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Sample records for aids vaccine trials

  1. Preparedness for AIDS vaccine trials in India.

    PubMed

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Kochhar, Sonali; Kapoor, Sushma; Das, Sweta; Bahri, Jyoti; Ghosh, Meenakshi Datta; Ganguly, N K; Nayyar, Anjali; Chataway, Mark

    2008-06-01

    India bears a heavy disease burden of HIV/AIDS infected and affected people. A safe, effective and accessible preventive AIDS vaccine, used along with other preventive interventions, is urgently needed to stem the epidemic. This review highlights the extensive preparedness activities undertaken from 2002 by the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), its Indian government and non government partners with the Indian scientific, political, media and community stakeholders and the capacity building process, before the conduct of the first ever AIDS vaccine trials in India in early 2005. Issues addressed included mistrust of clinical research due to past history of some unethical trials, transparency, community involvement, stigma and discrimination, provision for care and treatment of participants, informed consent, gender considerations, approval process, and operational aspects. The strong political support along with preparedness activities led to the successful conduct of AIDS vaccine trials enrolling equitably healthy women and men from all sections of society. This has paved the way for future vaccine trials in the country. PMID:18765870

  2. The ethical design of an AIDS vaccine trial in Africa.

    PubMed

    Christakis, N A

    1988-01-01

    In 1987 in Zaire, a French investigator and a small group of Zairians were immunized with a French investigational AIDS vaccine. This action leads to questioning whether different sociocultural settings should have different research ethics applied, especially on pandemic diseases. Another question is to clarify the valid reasons for conducting an AIDS trial in Africa. The design of an AIDS vaccine trial should vary with the ethical and cultural factors of the research population involved, even if the epidemiological and scientific factors are the same worldwide. In Africa, study subjects meet the requirements for AIDS research: They are free from HIV infection and are at risk for the infection. However, concerns center on how to keep the subjects free from risks during the 6 months between HIV tests and how to ensure laboratory test accuracy. The applicability of the findings to that population are essential, although they may be unique to Africa. Research subjects must consent to participating in the trial and must be advised of their antibody status and of their becoming seropositive. To increase the beneficent treatment of subjects and decrease the risks, the study size should be increased and all participants should be counseled to avoid risky behaviors. A subject's family or social group may need to give consent in addition to the subject, because of cultural views. The explanation of the research must be in culturally relevant terms. Africa should have fair access to the vaccine resulting from the research. PMID:3397278

  3. Willingness to participate in AIDS vaccine trials among high-risk populations in northern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Celentano, D D; Beyrer, C; Natpratan, C; Eiumtrakul, S; Sussman, L; Renzullo, P O; Khamboonruang, C; Nelson, K E

    1995-09-01

    Thailand has been designated a site for preventive human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) vaccine trials, and Phase I and II trials are currently underway. To assess the feasibility of large-scale Phase III trials involving high-risk individuals, questionnaires were administered to four cohorts of potential participants from North Thailand: 215 female commercial sex workers recruited from sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics, 219 male STD clients from the same area, 1453 men conscripted into the Royal Thai Army in 1993, and 293 men discharged from the Army in 1993. Approximately 25% of members of each cohort indicated they would definitely join a prophylactic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) trial. The major barriers to participation were concerns about vaccine safety (61% of military cohorts and 32% of civilians) and fear of acquiring AIDS through vaccination (21%). Also expressed were concerns about social discrimination, immediate side effects, and rejection by sexual partner. Two-thirds of respondents indicated that provision of a five-year family health insurance plan would induce them to participate in a vaccine trial, while another 25% did not require any incentive. Overall, these findings indicate that steps must be taken to alleviate fears and misconceptions associated with HIV vaccines before Phase III is initiated. PMID:8527082

  4. Scientific and regulatory challenges in evaluating clinical trial protocols for HIV-1/AIDS vaccines - A review from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Zhou, TieQun; Knezevic, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Clinical development of prophylactic HIV/AIDS vaccines presents many scientific challenges that result in challenges for regulators reviewing clinical trial applications (CTAs). The World Health Organization (WHO) has the responsibility to provide technical support to these regulators. The search for an HIV/AIDS vaccine will only succeed through well-designed, -conducted and -controlled human efficacy studies reviewed and approved by regulators in countries worldwide, particularly in countries where the epidemic has hit hardest, such as in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This review summarizes the current candidates in development and focuses on challenges regulators face when reviewing CTAs, such as the evolving landscape of "standard of prevention," trials in adolescents, adaptive trial designs, correlates of protection and their analysis, and access to successful vaccines. There are many unknowns in the field of HIV/AIDS vaccine development and often, there is not a clear right or wrong approach because of the scientific challenges described in this review. Consequently, regulators should not feel that decisions need be made in isolation, when there are many available international collaborative efforts and opportunities to seek expert advice. The WHO provides many such opportunities and support to regulators across the globe. PMID:26732973

  5. Polyvalent AIDS Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Shan; Grimes Serrano, Jill M.; Wang, Shixia

    2013-01-01

    A major hurdle in the development of a global HIV-1 vaccine is viral diversity. For close to three decades, HIV vaccine development has focused on either the induction of T cell immune responses or antibody responses, and only rarely on both components. After the failure of the STEP trial, the scientific community concluded that a T cell-based vaccine would likely not be protective if the T cell immune responses were elicited against only a few dominant epitopes. Similarly, for vaccines focusing on antibody responses, one of the main criticisms after VaxGen’s failed Phase III trials was on the limited antigen breadth included in the two formulations used. The successes of polyvalent vaccine approaches against other antigenically variable pathogens encourage implementation of the same approach for the design of HIV-1 vaccines. A review of the existing HIV-1 vaccination approaches based on the polyvalent principle is included here to provide a historical perspective for the current effort of developing a polyvalent HIV-1 vaccine. Results summarized in this review provide a clear indication that the polyvalent approach is a viable one for the future development of an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:21054250

  6. Genomic Analysis Reveals Pre- and Postchallenge Differences in a Rhesus Macaque AIDS Vaccine Trial: Insights into Mechanisms of Vaccine Efficacy▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Palermo, Robert E.; Patterson, L. Jean; Aicher, Lauri D.; Korth, Marcus J.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Katze, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    at 3 months postchallenge. This study demonstrates the sensitivity and discrimination of gene expression profiling of whole blood as an analytical tool in AIDS vaccine trials, providing unique insights into in vivo mechanisms and potential correlates of protection. PMID:21068249

  7. Tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Rosalind; McShane, Helen

    2011-01-01

    Effective prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccination is a key strategy for controlling the global TB epidemic. The partial effectiveness of the existing TB vaccine, bacille Calmette–Guérin (BCG), suggests effective vaccination is possible and highlights the need for an improved vaccination strategy. Clinical trials are evaluating both modifications to the existing BCG immunization methods and also novel TB vaccines, designed to replace or boost BCG. Candidate vaccines in clinical development include live mycobacterial vaccines designed to replace BCG, subunit vaccines designed to boost BCG and therapeutic vaccines designed as an adjunct to chemotherapy. There is a great need for validated animal models, identification of immunological biomarkers of protection and field sites with the capacity for large-scale efficacy testing in order to develop and license a novel TB vaccine or regimen. PMID:21604985

  8. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention Research : Vaccines Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Vaccines What Are Vaccines and What Do They Do? A vaccine—also ... immune response against the disease. Is There a Vaccine for HIV? No. There is currently no vaccine ...

  9. HIV-1 Vaccine Trials: Evolving Concepts and Designs

    PubMed Central

    Sanou, Missa P; De Groot, Anne S; Murphey-Corb, Michael; Levy, Jay A; Yamamoto, Janet K

    2012-01-01

    An effective prophylactic HIV-1 vaccine is needed to eradicate the HIV/AIDS pandemic but designing such a vaccine is a challenge. Despite many advances in vaccine technology and approaches to generate both humoral and cellular immune responses, major phase-II and -III vaccine trials against HIV/AIDS have resulted in only moderate successes. The modest achievement of the phase-III RV144 prime-boost trial in Thailand re-emphasized the importance of generating robust humoral and cellular responses against HIV. While antibody-directed approaches are being pursued by some groups, others are attempting to develop vaccines targeting cell-mediated immunity, since evidence show CTLs to be important for the control of HIV replication. Phase-I and -IIa multi-epitope vaccine trials have already been conducted with vaccine immunogens consisting of known CTL epitopes conserved across HIV subtypes, but have so far fallen short of inducing robust and consistent anti-HIV CTL responses. The concepts leading to the development of T-cell epitope-based vaccines, the outcomes of related clinical vaccine trials and efforts to enhance the immunogenicity of cell-mediated approaches are summarized in this review. Moreover, we describe a novel approach based on the identification of SIV and FIV antigens which contain conserved HIV-specific T-cell epitopes and represent an alternative method for developing an effective HIV vaccine against global HIV isolates. PMID:23289052

  10. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    HIV Prevention HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials (Last updated 9/15/2015; last reviewed 9/15/2015) Key Points HIV/AIDS clinical trials are ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ...

  11. Private investment in AIDS vaccine development: obstacles and solutions.

    PubMed Central

    Batson, A.; Ainsworth, M.

    2001-01-01

    The development of vaccines for the prevention of AIDS, malaria, tuberculosis, and other diseases requires both public and private investment. Private investment, however, has been far lower than might have been hoped, given the massive human toll of these diseases, particularly in the poorest countries. With a view to understanding this situation and exploring potential solutions, the World Bank AIDS Vaccine Task Force commissioned a study on the perspectives of the biotechnology, vaccine, and pharmaceutical industries regarding investment in research and development work on an AIDS vaccine. It was found that different obstacles to the development of an AIDS vaccine arose during the product development cycle. During the earlier phases, before obtaining proof of product, the principal barriers were scientific. The lack of consensus on which approach was likely to be effective increased uncertainty and the risks associated with investing in expensive clinical trials. The later phases, which involved adapting, testing, and scaling up production for different populations, were most influenced by market considerations. In order to raise the levels of private research and development in an AIDS vaccine there will probably have to be a combination of push strategies, which reduce the cost and scientific risk of investment, and pull strategies, which guarantee a market. PMID:11545328

  12. AIDS Vaccines and Preexposure Prophylaxis: Is Synergy Possible?

    PubMed Central

    Excler, Jean-Louis; Rida, Wasima; Priddy, Frances; Gilmour, Jill; McDermott, Adrian B.; Kamali, Anatoli; Anzala, Omu; Mutua, Gaudensia; Sanders, Eduard J.; Koff, Wayne; Berkley, Seth

    2011-01-01

    Abstract While the long-term goal is to develop highly effective AIDS vaccines, first generation vaccines may be only partially effective. Other HIV prevention modalities such as preexposure prophylaxis with antiretrovirals (PrEP) may have limited efficacy as well. The combined administration of vaccine and PrEP (VAXPREP), however, may have a synergistic effect leading to an overall benefit that is greater than the sum of the individual effects. We propose two test-of-concept trial designs for an AIDS vaccine plus oral or topical ARV. In one design, evidence that PrEP reduces the risk of HIV acquisition is assumed to justify offering it to all participants. A two-arm study comparing PrEP alone to VAXPREP is proposed in which 30 to 60 incident infections are observed to assess the additional benefit of vaccination on risk of infection and setpoint viral load. The demonstrated superiority of VAXPREP does not imply vaccine alone is efficacious. Similarly, the lack of superiority does not imply vaccine alone is ineffective, as antagonism could exist between vaccine and PrEP. In the other design, PrEP is assumed not to be in general use. A 2 × 2 factorial design is proposed in which high-risk individuals are randomized to one of four arms: placebo vaccine given with placebo PrEP, placebo vaccine given with PrEP, vaccine given with placebo PrEP, or VAXPREP. Between 60 and 210 infections are required to detect a benefit of vaccination with or without PrEP on risk of HIV acquisition or setpoint viral load, with fewer infections needed when synergy is present. PMID:21043994

  13. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sodium Ganciclovir Harvoni Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B (Recombinant) Vaccine Hepatitis B Vaccine Human Papillomavirus 9 Valent (Types ... 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, 58) Vaccine, Recombinant Human Papillomavirus Bivalent (Types 16 and 18) Vaccine, ...

  14. Safety and Immunogenicity of Early Measles Vaccination in Children Born to HIV-Infected Mothers in the United States: Results of Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group (PACTG) Protocol 225

    PubMed Central

    Beeler, Judy; Li, Hong; Audet, Susette; Smith, Betsy; Moye, John; Nalin, David; Krasinski, Keith

    2011-01-01

    Background. PACTG (Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group) 225, a multicenter, randomized, open-label trial in the United States evaluated reactogenicity and immunogenicity of 2 vaccination regimens: monovalent measles vaccine (Attenuvax) at 6 months of age and measles, mumps, and rubella, live attenuated (MMRII) vaccine at 12 months of age (2D), or only MMRII at 12 months of age (1D) in human immunodeficiency virus–infected (HIV-infected) (POS) and uninfected (NEG) children in the pre–highly active antiretroviral therapy (pre-HAART) period. Methods. Plaque-reduction neutralization (PRN) of measles-neutralizing antibody titers were evaluated at study weeks 0, 6, 26, 32, 52, and 130 (∼3 years of age). Results. The 110 subjects included: 65 2DNEG; 30 1DNEG; 7 2DPOS and 8 1DPOS. Vaccinations (n = 175) were associated with no adverse experiences >Grade 2 except for Grade 3 fever (n = 2, 1 1DPOS and 1 1DNEG). Six weeks after Attenuvax, all 2DPOS subjects (7/7) seroresponded (PRN titers ≥120 mIU/mL) with median titers significantly exceeding 2DNEG titers (2115 vs 628 mIU/mL, respectively; P = .023). At ∼3 years of age, 67% 1DPOS (4/6) and 83% 2DPOS (4/5) subjects maintained titers ≥120 mIU/mL. Prevaccination titers ≥25 mIU/mL among 2DNEG subjects correlated inversely with the likelihood of achieving titers ≥120 mIU/mL (56% vs 90%; P = .004). Conclusions. Among HIV-infected children pre-HAART, Attenuvax at 6 months was well tolerated and immunogenic. These data support the current World Health Organization (WHO) recommendation to administer a first dose of measles vaccine at 6 months of age to HIV-infected children. PMID:21666159

  15. Cytomegalovirus vaccine: phase II clinical trial results.

    PubMed

    Rieder, F; Steininger, C

    2014-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is one of the most significant viral pathogens during pregnancy and in immunocompromised patients. Antiviral prophylactic strategies are limited by toxicities, drug-drug interactions and development of antiviral resistance. A safe and protective vaccine against CMV is highly desirable in view of the potential positive impact on CMV-associated morbidity and mortality as well as healthcare costs. Unfortunately, this demand could not be met in the past four decades although development of a CMV vaccine has been ranked at the highest priority by the US Institute of Medicine. Multiple different vaccine candidates have been developed and evaluated in phase I clinical trials and few succeeded to phase II trials. Nevertheless, two different vaccines showed recently promising results in trials that studied healthy adults and immunocompromised solid-organ and bone-marrow transplant recipients, respectively. The gB/MF59 vaccine exhibited a vaccine efficacy of 50% in healthy, postpartum females. In transplant patients, gB/MF59 and the DNA vaccine TransVax both limited the periods of viraemia and consequently the need for antiviral treatment. The success of these trials is encouraging and will probably give new impetus to the development of an effective CMV vaccine. Sterilizing immunity may not be attainable in the near future and may not be necessary for a CMV vaccine to have a significant impact on health care as discussed in the present review. PMID:24283990

  16. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Center Statistical and Data Management Center Glossaries Sites Clinical Trials About the Trial Process Trials Open to Enrollment Recent Study Results Access to Published Data Clinical Trials Resources Committees Executive Scientific Resource Community General Information ...

  17. An Interview with AIDS Vaccine Researcher Chris Parks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Megan

    2010-01-01

    The search for an AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) vaccine is truly a global effort, with university laboratories, biotech firms, pharmaceutical companies, nonprofit research organizations, hospitals, and clinics all working together to develop an effective vaccine as quickly as possible. The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI)…

  18. Development of an AIDS vaccine using Sendai virus vectors.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Hiroshi; Matano, Tetsuro

    2015-11-01

    Development of an effective AIDS vaccine is crucial for the control of global human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) prevalence. We have developed a novel AIDS vaccine using a Sendai virus (SeV) vector and investigated its efficacy in a macaque AIDS model of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection. Its immunogenicity and protective efficacy have been shown, indicating that the SeV vector is a promising delivery tool for AIDS vaccines. Here, we describe the potential of SeV vector as a vaccine antigen delivery tool to induce effective immune responses against HIV-1 infection. PMID:26232346

  19. Local Knowledge and Experiences of Vaccination: Implications for HIV-Preventive Vaccine Trials in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindegger, Graham; Quayle, Michael; Ndlovu, Moses

    2007-01-01

    This study forms part of the preparation of communities for HIV-preventive vaccine trials in South Africa. On the basis of the assumption that attitudes to any HIV vaccine or vaccine trials will partly be influenced by experiences of vaccination in general, this study aimed to investigate knowledge of, attitudes to, and experiences of vaccination…

  20. Strengthening capacity for AIDS vaccine research: analysis of the Pfizer Global Health Fellows Program and the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Industry partnerships can help leverage resources to advance HIV/AIDS vaccine research, service delivery, and policy advocacy goals. This often involves capacity building for international and local non-governmental organizations (NGOs). International volunteering is increasingly being used as a capacity building strategy, yet little is known about how corporate volunteers help to improve performance of NGOs in the fight against HIV/AIDS. Methods This case study helps to extend our understanding by analyzing how the Pfizer Global Health Fellows (GHF) program helped develop capacity of the International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI), looking specifically at Fellowship activities in South Africa, Kenya, and Uganda. From 2005–2009, 8 Pfizer GHF worked with IAVI and local research centers to strengthen capacity to conduct and monitor vaccine trials to meet international standards and expand trial activities. Data collection for the case study included review of Fellow job descriptions, online journals, evaluation reports, and interviews with Fellows and IAVI staff. Qualitative methods were used to analyze factors which influenced the process and outcomes of capacity strengthening. Results Fellows filled critical short-term expert staffing needs at IAVI as well as providing technical assistance and staff development activities. Capacity building included assistance in establishing operating procedures for the start-up period of research centers; training staff in Good Clinical Practice (GCP); developing monitoring capacity (staff and systems) to assure that centers are audit-ready at all times; and strategic planning for data management systems. Factors key to the success of volunteering partnerships included similarities in mission between the corporate and NGO partners, expertise and experience of Fellows, and attitudes of partner organization staff. Conclusion By developing standard operating procedures, ensuring that monitoring and regulatory

  1. Trial watch: Peptide vaccines in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Vacchelli, Erika; Martins, Isabelle; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jerome; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2012-12-01

    Prophylactic vaccination constitutes one of the most prominent medical achievements of history. This concept was first demonstrated by the pioneer work of Edward Jenner, dating back to the late 1790s, after which an array of preparations that confer life-long protective immunity against several infectious agents has been developed. The ensuing implementation of nation-wide vaccination programs has de facto abated the incidence of dreadful diseases including rabies, typhoid, cholera and many others. Among all, the most impressive result of vaccination campaigns is surely represented by the eradication of natural smallpox infection, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The idea of employing vaccines as anticancer interventions was first theorized in the 1890s by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it soon became clear that while vaccination could be efficiently employed as a preventive measure against infectious agents, anticancer vaccines would have to (1) operate as therapeutic, rather than preventive, interventions (at least in the vast majority of settings), and (2) circumvent the fact that tumor cells often fail to elicit immune responses. During the past 30 y, along with the recognition that the immune system is not irresponsive to tumors (as it was initially thought) and that malignant cells express tumor-associated antigens whereby they can be discriminated from normal cells, considerable efforts have been dedicated to the development of anticancer vaccines. Some of these approaches, encompassing cell-based, DNA-based and purified component-based preparations, have already been shown to exert conspicuous anticancer effects in cohorts of patients affected by both hematological and solid malignancies. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating purified peptides or full-length proteins as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23264902

  2. Trial watch: DNA vaccines for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Senovilla, Laura; Vacchelli, Erika; Garcia, Pauline; Eggermont, Alexander; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Galon, Jérôme; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2013-04-01

    The foundation of modern vaccinology dates back to the 1790s, when the English physician Edward Jenner uncovered the tremendous medical potential of prophylactic vaccination. Jenner's work ignited a wave of nationwide vaccination campaigns abating the incidence of multiple life-threatening infectious diseases and culminating with the eradication of natural smallpox virus, which was definitively certified by the WHO in 1980. The possibility of using vaccines against cancer was first proposed at the end of the 19th century by Paul Ehrlich and William Coley. However, it was not until the 1990s that such a hypothesis began to be intensively investigated, following the realization that the immune system is not completely unresponsive to tumors and that neoplastic cells express immunogenic tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Nowadays, anticancer vaccines are rapidly moving from the bench to the bedside, and a few prophylactic and therapeutic preparations have already been approved by FDA for use in humans. In this setting, one interesting approach is constituted by DNA vaccines, i.e., TAA-encoding circularized DNA constructs, often of bacterial origin, that are delivered to patients as such or by means of specific vectors, including (but not limited to) liposomal preparations, nanoparticles, bacteria and viruses. The administration of DNA vaccines is most often performed via the intramuscular or subcutaneous route and is expected to cause (1) the endogenous synthesis of the TAA by myocytes and/or resident antigen-presenting cells; (2) the presentation of TAA-derived peptides on the cell surface, in association with MHC class I molecules; and (3) the activation of potentially therapeutic tumor-specific immune responses. In this Trial Watch, we will summarize the results of recent clinical trials that have evaluated/are evaluating DNA vaccines as therapeutic interventions against cancer. PMID:23734328

  3. "They Take Positive People": An Investigation of Communication in the Informed Consent Process of an HIV/AIDS Vaccine Trial in South Africa

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watermeyer, Jennifer; Penn, Claire

    2008-01-01

    South Africa is a multilingual, multicultural context that poses communication challenges to health professionals. In a clinical trial, information must be thoroughly understood by participants in order for consent to be informed. Unfortunately, this is not always the case. This pilot study aimed to identify communication successes and breakdowns…

  4. HIV Vaccines: A Magic Bullet in the Fight against AIDS?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinkerton, Steven D.; Abramson, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    Biomedical, logistic, economic, social, and psychosocial issues related to the successful distribution and use of a vaccine for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are reviewed. A mathematical model is introduced as an aid in conceptualizing these issues. The HIV vaccine should be seen as an adjunct to behavioral modification. (SLD)

  5. Two-Step Ebola Vaccine Strategy Works in Early Trial

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158384.html Two-Step Ebola Vaccine Strategy Works in Early Trial But one expert ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new two-step Ebola vaccine strategy has shown some promise in early clinical ...

  6. Inclusion of South African adolescents in HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Adler, David H.

    2013-01-01

    South Africa has more people living with HIV than any other nation. The HIV epidemic in South Africa is being driven by new infections among adolescents. Inclusion of adolescents in HIV vaccine trials is essential for successful vaccine development, however, recruitment and retention of at-risk South African adolescents into these trials poses a number of legal, ethical and operational challenges. This article discusses the South African ethico-legal context in which future adolescent HIV vaccine trials would be conducted followed by a review of available data regarding strategies for recruitment into these trials and retention of trial participants. PMID:24729929

  7. Malaria vaccine clinical trials: what’s on the horizon

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Alberto; Joyner, Chester

    2015-01-01

    Significant progress towards a malaria vaccine, specifically for Plasmodium falciparum, has been made in the past few years with the completion of numerous clinical trials. Each trial has utilized a unique combination of antigens, delivery platforms, and adjuvants, and the data that has been obtained provides critical information that has poises the research community for the development of next generation malaria vaccines. Despite the progress towards a P. falciparum vaccine, P. vivax vaccine research requires more momentum and additional investigations to identify novel vaccine candidates. In this review, recently completed and ongoing malaria vaccine clinical trials as well as vaccine candidates that are in the development pipeline are reviewed. Perspectives for future research using post-genomic mining, nonhuman primate models, and systems biology are also discussed. PMID:26172291

  8. Role of nanotechnology in HIV/AIDS vaccine development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Chen, Chunying

    2016-08-01

    HIV/AIDS is one of the worst crises affecting global health and influencing economic development and social stability. Preventing and treating HIV infection is a crucial task. However, there is still no effective HIV vaccine for clinical application. Nanotechnology has the potential to solve the problems associated with traditional HIV vaccines. At present, various nano-architectures and nanomaterials can function as potential HIV vaccine carriers or adjuvants, including inorganic nanomaterials, liposomes, micelles and polymer nanomaterials. In this review, we summarize the current progress in the use of nanotechnology for the development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine and discuss its potential to greatly improve the solubility, permeability, stability and pharmacokinetics of HIV vaccines. Although nanotechnology holds great promise for applications in HIV/AIDS vaccines, there are still many inadequacies that result in a variety of risks and challenges. The potential hazards to the human body and environment associated with some nano-carriers, and their underlying mechanisms require in-depth study. Non-toxic or low-toxic nanomaterials with adjuvant activity have been identified. However, studying the confluence of factors that affect the adjuvant activity of nanomaterials may be more important for the optimization of the dosage and immunization strategy and investigations into the exact mechanism of action. Moreover, there are no uniform standards for investigations of nanomaterials as potential vaccine adjuvants. These limitations make it harder to analyze and deduce rules from the existing data. Developing vaccine nano-carriers or adjuvants with high benefit-cost ratios is important to ensure their broad usage. Despite some shortcomings, nanomaterials have great potential and application prospects in the fields of AIDS treatment and prevention. PMID:26952542

  9. Impact, Challenges, and Future Projections of Vaccine Trials in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Idoko, Olubukola T.; Kochhar, Sonali; Agbenyega, Tsiri E.; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ota, Martin O. C.

    2013-01-01

    Immunization remains the most cost effective method for the control of infectious diseases. Therefore, there is a global effort to deploy new vaccines for disease control and eradication. These new vaccines must be tested in the settings in which they will be used. This necessity has required the conduct of many vaccine trials in Africa, where several infectious diseases with significant public health impact are prevalent. However, these areas have peculiarities and are just beginning to gain expertise in the conduct of such trials. The vaccine developers and sponsors of these trials may also not be conversant with some issues unique to the trial site. The understanding gap from both partners can result in challenges if not addressed during the planning phase of the trial. This review seeks to highlight the issues surrounding the conduct of clinical trials in resource-constrained settings and suggests some ways of circumventing them. PMID:23468356

  10. Ethical Rationale for the Ebola "Ring Vaccination" Trial Design.

    PubMed

    Rid, Annette; Miller, Franklin G

    2016-03-01

    The 2014 Ebola virus epidemic is the largest and most severe ever recorded. With no approved vaccines or specific treatments for Ebola, clinical trials were launched within months of the epidemic in an unprecedented show of global partnership. One of these trials used a highly innovative "ring vaccination" design. The design was chosen for operational, scientific, and ethical reasons--in particular, it was regarded as ethically superior to individually randomized placebo-controlled trials. We scrutinize the ethical rationale for the ring vaccination design. We argue that the ring vaccination design is ethical but fundamentally equivalent to placebo-controlled designs with respect to withholding a potentially effective intervention from the control group. We discuss the implications for the ongoing ring vaccination trial and future research. PMID:26794172

  11. Non-human primate models for HIV/AIDS vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yongjun; Gordon, Shari; Franchini, Genoveffa; Berzofsky, Jay A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of HIV vaccines has been hampered by the lack of an animal model that can accurately predict vaccine efficacy. Chimpanzees can be infected with HIV-1 but are not practical for research. However, several species of macaques are susceptible to the Simian Immunodeficiency Viruses (SIV) that causes a disease in macaques that closely mimics HIV in humans. Thus, macaque-SIV models of HIV infection have become a critical foundation for AIDS vaccine development. Here, we examine the multiple variables and considerations that must be taken into account to use this NHP model effectively. These include the species and subspecies of macaques, virus strain, dose and route of administration and macaque genetics including Major Histocompatibility Complex molecules that affect immune responses and other virus restriction factors. We illustrate how these NHP models can be used to carry out studies of immune responses in mucosal and other tissues than could not easily be performed on human volunteers. Futhermore macaques are an ideal model system to optimize adjuvants, test vaccine platforms, and identify correlates of protection that can advance the HIV vaccine field. We also illustrate techniques used to identify different macaque lymphocyte populations and review some poxvirus vaccine candidates that are in various stages of clinical trials. Understanding how to effectively use this valuable model will greatly increase the likelihood of finding a successful vaccine for HIV. PMID:24510515

  12. Lessons Learned from HIV Vaccine Clinical Efficacy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Day, Tracey A.; Kublin, James G.

    2014-01-01

    The past few years have witnessed many promising advances in HIV prevention strategies involving pre-exposure prophylaxis approaches. Some may now wonder whether an HIV vaccine is still needed, and whether developing one is even possible. The partial efficacy reported in the RV144 trial and the encouraging results of the accompanying immune correlates analysis suggest that an effective HIV vaccine is achievable. These successes have provided a large impetus and guidance for conducting more HIV vaccine trials. A key lesson learned from RV144 is that assessment of HIV acquisition is now a feasible and valuable primary objective for HIV preventive vaccine trials. In this article we review how RV144 and other HIV vaccine efficacy trials have instructed the field and highlight some of the HIV vaccine concepts in clinical development. After a long and significant investment, HIV vaccine clinical research is paying off in the form of valuable lessons that, if applied effectively, will accelerate the path toward a safe and effective vaccine. Together with other HIV prevention approaches, preventive and therapeutic HIV vaccines will be invaluable tools in bringing the epidemic to an end. PMID:24033299

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccine trials and tribulations: Vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Handler, Nancy S; Handler, Marc Z; Majewski, Slawomir; Schwartz, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    As of December 2014, there were 3 approved vaccines for human papillomavirus (HPV): bivalent Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline, New York, NY), quadrivalent Gardasil (Merck and Co, Kenilworth, NJ), and 9-valent Gardasil-9 (Merck and Co). The average cost per dose is $120, with a recommended 3-dose course. The quadrivalent vaccine is the most widely administered worldwide. As with the bivalent and 9-valent vaccines, the vaccine is considered safe, although concerns have been raised. In addition to immunization against the targeted HPV types, there is evidence that there is cross protection against other types of HPV. This continuing medical education review evaluates the differences in vaccines that are currently on the market; part II focuses on the cost-effectiveness of vaccination, the HPV vaccination programs currently instituted around the globe, efficacy, and safety. PMID:26475535

  14. A Review of Clinical Trials of Human Papillomavirus Prophylactic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, John T.; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    End of study analyses of the phase III trials of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines in young women are now largely completed. Two distinct vaccines were evaluated, Gardasil® (Merck & Co., Whitehouse Station, NJ USA) a quadrivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 6, 11, 16 and 18 and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium), a bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 16 and 18. Both vaccines exhibited excellent safety and immunogenicity profiles. The vaccines also demonstrated remarkably high and similar efficacy against the vaccine-targeted types for a range of cervical endpoints from persistent infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) in women naïve to the corresponding type at the time of vaccination. However, protection from incident infection or disease from non-vaccine types was restricted, and the vaccines had no effect on prevalent infection or disease. Gardasil® also demonstrated strong protection against genital warts and vulvar/vaginal neoplasia associated with the vaccine types. In other trials, Gardasil® protected mid-adult women from incident infection and CIN caused by the vaccine types and protected men for incident infection, genital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia by the vaccine types. Cervarix® protected against vaccine-targeted anal infections in women in an end of study evaluation. For practical reasons, efficacy studies have not been conducted in the primary target populations of current vaccination programs, adolescent girls and boys. However, immunogenicity bridging studies demonstrating excellent safety and strong immune responses in adolescence, coupled with the documentation of durable antibody responses and protection in young adults, leads to an optimistic projection of the effectiveness of the vaccines in adolescent vaccination programs. Taken together, the excellent clinical trial results strongly support the potential of the vaccines as

  15. Immunological monitoring of anticancer vaccines in clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Ogi, Chizuru; Aruga, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic anticancer vaccines operate by eliciting or enhancing an immune response that specifically targets tumor-associated antigens. Although intense efforts have been made for developing clinically useful anticancer vaccines, only a few Phase III clinical trials testing this immunotherapeutic strategy have achieved their primary endpoint. Here, we report the results of a retrospective research aimed at clarifying the design of previously completed Phase II/III clinical trials testing therapeutic anticancer vaccines and at assessing the value of immunological monitoring in this setting. We identified 17 anticancer vaccines that have been investigated in the context of a completed Phase II/III clinical trial. The immune response of patients receiving anticancer vaccination was assessed for only 8 of these products (in 15 distinct studies) in the attempt to identify a correlation with clinical outcome. Of these studies, 13 were supported by a statistical correlation study (Log-rank test), and no less than 12 identified a positive correlation between vaccine-elicited immune responses and disease outcome. Six trials also performed a Cox proportional hazards analysis, invariably demonstrating that vaccine-elicited immune responses have a positive prognostic value. However, despite these positive results in the course of early clinical development, most therapeutic vaccines tested so far failed to provide any clinical benefit to cancer patients in Phase II/III studies. Our research indicates that evaluating the immunological profile of patients at enrollment might constitute a key approach often neglected in these studies. Such an immunological monitoring should be based not only on peripheral blood samples but also on bioptic specimens, whenever possible. The evaluation of the immunological profile of cancer patients enrolled in early clinical trials will allow for the identification of individuals who have the highest chances to benefit from anticancer vaccination

  16. Principles of malaria vaccine trials: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1986-01-01

    The Scientific Working Groups on Immunology of Malaria and on Applied Field Research in Malaria of the UNDP/World Bank/WHO Special Programme for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases held a joint meeting at WHO headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland, on 4-8 February 1985 to consider the current status of malaria vaccine research. Although experience with vaccines against bacterial and viral infections provides valuable information, the advanced stages of development of malaria vaccines pose entirely new problems calling for the elaboration of guidelines for preclinical studies and vaccine trials. The principal purpose of this meeting was to establish such guidelines.

  17. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    PubMed

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate. PMID:19835869

  18. Therapeutic human papillomavirus vaccines: current clinical trials and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-Fu; Ma, Barbara; Monie, Archana; Tsen, Shaw-Wei; Wu, T-C

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the second largest cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide. It is now evident that persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary for the development and maintenance of cervical cancer. Thus, effective vaccination against HPV represents an opportunity to restrain cervical cancer and other important cancers. The FDA recently approved the HPV vaccine Gardasil for the preventive control of HPV, using HPV virus-like particles (VLP) to generate neutralizing antibodies against major capsid protein, L1. However, prophylactic HPV vaccines do not have therapeutic effects against pre-existing HPV infections and HPV-associated lesions. Furthermore, due to the considerable burden of HPV infections worldwide, it would take decades for preventive vaccines to affect the prevalence of cervical cancer. Thus, in order to speed up the control of cervical cancer and treat current infections, the continued development of therapeutic vaccines against HPV is critical. Therapeutic HPV vaccines can potentially eliminate pre-existing lesions and malignant tumors by generating cellular immunity against HPV-infected cells that express early viral proteins such as E6 and E7. Objective This review discusses the future directions of therapeutic HPV vaccine approaches for the treatment of established HPV-associated malignancies, with emphasis on current progress of HPV vaccine clinical trials. Methods Relevant literature is discussed. Results/conclusion Though their development has been challenging, many therapeutic HPV vaccines have been shown to induce HPV-specific antitumor immune responses in preclinical animal models and several promising strategies have been applied in clinical trials. With continued progress in the field of vaccine development, HPV therapeutic vaccines may provide a potentially promising approach for the control of lethal HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:18352847

  19. Early Phase Clinical Trials with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1 and Malaria Vectored Vaccines in The Gambia: Frontline Challenges in Study Design and Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Afolabi, Muhammed O.; Adetifa, Jane U.; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B.; Viebig, Nicola K.; Kampmann, Beate; Bojang, Kalifa

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and malaria are among the most important infectious diseases in developing countries. Existing control strategies are unlikely to curtail these diseases in the absence of efficacious vaccines. Testing of HIV and malaria vaccines candidates start with early phase trials that are increasingly being conducted in developing countries where the burden of the diseases is high. Unique challenges, which affect planning and implementation of vaccine trials according to internationally accepted standards have thus been identified. In this review, we highlight specific challenges encountered during two early phase trials of novel HIV-1 and malaria vectored vaccine candidates conducted in The Gambia and how some of these issues were pragmatically addressed. We hope our experience will be useful for key study personnel involved in day-to-day running of similar clinical trials. It may also guide future design and implementation of vaccine trials in resource-constrained settings. PMID:24615122

  20. The Sabin live poliovirus vaccination trials in the USSR, 1959.

    PubMed Central

    Horstmann, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    Widespread use of the Sabin live attenuated poliovirus vaccine has had tremendous impact on the disease worldwide, virtually eliminating it from a number of countries, including the United States. Early proof of its safety and effectiveness was presented in 1959 by Russian investigators, who had staged massive trials in the USSR, involving millions of children. Their positive results were at first viewed in the United States and elsewhere with some skepticism, but the World Health Organization favored proceeding with large-scale trials, and responded to the claims made by Russian scientists by sending a representative to the USSR to review in detail the design and execution of the vaccine programs and the reliability of their results. The report that followed was a positive endorsement of the findings and contributed to the acceptance of the Sabin vaccine in the United States, where it has been the polio vaccine of choice since the mid-1960s. PMID:1814062

  1. The ring vaccination trial: a novel cluster randomised controlled trial design to evaluate vaccine efficacy and effectiveness during outbreaks, with special reference to Ebola

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A World Health Organization expert meeting on Ebola vaccines proposed urgent safety and efficacy studies in response to the outbreak in West Africa. One approach to communicable disease control is ring vaccination of individuals at high risk of infection due to their social or geographical connection to a known case. This paper describes the protocol for a novel cluster randomised controlled trial design which uses ring vaccination. In the Ebola ça suffit ring vaccination trial, rings are randomised 1:1 to (a) immediate vaccination of eligible adults with single dose vaccination or (b) vaccination delayed by 21 days. Vaccine efficacy against disease is assessed in participants over equivalent periods from the day of randomisation. Secondary objectives include vaccine effectiveness at the level of the ring, and incidence of serious adverse events. Ring vaccination trials are adaptive, can be run until disease elimination, allow interim analysis, and can go dormant during inter-epidemic periods. PMID:26215666

  2. The ring vaccination trial: a novel cluster randomised controlled trial design to evaluate vaccine efficacy and effectiveness during outbreaks, with special reference to Ebola.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    A World Health Organization expert meeting on Ebola vaccines proposed urgent safety and efficacy studies in response to the outbreak in West Africa. One approach to communicable disease control is ring vaccination of individuals at high risk of infection due to their social or geographical connection to a known case. This paper describes the protocol for a novel cluster randomised controlled trial design which uses ring vaccination.In the Ebola ça suffit ring vaccination trial, rings are randomised 1:1 to (a) immediate vaccination of eligible adults with single dose vaccination or (b) vaccination delayed by 21 days. Vaccine efficacy against disease is assessed in participants over equivalent periods from the day of randomisation. Secondary objectives include vaccine effectiveness at the level of the ring, and incidence of serious adverse events. Ring vaccination trials are adaptive, can be run until disease elimination, allow interim analysis, and can go dormant during inter-epidemic periods. PMID:26215666

  3. Salivary binding antibodies induced by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 recombinant gp120 vaccine. The NIAID AIDS Vaccine Evaluation Group.

    PubMed Central

    Gorse, G J; Yang, E Y; Belshe, R B; Berman, P W

    1996-01-01

    Salivary binding antibodies induced by candidate human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) vaccines in healthy, HIV-1 uninfected volunteers were assessed in a clinical trial evaluating intramuscularly injected HIV-1MN recombinant gp120 (rgp120) vaccine alone or with HIV-1IIIB rgp120 vaccine. The two rgp120 vaccines induced envelope glycoprotein-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) and IgA antibodies in whole saliva and serum. PMID:8914773

  4. Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy in Vietnam: Results of a randomized controlled trial Pertussis vaccination during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hoang, Ha Thi Thu; Leuridan, Elke; Maertens, Kirsten; Nguyen, Trung Dac; Hens, Niel; Vu, Ngoc Ha; Caboré, Raissa Nadège; Duong, Hong Thi; Huygen, Kris; Van Damme, Pierre; Dang, Anh Duc

    2016-01-01

    A pertussis vaccination during pregnancy has recently been adopted in several countries to indirectly protect young infants. This study assessed the effect of adding a pertussis component to the tetanus vaccination, in the pregnancy immunization program in Vietnam. A randomized controlled trial was performed. Pregnant women received either a Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria acellular pertussis) vaccine or a tetanus only vaccine between 19 and 35 weeks' gestational age. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) against tetanus (TT), diphtheria (DT), pertussis toxin (PT), filamentous hemaglutinin (FHA) and pertactin (Prn) were measured using commercial ELISA tests, at baseline, 1 month after maternal vaccination, at delivery, and in infants from cord blood and before and after the primary series (EPI: month 2-3-4) of a pertussis containing vaccine. Significantly higher geometric mean concentrations (GMC) were observed for all 3 measured pertussis antigens in the offspring of the Tdap group, up to 2 months of age. One month after completion of the primary infant vaccination schedule, anti-Prn GMC, but not anti-PT and anti-FHA GMCs, was significantly (p=0.006) higher in the control group. Maternal antibodies induced by vaccination during pregnancy close the susceptibility gap for pertussis in young infants. Limited interference with the infant vaccine responses was observed. Whether this interference effect disappears with the administration of a fourth vaccine dose is further studied. PMID:26529073

  5. SIV DNA vaccine trial in macaques: post-challenge necropsy in vaccine and control groups.

    PubMed

    Lu, S; Manson, K; Wyand, M; Robinson, H L

    1997-06-01

    In this study we describe the histopathologic findings from nine macaques in a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) DNA vaccine trial evaluating the ability of a 5-plasmid DNA vaccine to protect against an uncloned SIVmac251 challenge (Lu et al., J. Virol. 1996, 70, 3978-3991). Three vaccinated and one control macaque developed disease and were euthanized in the first year following challenge. The other four vaccinated and one control macaque remained clinically normal and were euthanized at the end of the trial (60 weeks post-challenge). The necropsy data revealed that both diseased and clinically normal macaques had developed typical SIV-related lymphoid changes, inflammatory disorders and opportunistic infections. All animals had variable degrees of follicular and/or paracortical lymphoid hyperplasia suggesting immune activation. All but one vaccinated macaque and both control macaques had SIV-associated opportunistic infections. Within the small groups of animals, the ability to contain opportunistic infections was superior, and the overall lymphoid changes less severe, in the macaques that had received vaccine DNAs by three routes of inoculation (intravenous, intramuscular and gene gun) than in those that had received control DNAs or vaccine DNAs by gene gun only. In the future it will be important to further test how the route and method of DNA inoculation impact the efficacy of immunodeficiency virus vaccines. PMID:9234548

  6. Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial

    PubMed Central

    Van Buynder, Paul G.; Carcione, Dale; Rettura, Vince; Daly, Alison; Woods, Emily

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Van Buynder et al. (2010) Marketing paediatric influenza vaccination: results of a major metropolitan trial. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(1), 33–38. Objectives  After a cluster of rapidly fulminant influenza related toddler deaths in a Western Australian metropolis, children aged six to 59 months were offered influenza vaccination in subsequent winters. Some parental resistance was expected and previous poor uptake of paediatric influenza vaccination overseas was noted. A marketing campaign addressing barriers to immunization was developed to maximise uptake. Design  Advertising occurred in major statewide newspapers, via public poster displays and static ‘eye‐lite’ displays, via press releases, via a series of rolling radio advertisements, via direct marketing to child care centres, and via a linked series of web‐sites. Parents were subsequently surveyed to assess reasons for vaccination. Main Outcome Results  The campaign produced influenza vaccination coverage above that previously described elsewhere and led to a proportionate reduction in influenza notifications in this age group compared to previous seasons. Conclusions  Influenza in children comes with significant morbidity and some mortality. Paediatric influenza vaccination is safe, well tolerated and effective if two doses are given. A targeted media campaign can increase vaccine uptake if it reinforces the seriousness of influenza and addresses community ‘myths’ about influenza and influenza vaccine. The lessons learned enabling enhancements of similar programs elsewhere. PMID:21138538

  7. Preparing for future efficacy trials of severe malaria vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Bronner P; Prevots, D Rebecca; Kabyemela, Edward; Fried, Michal; Duffy, Patrick E

    2016-04-01

    Severe malaria is a major cause of mortality in children, but comprises only a small proportion of Plasmodium falciparum infections in naturally exposed populations. The evaluation of vaccines that prevent severe falciparum disease will require clinical trials whose primary efficacy endpoint will be severe malaria risk during follow-up. Here, we show that such trials are feasible with fewer than 1000 participants in areas with intense malaria transmission during the age interval when severe malaria incidence peaks. PMID:26923455

  8. Trial Watch: Peptide-based anticancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Pol, Jonathan; Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Galon, Jérôme; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    Malignant cells express antigens that can be harnessed to elicit anticancer immune responses. One approach to achieve such goal consists in the administration of tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) or peptides thereof as recombinant proteins in the presence of adequate adjuvants. Throughout the past decade, peptide vaccines have been shown to mediate antineoplastic effects in various murine tumor models, especially when administered in the context of potent immunostimulatory regimens. In spite of multiple limitations, first of all the fact that anticancer vaccines are often employed as therapeutic (rather than prophylactic) agents, this immunotherapeutic paradigm has been intensively investigated in clinical scenarios, with promising results. Currently, both experimentalists and clinicians are focusing their efforts on the identification of so-called tumor rejection antigens, i.e., TAAs that can elicit an immune response leading to disease eradication, as well as to combinatorial immunostimulatory interventions with superior adjuvant activity in patients. Here, we summarize the latest advances in the development of peptide vaccines for cancer therapy. PMID:26137405

  9. AIDS vaccine research in Asia: needs and opportunities. Report from a UNAIDS/WHO/NIID meeting Tokyo, 28-30 October 1998.

    PubMed

    1999-07-30

    A meeting was organized by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS), the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the Japanese National Institute of Infectious Diseases (NIID) with the following objectives: (i) to discuss public health and economic rationale to accelerate the development and evaluation of HIV vaccines suitable for use in Asia; (ii) to review ongoing preclinical HIV vaccine research in Asia; (iii) to review the Asian experience in conducting clinical trials of HIV candidate vaccines; (iv) to explore possibilities for international collaboration between countries in the region and with other countries and institutions; and (v) to discuss issues related to availability of future effective HIV vaccines. The meeting was attended by participants from Australia, China, France, Germany, India, Japan, Malaysia, Myanmar, South Korea, Thailand, United Kingdom, and the United States of America. The HIV epidemic in Asia is rapidly spreading and has already resulted in a total of 7 million HIV infections in the region. The epidemic already has a significant public health and economic impact, which may be worse in the future, unless effective intervention programmes are successfully implemented. A safe, effective, and affordable vaccine should be considered as the best hope for a long-term solution to the HIV epidemic in Asia. Asian scientists and institutions have established a number of international collaborations to isolate and characterize prevalent HIV-1 strains (mostly belonging to subtypes C and E) and are developing candidate vaccines based on these subtypes. In the region, phase I/II clinical trials of preventative HIV candidate vaccines have been conducted in Australia, China and Thailand. Since 1993, a comprehensive National AIDS Vaccine Plan has allowed Thailand to conduct phase I/II trials of six different preventative or therapeutic candidate vaccines, and the first phase III preventative efficacy trial has been approved. The meeting

  10. Current status of the development of an AIDS vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lasky, L A

    1989-01-01

    It is commonly agreed that the development of a vaccine that would prove effective against infection by the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV, would be an important measure toward eliminating the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome, AIDS. The biology of HIV is complex and very little is known regarding the host immune defenses against viral infection. The virus has evolved mechanisms to evade the immune system which would appear to make traditional vaccine approaches potentially inadequate. However, all of the diverse technologies which have recently been developed in the field of vaccinology have already been applied in large measure to this disease. These techniques include the use of subunits derived from the virus or by recombinant DNA methods, the use of peptides, the use of anti-idiotypes, and the use of various attenuated viruses which can be utilized as gene carriers. This review summarizes the status of these approaches in an attempt to give a critical overview of the field as it presently exists. PMID:2673294

  11. An immunologic model for rapid vaccine assessment -- a clinical trial in a test tube.

    PubMed

    Higbee, Russell G; Byers, Anthony M; Dhir, Vipra; Drake, Donald; Fahlenkamp, Heather G; Gangur, Jyoti; Kachurin, Anatoly; Kachurina, Olga; Leistritz, Del; Ma, Yifan; Mehta, Riyaz; Mishkin, Eric; Moser, Janice; Mosquera, Luis; Nguyen, Mike; Parkhill, Robert; Pawar, Santosh; Poisson, Louis; Sanchez-Schmitz, Guzman; Schanen, Brian; Singh, Inderpal; Song, Haifeng; Tapia, Tenekua; Warren, William; Wittman, Vaughan

    2009-09-01

    While the duration and size of human clinical trials may be difficult to reduce, there are several parameters in pre-clinical vaccine development that may be possible to further optimise. By increasing the accuracy of the models used for pre-clinical vaccine testing, it should be possible to increase the probability that any particular vaccine candidate will be successful in human trials. In addition, an improved model will allow the collection of increasingly more-informative data in pre-clinical tests, thus aiding the rational design and formulation of candidates entered into clinical evaluation. An acceleration and increase in sophistication of pre-clinical vaccine development will thus require the advent of more physiologically-accurate models of the human immune system, coupled with substantial advances in the mechanistic understanding of vaccine efficacy, achieved by using this model. We believe the best viable option available is to use human cells and/or tissues in a functional in vitro model of human physiology. Not only will this more accurately model human diseases, it will also eliminate any ethical, moral and scientific issues involved with use of live humans and animals. An in vitro model, termed "MIMIC" (Modular IMmune In vitro Construct), was designed and developed to reflect the human immune system in a well-based format. The MIMIC System is a laboratory-based methodology that replicates the human immune system response. It is highly automated, and can be used to simulate a clinical trial for a diverse population, without putting human subjects at risk. The MIMIC System uses the circulating immune cells of individual donors to recapitulate each individual human immune response by maintaining the autonomy of the donor. Thus, an in vitro test system has been created that is functionally equivalent to the donor's own immune system and is designed to respond in a similar manner to the in vivo response. PMID:19807200

  12. Phase II trial of whole-cell pertussis vaccine vs an acellular vaccine containing agglutinogens.

    PubMed

    Miller, E; Ashworth, L A; Robinson, A; Waight, P A; Irons, L I

    1991-01-12

    An acellular pertussis vaccine containing agglutinogens 2 and 3, pertussis toxin, and filamentous haemagglutinin was developed by the Centre for Applied Microbiology and Research in the UK. 188 infants were entered into a randomised blind trial and received either the acellular or a whole-cell vaccine, combined with diphtheria and tetanus toxoids, in a 3, 5, and 8-10 month schedule. Local reactions were similar in the two groups but significantly fewer infants had systemic symptoms after the acellular vaccine. Mean log-antibody titres to the agglutinogen and toxin components were higher with the acellular than with the whole-cell vaccine. Persistence of antibodies one year after the third dose was also better in the acellular group. PMID:1670725

  13. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research.

    PubMed

    Siskind, Rona L; Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T; Broder, Gail B; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W; Renzullo, Philip O

    2016-08-15

    In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health-funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve the health of

  14. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T.; Broder, Gail B.; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W.; Renzullo, Philip O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health–funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve

  15. Efficacy Results of a Trial of a Herpes Simplex Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Belshe, Robert B.; Leone, Peter A.; Bernstein, David I.; Wald, Anna; Levin, Myron J.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Gorfinkel, Iris; Morrow, Rhoda L. Ashley; Ewell, Marian G.; Stokes-Riner, Abbie; Dubin, Gary; Heineman, Thomas C.; Schulte, Joann M.; Deal, Carolyn D.

    2012-01-01

    Background Two previous studies of a herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) subunit vaccine containing glycoprotein D in HSV-discordant couples revealed 73% and 74% efficacy against genital disease in women who were negative for both HSV type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 antibodies. Efficacy was not observed in men or HSV-1 seropositive women. Methods We conducted a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial involving 8323 women 18 to 30 years of age who were negative for antibodies to HSV-1 and HSV-2. At months 0, 1, and 6, some subjects received the investigational vaccine, consisting of 20 μg of glycoprotein D from HSV-2 with alum and 3-O-deacylated monophosphoryl lipid A as an adjuvant; control subjects received the hepatitis A vaccine, at a dose of 720 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) units. The primary end point was occurrence of genital herpes disease due to either HSV-1 or HSV-2 from month 2 (1 month after dose 2) through month 20. Results The HSV vaccine was associated with an increased risk of local reactions as compared with the control vaccine, and it elicited ELISA and neutralizing antibodies to HSV-2. Overall, the vaccine was not efficacious; vaccine efficacy was 20% (95% confidence interval [CI], −29 to 50) against genital herpes disease. However, efficacy against HSV-1 genital disease was 58% (95% CI, 12 to 80). Vaccine efficacy against HSV-1 infection (with or without disease) was 35% (95% CI, 13 to 52), but efficacy against HSV-2 infection was not observed (−8%; 95% CI, −59 to 26). Conclusions In a study population that was representative of the general population of HSV-1– and HSV-2–seronegative women, the investigational vaccine was effective in preventing HSV-1 genital disease and infection but not in preventing HSV-2 disease or infection. (Funded by the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and GlaxoSmithKline; ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT00057330.) PMID:22216840

  16. Clinical hypothesis: Application of AIDS vaccines together with thyroid hormones to increase their immunogenic effect.

    PubMed

    Halabe Bucay, Alberto

    2007-08-14

    To date, none of the vaccines that have been developed to prevent AIDS have proven to be sufficiently effective, despite the human immunodeficiency virus itself having been used as a vector as well as viral fragments, and genetic material from the virus itself and that the vaccines available have been administered with different adjuvants, including cytokines. This paper presents the hypothesis that if AIDS vaccines are administered together with thyroid hormones, the cellular and humoral immune responses will increase and the patients that receive these together will present much better immunogenicity against AIDS. PMID:17570565

  17. Scientific considerations for the regulation and clinical evaluation of HIV/AIDS preventive vaccines: report from a WHO-UNAIDS Consultation 13-15 March 2001, Geneva, Switzerland.

    PubMed

    2002-07-01

    The consultation was jointly organized by the WHO-UNAIDS HIV Vaccine Initiative and the Quality Assurance and Safety of Biologicals Team of the World Health Organization (WHO). Thirty-four experts from 16 developed and developing countries attended the meeting, bringing together expertise from academic institutions, clinical trial centres, national and international regulatory authorities. Representatives of major pharmaceutical companies were also invited. The primary objective of the meeting was to identify gaps that need to be addressed from regulatory perspective to ensure appropriate progress of HIV vaccine development from basic research to human trials, licensing and future application, with a special focus on needs of developing countries. As a result of discussions, the following priority needs were identified and recommendations were made in order to establish an appropriate regulatory framework for the development and evaluation of preventive HIV/AIDS vaccines, which were divided in two main areas: (a) standardization and control of candidate HIV/AIDS vaccines, and (b) approaches to the conduct of clinical trials of candidate HIV/AIDS vaccines. PMID:12131232

  18. Determinants of personal demand for an AIDS vaccine in Uganda: contingent valuation survey.

    PubMed Central

    Bishai, David; Pariyo, George; Ainsworth, Martha; Hill, Kenneth

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the factors affecting demand for an HIV/AIDS vaccine among adults in their prime earning and childbearing years and the impact of vaccination on risk behaviour in a high-prevalence, low-income country. METHODS: A contingent valuation survey of 1677 adults aged 18-60 years was conducted in 12 districts in Uganda. Respondents were asked about a hypothetical vaccine to prevent HIV infection. Households were randomly assigned survey questionnaires with one of two levels of vaccine efficacy (50% or 95%) and one of five prices. The influence of demographic characteristics, vaccine efficacy, self-assessed risk of infection, price, and household assets on vaccine demand was assessed using multivariate regression analysis. FINDINGS: Altogether, 94% (1576/1677) of respondents would be willing to be vaccinated with a free HIV/AIDS vaccine; 31% (78/251) would not be willing to be vaccinated at a price of 5000 Ugandan shillings (2.86 U.S. dollars). Household wealth, vaccine price, and risk behaviour were significant determinants of individual demand. Demand was equally high for both low-efficacy and high-efficacy vaccines. Respondents believed that condom use would be slightly less necessary with a high-efficacy vaccine (655/825; 79.4%) than a low-efficacy vaccine (690/843; 81.8%). However, reported condom use with partners other than spouses in the absence of a vaccine was much lower (137/271; 50.6%), with 26% (175/670) of men and 9.5% (96/1007) of women reporting having had partners other than their spouses during the past year. CONCLUSION: The high demand for an AIDS vaccine of any level of efficacy can be explained by the heavy toll of AIDS in Uganda: 72% (990/1371) of respondents had lost a family member to the disease. An AIDS vaccine would be self-targeting: those with a greater chance of becoming infected and spreading HIV would be more likely to seek a vaccine, improving the efficiency of vaccination programmes. However,,high levels of risk

  19. Major vaccine project: largest AIDS research grants ever to two "most promising" approaches.

    PubMed

    James, J S

    1998-12-01

    The International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI) has awarded more than $9 million in grants to develop two vaccines. These two vaccines were chosen by experts as the most promising in development. One program, led by Oxford University and the University of Nairobi, will combine two vaccines to investigate if they work well together. A second project will fund development of an HIV vaccine using a non-virulent form of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE). In exchange for investing money into such technologies, IAVI has negotiated for the results to be available in developing countries. Additional information is available on the IAVI web site. PMID:11366075

  20. Selectively willing and conditionally able: HIV vaccine trial participation among women at “high risk” of HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Voytek, Chelsea D.; Jones, Kevin T.; Metzger, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy studies of investigational HIV vaccines require enrollment of individuals at ‘high risk’ for HIV. This paper examines participation in HIV vaccine trials among women at ‘high risk’ for HIV acquisition. In-depth interviews were conducted with 17 African-American women who use crack cocaine and/or exchange sex for money/drugs to elicit attitudes toward medical research and motivators and deterrents to HIV vaccine trial participation. Interviews were digitally recorded and transcribed; data were coded and compiled into themes. Most women expressed favorable attitudes toward medical research in general. Motivators for trial participation included compensation; personal benefits including information, social services, and the possibility that the trial vaccine could prevent HIV; and altruism. Deterrents included: dislike of needles; distrust; concern about future consequences of participating. In addition, contingencies, caregiving responsibilities, and convenience issues constituted barriers which could impede participation. Respondents described varied, complex perspectives, and individual cases illustrate how these themes played out as women contemplated trial participation. Understanding factors which influence vaccine research participation among women at ‘high risk’ can aid sites to tailor recruitment procedures to local contexts. Concerns about future reactions can be addressed through sustained community education. Convenience barriers can be ameliorated by providing rides to study visits when necessary, and/or conducting study visits in accessible neighborhood locations. Women in this sample thought carefully about enrolling in HIV vaccine trials given the structural constraints within which they lived. Further research is needed regarding structural factors which influence personal agency and individuals’ thinking about research participation. PMID:21704110

  1. HIV Vaccine Trial participation in South Africa - an ethical assessment.

    PubMed

    Moodley, Keymanthri

    2002-04-01

    Trial participation in the proposed HIV Vaccine Trials in South Africa is discussed in the context of the ethical tension that exists between international ethical research standards and local standards of care and cultural norms in the Third World. The important concepts of informed consent, risk-benefit ratio and fair treatment of trial participants are interpreted differently in traditional, rural African communities, where a moderate form of communitarianism referred to as "Ubuntu" or "communalism" is still prevalent. Research is an altruistic endeavor that benefits communities and societies as a result of risks taken by individuals. Universal ethical guidelines that are highly individualistic and fail to emphasize communalism may represent serious problems for the sort of research needed in Africa today. PMID:11961697

  2. Ending the Global HIV/AIDS Pandemic: The Critical Role of an HIV Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Fauci, Anthony S.; Folkers, Gregory K.; Marston, Hilary D.

    2014-01-01

    While the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS pandemic continues, the incidence of HIV infections has fallen because of the deployment of antiretroviral drugs and multiple prevention modalities. To achieve a durable end to the pandemic, a vaccine remains essential. Recent advances in vaccinology offer new promise for an effective HIV vaccine. PMID:25151483

  3. Lessons learned from cancer vaccine trials and target antigen choice.

    PubMed

    Butterfield, Lisa H

    2016-07-01

    A wide variety of tumor antigens have been targeted in cancer immunotherapy studies. Traditionally, the focus has been on commonly overexpressed antigens shared across many patients and/or tumor types. As the field has progressed, the identity of human tumor rejection antigens has broadened. Immunologic monitoring of clinical trials has slowly elucidated candidate biomarkers of immune response and clinical response, and conversely, of immune dysfunction and suppression. We have utilized MART-1/Melan-A in our melanoma studies and observed a high frequency of immune responses and several significant clinical responses in patients vaccinated with this melanosomal protein. Alpha-fetoprotein is a shared, overexpressed tumor antigen and secreted glycoprotein that we have tested in hepatocellular cancer vaccines. Our recent studies have identified immunosuppressive and immune-skewing activities of this antigen. The choice of target antigen and its form can have unexpected effects. PMID:26842127

  4. A Sequential Phase 2b Trial Design for Evaluating Vaccine Efficacy and Immune Correlates for Multiple HIV Vaccine Regimens

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Peter B.; Grove, Douglas; Gabriel, Erin; Huang, Ying; Gray, Glenda; Hammer, Scott M.; Buchbinder, Susan P.; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Self, Steven G.

    2012-01-01

    Five preventative HIV vaccine efficacy trials have been conducted over the last 12 years, all of which evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) to prevent HIV infection for a single vaccine regimen versus placebo. Now that one of these trials has supported partial VE of a prime-boost vaccine regimen, there is interest in conducting efficacy trials that simultaneously evaluate multiple prime-boost vaccine regimens against a shared placebo group in the same geographic region, for accelerating the pace of vaccine development. This article proposes such a design, which has main objectives (1) to evaluate VE of each regimen versus placebo against HIV exposures occurring near the time of the immunizations; (2) to evaluate durability of VE for each vaccine regimen showing reliable evidence for positive VE; (3) to expeditiously evaluate the immune correlates of protection if any vaccine regimen shows reliable evidence for positive VE; and (4) to compare VE among the vaccine regimens. The design uses sequential monitoring for the events of vaccine harm, non-efficacy, and high efficacy, selected to weed out poor vaccines as rapidly as possible while guarding against prematurely weeding out a vaccine that does not confer efficacy until most of the immunizations are received. The evaluation of the design shows that testing multiple vaccine regimens is important for providing a well-powered assessment of the correlation of vaccine-induced immune responses with HIV infection, and is critically important for providing a reasonably powered assessment of the value of identified correlates as surrogate endpoints for HIV infection. PMID:23181167

  5. Vaccination trials in Australia and Argentina confirm the effectiveness of the EG95 hydatid vaccine in sheep.

    PubMed

    Lightowlers, M W; Jensen, O; Fernandez, E; Iriarte, J A; Woollard, D J; Gauci, C G; Jenkins, D J; Heath, D D

    1999-04-01

    Experimental vaccine trials against hydatid disease have been undertaken in sheep using the EG95 recombinant vaccine. Challenge infection was with viable Echinococcus granulosus eggs obtained from a New Zealand isolate (dog/sheep cycle), an Australian isolate (dingo/wallaby cycle) and an Argentine isolate (dog/sheep cycle). Vaccination with EG95 conferred a high degree of protection against challenge with all three parasite isolates (protection range 96-100%). Taken together, the trials demonstrated that 86% of vaccinated sheep were completely free of viable hydatid cysts when examined approximately 1 year after challenge infection. Vaccination reduced the number of viable cysts by 99.3% compared with unvaccinated controls. These results suggest that the EG95 vaccine could have wide applicability as a new tool for use in hydatid control campaigns. PMID:10428628

  6. Novel Vaccine Approach Achieves “Functional Cure” of AIDS Virus in Monkeys | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer Scientists at the Oregon Health & Science University and the AIDS and Cancer Virus Program of the Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research have used a novel vaccine approach to achieve a “functional cure” and apparent eradication of infection with a monkey version of the AIDS virus.

  7. Ebola virus disease candidate vaccines under evaluation in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Martins, Karen A; Jahrling, Peter B; Bavari, Sina; Kuhn, Jens H

    2016-09-01

    Filoviruses are the etiological agents of two human illnesses: Ebola virus disease and Marburg virus disease. Until 2013, medical countermeasure development against these afflictions was limited to only a few research institutes worldwide as both infections were considered exotic due to very low case numbers. Together with the high case-fatality rate of both diseases, evaluation of any candidate countermeasure in properly controlled clinical trials seemed impossible. However, in 2013, Ebola virus was identified as the etiological agent of a large disease outbreak in Western Africa including almost 30,000 infections and more than 11,000 deaths, including case exportations to Europe and North America. These large case numbers resulted in medical countermeasure development against Ebola virus disease becoming a global public-health priority. This review summarizes the status quo of candidate vaccines against Ebola virus disease, with a focus on those that are currently under evaluation in clinical trials. PMID:27160784

  8. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:26155388

  9. Perceptions of a community sample about participation in future HIV vaccine trials in south India.

    PubMed

    Nyamathi, Adeline M; Suhadev, Mohanarani; Swaminathan, Soumya; Fahey, John L

    2007-07-01

    Focus group discussions were conducted to assess factors that might impact participation of subgroups in Chennai for future HIV vaccine trials. The participants were 112 men and women representing the following: (1) transport workers; (2) clients who attended a sexually transmitted disease clinic; (3) injection drug users; (4) men having sex with men; (5) women in sex work; and (6) monogamous married women. Participants expressed an intense interest in future HIV vaccine trials. Willingness to participate in future trials included altruism and the desire to have a protective vaccine for the future. Assurances regarding stigma and confidentiality, and compensation for families in the event of a poor outcome with a future HIV vaccine trial were reported. Concerns also centered on the impact of seroconverting, and a possible increase in risk behaviors. The need for education and counseling about the dangers of engaging in risky behavior during and after participating in a future HIV vaccine trial is discussed. PMID:17016758

  10. Subtype C gp140 Vaccine Boosts Immune Responses Primed by the South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative DNA-C2 and MVA-C HIV Vaccines after More than a 2-Year Gap

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Kenneth H.; Elizaga, Marnie L.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Allen, Mary; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David; De Rosa, Stephen C.; Sato, Alicia; Gu, Niya; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Tucker, Timothy; Barnett, Susan W.; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N.; Shen, Xiaoying; Downing, Katrina; Williamson, Carolyn; Pensiero, Michael; Corey, Lawrence; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-01-01

    A phase I safety and immunogenicity study investigated South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative (SAAVI) HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) DNA vaccine encoding Gag-RT-Tat-Nef and gp150, boosted with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing matched antigens. Following the finding of partial protective efficacy in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial, a protein boost with HIV-1 subtype C V2-deleted gp140 with MF59 was added to the regimen. A total of 48 participants (12 U.S. participants and 36 Republic of South Africa [RSA] participants) were randomized to receive 3 intramuscular (i.m.) doses of SAAVI DNA-C2 of 4 mg (months 0, 1, and 2) and 2 i.m. doses of SAAVI MVA-C of 1.45 × 109 PFU (months 4 and 5) (n = 40) or of a placebo (n = 8). Approximately 2 years after vaccination, 27 participants were rerandomized to receive gp140/MF59 at 100 μg or placebo, as 2 i.m. injections, 3 months apart. The vaccine regimen was safe and well tolerated. After the DNA-MVA regimen, CD4+ T-cell and CD8+ T-cell responses occurred in 74% and 32% of the participants, respectively. The protein boost increased CD4+ T-cell responses to 87% of the subjects. All participants developed tier 1 HIV-1C neutralizing antibody responses as well as durable Env binding antibodies that recognized linear V3 and C5 peptides. The HIV-1 subtype C DNA-MVA vaccine regimen showed promising cellular immunogenicity. Boosting with gp140/MF59 enhanced levels of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as CD4+ T-cell responses to HIV-1 envelope. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00574600 and NCT01423825.) PMID:27098021

  11. Subtype C gp140 Vaccine Boosts Immune Responses Primed by the South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative DNA-C2 and MVA-C HIV Vaccines after More than a 2-Year Gap.

    PubMed

    Gray, Glenda E; Mayer, Kenneth H; Elizaga, Marnie L; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Allen, Mary; Morris, Lynn; Montefiori, David; De Rosa, Stephen C; Sato, Alicia; Gu, Niya; Tomaras, Georgia D; Tucker, Timothy; Barnett, Susan W; Mkhize, Nonhlanhla N; Shen, Xiaoying; Downing, Katrina; Williamson, Carolyn; Pensiero, Michael; Corey, Lawrence; Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2016-06-01

    A phase I safety and immunogenicity study investigated South African AIDS Vaccine Initiative (SAAVI) HIV-1 subtype C (HIV-1C) DNA vaccine encoding Gag-RT-Tat-Nef and gp150, boosted with modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) expressing matched antigens. Following the finding of partial protective efficacy in the RV144 HIV vaccine efficacy trial, a protein boost with HIV-1 subtype C V2-deleted gp140 with MF59 was added to the regimen. A total of 48 participants (12 U.S. participants and 36 Republic of South Africa [RSA] participants) were randomized to receive 3 intramuscular (i.m.) doses of SAAVI DNA-C2 of 4 mg (months 0, 1, and 2) and 2 i.m. doses of SAAVI MVA-C of 1.45 × 10(9) PFU (months 4 and 5) (n = 40) or of a placebo (n = 8). Approximately 2 years after vaccination, 27 participants were rerandomized to receive gp140/MF59 at 100 μg or placebo, as 2 i.m. injections, 3 months apart. The vaccine regimen was safe and well tolerated. After the DNA-MVA regimen, CD4(+) T-cell and CD8(+) T-cell responses occurred in 74% and 32% of the participants, respectively. The protein boost increased CD4(+) T-cell responses to 87% of the subjects. All participants developed tier 1 HIV-1C neutralizing antibody responses as well as durable Env binding antibodies that recognized linear V3 and C5 peptides. The HIV-1 subtype C DNA-MVA vaccine regimen showed promising cellular immunogenicity. Boosting with gp140/MF59 enhanced levels of binding and neutralizing antibodies as well as CD4(+) T-cell responses to HIV-1 envelope. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00574600 and NCT01423825.). PMID:27098021

  12. Controlled field trial of the effectiveness of cholera and cholera El Tor vaccines in Calcutta*

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A. Das; Sinha, Renuka; Shrivastava, D. L.; De, S. P.; Taneja, B. L.; Rao, M. S.; Abou-Gareeb, A. H.

    1967-01-01

    To assess the effectiveness of cholera vaccines, 2 controlled field trials were made in Calcutta—an endemic area—during 1964 and 1965. Three Indian vaccines of which 1 was grown on casein hydrolysate and 2 on agar, a freeze-dried vaccine from the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research (WRAIR), Washington, D.C., and an El Tor vaccine from the Philippines were used, with typhoid-paratyphoid (TAB) vaccine as a control. The 210 112 volunteers were vaccinated subcutaneously with a single dose of one of the vaccines. In the 1964 trial, the number of bacteriologically confirmed cases was not enough to show statistically significant differences in incidence between the 5 vaccine groups and the control group. However, the WRAIR freeze-dried vaccine protected about 40% of the vaccinees for 6 months after vaccination, although the efficacy was higher (57%) during the first 3 months than during the subsequent 3 months (28%). Agar-grown vaccine, produced by the Central Research Institute, Kasauli, was 37% efficacious. In the 1965 trial, owing to the small number of cases in the study area, the Kasauli vaccine was the only one to show statistically significant protection (40%). PMID:5301381

  13. Visibility aids for pedestrians and cyclists: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Kwan, Irene; Mapstone, James

    2004-05-01

    This study aims to quantify the effect of visibility aids on the occurrence of pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries, and drivers' responses in detection and recognition. Trial reports were systematically reviewed according to predefined eligibility criteria, including randomised controlled trials or controlled before-and-after trials comparing visibility aids and no visibility aids, and of different visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist safety, and drivers' responses in detection and recognition. This included trials in which the order of interventions was randomised, or balanced using a Latin square design. Two reviewers independently assessed validity of trials and abstracted data. The main outcome measures were pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries, and drivers'/observers' responses in the detection and recognition time, distance and frequency. No trials which assessed the effect of visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist-motor vehicle collisions and injuries were identified. Twelve trials examined the effectiveness of daytime visibility aids and 25 trials on night time visibility aids, including 882 participants. Drivers' and observers' detection and recognition improved with visibility aids. For daytime, fluorescent materials in yellow, red and orange colours enhanced detection and recognition. "Biomotion" markings enhanced recognition. Substantial heterogeneity between the trials limits the possibility for meta-analysis. Visibility aids have the potential to improve detection and recognition and would merit further development to gain public acceptance. However, the impact of visibility aids on pedestrian and cyclist safety is unknown and needs to be determined. PMID:15003574

  14. Refugees, humanitarian aid and the right to decline vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Caplan, A L; Curry, David R

    2015-03-01

    Recent instances of governments and others refusing humanitarian assistance to refugees and IDPs (internally-displaced persons) unless they agreed to polio immunization for their children raise difficult ethical challenges. The authors argue that states have the right and a responsibility to require such vaccinations in instances where the serious vaccine-preventable disease(s) at issue threaten others, including local populations, humanitarian workers, and others in camps or support settings. PMID:25135799

  15. Factors that influence the willingness of young adults in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, to participate in phase I/II HIV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Mbunda, Theodora; Bakari, Muhammad; Tarimo, Edith A. M.; Sandstrom, Eric; Kulane, Asli

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV/AIDS continues to destroy the lives of young people especially in low-income countries. The inclusion of youths in HIV vaccine trials is of utmost importance in obtaining an effective vaccine that is acceptable to them. Objective To characterize the willingness of young adults in Tanzania to participate in an HIV vaccine trial and the factors that influence this willingness. Design Four hundred and fifty young adults who visited a youth-friendly Infectious Diseases Clinic (IDC) from February 2012 to September 2012 completed a self-administered questionnaire concerning sociodemographic information, their knowledge about and perception of HIV vaccine studies, and the availability of social support. Results Of our participants, 50.6% expressed willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials, and this willingness was positively correlated with having some knowledge about HIV vaccine studies (AOR, 2.2; 95% CI: 1.4–3.4), a positive perception toward such studies (AOR, 2.3; 95% CI: 1.5–3.6), having a relationship with someone who could help them make a decision (AOR, 2.5; 95% CI: 1.3–4.9), and age at the time of sexual debut (AOR, 2.6; 95% CI 1.0–6.7) for 15- to 19-year-olds and (AOR, 2.7; 95% CI 1.0–7.1) for older participants. Conclusions The participants exhibited a moderate willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials, which was associated with a positive perception of and some knowledge about such trials, having a relationship with someone who might influence their decision as well as age at time of sexual debut. More efforts should be made to inform the youths about specific HIV vaccine trials and related matters, as well as to engage significant others in the decision-making process. PMID:24572007

  16. Project VOGUE: A partnership for increasing HIV knowledge and HIV vaccine trial awareness among House Ball leaders in Western New York

    PubMed Central

    Alio, Amina P.; Fields, Sheldon D.; Humes, Damon L.; Bunce, Catherine A.; Wallace, Stephaun E.; Lewis, Cindi; Elder, Heather; Wakefield, Steven; Keefer, Michael C.

    2014-01-01

    Men who sleep with men (MSM) and transgender individuals of color, the largest demographic in the House Ball community (HBC) are amongst the group at highest risk for HIV infection in the United States. The HBC have limited access to culturally appropriate HIV education. This study aimed to develop a partnership with HBC leaders to uncover strategies for increasing HIV prevention knowledge, including participation in HIV vaccine trials. To this end a research institution-community-HBC partnership was established. In-depth qualitative and quantitative data were collected from the 14 HBC leaders in western New York, revealing that knowledge of HIV and related vaccine trials was limited. Barriers to increasing HIV knowledge included fear of peer judgment, having inaccurate information about HIV, and lack of education. Among the HBC, community partnerships will further aid in the development of future HIV prevention programs and increase individuals’ willingness to participate in future HIV vaccine trials. PMID:25642120

  17. Plant-based vaccines for animals and humans: recent advances in technology and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-09-01

    It has been about 30 years since the first plant engineering technology was established. Although the concept of plant-based pharmaceuticals or vaccines motivates us to develop practicable commercial products using plant engineering, there are some difficulties in reaching the final goal: to manufacture an approved product. At present, the only plant-made vaccine approved by the United States Department of Agriculture is a Newcastle disease vaccine for poultry that is produced in suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progress toward commercialization of plant-based vaccines takes much effort and time, but several candidate vaccines for use in humans and animals are in clinical trials. This review discusses plant engineering technologies and regulations relevant to the development of plant-based vaccines and provides an overview of human and animal vaccines currently under clinical trials. PMID:26668752

  18. Comparative trial of live attenuated measles vaccine in Hong Kong by intramuscular and intradermal injection

    PubMed Central

    1967-01-01

    Between April and July 1966 a comparative trial of two live attenuated measles vaccines (Schwarz and Beckenham 31), given intramuscularly or intradermally, was conducted in Hong Kong. Some 910 non-immune children completed the trial. The Beckenham 31 vaccine caused significantly more complications than Schwarz vaccine, but it also resulted in a much higher mean antibody titre by both intramuscular and intradermal injection than did Schwarz vaccine. The seroconversion rates were satisfactory for both vaccines given intramuscularly but not for either given intradermally (at one-fifth the recognized intramuscular dose). The authors suggest that either vaccine may usefully be given for measles prophylaxis. The choice between Beckenham 31, with a higher complication rate and higher antibody levels, and Schwarz, with fewer complications but lower antibody levels, would depend on the type of community, the adequacy of the medical services, the severity of measles and an assessment of how either vaccine, with its known complications, might affect other immunization programmes. PMID:5299670

  19. Plant-based vaccines for animals and humans: recent advances in technology and clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Takeyama, Natsumi; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    It has been about 30 years since the first plant engineering technology was established. Although the concept of plant-based pharmaceuticals or vaccines motivates us to develop practicable commercial products using plant engineering, there are some difficulties in reaching the final goal: to manufacture an approved product. At present, the only plant-made vaccine approved by the United States Department of Agriculture is a Newcastle disease vaccine for poultry that is produced in suspension-cultured tobacco cells. The progress toward commercialization of plant-based vaccines takes much effort and time, but several candidate vaccines for use in humans and animals are in clinical trials. This review discusses plant engineering technologies and regulations relevant to the development of plant-based vaccines and provides an overview of human and animal vaccines currently under clinical trials. PMID:26668752

  20. Expectation of Volunteers Towards the Vaccine Efficacy of the Prime-Boost HIV Vaccine Phase III Trial During Unblinding

    PubMed Central

    Khowsroy, Kessuda; Sabmee, Yupa; Laowarakul, Pataramon; Wattanakitwichai, Jutarat; Auetian, Jiraporn; Lothong, Kannika; Boondao, Roongtip; Maythaarttaphong, Sarawan; Yaemwong, Sunee; Excler, Jean-Louis; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A Phase III community-based HIV vaccine trial using the ALVAC-HIV and AIDSVAX B/E prime-boost regimen (RV144) showed a modest vaccine efficacy of 31.2% against HIV acquisition. Participant's understanding of the trial is a key element of its success. This study aimed to understand participant's expectation and response to the overall results of the trial as well after unblinding. Using an open-ended questionnaire, data were collected from 400 participants who came for the unblinding visit. Fifty-three percent received the vaccine and 47% were placebo recipients. The median age was 30 years (range: 22–37). The observed vaccine efficacy of 31.2% was lower than expected by 67.75% of participants compared to higher than expected (by 6%), as expected (by 11.25%), and those with no expectation (15%). A majority of participants (71.5%) were happy and proud, and indicated that it was a good result. The rest were sad or disappointed (22.75%) or acquiescent (5.75%). After unblinding, 67.92% of the vaccine recipients had a positive response and 32.08% were acquiescent. Among placebo recipients, 85.11% were acquiescent and 10.11% indicated that being assigned to the vaccine group would have been better even though vaccine efficacy was only 31.2%. Despite the modest vaccine efficacy, a majority of study participants acknowledged the value of the trial and hoped that information from RV144 could be used for future vaccine development. PMID:24906244

  1. Exploring the Potential Health Impact and Cost-Effectiveness of AIDS Vaccine within a Comprehensive HIV/AIDS Response in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Harmon, Thomas M.; Fisher, Kevin A.; McGlynn, Margaret G.; Stover, John; Warren, Mitchell J.; Teng, Yu; Näveke, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Background The Investment Framework Enhanced (IFE) proposed in 2013 by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) explored how maximizing existing interventions and adding emerging prevention options, including a vaccine, could further reduce new HIV infections and AIDS-related deaths in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). This article describes additional modeling which looks more closely at the potential health impact and cost-effectiveness of AIDS vaccination in LMICs as part of UNAIDS IFE. Methods An epidemiological model was used to explore the potential impact of AIDS vaccination in LMICs in combination with other interventions through 2070. Assumptions were based on perspectives from research, vaccination and public health experts, as well as observations from other HIV/AIDS interventions and vaccination programs. Sensitivity analyses varied vaccine efficacy, duration of protection, coverage, and cost. Results If UNAIDS IFE goals were fully achieved, new annual HIV infections in LMICs would decline from 2.0 million in 2014 to 550,000 in 2070. A 70% efficacious vaccine introduced in 2027 with three doses, strong uptake and five years of protection would reduce annual new infections by 44% over the first decade, by 65% the first 25 years and by 78% to 122,000 in 2070. Vaccine impact would be much greater if the assumptions in UNAIDS IFE were not fully achieved. An AIDS vaccine would be cost-effective within a wide range of scenarios. Interpretation Even a modestly effective vaccine could contribute strongly to a sustainable response to HIV/AIDS and be cost-effective, even with optimistic assumptions about other interventions. Higher efficacy would provide even greater impact and cost-effectiveness, and would support broader access. Vaccine efficacy and cost per regimen are critical in achieving cost-effectiveness, with cost per regimen being particularly critical in low-income countries and at lower efficacy levels. PMID:26731116

  2. Correlates of protection for rotavirus vaccines: Possible alternative trial endpoints, opportunities, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Angel, Juana; Steele, A Duncan; Franco, Manuel A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is a major vaccine-preventable killer of young children worldwide. Two RV vaccines are globally commercially available and other vaccines are in different stages of development. Due to the absence of a suitable correlate of protection (CoP), all RV vaccine efficacy trials have had clinical endpoints. These trials represent an important challenge since RV vaccines have to be introduced in many different settings, placebo-controlled studies are unethical due to the availability of licensed vaccines, and comparator assessments for new vaccines with clinical endpoints are very large, complex, and expensive to conduct. A CoP as a surrogate endpoint would allow predictions of vaccine efficacy for new RV vaccines and enable a regulatory pathway, contributing to the more rapid development of new RV vaccines. The goal of this review is to summarize experiences from RV natural infection and vaccine studies to evaluate potential CoP for use as surrogate endpoints for assessment of new RV vaccines, and to explore challenges and opportunities in the field. PMID:25483685

  3. Can Self-Prediction Overcome Barriers to Hepatitis B Vaccination? A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Anthony D.; Cox, Dena; Cyrier, Rosalie; Graham-Dotson, Yolanda; Zimet, Gregory D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a serious public health problem, due in part to low vaccination rates among high-risk adults, many of whom decline vaccination because of barriers such as perceived inconvenience or discomfort. This study evaluates the efficacy of a self-prediction intervention to increase HBV vaccination rates among high-risk adults. Method Randomized controlled trial of 1175 adults recruited from three STD clinics in the United States over 28 months. Participants completed an audio-computer-assisted self-interview (A-CASI), which presented information about HBV infection and vaccination, and measured relevant beliefs, behaviors and demographics. Half of participants were assigned randomly to a "self-prediction" intervention, asking them to predict their future acceptance of HBV vaccination. The main outcome measure was subsequent vaccination behavior. Other measures included perceived barriers to HBV vaccination, measured prior to the intervention. Results There was a significant interaction between the intervention and vaccination barriers, indicating the effect of the intervention differed depending on perceived vaccination barriers. Among high-barriers patients, the intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance. Among low-barrier patients, the intervention did not influence vaccination acceptance. Conclusions The self-prediction intervention significantly increased vaccination acceptance among "high-barriers" patients, who typically have very low vaccination rates. This brief intervention could be a useful tool in increasing vaccine uptake among high-barriers patients. PMID:21875205

  4. New Animal Model Could Boost Research on AIDS Drugs and Vaccines | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer, and Jeff Lifson, Guest Writer In a research milestone reported in the June 20 issue of the journal Science, scientists have developed a minimally modified version of HIV-1, the virus that causes AIDS in infected humans, that is capable of causing progressive infection and AIDS in monkeys. The advance should help create more authentic animal models of the disease and provide a potentially invaluable approach for faster and better preclinical evaluation of new drugs and vaccines.

  5. Typhoid fever vaccines: systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Fraser, Abigail; Paul, Mical; Goldberg, Elad; Acosta, Camilo J; Leibovici, Leonard

    2007-11-01

    We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials comparing a typhoid fever vaccine with any alternative typhoid fever vaccine or inactive agent. Trials evaluating killed whole-cell vaccines were excluded. The cumulative efficacy at 3 years for the Ty21a and the polysaccharide Vi vaccine were similar: 51% (95%CI 36%, 62%), and 55% (95%CI 30%, 70%), respectively. The cumulative efficacy of the Vi-rEPA vaccine at 3.8 years was higher, 89% (95%CI 76%, 97%), but this vaccine has not yet been licensed for use and was evaluated in only one trial. Adverse events were mild in nature and for most, not significantly more frequent in any of the vaccine groups when compared with placebo. Both the currently licensed Ty21a and Vi vaccine, are safe and efficacious for preventing typhoid fever. Neither vaccine is currently registered for administration to children below 2 years of age. Given the recent finding that typhoid fever also affects infants, development of a conjugate vaccine is warranted. PMID:17928109

  6. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  7. Clinical trials for vaccine development in registry of Korea Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seog-Youn

    2013-01-01

    Based on the action plan "Ensuring a stable supply of National Immunization Program vaccines and sovereignty of biopharmaceutical products," Korea Food and Drug Administration (KFDA) has made efforts to develop vaccines in the context of self reliance and to protect public health. Along with the recognized infrastructures for clinical trials, clinical trials for vaccines have also gradually been conducted at multinational sites as well as at local sites. KFDA will support to expand six to eleven kinds of vaccines by 2017. In accordance with integrated regulatory system, KFDA has promoted clinical trials, established national lot release procedure, and strengthened good manufacturing practices inspection and post marketing surveillance. Against this backdrop, KFDA will support the vaccine development and promote excellent public health protection. PMID:23596594

  8. A common pharmacophoric footprint for AIDS vaccine design.

    PubMed

    Pisterer, Christoph; Mihailescu, Dan; Smith, Jeremy C; Reed, Jennifer

    2004-07-15

    The most promising target antigen for an HIV vaccine designed using the classic antibody strategy has been the viral coat protein gp120. Unfortunately, its high variability has prevented this approach. We examine here a 15-residue peptide derived from the CD4-binding domain of gp120. By use of molecular dynamics computer simulation, it is shown that despite considerable sequence variation, the three-dimensional structure of the peptide is preserved over the full range of clade-specific sequences. Furthermore, sequences threaded onto the structure exhibit common three-dimensional electrostatic and hydrophobic properties. These common physicochemical characteristics constitute a pharmacophoric footprint that promises to be useful in the design of a synthetic antigen for vaccine development. PMID:15239651

  9. How Should HIV Vaccine Efficacy Trials Be Conducted? Diverse U.S. Communities Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kegeles, Susan M.; Johnson, Mallory O.; Strauss, Ronald P.; Ralston, Brady; Hays, Robert B.; Metzger, David S.; McLellan-Lemal, Eleanor; MacQueen, Kathleen M.

    2006-01-01

    Developing an effective vaccine remains a critical long-term approach to HIV prevention. Every efficacy trial should be responsive to the concerns of participating communities because the successful development of an HIV preventive vaccine will require long-term involvement of people who have been marginalized and who distrust the government and…

  10. Behavioral risk assessment in HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) clinical trials: A qualitative study exploring HVTN staff perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele Peake; Karuna, Shelly T.; Nebergall, Michelle; Koblin, Beryl A.; Kublin, Jim G.

    2013-01-01

    In HIV vaccine trials, the collection and analysis of participant behavior data associated with risk of acquiring HIV-infection is important for a number of reasons. Although the rationale for behavioral risk assessment in HIV vaccine clinical trials is clear, consistent collection of behavioral data over time and across protocols has been challenging for the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN). Integrating biomedical and behavioral research within the same preventive vaccine clinical trial has proven difficult. The HVTN conducted an internal landscape analysis to: (1) evaluate the challenges of behavioral risk assessment in HIV vaccine trials and observational studies; (2) explore the impact of the Step Study on behavioral risk assessment measures; and (3) identify strategies to overcome existing challenges and improve the quality of data resulting from behavioral risk analysis. These analyses of behavioral risk within the HVTN revealed several challenges and recommendations for improved behavioral risk data collection in future protocols. The recommendations for improvement include: (1) establishment of protocol-specific behavioral risk working groups that include social and behavioral experts; (2) provision of behavioral rationale and objectives to the development team; (3) creation of a template for geographic- and population-specific assessment of low and high risk behaviors; and (4) pilot testing of behavioral risk assessments. Results also underscored the need for routinely conducted analyses of behavioral data. PMID:23859840

  11. Bad Blood: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study and Legacy Recruitment for Experimental AIDS Vaccines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Kimberly Sessions

    2005-01-01

    For African Americans, medical research often connotes exploitation and cruelty, making recruiting African Americans to participate in HIV vaccine trials particularly daunting. But infusing adult education principles into such efforts is both increasing African American participation and helping heal the legacy of the Tuskegee experiment.

  12. HIV Vaccine-Induced Sero-Reactivity: A Challenge for Trial Participants, Researchers, and Physicians

    PubMed Central

    Voronin, Yegor; Zinszner, Helene; Karg, Carissa; Brooks, Katie; Coombs, Robert; Hural, John; Holt, Renee; Fast, Pat; Allen, Mary; Allen, Mary; Busch, Michael; Fast, Pat; Fruth, Ulrich; Golding, Hana; Khurana, Surender; Mulenga, Joseph; Peel, Sheila; Schito, Marco; Voronin, Yegor; Barnabas, Nomampondo; Bentsen, Christopher; Graham, Barney; Gray, Glenda; Levin, Andrew; McCluskey, Margaret; O'Connell, Robert; Snow, Bill; Ware, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-inducing vaccines are a major focus in the preventive HIV vaccine field. Because the most common tests for HIV infection rely on detecting antibodies to HIV, they may also detect antibodies induced by a candidate HIV vaccine. The detection of vaccine-induced antibodies to HIV by serological tests is most commonly referred to as vaccine-induced sero-reactivity (VISR). VISR can be misinterpreted as a sign of HIV infection in a healthy study participant. In a participant who has developed vaccine-induced antibodies, accurate diagnosis of HIV infection (or lack thereof) may require specialized tests and algorithms (differential testing) that are usually not available in community settings. Organizations sponsoring clinical testing of preventive HIV vaccine candidates have an ethical obligation not only to inform healthy volunteers about the potential problems associated with participating in a clinical trial but also to help manage any resulting issues. This article explores the scope of VISR-related issues that become increasingly prevalent as the search for an effective HIV vaccine continues and will be paramount once a preventive vaccine is deployed. We also describe ways in which organizations conducting HIV vaccine trials have addressed these issues and outline areas where more work is needed. PMID:25649349

  13. Protein carriers of conjugate vaccines: characteristics, development, and clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Pichichero, Michael E

    2013-12-01

    The immunogenicity of polysaccharides as human vaccines was enhanced by coupling to protein carriers. Conjugation transformed the T cell-independent polysaccharide vaccines of the past to T cell-dependent antigenic vaccines that were much more immunogenic and launched a renaissance in vaccinology. This review discusses the conjugate vaccines for prevention of infections caused by Hemophilus influenzae type b, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Neisseria meningitidis. Specifically, the characteristics of the proteins used in the construction of the vaccines including CRM, tetanus toxoid, diphtheria toxoid, Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane complex, and Hemophilus influenzae protein D are discussed. The studies that established differences among and key features of conjugate vaccines including immunologic memory induction, reduction of nasopharyngeal colonization and herd immunity, and antibody avidity and avidity maturation are presented. Studies of dose, schedule, response to boosters, of single protein carriers with single and multiple polysaccharides, of multiple protein carriers with multiple polysaccharides and conjugate vaccines administered concurrently with other vaccines are discussed along with undesirable consequences of conjugate vaccines. The clear benefits of conjugate vaccines in improving the protective responses of the immature immune systems of young infants and the senescent immune systems of the elderly have been made clear and opened the way to development of additional vaccines using this technology for future vaccine products. PMID:23955057

  14. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media

    PubMed Central

    Novotny, Laura A.; Clements, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4+ T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  15. Therapeutic Transcutaneous Immunization with a Band-Aid Vaccine Resolves Experimental Otitis Media.

    PubMed

    Novotny, Laura A; Clements, John D; Bakaletz, Lauren O

    2015-08-01

    Transcutaneous immunization (TCI) is a noninvasive strategy to induce protective immune responses. We describe TCI with a band-aid vaccine placed on the postauricular skin to exploit the unique organization of the stratum corneum and to promote the development of immune responses to resolve active experimental otitis media due to nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHI). This therapeutic immunization strategy induced significantly earlier resolution of middle ear fluid and rapid eradication of both planktonic and mucosal biofilm-resident NTHI within 7 days after receipt of the first immunizing band-aid vaccine. Efficacy was ascribed to the homing of immunogen-bearing cutaneous dendritic cells to the nasal-associated lymphoid tissue, induction of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells, and the presence of immunogen-specific IgM and IgG within the middle ear. TCI using band-aid vaccines could expand the use of traditional parenteral preventative vaccines to include treatment of active otitis media, in addition to other diseases of the respiratory tract due to NTHI. PMID:26018536

  16. Comparative analysis of pentavalent rotavirus vaccine strains and G8 rotaviruses identified during vaccine trial in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heylen, Elisabeth; Zeller, Mark; Ciarlet, Max; Lawrence, Jody; Steele, Duncan; Van Ranst, Marc; Matthijnssens, Jelle

    2015-01-01

    RotaTeqTM is a pentavalent rotavirus vaccine based on a bovine rotavirus genetic backbone in vitro reassorted with human outer capsid genes. During clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, the vaccine efficacy over a 2-year follow-up was lower against the genotypes contained in the vaccine than against the heterotypic G8P[6] and G8P[1] rotavirus strains of which the former is highly prevalent in Africa. Complete genome analyses of 43 complete rotavirus genomes collected during phase III clinical trials of RotaTeqTM in Sub-Saharan Africa, were conducted to gain insight into the high level of cross-protection afforded by RotaTeqTM against these G8 strains. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of a high number of bovine rotavirus gene segments in these human G8 strains. In addition, we performed an in depth analysis on the individual amino acid level which showed that G8 rotaviruses were more similar to the RotaTeqTM vaccine than non-G8 strains. Because RotaTeqTM possesses a bovine genetic backbone, the high vaccine efficacy against G8 strains might be partially explained by the fact that all these strains contain a complete or partial bovine-like backbone. Altogether, this study supports the hypothesis that gene segments other than VP7 and VP4 play a role in vaccine-induced immunity. PMID:26440913

  17. Macromolecular Assemblage in the Design of a Synthetic AIDS Vaccine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defoort, Jean-Philippe; Nardelli, Bernardetta; Huang, Wolin; Ho, David D.; Tam, James P.

    1992-05-01

    We describe a peptide vaccine model based on the mimicry of surface coat protein of a pathogen. This model used a macromolecular assemblage approach to amplify peptide antigens in liposomes or micelles. The key components of the model consisted of an oligomeric lysine scaffolding to amplify peptide antigens covalently 4-fold and a lipophilic membrane-anchoring group to further amplify noncovalently the antigens many-fold in liposomal or micellar form. A peptide antigen derived from the third variable domain of glycoprotein gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), consisting of neutralizing, T-helper, and T-cytotoxic epitopes, was used in a macromolecular assemblage model (HIV-1 linear peptide amino acid sequence 308-331 in a tetravalent multiple antigen peptide system linked to tripalmitoyl-S-glycerylcysteine). The latter complex, in liposome or micelle, was used to immunize mice and guinea pigs without any adjuvant and found to induce gp120-specific antibodies that neutralize virus infectivity in vitro, elicit cytokine production, and prime CD8^+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes in vivo. Our results show that the macromolecular assemblage approach bears immunological mimicry of the gp120 of HIV virus and may lead to useful vaccines against HIV infection.

  18. A Randomized Trial to Increase Acceptance of Childhood Vaccines by Vaccine-Hesitant Parents: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Williams, S. Elizabeth; Rothman, Russell L.; Offit, Paul A.; Schaffner, William; Sullivan, Molly; Edwards, Kathryn M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective A cluster-randomized trial was performed to evaluate an educational intervention to improve parental attitudes and vaccine uptake in vaccine-hesitant parents. Methods Two primary care sites were randomized to provide families with either usual care, or an intervention (video and written information) for vaccine-hesitant parents. Eligible parents included those presenting for their child’s 2 week well visit with performance on the Parent Attitudes about Childhood Vaccines (PACV) survey suggesting vaccine hesitancy (score ≥25). Enrollees completed PACV surveys at the 2 month well visit and vaccination status at 12 weeks of age was assessed. The primary outcome was the difference in PACV scores obtained at enrollment and 2 months between the two groups. The proportion of on-time vaccination was also compared at 12 weeks. Results 454 parents were approached and 369 (81.3%) participated; 132 had PACV scores ≥ 25 and were enrolled [67 in the control group (mean PACV score = 37) and 55 in the intervention group (mean PACV score = 40)]. Two month PACV surveys were completed by 108 (~90%) of enrollees. Parents in the intervention group had a significant decrease in PACV score at two months compared to control (median difference = 6.7, p=0.049); this remained significant after adjustment for baseline PACV score, race/ethnicity, and income (p=0.044). There was no difference in the on-time receipt of vaccines between groups at 12 weeks. Conclusions A brief educational intervention for vaccine-hesitant parents was associated with a modest but significant increase in measured parental attitudes towards vaccines. PMID:24011750

  19. DNA Priming for Seasonal Influenza Vaccine: A Phase 1b Double-Blind Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ledgerwood, Julie E.; Bellamy, Abbie R.; Belshe, Robert; Bernstein, David I.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Patel, Shital M.; Renehan, Phyllis; Zajdowicz, Thad; Schwartz, Richard; Koup, Richard; Bailer, Robert T.; Yamshchikov, Galina V.; Enama, Mary E.; Sarwar, Uzma; Larkin, Brenda; Graham, Barney S.

    2015-01-01

    Background The efficacy of current influenza vaccines is limited in vulnerable populations. DNA vaccines can be produced rapidly, and may offer a potential strategy to improve vaccine immunogenicity, indicated by studies with H5 influenza DNA vaccine prime followed by inactivated vaccine boost. Methods Four sites enrolled healthy adults, randomized to receive 2011/12 seasonal influenza DNA vaccine prime (n=65) or phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (n=66) administered intramuscularly with Biojector. All subjects received the 2012/13 seasonal inactivated influenza vaccine, trivalent (IIV3) 36 weeks after the priming injection. Vaccine safety and tolerability was the primary objective and measurement of antibody response by hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) was the secondary objective. Results The DNA vaccine prime-IIV3 boost regimen was safe and well tolerated. Significant differences in HAI responses between the DNA vaccine prime and the PBS prime groups were not detected in this study. Conclusion While DNA priming significantly improved the response to a conventional monovalent H5 vaccine in a previous study, it was not effective in adults using seasonal influenza strains, possibly due to pre-existing immunity to the prime, unmatched prime and boost antigens, or the lengthy 36 week boost interval. Careful optimization of the DNA prime-IIV3 boost regimen as related to antigen matching, interval between vaccinations, and pre-existing immune responses to influenza is likely to be needed in further evaluations of this vaccine strategy. In particular, testing this concept in younger age groups with less prior exposure to seasonal influenza strains may be informative. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01498718 PMID:25950433

  20. A Comprehensive, Model-Based Review of Vaccine and Repeat Infection Trials for Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C. Paul; Evans, Holly; Larsen, Sasha E.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Filarial worms cause highly morbid diseases such as elephantiasis and river blindness. Since the 1940s, researchers have conducted vaccine trials in 27 different animal models of filariasis. Although no vaccine trial in a permissive model of filariasis has provided sterilizing immunity, great strides have been made toward developing vaccines that could block transmission, decrease pathological sequelae, or decrease susceptibility to infection. In this review, we have organized, to the best of our ability, all published filaria vaccine trials and reviewed them in the context of the animal models used. Additionally, we provide information on the life cycle, disease phenotype, concomitant immunity, and natural immunity during primary and secondary infections for 24 different filaria models. PMID:23824365

  1. Placebo use in vaccine trials: recommendations of a WHO expert panel.

    PubMed

    Rid, Annette; Saxena, Abha; Baqui, Abdhullah H; Bhan, Anant; Bines, Julie; Bouesseau, Marie-Charlotte; Caplan, Arthur; Colgrove, James; Dhai, Ames; Gomez-Diaz, Rita; Green, Shane K; Kang, Gagandeep; Lagos, Rosanna; Loh, Patricia; London, Alex John; Mulholland, Kim; Neels, Pieter; Pitisuttithum, Punee; Sarr, Samba Cor; Selgelid, Michael; Sheehan, Mark; Smith, Peter G

    2014-08-20

    Vaccines are among the most cost-effective interventions against infectious diseases. Many candidate vaccines targeting neglected diseases in low- and middle-income countries are now progressing to large-scale clinical testing. However, controversy surrounds the appropriate design of vaccine trials and, in particular, the use of unvaccinated controls (with or without placebo) when an efficacious vaccine already exists. This paper specifies four situations in which placebo use may be acceptable, provided that the study question cannot be answered in an active-controlled trial design; the risks of delaying or foregoing an efficacious vaccine are mitigated; the risks of using a placebo control are justified by the social and public health value of the research; and the research is responsive to local health needs. The four situations are: (1) developing a locally affordable vaccine, (2) evaluating the local safety and efficacy of an existing vaccine, (3) testing a new vaccine when an existing vaccine is considered inappropriate for local use (e.g. based on epidemiologic or demographic factors), and (4) determining the local burden of disease. PMID:24768580

  2. 77 FR 49409 - Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... rabies in the United States. On July 9, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 40322- 40323... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of an Environmental... with the proposed field trial to test the safety and efficacy of an experimental oral rabies...

  3. Template protocol for clinical trials investigating vaccines--focus on safety elements.

    PubMed

    Bonhoeffer, Jan; Imoukhuede, Egeruan B; Aldrovandi, Grace; Bachtiar, Novilia S; Chan, Eng-Soon; Chang, Soju; Chen, Robert T; Fernandopulle, Rohini; Goldenthal, Karen L; Heffelfinger, James D; Hossain, Shah; Jevaji, Indira; Khamesipour, Ali; Kochhar, Sonali; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Malkin, Elissa; Nalin, David; Prevots, Rebecca; Ramasamy, Ranjan; Sellers, Sarah; Vekemans, Johan; Walker, Kenneth B; Wilson, Pam; Wong, Virginia; Zaman, Khalequz; Heininger, Ulrich

    2013-11-12

    This document is intended as a guide to the protocol development for trials of prophylactic vaccines. The template may serve phases I-IV clinical trials protocol development to include safety relevant information as required by the regulatory authorities and as deemed useful by the investigators. This document may also be helpful for future site strengthening efforts. PMID:23499603

  4. Evidence of Blood Stage Efficacy with a Virosomal Malaria Vaccine in a Phase IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Fiona M.; Porter, David W.; Okitsu, Shinji L.; Westerfeld, Nicole; Vogel, Denise; Todryk, Stephen; Poulton, Ian; Correa, Simon; Hutchings, Claire; Berthoud, Tamara; Dunachie, Susanna; Andrews, Laura; Williams, Jack L.; Sinden, Robert; Gilbert, Sarah C.; Pluschke, Gerd; Zurbriggen, Rinaldo; Hill, Adrian V. S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Previous research indicates that a combination vaccine targeting different stages of the malaria life cycle is likely to provide the most effective malaria vaccine. This trial was the first to combine two existing vaccination strategies to produce a vaccine that induces immune responses to both the pre-erythrocytic and blood stages of the P. falciparum life cycle. Methods This was a Phase I/IIa study of a new combination malaria vaccine FFM ME-TRAP+PEV3A. PEV3A includes peptides from both the pre-erythrocytic circumsporozoite protein and the blood-stage antigen AMA-1. This study was conducted at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK. The participants were healthy, malaria naïve volunteers, from Oxford. The interventions were vaccination with PEV3A alone, or PEV3A+FFM ME-TRAP. The main outcome measure was protection from malaria in a sporozoite challenge model. Other outcomes included measures of parasite specific immune responses induced by either vaccine; and safety, assessed by collection of adverse event data. Results We observed evidence of blood stage immunity in PEV3A vaccinated volunteers, but no volunteers were completely protected from malaria. PEV3A induced high antibody titres, and antibodies bound parasites in immunofluorescence assays. Moreover, we observed boosting of the vaccine-induced immune response by sporozoite challenge. Immune responses induced by FFM ME-TRAP were unexpectedly low. The vaccines were safe, with comparable side effect profiles to previous trials. Although there was no sterile protection two major observations support an effect of the vaccine-induced response on blood stage parasites: (i) Lower rates of parasite growth were observed in volunteers vaccinated with PEV3A compared to unvaccinated controls (p = 0.012), and this was reflected in the PCR results from PEV3A vaccinated volunteers. These showed early control of parasitaemia by some volunteers in this

  5. The costs and effectiveness of large Phase III pre-licensure vaccine clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Black, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the 1980s, most vaccines were licensed based upon safety and effectiveness studies in several hundred individuals. Beginning with the evaluation of Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccines, much larger pre-licensure trials became common. The pre-licensure trial for Haemophilus influenzae oligosaccharide conjugate vaccine had more than 60,000 children and that of the seven-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine included almost 38,000 children. Although trial sizes for both of these studies were driven by the sample size required to demonstrate efficacy, the sample size requirements for safety evaluations of other vaccines have subsequently increased. With the demonstration of an increased risk of intussusception following the Rotashield brand rotavirus vaccine, this trend has continued. However, routinely requiring safety studies of 20,000-50,000 or more participants has two major downsides. First, the cost of performing large safety trials routinely prior to licensure of a vaccine is very large, with some estimates as high at US$200 million euros for one vaccine. This high financial cost engenders an opportunity cost whereby the number of vaccines that a company is willing or able to develop to meet public health needs becomes limited by this financial barrier. The second downside is that in the pre-licensure setting, such studies are very time consuming and delay the availability of a beneficial vaccine substantially. One might argue that in some situations, this financial commitment is warranted such as for evaluations of the risk of intussusception following newer rotavirus vaccines. However, it must be noted that while an increased risk of intussusception was not identified in large pre-licensure studies, in post marketing evaluations an increased risk of this outcome has been identified. Thus, even the extensive pre-licensure evaluations conducted did not identify an associated risk. The limitations of large Phase III trials have also been

  6. Motivations and concerns about adolescent tuberculosis vaccine trial participation in rural Uganda: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Buregyeya, Esther; Kulane, Asli; Kiguli, Juliet; Musoke, Phillipa; Mayanja, Harriet; Mitchell, Ellen Maeve Hanlon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Research is being carried out to develop and test new potentially more effective tuberculosis vaccines. Among the vaccines being developed are those that target adolescents. This study explored the stakeholders’ perceptions about adolescent participation in a hypothetical tuberculosis vaccine trial in Ugandan adolescents. Methods Focus group discussions with adolescents, parents of infants and adolescents, and key informant interviews with community leaders and traditional healers were conducted. Results The majority of the respondents expressed potential willingness to allow their children participate in a tuberculosis vaccine trial. Main motivations for potential participation would be being able to learn about health-related issues. Hesitations included the notion that trial participation would distract the youths from their studies, fear of possible side effects of an investigational product, and potential for being sexually exploited by researchers. In addition, bad experiences from participation in previous research and doubts about the importance of research were mentioned. Suggested ways to motivate participation included: improved clarity on study purpose, risks, benefits and better scheduling of study procedures to minimize disruption to participants’ academic schedules. Conclusion Findings from this study suggest that the community is open to potential participation of adolescents in a tuberculosis vaccine trial. However, there is a need to communicate more effectively with the community about the purpose of the trial and its effects, including safety data, in a low-literacy, readily understood format. This raises a challenge to researchers, who cannot know all the potential effects of a trial product before it is tested. PMID:26834929

  7. Field trial of a heat-stable measles vaccine in Papua New Guinea.

    PubMed

    Climie, A; André, F E

    1984-12-01

    In Papua New Guinea, consideration has been given to the introduction of measles vaccination, and a trial was conducted to determine the optimum age for vaccination and the suitability of a heat-stable measles vaccine (Rimevax) for countrywide use. As much of the vaccination programme is carried out by MCH teams on foot patrols, the trial was designed to determine immunogenicity of the vaccine after being transported and used for a week in a standard issue vaccine Esky by MCH staff. A study of the relevant literature having indicated 9 months as the probable best minimum age for measles vaccination, younger children were not included. The study was carried out on 313 infants and children aged nine to 24 months. An overall seroconversion rate of 96.6% was achieved using initially potent vaccine kept under field conditions for up to 102h. Ninety-seven percent of the vaccinees less than 11 months and 15 days of age seroconverted, as did all 15 children who were less than 70% of the Harvard standard weight for age. All 35 children who had seroconverted and who were retested six months after vaccination had detectable measles antibodies in their serum. Parental recollection of past measles infection was found unreliable as was reporting of post-vaccination reactions by parental recall since the incidence of reported 'reactions' in initially seronegative and seropositive vaccinees were similar. It is concluded that use of this heat-stable vaccine is possible with existing cold chain facilities in PNG and that infants can be vaccinated from the age of 9 months. PMID:6534989

  8. Neutropenia as an Adverse Event following Vaccination: Results from Randomized Clinical Trials in Healthy Adults and Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Muturi-Kioi, Vincent; Lewis, David; Launay, Odile; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Anemona, Alessandra; Loulergue, Pierre; Bodinham, Caroline L.; Aerssens, Annelies; Groth, Nicola; Saul, Allan; Podda, Audino

    2016-01-01

    Background In the context of early vaccine trials aimed at evaluating the safety profile of novel vaccines, abnormal haematological values, such as neutropenia, are often reported. It is therefore important to evaluate how these trials should be planned not to miss potentially important safety signals, but also to understand the implications and the clinical relevance. Methodology We report and discuss the results from five clinical trials (two with a new Shigella vaccine in the early stage of clinical development and three with licensed vaccines) where the absolute neutrophil counts (ANC) were evaluated before and after vaccination. Additionally, we have performed a systematic review of the literature on cases of neutropenia reported during vaccine trials to discuss our results in a more general context. Principal Findings Both in our clinical trials and in the literature review, several cases of neutropenia have been reported, in the first two weeks after vaccination. However, neutropenia was generally transient and had a benign clinical outcome, after vaccination with either multiple novel candidates or well-known licensed vaccines. Additionally, the vaccine recipients with neutropenia frequently had lower baseline ANC than non-neutropenic vaccinees. In many instances neutropenia occurred in subjects of African descent, known to have lower ANC compared to western populations. Conclusions It is important to include ANC and other haematological tests in early vaccine trials to identify potential safety signals. Post-vaccination neutropenia is not uncommon, generally transient and clinically benign, but many vaccine trials do not have a sampling schedule that allows its detection. Given ethnic variability in the level of circulating neutrophils, normal ranges taking into account ethnicity should be used for determination of trial inclusion/exclusion criteria and classification of neutropenia related adverse events. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02017899

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccine trials and tribulations: Clinical perspectives.

    PubMed

    Handler, Marc Z; Handler, Nancy S; Majewski, Slawomir; Schwartz, Robert A

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) affects hundreds of millions of people worldwide and is associated with both benign and malignant neoplasms in men and women. It is a double-stranded DNA virus with an icosahedral capsid. Forty HPV types are known to infect mucosal keratinocytes. If not cured by the immune system, the infection can lead to genital warts, mucosal dysplasia, or cancer. The most common oncogenic types are 16 and 18. The vaccine to prevent HPV and its associated morbidity and mortality has existed since 2006. Several variations protect against an increasing number of HPV types. The recommended vaccination age is before sexual exposure; administration of the vaccine to children has been controversial. This continuing medical education review evaluates the current HPV vaccines available to clinicians. Part I focuses on the debate over who should be vaccinated, at what age, and in which populations. PMID:26475534

  10. AIDS Clinical Trials Group Longitudinal Linked Randomized Trials (ALLRT): Rationale, Design, and Baseline Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Smurzynski, Marlene; Collier, Ann C.; Koletar, Susan L.; Bosch, Ronald J.; Wu, Kunling; Bastow, Barbara; Benson, Constance A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose ALLRT is a longitudinal cohort study of HIV-infected subjects prospectively randomized into selected clinical trials for antiretroviral (ARV) treatment-naïve and ARV treatment-experienced individuals conducted by the AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG). We describe the rationale, design, and baseline characteristics of the ALLRT cohort and its potential to address important research questions related to ARV therapy. Method Standardized visits occur every 16 weeks to evaluate long-term clinical, virologic, and immunologic outcomes associated with ARV treatment. Results A total of 4,371 subjects enrolled in ALLRT from January 2000 through June 2007. Of these, 3,146 (72%) were ARV naïve at parent study entry (18% female, 44% white, 32% black, 21% Hispanic; median age 37 years, CD4 count 218 cells/μL, follow-up 3.6 years; 343 [11%] followed ≥8 years) and 1,225 (28%) were treatment experienced (13% female, 59% white, 20% black, 17% Hispanic; median age 42 years, CD4 count 325 cells/μL, follow-up 5.7 years). Conclusions ALLRT provides the opportunity to understand long-term ramifications of therapeutic ARV choices and determine whether these vary by treatment regimen, timing of treatment initiation, or treatment changes over long-term follow-up. Investigations based on uniform data and specimen collection in the context of randomized ARV treatments will be critical to developing more successful long-term therapeutic strategies for HIV treatment. PMID:18753121

  11. A controlled field trial and laboratory study of five typhoid vaccines in the USSR*

    PubMed Central

    Hejfec, L. B.; Salmin, L. V.; Lejtman, M. Z.; Kuz'minova, M. L.; Vasil'eva, A. V.; Levina, L. A.; Bencianova, T. G.; Pavlova, E. A.; Antonova, A. A.

    1966-01-01

    A controlled field trial of typhoid vaccines was carried out in the USSR in 1962. It was the fifth and last of a series. Five preparations were tested, the most effective being a heat-killed divalent vaccine prepared from aerated broth culture. The results of a laboratory study of the vaccines were not in complete agreement with the data from the field trial. No correlation was found between the effectiveness of vaccines and the data from laboratory tests as to their potency, and the authors suggest that differences in effectiveness may be due to varying degrees of damage to biological components during the different production processes. The effectiveness is also sensitive to dosage. PMID:5296393

  12. Ethical considerations for designing GBS maternal vaccine efficacy trials in low-middle income countries.

    PubMed

    White, Amina; Madhi, Shabir A

    2015-11-25

    Many in the scientific community agree that a randomized, placebo-controlled trial would offer the most scientifically rigorous study design for establishing the efficacy of a Group B Streptococcus (GBS) vaccine administered to pregnant women for the prevention of invasive GBS disease in young infants. There are compelling reasons to conduct such a trial in low-middle income countries (LMICs) with a high burden of disease, such as South Africa, and to adopt an add-on trial design in which participants are randomized to receive the GBS vaccine or placebo in addition to the locally available standard of care. Yet there is a longstanding debate about whether trials in LMICs should offer participants the worldwide best available standard of care. In this article, we examine both the risk-benefit profile and the potential for exploitation with an add-on trial design in the context of the locally available standard of care in South Africa. Our analysis suggests that providing the local standard of care to participants in this case may be not only more scientifically valuable but also more ethically acceptable than attempting to provide the worldwide best available standard of care in the South African setting. Moreover, the example of GBS in the South African setting can help to elucidate important ethical considerations for determining the acceptability of testing vaccine efficacy in the context of locally available rather than the worldwide best available standard of care in Phase III trials of other new maternal vaccines. PMID:26271832

  13. Vaccination trials against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides (large-colony-type) infection in goats.

    PubMed

    Bar-Moshe, B; Rapoport, E; Brenner, J

    1984-10-01

    Vaccination trials against Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides in suckling and weaned kids are described. A formalin-killed vaccine with adjuvant was used. Challenge to the vaccinated suckling kids was by ingestion of dam's infected milk and by subcutaneous inoculation of 10(6) organisms, and to the vaccinated weaned kids, by subcutaneous inoculation alone. The weaned 6-week-old kids were vaccinated, given a booster 3 weeks later and challenged 1 month after that. Serological monitoring was by enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The six control kids remained serologically negative and after challenge were pyrexic and mycoplasmaemic. All died or were killed in extremis, with a characteristic cellulitis at the site of inoculation, arthritis and swollen spleen. In contrast, the vaccinated kids remained healthy. There was a modest antibody response to the initial vaccination and a further steep rise after the booster. After challenge the organism was recovered only from the lymph nodes proximal to the site of challenge in some animals, and from the liver and kidney in two animals. All the vaccinated suckling kids were unaffected by ingestion of their dam's infected milk. The kids that received only one vaccine inoculation on the day of birth, and one control kid, succumbed to subcutaneous challenge, whereas the kids that were given a booster, except for one, remained healthy. PMID:6511322

  14. A field vaccine trial in Tanzania demonstrates partial protection against malignant catarrhal fever in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Lankester, F.; Russell, G.C.; Lugelo, A.; Ndabigaye, A.; Mnyambwa, N.; Keyyu, J.; Kazwala, R.; Grant, D.; Percival, A.; Deane, D.; Haig, D.M.; Cleaveland, S.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal lymphoproliferative disease of cattle that, in East Africa, results from transmission of the causative virus, alcelaphine herpesvirus 1 (AlHV-1), from wildebeest. A vaccine field trial involving an attenuated AlHV-1 virus vaccine was performed over two wildebeest calving seasons on the Simanjiro Plain of northern Tanzania. Each of the two phases of the field trial consisted of groups of 50 vaccinated and unvaccinated cattle, which were subsequently exposed to AlHV-1 challenge by herding toward wildebeest. Vaccination resulted in the induction of virus-specific and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Some cattle in the unvaccinated groups also developed virus-specific antibody responses but only after the start of the challenge phase of the trial. PCR of DNA from blood samples detected AlHV-1 infection in both groups of cattle but the frequency of infection was significantly lower in the vaccinated groups. Some infected animals showed clinical signs suggestive of MCF but few animals went on to develop fatal MCF, with similar numbers in vaccinated and unvaccinated groups. This study demonstrated a baseline level of MCF-seropositivity among cattle in northern Tanzania of 1% and showed that AlHV-1 virus-neutralizing antibodies could be induced in Tanzanian zebu shorthorn cross cattle by our attenuated vaccine, a correlate of protection in previous experimental trials. The vaccine reduced infection rates by 56% in cattle exposed to wildebeest but protection from fatal MCF could not be determined due to the low number of fatal cases. PMID:26706270

  15. Wheeze as an Adverse Event in Pediatric Vaccine and Drug Randomized Controlled Trials: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Marangu, Diana; Kovacs, Stephanie; Walson, Judd; Bonhoeffer, Jan; Ortiz, Justin R.; John-Stewart, Grace; Horne, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Wheeze is an important sign indicating a potentially severe adverse event in vaccine and drug trials, particularly in children. However, there are currently no consensus definitions of wheeze or associated respiratory compromise in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). Objective To identify definitions and severity grading scales of wheeze as an adverse event in vaccine and drug RCTs enrolling children <5 years and to determine their diagnostic performance based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Methods We performed a systematic review of electronic databases and reference lists with restrictions for trial settings, English language and publication date ≥ 1970. Wheeze definitions and severity grading were abstracted and ranked by a diagnostic certainty score based on sensitivity, specificity and inter-observer agreement. Results Of 1,205 articles identified using our broad search terms, we identified 58 eligible trials conducted in 38 countries, mainly in high-income settings. Vaccines made up the majority (90%) of interventions, particularly influenza vaccines (65%). Only 15 trials provided explicit definitions of wheeze. Of 24 studies that described severity, 11 described wheeze severity in the context of an explicit wheeze definition. The remaining 13 studies described wheeze severity where wheeze was defined as part of a respiratory illness or a wheeze equivalent. Wheeze descriptions were elicited from caregiver reports (14%), physical examination by a health worker (45%) or a combination (41%). There were 21/58 studies in which wheeze definitions included combined caregiver report and healthcare worker assessment. The use of these two methods appeared to have the highest combined sensitivity and specificity. Conclusion Standardized wheeze definitions and severity grading scales for use in pediatric vaccine or drug trials are lacking. Standardized definitions of wheeze are needed for assessment of possible adverse events as

  16. Components of the indirect effect in vaccine trials: identification of contagion and infectiousness effects

    PubMed Central

    VanderWeele, Tyler J.; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J.; Halloran, M. Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination of one person may prevent the infection of another either because the vaccine prevents the first from being infected and from infecting the second, or because, even if the first person is infected, the vaccine may render the infection less infectious. We might refer to the first of these mechanisms as a contagion effect and the second as an infectiousness effect. In the simple setting of a randomized vaccine trial with households of size two, we use counterfactual theory under interference to provide formal definitions of a contagion effect and an unconditional infectiousness effect. Using ideas analogous to mediation analysis, we show that the indirect effect (the effect of one person’s vaccine on another’s outcome) can be decomposed into a contagion effect and an unconditional infectiousness effect on the risk-difference, risk-ratio, odds-ratio and vaccine-efficacy scales. We provide identification assumptions for such contagion and unconditional infectiousness effects, and describe a simple statistical technique to estimate these effects when they are identified. We also give a sensitivity-analysis technique to assess how inferences would change under violations of the identification assumptions. The concepts and results of this paper are illustrated with hypothetical vaccine-trial data. PMID:22828661

  17. Components of the indirect effect in vaccine trials: identification of contagion and infectiousness effects.

    PubMed

    Vanderweele, Tyler J; Tchetgen Tchetgen, Eric J; Halloran, M Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Vaccination of one person may prevent the infection of another either because the vaccine prevents the first from being infected and from infecting the second, or because, even if the first person is infected, the vaccine may render the infection less infectious. We might refer to the first of these mechanisms as a contagion effect and the second as an infectiousness effect. In the simple setting of a randomized vaccine trial with households of size two, we use counterfactual theory under interference to provide formal definitions of a contagion effect and an unconditional infectiousness effect. Using ideas analogous to mediation analysis, we show that the indirect effect (the effect of one person's vaccine on another's outcome) can be decomposed into a contagion effect and an unconditional infectiousness effect on the risk difference, risk ratio, odds ratio, and vaccine efficacy scales. We provide identification assumptions for such contagion and unconditional infectiousness effects and describe a simple statistical technique to estimate these effects when they are identified. We also give a sensitivity analysis technique to assess how inferences would change under violations of the identification assumptions. The concepts and results of this paper are illustrated with hypothetical vaccine trial data. PMID:22828661

  18. Multiple factors affect immunogenicity of DNA plasmid HIV vaccines in human clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xia; Morgan, Cecilia; Yu, Xuesong; DeRosa, Stephen; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Montefiori, David C.; Kublin, James; Corey, Larry; Keefer, Michael C.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmid DNA vaccines have been licensed for use in domesticated animals because of their excellent immunogenicity, but none have yet been licensed for use in humans. Here we report a retrospective analysis of 1218 healthy human volunteers enrolled in 10 phase I clinical trials in which DNA plasmids encoding HIV antigens were administered. Elicited T-cell immune responses were quantified by validated intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) stimulated with HIV peptide pools. HIV-specific binding and neutralizing antibody activities were also analyzed using validated assays. Results showed that, in the absence of adjuvants and boosting with alternative vaccines, DNA vaccines elicited CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses in an average of 13.3% (95% CI: 9.8% to 17.8%) and 37.7% (95% CI: 31.9% to 43.8%) of vaccine recipients, respectively. Three vaccinations (versus 2) improved the proportion of subjects with antigen-specific CD8+ responses (p=0.02), as did increased DNA dosage (p=0.007). Furthermore, female gender and participants having a lower Body Mass Index were independently associated with higher CD4+ T-cell response rate (p=0.001 and p=0.008, respectively). These vaccines elicited minimal neutralizing and binding antibody responses. These findings of the immunogenicity of HIV DNA vaccines in humans can provide guidance for future clinical trials. PMID:25820067

  19. The use of urine in the follow-up of HPV vaccine trials

    PubMed Central

    Vorsters, Alex; Van Keer, Severien; Van Damme, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Prevention and treatment of human papillomavirus related cervical cancer through vaccination is a relative new field with many scientific, technological and implementational challenges requiring numerous new clinical trials. The initial prophylactic HPV vaccine trials allowed to set new end-points based on persistent infection in order to determine vaccine efficacy for prevention of cervical cancer. Major progress has been made regarding detection of HPV DNA in urine and high correlations between urinary HPV DNA and cervical infections have been established. Urine sampling has a number of assets such as its non-invasive character, and allowing for self-collection at home creating options to simplify follow-up of HPV in women participating in HPV vaccine efficacy trials. The current reported variability in urinary HPV sampling and detection can be overcome through relative simple sampling and testing guidelines. Determining persistent infection or lack of therapy response by urinary HPV detection may be an interesting approach to assess a viral end-point in HPV prophylactic and therapeutic vaccine efficacy trials for women. PMID:25664398

  20. Protocol for the Osteoporosis Choice trial. A pilot randomized trial of a decision aid in primary care practice

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Bisphosphonates can reduce fracture risk in patients with osteoporosis, but many at-risk patients do not start or adhere to these medications. The aims of this study are to: (1) preliminarily evaluate the effect of an individualized 10-year osteoporotic fracture risk calculator and decision aid (OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE) for postmenopausal women at risk for osteoporotic fractures; and (2) assess the feasibility and validity (i.e., absence of contamination) of patient-level randomization (vs. cluster randomization) in pilot trials of decision aid efficacy. Methods/Design This is a protocol for a parallel, 2-arm, randomized trial to compare an intervention group receiving OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE to a control group receiving usual primary care. Postmenopausal women with bone mineral density T-scores of <-1.0, not receiving bisphosphonate therapy, and receiving care at participating primary care practices in and around Rochester, Minnesota, USA will be eligible to participate in the trial. We will measure the effect of OSTEOPOROSIS CHOICE on five outcomes: (a) patient knowledge regarding osteoporosis risk factors and treatment; (b) quality of the decision-making process for both the patient and clinician; (c) patient and clinician acceptability and satisfaction with the decision aid; (d) rate of bisphosphonate use and adherence, and (e) trial processes (e.g., ability to recruit participants, collect patient outcomes). To capture these outcomes, we will use patient and clinician surveys following each visit and video recordings of the clinical encounters. These video recordings will also allow us to determine the extent to which clinicians previously exposed to the decision aid were able to recreate elements of the decision aid with control patients (i.e., contamination). Pharmacy prescription profiles and follow-up phone interviews will assess medication start and adherence at 6 months. Discussion This pilot trial will provide evidence of feasibility, validity of

  1. Vaccination Strategies against Highly Pathogenic Arenaviruses: The Next Steps toward Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ölschläger, Stephan; Flatz, Lukas

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is one of the most valuable weapons against infectious diseases and has led to a significant reduction in mortality and morbidity. However, for most viral hemorrhagic fevers caused by arenaviruses, no prophylactic vaccine is available. This is particularly problematic as these diseases are notoriously difficult to diagnose and treat. Lassa fever is globally the most important of the fevers caused by arenaviruses, potentially affecting millions of people living in endemic areas, particularly in Nigeria. Annually, an estimated 300,000 humans are infected and several thousands succumb to the disease. The successful development of the vaccine “Candid#1” against Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever, proved that an effective arenavirus vaccine can be developed. Although several promising studies toward the development of a Lassa fever vaccine have been published, no vaccine candidate has been tested in human volunteers or patients. This review summarizes the immunology and other aspects of existing experimental arenavirus vaccine studies, discusses the reasons for the lack of a vaccine, and proposes a plan for overcoming the final hurdles toward clinical trials. PMID:23592977

  2. Accelerated Hepatitis B Vaccine Schedule among Drug Users – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Lu-Yu; Grimes, Carolyn Z.; Tran, Thanh Quoc; Clark, April; Xia, Rui; Lai, Dejian; Troisi, Catherine; Williams, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Background Hepatitis B vaccine provides a model for improving uptake and completion of multi-dose vaccinations in the drug-using community. Methods DASH project conducted randomized controlled trial among not-in-treatment current drug users in two urban neighborhoods. Neighborhoods were cluster-randomized to receive a standard (HIV information) or enhanced (HBV vaccine acceptance/adherence) behavioral intervention; participants within clusters were randomized to a standard (0, 1, 6 mo) or accelerated (0, 1, 2 mo) vaccination schedule. Outcomes were completion of three-dose vaccine and HBV seroprotection. Results Of those screening negative for HIV/HBV, 77% accepted HB vaccination and 75% of those received all 3 doses. Injecting drug users (IDUs) on the accelerated schedule were significantly more likely to receive 3 doses (76%) than those on the standard schedule (66%, p=.04), although for drug users as a whole the adherence was 77% and 73%. No difference in adherence was observed between behavioral intervention groups. Predictors of adherence were older age, African American race, stable housing, and alcohol use. Cumulative HBV seroprotection (≥10 mIU/mL) was gained by 12 months by 65% of those completing. Seroprotection at 6 months was greater for the accelerated schedule group. Conclusions The accelerated vaccine schedule improves hepatitis B vaccination adherence among IDU. PMID:20936979

  3. The Tragedy of AIDS: A New Trial for Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodges, Linda C.; Poteet, Gaye W.

    1987-01-01

    Presents some recent facts regarding Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Discusses the needs of nursing students for knowledge about this disease and how to protect themselves while caring for patients. Discusses the fear of contagion among health workers. (CH)

  4. Trial watch: Naked and vectored DNA-based anticancer vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Bloy, Norma; Buqué, Aitziber; Aranda, Fernando; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Sautès-Fridman, Catherine; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One type of anticancer vaccine relies on the administration of DNA constructs encoding one or multiple tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). The ultimate objective of these preparations, which can be naked or vectored by non-pathogenic viruses, bacteria or yeast cells, is to drive the synthesis of TAAs in the context of an immunostimulatory milieu, resulting in the (re-)elicitation of a tumor-targeting immune response. In spite of encouraging preclinical results, the clinical efficacy of DNA-based vaccines employed as standalone immunotherapeutic interventions in cancer patients appears to be limited. Thus, efforts are currently being devoted to the development of combinatorial regimens that allow DNA-based anticancer vaccines to elicit clinically relevant immune responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in the preclinical and clinical development of this therapeutic paradigm. PMID:26155408

  5. HIV Epidemic in Asia: Implications for HIV Vaccine and Other Prevention Trials.

    PubMed

    Phanuphak, Nittaya; Lo, Ying-Ru; Shao, Yiming; Solomon, Sunil Suhas; O'Connell, Robert J; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Chang, David; Kim, Jerome H; Excler, Jean Louis

    2015-11-01

    An overall decrease of HIV prevalence is now observed in several key Asian countries due to effective prevention programs. The decrease in HIV prevalence and incidence may further improve with the scale-up of combination prevention interventions. The implementation of future prevention trials then faces important challenges. The opportunity to identify heterosexual populations at high risk such as female sex workers may rapidly wane. With unabating HIV epidemics among men who have sex with men (MSM) and transgender (TG) populations, an effective vaccine would likely be the only option to turn the epidemic. It is more likely that efficacy trials will occur among MSM and TG because their higher HIV incidence permits smaller and less costly trials. The constantly evolving patterns of HIV-1 diversity in the region suggest close monitoring of the molecular HIV epidemic in potential target populations for HIV vaccine efficacy trials. CRF01_AE remains predominant in southeast Asian countries and MSM populations in China. This relatively steady pattern is conducive to regional efficacy trials, and as efficacy warrants, to regional licensure. While vaccines inducing nonneutralizing antibodies have promise against HIV acquisition, vaccines designed to induce broadly neutralizing antibodies and cell-mediated immune responses of greater breadth and depth in the mucosal compartments should be considered for testing in MSM and TG. The rationale and design of efficacy trials of combination prevention modalities such as HIV vaccine and preexposure prophylaxis (PrEP) remain hypothetical, require high adherence to PrEP, are more costly, and present new regulatory challenges. The prioritization of prevention interventions should be driven by the HIV epidemic and decided by the country-specific health and regulatory authorities. Modeling the impact and cost-benefit may help this decision process. PMID:26107771

  6. Timing and trials of hearing aids and assistive devices.

    PubMed

    Chute, P M

    1997-09-01

    Of all the factors under consideration during the evaluation for a cochlear implant, perhaps the most critical is the speech perception ability of the candidate when using appropriate amplification. For children, this issue is often complicated by inadequate training or limited use of the sensory aid. Guidelines for implantation suggest that there be a "lack of benefit from hearing aids" to qualify as a candidate. This "lack of benefit" must be explored when using the most appropriate aid coupled with the proper rehabilitation. In determining candidacy for children, it becomes extremely important to assess benefit using a variety of sensory aids while having access to well-directed auditory intervention. The types of amplification that can be used during the preimplant evaluation stage include conventional behind-the-ear devices, FM units, vibrotactile aids, and frequency transposition aids. Although some of these devices are used more often than others, centers implanting children should be aware of the role that each plays in the evaluation process. To determine the frequency with which these devices are used as well as the types of strategies that are emphasized in the preimplant training interval, a questionnaire was developed to gather information from the cochlear implant facilities in the United States. The results of this survey will be presented to demonstrate training and device trends that are incorporated during the preimplant process. Additionally, the use of frequency transposition hearing aids as part of the preimplant training procedure will be explored. The facility at Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital has studied these devices in a small group of adults and children. Data pertaining to the speech perceptual abilities obtained with both the TranSonic and the Emily will be presented and compared to results with the Nucleus cochlear implant system. PMID:9334766

  7. Clinical Development of a Cytomegalovirus DNA Vaccine: From Product Concept to Pivotal Phase 3 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Larry R.; Wloch, Mary K.; Chaplin, Jennifer A.; Gerber, Michele; Rolland, Alain P.

    2013-01-01

    2013 marks a milestone year for plasmid DNA vaccine development as a first-in-class cytomegalovirus (CMV) DNA vaccine enters pivotal phase 3 testing. This vaccine consists of two plasmids expressing CMV antigens glycoprotein B (gB) and phosphoprotein 65 (pp65) formulated with a CRL1005 poloxamer and benzalkonium chloride (BAK) delivery system designed to enhance plasmid expression. The vaccine’s planned initial indication under investigation is for prevention of CMV reactivation in CMV-seropositive (CMV+) recipients of an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT). A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled phase 2 proof-of-concept study provided initial evidence of the safety of this product in CMV+ HCT recipients who underwent immune ablation conditioning regimens. This study revealed a significant reduction in viral load endpoints and increased frequencies of pp65-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells in vaccine recipients compared to placebo recipients. The results of this endpoint-defining trial provided the basis for defining the primary and secondary endpoints of a global phase 3 trial in HCT recipients. A case study is presented here describing the development history of this vaccine from product concept to initiation of the phase 3 trial. PMID:26344340

  8. The statistical power and validity of Ebola vaccine trials in Sierra Leone: A simulation study of trial design and analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bellan, Steven E.; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Pearson, Carl A. B.; Champredon, David; Fox, Spencer J.; Skrip, Laura; Galvani, Alison P.; Gambhir, Manoj; Lopman, Ben A.; Porco, Travis C.; Meyers, Lauren Ancel; Dushoff, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Background Safe and effective vaccines may help end the ongoing Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa, and mitigate future outbreaks. We evaluate the statistical validity and power of randomized controlled (RCT) and stepped-wedge cluster trial (SWCT) designs in Sierra Leone, where EVD incidence is spatiotemporally heterogeneous, and rapidly declining. Methods We forecasted district-level EVD incidence over the next six months using a stochastic model fit to data from Sierra Leone. We then simulated RCT and SWCT designs in trial populations comprising geographically distinct clusters of high risk, taking into account realistic logistical constraints, as well as both individual-level and cluster-level variation in risk. We assessed false positive rates and power for parametric and nonparametric analyses of simulated trial data, across a range of vaccine efficacies and trial start dates. Findings For an SWCT, regional variation in EVD incidence trends produced inflated false positive rates (up to 0.11 at α=0.05) under standard statistical models, but not when analyzed by a permutation test, whereas all analyses of RCTs remained valid. Assuming a six-month trial starting February 18, 2015, we estimate the power to detect a 90% efficacious vaccine to be between 48% and 89% for an RCT, and between 6.4% and 26% for an SWCT, depending on incidence within the trial population. We estimate that a one-month delay in implementation will reduce the power of the RCT and SWCT by 20% and 49%, respectively. Interpretation Spatiotemporal variation in infection risk undermines the SWCT's statistical power. This variation also undercuts the SWCT's expected ethical advantages over the RCT, because the latter but not the former can prioritize high-risk clusters. Funding US National Institutes of Health, US National Science Foundation, Canadian Institutes of Health Research PMID:25886798

  9. 78 FR 49444 - Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of a Supplement to an Environmental Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-14

    ... in the Federal Register (77 FR 49409-49410, Docket No. APHIS-2012-0052) a notice \\1\\ announcing the... presented in an appendix to the EA. On June 5, 2013, we published in the Federal Register (78 FR 33798... relative to an oral rabies vaccination field trial in New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Vermont, ] and...

  10. 78 FR 33798 - Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of a Supplemental Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-05

    ..., including National Forest System lands. On July 9, 2012, we published in the Federal Register (77 FR 40322... 16, 2012 (77 FR 49409- 49410, Docket No. APHIS-2012-0052). The field trial began in August 2012... whether the wildlife rabies vaccine will produce sufficient levels of population immunity against...

  11. 77 FR 40322 - Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of an Environmental Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ... raccoon (eastern States), coyote (Texas), and gray fox (Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona) rabies virus variants to new areas. While this vaccine has proven to be orally effective in raccoons, coyotes, and foxes..., skunks, foxes, and coyotes. The proposed field trial would take place within approximately 10,483...

  12. 76 FR 56731 - Oral Rabies Vaccine Trial; Availability of an Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-14

    ...We are advising the public that an environmental assessment and finding of no significant impact have been prepared by the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service relative to an oral rabies vaccination field trial in West Virginia. Based on its finding of no significant impact, the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service has determined that an environmental impact statement need not be......

  13. Enrollment in YFV Vaccine Trial: An Evaluation of Recruitment Outcomes Associated with a Randomized Controlled Double-Blind Trial of a Live Attenuated Yellow Fever Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Frew, Paula M; Shapiro, Eve T; Lu, Lu; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Keyserling, Harry L; Mulligan, Mark J

    2013-04-15

    This investigation evaluated several factors associated with diverse participant enrollment of a clinical trial assessing safety, immunogenicity, and comparative viremia associated with administration of 17-D live, attenuated yellow fever vaccine given alone or in combination with human immune globulin. We obtained baseline participant information (e.g., sociodemographic, medical) and followed recruitment outcomes from 2005 to 2007. Of 355 potential Yellow Fever vaccine study participants, 231 cases were analyzed. Strong interest in study participation was observed among racial and ethnically diverse persons with 36.34% eligible following initial study screening, resulting in 18.75% enrollment. The percentage of white participants increased from 63.66% (prescreened sample) to 81.25% (enrollment group). The regression model was significant with white race as a predictor of enrollment (OR=2.744, 95% CI=1.415-5.320, p=0.003).In addition, persons were more likely to enroll via direct outreach and referral mechanisms compared to mass advertising (OR=2.433, 95% CI=1.102-5.369). The findings indicate that racially diverse populations can be recruited to vaccine clinical trials, yet actual enrollment may not reflect that diversity. PMID:25221781

  14. Comprehensive Sieve Analysis of Breakthrough HIV-1 Sequences in the RV144 Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Edlefsen, Paul T.; Rolland, Morgane; Hertz, Tomer; Tovanabutra, Sodsai; Gartland, Andrew J.; deCamp, Allan C.; Magaret, Craig A.; Ahmed, Hasan; Gottardo, Raphael; Juraska, Michal; McCoy, Connor; Larsen, Brendan B.; Sanders-Buell, Eric; Carrico, Chris; Menis, Sergey; Bose, Meera; Arroyo, Miguel A.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L.; Kirys, Tatsiana; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Kwong, Peter D.; Scheffler, Konrad; Pond, Sergei L. Kosakovsky; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Michael, Nelson L.; Schief, William R.; Mullins, James I.; Kim, Jerome H.; Gilbert, Peter B.

    2015-01-01

    The RV144 clinical trial showed the partial efficacy of a vaccine regimen with an estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) of 31% for protecting low-risk Thai volunteers against acquisition of HIV-1. The impact of vaccine-induced immune responses can be investigated through sieve analysis of HIV-1 breakthrough infections (infected vaccine and placebo recipients). A V1/V2-targeted comparison of the genomes of HIV-1 breakthrough viruses identified two V2 amino acid sites that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Here we extended the V1/V2 analysis to the entire HIV-1 genome using an array of methods based on individual sites, k-mers and genes/proteins. We identified 56 amino acid sites or “signatures” and 119 k-mers that differed between the vaccine and placebo groups. Of those, 19 sites and 38 k-mers were located in the regions comprising the RV144 vaccine (Env-gp120, Gag, and Pro). The nine signature sites in Env-gp120 were significantly enriched for known antibody-associated sites (p = 0.0021). In particular, site 317 in the third variable loop (V3) overlapped with a hotspot of antibody recognition, and sites 369 and 424 were linked to CD4 binding site neutralization. The identified signature sites significantly covaried with other sites across the genome (mean = 32.1) more than did non-signature sites (mean = 0.9) (p < 0.0001), suggesting functional and/or structural relevance of the signature sites. Since signature sites were not preferentially restricted to the vaccine immunogens and because most of the associations were insignificant following correction for multiple testing, we predict that few of the genetic differences are strongly linked to the RV144 vaccine-induced immune pressure. In addition to presenting results of the first complete-genome analysis of the breakthrough infections in the RV144 trial, this work describes a set of statistical methods and tools applicable to analysis of breakthrough infection genomes in general vaccine efficacy

  15. HIV prevention responsibilities in HIV vaccine trials: complexities facing South African researchers.

    PubMed

    Essack, Zaynab; Slack, Catherine; Koen, Jennifer; Gray, Glenda

    2010-01-01

    Researchers should protect the welfare of research participants through providing methods to reduce their risk of acquiring HIV. This is especially important given that late-phase HIV vaccine trials enrol HIV-uninfected trial volunteers from high-risk populations. Current ethical guidelines may be difficult for stakeholders to implement, and we know very little about what prevention services researchers are currently providing to participants or their successes, best practices and challenges. We recommend that current normative guidance be systematically reviewed and actual practice at vaccine sites be documented. Adding new tools to the current package of prevention services will involve complex decision making with few set standards, and regulatory and scientific challenges. We recommend that stakeholders (including regulators) convene to consider standards of evidence for new tools, and that decision-making processes be explicitly documented and researched. A further critical ethical task is exploring the threshold at which adding new tools will compromise the validity of trial results. PMID:20429488

  16. Characteristics of a cluster-randomized phase IV human papillomavirus vaccination effectiveness trial.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Matti; Apter, Dan; Baussano, Iacopo; Eriksson, Tiina; Natunen, Kari; Paavonen, Jorma; Vänskä, Simopekka; Bi, Dan; David, Marie-Pierre; Datta, Sanjoy; Struyf, Frank; Jenkins, David; Pukkala, Eero; Garnett, Geoff; Dubin, Gary

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPV) cause anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. HPV-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine formulated with an AS04 adjuvant is very efficacious against hrHPV associated precancers but the herd effects of different vaccination scenarios are not known. Our cluster randomized trial (NCT00534638) assesses the overall and herd effects of vaccinating girls vs. girls and boys. In two school-years (2007-2008 and 2008-2009) we invited 80,272 1992-1995 born early adolescents to a CRT in 33 communities a priori stratified by low, intermediate and high HPV-16/18 seroprevalence. In 11 Arm A communities 90% of participating girls and boys were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine, in 11 Arm B communities 90% of girls were assigned to receive HPV-16/18 vaccine - boys were assigned to receive hepatitis B-virus (HBV) vaccine, and in 11 Arm C communities all were assigned to receive HBV-vaccine. Prevalence of HPV in vaccinated and unvaccinated girls is studied at age 18.5 years. Recruitment resulted in equal enrolment of four birth cohorts (born 1992-1995) comprising altogether 32,175 (40% response) early adolescents: 20,514 girls (50.5-53.0% response by arm) and 11,661 boys (21.9-31.6%% response by arm). At the age of 15 years, 79.3% of the vaccinees completed a questionnaire. Among them >98% were living at, and during the week-ends 1.3-1.6% stayed outside, the study site communities. Smoking habit and alcohol consumption were similar in the different trial arms, also mean-age of menarche (12.4 years) and 1st ejaculation (12.6 years), and sexual behaviour (among those <25%, who had had sexual debut) did not differ by arm: mean-age at the sexual debut 14.3 and 14.4 in girls and boys, and proportions of those with multiple (≥5) life-time sexual partners (6.5-7.5%) at the age of 15 years. Uniform residential, life-style and sexual behaviour characteristics indicate successful randomization/enrolment of the CRT. Our CRT will verify modelled

  17. Heterologous Prime-Boost HIV-1 Vaccination Regimens in Pre-Clinical and Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Scott A.; Surman, Sherri L.; Sealy, Robert; Jones, Bart G.; Slobod, Karen S.; Branum, Kristen; Lockey, Timothy D.; Howlett, Nanna; Freiden, Pamela; Flynn, Patricia; Hurwitz, Julia L.

    2010-01-01

    Currently, there are more than 30 million people infected with HIV-1 and thousands more are infected each day. Vaccination is the single most effective mechanism for prevention of viral disease, and after more than 25 years of research, one vaccine has shown somewhat encouraging results in an advanced clinical efficacy trial. A modified intent-to-treat analysis of trial results showed that infection was approximately 30% lower in the vaccine group compared to the placebo group. The vaccine was administered using a heterologous prime-boost regimen in which both target antigens and delivery vehicles were changed during the course of inoculations. Here we examine the complexity of heterologous prime-boost immunizations. We show that the use of different delivery vehicles in prime and boost inoculations can help to avert the inhibitory effects caused by vector-specific immune responses. We also show that the introduction of new antigens into boost inoculations can be advantageous, demonstrating that the effect of ‘original antigenic sin’ is not absolute. Pre-clinical and clinical studies are reviewed, including our own work with a three-vector vaccination regimen using recombinant DNA, virus (Sendai virus or vaccinia virus) and protein. Promising preliminary results suggest that the heterologous prime-boost strategy may possibly provide a foundation for the future prevention of HIV-1 infections in humans. PMID:20407589

  18. FCGR2C polymorphisms associate with HIV-1 vaccine protection in RV144 trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shuying S.; Gilbert, Peter B.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Kijak, Gustavo; Ferrari, Guido; Thomas, Rasmi; Pyo, Chul-Woo; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Montefiori, David; Liao, Hua-Xin; Nabel, Gary; Pinter, Abraham; Evans, David T.; Gottardo, Raphael; Dai, James Y.; Janes, Holly; Morris, Daryl; Fong, Youyi; Edlefsen, Paul T.; Li, Fusheng; Frahm, Nicole; Alpert, Michael D.; Prentice, Heather; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Robb, Merlin L.; O’Connell, Robert J.; Haynes, Barton F.; Michael, Nelson L.; Kim, Jerome H.; McElrath, M. Juliana; Geraghty, Daniel E.

    2014-01-01

    The phase III RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial estimated vaccine efficacy (VE) to be 31.2%. This trial demonstrated that the presence of HIV-1–specific IgG-binding Abs to envelope (Env) V1V2 inversely correlated with infection risk, while the presence of Env-specific plasma IgA Abs directly correlated with risk of HIV-1 infection. Moreover, Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses inversely correlated with risk of infection in vaccine recipients with low IgA; therefore, we hypothesized that vaccine-induced Fc receptor–mediated (FcR-mediated) Ab function is indicative of vaccine protection. We sequenced exons and surrounding areas of FcR-encoding genes and found one FCGR2C tag SNP (rs114945036) that associated with VE against HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE, with lysine at position 169 (169K) in the V2 loop (CRF01_AE 169K). Individuals carrying CC in this SNP had an estimated VE of 15%, while individuals carrying CT or TT exhibited a VE of 91%. Furthermore, the rs114945036 SNP was highly associated with 3 other FCGR2C SNPs (rs138747765, rs78603008, and rs373013207). Env-specific IgG and IgG3 Abs, IgG avidity, and neutralizing Abs inversely correlated with CRF01_AE 169K HIV-1 infection risk in the CT- or TT-carrying vaccine recipients only. These data suggest a potent role of Fc-γ receptors and Fc-mediated Ab function in conferring protection from transmission risk in the RV144 VE trial. PMID:25105367

  19. Immune Responses to Single-Dose Versus Double-Dose Hepatitis B Vaccines in Healthcare Workers not Responding to the Primary Vaccine Series: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Joukar, Farahnaz; Mansour-Ghanaei, Fariborz; Naghipour, Mohammad-Reza; Asgharnezhad, Mehrnaz

    2016-01-01

    Background Recommendations to immunize healthcare workers (HCWs) against hepatitis B are well known. However, a proportion of individuals do not respond to the primary standard three-dose HB vaccination schedule. Objectives The current study aimed to evaluate whether a double-dose HB booster vaccine could induce better protective anti-HB titers than a single-dose booster in non-protected HCWs. Materials and Methods This was a randomized clinical trial. A total of 91 HCWs not responding to the primary vaccine series in 2014 were enrolled. The participants were randomized into two groups that received a double dose of the HB vaccine containing 40 µg of antigen or a single dose of the HB vaccine containing 20 µg of antigen in three doses (at zero, one and six months after vaccination). Blood samples were collected before vaccinations and 28 days after the third dose to assess the seroconversion rate, according to the anti-HB antibody titer threshold of > 10 mIU/mL. Results The seroconversion rates were 93.2% and 87.2% after the first booster doses of the double-dose and single-dose HB vaccines, respectively (P = 0.64). In the double-dose HB vaccine group, the seroconversion rate was 97.8% compared with 89.6% in the single-dose group following the second vaccine dose (P = 0.83). All of the participants in both groups were seroprotected after the third HB vaccine dose. Conclusions Both the single- and double-dose HB vaccines were adequately immunogenic, and the double-dose HB vaccine was not significantly more immunogenic than the single-dose vaccine in terms of the seroconversion rates of HCWs who had not responded to the primary vaccine series. PMID:27148385

  20. Phase I clinical trial of multiple-peptide vaccination for patients with advanced biliary tract cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with advanced biliary tract cancer (BTC) is extremely poor and only a few standard treatments are available for this condition. We performed a phase I trial to investigate the safety, immune response and anti-tumor effect of vaccination with three peptides derived from cancer-testis antigens. Methods This study was conducted as a phase I trial. Nine patients with advanced BTC who had unresectable tumors and were refractory to standard chemotherapy were enrolled. Three HLA-A*2402 restricted epitope peptides-cell division cycle associated 1 (CDCA1), cadherin 3 (CDH3) and kinesin family member 20A (KIF20A)-were administered subcutaneously, and the adverse events and immune response were assessed. The clinical effects observed were the tumor response, progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results The three-peptide vaccination was well-tolerated up to a dose of 3 mg per peptide (9 mg total). No grade 3 or 4 adverse events were observed after vaccination. Peptide-specific T cell immune responses were observed in all patients and stable disease was observed in 5 of 9 patients. The median PFS and OS were 3.4 and 9.7 months. The Grade 2 injection site reaction and continuous vaccination after PD judgment appeared to be prognostic of OS. Conclusions Multiple-peptide vaccination was well tolerated and induced peptide-specific T-cell responses. Trial registration This study was registered with the University Hospital Medical Information Network Clinical Trials Registry (UMIN-CTR000003229). PMID:24606884

  1. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available. African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need. However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained. PMID:23496910

  2. Experience and challenges from clinical trials with malaria vaccines in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mwangoka, Grace; Ogutu, Bernhards; Msambichaka, Beverly; Mzee, Tutu; Salim, Nahya; Kafuruki, Shubis; Mpina, Maxmillian; Shekalaghe, Seif; Tanner, Marcel; Abdulla, Salim

    2013-01-01

    Malaria vaccines are considered amongst the most important modalities for potential elimination of malaria disease and transmission. Research and development in this field has been an area of intense effort by many groups over the last few decades. Despite this, there is currently no licensed malaria vaccine. Researchers, clinical trialists and vaccine developers have been working on many approached to make malaria vaccine available.African research institutions have developed and demonstrated a great capacity to undertake clinical trials in accordance to the International Conference on Harmonization-Good Clinical Practice (ICH-GCP) standards in the last decade; particularly in the field of malaria vaccines and anti-malarial drugs. This capacity is a result of networking among African scientists in collaboration with other partners; this has traversed both clinical trials and malaria control programmes as part of the Global Malaria Action Plan (GMAP). GMAP outlined and support global strategies toward the elimination and eradication of malaria in many areas, translating in reduction in public health burden, especially for African children. In the sub-Saharan region the capacity to undertake more clinical trials remains small in comparison to the actual need.However, sustainability of the already developed capacity is essential and crucial for the evaluation of different interventions and diagnostic tools/strategies for other diseases like TB, HIV, neglected tropical diseases and non-communicable diseases. There is urgent need for innovative mechanisms for the sustainability and expansion of the capacity in clinical trials in sub-Saharan Africa as the catalyst for health improvement and maintained. PMID:23496910

  3. Schistosomes: the road from host-parasite interactions to vaccines in clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Capron, André; Riveau, Gilles; Capron, Monique; Trottein, François

    2005-03-01

    Insights over recent years into the interactions between helminths, including schistosomes, and the immune system have generated new concepts in immunology and significant advances in vaccine strategies. Here, we report recent advances that substantially increase our understanding of the nature of the host innate and adaptive responses to schistosomes and on strategies elaborated by the parasite to manipulate such responses. We also describe the long road that has allowed us to move from the identification of an anti-schistosome vaccine candidate, a 28kDa glutathione-S-transferase, to its recent evaluation in human clinical trials. PMID:15734662

  4. Escherichia coli O157:H7 vaccine field trial in 9 feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Abstract A feedlot trial was conducted to assess the efficacy of an Escherichia coli O157:H7 vaccine in reducing fecal shedding of E. coli O157:H7 in 218 pens of feedlot cattle in 9 feedlots in Alberta and Saskatchewan. Pens of cattle were vaccinated once at arrival processing and again at reimplanting with either the E. coli O157:H7 vaccine or a placebo. The E. coli O157:H7 vaccine included 50 μg of type III secreted proteins. Fecal samples were collected from 30 fresh manure patties within each feedlot pen at arrival processing, revaccination at reimplanting, and within 2 wk of slaughter. The mean pen prevalence of E. coli O157:H7 in feces was 5.0%; ranging in pens from 0% to 90%, and varying signif icantly (P < 0.001) among feedlots. There was no signif icant association (P > 0.20) between vaccination and pen prevalence of fecal E. coli O157:H7 following initial vaccination, at reimplanting, or prior to slaughter. PMID:16187717

  5. Effect of bivalent human papillomavirus vaccination on pregnancy outcomes: long term observational follow-up in the Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Befano, Brian L; Gonzalez, Paula; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Herrero, Rolando; Schiller, John T; Kreimer, Aimée R; Schiffman, Mark; Hildesheim, Allan; Wilcox, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine on miscarriage. Design Observational long term follow-up of a randomized, double blinded trial combined with an independent unvaccinated population based cohort. Setting Single center study in Costa Rica. Participants 7466 women in the trial and 2836 women in the unvaccinated cohort enrolled at the end of the randomized trial and in parallel with the observational trial component. Intervention Women in the trial were assigned to receive three doses of bivalent HPV vaccine (n=3727) or the control hepatitis A vaccine (n=3739). Crossover bivalent HPV vaccination occurred in the hepatitis A vaccine arm at the end of the trial. Women in the unvaccinated cohort received (n=2836) no vaccination. Main outcome measure Risk of miscarriage, defined by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as fetal loss within 20 weeks of gestation, in pregnancies exposed to bivalent HPV vaccination in less than 90 days and any time from vaccination compared with pregnancies exposed to hepatitis A vaccine and pregnancies in the unvaccinated cohort. Results Of 3394 pregnancies conceived at any time since bivalent HPV vaccination, 381 pregnancies were conceived less than 90 days from vaccination. Unexposed pregnancies comprised 2507 pregnancies conceived after hepatitis A vaccination and 720 conceived in the unvaccinated cohort. Miscarriages occurred in 451 (13.3%) of all exposed pregnancies, in 50 (13.1%) of the pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from bivalent HPV vaccination, and in 414 (12.8%) of the unexposed pregnancies, of which 316 (12.6%) were in the hepatitis A vaccine group and 98 (13.6%) in the unvaccinated cohort. The relative risk of miscarriage for pregnancies conceived less than 90 days from vaccination compared with all unexposed pregnancies was 1.02 (95% confidence interval 0.78 to 1.34, one sided P=0.436) in unadjusted analyses. Results were similar after adjusting for age at

  6. HIV Susceptibility of human antigen-specific CD4 T cells in AIDS pathogenesis and vaccine response.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haitao; Liu, Fengliang; Kim, Jerome; Ratto-Kim, Silvia

    2016-06-01

    HIV causes infection and progressive depletion of human CD4 T cells. Emerging data have shown that antigen-specific CD4 T-cell subsets manifest differential susceptibility to HIV, potentially leading to pathogen-specific immune failure and opportunistic infections. This concept was recently explored in context of vectors utilized in HIV vaccine trials, and the data suggest that adenovirus type 5(Ad5)-specific CD4 T cells elicited by Ad5-HIV vaccine may be particularly susceptible to HIV, potentially rendering Ad5 vaccine recipients susceptible to HIV acquisition. We here examined recent data regarding the HIV susceptibility of antigen-specific CD4 T cells induced during infection or HIV vaccination and discussed its potential impact on HIV acquisition risk posed by HIV vaccination. PMID:26814372

  7. Phase II Trial of Imatinib in AIDS-Associated Kaposi's Sarcoma: AIDS Malignancy Consortium Protocol 042

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Henry B.; Krown, Susan E.; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Honda, Kord; Rapisuwon, Suthee; Wang, Zhenghe; Aboulafia, David; Reid, Erin G.; Rudek, Michelle A.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Noy, Ariela

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) is a disease of multifocal vascular proliferation that requires infection with KS herpes virus (KSHV/HHV-8). Activation of the c-kit and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptors by autocrine/paracrine mechanisms follows endothelial cell KSHV infection. In a pilot study, imatinib, a c-kit/PDGF-receptor inhibitor, induced partial regression of AIDS-associated KS (AIDS-KS) in five of 10 patients. Patients and Methods This multicenter phase II study was designed to estimate the response rate to imatinib in AIDS-KS. Secondary objectives included investigation of predictors of response and imatinib pharmacokinetics in patients on antiretrovirals. Patients received imatinib 400 mg/day by mouth for up to 12 months with dose escalation up to 600 mg/day at 3 months if their disease was stable. Results Thirty patients were treated at 12 AIDS Malignancy Consortium sites. Ten patients (33.3%) achieved partial response, six (20%) had stable disease, and seven (23.3%) exhibited KS progression. Nine patients completed 52 weeks of imatinib therapy. The median treatment duration was 22.5 weeks. Only five patients (16.7%) discontinued therapy owing to adverse events. Antiretroviral regimens did not significantly alter imatinib metabolism. Activating mutations in PDGF-R and c-kit were not found at baseline or at disease progression. We found no correlation with response with changes in any of the candidate cytokines. Conclusion Imatinib has activity in AIDS-KS. Pharmacokinetic interactions with antiretroviral drugs did not correlate with toxicity. Thirty percent of patients showed long-term clinical benefit and remained on imatinib for the entire year. These results suggest imatinib is well tolerated and may be an alternative therapy for some patients with AIDS-KS. PMID:24378417

  8. Predictors of Medication Adherence in an AIDS Clinical Trial: Patient and Clinician Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents data from an AIDS clinical trial that evaluated 238 (60 percent nonwhite) patients infected with HIV and their clinician's perceptions of medication adherence and visit attendance in relationship to lifestyle, psychosocial, and health belief model (HBM) variables. Twelve sites collected data via a prospective, multisite…

  9. Randomized, Controlled Trial of a 13-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Administered Concomitantly with an Influenza Vaccine in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gurtman, Alejandra; Rubino, John; Smith, William; van Cleeff, Martin; Jayawardene, Deepthi; Giardina, Peter C.; Emini, Emilio A.; Gruber, William C.; Scott, Daniel A.; Schmöle-Thoma, Beate

    2012-01-01

    A randomized, double-blind, phase 3 trial evaluated the immunogenicity, safety, and tolerability of a 13-valent pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV13) coadministered with trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV) in pneumococcal vaccine-naive adults. Participants ages 50 to 59 years (n = 1,116) received TIV with PCV13 (group 1) or placebo (group 2) (1:1 randomization); 1 month later, group 1 received placebo and group 2 received PCV13. A hemagglutination inhibition (HAI) assay for TIV and a standardized enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for pneumococcal serotype-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) were performed and opsonophagocytic activity (OPA) titers (assessed post hoc) were measured at baseline and 1 and 2 months postvaccination. The rises in HAI assay geometric mean titer (GMT) and percentage of participants in groups 1 and 2 with ≥4-fold increases in HAI responses (A/H1N1, 84.0% and 81.2%, respectively; A/H3N2, 71.1% and 69.5%, respectively; and B, 60.6% and 60.3%, respectively) were similar. In group 1, all serotypes met the predefined IgG geometric mean concentration (GMC) ratio noninferiority criterion relative to group 2, but GMCs were lower in group 1 than group 2. When comparing group 1 with group 2, 5 serotypes did not meet the OPA GMT ratio noninferiority criterion, and OPA GMTs were significantly lower for 10 serotypes. PCV13 injection site reactions were similar and mostly mild in both groups. Systemic events were more frequent in group 1 (86.2%) than group 2 (76.7%; P < 0.001); no vaccine-related serious adverse events occurred. Coadministration of PCV13 and TIV was well tolerated but associated with lower PCV13 antibody responses and is of unknown clinical significance. Given the positive immunologic attributes of PCV13, concomitant administration with TIV should be dictated by clinical circumstances. PMID:22739693

  10. Vaccine for Cocaine Dependence: A Randomized Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kosten, Thomas R.; Domingo, Coreen B.; Shorter, Daryl; Orson, Frank; Green, Charles; Somoza, Eugene; Sekerka, Rachelle; Levin, Frances R.; Mariani, John J.; Stitzer, Maxine; Tompkins, D. Andrew; Rotrosen, John; Thakkar, Vatsal; Smoak, Benjamin; Kampman, Kyle

    2014-01-01

    Aims We evaluated the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of succinylnorcocaine conjugated to cholera toxin B protein as a vaccine for cocaine dependence. Methods This 6-site, 24 week Phase III randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial assessed efficacy during weeks 8 to 16. We measured urine cocaine metabolites thrice weekly as the main outcome. Results The 300 subjects (76% male, 72% African-American, mean age 46 years) had smoked cocaine on average for 13 days monthly at baseline. We hypothesized that retention might be better and positive urines lower for subjects with anti-cocaine IgG levels of ≥ 42 μg/mL (high IgG), which was attained by 67% of the 130 vaccine subjects receiving five vaccinations. Almost 3-times fewer high than low IgG subjects dropped out (7% vs 20%). Although for the full 16 weeks cocaine positive urine rates showed no significant difference between the three groups (placebo, high, low IgG), after week 8, more vaccinated than placebo subjects attained abstinence for at least two weeks of the trial (24% vs 18%), and the high IgG group had the most cocaine-free urines for the last 2 weeks of treatment (OR=3.02), but neither were significant. Injection site reactions of induration and tenderness differed between placebo and active vaccine, and the 29 serious adverse events did not lead to treatment related withdrawals, or deaths. Conclusions The vaccine was safe, but it only partially replicated the efficacy found in the previous study based on retention and attaining abstinence. PMID:24793366

  11. Cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of cancer vaccination trials registered on the US Clinical Trials Database demonstrates paucity of immunological trial endpoints and decline in registration since 2008

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Liangjian; Yan, Haixi; Shyam-Sundar, Vijay; Janowitz, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Cancer vaccination has been researched as a means of treating and preventing cancer, but successful translational efforts yielding clinical therapeutics have been limited. Numerous reasons have been offered in explanation, pertaining both to the vaccine formulation, and the clinical trial methodology used. This study aims to characterize the tumor vaccine clinical trial landscape quantitatively, and explore the possible validity of the offered explanations including the translational obstacles posed by the current common endpoints. Methods We performed a detailed cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis of tumor vaccine trials (n=955) registered in the US Clinical Trials database. Results The number of tumor vaccine trials initiated per annum has declined 30% since a peak in 2008. In terms of vaccine formulation, 25% of trials use tumor cell/lysate preparations; whereas, 73% of trials vaccinate subjects against defined protein/peptide antigens. Also, 68% of trials do not use vectors for antigen delivery. Both these characteristics of tumor vaccines have remained unchanged since 1996. The top five types of cancer studied are: melanoma (22.6%); cervical cancer (13.0%); breast cancer (11.3%); lung cancer (9.5%); and prostate cancer (9.4%). In addition, 86% of the trials are performed where there is established disease rather than prophylactically, of which 67% are performed exclusively in the adjuvant setting. Also, 42% of Phase II trials do not measure any survival-related endpoint, and only 23% of Phase III trials assess the immune response to vaccination. Conclusion The clinical trial effort in tumor vaccination is declining, necessitating a greater urgency in identifying and removing the obstacles to clinical translation. These obstacles may include: 1) vaccination against a small range of antigens; 2) naked delivery of antigen; 3) investigation of less immunogenic cancer types; and 4) investigation in the setting of established disease. In addition

  12. Exploring Barriers and Facilitators to Participation of Male-To-Female Transgender Persons in Preventive HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ro; Mooney, Jessica; Broder, Gail; Bolton, Marcus; Votto, Teress; Davis-Vogel, Annet

    2013-01-01

    Observed seroincidence and prevalence rates in male to female (MTF) transgender individuals highlight the need for effective targeted HIV prevention strategies for this community. In order to develop an effective vaccine that can be used by transgender women, researchers must understand and address existing structural issues that present barriers to this group’s participation in HIV vaccine clinical trials. Overcoming barriers to participation is important for ensuring HIV vaccine acceptability and efficacy for the MTF transgender community. To explore barriers and facilitators to MTF transgender participation in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials, the HIV Vaccine Trials Network (HVTN) conducted focus groups among transgender women in four urban areas (Atlanta, Boston, Philadelphia and San Francisco). Barriers and facilitators to engagement of transgender women in preventive HIV vaccine clinical trials led to the following recommendations: (1) transgender cultural competency training; (2) creating trans-friendly environments; (3) true partnerships with local trans-friendly organizations and health care providers; (4) protocols that focus on transgender specific issues; and (5) data collection and tracking of transgender individuals. These results have implications for the conduct of HIV vaccine trials, as well as engagement of transgender women in research programs in general. PMID:23446435

  13. Effect of Antihelminthic Treatment on Vaccine Immunogenicity to a Seasonal Influenza Vaccine in Primary School Children in Gabon: A Randomized Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Brückner, Sina; Agnandji, Selidji T.; Berberich, Stefan; Bache, Emmanuel; Fernandes, José F.; Schweiger, Brunhilde; Massinga Loembe, Marguerite; Engleitner, Thomas; Lell, Bertrand; Mordmüller, Benjamin; Adegnika, Ayola A.; Yazdanbakhsh, Maria; Kremsner, Peter G.; Esen, Meral

    2015-01-01

    Background Helminth infections are a major public health problem, especially in the tropics. Infected individuals have an altered immune response with evidence that antibody response to vaccination is impaired. Hence, treatment of helminth infections before vaccination may be a simple intervention to improve vaccine immunogenicity. In the present study we investigated whether a single-dose antihelminthic treatment influences antibody responses to a seasonal influenza vaccine in primary school children living in Gabon, Central Africa. Methods In this placebo-controlled double-blind trial conducted in Gabon the effect of a single-dose antihelminthic treatment with 400 mg albendazole versus a placebo one month prior to immunization with a seasonal influenza vaccine was investigated. Antiviral antibody titers against all three vaccine strains were assessed by haemagglutination inhibition (HI) test at baseline (Day 0; vaccination) and four weeks (Day 28) as well as 12 weeks (Day 84) following vaccination. Vaccine-specific memory B-cell response was measured at Day 0 and Day 84 by vaccine-specific Enzyme-linked Immunospot (ELISpot) assay. The trial is registered with the Pan African Clinical Trials Registry (PACTR) (PACTR201303000434188). Results 98 school children aged 6–10 years were randomly allocated to receive either antihelminthic treatment or placebo and were vaccinated one month after the treatment. The prevalence of helminths at baseline was 21%. Vaccine-specific HI titers against at least one of the three vaccine strains increased at Day 28 and Day 84 in all participants. HI titers against both influenza A strains as well as memory B-cell response were modestly higher in the antihelminthic treated group compared to the placebo group but the difference was not statistically significant. Total but not specific IgA was elevated in the antihelminthic treated group compared to the control group at Day 28. Conclusion In our setting antihelminthic treatment had no

  14. Willingness to participate in HIV vaccine trials among a sample of men who have sex with men, with and without a history of commercial sex, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Souza, C T; Lowndes, C M; Szwarcwald, C Landman; Sutmöller, F; Bastos, F I

    2003-08-01

    The study objective was to assess willingness of men who have sex with men (MSM) enrolled in a vaccine preparedness study ('Projeto Rio') to participate in phase III anti-HIV/AIDS vaccine trials. Overall, 57% of Projeto Rio participants stated they would participate in a putative vaccine trial. MSM who reported commercial sex work were significantly (p < 0.05) more likely to engage in risky behaviours than others. In bivariate analysis, commercial sex workers (CSWs) were significantly (p < 0.05) more likely than non-commercial sex workers (NCSWs) to be willing to participate in vaccine trials (62.6% versus 51.4%). Among those willing, CSWs reported significantly more often (p < 0.05) (50.5%) than NCSWs (38.0%) that they would enroll to protect themselves from HIV. In multivariate analyses, variables associated with willingness to participate (WTP) were lower educational level, positive serology for syphilis, and 'engagement, under the influence of alcohol, in risky sexual practices that would normally be avoided', but not commercial sex work. The potential enrollment in vaccine trials of MSM CWSs, as well as participants of low socio-economic status and high risk, seems thus to be possible. PMID:14509868

  15. Community Perspectives Associated With the African PsA-TT (MenAfriVac) Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Idoko, Olubukola T.; Diallo, Aldiouma; Sow, Samba O.; Hodgson, Abraham; Akinsola, Adebayo; Diarra, Bou; Haidara, Fadima Cheick; Ansah, Patrick Odum; Kampmann, Beate; Bouma, Enricke; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Enwere, Godwin C.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The Meningitis Vaccine Project (MVP) was established to address epidemic meningitis as a public health problem in sub-Saharan Africa and, to that end, worked to develop a group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT. Methods. Experiences in 4 clinical trial sites are described. Culturally sensitive collaborative strategies were adopted to manage acceptable communication methods, peculiarities with the consent process, participant medical issues, community care, and death. Results. The clinical trials were completed successfully through community acceptance and active community collaboration. The trials also strengthened the capacities in the participating communities, and actively worked to resolve community problems. Conclusions. The understanding and integration of sociocultural realities of communities were major assets in the conduct and acceptance of these trials. MVP succeeded in these sites and provided a sound example for future clinical studies in Africa. Clinical Trials Registration. ISRTCN78147026 (PsA-TT 002); ISRCTN87739946 (PsA-TT 003); ISRCTN82484612 (PsA-TT 004); PACTR ATMR2010030001913177 (PsA-TT 006); and PACTR201110000328305 (PsA-TT 007). PMID:26553669

  16. Pilot Field Trial of the EG95 Vaccine Against Ovine Cystic Echinococcosis in Rio Negro, Argentina: Second Study of Impact

    PubMed Central

    Larrieu, Edmundo; Mujica, Guillermo; Gauci, Charles G.; Vizcaychipi, Katherina; Seleiman, Marcos; Herrero, Eduardo; Labanchi, José Luis; Araya, Daniel; Sepúlveda, Luis; Grizmado, Claudia; Calabro, Arnoldo; Talmon, Gabriel; Poggio, Thelma Verónica; Crowley, Pablo; Cespedes, Graciela; Santillán, Graciela; García Cachau, Mariela; Lamberti, Roberto; Gino, Lilia; Donadeu, Meritxell; Lightowlers, Marshall W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) is an important zoonotic disease caused by the cestode parasite Echinococcus granulosus. It occurs in many parts of the world where pastoral activities predominate, including the Rio Negro province of Argentina. Although CE control activities have been undertaken in the western regions of Rio Negro for more than two decades, the disease continues to remain prevalent in both the human and livestock animal populations. Vaccination of animal intermediate hosts of CE with the EG95 vaccine may provide a new opportunity to improve the effectiveness of CE control measures, although data are lacking about field application of the vaccine. Aims Evaluate the impact of EG95 vaccination in sheep on the transmission of Echinococcus granulosus in a field environment. Methodology Two trial sites were established in western Rio Negro province within indigenous communities. Vaccination of lambs born into one trial site was introduced and continued for 6 years. Prior to initiation of the trial, and at the end of the trial, the prevalence of CE in sheep was determined by necropsy. Weaned lambs received two injections of EG95 vaccine, approximately one month apart, and a single booster injection one year later. Vaccination was not implemented at the second trial site. A total of 2725 animals were vaccinated in the first year. Animals from this cohort as well as age-matched sheep from the control area were evaluated by necropsy. Key results Introduction of the vaccine led to a statistically significant in the number and size of hydatid cysts in comparison to the situation prior to the introduction of the vaccine, or compared to CE prevalence in the control area where the vaccine was not applied. The prevalence of infection in the vaccinated area was also significantly reduced by 62% compared to the re-intervention level, being lower than the prevalence seen in the control area, although the difference from the control area after the intervention

  17. Youth-Specific Considerations in the Development of PrEP, Microbicide and Vaccine Research Trials

    PubMed Central

    Rudy, Bret J.; Kapogiannis, Bill G.; Lally, Michelle A.; Gray, Glenda E; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Krogstad, Paul; McGowan, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Preventing HIV infection in adolescents and young adults will require a multimodal, targeted approach including individual-directed behavioral risk reduction, community-level structural change, and biomedical interventions to prevent sexual transmission. Trials testing biomedical interventions to prevent HIV transmission will require special attention in this population due to the unique psychosocial as well as physiologic characteristics that differentiate them from older populations. For example, microbicide research will need to consider acceptability, dosing requirements, and co-infection rates that are unique to this population. Pre-exposure prophylaxis studies also will need to consider potential unique psychosocial issues such as sexual disinhibition and acceptability as well as unique pharmacokinetic parameters of antiretroviral agents. Vaccine trials also face unique issues with this population, including attitudes towards vaccines, risks related to false-positive HIV tests related to vaccine, and different immune responses based on more robust immunity. In this paper, we will discuss issues around implementing each of these biomedical prevention modalities in trials among adolescents and young adults to help to guide future successful research targeting this population. PMID:20571421

  18. Reference Intervals in Healthy Adult Ugandan Blood Donors and Their Impact on Conducting International Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Leigh Anne; Eller, Michael A.; Ouma, Benson; Kataaha, Peter; Kyabaggu, Denis; Tumusiime, Richard; Wandege, Joseph; Sanya, Ronald; Sateren, Warren B.; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Kibuuka, Hannah; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; de Souza, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    Background Clinical trials are increasingly being conducted internationally. In order to ensure enrollment of healthy participants and proper safety evaluation of vaccine candidates, established reference intervals for clinical tests are required in the target population. Methodology/Principal Findings We report a reference range study conducted in Ugandan adult blood bank donors establishing reference intervals for hematology and clinical chemistry parameters. Several differences were observed when compared to previously established values from the United States, most notably in neutrophils and eosinophils. Conclusions/Significance In a recently conducted vaccine trial in Uganda, 31 percent (n = 69) of volunteers screened (n = 223) were excluded due to hematologic abnormalities. If local reference ranges had been employed, 83% of those screened out due to these abnormalities could have been included in the study, drastically reducing workload and cost associated with the screening process. In addition, toxicity tables used in vaccine and drug trial safety evaluations may need adjustment as some clinical reference ranges determined in this study overlap with grade 1 and grade 2 adverse events. PMID:19079547

  19. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  20. Kinetics and Avidity of Antibodies Evoked by Heptavalent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccines PncCRM and PncOMPC in the Finnish Otitis Media Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ekström, Nina; Åhman, Heidi; Verho, Jouko; Jokinen, Jukka; Väkeväinen, Merja; Kilpi, Terhi; Käyhty, Helena

    2005-01-01

    The licensure of new pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) relies on immunogenicity data. When defining correlates of protection, vaccine efficacy data must be included. In the FinOM Vaccine Efficacy Trial, the PncOMPC vaccine showed an efficacy profile similar to that of the licensed PncCRM vaccine despite different antibody responses after primary and booster vaccinations. We determined antibody kinetics and avidities in a subgroup of infants participating in the FinOM trial. A total of 166 infants in three vaccine groups were immunized at 2, 4, 6, and 12 months of age with 7-valent PCV, PncCRM or PncOMPC, or hepatitis B vaccine. Concentrations of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) against pneumococcal capsular polysaccharides were determined at 2, 4, 6, 7, 12, 13, and 24 months of age, and the avidity index (AI) to serotypes 6B, 19F, and 23F were determined at 7, 12, 13, and 24 months of age by enzyme immunoassay. Both PCVs were highly immunogenic, but they demonstrated different kinetics of antibody response; the concentration of IgG against serotypes 6B, 19F, and 23F declined faster after the third and fourth doses of vaccine in the PncCRM group than in the PncOMPC group. For both PCVs, the mean AI of anti-6B and -23F, but not of anti-19F, increased during the follow-up, which is in line with serotype-specific protection in the FinOM trial. Our data suggest that the kinetics and avidities of antibodies should be considered, in addition to antibody responses, when defining correlates of protection. PMID:15618174

  1. Statistical methodology for the evaluation of vaccine efficacy in a phase III multi-centre trial of the RTS,S/AS01 malaria vaccine in African children

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There has been much debate about the appropriate statistical methodology for the evaluation of malaria field studies and the challenges in interpreting data arising from these trials. Methods The present paper describes, for a pivotal phase III efficacy of the RTS, S/AS01 malaria vaccine, the methods of the statistical analysis and the rationale for their selection. The methods used to estimate efficacy of the primary course of vaccination, and of a booster dose, in preventing clinical episodes of uncomplicated and severe malaria, and to determine the duration of protection, are described. The interpretation of various measures of efficacy in terms of the potential public health impact of the vaccine is discussed. Conclusions The methodology selected to analyse the clinical trial must be scientifically sound, acceptable to regulatory authorities and meaningful to those responsible for malaria control and public health policy. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619 PMID:21816030

  2. A randomized controlled trial of analgesia during vaccination in adults.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Lord, Allison; Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Kikuta, Andrew; Yiu, Ashley; Darra, Erwin; Bruinse, Barbara; Keogh, Tom; Stephens, Derek

    2010-07-19

    Although immunization injections are the most common painful medical procedures, pain-relieving interventions are not routinely used. In this randomized controlled trial, we compared the effectiveness of topical anesthesia using liposomal lidocaine to: (1) vapocoolant spray using a proprietary blend of 1,1,1,3,3-pentafluoropropane and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane; (2) nurse-administered tactile stimulation; or (3) self-directed distraction by means of reading a magazine. Liposomal lidocaine was more effective (p

  3. A combined analysis of immunogenicity, antibody kinetics and vaccine efficacy from phase 2 trials of the RTS,S malaria vaccine

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The RTS,S malaria vaccine is currently undergoing phase 3 trials. High vaccine-induced antibody titres to the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) antigen have been associated with protection from infection and episodes of clinical malaria. Methods Using data from 5,144 participants in nine phase 2 trials, we explore predictors of vaccine immunogenicity (anti-CSP antibody titres), decay in antibody titres, and the association between antibody titres and clinical outcomes. We use empirically-observed relationships between these factors to predict vaccine efficacy in a range of scenarios. Results Vaccine-induced anti-CSP antibody titres were significantly associated with age (P = 0.04), adjuvant (P <0.001), pre-vaccination anti-hepatitis B surface antigen titres (P = 0.005) and pre-vaccination anti-CSP titres (P <0.001). Co-administration with other vaccines reduced anti-CSP antibody titres although not significantly (P = 0.095). Antibody titres showed a bi-phasic decay over time with an initial rapid decay in the first three months and a second slower decay over the next three to four years. Antibody titres were significantly associated with protection, with a titre of 51 (95% Credible Interval (CrI): 29 to 85) ELISA units/ml (EU/mL) predicted to prevent 50% of infections in children. Vaccine efficacy was predicted to decline to zero over four years in a setting with entomological inoculation rate (EIR) = 20 infectious bites per year (ibpy). Over a five-year follow-up period at an EIR = 20 ibpy, we predict RTS,S will avert 1,782 cases per 1,000 vaccinated children, 1,452 cases per 1,000 vaccinated infants, and 887 cases per 1,000 infants when co-administered with expanded programme on immunisation (EPI) vaccines. Our main study limitations include an absence of vaccine-induced cellular immune responses and short duration of follow-up in some individuals. Conclusions Vaccine-induced anti-CSP antibody titres and transmission intensity can

  4. Minorities Remain Underrepresented in HIV/AIDS Research Despite Access to Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Mancilla, Jose R.; Cohn, Susan E.; Krishnan, Supriya; Cespedes, Michelle; Floris-Moore, Michelle; Schulte, Gail; Pavlov, Gregory; Mildvan, Donna; Smith, Kimberly Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background The reasons for minority underrepresentation in HIV/AIDS clinical trials remain unclear. We aimed to evaluate the knowledge, experience and factors that influence minority participation in HIV/AIDS studies in the US. Methods An anonymous, bilingual, self-administered survey on study participation was given to HIV-infected adults attending AIDS Clinical Trials Group-affiliated clinics in the US and Puerto Rico. Chi-square tests were used to evaluate differences by race/first language/level of education. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for factors associated with being talked to about participation in a study. Results We analyzed 2,175 complete surveys (221 in Spanish). Among respondents, 31% were White, 40% black/African American (AA) and 21% Hispanic. The overall rate of previous participation in any HIV/AIDS study was 48%. Hispanics were less likely to know about studies compared to whites and AAs (67% vs. 74% and 76%; p<0.001). Compared to whites, AAs and Hispanics were less likely to have been talked to about participating in a study (76% vs. 67% and 67%; p<0.001). The OR for being talked to about participating in a study was 0.65 (95% CI: 0.52–0.81) for AAs and 0.65 (95% CI: 0.49–0.85) for Hispanics, compared to whites. AAs and Hispanics were more likely to state that studies were not friendly to their race (17% and 10% vs. 4%; p<0.001). Conclusions Minorities continue to face barriers for HIV/AIDS trial participation, even when clinical research is available. Enrollment strategies should better target minorities to improve recruitment in HIV/AIDS research. PMID:24518211

  5. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Etcheverry, M Florencia; Lum, Paula J; Evans, Jennifer L; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2011-02-24

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). PMID:21241735

  6. HIV vaccine trial willingness among injection and non-injection drug users in two urban centres, Barcelona and San Francisco

    PubMed Central

    Etcheverry, M. Florencia; Lum, Paula J.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Sanchez, Emilia; de Lazzari, Elisa; Mendez-Arancibia, Eva; Sierra, Ernesto; Gatell, José M.; Page, Kimberly; Joseph, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Being able to recruit high-risk volunteers who are also willing to consider future participation in vaccine trials are critical features of vaccine preparedness studies. We described data from two cohorts of injection- and non-injection drug users in Barcelona, Spain [Red Cross centre] and in San Francisco, USA, [UFO-VAX study] at high risk of HIV/HCV infection to assess behaviour risk exposure and willingness to participate in future preventive HIV vaccine trials. We successfully identified drug-using populations that would be eligible for future HIV vaccine efficacy trials, based on reported levels of risk during screening and high levels of willingness to participate. In both groups, Red Cross and UFO-VAX respectively, HCV infection was highly prevalent at baseline (41% and 34%), HIV baseline seroprevalence was 4.2% and 1.5%, and high levels of willingness were seen (83% and 78%). PMID:21241735

  7. Vaccinations

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated? For many years, a set of annual vaccinations was considered normal and necessary for dogs and ... to protect for a full year. Consequently, one vaccination schedule will not work well for all pets. ...

  8. Factors influencing women's attitudes towards antenatal vaccines, group B Streptococcus and clinical trial participation in pregnancy: an online survey

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Fiona; Stevens, Zoe; Plumb, Jane; Hughes, Rhona; Voysey, Merryn; Heath, Paul T; Snape, Matthew D

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore factors influencing the likelihood of antenatal vaccine acceptance of both routine UK antenatal vaccines (influenza and pertussis) and a hypothetical group B Streptococcus (GBS) vaccine in order to improve understanding of how to optimise antenatal immunisation acceptance, both in routine use and clinical trials. Setting An online survey distributed to women of childbearing age in the UK. Participants 1013 women aged 18–44 years in England, Scotland and Wales. Methods Data from an online survey conducted to gauge the attitudes of 1013 women of childbearing age in England, Scotland and Wales to antenatal vaccination against GBS were further analysed to determine the influence of socioeconomic status, parity and age on attitudes to GBS immunisation, using attitudes to influenza and pertussis vaccines as reference immunisations. Factors influencing likelihood of participation in a hypothetical GBS vaccine trial were also assessed. Results Women with children were more likely to know about each of the 3 conditions surveyed (GBS: 45% vs 26%, pertussis: 79% vs 63%, influenza: 66% vs 54%), to accept vaccination (GBS: 77% vs 65%, pertussis: 79% vs 70%, influenza: 78% vs 68%) and to consider taking part in vaccine trials (37% vs 27% for a hypothetical GBS vaccine tested in 500 pregnant women). For GBS, giving information about the condition significantly increased the number of respondents who reported that they would be likely to receive the vaccine. Health professionals were the most important reported source of information. Conclusions Increasing awareness about GBS, along with other key strategies, would be required to optimise the uptake of a routine vaccine, with a specific focus on informing women without previous children. More research specifically focusing on acceptability in pregnant women is required and, given the value attached to input from healthcare professionals, this group should be included in future studies. PMID:27098824

  9. Ancillary care in South African HIV vaccine trials: addressing needs, drafting protocols, and engaging community.

    PubMed

    Slack, Catherine M

    2014-02-01

    There has been debate about sponsor-investigator ethical responsibilities to address participants' medical needs in trials in resource-constrained contexts. Certain ethical guidelines make detailed recommendations. This study explored whether ethical guideline recommendations for care in HIV vaccine trials were being met, and whether stakeholders were facing difficulties addressed by guidelines. It sampled key stakeholders involved in two trials across five sites in South Africa, and reviewed relevant documentation. It concluded that sites were largely meeting guideline recommendations for addressing needs, with some exceeding these. Recommendations for writing protocols were only partially achieved. Recommendations for engaging participating community were mostly met, except for "moral negotiation" recommendations. Suggestions are made to strengthen practices, and to improve guidelines so they address empirical concerns. PMID:24572086

  10. Clinical Trial of an Oral Live Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidate, WRSS1, in Thai Adults

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Dilara; Chamnanchanunt, Supat; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Luvira, Viravarn; Dhitavat, Jittima; Venkatesan, Malabi M.; Mason, Carl J.; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

    2016-01-01

    Live attenuated Shigella sonnei vaccine candidate WRSS1, previously tested in U.S. and Israeli volunteers, was evaluated in a population of adult Thai volunteers in which the organism is endemic. In a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind design, inpatient participants received a single oral dose of 1.6 × 104 CFU of WRSS1. The vaccine was generally well tolerated, with equal numbers of vaccinees and placebo controls showing mild symptoms. Only 3 of 13 vaccinees (23%) had culture-positive stools, while a total of 9 vaccinees were positive by PCR. Lack of vaccine shedding in volunteers correlated with lack of clinical symptoms and immune responses, just as the duration of fecal shedding correlated directly with stronger immune responses. Two months following immunization, 10 vaccinees and 10 newly recruited naive controls received a challenge dose of 1,670 CFU of virulent S. sonnei strain 53G. This dose had previously demonstrated a 75% attack rate for dysentery in Thai volunteers. However, in this study the attack rate for dysentery in naive controls after challenge was 20%. Based on clinical record summaries, 3 vaccinees and 5 naive controls experienced clinically relevant illness (diarrhea/dysentery/fever/shigellosis), and a 40% vaccine efficacy was calculated. When these data are compared to those for the performance of this vaccine candidate in more naive populations, it is clear that a single oral dose of WRSS1 at 104 CFU failed to achieve its full potential in a population in which the organism is endemic. Higher doses and/or repeated immunizations may contribute to improved vaccine shedding and consequent elevation of protective immune responses in a population in which the organism is endemic. (The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01080716.) PMID:27146000

  11. Clinical Trial of an Oral Live Shigella sonnei Vaccine Candidate, WRSS1, in Thai Adults.

    PubMed

    Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Islam, Dilara; Chamnanchanunt, Supat; Ruamsap, Nattaya; Khantapura, Patchariya; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Kittitrakul, Chatporn; Luvira, Viravarn; Dhitavat, Jittima; Venkatesan, Malabi M; Mason, Carl J; Bodhidatta, Ladaporn

    2016-07-01

    Live attenuated Shigella sonnei vaccine candidate WRSS1, previously tested in U.S. and Israeli volunteers, was evaluated in a population of adult Thai volunteers in which the organism is endemic. In a randomized placebo-controlled, double-blind design, inpatient participants received a single oral dose of 1.6 × 10(4) CFU of WRSS1. The vaccine was generally well tolerated, with equal numbers of vaccinees and placebo controls showing mild symptoms. Only 3 of 13 vaccinees (23%) had culture-positive stools, while a total of 9 vaccinees were positive by PCR. Lack of vaccine shedding in volunteers correlated with lack of clinical symptoms and immune responses, just as the duration of fecal shedding correlated directly with stronger immune responses. Two months following immunization, 10 vaccinees and 10 newly recruited naive controls received a challenge dose of 1,670 CFU of virulent S. sonnei strain 53G. This dose had previously demonstrated a 75% attack rate for dysentery in Thai volunteers. However, in this study the attack rate for dysentery in naive controls after challenge was 20%. Based on clinical record summaries, 3 vaccinees and 5 naive controls experienced clinically relevant illness (diarrhea/dysentery/fever/shigellosis), and a 40% vaccine efficacy was calculated. When these data are compared to those for the performance of this vaccine candidate in more naive populations, it is clear that a single oral dose of WRSS1 at 10(4) CFU failed to achieve its full potential in a population in which the organism is endemic. Higher doses and/or repeated immunizations may contribute to improved vaccine shedding and consequent elevation of protective immune responses in a population in which the organism is endemic. (The study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01080716.). PMID:27146000

  12. Efficacy of a piglet-specific commercial inactivated vaccine against Porcine circovirus type 2 in clinical field trials

    PubMed Central

    Han, Kiwon; Seo, Hwi Won; Oh, Yeonsu; Park, Changhoon; Kang, Ikjae; Jang, Hyun; Chae, Chanhee

    2013-01-01

    The efficacy of a piglet-specific inactivated Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) vaccine was evaluated with clinical field trials, as recommended by the Republic of Korea’s Animal, Plant & Fisheries Quarantine & Inspection Agency. Three farms were selected on the basis of their history of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome. On each farm 60, 1-week-old pigs were randomly allocated to 1 of 2 treatment groups: vaccination at 1 and 3 wk of age or no vaccination. The 2-dose schedule of vaccination with inactivated PCV2 vaccine improved the average daily weight gain from birth to 16 wk of age, the PCV2 load in the blood, and the frequency and severity of lymph node lesions. Inactivated PCV2 vaccine seems to be very effective in controlling PCV2 infection under field conditions. PMID:24101803

  13. Theoretical Model of Critical issues in Informed Consent in HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cindi A.; Dewhurst, Stephen; McMahon, James M.; Bunce, Catherine A.; Keefer, Michael C.; Alio, Amina P.

    2014-01-01

    The informed consent (IC) process for HIV vaccine trials poses unique challenges and would benefit from improvements to its historically-based structure and format. Here, we propose a theoretical framework that provides a basis for systematically evaluating and addressing these challenges. The proposed framework follows a linear pathway, starting with the precondition of voluntariness, three main variables of valid decision-making (competency, provision of information and understanding) and then the consequential outcome of either refusal or consent to participate. The existing literature reveals that culturally appropriate provision of information and resultant understanding by the vaccine trial participant are among the most significant factors influencing the authenticity of valid decision-making, though they may be overridden by other considerations, such as individual altruism, mistrust and HIV-related stigma. Community collaborations to foster bidirectional transmission of information and more culturally tailored consenting materials therefore represent a key opportunity to enhance the informed consent process. By providing a visual synopsis of the issues most critical to IC effectiveness in a categorical and relational manner, the framework provided here presents HIV vaccine researchers a tool by which the informed consent process can be more systematically evaluated and consequently improved. PMID:24865892

  14. Intracellular Cytokine Staining and Flow Cytometry: Considerations for Application in Clinical Trials of Novel Tuberculosis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Steven G.; Smits, Kaatje; Joosten, Simone A.; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Satti, Iman; Fletcher, Helen A.; Caccamo, Nadia; Dieli, Francesco; Mascart, Francoise; McShane, Helen; Dockrell, Hazel M.; Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular cytokine staining combined with flow cytometry is one of a number of assays designed to assess T-cell immune responses. It has the specific advantage of enabling the simultaneous assessment of multiple phenotypic, differentiation and functional parameters pertaining to responding T-cells, most notably, the expression of multiple effector cytokines. These attributes make the technique particularly suitable for the assessment of T-cell immune responses induced by novel tuberculosis vaccines in clinical trials. However, depending upon the particular nature of a given vaccine and trial setting, there are approaches that may be taken at different stages of the assay that are more suitable than other alternatives. In this paper, the Tuberculosis Vaccine Initiative (TBVI) TB Biomarker Working group reports on efforts to assess the conditions that will determine when particular assay approaches should be employed. We have found that choices relating to the use of fresh whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and frozen PBMC; use of serum-containing or serum-free medium; length of stimulation period and use of co-stimulatory antibodies can all affect the sensitivity of intracellular cytokine assays. In the case of sample material, frozen PBMC, despite some loss of sensitivity, may be more advantageous for batch analysis. We also recommend that for multi-site studies, common antibody panels, gating strategies and analysis approaches should be employed for better comparability. PMID:26367374

  15. Clinical trial with an anti-rabies human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV).

    PubMed

    Gerichter, C B; Shtark, J; Braunstein, I

    1978-01-01

    A clinical trial with an anti-rabies human diploid cell vaccine (HDCV) Mérieux, has been carried out by the Government Central Laboratories and the District Health Office, Ministry of Health, Jerusalem, Israel, on 25 persons bitten by stray dogs and cats. These bitten persons were given 6 injections of the above-mentioned vaccine on days 0, 3, 7, 14, 30 and 90 post-exposure. A through medical examination was carried out by a qualified physician in order to establish the local and systemic side effects. These side effects were trivial and were mostly observed with the third and fourth injections. In addition a neutralization test on mice was carried out with all sera taken on the days of injection. There was a prompt and adequate development of neutralizing antibodies even on the seventh day after the beginning of treatment, and before the fourth injection. In several cases there was a very high level of neutralizing antibodies even reaching as much as 500 I.U./ml. In conclusion these results have shown that the diploid cell vaccine is a very safe immunogenic vaccine and the authors recommend its use for pre- and post-exposure. PMID:381073

  16. Population-based enrolment of adolescents in a long-term follow-up trial of human papillomavirus vaccine efficacy.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, M; Idänpään-Heikkilä, I; Lunnas, T; Palmroth, J; Barr, E; Cacciatore, R; Isaksson, R; Kekki, M; Koskela, P; Kosunen, E; Kuortti, M; Lahti, L; Liljamo, T; Luostarinen, T; Apter, D; Pukkala, E; Paavonen, J

    2006-04-01

    We evaluated a study setting for assessment of the long-term vaccine efficacy (VE) of human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like-particle (VLP) vaccine against cervical carcinoma. A total of 22,412 16- to 17-year old adolescent women from seven cities in Finland were invited by letter to participate in a phase III study of a quadrivalent HPV (types 6, 11, 16, 18) VLP vaccine, between September 2002 and March 2003. A total of 30,947 18-year old women were invited to participate as unvaccinated controls. These women were asked about their willingness to participate in an HPV vaccination trial and to fill a health questionnaire. These three population-based cohorts of adolescent women, including women vaccinated with HPV vaccine or placebo vaccine and unvaccinated control women, are systematically followed over time. The study cohort database will be linked with the Finnish Cancer Registry using cervical carcinoma in situ (CIS) and invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) as endpoints. Assuming that the cumulative incidence of CIS and ICC over 15 years is 0.45%, and that there is no loss to follow-up, and power of 80%, the determination of 70% total VE will require 3357 HPV vaccine recipients, 3357 placebo vaccine recipients, and 6714 unvaccinated controls. At the baseline, 2632 (12%) of the invited adolescents volunteered to the phase III vaccination trial, and 6790 (22%) responded to the questionnaire study. During a recruitment period of 10 months, 874 HPV vaccine recipients, 875 placebo recipients and 1919 unvaccinated controls were enrolled. Population-based enrollment of large cohorts of vaccinated and unvaccinated adolescents for passive registry-based follow-up with cervical carcinoma as the end-point is feasible and currently going on in Finland. PMID:16595046

  17. Continued Follow-Up of Phambili Phase 2b Randomized HIV-1 Vaccine Trial Participants Supports Increased HIV-1 Acquisition among Vaccinated Men

    PubMed Central

    Moodie, Zoe; Metch, Barbara; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Churchyard, Gavin; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Laher, Fatima; Roux, Surita; Mngadi, Kathryn; Innes, Craig; Mathebula, Matsontso; Allen, Mary; Bentley, Carter; Gilbert, Peter B.; Robertson, Michael; Kublin, James; Corey, Lawrence; Gray, Glenda E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The Phase 2b double-blinded, randomized Phambili/HVTN 503 trial evaluated safety and efficacy of the MRK Ad5 gag/pol/nef subtype B HIV-1 preventive vaccine vs placebo in sexually active HIV-1 seronegative participants in South Africa. Enrollment and vaccinations stopped and participants were unblinded but continued follow-up when the Step study evaluating the same vaccine in the Americas, Caribbean, and Australia was unblinded for non-efficacy. Final Phambili analyses found more HIV-1 infections amongst vaccine than placebo recipients, impelling the HVTN 503-S recall study. Methods HVTN 503-S sought to enroll all 695 HIV-1 uninfected Phambili participants, provide HIV testing, risk reduction counseling, physical examination, risk behavior assessment and treatment assignment recall. After adding HVTN 503-S data, HIV-1 infection hazard ratios (HR vaccine vs. placebo) were estimated by Cox models. Results Of the 695 eligible, 465 (67%) enrolled with 230 from the vaccine group and 235 from the placebo group. 38% of the 184 Phambili dropouts were enrolled. Enrollment did not differ by treatment group, gender, or baseline HSV-2. With the additional 1286 person years of 503-S follow-up, the estimated HR over Phambili and HVTN 503-S follow-up was 1.52 (95% CI 1.08–2.15, p = 0.02, 82 vaccine/54 placebo infections). The HR was significant for men (HR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49, 5.06, p = 0.001) but not for women (HR = 1.12, 95% CI 0.73, 1.72, p = 0.62). Conclusion The additional follow-up from HVTN 503-S supported the Phambili finding of increased HIV-1 acquisition among vaccinated men and strengthened the evidence of lack of vaccine effect among women. Trial Registration clinicaltrials.gov NCT00413725 SA National Health Research Database DOH-27-0207-1539 PMID:26368824

  18. Efficacy of a commercial live attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine in a large scale field trial in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sangshin; Lee, Joong-Bok; Kim, Kyung-Jin; Oh, Yu-Sik; Kim, Man-Ok; Oh, Yu-Ri; Hwang, Min-A; Lee, Jung-Ah

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Porcine proliferative enteropathy (PPE) is known as one of the most important risk factors causing economic losses in swine industry worldwide. This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of a commercial oral attenuated Lawsonia intracellularis vaccine (Enterisol Ileitis) against PPE under a commercial pig farm condition in Korea. Materials and Methods Thirty two-day-old 672 piglets were randomly allocated into vaccinated and control groups. All piglets in the vaccinated group were inoculated with a commercial attenuated L. intracellularis vaccine as following the manufacturer's instruction. Body weights of all pigs in both groups were measured on the vaccination day and 6, 14, and 20 weeks post vaccination and an average daily weight gain (ADWG) was calculated. Health status was observed biweekly during the whole trial. Results The vaccinated group showed significantly higher body weight (p<0.05) and ADWG (p<0.05) than those of the control group. The vaccinated group had significantly reduced impairments in activity, growth, defecation frequency, and stool hardness (p<0.05). Additional health benefits and improved weight gain by the vaccination produced a 4.2:1 return of investment, and the higher gross margin was $4.80 per pig. Conclusion Our finding suggests that the L. intracellularis vaccine program has effects on the substantial health and economic benefits in the Korean swine industry. PMID:23858405

  19. Vaccine-Induced CD107a+ CD4+ T Cells Are Resistant to Depletion following AIDS Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Terahara, Kazutaka; Ishii, Hiroshi; Nomura, Takushi; Takahashi, Naofumi; Takeda, Akiko; Shiino, Teiichiro; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ T-cell responses are crucial for effective antibody and CD8+ T-cell induction following virus infection. However, virus-specific CD4+ T cells can be preferential targets for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV-specific CD4+ T-cell induction by vaccination may thus result in enhancement of virus replication following infection. In the present study, we show that vaccine-elicited CD4+ T cells expressing CD107a are relatively resistant to depletion in a macaque AIDS model. Comparison of virus-specific CD107a, macrophage inflammatory protein-1β, gamma interferon, tumor necrosis factor alpha, and interleukin-2 responses in CD4+ T cells of vaccinated macaques prechallenge and 1 week postchallenge showed a significant reduction in the CD107a− but not the CD107a+ subset after virus exposure. Those vaccinees that failed to control viremia showed a more marked reduction and exhibited significantly higher viral loads at week 1 than unvaccinated animals. Our results indicate that vaccine-induced CD107a− CD4+ T cells are depleted following virus infection, suggesting a rationale for avoiding virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T-cell induction in HIV vaccine design. IMPORTANCE Induction of effective antibody and/or CD8+ T-cell responses is a principal vaccine strategy against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. CD4+ T-cell responses are crucial for effective antibody and CD8+ T-cell induction. However, virus-specific CD4+ T cells can be preferential targets for HIV infection. Here, we show that vaccine-induced virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T cells are largely depleted following infection in a macaque AIDS model. While CD4+ T-cell responses are important in viral control, our results indicate that virus-specific CD107a− CD4+ T-cell induction by vaccination may not lead to efficient CD4+ T-cell responses following infection but rather be detrimental and accelerate viral replication in the acute phase. This suggests that HIV vaccine design

  20. Constructing a trial as a personal lifestyle change project: participants' experiences in a clinical study for nicotine vaccination.

    PubMed

    Wolters, Anna; de Wert, Guido; van Schayck, Onno; Horstman, Klasien

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the experiences and dynamics of the involvement of research participants in a randomized clinical trial for nicotine vaccination. Participants received an experimental nicotine vaccine or a placebo, in addition to quit smoking medication and counseling. The longitudinal design of this qualitative study allowed us to follow people from their first visit to the trial location until the unblinding of their treatment with either verum or placebo vaccine. The empirical data consisted of 49 semi-structured, in-depth interviews, field notes and memos, and trial documents collected in the Netherlands between 2010 and 2012. Participants' expectations and experiences of the innovative nicotine vaccine were characterized by ambivalence: Although they complied with the research design, throughout the study they tinkered with discourses, objects, and activities to make them serve their individual goals. They made the concepts of nicotine vaccination and placebo treatment meaningful for quitting, reshaped the meaning of research tests and obligatory visits to serve their own personal goals, and introduced a new element into the trial by creating space to discuss problems that might endanger the quit attempt. In short, the participants constructed the clinical study for nicotine vaccination as their own personal lifestyle change project. PMID:24581069

  1. PHASE II AIDS MALIGNANCY CONSORTIUM TRIAL OF TOPICAL HALOFUGINONE IN AIDS-RELATED KAPOSI’S SARCOMA

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Henry B.; Fingleton, Barbara; Lee, Jeannette Y.; Geyer, Julia T.; Cesarman, Ethel; Parise, Robert A.; Egorin, Merrill J.; Dezube, Bruce J.; Aboulafia, David; Krown, Susan E.

    2010-01-01

    Using a novel blinded intra-patient vehicle control design, we conducted a phase II study of topically-administered halofuginone, an angiogenesis inhibitor that inhibits collagen type-I and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), in patients with AIDS-related Kaposi’s sarcoma (KS). Serial KS biopsies assessed treatment effects on angiogenic factors and KSHV-LANA. We observed marked heterogeneity of KSHV-LANA expression. Although the small number of subjects whose response could be evaluated precluded definitive assessment of halofuginone’s efficacy, we observed a significant decrease in type-I collagen only in halofuginone-treated lesions, but no effect on MMP-2. The trial design is applicable to future studies of topical agents. PMID:21068672

  2. Candidate hepatitis C vaccine trials and people who inject drugs: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Lisa; White, Bethany; Hellard, Margaret; Madden, Annie; Prins, Maria; Kerr, Thomas; Page, Kimberly

    2013-01-01

    This article appeared in a journal published by Elsevier. The attached copy is furnished to the author for internal non-commercial research and education use, including for instruction at the authors institution and sharing with colleagues. Other uses, including reproduction and distribution, or selling or licensing copies, or posting to personal, institutional or third party websites are prohibited. In most cases authors are permitted to post their version of the article (e.g. in Word or Tex form) to their personal website or institutional repository. Authors requiring further information regarding Elsevier's archiving and manuscript policies are encouraged to visit: http://www.elsevier.com/copyright People who inject drugs (PWID) are at high risk of HCV. Limited evidence of the effectiveness of prevention interventions and low uptake of treatment in this group highlight the need for increased investment in biomedical interventions, notably safe and efficacious vaccines. While several candidates are currently in development, field trials in PWID present challenges, including ethical issues associated with trial literacy, informed consent and standards of care. Significant biological and social factors and differences between HIV and HCV suggest that HCV warrants targeted vaccine preparedness research to lay the groundwork for successful implementation of future trials. PMID:20831914

  3. An Automated HIV-1 Env-Pseudotyped Virus Production for Global HIV Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Fuss, Martina; Mazzotta, Angela S.; Sarzotti-Kelsoe, Marcella; Ozaki, Daniel A.; Montefiori, David C.; von Briesen, Hagen; Zimmermann, Heiko; Meyerhans, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Background Infections with HIV still represent a major human health problem worldwide and a vaccine is the only long-term option to fight efficiently against this virus. Standardized assessments of HIV-specific immune responses in vaccine trials are essential for prioritizing vaccine candidates in preclinical and clinical stages of development. With respect to neutralizing antibodies, assays with HIV-1 Env-pseudotyped viruses are a high priority. To cover the increasing demands of HIV pseudoviruses, a complete cell culture and transfection automation system has been developed. Methodology/Principal Findings The automation system for HIV pseudovirus production comprises a modified Tecan-based Cellerity system. It covers an area of 5×3 meters and includes a robot platform, a cell counting machine, a CO2 incubator for cell cultivation and a media refrigerator. The processes for cell handling, transfection and pseudovirus production have been implemented according to manual standard operating procedures and are controlled and scheduled autonomously by the system. The system is housed in a biosafety level II cabinet that guarantees protection of personnel, environment and the product. HIV pseudovirus stocks in a scale from 140 ml to 1000 ml have been produced on the automated system. Parallel manual production of HIV pseudoviruses and comparisons (bridging assays) confirmed that the automated produced pseudoviruses were of equivalent quality as those produced manually. In addition, the automated method was fully validated according to Good Clinical Laboratory Practice (GCLP) guidelines, including the validation parameters accuracy, precision, robustness and specificity. Conclusions An automated HIV pseudovirus production system has been successfully established. It allows the high quality production of HIV pseudoviruses under GCLP conditions. In its present form, the installed module enables the production of 1000 ml of virus-containing cell culture supernatant per

  4. Correlates of Protection against Influenza in the Elderly: Results from an Influenza Vaccine Efficacy Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Andrew J.; Voloshen, Timothy; Hu, Branda; Landolfi, Victoria A.; Talbot, H. Keipp

    2016-01-01

    Although a number of studies have investigated and quantified immune correlates of protection against influenza in adults and children, data on immune protection in the elderly are sparse. A recent vaccine efficacy trial comparing standard-dose with high-dose inactivated influenza vaccine in persons 65 years of age and older provided the opportunity to examine the relationship between values of three immunologic assays and protection against community-acquired A/H3N2 influenza illness. The high-dose vaccine induced significantly higher antibody titers than the standard-dose vaccine for all assays. For the hemagglutination inhibition assay, a titer of 40 was found to correspond with 50% protection when the assay virus was antigenically well matched to the circulating virus—the same titer as is generally recognized for 50% protection in younger adults. A dramatically higher titer was required for 50% protection when the assay virus was a poor match to the circulating virus. With the well-matched virus, some protection was seen at the lowest titers; with the poorly matched virus, high levels of protection were not achieved even at the highest titers. Strong associations were also seen between virus neutralization test titers and protection, but reliable estimates for 50% protection were not obtained. An association was seen between titers of an enzyme-linked lectin assay for antineuraminidase N2 antibodies and protection; in particular, the proportion of treatment effect explained by assay titer in models that included both this assay and one of the other assays was consistently higher than in models that included either assay alone. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01427309.) PMID:26762363

  5. Does participation in an HIV vaccine efficacy trial affect risk behaviour in South Africa?

    PubMed Central

    Gray, GE; Metch, B; Churchyard, G; Mlisana, K; Nchabeleng, M; Allen, M; Moodie, Z; Kublin, J; Bekker, L-G

    2014-01-01

    Background Increased sexual risk behaviour in participants enrolled in HIV prevention trials has been a concern. The HVTN 503/Phambili study, a phase 2B study of the Merck Ad-5 multiclade HIV vaccine in South Africa, suspended enrollment and vaccinations following the results of the Step study. Participants were notified of their treatment allocation and continue to be followed. We investigated changes in risk behaviour over time and assessed the impact of study unblinding. Methods 801 participants were enrolled. Risk behaviors were assessed with an interviewer-administered questionnaire at 6-month intervals. We assessed change from enrolment to the first 6-month assessment pre-unblinding and between enrolment and at least 6 months post-unblinding on all participants with comparable data. A one-time unblinding risk perception questionnaire was administered post-unblinding. Results A decrease in participants reporting unprotected sex was observed in both measured time periods for men and women, with no differences by treatment arm. At 6 months (pre-unblinding), 29.6% of men and 35.8% of women reported changing from unprotected to protected sex (p <0.0001 for each).Men (22%) were more likely than women (14%) to report behavior change after unblinding (p=0.009). Post-enrolment, 142 (45%) of 313 previously uncircumcised men underwent medical circumcision. 663 participants completed the unblinding questionnaire. More vaccine (24.6%) as compared to placebo recipients (12.0%) agreed that they were more likely to get HIV than most people (p<0.0001), and attributed this to receiving the vaccine. Conclusion We did not find evidence of risk compensation during this clinical trial. Some risk behaviour reductions including male circumcision were noted irrespective of treatment allocation. PMID:23370155

  6. Development of Diagnostic Criteria for Serious Non-AIDS Events in HIV Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lifson, Alan R.; Belloso, Waldo H.; Davey, Richard T.; Duprez, Daniel; Gatell, Jose M.; Hoy, Jennifer F.; Krum, Eric A.; Nelson, Ray; Pedersen, Court; Perez, George; Price, Richard W.; Prineas, Ronald J.; Rhame, Frank S.; Sampson, James H.; Worley, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Serious non-AIDS (SNA) diseases are important causes of morbidity and mortality in the HAART era. We describe development of standard criteria for 12 SNA events for Endpoint Review Committee (ERC) use in START, a multicenter international HIV clinical trial. Methods SNA definitions were developed based upon the following: (1) criteria from a previous trial (SMART), (2) review of published literature, (3) an iterative consultation and review process with the ERC and other content experts, and (4) evaluation of draft SNA criteria using retrospectively collected reports in another trial (ESPRIT). Results Final criteria are presented for acute myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease requiring drug treatment, coronary revascularization, decompensated liver disease, deep vein thrombosis, diabetes mellitus, end-stage renal disease, non-AIDS cancer, peripheral arterial disease, pulmonary embolism, and stroke. Of 563 potential SNA events reported in ESPRIT and reviewed by an ERC, 72% met “confirmed” and 13% “probable” criteria. Twenty-eight percent of cases initially reviewed by the ERC required follow-up discussion (adjudication) before a final decision was reached. Conclusion HIV clinical trials that include SNA diseases as clinical outcomes should have standardized SNA definitions to optimize event reporting and validation and should have review by an experienced ERC with opportunities for adjudication. PMID:20974576

  7. “Speaking the Dialect”: Understanding Public Discourse in the Aftermath of an HIV Vaccine Trial Shutdown

    PubMed Central

    Logie, Carmen; James, LLana; Charles, Tamicka; Maxwell, John; Salam, Khaled; Woodford, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We investigated how persons from key populations at higher risk of HIV exposure interpreted the process and outcomes of the Step Study HIV-1 vaccine trial, which was terminated early, and implications for willingness to participate in and community support for HIV vaccine research. Methods. We used qualitative methods and a community-based approach in 9 focus groups (n = 72) among ethnically and sexually diverse populations and 6 semistructured key informant interviews in Ontario, Canada, in 2007 to 2008. Results. Participants construed social meaning from complex clinical and biomedical phenomena. Social representations and mental models emerged in fears of vaccine-induced infection, conceptualizations of unfair recruitment practices and increased risk behaviors among trial participants, and questioning of informed consent. Narratives of altruism and the common good demonstrated support for future trials. Conclusions. Public discourse on HIV vaccine trials is a productive means of interpreting complex clinical trial processes and outcomes in the context of existing beliefs and experiences regarding HIV vaccines, medical research, and historical disenfranchisement. Strategic engagement with social representations and mental models may promote meaningful community involvement in biomedical HIV prevention research. PMID:21778490

  8. The State of Norovirus Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Debbink, Kari; Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Baric, Ralph S.

    2014-01-01

    Noroviruses represent the most important cause of acute gastroenteritis worldwide; however, currently no licensed vaccine exists. Widespread vaccination that minimizes overall norovirus disease burden would benefit the entire population, but targeted vaccination of specific populations such as healthcare workers may further mitigate the risk of severe disease and death in vulnerable populations. While a few obstacles hinder the rapid development of efficacious vaccines, human trials for virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines show promise in both immune response and protection studies, with availability of vaccines being targeted over the next 5–10 years. Ongoing work including identification of important norovirus capsid antigenic sites, development of improved model systems, and continued studies in humans will allow improvement of future vaccines. In the meantime, a better understanding of norovirus disease course and transmission patterns can aid healthcare workers as they take steps to protect high-risk populations such as the elderly and immunocompromised individuals from chronic and severe disease. PMID:24585561

  9. Designing a field trial of an equine grass sickness vaccine: A questionnaire-based feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Ireland, Joanne L; McGorum, Bruce C; Proudman, Christopher J; Newton, J Richard

    2016-07-01

    Without an experimental model of equine grass sickness (EGS), a randomised controlled field trial (RCT) represents the only method of evaluating the efficacy of Clostridium botulinum type C vaccination in preventing naturally occurring disease. Clinical trial feasibility is an important aspect of preliminary work undertaken prior to initiating RCTs, estimating parameters that are important for study design. This cross-sectional study aimed to assess the feasibility of conducting a nationwide RCT of a candidate vaccine for EGS based on responses from a sample of British equine veterinary practices (n = 119/284). Seventy-three percent of practices had attended ≥1 EGS case within the preceding 2 years (median four cases), and 51.3% regularly attended recurrently affected premises. Veterinary surgeons had greater confidence diagnosing acute/subacute EGS based solely on history and clinical signs compared to chronic EGS. Ninety-one percent of respondents (n = 103/113) considered the proposed RCT to be important/very important to equine veterinary research. Ninety-one percent of respondents (n = 102/112) indicated preparedness to assist in owner recruitment and 92.9% (n = 104/112) indicated willingness to participate in a RCT. The most frequent reasons for practices declining to participate were low incidence of EGS (n = 4), did not believe clients would wish to participate (n = 3) and amount of paperwork/data collection involved (n = 2). There was considerable support amongst participating veterinary practices for a RCT evaluating the efficacy of Clostridium botulinum vaccination for the prevention of EGS in Britain. Substantial proportions of participating practices would be prepared to participate in the RCT and regularly attended EGS-affected premises that would meet trial inclusion criteria. PMID:27240918

  10. Phase I clinical trial of O-Acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant polysaccharide based typhoid vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Szu, Shousun C.; Lin, Kimi F-Y; Hunt, Steven; Chu, Chiayung; Thinh, Nguyen Duc

    2014-01-01

    Background Typhoid fever remains an important cause of morbidity and mortality in the developing countries. Vi capsular polysaccharide conjugate vaccine demonstrated safety and efficacy in young children in high endemic regions. A novel typhoid conjugate vaccine based on plant polysaccharide pectin was studied in a phase I trial. Methods Fruit pectin, having the same carbohydrate backbone structure as Vi, was purified from citrus peel and used as the polysaccharide source to prepare a semi-synthetic typhoid conjugate vaccine. Pectin was chemically O-acetylated (OAcPec) to antigenically resemble Vi and conjugated to carrier protein rEPA, a recombinant exoprotein A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa. 25 healthy volunteers, 18–45 years old, were injected once with OAcPec-rEPA. Safety and IgG antibodies reactive with Vi and pectin were analyzed. Results No vaccine associated serious adverse reaction was reported. Six weeks after the injection of OAcPec-rEPA, 64% of the volunteers elicited >4 fold rise of anti-Vi IgG. At 26 weeks the level declined, but the difference between the levels at 6 and 26 weeks are not statistically significant. There is a direct correlation between the level of anti-Vi IgG before and after the injection (R2 = 0.96). The anti-Vi IgG can be absorbed by Vi, but not by pectin. There was no corresponding increase of anti-pectin after the injection, indicating the antibody response to OAcPec-rEPA was specific to Vi. There is no Vi-rEPA data in US adults for comparison of immune responses. The OAcPec-rEPA elicited significantly less IgG anti-Vi in US adults than those by Vi-rEPA in Vietnamese adults. Conclusion The O-acetylated pectin conjugate, a plant based typhoid vaccine, is safe and immunogenic in adult volunteers. PMID:24657719

  11. Using financial incentives to increase initial uptake and completion of HPV vaccinations: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background HPV vaccination reduces the risk of cervical cancer. Uptake however, of the ‘catch-up’ campaign in England for 17-18 year old girls is below the 80% NHS target. The aim of this randomized controlled trial is to assess the impact of financial incentives on (a) the uptake and completion of an HPV vaccination programme and (b) the quality of the decisions to undertake the vaccination. Method/Design One thousand (n = 1000) 16-18 year-old girls will be invited to participate in an HPV vaccination programme: Five-hundred (n = 500) will have received a previous invitation to get vaccinated but will have failed to do so (previous non-attenders) and 500 will not have previously received an invitation (first-time invitees). Girls will be randomly selected from eligible participants who are registered with a GP in areas covered by the Birmingham East and North (BEN) and Heart of Birmingham Primary Care Trusts. The two samples of girls will be randomised to receive either a standard vaccination invitation letter or an invitation letter including the offer of vouchers worth £45 for receiving three vaccinations. Girls will also complete a questionnaire to assess the quality of their decisions to be vaccinated. The primary outcome will be uptake of the 1st and 3rd vaccinations. The secondary outcome will be the quality of the decisions to undertake the vaccination, measured by assessing attitudes towards and knowledge of the HPV vaccination. Discussion The key results will be: a) the effectiveness of financial incentives in increasing uptake of the 1st and 3rd vaccinations; b) the role of participants’ socio-economic status in the moderation of the impact of incentives on uptake; and c) the impact of incentives on the quality of decisions to undertake the HPV vaccinations. PMID:22947332

  12. Qualitative Contributions to a Randomized Controlled Trial Addressing HIV/AIDS-Stigma in Medical Students

    PubMed Central

    Marzán-Rodríguez, Melissa; Varas-Díaz, Nelson; Neilands, Torsten

    2016-01-01

    Specialized training for healthcare professionals (HCP) in order to reduce HIV/AIDS related stigma must be part of a public health model for HIV/AIDS. Tested interventions to reduce HIV/AIDS related stigma among HCP have been mostly absent from these efforts. A qualitative approach was used to assess stigma reduction within a traditional randomized controlled design in order to better understand how our current stigma intervention worked and was understood by 2nd year medical students. After conducting a quantitative follow up survey one-year post intervention we conducted 20 in-depth qualitative interviews with a subsample of our intervention group participants as part of the overall evaluation process. Once the interviews were finished, we transcribed them and used NVivo (v.8) to organized the qualitative data. In the process of analyzing the qualitative data we identified core intervention areas participants described as useful for their training and development: (1) acquiring more HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, (2) increased skills for management of high stigma situations, and (3) the ability to identify socio-structural factors that foster HIV infection among clients. The gathered information is important in order to have a deep understanding of how attitudinal change happens as part of our intervention strategies. Keywords: HIV/AIDS, Stigma, Randomized Controlled Trial, Qualitative Evaluation, Medical Students, Puerto Rico PMID:26855975

  13. [A field trial for early vaccination against Gässer's disease using Porcilis Glässer].

    PubMed

    Palzer, A; Ritzmann, M; Heinritzi, K

    2007-09-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the use of an early vaccine for Haemophilus parasuis in three and five week old piglets. In the first field trial, 144 female piglets were divided into four groups. The groups consisted of animals showing no clinical signs of the disease (clinically normal) and a second group displaying clinical signs of the disease (clinically suspect). Half of the animals belonging to both clinical groups were vaccinated. In a second field trial, 240 female piglets, which were clinically normal at the time of housing and originating from the same farm were divided into two groups. Swine from one group were vaccinated, and both groups were regularly weighed and clinically examined until the end of the growing-finishing phase. Vaccinated animals from the first field trial which were clinically weighed on average 0.353 kg more than animals from the nonvaccinated control group at 11th weeks of age. Piglets of the vaccinated clinically suspected group which were 13 weeks of age weighed on average 1.41 kg more than the piglets from the nonvaccinated group. The average clinical scores for both vaccinated groups were lower than those from the nonvaccinated groups. The results from the second field trial showed that the average weight of the vaccinated group was higher by 3.1 kg than those of the control group.Also, a significant difference in weight gain was found beginning in the thirteenth week of age. The percentage of altered animals or animals unfit for growing-finishing was 8.3% in the nonvaccinated group at the end of the rearing phase. In comparison, this percentage was 3.8% in the vaccinated group. PMID:17929704

  14. Randomized Trial of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation and Hearing Aids for Tinnitus Management.

    PubMed

    Shekhawat, Giriraj Singh; Searchfield, Grant D; Stinear, Cathy M

    2013-11-01

    Background. The perception of sound in the absence of an external sound is tinnitus. Tinnitus can have a severe negative impact on quality of life. Objective. This trial investigated whether multisession anodal transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) of the left temporoparietal area would enhance sound therapy from hearing aids. Methods. Forty participants (mean age = 54 years) experiencing chronic tinnitus (minimum 2 years) completed a 7-month long double-blind randomized clinical trial. Participants were randomized into 2 groups: control receiving sham tDCS and experimental receiving tDCS. Each group underwent multisession (5 consecutive sessions with 24-hour gap) anodal tDCS (2 mA intensity and 20 minutes duration) of the left temporoparietal area, followed by hearing aid use for 6 months. The impact of tDCS and hearing aid use on tinnitus was assessed using questionnaires (primary measure: Tinnitus Functional Index) and minimum masking level measurement. Results. There was a significant reduction in the overall Tinnitus Functional Index score with time, F(2, 37) = 11.9, P = .0001, for both the groups. Similar patterns were seen for secondary measures. tDCS appeared to have a positive effect on minimum masking levels but not questionnaire responses. Conclusions. After 3 months of hearing aid use, there were significant improvements in tinnitus, which were sustained at 6 months of use. The hearing aid effects appeared independent of tDCS. Further investigations of tDCS or other neuromodulators priming the auditory system for sound therapy based tinnitus treatments are warranted. PMID:24213961

  15. Hepatitis C vaccine clinical trials among people who use drugs: potential for participation and involvement in recruitment.

    PubMed

    Young, April M; Stephens, Dustin B; Khaleel, Hanan A; Havens, Jennifer R

    2015-03-01

    Candidate prophylactic HCV vaccines are approaching phase III clinical trial readiness, yet little is known about the potential for participation among target groups or innovative ways to promote enrollment within 'hard-to-reach' populations. This study describes HCV vaccine trial participation willingness among a high-risk sample of people who use drugs and their willingness to assist researchers by promoting the trial among peers. Willingness to participate in and encourage peers' participation in an HCV vaccine trial was assessed among injection and non-injection drug users enrolled in a cohort study in Kentucky using interviewer-administered questionnaires (n=165 and 415, respectively, with willingness to participate assessed among HCV-seronegative participants only). Generalized linear mixed models were used to determine correlates to being "very likely" to participate or encourage participation in a trial. Most reported being likely to participate or encourage participation in a vaccine trial (63% and 87%, respectively). Men were significantly less likely to report willingness to encourage others' participation, while willingness to encourage was higher among lower income, HCV-seropositive, heroin-using, and methamphetamine-using participants. Unemployment, lesser education, receipt of financial support from more peers, and nonmedical prescription drug use were positively associated with willingness to participate. Differential enrollment in HCV vaccine clinical trials by socioeconomic status may occur, underscoring ethical considerations and need for avoiding coercion. Notably, the data suggest that a peer-driven approach to promoting trial participation among people who use drugs could be feasible in this population and that HCV-seropositive individuals and women could be especially instrumental in these efforts. PMID:25553715

  16. Hepatitis C vaccine clinical trials among people who use drugs: potential for participation and involvement in recruitment

    PubMed Central

    Young, April M.; Stephens, Dustin B.; Khaleel, Hanan A.; Havens, Jennifer R.

    2015-01-01

    Candidate prophylactic HCV vaccines are approaching phase III clinical trial readiness, yet little is known about the potential for participation among target groups or innovative ways to promote enrollment within ‘hard-to-reach’ populations. This study describes HCV vaccine trial participation willingness among a high-risk sample of people who use drugs and their willingness to assist researchers by promoting the trial among peers. Willingness to participate in and encourage peers’ participation in an HCV vaccine trial was assessed among injection and non-injection drug users enrolled in a cohort study in Kentucky using interviewer-administered questionnaires (n=165 and 415, respectively, with willingness to participate assessed among HCV-seronegative participants only). Generalized linear mixed models were used to determine correlates to being "very likely" to participate or encourage participation in a trial. Most reported being likely to participate or encourage participation in a vaccine trial (63% and 87%, respectively). Men were significantly less likely to report willingness to encourage others’ participation, while willingness to encourage was higher among HCV-seropositive participants. Unemployment, lesser education, receipt of financial support from more peers, and nonmedical prescription drug use were positively associated with willingness to participate, as were heroin and methamphetamine use. Differential enrollment in HCV vaccine clinical trials by socioeconomic status may occur, underscoring ethical considerations and need for avoiding coercion. Notably, the data suggest that a peer-driven approach to promoting trial participation among people who use drugs could be feasible in this population and that HCV-seropositive individuals and women could be especially instrumental in these efforts. PMID:25553715

  17. Provision of HIV treatment in HIV preventive vaccine trials: a developing country perspective.

    PubMed

    Slack, C; Stobie, M; Milford, C; Lindegger, G; Wassenaar, D; Strode, A; Ijsselmuiden, C

    2005-03-01

    HIV treatment for participants who become infected during HIV vaccine trials has been the focus of ethical controversy. The obligations of sponsors to ensure that participants have access to antiretrovirals have been a particular focus of this debate. This paper presents three arguments that have been made in this regard, and some of their limitations, in anticipation of HIV vaccine trials in South Africa. The first argument is that HIV risk behaviour increases in such trials, and HIV infection can be viewed as a research-related injury, justifying sponsor provision of treatment on grounds of compensation for harm. We conclude that risk-behaviour studies to date do not show general increases in risk behaviour that could constitute the basis for a general obligation. Participation may well adversely impact on risk behaviour for some individuals, and conceivably this could be demonstrated. This argument may, therefore, have merit at the individual level; however, it seems a weak platform from which to argue that sponsors should treat all HIV infections acquired during trials. The second argument is that treatment should be provided based on distributive justice. We conclude that traditional concepts of "distributive justice" in research appear limited in justifying obligations of sponsors to ensure access to antiretrovirals. Further, using research initiatives to reduce global health care inequities is controversial, and even proponents may disagree about the fairest use of finite resources. The third argument is that sponsors should ensure antiretroviral access on grounds of beneficence; namely, the maxim that if one can do something beneficial without sacrificing anything of comparable significance, it ought to be done. Thus, sponsors should provide more interventions than those minimally required to conduct the research. However, beneficence may demand levels of altruism that exceeds what is reasonable. While the latter arguments may provide stronger

  18. Safety Monitoring in Group A Meningococcal Conjugate Vaccine Trials: Description, Challenges, and Lessons

    PubMed Central

    Enwere, Godwin C.; Paranjape, Gandhali; Kulkarni, Prasad S.; Ginde, Manisha; Hartmann, Katharina; Viviani, Simonetta; Chaumont, Julie; Martellet, Lionel; Makadi, Marie-Francoise; Ivinson, Karen; Marchetti, Elisa; Herve, Jacques; Kertson, Kim; LaForce, F. Marc; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Background. The determination of the safety profile of any vaccine is critical to its widespread use in any population. In addition, the application of international guidelines to fit local context could be a challenging but important step toward obtaining quality safety data. Methods. In clinical studies of PsA-TT (MenAfriVac), safety was monitored immediately after vaccination, at 4–7 days for postimmunization local and systemic reactions, within 28 days for adverse events, and throughout the duration of study for serious adverse events. Initial and ongoing training of sites' staff were undertaken during the studies, and a data and safety monitoring board reviewed all the data during and after the studies. Results. The safety of PsA-TT was evaluated according to international standards despite obvious challenges in remote areas where these studies were conducted. These challenges included the need for uniformity of methods, timely reporting in the context of frequent communication problems, occurrence of seasonal diseases such as malaria and rotavirus diarrhea, and healthcare systems that required improvement. Conclusions. The trials of PsA-TT highlighted the value of a robust vaccine development plan and design so that lessons learned in initial studies were incorporated into the subsequent ones, initial training and periodic retraining, strict monitoring of all procedures, and continuous channel of communication with all stakeholders that enabled the application of international requirements to local settings, with high quality of data. PMID:26553681

  19. Mental health first aid training in a workplace setting: A randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN13249129

    PubMed Central

    Kitchener, Betty A; Jorm, Anthony F

    2004-01-01

    Background The Mental Health First Aid training course was favorably evaluated in an uncontrolled trial in 2002 showing improvements in participants' mental health literacy, including knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence and help provided to others. This article reports the first randomized controlled trial of this course. Methods Data are reported on 301 participants randomized to either participate immediately in a course or to be wait-listed for 5 months before undertaking the training. The participants were employees in two large government departments in Canberra, Australia, where the courses were conducted during participants' work time. Data were analyzed according to an intention-to-treat approach. Results The trial found a number of benefits from this training course, including greater confidence in providing help to others, greater likelihood of advising people to seek professional help, improved concordance with health professionals about treatments, and decreased stigmatizing attitudes. An additional unexpected but exciting finding was an improvement in the mental health of the participants themselves. Conclusions The Mental Health First Aid training has shown itself to be not only an effective way to improve participants' mental health literacy but also to improve their own mental health. It is a course that has high applicability across the community. PMID:15310395

  20. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Vaccinations are injections of antigens into the body. Once the antigens enter the blood, they circulate along ... suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of an ...

  1. Immune Monitoring in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials: Critical Issues of Functional Flow Cytometry-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Urbani, Francesca; Proietti, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    The development of immune monitoring assays is essential to determine the immune responses against tumor-specific antigens (TSAs) and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) and their possible correlation with clinical outcome in cancer patients receiving immunotherapies. Despite the wide range of techniques used, to date these assays have not shown consistent results among clinical trials and failed to define surrogate markers of clinical efficacy to antitumor vaccines. Multiparameter flow cytometry- (FCM-) based assays combining different phenotypic and functional markers have been developed in the past decade for informative and longitudinal analysis of polyfunctional T-cells. These technologies were designed to address the complexity and functional heterogeneity of cancer biology and cellular immunity and to define biomarkers predicting clinical response to anticancer treatment. So far, there is still a lack of standardization of some of these immunological tests. The aim of this review is to overview the latest technologies for immune monitoring and to highlight critical steps involved in some of the FCM-based cellular immune assays. In particular, our laboratory is focused on melanoma vaccine research and thus our main goal was the validation of a functional multiparameter test (FMT) combining different functional and lineage markers to be applied in clinical trials involving patients with melanoma. PMID:24195078

  2. Phase I trial of thymidylate synthase poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) vaccine in advanced cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cusi, Maria Grazia; Botta, Cirino; Pastina, Pierpaolo; Rossetti, Maria Grazia; Dreassi, Elena; Guidelli, Giacomo Maria; Fioravanti, Antonella; Martino, Elodia Claudia; Gandolfo, Claudia; Pagliuchi, Marco; Basile, Assunta; Carbone, Salvatore Francesco; Ricci, Veronica; Micheli, Lucia; Tassone, Pierfrancesco; Tagliaferri, Pierosandro; Pirtoli, Luigi; Correale, Pierpaolo

    2015-09-01

    Thymidylate synthase (TS) poly-epitope peptide (TSPP) is a 27-mer peptide vaccine containing the amino acidic sequences of three epitopes with HLA-A2.1-binding motifs of TS, an enzyme overexpressed in cancer cells, which plays a crucial role in DNA repair and replication. Based on the results of preclinical studies, we designed a phase Ib trial (TSPP/VAC1) to investigate, in a dose escalation setting, the safety and the biological activity of TSPP vaccination alone (arm A) or in combination with GM-CSF and IL-2 (arm B) in cancer patients. Twenty-one pretreated metastatic cancer patients, with a good performance status (ECOG ≤ 1) and no severe organ failure or immunological disease, were enrolled in the study (12 in arm A, nine in arm B) between April 2011 and January 2012, with a median follow-up of 28 months. TSPP resulted safe, and its maximal tolerated dose was not achieved. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. The most common adverse events were grade 2 dermatological reactions to the vaccine injection, cough, rhinitis, fever, poly-arthralgia, gastro-enteric symptoms and, to a lesser extent, moderate hypertension and hypothyroidism. We detected a significant rise in auto-antibodies and TS-epitope-specific CTL precursors. Furthermore, TSPP showed antitumor activity in this group of pretreated patients; indeed, we recorded one partial response and seven disease stabilizations (SD) in arm A, and three SD in arm B. Taken together, our findings provide the framework for the evaluation of the TSPP anti-tumor activity in further disease-oriented clinical trials. PMID:26031574

  3. Quantifying Protection Against Influenza Virus Infection Measured by Hemagglutination-inhibition Assays in Vaccine Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xiahong; Fang, Vicky J.; Ohmit, Suzanne E.; Monto, Arnold S.; Cowling, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Correlations between hemagglutination-inhibition titers (hereafter “titers”) and protection against infection have been identified in historical studies. However, limited information is available about the dynamics of how titer influences protection. Methods: Titers were measured in randomized, placebo-controlled vaccine trials in Hong Kong among pediatrics during September 2009–December 2010 and the United States among adults during Oct 2007–April 2008. Intermediate unobserved titers were imputed using three interpolation methods. As participants were recruited at different times leading to varying exposure to infection relative to entry, a modified proportional hazards model was developed to account for staggered entry into the studies and to quantify the correlation of titers with protection against influenza infections, adjusting for waning in titers. The model was fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo and importance sampling. Results: A titer of 1:40 was associated with a reduced infection risk of 40%–70% relative to a titer of 1:10, depending on the circulating strain; the corresponding protection associated with a titer of 1:80 was 54%–84%. Results were robust across interpolation methods. The trivalent-inactivated vaccine reduced cumulative incidence of influenza B and influenza A(H3N2) infections by six percentage points (pp; 95% credible interval = 2 pp, 10 pp) and 1 pp (95% credible interval = 0.3 pp, 2 pp) respectively, but not for influenza A(H1N1)pdm09. The live-attenuated vaccine showed little efficacy against influenza A(H3N2) infections. Conclusions: Titers are correlated with protection against influenza infections. The trivalent inactivated vaccine can reduce the risk of influenza A(H3N2) and influenza B infections in the community. PMID:26427723

  4. Efficacy of a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection among young women: a nested analysis within the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R.; Gonzalèz, Paula; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Solomon, Diane; Jimenez, Silvia; Schiller, John T.; Lowy, Douglas R.; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Struijk, Linda; Quint, Wim; Chen, Sabrina; Wacholder, Sholom; Hildesheim, Allan; Herrero, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Background Anal cancer remains rare (incidence of ∼1.5 per 100,000 women annually) but rates are increasing in many countries. Human papillomavirus-16 (HPV16) infection causes most cases. We evaluated vaccine efficacy (VE) of an ASO4-adjuvanted HPV16/18 vaccine against anal HPV16/18 infection. Methods In a randomized double-blind controlled trial designed to evaluate VE against persistent cervical HPV16/18 infections and associated precancerous lesions in Costa Rica, 4210 healthy women underwent anal specimen collection (4224 of 5968= 70.8% of eligible women) at the final blinded study visit 4 years after vaccination to evaluate anal HPV16/18 VE. Cervical HPV16/18 VE among the same women at the same visit was calculated as a comparator. For this ancillary work, analyses were conducted in a restricted cohort of women both cervical HPV16/18 DNA negative and HPV 16/18 seronegative prior at enrollment (N=1989), and in the full cohort (all women with an anal specimen). Findings In the restricted cohort, VE against prevalent HPV16/18 anal infection measured one-time, four-years post-vaccination was 83.6% (95%CI 66.7% to 92.8%), which was comparable to cervical HPV16/18 VE (87.9%, 95%CI 77.4% to 94.0%). In the full cohort, HPV16/18 VE was statistically lower at the anus (62.0%, 95%CI 47.1% to 73.1%) compared to the cervix (76.4%, 95%CI 67.0% to 83.5%) (p for anatomic-site interaction =0.03). Significant and comparable VE estimates against a composite endpoint of HPV31/33/45 (i.e.: cross-protection) was observed at the anus and cervix. Interpretation The ASO4-adjuvanted vaccine affords strong protection against anal HPV, particularly among women more likely to be HPV naïve at vaccination. Funding. The Costa Rica HPV Vaccine Trial is sponsored and funded by the NCI (contract N01-CP-11005), with funding support from the National Institutes of Health Office of Research on Women's Health, and conducted with support from the Ministry of Health of Costa Rica. Vaccine was

  5. Meta-Analysis on Randomized Controlled Trials of Vaccines with QS-21 or ISCOMATRIX Adjuvant: Safety and Tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Bigaeva, Emilia; van Doorn, Eva; Liu, Heng; Hak, Eelko

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives QS-21 shows in vitro hemolytic effect and causes side effects in vivo. New saponin adjuvant formulations with better toxicity profiles are needed. This study aims to evaluate the safety and tolerability of QS-21 and the improved saponin adjuvants (ISCOM, ISCOMATRIX and Matrix-M™) from vaccine trials. Methods A systematic literature search was conducted from MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane library and Clinicaltrials.gov. We selected for the meta-analysis randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of vaccines adjuvanted with QS-21, ISCOM, ISCOMATRIX or Matrix-M™, which included a placebo control group and reported safety outcomes. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using a random-effects model. Jadad scale was used to assess the study quality. Results Nine RCTs were eligible for the meta-analysis: six trials on QS-21-adjuvanted vaccines and three trials on ISCOMATRIX-adjuvanted, with 907 patients in total. There were no studies on ISCOM or Matrix-M™ adjuvanted vaccines matching the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis identified an increased risk for diarrhea in patients receiving QS21-adjuvanted vaccines (RR 2.55, 95% CI 1.04–6.24). No increase in the incidence of the reported systemic AEs was observed for ISCOMATRIX-adjuvanted vaccines. QS-21- and ISCOMATRIX-adjuvanted vaccines caused a significantly higher incidence of injection site pain (RR 4.11, 95% CI 1.10–15.35 and RR 2.55, 95% CI 1.41–4.59, respectively). ISCOMATRIX-adjuvanted vaccines also increased the incidence of injection site swelling (RR 3.43, 95% CI 1.08–10.97). Conclusions Our findings suggest that vaccines adjuvanted with either QS-21 or ISCOMATRIX posed no specific safety concern. Furthermore, our results indicate that the use of ISCOMATRIX enables a better systemic tolerability profile when compared to the use of QS-21. However, no better local tolerance was observed for ISCOMATRIX-adjuvanted vaccines in immunized non

  6. Decision Aid to Technologically Enhance Shared decision making (DATES): study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinicians face challenges in promoting colorectal cancer screening due to multiple competing demands. A decision aid that clarifies patient preferences and improves decision quality can aid shared decision making and be effective at increasing colorectal cancer screening rates. However, exactly how such an intervention improves shared decision making is unclear. This study, funded by the National Cancer Institute, seeks to provide detailed understanding of how an interactive decision aid that elicits patient’s risks and preferences impacts patient-clinician communication and shared decision making, and ultimately colorectal cancer screening adherence. Methods/Design This is a two-armed single-blinded randomized controlled trial with the target of 300 patients per arm. The setting is eleven community and three academic primary care practices in Metro Detroit. Patients are men and women aged between 50 and 75 years who are not up to date on colorectal cancer screening. ColoDATES Web (intervention arm), a decision aid that incorporates interactive personal risk assessment and preference clarification tools, is compared to a non-interactive website that matches ColoDATES Web in content but does not contain interactive tools (control arm). Primary outcomes are patient uptake of colorectal cancer screening; patient decision quality (knowledge, preference clarification, intent); clinician’s degree of shared decision making; and patient-clinician concordance in the screening test chosen. Secondary outcome incorporates a Structural Equation Modeling approach to understand the mechanism of the causal pathway and test the validity of the proposed conceptual model based on Theory of Planned Behavior. Clinicians and those performing the analysis are blinded to arms. Discussion The central hypothesis is that ColoDATES Web will improve colorectal cancer screening adherence through improvement in patient behavioral factors, shared decision making between the

  7. Enveloped viruses understood via multiscale simulation: computer-aided vaccine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreif, Z.; Adhangale, P.; Cheluvaraja, S.; Perera, R.; Kuhn, R.; Ortoleva, P.

    Enveloped viruses are viewed as an opportunity to understand how highly organized and functional biosystems can emerge from a collection of millions of chaotically moving atoms. They are an intermediate level of complexity between macromolecules and bacteria. They are a natural system for testing theories of self-assembly and structural transitions, and for demonstrating the derivation of principles of microbiology from laws of molecular physics. As some constitute threats to human health, a computer-aided vaccine and drug design strategy that would follow from a quantitative model would be an important contribution. However, current molecular dynamics simulation approaches are not practical for modeling such systems. Our multiscale approach simultaneously accounts for the outer protein net and inner protein/genomic core, and their less structured membranous material and host fluid. It follows from a rigorous multiscale deductive analysis of laws of molecular physics. Two types of order parameters are introduced: (1) those for structures wherein constituent molecules retain long-lived connectivity (they specify the nanoscale structure as a deformation from a reference configuration) and (2) those for which there is no connectivity but organization is maintained on the average (they are field variables such as mass density or measures of preferred orientation). Rigorous multiscale techniques are used to derive equations for the order parameters dynamics. The equations account for thermal-average forces, diffusion coefficients, and effects of random forces. Statistical properties of the atomic-scale fluctuations and the order parameters are co-evolved. By combining rigorous multiscale techniques and modern supercomputing, systems of extreme complexity can be modeled.

  8. Enveloped viruses understood via multiscale simulation: computer-aided vaccine design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shreif, Z.; Adhangale, P.; Cheluvaraja, S.; Perera, R.; Kuhn, R.; Ortoleva, P.

    2008-04-01

    Enveloped viruses are viewed as an opportunity to understand how highly organized and functional biosystems can emerge from a collection of millions of chaotically moving atoms. They are an intermediate level of complexity between macromolecules and bacteria. They are a natural system for testing theories of self-assembly and structural transitions, and for demonstrating the derivation of principles of microbiology from laws of molecular physics. As some constitute threats to human health, a computer-aided vaccine and drug design strategy that would follow from a quantitative model would be an important contribution. However, current molecular dynamics simulation approaches are not practical for modeling such systems. Our multiscale approach simultaneously accounts for the outer protein net and inner protein/genomic core, and their less structured membranous material and host fluid. It follows from a rigorous multiscale deductive analysis of laws of molecular physics. Two types of order parameters are introduced: (1) those for structures wherein constituent molecules retain long-lived connectivity (they specify the nanoscale structure as a deformation from a reference configuration) and (2) those for which there is no connectivity but organization is maintained on the average (they are field variables such as mass density or measures of preferred orientation). Rigorous multiscale techniques are used to derive equations for the order parameters dynamics. The equations account for thermal-average forces, diffusion coefficients, and effects of random forces. Statistical properties of the atomic-scale fluctuations and the order parameters are co-evolved. By combining rigorous multiscale techniques and modern supercomputing, systems of extreme complexity can be modeled.

  9. Novel Ordered Stepped-Wedge Cluster Trial Designs for Detecting Ebola Vaccine Efficacy Using a Spatially Structured Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Diakite, Ibrahim; Mooring, Eric Q.; Velásquez, Gustavo E.; Murray, Megan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background During the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, policy-makers were confronted with difficult decisions on how best to test the efficacy of EVD vaccines. On one hand, many were reluctant to withhold a vaccine that might prevent a fatal disease from study participants randomized to a control arm. On the other, regulatory bodies called for rigorous placebo-controlled trials to permit direct measurement of vaccine efficacy prior to approval of the products. A stepped-wedge cluster study (SWCT) was proposed as an alternative to a more traditional randomized controlled vaccine trial to address these concerns. Here, we propose novel “ordered stepped-wedge cluster trial” (OSWCT) designs to further mitigate tradeoffs between ethical concerns, logistics, and statistical rigor. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed a spatially structured mathematical model of the EVD outbreak in Sierra Leone. We used the output of this model to simulate and compare a series of stepped-wedge cluster vaccine studies. Our model reproduced the observed order of first case occurrence within districts of Sierra Leone. Depending on the infection risk within the trial population and the trial start dates, the statistical power to detect a vaccine efficacy of 90% varied from 14% to 32% for standard SWCT, and from 67% to 91% for OSWCTs for an alpha error of 5%. The model’s projection of first case occurrence was robust to changes in disease natural history parameters. Conclusions/Significance Ordering clusters in a step-wedge trial based on the cluster’s underlying risk of infection as predicted by a spatial model can increase the statistical power of a SWCT. In the event of another hemorrhagic fever outbreak, implementation of our proposed OSWCT designs could improve statistical power when a step-wedge study is desirable based on either ethical concerns or logistical constraints. PMID:27509037

  10. Selection of an adjuvant for seasonal influenza vaccine in elderly people: modelling immunogenicity from a randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . Higher T-cell responses for adjuvanted versus non-adjuvanted vaccine were observed for all except two formulations (AS03C and AS03B-MPL25). Reactogenicity increased with increasing AS03 dosage, and with MPL. No safety concerns were raised. Conclusions Five formulations containing AS03A or AS03B were identified as potential candidates to improve immune responses to influenza vaccination; AS03B without MPL showed the best balance between improved immunogenicity and acceptable reactogenicity. Trial registration This trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00540592 PMID:23890405

  11. Efficacy of Fewer than Three Doses of an HPV-16/18 AS04 adjuvanted Vaccine: Combined Analysis of Data from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial and the PATRICIA Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kreimer, Aimée R; Struyf, Frank; Del Rosario-Raymundo, Maria Rowena; Hildesheim, Allan; Skinner, S Rachel; Wacholder, Sholom; Garland, Suzanne M; Herrero, Rolando; David, Marie-Pierre; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2015-01-01

    Background Limited data suggest one or two doses of the HPV vaccines confer similar protection to the three-dose regimen. This study aimed to further evaluate the question of reduced-dose efficacy of the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Methods Summary-level data from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT; NCT00128661) and the PApilloma TRIal against Cancer In young Adults (PATRICIA; NCT001226810), two phase III controlled, randomized, double-blind, clinical trials of the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine among young women, were combined in a post-hoc analysis (GSK e-track 202142) to investigate efficacy of fewer doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine after four years of follow-up. Women were randomly assigned to receive three doses of the HPV-16/18 vaccine or to a control vaccine; yet some received fewer doses. After excluding women with <12-months follow-up or those HPV16/18 DNA-positive at enrollment (for the HPV16/18 endpoint), vaccine efficacy (VE) was calculated against one-time detection of incident HPV infections after three (n=11,110 HPV:11,217control), two (n=611:574), and one (N=292:251) dose(s). The main aim of the study was to ascertain HPV16/18 VE in both full and naïve cohorts, as well as to explore protection conferred against non-vaccine HPV types, by number of doses received. Findings VE against incident HPV16/18 infections for three doses was 77·0% (95%CI 74·7 to 79·1%), two doses was 76·0% (95%CI 62·0 to 85·3%), and one dose was 85·7% (95%CI 70·7 to 93·7%). VE against incident HPV31/33/45 infections for three doses was 59·7% (95%CI 56·0 to 63·0%), two doses was 37·7% (95%CI 12·4 to 55·9%), and one dose was 36·6% (95%CI −5·4 to 62·2%). However, two-dose women who received their second dose at six months, but not those receiving it at one month, had efficacy estimates against HPV 31/33/45 similar to the three-dose group (VE 68·1%, 95%CI 27·0 to 87·0%; CVT data only). Interpretation Four years following vaccination of women aged 15 to 25 years, one

  12. Noninterference of Rotavirus Vaccine With Measles-Rubella Vaccine at 9 Months of Age and Improvements in Antirotavirus Immunity: A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, K.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Victor, John C.; Yunus, Mohammad; Bari, Tajul Islam A.; Azim, Tasnim; Rahman, Mustafizur; Mowla, Syed Mohammad Niaz; Bellini, William J.; McNeal, Monica; Icenogle, Joseph P.; Lopman, Ben; Parashar, Umesh; Cortese, Margaret M.; Steele, A. Duncan; Neuzil, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. The burden of rotavirus morbidity and mortality is high in children aged <5 years in developing countries, and evaluations indicate waning protection from rotavirus immunization in the second year. An additional dose of rotavirus vaccine may enhance the immune response and lengthen the period of protection against disease, but coadministration of this dose should not interfere with immune responses to concurrently given vaccines. Methods. A total of 480 9-month-old participants from Matlab, Bangladesh, were enrolled in a study with a primary objective to establish noninferiority of concomitant administration of measles-rubella vaccine (MR) and a third dose of human rotavirus vaccine (HRV; MR + HRV), compared with MR given alone. Secondary objectives included noninferiority of rubella antibody seroconversion and evaluating rotavirus IgA/IgG seroresponses in MR + HRV recipients. Results. Two months after vaccination, 75.3% and 74.3% of MR + HRV and MR recipients, respectively, had seroprotective levels of measles virus antibodies; 100.0% and 99.6%, respectively, showed anti–rubella virus immunoglobulin G (IgG) seroprotection. In the MR + HRV group, antirotavirus immunoglobulin A and IgG seropositivity frequencies before vaccination (52.7% and 66.3%, respectively) increased to 69.6% and 88.3% after vaccination. Conclusions. Vaccine-induced measles and rubella antibody responses are not negatively affected by concomitant administration of HRV. The HRV dose increases antirotavirus serum antibody titers and the proportion of infants with detectable antirotavirus antibody. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01700621. PMID:26823338

  13. A controlled field trial of the effectiveness of acetone-dried and inactivated and heat-phenol-inactivated typhoid vaccines in Yugoslavia*

    PubMed Central

    1964-01-01

    In 1954-60 a Yugoslav Typhoid Commission showed in the first controlled field trial of typhoid vaccines, carried out in Osijek, Yugoslavia, that heat-phenol-inactivated typhoid vaccine gave a relatively high and long-lasting immunity. However, this liquid vaccine preparation was unstable and laboratory potency tests were inconclusive, and it was therefore decided that stable, dried, heat-killed, phenol-preserved vaccine be tested together with an acetone-inactivated and -dried vaccine in controlled field trials, supported in part by the World Health Organization, in Yugoslavia and British Guiana. This is report on the controlled trials organized in two Yugoslav towns, Bitola and Priština. Three comparable groups were formed by random allocation of vaccines among 45 497 volunteers in the two towns. In each town one group received heat-phenol vaccine, the second group acetone-dried vaccine and the third (control) group tetanus toxoid. Two doses were given four weeks apart in the spring of 1960 and the vaccinated persons were followed up for 2 1/2 years. The effectiveness of the vaccines was measured by comparing typhoid morbidity rates in the three groups. It was found during an outbreak of typhoid fever in Priština two years after primary vaccination that both the acetone-dried and the heat-phenol vaccines were effective, the former being superior. PMID:14196811

  14. ETHICAL TRADEOFFS IN TRIAL DESIGN: CASE STUDY OF AN HPV VACCINE TRIAL IN HIV-INFECTED ADOLESCENT GIRLS IN LOWER INCOME SETTINGS

    PubMed Central

    LINDSEY, J. C.; SHAH, S. K.; SIBERRY, G. K.; JEAN-PHILIPPE, P.; LEVIN, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    The Declaration of Helsinki and the Council of the International Organization of Medical Sciences provide guidance on standards of care and prevention in clinical trials. In the current and increasingly challenging research environment, the ethical status of a trial design depends not only on protection of participants, but also on social value, feasibility, and scientific validity. Using the example of a study assessing efficacy of a vaccine to prevent human papilloma virus in HIV-1 infected adolescent girls in low resource countries without access to the vaccine, we compare several trial designs which rank lower on some criteria and higher on others, giving rise to difficult trade-offs. This case demonstrates the need for developing more nuanced guidance documents to help researchers balance these often conflicting criteria. PMID:23725055

  15. Quality Assessment for Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG 5146): A Multicenter Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    DiFrancesco, Robin; Rosenkranz, Susan; Mukherjee, A. Lisa; Demeter, Lisa M.; Jiang, Hongyu; DiCenzo, Robert; Dykes, Carrie; Rinehart, Alex; Albrecht, Mary; Morse, Gene D.

    2010-01-01

    In a randomized trial, AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) protocol 5146 (A5146) investigated the use of TDM to adjust doses of HIV-1 protease inhibitors (PIs) in patients with prior virologic failure on PI-based therapy who were starting a new PI-based regimen. The overall percentage of “PI trough repeats”, such as rescheduled visits or redrawn PI trough specimens, increased from 2% to 5% to 10% as the process progressed from the clinical sites, the PSL, and the study team, respectively. Cumulatively, this represents a 17% rate of failure to obtain adequate PI trough sample. While targeting a turn-around of ≤ 7 days from sample receipt to a drug concentration report, 12% of the received specimens required a longer period to report concentrations. The implementation of dosing changes in the TDM arm were achieved within ≤7 days for 56% of the dose change events, and within ≤14 days for 77% of dose change events. This quality assurance analysis provides a valuable summary of the specific points in the TDM process that could be improved during a multicenter clinical trial including: [1] shortening the timeline of sample shipment from clinical site to the lab, [2] performing the collection of PI trough specimen within the targeted sampling window by careful monitoring of the last dose times and collection times by the clinicians [3] increasing patient adherence counseling to reduce the number of samples that are redrawn due to suspecting inconsistent adherence, and [4] decreasing the time to successful TDM-based dose adjustment. The application of some of these findings may also be relevant to single center studies or clinical TDM programs within a hospital. PMID:20592644

  16. Randomized Controlled Field Trial to Assess the Immunogenicity and Safety of Rift Valley Fever Clone 13 Vaccine in Livestock

    PubMed Central

    Njenga, M. Kariuki; Njagi, Leonard; Thumbi, S. Mwangi; Kahariri, Samuel; Githinji, Jane; Omondi, Eunice; Baden, Amy; Murithi, Mbabu; Paweska, Janusz; Ithondeka, Peter M.; Ngeiywa, Kisa J.; Dungu, Baptiste; Donadeu, Meritxell; Munyua, Peninah M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although livestock vaccination is effective in preventing Rift Valley fever (RVF) epidemics, there are concerns about safety and effectiveness of the only commercially available RVF Smithburn vaccine. We conducted a randomized controlled field trial to evaluate the immunogenicity and safety of the new RVF Clone 13 vaccine, recently registered in South Africa. Methods In a blinded randomized controlled field trial, 404 animals (85 cattle, 168 sheep, and 151 goats) in three farms in Kenya were divided into three groups. Group A included males and non-pregnant females that were randomized and assigned to two groups; one vaccinated with RVF Clone 13 and the other given placebo. Groups B included animals in 1st half of pregnancy, and group C animals in 2nd half of pregnancy, which were also randomized and either vaccinated and given placebo. Animals were monitored for one year and virus antibodies titers assessed on days 14, 28, 56, 183 and 365. Results In vaccinated goats (N = 72), 72% developed anti-RVF virus IgM antibodies and 97% neutralizing IgG antibodies. In vaccinated sheep (N = 77), 84% developed IgM and 91% neutralizing IgG antibodies. Vaccinated cattle (N = 42) did not develop IgM antibodies but 67% developed neutralizing IgG antibodies. At day 14 post-vaccination, the odds of being seropositive for IgG in the vaccine group was 3.6 (95% CI, 1.5 – 9.2) in cattle, 90.0 (95% CI, 25.1 – 579.2) in goats, and 40.0 (95% CI, 16.5 – 110.5) in sheep. Abortion was observed in one vaccinated goat but histopathologic analysis did not indicate RVF virus infection. There was no evidence of teratogenicity in vaccinated or placebo animals. Conclusions The results suggest RVF Clone 13 vaccine is safe to use and has high (>90%) immunogenicity in sheep and goats but moderate (> 65%) immunogenicity in cattle. PMID:25756501

  17. Immunogenicity and Safety of an Inactivated Quadrivalent Influenza Vaccine Candidate: A Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial in Children

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Joanne M.; Carmona Martinez, Alfonso; Chatterjee, Archana; Halperin, Scott A.; McNeil, Shelly; Reisinger, Keith S.; Aggarwal, Naresh; Huang, Li-Min; Peng, Ching-Tien; Garcia-Sicilia, José; Salamanca de la Cueva, Ignacio; Cabañas, Fernando; Treviño-Garza, Consuelo; Rodríguez-Weber, Miguel Angel; de la O, Manuel; Chandrasekaran, Vijayalakshmi; Dewé, Walthère; Liu, Aixue; Innis, Bruce L.; Jain, Varsha K.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mismatch between circulating influenza B viruses (Yamagata and Victoria lineages) and vaccine strains occurs frequently. Methods. In a randomized controlled trial, immunogenicity and safety of an inactivated quadrivalent influenza vaccine candidate (QIV) versus trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine (TIV)-Victoria(Vic) and TIV-Yamagata(Yam) in children 3–17 years of age was evaluated. In an open-label study arm, QIV only was assessed in children 6–35 months of age. Results. A total of 3094 children (932 QIV, 929 TIV-Vic, 932 TIV-Yam, and 301 QIV only) were vaccinated. QIV was noninferior to the TIVs for shared strains (A/H3N2 and A/H1N1) based on hemagglutination-inhibition (HI) antibodies 28 days after last vaccination, and superior for the unique B strains Victoria and Yamagata (geometric mean titer ratios 2.61, 3.78; seroconversion rate differences 33.96%, 44.63%). Among children in the randomized trial, adverse event rates were similar except for injection site pain (dose 1: 65.4% QIV, 54.6% TIV-Vic, 55.7% TIV-Yam). Conclusion. QIV elicited superior HI responses to the added B strains compared to TIV controls, potentially improving its effectiveness against influenza B. HI responses were similar between QIV and TIV controls for the shared strains. QIV had an acceptable safety profile relative to TIVs. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT01198756. PMID:23847058

  18. Efficacy of the HPV-16/18 Vaccine: Final according to protocol results from the blinded phase of the randomized Costa Rica HPV-16/18 Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hildesheim, Allan; Wacholder, Sholom; Catteau, Gregory; Struyf, Frank; Dubin, Gary; Herrero, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    Background A community-based randomized trial was conducted in Costa Rica to evaluate the HPV-16/18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine (NCT00128661). The primary objective was to evaluate efficacy of the vaccine to prevent cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or more severe disease (CIN2+) associated with incident HPV-16/18 cervical infections. Secondary objectives were to evaluate efficacy against CIN2+ associated with incident cervical infection by any oncogenic HPVs and to evaluate duration of protection against incident cervical infection with HPV-16/18. Vaccine safety and immunogenicity over the 4-year follow-up were also evaluated. Methods We randomized (3,727 HPV arm; 3,739 Control arm), vaccinated (HPV-16/18 or Hepatitis A) and followed (median 53.8 months) 7,466 healthy women aged 18-25 years. 5,312 women (2,635 HPV arm; 2,677 Control arm) were included in the according to protocol analysis for efficacy. The full cohort was evaluated for safety. Immunogenicity was considered on a subset of 354 (HPV-16) and 379 (HPV-18) women. HPV type was assessed by PCR on cytology specimens. Immunogenicity was assessed using ELISA and inhibition enzyme immunoassays. Disease outcomes were histologically confirmed. Vaccine efficacy and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) were computed. Results Vaccine efficacy was 89.8% (95% CI: 39.5 - 99.5; N=11 events total) against HPV-16/18 associated CIN2+, 59.9% (95% CI: 20.7 - 80.8; N=39 events total) against CIN2+ associated with non-HPV-16/18 oncogenic HPVs and 61.4% (95% CI: 29.5-79.8; N=51 events total) against CIN2+ irrespective of HPV type. The vaccine had an acceptable safety profile and induced robust and long-lasting antibody responses. Conclusions Our findings confirm the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the HPV-16/18 vaccine against incident HPV infections and cervical disease associated with HPV-16/18 and other oncogenic HPV types. These results will serve as a benchmark to which we can compare future findings from ongoing extended

  19. Proteomic Analysis of Mecistocirrus digitatus and Haemonchus contortus Intestinal Protein Extracts and Subsequent Efficacy Testing in a Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Alison J.; Inglis, Neil F.; Manson, Erin D. T.; Subhadra, Subhra; Illangopathy, Manikkavasagan; Muthusamy, Raman; Knox, David P.

    2014-01-01

    Background Gastrointestinal nematode infections, such as Haemonchus contortus and Mecistocirrus digitatus, are ranked in the top twenty diseases affecting small-holder farmers' livestock, yet research into M. digitatus, which infects cattle and buffalo in Asia is limited. Intestine-derived native protein vaccines are effective against Haemonchus, yet the protective efficacy of intestine-derived M. digitatus proteins has yet to be determined. Methodology/Principal Findings A simplified protein extraction protocol (A) is described and compared to an established method (B) for protein extraction from H. contortus. Proteomic analysis of the H. contortus and M. digitatus protein extracts identified putative vaccine antigens including aminopeptidases (H11), zinc metallopeptidases, glutamate dehydrogenase, and apical gut membrane polyproteins. A vaccine trial compared the ability of the M. digitatus extract and two different H. contortus extracts to protect sheep against H. contortus challenge. Both Haemonchus fractions (A and B) were highly effective, reducing cumulative Faecal Egg Counts (FEC) by 99.19% and 99.89% and total worm burdens by 87.28% and 93.64% respectively, compared to the unvaccinated controls. There was no effect on H. contortus worm burdens following vaccination with the M. digitatus extract and the 28.2% reduction in cumulative FEC was not statistically significant. However, FEC were consistently lower in the M. digitatus extract vaccinates compared to the un-vaccinated controls from 25 days post-infection. Conclusions/Significance Similar, antigenically cross-reactive proteins are found in H. contortus and M. digitatus; this is the first step towards developing a multivalent native vaccine against Haemonchus species and M. digitatus. The simplified protein extraction method could form the basis for a locally produced vaccine against H. contortus and, possibly M. digitatus, in regions where effective cold chains for vaccine distribution are limited

  20. Clinical evaluation for batch consistency of an inactivated enterovirus 71 vaccine in a large-scale phase 3 clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Juan; Meng, Fan-Yue; Mao, Qunying; Li, Jing-Xin; Wang, Hua; Liang, Zheng-Lun; Zhang, Yun-Tao; Gao, Fan; Chen, Qing-Hua; Hu, Yuemei; Ge, Zi-Jun; Yao, Xin; Guo, Hui-Jie; Zhu, Feng-Cai; Li, Xiu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The demonstration of batch-to-batch consistency to confirm the reliability of the manufacturing process has become a mandatory step in vaccine development. This is a post-hoc analysis aimed to provide more solid evidence on the immunogenicity and consistency of 3 consecutive batches of a novel inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine. In total 10 245 healthy Chinese children aged 6–35 months had been recruited and randomized to receive one of 3 batches of EV71 vaccine or placebo according to a two-dose immunization schedule in a phase 3 clinical trial. Blood samples were taken just before and 28 days after vaccinations for serological tests of EV71 neutralizing antibody (NTAb) titer from the subjects. Among them, 7263 (70.9%) subjects with seronegative EV71 NTAb at baseline and the data of serological tests post-vaccination available were included for the analysis. The results showed that EV71 vaccine elicited high geometric mean titers (GMTs) of 407.0 U/mL (95% CI, 373.5–443.6) for batch 1, 468.1 U/mL (95% CI, 432.2–507.0) for batch 2, and 520.6 U/mL (95% CI, 481.2–563.3) for batch 3. The two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the GMT ratios between each pair of vaccine batches were all within an interval of [0.67, 1.5]. Subjects who received EV71 vaccines demonstrated significant higher GMTs than those received placebos did (P < 0.001). In terms of incidence of both local and general adverse reactions, no differences were found among 3 vaccine batches and placebos. EV71 vaccine was highly immunogenic in children, and the 3 consecutive batches were well consistent. PMID:24633366

  1. Helping People with HIV/AIDS Return to Work: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David J.; Chernoff, Robert A.; Buitron, Michael; Comulada, W. Scott; Liang, Li-Jung; Wong, F. Lennie

    2013-01-01

    Objective New treatments introduced in the mid 1990s led many people with HIV/AIDS who previously had been disabled by their disease to contemplate workforce reentry; many remain unemployed, and little is known concerning interventions that might help them return to work. We report the results of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of an intervention designed to help people with HIV/AIDS reenter the workforce. Design We tested a mixed (group – individual) modality intervention that incorporated elements of Motivational Interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002), skills building from Dialectical Behavior Therapy (Linehan, 1993), and job-related skills (Price & Vinokur, 1995). A total of 174 individuals participated in either the intervention or in standard of care and were followed for 24 months. Results Compared to individuals referred for standard of care, participants in the intervention engaged in more workforce-reentry activities over time and, once employed, were more likely to remain employed. Dose-response analyses revealed that among intervention participants, participants who attended more than one individual session engaged in more workforce-reentry activities than did individual who attended one or fewer individual sessions, whereas frequency of group session participation did not effect a difference between participants who attended more than six group sessions and participants who attended six or fewer group sessions. Conclusion Theoretically-based workforce-reentry assistance programs can assist disabled people with HIV/AIDS in their return-to-work efforts. PMID:23148715

  2. Mental health first aid training for high school teachers: a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Mental disorders often have their first onset during adolescence. For this reason, high school teachers are in a good position to provide initial assistance to students who are developing mental health problems. To improve the skills of teachers in this area, a Mental Health First Aid training course was modified to be suitable for high school teachers and evaluated in a cluster randomized trial. Methods The trial was carried out with teachers in South Australian high schools. Teachers at 7 schools received training and those at another 7 were wait-listed for future training. The effects of the training on teachers were evaluated using questionnaires pre- and post-training and at 6 months follow-up. The questionnaires assessed mental health knowledge, stigmatizing attitudes, confidence in providing help to others, help actually provided, school policy and procedures, and teacher mental health. The indirect effects on students were evaluated using questionnaires at pre-training and at follow-up which assessed any mental health help and information received from school staff, and also the mental health of the student. Results The training increased teachers' knowledge, changed beliefs about treatment to be more like those of mental health professionals, reduced some aspects of stigma, and increased confidence in providing help to students and colleagues. There was an indirect effect on students, who reported receiving more mental health information from school staff. Most of the changes found were sustained 6 months after training. However, no effects were found on teachers' individual support towards students with mental health problems or on student mental health. Conclusions Mental Health First Aid training has positive effects on teachers' mental health knowledge, attitudes, confidence and some aspects of their behaviour. Trial registration ACTRN12608000561381 PMID:20576158

  3. Clinical trials of dendritic cell-based cancer vaccines in hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Pyzer, Athalia R; Avigan, David E; Rosenblatt, Jacalyn

    2015-01-01

    The potential for the immune system to target hematological malignancies is demonstrated in the allogeneic transplant setting, where durable responses can be achieved. However, allogeneic transplantation is associated with significant morbidity and mortality related to graft versus host disease. Cancer immunotherapy has the capacity to direct a specific cytotoxic immune response against cancer cells, particularly residual cancer cells, in order to reduce the likelihood of disease relapse in a more targeted and tolerated manner. Ex vivo dendritic cells can be primed in various ways to present tumor associated antigen to the immune system, in the context of co-stimulatory molecules, eliciting a tumor specific cytotoxic response in patients. Several approaches to prime dendritic cells and overcome the immunosuppressive microenvironment have been evaluated in pre-clinical and early clinical trials with promising results. In this review, we summarize the clinical data evaluating dendritic cell based vaccines for the treatment of hematological malignancies. PMID:25625926

  4. Impact of Withholding Breastfeeding at the Time of Vaccination on the Immunogenicity of Oral Rotavirus Vaccine—A Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Asad; Kazi, Abdul Momin; Cortese, Margaret M.; Fleming, Jessica A.; Moon, SungSil; Parashar, Umesh D.; Jiang, Baoming; McNeal, Monica M.; Steele, Duncan; Bhutta, Zulfiqar; Zaidi, Anita K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Breast milk contains anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies and other innate immune factors that inhibit rotavirus replication in vitro. These factors could diminish the immunogenicity of oral rotavirus vaccines, particularly if breastfeeding occurs close to the time of vaccine administration. Methods Between April 2011 and November 2012, we conducted an open label, randomized trial to compare the immunogenicity of Rotarix (RV1) in infants whose breastfeeding was withheld one hour before through one hour after vaccination with that in infants breastfed at the time of vaccination. The trial was conducted in the peri-urban area of Ibrahim Hyderi in Karachi, Pakistan. Both groups received three doses of RV1 at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age. Seroconversion (anti-rotavirus IgA antibodies ≥20 U/mL in subjects seronegative at 6 weeks of age) following three vaccine doses (6, 10 and 14 weeks) was determined at 18 weeks of age (primary objective) and seroconversion following two doses (6 and 10 weeks) was determined at 14 weeks of age (secondary objective). Results Four hundred eligible infants were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio between the withholding breastfeeding and immediate breastfeeding arms. Overall, 353 (88.3%) infants completed the study according to protocol; 181 in the withholding breastfeeding group and 172 in the immediate breastfeeding group. After three RV1 doses, anti-rotavirus IgA antibody seroconversion was 28.2% (95% CI: 22.1; 35.1) in the withholding arm and 37.8% (95% CI: 30.9; 45.2) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -9.6% [95% CI: -19.2; 0.2] p=0.07). After two doses of RV1, seroconversion was 16.6% (95% CI: 11.9; 22.7) in the withholding arm and 29.1% (95% CI: 22.8, 36.3) in the immediate breastfeeding arm (difference: -12.5% [95% CI: -21.2,-3.8] p=0.005). Conclusions Withholding breastfeeding around the time of RV1 vaccine administration did not lead to increased anti-rotavirus IgA seroconversion compared with that seen with a

  5. Vaccines.gov

    MedlinePlus

    ... Getting Vaccinated More Info Glossary Our Partners Related Websites AIDS.gov Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA) CDC Vaccines Countermeasures Injury Compensation Program ...

  6. SMS text message reminders to improve infant vaccination coverage in Guatemala: A pilot randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Domek, Gretchen J.; Contreras-Roldan, Ingrid L.; O’Leary, Sean T.; Bull, Sheana; Furniss, Anna; Kempe, Allison; Asturias, Edwin J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient reminder systems are an evidence-based way to improve childhood vaccination rates but are difficult to implement in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Short Message Service (SMS) texts may offer a potential low-cost solution, especially in LMICs where mobile phones are becoming more ubiquitous. Objective To determine if an SMS-based vaccination reminder system aimed at improving completion of the infant primary immunization series is feasible and acceptable in Guatemala. Methods A pilot randomized controlled trial was conducted at two public health clinics in Guatemala City. Infants aged 8–14 weeks presenting for the first dose of the primary immunization series were enrolled in March–April 2013. Participants randomized into the intervention received three SMS reminders one week before the second and third dose. A follow-up acceptability survey was administered to both groups. Results The participation rate was 86.8% (321/370); 8 did not own a cell phone and 12 could not use SMS. 96.9% of intervention parents were sent at least one SMS reminder prior to visit 2 and 96.3% prior to visit 3. Both intervention and usual care participants had high rates of vaccine and visit completion, with a non-statistically significant higher percentage of children in the intervention completing both visit 2 (95.0% vs. 90.1%, p = .12) and visit 3 (84.4% vs. 80.7%, p = .69). More intervention vs. usual care parents agreed that SMS reminders would be helpful for remembering appointments (p < .0001), agreed to being interested in receiving future SMS reminders (p < .0001), and said that they would be willing to pay for future SMS reminders (p = .01). Conclusion This proof of concept evaluation showed that a new application of SMS technology is feasible to implement in a LMIC with high user satisfaction. Larger studies with modifications in the SMS system are needed to determine effectiveness (Clinical Trial Registry NCT01663636). PMID:27026145

  7. Human Phase 1 trial of low-dose inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant.

    PubMed

    Gordon, David L; Sajkov, Dimitar; Honda-Okubo, Yoshikazu; Wilks, Samuel H; Aban, Malet; Barr, Ian G; Petrovsky, Nikolai

    2016-07-19

    Influenza vaccines are usually non-adjuvanted but addition of adjuvant may improve immunogenicity and permit dose-sparing, critical for vaccine supply in the event of an influenza pandemic. The aim of this first-in-man study was to determine the effect of delta inulin adjuvant on the safety and immunogenicity of a reduced dose seasonal influenza vaccine. Healthy male and female adults aged 18-65years were recruited to participate in a randomized controlled study to compare the safety, tolerability and immunogenicity of a reduced-dose 2007 Southern Hemisphere trivalent inactivated influenza vaccine formulated with Advax™ delta inulin adjuvant (LTIV+Adj) when compared to a full-dose of the standard TIV vaccine which does not contain an adjuvant. LTIV+Adj provided equivalent immunogenicity to standard TIV vaccine as assessed by hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays against each vaccine strain as well as against a number of heterosubtypic strains. HI responses were sustained at 3months post-immunisation in both groups. Antibody landscapes against a large panel of H3N2 influenza viruses showed distinct age effects whereby subjects over 40years old had a bimodal baseline HI distribution pattern, with the highest HI titers against the very oldest H3N2 isolates and with a second HI peak against influenza isolates from the last 5-10years. By contrast, subjects >40years had a unimodal baseline HI distribution with peak recognition of H3N2 isolates from approximately 20years ago. The reduced dose TIV vaccine containing Advax adjuvant was well tolerated and no safety issues were identified. Hence, delta inulin may be a useful adjuvant for use in seasonal or pandemic influenza vaccines. Australia New Zealand Clinical Trial Registry: ACTRN12607000599471. PMID:27342914

  8. [VACCINES].

    PubMed

    Bellver Capella, Vincente

    2015-10-01

    Vaccines are an extraordinary instrument of immunization of the population against infectious diseases. Around them there are many ethical issues. One of the most debated is what to do with certain groups opposition to vaccination of their children. States have managed in different ways the conflict between the duty of vaccination and the refusal to use vaccines: some impose the vaccination and others simply promote it. In this article we deal with which of these two approaches is the most suitable from an ethical and legal point of view. We stand up for the second option, which is the current one in Spain, and we propose some measures which should be kept in mind to improve immunization programs. PMID:26685562

  9. Pregnancy Incidence and Correlates during the HVTN 503 Phambili HIV Vaccine Trial Conducted among South African Women

    PubMed Central

    Latka, Mary H.; Fielding, Katherine; Gray, Glenda E.; Bekker, Linda-Gail; Nchabeleng, Maphoshane; Mlisana, Koleka; Nielson, Tanya; Roux, Surita; Mkhize, Baningi; Mathebula, Matsontso; Naicker, Nivashnee; de Bruyn, Guy; Kublin, James; Churchyard, Gavin J.

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV prevention trials are increasingly being conducted in sub-Saharan Africa. Women at risk for HIV are also at risk of pregnancy. To maximize safety, women agree to avoid pregnancy during trials, yet pregnancies occur. Using data from the HVTN 503/“Phambili” vaccine trial, we report pregnancy incidence during and after the vaccination period and identify factors, measured at screening, associated with incident pregnancy. Methods To enrol in the trial, women agreed and were supported to avoid pregnancy until 1 month after their third and final vaccination (“vaccination period”), corresponding to the first 7 months of follow-up. Unsterilized women, pooled across study arms, were analyzed. Poisson regression compared pregnancy rates during and after the vaccination period. Cox proportional hazards regression identified associations with first pregnancy. Results Among 352 women (median age 23 yrs; median follow-up 1.5 yrs), pregnancy incidence was 9.6/100 women-years overall and 6.8/100 w-yrs and 11.3/100 w-yrs during and after the vaccination period, respectively [Rate Ratio = 0.60 (0.32–1.14), p = 0.10]. In multivariable analysis, pregnancy was reduced among women who: enrolled at sites providing contraception on-site [HR = 0.43, 95% CI (0.22–0.86)]; entered the trial as injectable contraceptive users [HR = 0.37 (0.21–0.67)] or as consistent condom users (trend) [HR = 0.54 (0.28–1.04)]. Compared with women with a single partner of HIV-unknown status, pregnancy rates were increased among women with: a single partner whose status was HIV-negative [HR = 2.34(1.16–4.73)] and; 2 partners both of HIV-unknown status [HR = 4.42(1.59–12.29)]. Women with 2 more of these risk factors: marijuana use, heavy drinking, or use of either during sex, had increased pregnancy incidence [HR = 2.66 (1.24–5.72)]. Conclusions It is possible to screen South African women for pregnancy risk at trial entry. Providing injectable

  10. Immunogenicity and safety results from a randomized multicenter trial comparing a Tdap-IPV vaccine (REPEVAX®) and a tetanus monovalent vaccine in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Laurichesse, Henri; Zimmermann, Ulrich; Galtier, Florence; Launay, Odile; Duval, Xavier; Richard, Patrick; Sadorge, Christine; Soubeyrand, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    In adults with a tetanus-prone injury, combined vaccines such as Tdap-IPV (REPEVAX®) can boost immunity against several diseases simultaneously. This Phase IIIb, parallel-group, open-label trial compared antibody responses to Tdap-IPV and tetanus monovalent vaccine (TMV; Vaccin Tétanique Pasteur® or Tetavax®) against tetanus toxoid 10 and 28 d post-vaccination. Between July and December 2009, four centers in France and five in Germany recruited healthy adults who had received a tetanus-containing vaccine 5−10 y previously. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive at the first visit a single dose (0.5 mL) of Tdap-IPV or TMV, with follow-up visits at Day 10 and Day 28. Outcomes: per protocol (PP) population immunogenicity at Day 10 (primary) and at Day 28 (secondary); safety throughout the study. Of 456 adults randomized, 223 received Tdap-IPV and 233 received TMV (PP population: 183 and 199 participants, respectively). All participants receiving Tdap-IPV and 99.0% receiving TMV had an anti-tetanus antibody concentration ≥ 0.1 IU/mL, confirming non-inferiority of Tdap-IPV to TMV (95% confidence interval of the difference: –1.2, 3.6). Number of adverse events reported was comparable in each group. Injection-site reactions were reported by 76.6% participants receiving Tdap-IPV and 74.6% receiving TMV. Systemic events (e.g., malaise, myalgia and headache) were reported in 47.7% and 39.7% of the Tdap-IPV and the TMV groups, respectively. Tdap-IPV is effective and well-tolerated for use in the management of tetanus-prone injuries in emergency settings in persons for whom a booster against diphtheria, pertussis and poliomyelitis is also needed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00928785. Research sponsored by Sanofi Pasteur MSD. PMID:23032160

  11. Malaria vaccine.

    PubMed

    1994-05-01

    Some have argued that the vaccine against malaria developed by Manuel Pattaroyo, a Colombian scientist, is being tested prematurely in humans and that it is unlikely to be successful. While the Pattaroyo vaccine has been shown to confer protection against the relatively mild malaria found in Colombia, doubts exist over whether it will be effective in Africa. Encouraging first results, however, are emerging from field tests in Tanzania. The vaccine triggered a strong new immune response, even in individuals previously exposed to malaria. Additional steps must be taken to establish its impact upon mortality and morbidity. Five major trials are underway around the world. The creator estimates that the first ever effective malaria vaccine could be available for widespread use within five years and he has no intention of securing a patent for the discovery. In another development, malaria specialists from 35 African countries convened at an international workshop in Zimbabwe to compare notes. Participants disparaged financial outlays for the fight against malaria equivalent to 2% of total AIDS funding as insufficient; noted intercountry differences in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment; and found information exchange between anglophone and francophone doctors to be generally poor. PMID:12287671

  12. Using Facebook™ to Recruit College-Age Men for a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Raviotta, Jonathan M; Nowalk, Mary Patricia; Lin, Chyongchiou Jeng; Huang, Hsin-Hui; Zimmerman, Richard K

    2016-03-01

    College-age men were recruited using Facebook™ advertisements (ads), as well as traditional recruitment methods, for a randomized controlled trial to compare immunological responses to human papillomavirus vaccine administered in two dosing schedules. This study compares enrollees who were recruited through traditional recruitment methods versus social networking sites (SNSs), including Facebook. Potential participants were recruited using flyers posted on and off campus(es), and distributed at health fairs, classes, sporting, and other campus events; e-mails to students and student organizations; and print advertisements in student newspapers and on city buses. Facebook ads were displayed to users with specific age, geographic, and interest characteristics; ads were monitored daily to make adjustments to improve response. A total of 220 males, aged 18 to 25 years enrolled between October 2010 and May 2011. The majority of participants (51%) reported print advertisements as the method by which they first heard about the study, followed by personal contact (29%) and Facebook or other SNSs (20%). The likelihood of a SNS being the source by which the participant first heard about the study compared with traditional methods was increased if the participant reported (a) being homosexual or bisexual or (b) posting daily updates on SNSs. Facebook and other SNSs are a viable recruitment strategy for reaching potential clinical trial participants among groups who typically use social media to stay connected with their friends and hard-to-reach groups such as young men who self-identify as homosexual or bisexual. PMID:25389213

  13. Optimising and evaluating the characteristics of a multiple antigen ELISA for detection of Mycobacterium bovis infection in a badger vaccine field trial.

    PubMed

    Aznar, Inma; Frankena, Klaas; More, Simon J; Whelan, Clare; Martin, Wayne; Gormley, Eamonn; Corner, Leigh A L; Murphy, Denise; De Jong, Mart C M

    2014-01-01

    A long-term research programme has been underway in Ireland to evaluate the usefulness of badger vaccination as part of the national bTB (bovine tuberculosis) control strategy. This culminated in a field trial which commenced in county Kilkenny in 2009 to determine the effects of badger vaccination on Mycobacterium bovis transmission in badgers under field conditions. In the present study, we sought to optimise the characteristics of a multiplex chemiluminescent assay for detection of M. bovis infection in live badgers. Our goal was to maximise specificity, and therefore statistical power, during evaluation of the badger vaccine trial data. In addition, we also aimed to explore the effects of vaccination on test characteristics. For the test optimisation, we ran a stepwise logistic regression with analytical weights on the converted Relative Light Units (RLU) obtained from testing blood samples from 215 badgers captured as part of culling operations by the national Department of Agriculture, Food and the Marine (DAFM). The optimised test was applied to two other datasets obtained from two captive badger studies (Study 1 and Study 2), and the sensitivity and specificity of the test was attained separately for vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. During optimisation, test sensitivity was maximised (30.77%), while retaining specificity at 99.99%. When the optimised test was then applied to the captive badger studies data, we observed that test characteristics did not vary greatly between vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. However, a different time lag between infection and a positive test result was observed in vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers. We propose that the optimized multiplex immunoassay be used to analyse the vaccine trial data. In relation to the difference in the time lag observed for vaccinated and non-vaccinated badgers, we also present a strategy to enable the test to be used during trial evaluation. PMID:24983473

  14. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares

    PubMed Central

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein–peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  15. Computer-aided vaccine designing approach against fish pathogens Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare using bioinformatics softwares.

    PubMed

    Mahendran, Radha; Jeyabaskar, Suganya; Sitharaman, Gayathri; Michael, Rajamani Dinakaran; Paul, Agnal Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda and Flavobacterium columnare are two important intracellular pathogenic bacteria that cause the infectious diseases edwardsiellosis and columnaris in wild and cultured fish. Prediction of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) binding is an important issue in T-cell epitope prediction. In a healthy immune system, the T-cells must recognize epitopes and induce the immune response. In this study, T-cell epitopes were predicted by using in silico immunoinformatics approach with the help of bioinformatics tools that are less expensive and are not time consuming. Such identification of binding interaction between peptides and MHC alleles aids in the discovery of new peptide vaccines. We have reported the potential peptides chosen from the outer membrane proteins (OMPs) of E. tarda and F. columnare, which interact well with MHC class I alleles. OMPs from E. tarda and F. columnare were selected and analyzed based on their antigenic and immunogenic properties. The OMPs of the genes TolC and FCOL_04620, respectively, from E. tarda and F. columnare were taken for study. Finally, two epitopes from the OMP of E. tarda exhibited excellent protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Five epitopes from the OMP of F. columnare had good protein-peptide interaction when docked with MHC class I alleles. Further in vitro studies can aid in the development of potential peptide vaccines using the predicted peptides. PMID:27284239

  16. An HIV vaccine: how and when?

    PubMed Central

    Esparza, J.

    2001-01-01

    The best long-term hope for controlling the human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) pandemic is a safe, effective and affordable preventive vaccine, but its development has encountered unprecedented scientific challenges. The first phase I trial of an HIV vaccine was conducted in 1987. Subsequently, more than 30 candidate vaccines have been tested in over 60 phase I/II trials, involving approximately 10 000 healthy volunteers. Most of these trials have been conducted in the USA and Europe, but several have also been conducted in developing countries. The first phase III trials began in the USA in 1998 and in Thailand in 1999 to assess the efficacy of the first generation of HIV vaccines (based on the HIV envelope protein, gp120); the results will be available within the next 1-2 years. To accelerate the development of an HIV vaccine, additional candidate vaccines must be evaluated in parallel in both industrialized and developing countries. This will require international collaboration and coordination and critical ethical issues will need to be addressed. To ensure that future HIV vaccines contribute to the overall HIV/AIDS prevention effort, we should begin planning now on how best to use them. PMID:11799445

  17. A randomized controlled trial testing the efficacy of an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual.

    PubMed

    Wantland, Dean J; Holzemer, William L; Moezzi, Shahnaz; Willard, Suzanne S; Arudo, John; Kirksey, Kenn M; Portillo, Carmen J; Corless, Inge B; Rosa, María E; Robinson, Linda L; Nicholas, Patrice K; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Sefcik, Elizabeth F; Human, Sarie; Rivero, Marta M; Maryland, Mary; Huang, Emily

    2008-09-01

    This study investigates whether using an HIV/AIDS symptom management manual with self-care strategies for 21 common symptoms, compared to a basic nutrition manual, had an effect on reducing symptom frequency and intensity. A 775-person, repeated measures, randomized controlled trial was conducted over three months in 12 sites from the United States, Puerto Rico, and Africa to assess the relationship between symptom intensity with predictors for differences in initial symptom status and change over time. A mixed model growth analysis showed a significantly greater decline in symptom frequency and intensity for the group using the symptom management manual (intervention) compared to those using the nutrition manual (control) (t=2.36, P=0.018). The models identified three significant predictors for increased initial symptom intensities and in intensity change over time: (1) protease inhibitor-based therapy (increased mean intensity by 28%); (2) having comorbid illness (nearly twice the mean intensity); and (3) being Hispanic receiving care in the United States (increased the mean intensity by 2.5 times). In addition, the symptom manual showed a significantly higher helpfulness rating and was used more often compared to the nutrition manual. The reduction in symptom intensity scores provides evidence of the need for palliation of symptoms in individuals with HIV/AIDS, as well as symptoms and treatment side effects associated with other illnesses. The information from this study may help health care providers become more aware of self-management strategies that are useful to persons with HIV/AIDS and help them to assist patients in making informed choices. PMID:18400461

  18. Impact of prenatal education on maternal utilization of analgesic interventions at future infant vaccinations: a cluster randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Anna; Smart, Sarah; Sheedy, Matthuschka; Yoon, Eugene W; Vyas, Charmy; Parikh, Chaitya; Pillai Riddell, Rebecca; Shah, Vibhuti

    2014-07-01

    Analgesic interventions are not routinely used during vaccine injections in infants. Parents report a desire to mitigate injection pain, but lack the knowledge about how to do so. The objective of this cluster-randomized trial was to evaluate the effect of a parent-directed prenatal education teaching module about vaccination pain management on analgesic utilization at future infant vaccinations. Expectant mothers enrolled in prenatal classes at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto were randomized to a 20-30minute interactive presentation about vaccination pain management (experimental group) or general vaccination information (control group). Both presentations included a PowerPoint (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA, USA) and video presentation, take-home pamphlet, and "Question and Answer" period. The primary outcome was self-reported utilization of breastfeeding, sugar water, or topical anaesthetics at routine 2-month infant vaccinations. Between October 2012 and July 2013, 197 expectant mothers from 28 prenatal classes participated; follow-up was obtained in 174 (88%). Maternal characteristics did not differ (P>0.05) between groups. Utilization of one or more prespecified pain interventions occurred in 34% of participants in the experimental group, compared to 17% in the control group (P=0.01). Inclusion of a pain management module in prenatal classes led to increased utilization of evidence-based pain management interventions by parents at the 2-month infant vaccination appointment. Educating parents offers a novel and effective way of improving the quality of pain care delivered to infants during vaccination. Additional research is needed to determine if utilization can be bolstered further using techniques such as postnatal hospital reinforcement, reminder cards, and clinician education. PMID:24704427

  19. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and "flu-like" symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  20. NGlycolylGM3/VSSP Vaccine in Metastatic Breast Cancer Patients: Results of Phase I/IIa Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Ana; Hernandez, Julio; Ortiz, Ramón; Cepeda, Meylán; Perez, Kirenia; Car, Adriana; Viada, Carmen; Toledo, Darién; Guerra, Pedro Pablo; García, Elena; Arboláez, Migdacelys; Fernandez, Luis E

    2012-01-01

    Patients treated with vaccines based on NGlycolil gangliosides have showed benefit in progression free survival and overall survival. These molecules, which have been observed in breast cancer cells, are minimally or not expressed in normal human tissue and have been considered as antigen tumor-specific. For this reason they are very attractive to immunotherapy. A phase I/II clinical trial was carried out in metastatic breast cancer patients with the NGlycolylGM3/VSSP vaccine administered by subcutaneous route. Selecting the optimal biological doses of the vaccine in these patients was the principal objective based on the immunogenicity, efficacy and safety results. Six levels of doses of vaccine were studied. Treatment schedule consisted of five doses every two weeks and then monthly until reaching a fifteenth doses. Doses levels studied were 150, 300, 600, 900, 1200 and 1500 μg. Five patients in each level were included except at the 900 μg dose, in which ten patients were included. Immunogenicity was determined by levels of antibodies generated in patients after vaccination. The response criteria of evaluation in solid tumors (RECIST) was used to evaluate antitumoral effect. Safety was evaluated by Common Toxicity Criteria of Adverse Event (CTCAE). The vaccine administration was safe and immunogenic in all does levels. Most frequent adverse events related to vaccination were mild or moderate and were related to injection site reactions and “flu-like” symptoms. Vaccination induced specific anti-NeuGcGM3 IgM and IgG antibodies responses in all patients. Disease control (objective response or stable disease) was obtained in 72.7% of evaluated patients. Median overall survival was 15.9 months. Two patients of two different dose levels achieved overall survival values of about six years. The dose of 900 μg was selected as biological optimal dose in which overall survival was 28.5 months. PMID:23055739

  1. Vaccines

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... help the body defend itself against foreign invaders. As the antigens invade the body's tissues, they attract ... the suppressor T cells stop the attack. After a vaccination, the body will have a memory of ...

  2. Is the “3+3” dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial design suitable for therapeutic cancer vaccine development? A recommendation for alternative design

    PubMed Central

    Rahma, Osama E.; Gammoh, Emily; Simon, Richard M.; Khleif, Samir N.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Phase 1 clinical trials are generally conducted to identify the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or the biologically active dose (BAD) using a traditional dose escalation design. This design may not be applied to cancer vaccines, given their unique mechanism of action. The FDA recently published “Guidance for Industry: Clinical Considerations for Therapeutic Cancer Vaccines.” However, many questions about the design of cancer vaccine studies remain unanswered. Experimental Design We analyzed the toxicity profile in 239 phase 1 therapeutic cancer vaccine trials. We addressed the ability of dose escalation to determine the MTD or the BAD in trials that used a dose escalation design. Results The rate of grade 3/4 vaccine-related systemic toxicities was 1.25 adverse event per 100 patients and 2 per 1000 vaccines. Only 2 out of the 127 dose escalation trials reported vaccine-related dose limiting toxicities, both of which used bacterial vector vaccines. Out of the 116 trials analyzed for the dose-immune response relationship, we found a statistically significant dose-immune response correlation only when the immune response was measured by antibodies (p<0.001) or delayed type hypersensitivity (p<0.05). However, the increase in cellular immune response did not appear further sustainable with the continued increase in dose. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that the risks of serious toxicities with therapeutic cancer vaccines are extremely low and that toxicities do not correlate with dose levels. Accordingly, the conventional dose escalation design is not suitable for cancer vaccines with few exceptions. Here we propose an alternative design for therapeutic cancer vaccine development. PMID:25037736

  3. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial

    PubMed Central

    Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T. Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L’Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-01-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2–14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14’s active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  4. Symptomatic Dengue Disease in Five Southeast Asian Countries: Epidemiological Evidence from a Dengue Vaccine Trial.

    PubMed

    Nealon, Joshua; Taurel, Anne-Frieda; Capeding, Maria Rosario; Tran, Ngoc Huu; Hadinegoro, Sri Rezeki; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Chong, Chee Kheong; Wartel, T Anh; Beucher, Sophie; Frago, Carina; Moureau, Annick; Simmerman, Mark; Laot, Thelma; L'Azou, Maïna; Bouckenooghe, Alain

    2016-08-01

    Dengue incidence has increased globally, but empirical burden estimates are scarce. Prospective methods are best-able to capture all severities of disease. CYD14 was an observer-blinded dengue vaccine study conducted in children 2-14 years of age in Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand, the Philippines, and Vietnam. The control group received no vaccine and resembled a prospective, observational study. We calculated the rates of dengue according to different laboratory or clinical criteria to make inferences about dengue burden, and compared with rates reported in the passive surveillance systems to calculate expansion factors which describe under-reporting. Over 6,933 person-years of observation in the control group there were 319 virologically confirmed dengue cases, a crude attack rate of 4.6%/year. Of these, 92 cases (28.8%) were clinically diagnosed as dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever by investigators and 227 were not, indicating that most symptomatic disease fails to satisfy existing case definitions. When examining different case definitions, there was an inverse relationship between clinical severity and observed incidence rates. CYD14's active surveillance system captured a greater proportion of symptomatic dengue than national passive surveillance systems, giving rise to expansion factors ranging from 0.5 to 31.7. This analysis showed substantial, unpredictable and variable under-reporting of symptomatic dengue, even within a controlled clinical trial environment, and emphasizes that burden estimates are highly sensitive to case definitions. These data will assist in generating disease burden estimates and have important policy implications when considering the introduction and health economics of dengue prevention and control interventions. PMID:27532617

  5. Effect of Peer Health Workers on AIDS Care in Rakai, Uganda: A Cluster-Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Larry W.; Kagaayi, Joseph; Nakigozi, Gertrude; Ssempijja, Victor; Packer, Arnold H.; Serwadda, David; Quinn, Thomas C.; Gray, Ronald H.; Bollinger, Robert C.; Reynolds, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human resource limitations are a challenge to the delivery of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in low-resource settings. We conducted a cluster randomized trial to assess the effect of community-based peer health workers (PHW) on AIDS care of adults in Rakai, Uganda. Methodology/Principal Findings 15 AIDS clinics were randomized 2∶1 to receive the PHW intervention (n = 10) or control (n = 5). PHW tasks included clinic and home-based provision of counseling, clinical, adherence to ART, and social support. Primary outcomes were adherence and cumulative risk of virologic failure (>400 copies/mL). Secondary outcomes were virologic failure at each 24 week time point up to 192 weeks of ART. Analysis was by intention to treat. From May 2006 to July 2008, 1336 patients were followed. 444 (33%) of these patients were already on ART at the start of the study. No significant differences were found in lack of adherence (<95% pill count adherence risk ratio [RR] 0.55, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.23–1.35; <100% adherence RR 1.10, 95% CI 0.94–1.30), cumulative risk of virologic failure (RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.61–1.08) or in shorter-term virologic outcomes (24 week virologic failure RR 0.93, 95% CI 0.65–1.32; 48 week, RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.47–1.48; 72 week, RR 0.81, 95% CI 0.44–1.49). However, virologic failure rates ≥96 weeks into ART were significantly decreased in the intervention arm compared to the control arm (96 week failure RR 0.50, 95% CI 0.31–0.81; 120 week, RR 0.59, 95% CI 0.22–1.60; 144 week, RR 0.39, 95% CI 0.16–0.95; 168 week, RR 0.30, 95% CI 0.097–0.92; 192 week, RR 0.067, 95% CI 0.0065–0.71). Conclusions/Significance A PHW intervention was associated with decreased virologic failure rates occurring 96 weeks and longer into ART, but did not affect cumulative risk of virologic failure, adherence measures, or shorter-term virologic outcomes. PHWs may be an effective intervention to sustain long-term ART in low-resource settings

  6. Information Vaccine: Using Graphic Novels as an HIV/AIDS Prevention Resource for Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albright, Kendra S.; Gavigan, Karen

    2014-01-01

    HIV/AIDS infections are growing at an alarming rate for young adults. In 2009, youth, ages 13-29, accounted for 39% of all new HIV infections in the U.S. (Division of HIV/ AIDS Prevention, Centers for Disease Control (CDC), 2011). South Carolina ranks eighth in the nation for new HIV cases, while the capital city of Columbia ranks seventh…

  7. Perceived need of a parental decision aid for the HPV vaccine: content and format preferences.

    PubMed

    Lechuga, Julia; Swain, Geoffrey; Weinhardt, Lance S

    2012-03-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a precursor of cervical cancer. In 2006, the Federal Drug Administration licensed a vaccine to protect against four types of HPV. Three years postlicensure of the vaccine, HPV vaccination is still fraught with controversy. To date, research suggests that contrary to popular notions, parents are less concerned with controversies on moral issues and more with uncertainty regarding because long-term safety of a drug is resolved after licensure. This study was designed to understand whether mothers from diverse ethnicities perceive a need for a decision support tool. Results suggest that the design of a culturally tailored decision support tool may help guide parents through the decision-making process. PMID:21444922

  8. A Phase I, Open-Label Trial, Evaluating the Safety and Immunogenicity of Candidate Tuberculosis Vaccines AERAS-402 and MVA85A, Administered by Prime-Boost Regime in BCG-Vaccinated Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Satti, Iman; Hokey, David A.; Dheenadhayalan, Veerabadran; Stockdale, Lisa; Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; Minhinnick, Alice; Wilkie, Morven; Vermaak, Samantha; Meyer, Joel; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Pau, Maria Grazia; Versteege, Isabella; Douoguih, Macaya; Hendriks, Jenny; Sadoff, Jerald; Landry, Bernard; Moss, Paul; McShane, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Background MVA85A and AERAS-402 are two clinically advanced viral vectored TB vaccine candidates expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens designed to boost BCG-induced immunity. Clinical trials with candidate malaria vaccines have demonstrated that adenoviral vector based priming immunisation, followed by MVA vector boost, induced high levels of immunity. We present the safety and immunogenicity results of the first clinical trial to evaluate this immunisation strategy in TB. Methods In this phase 1, open-label trial, 40 healthy previously BCG-vaccinated participants were enrolled into three treatment groups and vaccinated with 1 or 2 doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A; or 3 doses of AERAS-402. Results Most related adverse events (AEs) were mild and there were no vaccine related serious AEs. Boosting AERAS-402 with MVA85A significantly increased Ag85A-specific T-cell responses from day of vaccination. Two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A boost, resulted in a significantly higher AUC post-peak Ag85A response compared to three doses of AERAS-402 and historical data with MVA85A vaccination alone. The frequency of CD8+ T-cells producing IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 was highest in the group receiving two priming doses of AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A. Conclusions Vaccination with AERAS-402 followed by MVA85A was safe and increased the durability of antigen specific T-cell responses and the frequency and polyfunctionality of CD8+ T-cells, which may be important in protection against TB. Further clinical trials with adenoviral prime-MVA85A boost regimens are merited to optimise vaccination intervals, dose and route of immunisation and to evaluate this strategy in the target population in TB high burden countries. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01683773. PMID:26529238

  9. Text messaging reminders for influenza vaccine in primary care: a cluster randomised controlled trial (TXT4FLUJAB)

    PubMed Central

    Herrett, Emily; Williamson, Elizabeth; van Staa, Tjeerd; Ranopa, Michael; Free, Caroline; Chadborn, Tim; Goldacre, Ben; Smeeth, Liam

    2016-01-01

    Objectives (1) To develop methods for conducting cluster randomised trials of text messaging interventions utilising routine electronic health records at low cost; (2) to assess the effectiveness of text messaging influenza vaccine reminders in increasing vaccine uptake in patients with chronic conditions. Design Cluster randomised trial with general practices as clusters. Setting English primary care. Participants 156 general practices, who used text messaging software, who had not previously used text message influenza vaccination reminders. Eligible patients were aged 18–64 in ‘at-risk’ groups. Interventions Practices were randomly allocated to either an intervention or standard care arm in the 2013 influenza season (September to December). Practices in the intervention arm were asked to send a text message influenza vaccination reminder to their at-risk patients under 65. Practices in the standard care arm were asked to continue their influenza campaign as planned. Blinding Practices were not blinded. Analysis was performed blinded to practice allocation. Main outcome measures Practice-level influenza vaccine uptake among at-risk patients aged 18–64 years. Results 77 practices were randomised to the intervention group (76 analysed, n at-risk patients=51 121), 79 to the standard care group (79 analysed, n at-risk patients=51 136). The text message increased absolute vaccine uptake by 2.62% (95% CI −0.09% to 5.33%), p=0.058, though this could have been due to chance. Within intervention clusters, a median 21.0% (IQR 10.2% to 47.0%) of eligible patients were sent a text message. The number needed to treat was 7.0 (95% CI −0.29 to 14.3). Conclusions Patient follow-up using routine electronic health records is a low cost method of conducting cluster randomised trials. Text messaging reminders are likely to result in modest improvements in influenza vaccine uptake, but levels of patients being texted need to markedly increase if text messaging

  10. Safety and immunogenicity of Ontario Rabies Vaccine Bait (ONRAB) in the first us field trial in raccoons (Procyon lotor).

    PubMed

    Slate, Dennis; Chipman, Richard B; Algeo, Timothy P; Mills, Samuel A; Nelson, Kathleen M; Croson, Christopher K; Dubovi, Edward J; Vercauteren, Kurt; Renshaw, Randall W; Atwood, Todd; Johnson, Shylo; Rupprecht, Charles E

    2014-07-01

    In 2011, we conducted a field trial in rural West Virginia, USA to evaluate the safety and immunogenicity of a live, recombinant human adenovirus (AdRG1.3) rabies virus glycoprotein vaccine (Ontario Rabies Vaccine Bait; ONRAB) in wild raccoons (Procyon lotor) and striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis). We selected ONRAB for evaluation because of its effectiveness in raccoon rabies management in Ontario and Quebec, Canada, and significantly higher antibody prevalence rates in raccoons compared with a recombinant vaccinia-rabies glycoprotein (V-RG) vaccine, Raboral V-RG®, in US-Canada border studies. Raccoon rabies was enzootic and oral rabies vaccination (ORV) had never been used in the study area. We distributed 79,027 ONRAB baits at 75 baits/km(2) mostly by fixed-wing aircraft along parallel flight lines at 750-m intervals. Antibody prevalence was significantly higher at 49.2% (n=262) in raccoons after ONRAB was distributed than the 9.6% (n=395) before ORV. This was the highest antibody prevalence observed in raccoons by US Department of Agriculture Wildlife Services for areas with similar management histories evaluated before and after an initial ORV campaign at 75 baits/km(2) with Raboral V-RG. Tetracycline biomarker (TTCC) was significantly higher among antibody-positive raccoons after ONRAB baiting and was similar among raccoons before ORV had been conducted, an indication of vaccine-induced rabies virus-neutralizing antibody production following consumption of bait containing TTCC. Skunk sample size was inadequate to assess ONRAB effects. Safety and immunogenicity results supported replication of this field trial and led to a recommendation for expanded field trials in 2012 to evaluate safety and immunogenicity of ground-distributed ONRAB at 150 baits/km(2) in residential and commercial habitats in Ohio, USA and aerially distributed ONRAB at 75 baits/km(2) in rural habitats along US-Quebec border. PMID:24807178