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1

Air cathode structure manufacture  

DOEpatents

An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

Momyer, William R. (Palo Alto, CA); Littauer, Ernest L. (Los Altos Hills, CA)

1985-01-01

2

Degradation characteristics of air cathode in zinc air fuel cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) is a promising candidate for electrical energy storage and electric vehicle propulsion. However, its limited durability has become a major obstacle for its successful commercialization. In this study, 2-cell stacks, 25 cm² cells and three-electrode half-cells are constructed to experimentally investigate the degradation characteristics of the air cathode. The results of electrochemical tests reveal that the peak power density for the 25 cm2 cell with a new air cathode is 454 mW cm-2, which is twice as the value of the used air cathode. The electrochemical impedance analysis shows that both the charge transfer resistance and the mass transfer resistance of the used air cathodes have increased, suggesting that the catalyst surface area and gas diffusion coefficient have decreased significantly. Additionally, the microstructure and morphology of the catalytic layer (CL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are characterized by scanning electron microscopes (SEM). SEM results confirm that the micropores in CL and GDL of the used air cathode are seriously clogged, and many catalyst particles are lost. Therefore, the performance degradation is mainly due to the clogging of micropores and loss of catalyst particles. Furthermore, hypotheses of degradation mechanism and mitigation strategies for GDL and CL are discussed briefly.

Ma, Ze; Pei, Pucheng; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Xu, Huachi; Liu, Yongfeng; peng, Guanlin

2015-01-01

3

Investigation of the Gas-Diffusion-Electrode Used as Lithium/Air Cathode in Non-aqueous Electrolyte and the Importance of Carbon Material Porosity  

SciTech Connect

The gas-diffusion-electrode used in a Li-air cell has been studied in a unique homemade electrochemical cell. Three major obstacles for the development of a feasible Li-air system were discussed with a focus on the development of a functional gas-diffusion-electrode in non-aqueous electrolytes and the way of avoiding the passivation of gas-diffusion-electrodes caused by the deposition of the reduction products. It is the first time that the importance of establishing the 3-phase electrochemical interface in non-aqueous electrolyte is demonstrated by creating air-diffusion paths and an air saturated portion for an air cathode. A model mechanism of electrode passivation by the reaction products was also proposed. Lithium oxides formed during O{sub 2} reduction tend to block small pores, preventing them from further utilization in the electrochemical reaction. On the other hand, lithium oxides would accumulate inside the large pores during the reduction until the density of oxides becomes high enough to choke-off the mass transfer. Carbon materials with a high surface area associated with larger pores should be selected to make the gas-diffusion-electrode for Li-air battery. For the first time, a near linear relationship between the capacity of GDE in a non-aqueous electrolyte and the average pore diameter was demonstrated, which could be used to estimate the capacity of the GDE quantitatively.

Qu, D.; Yang, X.; Tran, C.

2010-04-02

4

Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m-2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation.

Ahn, Yongtae; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

2014-02-01

5

Electro-fenton and photoelectro-fenton degradation of sulfanilic acid using a boron-doped diamond anode and an air diffusion cathode.  

PubMed

The mineralization of sulfanilic acid has been studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) reaction with UVA light using an undivided electrochemical cell with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air diffusion cathode able to generate H(2)O(2). Organics were then oxidized by hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between generated H(2)O(2) and added Fe(2+). The UVA irradiation in PEF enhanced the production of hydroxyl radicals in the bulk, accelerating the removal of organics and photodecomposed intermediates like Fe(III)-carboxylate complexes. Partial decontamination of 1.39 mM sulfanilic acid solutions was achieved by EF until 100 mA cm(-2) at optimum conditions of 0.4 mM Fe(2+) and pH 3.0. The increase in current density and substrate content led to an almost total mineralization. In contrast, the PEF process was more powerful, yielding almost complete mineralization in less electrolysis time under comparable conditions. The kinetics for sulfanilic acid decay always followed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone were detected as aromatic intermediates, whereas acetic, maleic, formic, oxalic, and oxamic acids were identified as generated carboxylic acids. NH(4)(+) ion was preferentially released in both treatments, along with NO(3)(-) ion in smaller proportion. PMID:22404230

El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Garrido, José Antonio; Centellas, Francesc; Arias, Conchita; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Brillas, Enric

2012-04-01

6

A dual pore carbon aerogel based air cathode for a highly rechargeable lithium-air battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cathode structure plays a vital role in lithium-air battery for that it can provide space for discharged products accommodation and free path for oxygen, e- and Li+ transport. However, pore blockage, cathode passivation and degradation all result in low discharge rates and poor cycling capability. To get rid of these predicaments, a novel highly conductive dual pore carbon aerogel based air cathode is fabricated to construct a lithium-air battery, which exhibits 18 to 525 cycles in the LiTFSI/sulfolane electrolyte at a current density varying from 1.00 mA cm-2 to 0.05 mA cm-2, accompanied by a high energy efficiency of 78.32%. We postulate that the essence lies in that the as-prepared air cathode inventively create a suitable tri-phase boundary reaction zone, facilitating oxygen and Li+ diffusion in two independant pore channels, thus realizing a relative higher discharge rate capability, lower pore blockage and cathode passivation. Further, pore structure, carbon loading, rate capability, discharge depth and the air's effect are exploited and coordinated, targeting for a high power and reversible lithium-air battery. Such nano-porous carbon aerogel air cathode of novel dual pore structure and material design is expected to be an attractive alternative for lithium-air batteries and other lithium based batteries.

Wang, Fang; Xu, Yang-Hai; Luo, Zhong-Kuan; Pang, Yan; Wu, Qi-Xing; Liang, Chun-Sheng; Chen, Jing; Liu, Dong; Zhang, Xiang-hua

2014-12-01

7

Gas transport evaluation in lithium-air batteries with micro/nano-structured cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inefficient gas transport in the porous cathode is disastrous for the lithium-air battery to achieve a high electrochemical performance. Previous evaluation of the cathode diffusivity relies on indirect calculations based on multiple V-I data obtained over the intact battery system, which inevitably induces evaluation uncertainty and material waste. In this report, an electrochemical device is designed for the out-of-cell diffusivity measurement in the lithium-air battery with micro/nano-sized cathodes. With the measured diffusivity, a few electrochemical parameters including the limiting current density and the concentration polarization associated with the porous cathodes can thus be directly evaluated. The work facilitates the development of highly-efficient cathode materials in the general field of metal-air battery field.

Wang, Xiaoning; Wen, Kechun; Song, Yuanqiang; Ye, Luhan; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Pan, Yu; Lv, Weiqiang; Liao, Yulong; He, Weidong

2015-01-01

8

Approaches to methanol-tolerant air cathodes for methanol-air fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of truly methanol-tolerant oxygen cathodes will greatly assist the development of direct methanol-air fuel cells, because the cathode performance will not be affected by the presence of methanol or its oxidation products, which can diffuse across the cell from the anode. In addition, methanol will not be consumed at the cathode. Although platinum-based oxygen cathodes can continue to perform well in the presence of methanol under certain conditions, methanol can be consumed rapidly at such electrodes. Oxygen electrocatalysts were examined in the present work which are largely inactive for methanol oxidation and are also not affected significantly by the presence of methanol. These included heat-treated transition metal macrocycles and hydrated ruthenium dioxide. The most promising electrocatalyst examines thus far is heat-treated iron tetramethoxyphenylporphyrin supported on high area carbon.

Tryk, D.A.; Gupta, S.L.; Aldred, W.H.; Yeager, E.B. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)

1994-12-31

9

Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 ?m pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

2014-12-01

10

High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

Xing, Yangchuan

2013-08-22

11

Air-cathode structure optimization in separator-coupled microbial fuel cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microbial fuel cells (MFC) with 30% wet-proofed air cathodes have previously been optimized to have 4 diffusion layers (DLs) in order to limit oxygen transfer into the anode chamber and optimize performance. Newer MFC designs that allow close electrode spacing have a separator that can also reduce oxygen transfer into the anode chamber, and there are many types of carbon

Xiaoyuan Zhang; Haotian Sun; Peng Liang; Xia Huang; Xi Chen; Bruce E. Logan

2011-01-01

12

Battery with modular air cathode and anode cage  

DOEpatents

A battery assembly of the consumable metal anode type has now been constructed for ready assembly as well as disassembly. In a non-conductive and at least substantially inert cell body, space is provided for receiving an open-structured, non-consumable anode cage. The cage has an open top for facilitating insertion of an anode. A modular cathode is used, comprising a peripheral current conductor frame clamped about a grid reinforced air cathode in sheet form. The air cathode may be double gridded. The cathode frame can be sealed, during assembly, with electrolyte-resistant-sealant as well as with adhesive. The resulting cathode module can be assembled outside the cell body and readily inserted therein, or can later be easily removed therefrom.

Niksa, Marilyn J. (Painesville, OH); Pohto, Gerald R. (Mentor, OH); Lakatos, Leslie K. (Mentor, OH); Wheeler, Douglas J. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Niksa, Andrew J. (Painesville, OH); Schue, Thomas J. (Huntsburg, OH)

1987-01-01

13

Battery with modular air cathode and anode cage  

DOEpatents

A battery assembly of the consumable metal anode type has now been constructed for ready assembly as well as disassembly. In a non-conductive and at least substantially inert cell body, space is provided for receiving an open-structured, non-consumable anode cage. The cage has an open top for facilitating insertion of an anode. A modular cathode is used, comprising a peripheral current conductor frame clamped about a grid reinforced air cathode in sheet form. The air cathode may be double gridded. The cathode frame can be sealed, during assembly, with electrolyte-resistant-sealant as well as with adhesive. The resulting cathode module can be assembled outside the cell body and readily inserted therein, or can later be easily removed therefrom.

Niksa, Marilyn J. (Painesville, OH); Pohto, Gerald R. (Mentor, OH); Lakatos, Leslie K. (Mentor, OH); Wheeler, Douglas J. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Niksa, Andrew J. (Painesville, OH); Schue, Thomas J. (Huntsburg, OH); Turk, Thomas R. (Mentor, OH)

1988-01-01

14

Ab initio screening of lithium diffusion rates in transition metal oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries  

E-print Network

A screening metric for diffusion limitations in lithium ion battery cathodes is derived using transition state theory and common materials properties. The metric relies on net activation barrier for lithium diffusion. ...

Moore, Charles J. (Charles Jacob)

2012-01-01

15

Microbial fuel cell cathodes with poly(dimethylsiloxane) diffusion layers constructed around stainless steel mesh current collectors.  

PubMed

A new and simplified approach for making cathodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was developed by using metal mesh current collectors and inexpensive polymer/carbon diffusion layers (DLs). Rather than adding a current collector to a cathode material such as carbon cloth, we constructed the cathode around the metal mesh itself, thereby avoiding the need for the carbon cloth or other supporting material. A base layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and carbon black was applied to the air-side of a stainless steel mesh, and Pt on carbon black with Nafion binder was applied to the solution-side as catalyst for oxygen reduction. The PDMS prevented water leakage and functioned as a DL by limiting oxygen transfer through the cathode and improving coulombic efficiency. PDMS is hydrophobic, stable, and less expensive than other DL materials, such as PTFE, that are commonly applied to air cathodes. Multiple PDMS/carbon layers were applied in order to optimize the performance of the cathode. Two PDMS/carbon layers achieved the highest maximum power density of 1610 +/- 56 mW/m(2) (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.0 +/- 1.6 W/m(3) based on liquid volume). This power output was comparable to the best result of 1635 +/- 62 mW/m(2) obtained using carbon cloth with three PDMS/carbon layers and a Pt catalyst. The coulombic efficiency of the mesh cathodes reached more than 80%, and was much higher than the maximum of 57% obtained with carbon cloth. These findings demonstrate that cathodes can be constructed around metal mesh materials such as stainless steel, and that an inexpensive coating of PDMS can prevent water leakage and lead to improved coulombic efficiencies. PMID:20099808

Zhang, Fang; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

2010-02-15

16

A Li-O?/air battery using an inorganic solid-state air cathode.  

PubMed

The "(-) lithium (Li) anode|organic anolyte + inorganic catholyte|solid-state cathode (+)" Li-O2/air battery based on an inorganic solid-state air cathode was fabricated with a simple method. The electrochemical performance and reaction products of the Li-O2/air batteries under pure O2 and ambient air were investigated, respectively. The inorganic Li-ion conductive solid-state electrolyte Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO4)3 was stable during cycling and avoided the decomposition and volatilization problems that conventional organic electrolytes faced. Moreover, the porous air cathode provided a sufficient gas-phase O2-transport channel, facilitating the achievement of a high capacity of 14192 or 7869 mA h g(-1) under pure O2 or ambient air, respectively. Our results demonstrate that the Li-O2/air battery using an inorganic porous air cathode has a great potential for practical application. PMID:24959838

Wang, Xiaofei; Zhu, Ding; Song, Ming; Cai, Shengrong; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Yungui

2014-07-23

17

A Comparison of Fick and Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion Formulations in PEMFC Cathode Gas Diffusion Layers  

E-print Network

This paper explores the mathematical formulations of Fick and Maxwell-Stefan diffusion in the context of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell cathode gas diffusion layers. Formulations of diffusion combined with mass-averaged Darcy flow are considered for three component gases. Fick formulations can be considered as approximations of Maxwell-Stefan in a certain sense. For this application, the formulations can be compared computationally in a simple, one dimensional setting. We observe that the predictions of the formulations are very similar, despite their seemingly different structure. Analytic insight is given to the result. In addition, it is seen that for both formulations, diffusion laws are small perturbations from bulk flow. The work is also intended as a reference to multi-component gas diffusion formulations in the fuel cell setting.

Lindstrom, Michael

2013-01-01

18

Atmospheric diffusion fundamentals for air pollution applications  

Microsoft Academic Search

Following a description of the role played by the atmospheric boundary layer in controlling air pollution, the theory and parameterization of atmospheric diffusion are discussed. Diffusion in exceptional flows, such as over cities, water, complex terrain etc., is summarized together with diffusion modeling in air pollution applications. A course in the meteorology of air pollution is outlined.

F. A. Gifford Jr.

1977-01-01

19

Review of Cold Cathode Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate (AFRL\\/DE) has engaged in a high current density field emission cathode research program. This program explored the aspects of cathode materials as well as the details of cathode geometries and emission physics. This paper summarizes the results of this ongoing research effort to date. We review the history

Don Shiffler; Michael Haworth; Keith Cartwright; Ryan Umstattd; Mitch Ruebush; Susan Heidger; Matthew Lacour; Ken Golby; Don Sullivan; Peter Duselis; John Luginsland

2008-01-01

20

Corrosion properties of diffusion coatings under the conditions of cathode protection  

Microsoft Academic Search

Conclusions  We have developed a computational-experimental model for determining the parameters of the corrosion process under the conditions\\u000a of cathode protection, which allowed us to establish that the cathode protection substantially reduces the losses to corrosion\\u000a in carburized, nitrided, diffusion calorized, and chromized coatings.

Yu. A. Puchkov; V. A. Larkin

2000-01-01

21

Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries  

SciTech Connect

BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Today’s EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

None

2010-08-01

22

COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells Xiaoyuan Zhang a,b  

E-print Network

COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells Xiaoyuan Zhang a,b , Weihua He c.E. Eastgate Way, Suite 100, Bellevue, WA 98007, USA h i g h l i g h t s COD removal in air-cathode MFCs fit first-order kinetics. Current generation accelerated COD removal for both acetate and wastewater. COD

23

Bent paths of a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons can produce large-area homogeneous discharges at elevated pressures, which is an intriguing phenomenon in the physics of pulsed discharges. In this paper, runaway-electron-preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) was obtained in a wide pressure range (0.05-0.25 MPa), and under certain conditions a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader could be observed to propagate at some angles to the applied (background) electric field lines. For a 16-mm gap at an air pressure of 0.08-0.1 MPa, the percentage of pulses in which such propagation is observed is about 5%-50% of their total number, and in the other pulses such bent paths could not be observed because there is even no streamer or cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges. In our opinion, such propagation of the positive streamer and the cathode-directed spark leader at some angle to the background electric field lines owes to different increase rates of the electron density in different regions of the discharge volume under REP DD conditions. Therefore, during the formation of a REP DD, the increase of the electron density is inhomogeneous and nonsimultaneous, resulting in an electron density gradient at the ionization wave front.

Zhang, Cheng; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shao, Tao; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Wang, Ruixue; Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Yan, Ping

2015-03-01

24

SOFC cathode\\/electrolyte interfaces. Part II: Study of NdAlO 3 diffusion barriers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The growth of La2Zr2O7 and SrZrO3 reaction layers at the cathode-electrolyte interface during the fabrication process and in operating conditions negatively affects the SOFC (solid oxide fuel cell) performance. In the present paper the effectiveness of diffusion barriers at the SOFC cathode-electrolyte interface is investigated. Thin layers of neodymium aluminate (NdAlO3) were evaporated onto yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrates and characterized

C. Brugnoni; U. Ducati; C. Chemelli; M. Scagliotti; G. Chiodelli

1995-01-01

25

Hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell with nickel-based gas diffusion cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas diffusion cathodes with Ni alloy and Ni catalysts manufactured by chemical deposition were tested for H2 production in a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). In a continuous flow MEC, multi-component cathodes containing Ni, Mo, Cr, and Fe, at a total catalyst load of 1mgcm?2 on carbon support demonstrated stable H2 production at rates of 2.8–3.7?L?LR?1?d?1 with only 5% methane in

M.-F. Manuel; V. Neburchilov; H. Wang; S. R. Guiot; B. Tartakovsky

2010-01-01

26

Molecular Dynamics Study of Lithium Diffusion in Lithium-Manganese Spinel Cathode Materials  

SciTech Connect

A series of molecular dynamics computer simulations of the self-diffusion of lithium in pure and several doped lithium-manganese spinel materials has been completed. The theoretical approach is part of an effort to understand the mechanisms and rates of lithium diffusion, and to evaluate the structural control of the cathode materials upon lithium intercalation (charge-discharge) process. The molecular dynamics approach employs a fully ionic forcefield that accounts for electrostatic, repulsive, and dispersion interactions among all ions.

Cygan, R.T.; Westrich, H.R.; Dought, D.H.

1998-01-01

27

Design of experiments and principal component analysis as approaches for enhancing performance of gas-diffusional air-breathing bilirubin oxidase cathode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two statistical methods, design of experiments (DOE) and principal component analysis (PCA) are employed to investigate and improve performance of air-breathing gas-diffusional enzymatic electrodes. DOE is utilized as a tool for systematic organization and evaluation of various factors affecting the performance of the composite system. Based on the results from the DOE, an improved cathode is constructed. The current density generated utilizing the improved cathode (755 ± 39 ?A cm-2 at 0.3 V vs. Ag/AgCl) is 2-5 times higher than the highest current density previously achieved. Three major factors contributing to the cathode performance are identified: the amount of enzyme, the volume of phosphate buffer used to immobilize the enzyme, and the thickness of the gas-diffusion layer (GDL). PCA is applied as an independent confirmation tool to support conclusions made by DOE and to visualize the contribution of factors in individual cathode configurations.

Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Ulyanova, Yevgenia; Singhal, Sameer; Atanassov, Plamen

2014-01-01

28

Features of a near-cathode region in a gliding arc discharge in air flow  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the results of the investigation of a low-current atmospheric-pressure discharge in air flow with electrode geometry typical of the so-called gliding arc. At a current of fractions of an ampere the discharge burns in a regime of normal glow rather than in an arc regime and the area of the negative glow plasma smoothly moves over the cathode surface under the effect of gas flow. At the background of the glow discharge, occasional creation of a spark cathode spot can occur. Then the discharge becomes attached to the cathode surface and the site of current attachment does not move due to the gas flow. The site of current attachment continues its smooth displacement when the cathode spot is spontaneously extinguished. The events when the cathode spot abruptly jumps to a new place of attachment downstream are also observed.

Korolev, Y. D.; Frants, O. B.; Landl, N. V.; Bolotov, A. V.; Nekhoroshev, V. O.

2014-10-01

29

Two-phase flow and transport in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two-phase flow and transport of reactants and products in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is studied analytically and numerically. Single- and two-phase regimes of water distribution and transport are classified by a threshold current density corresponding to first appearance of liquid water at the membrane\\/cathode interface. When the cell operates above the threshold current density,

Z. H. Wang; C. Y. Wang; K. S. Chen

2001-01-01

30

Degradation of 4-chlorophenol by the anodic-cathodic cooperative effect with a Pd/MWNT gas-diffusion electrode.  

PubMed

Pd/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) catalyst used for the gas-diffusion electrode was prepared by ethylene glycol (EG) reduction and characterized by the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM). The results indicated that Pd particles with an average size of 8.0 nm were highly dispersed in the MWNTs with amorphous structure. In a diaphragm electrolysis system with a Ti/RuO(2)/IrO(2) anode and the Pd/MWNT gas diffusion cathode, the degradation of 4-chlorophenol was performed by a combination of electrochemical reduction and oxidation. The combined process was in favor of improving 4-chlorophenol degradation efficiency. The optimum reaction conditions were as following: initial pH 7, aeration with hydrogen and air. Under the optimized electrolysis conditions the removal of 4-chlorophenol in the anodic and cathodic compartments were 98.5 and 90.5%, respectively. Additionally, based on the analysis of electrolysis intermediates using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ion chromatography (IC), the electrolysis degradation of 4-chlorophenol was proposed containing the intermediates, such as phenol, hydroquinone, benzoquinone, maleic acid, fumaric acid, succinic acid, malonic acid, oxalic acid, acetic acid and formic acid. PMID:22592472

Wang, H; Wei, X J; Bian, Z Y

2012-01-01

31

Electrodeposition of nickel particles on a gas diffusion cathode for hydrogen production in a microbial electrolysis cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gas diffusion cathodes with electrodeposited nickel (Ni) particles have been developed and tested for hydrogen production in a continuous flow microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). A high catalytic activity of electrodeposited Ni particles in such a MEC was obtained without a proton exchange membrane, i.e. under direct cathode exposure to anodic liquid. Co-electrodeposition of Pt and Ni particles did not improve

S. Hrapovic; M.-F. Manuel; J. H. T. Luong; S. R. Guiot; B. Tartakovsky

2010-01-01

32

Study of an unitised bidirectional vanadium/air redox flow battery comprising a two-layered cathode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of a unitised bidirectional vanadium/air redox flow battery (VARFB) is described. It contains a two-layered cathode consisting of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with Pt/C catalyst for discharging and of an IrO2 modified graphite felt for charging. A simple routine is shown for the modification of a graphite felt with IrO2. A maximum energy efficiency of 41.7% at a current density of 20 mA cm-2 as well as an average discharge power density of 34.6 mW cm-2 at 40 mA cm-2 were obtained for VARFB operation at room temperature with the novel cathode setup. A dynamic hydrogen electrode was used to monitor half cell potentials during operation allowing to quantify the contribution of the cathode to the overall performance of the VARFB. Four consecutive cycles revealed that crossover of vanadium ions took place and irreversible degradation processes within the reaction unit lead to a performance decrease.

grosse Austing, Jan; Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

2015-01-01

33

Evaluation of activated carbon adsorbent for fuel cell cathode air filtration  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effectiveness of a commercial activated carbon modified by KOH (KMAC) was evaluated as adsorbent for purifying NOx and SO2, which are the major contaminants in fuel cell cathode air stream. The N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms of KMAC samples showed that the surface structure of the activated carbon was changed significantly by KOH impregnation. The sample of KMAC with a loading

Xiaowei Ma; Daijun Yang; Wei Zhou; Cunman Zhang; Xiangmin Pan; Lin Xu; Minzhong Wu; Jianxin Ma

2008-01-01

34

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells  

E-print Network

Effect of nitrate on the performance of single chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells Chontisa Accepted 26 August 2008 Published online 11 September 2008 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Denitrification microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has drawn much attention recently as a new approach of waste- water treatment

Tullos, Desiree

35

Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air  

PubMed Central

Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

2014-01-01

36

Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air.  

PubMed

Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

Koster van Groos, Paul G; Esser, Bradley K; Williams, Ross W; Hunt, James R

2014-01-01

37

Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation. PMID:23240212

Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsuba?i, Alper Tunga

2012-09-01

38

Parameter Estimates for a PEMFC Cathode Qingzhi Guo,* Vijay A. Sethuraman,* and Ralph E. White**,z  

E-print Network

Parameter Estimates for a PEMFC Cathode Qingzhi Guo,* Vijay A. Sethuraman,* and Ralph E. White PEMFC cathode the volume fraction of gas pores in the gas diffusion layer, the volume fraction of gas the performance of PEMFC air cathodes. While ionic conduction influences cathode performance over a wide range

Sethuraman, Vijay A.

39

Stability of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite cathode in humidified air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stability of strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode has been studied using symmetric cells (humidified air, LSM/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)/LSM, humidified air) under a range of humidification levels (0-50%), temperatures (750-850 °C), and cathodic biases (0-0.5 V). Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy revealed an increase in non-ohmic resistance with increasing H2O/O2 ratio, temperature, and cathodic bias. Post-test surface and interface studies showed the segregation of SrO particles on the LSM surface and formation of Mn2O3 and La2Zr2O7 compounds at the cathodic LSM/YSZ interface. The increase in non-ohmic resistance is attributed to surface segregation of SrO and interfacial compound formation, whereas formation and growth of SrO at the LSM surface is attributed to water adsorption. La2Zr2O7 formation is attributed to interfacial reactions.

Hu, Boxun; Keane, Michael; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Singh, Prabhakar

2014-02-01

40

Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

2014-12-01

41

Electricity generation from synthetic penicillin wastewater in an air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

A single chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an air-cathode was successfully demonstrated using glucose–penicillin mixtures or penicillin as fuel. Results showed that penicillin can be degraded and produce electricity simultaneously. Interestingly, these glucose–penicillin mixtures played an active role in production of electricity. The maximum power density for 1gL?1 glucose+50mgL?1 penicillin (101.2Wm?3) was 6-fold higher than the sum of that

Qing Wen; Fanying Kong; Hongtao Zheng; Dianxue Cao; Yueming Ren; Jinling Yin

2011-01-01

42

One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries.

Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

2015-01-01

43

One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries  

PubMed Central

Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

2015-01-01

44

One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries.  

PubMed

Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

2015-01-01

45

Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified activated carbon as air-cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m(2), which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m(2)) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m(2)). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. PMID:23902951

Xia, Xue; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

2013-08-28

46

Diffusion of buta-1,3-diene (1); air (2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) buta-1,3-diene; (2) air

Winkelmann, J.

47

Influence of cathode gas diffusion media on the performance of the PEMFCs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The influence of gas diffusion media (GDM), i.e. carbon paper, on PEMFCs was studied. The study was based on GDM thickness pore size distribution, air-permeability, electronic resistance and hydrophobicity. Cell performances were correlated with the physical properties of the GDM and reasonable agreements were made based on the oxygen-gain which was regarded as an index of mass transfer in the

M. Prasanna; H. Y. Ha; E. A. Cho; S.-A. Hong; I.-H. Oh

2004-01-01

48

Electricity generation using an air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cell in the presence and absence of a proton exchange membrane.  

PubMed

Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are typically designed as a two-chamber system with the bacteria in the anode chamber separated from the cathode chamber by a polymeric proton exchange membrane (PEM). Most MFCs use aqueous cathodes where water is bubbled with air to provide dissolved oxygen to electrode. To increase energy output and reduce the cost of MFCs, we examined power generation in an air-cathode MFC containing carbon electrodes in the presence and absence of a polymeric proton exchange membrane (PEM). Bacteria present in domestic wastewater were used as the biocatalyst, and glucose and wastewater were tested as substrates. Power density was found to be much greater than typically reported for aqueous-cathode MFCs, reaching a maximum of 262 +/- 10 mW/m2 (6.6 +/- 0.3 mW/L; liquid volume) using glucose. Removing the PEM increased the maximum power density to 494 +/- 21 mW/m2 (12.5 +/- 0.5 mW/L). Coulombic efficiency was 40-55% with the PEM and 9-12% with the PEM removed, indicating substantial oxygen diffusion into the anode chamber in the absence of the PEM. Power output increased with glucose concentration according to saturation-type kinetics, with a half saturation constant of 79 mg/L with the PEM-MFC and 103 mg/L in the MFC without a PEM (1000 omega resistor). Similar results on the effect of the PEM on power density were found using wastewater, where 28 +/- 3 mW/m2 (0.7 +/- 0.1 mW/L) (28% Coulombic efficiency) was produced with the PEM, and 146 +/- 8 mW/m2 (3.7 +/- 0.2 mW/L) (20% Coulombic efficiency) was produced when the PEM was removed. The increase in power output when a PEM was removed was attributed to a higher cathode potential as shown by an increase in the open circuit potential. An analysis based on available anode surface area and maximum bacterial growth rates suggests that mediatorless MFCs may have an upper order-of-magnitude limit in power density of 10(3) mW/m2. A cost-effective approach to achieving power densities in this range will likely require systems that do not contain a polymeric PEM in the MFC and systems based on direct oxygen transfer to a carbon cathode. PMID:15298217

Liu, Hong; Logan, Bruce E

2004-07-15

49

Effects of azide on electron transport of exoelectrogens in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

The effects of azide on electron transport of exoelectrogens were investigated using air-cathode MFCs. These MFCs enriched with azide at the concentration higher than 0.5mM generated lower current and coulomb efficiency (CE) than the control reactors, but at the concentration lower than 0.2mM MFCs generated higher current and CE. Power density curves showed overshoot at higher azide concentrations, with power and current density decreasing simultaneously. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) showed that azide at high concentration increased the charge transfer resistance. These analyses might reflect that a part of electrons were consumed by the anode microbial population rather than transferred to the anode. Bacterial population analyses showed azide-enriched anodes were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria compared with the controls. Based on these results it is hypothesized that azide can eliminate the growth of aerobic respiratory bacteria, and at the same time is used as an electron acceptor/sink. PMID:25062537

Zhou, Xiangtong; Qu, Youpeng; Kim, Byung Hong; Choo, Pamela Yengfung; Liu, Jia; Du, Yue; He, Weihua; Chang, In Seop; Ren, Nanqi; Feng, Yujie

2014-10-01

50

Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates  

E-print Network

With the ever-increasing availability of high performance computing facilities, numerical simulation through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to predict the room air distribution. CFD is becoming an important design...

Gangisetti, Kavita

2011-02-22

51

Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications.An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA curves of as electrospun Co(ii)-PAN fiber and C-CoPAN900 EDX and XPS spectra of the C-CoPAN900 photo of a home-built Zn-air cell and the preparation method of conventional catalyst electrode; polarization curves and corresponding power density plots of the battery using conventional type cathode of C-CoPN900 and commercial Pt/C catalyst; the electrocatalytic properties of hybrid CNFs obtained from varied weight ratios of PAN to cobalt acetate, e.g. 16 : 1 and 8 : 1, and their corresponding TGA curves; a comparison of the Zn-air battery performance of this work with recent literatures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05988c

Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Hor, T. S. Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

2015-01-01

52

Performance improvement of a PEMFC system controlling the cathode outlet air flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a stationary and dynamic study of the advantages of using a regulating valve for the cathode outlet flow in combination with the compressor motor voltage as manipulated variables in a fuel cell system. At a given load current, the cathode input and output flowrate determine the cathode pressure and stoichiometry, and consequently determine the oxygen partial pressure,

Diego Feroldi; Maria Serra; Jordi Riera

2007-01-01

53

Accelerated OH(-) transport in activated carbon air cathode by modification of quaternary ammonium for microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Activated carbon (AC) is a promising catalyst for the air cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because of its high performance and low cost. To increase the performance of AC air cathodes, the acceleration of OH(-) transport is one of the most important methods, but it has not been widely investigated. Here we added quaternary ammonium to ACs by in situ anchoring of a quaternary ammonium/epoxide-reacting compound (QAE) or ex situ mixing with anion exchange resins in order to modify ACs from not only the external surface but also inside the pores. In 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the in situ anchoring of QAE was a more effective way to increase the power. The highest power density of 2781 ± 36 mW/m(2), which is 10% higher than that of the control, was obtained using QAE-anchored AC cathodes. When the medium was switched to an unbuffered NaCl solution, the increase in maximum power density (885 ± 25 mW/m(2)) was in accordance with the anion exchange capacity (0.219 mmol/g). The highest power density of the anion exchange resin-mixed air cathode was 51% higher than that of the control, indicating that anion exchange is urgently needed in real wastewaters. Excess anchoring of QAE blocked both the mesopores and micropores, causing the power output to be inhibited. PMID:24597673

Wang, Xin; Feng, Cuijuan; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Qingrui; Li, Nan; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhou, Qixing

2014-04-01

54

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOEpatents

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

2013-04-23

55

Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes  

DOEpatents

A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

Weil, Kenneth Scott (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Kim, Jin Yong (Richland, WA); Choi, Jung-Pyung (Richland, WA)

2010-04-06

56

Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities  

E-print Network

Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel, PA 16802, USA h i g h l i g h t s Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separators were prepared with spray Polyvinyl alcohol a b s t r a c t Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid

57

Anolyte recirculation effects in buffered and unbuffered single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Two identical microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with a floating air-cathode were operated under either buffered (MFC-B) or bufferless (MFC-BL) conditions to investigate anolyte recirculation effects on enhancing proton transfer. With an external resistance of 50 ? and recirculation rate of 1.0 ml/min, MFC-BL had a 27% lower voltage (9.7% lower maximal power density) but a 64% higher Coulombic efficiency (CE) than MFC-B. MFC-B had a decreased voltage output, batch time, and CE with increasing recirculation rate resulting from more oxygen transfer into the anode. However, increasing the recirculation rate within a low range significantly enhanced proton transfer in MFC-BL, resulting in a higher voltage output, a longer batch time, and a higher CE. A further increase in recirculation rate decreased the batch time and CE of MFC-BL due to excess oxygen transfer into anode outweighing the proton-transfer benefits. The unbuffered MFC had an optimal recirculation rate of 0.35 ml/min. PMID:25514399

Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xun; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Li, Jun; Ye, Ding-ding; Liao, Qiang; Regan, John M

2015-03-01

58

Measuring radon concentration in air using a diffusion cloud chamber  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radon concentration in air is a major concern in lung cancer studies. A traditional technique used to measure radon abundance is the charcoal canister method. We propose a novel technique using a diffusion cloud chamber. This technique is simpler and can easily be used for physics demonstrations for high school and university students.

Cases, R.; Ros, E.; Zúñiga, J.

2011-09-01

59

ANALYTICAL DIFFUSION MODEL FOR LONG DISTANCE TRANSPORT OF AIR POLLUTANTS  

EPA Science Inventory

A steady-state two-dimensional diffusion model suitable for predicting ambient air pollutant concentrations averaged over a long time period (e.g., month, season, or year) and resulting from the transport of pollutants for distances greater than about 100 km from the source is de...

60

A Comparison of Fick and Maxwell-Stefan Diffusion Formulations in PEMFC Cathode Gas  

E-print Network

due to blockage by liquid water is quite significant, however, and can be a source of catalyst layer]. They are very efficient and are non-polluting, having only water as a by-product, when pure Hydrogen is used as fuel. Re- actant gases (oxidant on the cathode and hydrogen on the anode) are pumped through

Wetton, Brian

61

Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 ?m-0.8 ?m which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 ?m-3.0 ?m in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

2014-12-01

62

Effect of helium injection on diffusion dominated air ingress accidents in pebble bed reactors  

E-print Network

The primary objective of this thesis was to validate the sustained counter air diffusion (SCAD) method at preventing natural circulation onset in diffusion dominated air ingress accidents. The analysis presented in this ...

Yurko, Joseph Paul

2010-01-01

63

Large Eddy Simulation of a Methane–Air Diffusion Flame  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large Eddy Simulation has been applied to a piloted methane\\/air diffusion flame—the Sandia D flame—for which detailed experimental\\u000a data are available. To evaluate the reacting density, temperature and species mass fractions a conserved scalar laminar flamelet\\u000a formulation is employed, utilising a single virtually unstrained flamelet. The results of two simulations are discussed, comparing\\u000a the use of the standard Smagorinsky model

D. J. Clayton; W. P. Jones

2008-01-01

64

PROPOSITION DE SUJET DE THESE Fundamental study of oxygen exchange and diffusion in cathode  

E-print Network

materials for fuel cells G. Dezanneau, in collaboration with G. Geneste (CEA) Fuel cells are electrochemical factor for the cell efficiency. This efficiency is basically driven by the oxygen exchange and diffusion

Bezerianos, Anastasia

65

The performance of phosphorus (P)-doped activated carbon as a catalyst in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

To observe the influence of P-doped activated carbon (AC) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), AC was treated with H3PO4 (1M) at 80°C and 400°C respectively, and then was used as catalyst layer in the air-cathode. The maximum power densities were: 1096±33mW/m(2) (SP2, AC treated at 400°C), 954±36mW/m(2) (SP1, AC treated at 80°C), which were 55%, 35% higher than the control (708±27mW/m(2), untreated AC), respectively. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) showed that the total resistance was decreased and the pore structure was changed. The analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated that P-doped functional group was produced in SP2, which caused the 15% greater power density than SP1 by increasing O2 adsorption. What is more important, the chemically modified method is simple and economical. PMID:25151475

Chen, Zhihao; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao

2014-10-01

66

Urban air pollution and atmospheric diffusion research in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Air pollution has become a serious problem in China as a result of that country's efforts in the last 30 years to become a great industrial power. The burning of coal, which currently provides over 70% of all China's energy needs, is a major source of air pollution. Because Chinese coal is high in sulfur and ash content and because most combustion devices in China have low efficiencies, SO2 and particulate emissions are a serious problem and are comparable to or exceed those found in many countries that are much more industrialized. Although most coal is burned in North China, acid precipitation is most severe in South China because of the lack of buffering loess dust found in the former region. The Chinese government has already taken major steps to mitigate air pollution, such as relocating polluting industries, supplying coal with lower sulfur content, using gas instead of coal for residential heating, and levying fines on industries that exceed pollution standards. Atmospheric environmental impact assessment (AEIA) is also required for all major new projects. This article describes three types of mathematical diffusion models and field and wind-tunnel experiments that are used in such assessments. The Chinese authorities believe that a range of technological, managerial, locational, and behavioral changes must be effected before the air of Chinese cities can be significantly improved.

Ning, Datong; Whitney, Joseph B.; Yap, David

1987-11-01

67

[Performance of microbial fuel cells with Fe/C catalyst carbon felt air-cathode for treating landfill leachate].  

PubMed

Ferric nitrate/activated carbon powder catalyst was obtained through impregnation and Fe/C catalyst was adsorbed on carbon felt as air cathode electrodes. Effects of activated carbon powder dosage and ferric nitrate concentration on electricity generation of MFC with landfill leachate as fuel were measured. Performances of cathodes obtained at different ferric nitrate concentrations were evaluated by cyclic voltammetry tests. The results showed that with the increase of activated carbon powder dosage or the iron nitrate concentration, MFC produce electrical properties showed a decreasing trend after the first rise. When the activated carbon powder dosage was 1 g and the iron nitrate concentration was 0.25 mol x L(-1), it was proved to be an optimum cell performance for 4199.8 mW x m(-3) output power and 465 omega apparent resistance. Under the optimal ratio rang between ferric nitrate and activated carbon powder, MFC apparent resistance decreased and the power density increased respectively with the increase of catalyst total dosage. The best produce electrical properties of MFC with Fe/C catalyst for 0.25 mol x L(-1) iron nitrate and 1 g activated carbon powder dosage was observed by cyclic voltammetry tests. The output power of MFC and the removal quantity increased with the concentration of inlet and the maximum values were respectively 5478.92 mW x m(-3) and 1505.2 mg x L(-1). the maximum removal rates of COD achieved at 89.1%. PMID:22946205

Tang, Yu-Lan; Peng, Man; Yu, Yan; He, Ya-Ting; Fu, Jin-Xiang; Zhao, Yu-Hua

2012-06-01

68

Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution.  

PubMed

Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6?M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13?mW cm(-2), in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2?mW cm(-2). The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms. PMID:25765731

Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

2015-01-01

69

Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution  

PubMed Central

Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6?M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13?mW cm?2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2?mW cm?2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms. PMID:25765731

Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

2015-01-01

70

Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6 M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13 mW cm-2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2 mW cm-2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms.

Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

2015-03-01

71

Diffusion of 2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene (1); air (2)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) 2-methyl-buta-1,3-diene; (2) air

Winkelmann, J.

72

Gas Diffusivity And Air Permeability In Sandy Soils: Effect Of Particle Size, Compaction And Sample Scale  

Microsoft Academic Search

The transport and fate of gases in soils is mainly governed by gas diffusion and advection. The gas diffusivity (Dp\\/D0) is the transport parameter for the gas diffusion due to gas concentration gradient, while the air permeability (ka) is the transport parameter for advective gas transport due to soil-air pressure gradient. Hence, those gas transport parameters play a crucial role

S. Hamamoto; K. Kawamoto; P. Moldrup; T. Komatsu

2007-01-01

73

Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode  

E-print Network

Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of $62 mA, the UMDC was able

74

Advanced cathode and anode research at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

High power microwave (HPM) tubes require currents and voltages generally in excess of 1 kA and 100 kV. Traditionally such systems have operated in poor vacuum (>10-6 torr) and on a single shot basis. Current work at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has been directed toward high vacuum and high repetition rate systems, necessitating a complete revision of standard

D. Shiffler; M. Ruebush; M. LaCour; K. Golby; K. Cartwright; M. Haworth

2002-01-01

75

Grain boundary grooving and cathode voiding in bamboo-like metallic interconnects by surface drift diffusion under the capillary and electromigration forces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The process of grain boundary (GB) grooving and cathode voiding in sandwich type thin film bamboo lines are simulated by introducing a mathematical model, which flows from the fundamental postulates of irreversible thermodynamics. In the absence of the electric field, the computer studies on the triple junction kinetics show that it obeys the first order reaction kinetics at early transient stage, which is followed by the familiar time law as t¯1/4, at the steady state regime. The applied electric field (EF) in constant current experiments modifies this time law drastically above the well-defined electron wind intensity (EWI) threshold, and puts an upper limit for the groove depth, which decreases monotonically with EWI. Below the threshold level, the capillary regime predominates, and EF has little effect on the general kinetics of GB grooving, other than the linear increase in total elapsed time with EWI. An analytical formula for the cathode failure time in constant voltage test is obtained in terms of the system parameters, which are closely associated with the cathode voiding or grain thinning by surface drift diffusion.

Ogurtani, Tarik Omer; Akyildiz, Oncu

2005-05-01

76

N-type Cu2O doped activated carbon as catalyst for improving power generation of air cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

A novel n-type Cu2O doped activated carbon (AC) air cathode (Cu/AC) was developed as an alternative to Pt electrode for oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The maximum power density of MFCs using this novel air cathode was as high as 1390±76mWm(-2), almost 59% higher than the bare AC air cathode. Specifically, the resistance including total resistance and charge transfer resistance significantly decreased comparing to the control. Tafel curve also showed the faster electro-transfer kinetics of Cu/AC with exchange current density of 1.03×10(-3)Acm(-2), which was 69% higher than the control. Ribbon-like Cu2O was deposited on the surface of AC with the mesopore surface area increasing. Cubic Cu2O crystals exclusively expose (111) planes with the interplanar crystal spacing of 2.48Å, which was the dominate active sites for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). N-type Cu2O with oxygen vacancies played crucial roles in electrochemical catalytic activity. PMID:25863207

Zhang, Xi; Li, Kexun; Yan, Pengyu; Liu, Ziqi; Pu, Liangtao

2015-07-01

77

Electrochemical properties of graphene flakes as an air cathode material for Li-O2 batteries in an ether-based electrolyte.  

PubMed

We employed graphene flakes as an air-cathode material for Li-O2 batteries and investigated their electrochemical properties in the dimethyl ether electrolyte. Graphene flakes were prepared by microwave-assisted reduction of graphene oxide, and their electrochemical properties were compared with those of Ketjen Black and carbon nanotubes. The catalytic effect of the prepared graphene flake-air cathode was demonstrated using cyclic voltammetry and discharge-charge testing performed under a limited discharge capacity. The catalytic effect of graphene flakes was also supported by morphological and spectroscopic analysis of the discharge-charge products formed on the graphene surface. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that Li2O2, Li2O, and Li2CO3 were the main discharge products on all carbon-air cathode surfaces. Raman spectroscopy revealed that LiRCO3 was additionally formed on Ketjen Black and carbon nanotubes during the first discharge; however, its formation was not observed on the graphene flakes. The catalytic effect of the graphene flakes and the absence of LiRCO3 in the discharge product could explain the higher Coulombic efficiency in the discharge-charge tests. PMID:24166701

Kim, Se Young; Lee, Ho-Taek; Kim, Kwang-Bum

2013-12-14

78

Effect of chemically modified Vulcan XC-72R on the performance of air-breathing cathode in a single-chamber microbial fuel cell.  

PubMed

The catalytic activity of modified carbon powder (Vulcan XC-72R) for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in an air-breathing cathode of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been investigated. Chemical modification was carried out by using various chemicals, namely 5% nitric acid, 0.2N phosphoric acid, 0.2N potassium hydroxide and 10% hydrogen peroxide. Electrochemical study was performed for ORR of these modified carbon materials in the buffer solution pH range of 6-7.5 in the anodic compartment. Although, these treatments influenced the surface properties of the carbon material, as evident from the SEM-EDX analysis, treatment with H(2)PO(4), KOH, and H(2)O(2) did not show significant activity during the electrochemical test. The HNO(3) treated Vulcan demonstrated significant ORR activity and when used in the single-chamber MFC cathode, current densities (1115mA/m(2), at 5.6mV) greater than those for a Pt-supported un-treated carbon cathode were achieved. However, the power density for the latter was higher. Such chemically modified carbon material can be a cheaper alternative for expensive platinum catalyst used in MFC cathode construction. PMID:20171090

Duteanu, N; Erable, B; Senthil Kumar, S M; Ghangrekar, M M; Scott, K

2010-07-01

79

A best fit approach to estimating multiple diffuse source terms using ambient air monitoring data and an air dispersion model.  

PubMed

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses CAP88-PC Version 1.0 modeling software to demonstrate compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations Title 40 Part 61 Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities). Annual air emissions from both well characterized stack sources and difficult to characterize diffuse sources must be assessed. This paper describes a process that uses a mathematical optimization routine to find a set of estimated diffuse source terms that together with the measured stack source terms provides a best fit of modeled air concentrations to measured air concentrations at available sampling locations. The estimated and measured source terms may then be used in subsequent CAP88-PC modeling to estimate dose at the off-site maximally exposed individual. LLNL has found this process to be an effective way to deal with the required assessment of diffuse sources that have otherwise been difficult to assess. PMID:23803667

MacQueen, Donald; Bertoldo, Nicholas; Wegrecki, Anthony

2013-08-01

80

The Use of Passive Diffusion Tubes for Measuring Concentrations of Nitrogen Dioxide in Air  

Microsoft Academic Search

Passive diffusion tubes have been widely used in Europe for spatial and temporal measurement of NO2 concentrations. The method is cheap, simple, and provides concentration data in most circumstances that are sufficiently accurate for assessing exposure and compliance with air quality criteria. Tube-type diffusion samplers are prone to several sources of uncertainty, arising from the materials of construction, the absorbent

J. N. Cape

2009-01-01

81

MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)  

EPA Science Inventory

Abstract In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

82

Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet\\/2 (SBUV\\/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and

Georgi T. Georgiev; James J. Butler

2007-01-01

83

Characteristics and time evolution of a hollow cathode produced glow discharge plasma in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current radar systems use mechanical directors and phased array technology for beam steering. Use of a sheet plasma as a microwave reflector promises several advantages over these methods. Operation is inherently broad-band, since all frequencies below the plasma frequency are reflected. The orientation and shape of the reflector may be changed directly through electronic control without resort to moving parts or expensive RF switches. The relatively fast plasma formation and extinction times ([/approx]10/ /mus) allow for rapid redirection of the microwave beam. An experimental system, dubbed the Agile Mirror, has been constructed using a cylindrical LexanTM vacuum chamber suspended within a water cooled Helmholtz coil pair capable of producing a uniform 500 Gauss field. Using this system we have created plasmas capable of reflecting 10 GHz microwaves with characteristics comparable to that of a plane metallic reflector. Most previous glow discharge work has concentrated either on the DC characteristics, or on the very early evolution (<1-2 ?s), of the discharge. To create a practical agile mirror direction, we must be able to produce a stable, flat, homogeneous plasma sheet with predictable characteristics timescales from 5 ?s to 1 ms-a regime where little pertinent quantitative data exists. This work concentrates on diagnosing the time resolved behavior of the agile mirror plasma during the mid-time, from t = 5-300 ?s, in a regime which accentuates observed changes in the discharge circuit characteristics. Measurements on an air discharge produced using VD/approx2.2 kV, p ? 208 mTorr, and B ? 250 G reveal an ne=1011/ cm-3,/ Te=1[-]3 eV plasma with distinct negative glow, Faraday dark space, and positive column regions. Analysis of time resolved potential, temperature, and spectroscopic data reveal that this discharge transitions-on time scales of [/approx]100/ /mus-into a pure negative glow discharge. The characteristics and evolution of the discharge are highly reproducible. A computer model of the discharge reveals that heating of the background gas is responsible for the transition. Implications for operation of the agile mirror discharge as a plasma mirror are discussed.

Gregor, Joseph Atilla

84

Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene as metal-free catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet on graphene (PNCN) was used as an alternative cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Here we report a novel, low-cost, scalable, synthetic method for preparation of PNCN via the carbonization of graphite oxide-polyaniline hybrid (GO-PANI), subsequently followed by KOH activation treatment. Due to its high concentration of nitrogen and high specific surface area, PNCN exhibited an excellent catalytic activity for ORR. As a result, the maximum power density of 1159.34mWm(-2) obtained with PNCN catalyst was higher than that of Pt/C catalyst (858.49mWm(-2)) in a MFC. Therefore, porous nitrogen-doped carbon nanosheet could be a good alternative to Pt catalyst in MFCs. PMID:24239870

Wen, Qing; Wang, Shaoyun; Yan, Jun; Cong, Lijie; Chen, Ye; Xi, Hongyuan

2014-02-01

85

EXTINCTION STUDIES OF PROPANE/AIR COUNTERFLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AEROSOLS  

EPA Science Inventory

The fire suppression effectiveness of solid aerosols as suitable halon replacements has examined. Experiments were performed in a counterflow diffusion burner, consisting of two 1 cm i.d. tubes separated by 1 cm. Aerosols were delivered to propane/air flames in the air flow. Both...

86

Prediction of Air Mixing From High Sidewall Diffusers in Cooling Mode: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply in cooling mode. The research focused on the design, placement, and operation of air supply diffusers located high on a sidewall and return grilles located near the floor on the same sidewall. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions and room dimensions. Thermal loads characteristic of high performance homes were applied at the walls and room temperature was controlled via a thermostat. The results are intended to provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to provide proper room mixing for cooling of high performance homes.

Ridouane, E. H.; Gawlik, K.

2011-02-01

87

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was investigated as an alternative to Nafion as an air cathode catalyst binder in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Cathodes were constructed around either stainless steel (SS) mesh or copper mesh using PDMS as both catalyst binder and diffusion layer, and compared to cathodes of the same structure having a Nafion binder. With PDMS binder, copper mesh cathodes produced a maximum power of 1710 ± 1 mW m-2, while SS mesh had a slightly lower power of 1680 ± 12 mW m-2, with both values comparable to those obtained with Nafion binder. Cathodes with PDMS binder had stable power production of 1510 ± 22 mW m-2 (copper) and 1480 ± 56 mW m-2 (SS) over 15 days at cycle 15, compared to a 40% decrease in power with the Nafion binder. Cathodes with the PDMS binder had lower total cathode impedance than those with Nafion. This is due to a large decrease in diffusion resistance, because hydrophobic PDMS effectively prevented catalyst sites from filling up with water, improving oxygen mass transfer. The cost of PDMS is only 0.23% of that of Nafion. These results showed that PDMS is a very effective and low-cost alternative to Nafion binder that will be useful for large scale construction of these cathodes for MFC applications.

Zhang, Fang; Chen, Guang; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

2012-11-01

88

Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18?×?15?×?15?cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

Teng, Yun; Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai [State Key Laboratory of AEET, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-10-15

89

Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

2014-10-01

90

PASSIVE/DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS FOR PESTICIDES IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR  

EPA Science Inventory

Pesticides applied indoors vaporize from treated surfaces (e.g., carpets and baseboards) resulting in elevated air concentrations that may persist for long periods after applications. Estimating long-term respiratory exposures to pesticide vapors in residential indoor environme...

91

Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

1979-01-01

92

Pore Scale Modeling of the Reactive Transport of Chromium in the Cathode of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect

We present a pore scale model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode. Volatile chromium species are known to migrate from the current collector of the SOFC into the cathode where over time they decrease the voltage output of the fuel cell. A pore scale model is used to investigate the reactive transport of chromium species in the cathode and to study the driving forces of chromium poisoning. A multi-scale modeling approach is proposed which uses a cell level model of the cathode, air channel and current collector to determine the boundary conditions for a pore scale model of a section of the cathode. The pore scale model uses a discrete representation of the cathode to explicitly model the surface reactions of oxygen and chromium with a cathode material. The pore scale model is used to study the reaction mechanisms of chromium by considering the effects of reaction rates, diffusion coefficients, chromium vaporization, and oxygen consumption on chromium’s deposition in the cathode. The study shows that chromium poisoning is most significantly affected by the chromium reaction rates in the cathode and that the reaction rates are a function of the local current density in the cathode.

Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Amon, Cristina

2011-01-01

93

NITRIC ACID-AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT: EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION  

EPA Science Inventory

Trace gaseous HNO3 in air is removed in a laminar flow nylon tube. The HNO3 deposition pattern was obtained by sectioning the tube, extracting with an aqueous solution, and measuring the concentration by ion chromatography. Mass transport analysis of the deposition pattern demons...

94

Centrifugal Compressor Surge Margin Improved With Diffuser Hub Surface Air Injection  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aerodynamic stability is an important parameter in the design of compressors for aircraft gas turbine engines. Compression system instabilities can cause compressor surge, which may lead to the loss of an aircraft. As a result, engine designers include a margin of safety between the operating line of the engine and the stability limit line of the compressor. The margin of safety is typically referred to as "surge margin." Achieving the highest possible level of surge margin while meeting design point performance objectives is the goal of the compressor designer. However, performance goals often must be compromised in order to achieve adequate levels of surge margin. Techniques to improve surge margin will permit more aggressive compressor designs. Centrifugal compressor surge margin improvement was demonstrated at the NASA Glenn Research Center by injecting air into the vaned diffuser of a 4:1-pressure-ratio centrifugal compressor. Tests were performed using injector nozzles located on the diffuser hub surface of a vane-island diffuser in the vaneless region between the impeller trailing edge and the diffuser-vane leading edge. The nozzle flow path and discharge shape were designed to produce an air stream that remained tangent to the hub surface as it traveled into the diffuser passage. Injector nozzles were located near the leading edge of 23 of the 24 diffuser vanes. One passage did not contain an injector so that instrumentation located in that passage would be preserved. Several orientations of the injected stream relative to the diffuser vane leading edge were tested over a range of injected flow rates. Only steady flow (nonpulsed) air injection was tested. At 100 percent of the design speed, a 15-percent improvement in the baseline surge margin was achieved with a nozzle orientation that produced a jet that was bisected by the diffuser vane leading edge. Other orientations also improved the baseline surge margin. Tests were conducted at speeds below the design speed, and similar results were obtained. In most cases, the greatest improvement in surge margin occurred at fairly low levels of injected flow rate. Externally supplied injection air was used in these experiments. However, the injected flow rates that provided the greatest benefit could be produced using injection air that is recirculating between the diffuser discharge and nozzles located in the diffuser vaneless region. Future experiments will evaluate the effectiveness of recirculating air injection.

Skoch, Gary J.

2002-01-01

95

The Effects of Multiple Cooling Diffusers in an Underfloor Air Distribution System  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous work on an Underfloor Air Distribution (UFAD) system with a single heat source and a single cooling diffuser has been extended to study the effects of multiple cooling diffusers experimentally and theoretically. In the experiment, a plume and fountains represent a heat source and cooling vents separately. Two-layer temperature stratification forms provided that the physical characteristic of each diffuser is identical. For a fixed heat load and ventilation rate, the effect of multiple cooling diffusers is to decrease the height and the temperature of the cooler zone; and achieve displacement ventilation in the limit of a large number of diffusers per heat source. In the case of a fixed heat load and a constant underfloor plenum pressure, increasing the number of openings on the floor diminishes the two-layer stratification by cooling both layers but by different amounts.

Liu, Qing; Linden, Paul

2004-11-01

96

Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions.

Georgiev, Georgi T.; Butler, James J.

2007-11-01

97

Long-term calibration monitoring of Spectralon diffusers BRDF in the air-ultraviolet.  

PubMed

Long-term calibration monitoring of the bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) of Spectralon diffusers in the air-ultraviolet is presented. Four Spectralon diffusers were monitored in this study. Three of the diffusers, designated as H1, H2, and H3, were used in the prelaunch radiance calibration of the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet/2 (SBUV/2) satellite instruments on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) 14 and 16. A fourth diffuser, designated as the 400 diffuser, was used in the prelaunch calibration of the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) instrument scheduled for initial flight in 2009 on the National Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite System Preparatory Project. The BRDF data of this study were obtained between 1994 and 2005 using the scatterometer located in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Diffuser Calibration Laboratory. The diffusers were measured at 13 wavelengths between 230 and 425 nm at the incident and scatter angles used in the prelaunch calibrations of SBUV/2 and OMPS. Spectral features in the BRDF of Spectralon are also discussed. The comparison shows how the air-ultraviolet BRDF of these Spectralon samples changed over time under clean room deployment conditions. PMID:17994141

Georgiev, Georgi T; Butler, James J

2007-11-10

98

Exploration of ion migration mechanism and diffusion capability for Na3V2(PO4)2F3 cathode utilized in rechargeable sodium-ion batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NASICON-type Na3V2(PO4)2F3 is employed as a promising cathode for sodium-ion batteries in order to explore the ion-migration mechanism and diffusion capability. Two kinds of Na sites, namely Na(1) site and Na(2) site exist in the crystal structure per formula unit to accommodate a total of three sodium ions. The ion at Na(2) site with half occupation extracts first and inserts the last due to its high chemical potential, while the whole extraction/insertion of two ions between 1.6 and 4.6 V vs. Na+/Na can produce three plateaus in charge/discharge processes because of the reorganization of ions. The first discharge capacity of 111.6 mAh g-1 with retention of 97.6% after 50 cycles could be obtained by electrochemical testing at 0.091C. Electrochemical activation and/or structural reorganization of the system by cycling could improve the diffusion coefficient of sodium with a comparatively large magnitude of 10-12 cm2 s-1, though many influences on the resistance factors also can be attributed to the cycling process. Such work is of fundamental importance to the progression of sodium-based batteries to be fully realized and be implemented over existing Li-ion based batteries.

Song, Weixin; Ji, Xiaobo; Wu, Zhengping; Yang, Yingchang; Zhou, Zhou; Li, Fangqian; Chen, Qiyuan; Banks, Craig E.

2014-06-01

99

High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

1977-01-01

100

A THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION IN A METHANE/AIR TURBULENT DIFFUSION FLAME  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a theoretical analysis of nitric oxide production in a methane/air turbulent diffusion flame. In the coherent flame model used, the chemical reactions take place in laminar flame elements which are lengthened by the turbulent fluid motion and shortened...

101

Effects of water-contaminated air on blowoff limits of opposed jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The effects of water-contaminated air on the extinction and flame restoration of the central portion of N2-diluted H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flames are investigated using a coaxial tubular opposed jet burner. The results show that the replacement of N2 contaminant in air by water on a mole for mole basis decreases the maximum sustainable H2 mass flow, just prior to extinction, of the flame. This result contrasts strongly with the analogous substitution of water for N2 in a relatively hot premixed H2-O2-N2 flame, which was shown by Koroll and Mulpuru (1986) to lead to a significant, kinetically controlled increase in laminar burning velocity.

Pellett, Gerald L.; Jentzen, Marilyn E.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Northam, G. Burton

1988-01-01

102

Efficiency and air-stability improvement of flexible inverted polymer solar cells using ZnO/poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids as cathode buffer layers.  

PubMed

The flexible inverted polymer solar cells composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) blends on the flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were fabricated, which showed improving device performance by using solution-processed ZnO/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrids as cathode buffer layers compared to the devices using the pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layers. It is mainly attributed to the effective passivation of the ZnO surface traps, suppression of the interfacial charge recombination, decrease of the work function and improvement of the energy-level alignment between ZnO and PC61BM. When the PEG was introduced into the ZnO, the large aggregates was dispersed and yielded large ZnO nanoclusters containing less domain boundaries. The performance of devices with ZnO/PEG6000 (with averaged molecular weight of 6000) hybrids exhibited the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.3% compared to the devices with ZnO/PEG400 (with averaged molecular weight of 400) and ZnO/PEG20000 (with averaged molecular weight of 20000). It was found that the short PEG backbone (e.g., Mw = 400) containing less oxygen could not effectively passivate ZnO surface traps, meanwhile, longer PEG backbone (e.g., Mw = 20000) could lead to the formation of the charge transport barrier because of the insulating nature of PEG. Furthermore, solar cells with the ZnO/PEG buffer also showed better air-stability. The 23% degradation was observed after 14 days, compared to the 45% degradation of devices with the pristine ZnO buffer. In addition, due to the simplicity and low-temperature process, the ZnO/PEG hybrids can be well-suitable as cathode buffer for large area roll-to-roll manufacturing of printed polymer solar cells. PMID:23738498

Hu, Ting; Li, Fan; Yuan, Kai; Chen, Yiwang

2013-06-26

103

Air-Breathing Laminar Flow-Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Alkaline Electrolyte  

E-print Network

Air-Breathing Laminar Flow-Based Direct Methanol Fuel Cell with Alkaline Electrolyte Ranga S Power Systems, Cary, North Carolina 27513, USA We report the performance of an air-breathing laminar of an air-breathing gas diffusion electrode GDE as the cathode, which resulted in a fivefold improvement

Kenis, Paul J. A.

104

Fuel cell stack with passive air supply  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

2006-01-17

105

Microbial community structures differentiated in a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell fueled with rice straw hydrolysate  

PubMed Central

Background The microbial fuel cell represents a novel technology to simultaneously generate electric power and treat wastewater. Both pure organic matter and real wastewater can be used as fuel to generate electric power and the substrate type can influence the microbial community structure. In the present study, rice straw, an important feedstock source in the world, was used as fuel after pretreatment with diluted acid method for a microbial fuel cell to obtain electric power. Moreover, the microbial community structures of anodic and cathodic biofilm and planktonic culturewere analyzed and compared to reveal the effect of niche on microbial community structure. Results The microbial fuel cell produced a maximum power density of 137.6?±?15.5 mW/m2 at a COD concentration of 400 mg/L, which was further increased to 293.33?±?7.89 mW/m2 through adjusting the electrolyte conductivity from 5.6 mS/cm to 17 mS/cm. Microbial community analysis showed reduction of the microbial diversities of the anodic biofilm and planktonic culture, whereas diversity of the cathodic biofilm was increased. Planktonic microbial communities were clustered closer to the anodic microbial communities compared to the cathodic biofilm. The differentiation in microbial community structure of the samples was caused by minor portion of the genus. The three samples shared the same predominant phylum of Proteobacteria. The abundance of exoelectrogenic genus was increased with Desulfobulbus as the shared most abundant genus; while the most abundant exoelectrogenic genus of Clostridium in the inoculum was reduced. Sulfate reducing bacteria accounted for large relative abundance in all the samples, whereas the relative abundance varied in different samples. Conclusion The results demonstrated that rice straw hydrolysate can be used as fuel for microbial fuel cells; microbial community structure differentiated depending on niches after microbial fuel cell operation; exoelectrogens were enriched; sulfate from rice straw hydrolysate might be responsible for the large relative abundance of sulfate reducing bacteria. PMID:24433535

2014-01-01

106

Study on Thermal Diffusion in Artificial Air Near the Critical Point  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Air is absolutely essential for our everyday life and also very important in the field of industry. The major part of it is composed of nitrogen and oxygen. We investigated the Soret effect in artificial air, which was a nitrogen-oxygen binary mixture with the composition of 0.791 mole fraction of nitrogen and 0.209 mole fraction of oxygen near the critical point. In the case of the artificial air, the estimated critical temperature and the estimated critical pressure are 132.61 K and 3.8381 MPa, respectively. We carried out the experiments by using a single stage two-chamber cell. We made a temperature difference between the two chambers, which were separated by a porous diaphragm. After an experiment had run for sufficient time to reach steady state, the concentration of oxygen in each chamber was measured by using a gas chromatograph. From the experiments, we observed that the thermal diffusion factor showed a strong drop near the critical point. The thermal diffusion ratio indicated was negative and behaved like 3He-overflow="scroll">4He mixtures. There has been no report that the thermal diffusion ratio of the nitrogen-oxygen system behaves just like the mixture of such substances. We discuss the thermal diffusion in the nitrogen-oxygen binary mixture near the critical point.

Nakano, A.; Maeda, T.

2008-03-01

107

Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

1992-01-01

108

Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 ?) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area. PMID:23890977

Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

2013-09-01

109

Flamelet modeling of lifted turbulent methane\\/air and propane\\/air jet diffusion flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

The stabilization mechanism of lifted turbulent jet diffusion flames is a test problem for models of partially premixed turbulent combustion. In these flames, combustion processes occur in both the non- premixed and the premixed mode. For the flame stabilization process, however, flame propagation of the premixed branches seems to play a crucial role. In this paper, a flamelet model for

M. Chen; M. Herrmann; N. Peters

2000-01-01

110

Active layer of the oxygen cathode in a fuel cell with Nafion and platinum: The role played by the diffusion and ohmic restrictions and the selection of the working thickness of the active layer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The basic parameters that characterize the operation of the active layer of a cathode with Nafion are the effective coefficient\\u000a of the diffusion of oxygen, the effective ionic conductance, and the thickness of the active layer. One of the deficiencies\\u000a intrinsic to the fuel cells containing Nafion is their extreme sensitivity to the heat and moisture exchange. Nafion demands\\u000a an

Yu. G. Chirkov; V. I. Rostokin

2007-01-01

111

Singularités de la rhéologie de l'air humide saturé et diffusion moléculaire dans les milieux nuageuxSingularities in the rheology of saturated humid air, and molecular diffusion in cloods  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Under realistic assumptions, we propose a thermodynamical formalism providing, for the moist-saturated air (cloudy air), a generalized Fick's law. This Fick's law leads to a double diffusive rheology with Dufour effect. The form taken by the energy equation is slightly different from the classical form used in convection problems. We compare the equations with those of the convection in moist unsaturated air (the Dufour effect and all double diffusive effects disappear in this case). As application we demonstrate some consequences of this diffusion in cloudy convection. To cite this article: P.A. Bois, C. R. Mecanique 330 (2002) 627-632.

Bois, Pierre-Antoine

112

Cathodic arcs  

SciTech Connect

Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

Anders, Andre

2003-10-29

113

Active flow control integrated diffuser (afcid) for increased energy efficiency in variable air volume systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Variable air volume (VAV) air terminals are designed to save energy by reducing airflow into a given space based on occupancy and required load. Systems are typically designed to operate at peak load, however as load is reduced, performance is compromised due to inadequate throw. As a result, fans are installed to adjust for the losses, negating many of the energy savings. Additionally flow is vectored by the use of vanes, a basic passive type of flow control. An experimental investigation was performed to study the application of flow control on that of a HVAC diffuser using synthetic jets distributed evenly along the diffuser edge parallel to the flow field. The study was conducted on a 1:3 scale typical office space (150 ft2), which included a simulated scale HVAC system supplied by compressed air. Two different jet blowing ratios were investigated for system loads of 60% and 90%. The flow field was established using hot wire anemometry and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). This study demonstrates the effectiveness of synthetic jet based active flow control at controlling airflow, showing ability to affect throw parameters for changing flow rates within the test chamber. Vectoring of up to 20% and improvement in jet spread of 200% was demonstrated. The use of such devices has the potential to improve air quality and air distribution in building while simultaneously lowering energy demands of HVAC systems.

Van Der Schijff, Hermanus P.

114

Molecular diffusion effects in LES of a piloted methane-air flame  

SciTech Connect

Molecular diffusion effects in LES of a piloted methane-air (Sandia D) flame are investigated on a series of grids with progressively increased resolution. The reacting density, temperature and chemical composition are modeled based on the mixture fraction approach combined with a steady flamelet model. With a rationale to minimize interpolation uncertainties that are routinely introduced by a flamelet table look-up, quadratic splines relationships are employed to represent thermochemical variables. The role of molecular diffusivity in effecting spatial transport is studied by drawing a comparison with the turbulent diffusivity and analyzing their statistics conditioned on temperature. Statistical results demonstrate that the molecular diffusivity in the near-field almost always exceeds the turbulent diffusivity, except at low temperatures (less than 500 K). Thus, by altering the jet near-field, molecular transport plays an important role in the further downstream jet development. Molecular diffusivity continues to dominate in the centerline region throughout the flow field. Overall, the results suggest the strong necessity to represent molecular transport accurately in LES studies of turbulent reacting flows. (author)

Kemenov, Konstantin A.; Pope, Stephen B. [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)

2011-02-15

115

Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

2003-01-01

116

A mechanistic study of Soret diffusion in hydrogen-air flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

The separate and combined effects of Soret diffusion of the hydrogen molecule (H) and radical (H) on the structure and propagation speed of the freely-propagating planar premixed flames, and the strain-induced extinction response of premixed and nonpremixed counterflow flames, were computationally studied for hydrogen-air mixtures using a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties. Results show that, except for the conservative

F. Yang; C. K. Law; C. J. Sung; H. Q. Zhang

2010-01-01

117

A mechanistic study of Soret diffusion in hydrogen–air flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

The separate and combined effects of Soret diffusion of the hydrogen molecule (H2) and radical (H) on the structure and propagation speed of the freely-propagating planar premixed flames, and the strain-induced extinction response of premixed and nonpremixed counterflow flames, were computationally studied for hydrogen–air mixtures using a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties. Results show that, except for the conservative

F. Yang; C. K. Law; C. J. Sung; H. Q. Zhang

2010-01-01

118

Large-Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Piloted Methane\\/Air Diffusion Flame  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the present study Large-Eddy Simulations for a turbulent, piloted methane\\/air diffusion flame have been performed and the results are compared to experimental data by Barlow et al. The Smagorinsky model is used to obtain the eddy viscosity, where the Smagorinsky constant is obtained by the Dynamic Model. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model is applied to describe turbulence-chemistry interactions. The model

Heinz Pitsch; Helfried Steiner

1999-01-01

119

Lateral diffusion of amphiphiles and macromolecules at the air/water interface  

SciTech Connect

We report a lateral diffusion study on the air/water interface of a surface-active protein, bacterial lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, and vinyl polymer, poly(tert-butyl methacrylate), with the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. For the validation of implementating the technique and the calibration of our instrument, we relied on a phospholipid system that Peters and Beck have used earlier and found that our results were in accord with theirs within 20% in absolute magnitude. For both the phospholipid and lipase, we analyzed the lateral diffusion data in terms of the free area model of Sackmann and Traeuble. We conclude that the results of lipase could be interpreted by invoking a conformational change induced by lateral compression in the monolayer state and those of the polymer, by postulating the quenching of the diffusion process when its concentration crosses over from the dilute regime to the semidilute regime. 37 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Kim, Sanghoon; Yu, Hyuk [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

1992-05-14

120

Exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation in individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Luminescence properties of carbon nanotubes are strongly affected by exciton diffusion, which plays an important role in various nonradiative decay processes. Here we perform photoluminescence microscopy on hundreds of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to elucidate the interplay between exciton diffusion, end quenching, and exciton-exciton annihilation processes. A model derived from random-walk theory as well as Monte Carlo simulations are utilized to analyze nanotube length dependence and excitation power dependence of emission intensity. We have obtained the values of exciton diffusion length and absorption cross section for different chiralities, and diameter-dependent photoluminescence quantum yields have been observed. The simulations have also revealed the nature of a one-dimensional coalescence process, and an analytical expression for the power dependence of emission intensity is given.

Ishii, A.; Yoshida, M.; Kato, Y. K.

2015-03-01

121

Improvement of microbial fuel cell cathodes using cost-effective polyvinylidene fluoride  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is investigated as an alternative to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for air-cathode diffusion layers (DLs) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the improvement of MFC power generation. It is found that the cathode fabricated with PVDF achieves a higher maximum power density (MPD) than a PTFE cathode. Successive PVDF or PVDF/carbon black DLs are applied on the base layers in order to optimize cathode performance. The results show significant improvements in such performances as the coulombic efficiency (CE), MPD, and water loss. In electrochemical tests, the cathode coated with four PVDF DLs has the largest current response at a given applied potential, yielding the highest MPD of 0.123 mW cm-2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) and largest CE (10.7%) in the MFC test. Carbon black is added to the DLs in order to test its effect on the MFC power generation. Cathodes made from pure PVDF DLs perform better than those containing PVDF/carbon black DLs in electrochemical and MFC tests. In addition, a smaller MFC (28 mL) produces a much higher MPD than a larger MFC (700 mL), resulting in an increase in the CE.

Qiu, Zhaozheng; Su, Min; Wei, Liling; Han, Hongliang; Jia, Qibo; Shen, Jianquan

2015-01-01

122

Functional Relationships among Soil-air Permeability, Soil-gas Diffusivity, and Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity in Undisturbed Soils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Soil-pore geometric parameters including size distribution, total and air-filled porosity, pore tortuosity and connectivity strongly influence water and air flow in soils, and characterize soil-water and soil-gas transport parameters such as saturated hydraulic conductivity, soil-air permeability and soil-gas diffusivity. This study investigated functional relationships among the soil-pore dependent physical parameters in undisturbed soils and developed predictive expressions for soil-air permeability

K. Kawamoto; P. Moldrup; P. Schjønning; B. V. Iversen; T. Komatsu

2005-01-01

123

CO2/oxalate Cathodes as Safe and Efficient Alternatives in High Energy Density Metal-Air Type Rechargeable Batteries  

E-print Network

We present theoretical analysis on why and how rechargeable metal-air type batteries can be made significantly safer and more practical by utilizing CO2/oxalate conversions instead of O2/peroxide or O2/hydroxide ones, in the positive electrode. Metal-air batteries, such as the Li-air one, may have very large energy densities, comparable to that of gasoline, theoretically allowing for long range all-electric vehicles. There are, however, still significant challenges, especially related to the safety of their underlying chemistries, the robustness of their recharging and the need of supplying high purity O2 from air to the battery. We point out that the CO2/oxalate reversible electrochemical conversion is a viable alternative of the O2-based ones, allowing for similarly high energy density and almost identical voltage, while being much safer through the elimination of aggressive oxidant peroxides and the use of thermally stable, non-oxidative and environmentally benign oxalates instead.

Nemeth, Karoly

2013-01-01

124

Effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames under normal and microgravity conditions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global energy consumption has been increasing around the world, owing to the rapid growth of industrialization and improvements in the standard of living. As a result, more carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are being released into the environment. Therefore, techniques for achieving combustion at reduced carbon dioxide and nitric oxide emission levels have drawn increased attention. Combustion with a highly preheated air and low-oxygen concentration has been shown to provide significant energy savings, reduce pollution and equipment size, and uniform thermal characteristics within the combustion chamber. However, the fundamental understanding of this technique is limited. The motivation of the present study is to identify the effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Combustion characteristics of laminar coflow diffusion flames are evaluated for the effects of preheated combustion air temperature under normal and low-gravity conditions. Experimental measurements are conducted using direct flame photography, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are examined under four experimental conditions: normal-temperature/normal-gravity (case I), preheated-temperature/normal gravity (case II), normal-temperature/low-gravity (case III), and preheated-temperature/low-gravity (case IV). Comparisons between these four cases yield significant insights. In our studies, increasing the combustion air temperature by 400 K (from 300 K to 700 K), causes a 37.1% reduction in the flame length and about a 25% increase in peak flame temperature. The results also show that a 400 K increase in the preheated air temperature increases CH concentration of the flame by about 83.3% (CH is a marker for the rate of chemical reaction), and also increases the C2 concentration by about 60% (C2 is a marker for the soot precursor). It can therefore be concluded that preheating the combustion air increases the energy release intensity, flame temperature, C2 concentration, and, presumably, NOx production. Our work is the first to consider preheated temperature/low-gravity combustion. The results of our experiments reveal new insights. Where as increasing the temperature of the combustion air reduces the laminar flame width under normal gravity, we find that, in a low-gravity environment, increasing the combustion air temperature causes a significant increase in the flame width.

Ghaderi Yeganeh, Mohammad

125

Arduino-based control system for measuring ammonia in air using conditionally-deployed diffusive samplers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Arduino microcontrollers, wireless modules, and other low-cost hardware were used to develop a new type of air sampler for monitoring ammonia at strong areal sources like dairies, cattle feedlots, and waste treatment facilities. Ammonia was sampled at multiple locations on the periphery of an operation using Radiello diffusive passive samplers (Cod. RAD168- and RAD1201-Sigma-Aldrich). However, the samplers were not continuously exposed to the air. Instead, each sampling station included two diffusive samplers housed in specialized tubes that sealed the cartridges from the atmosphere. If a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions were met, the Radiellos were deployed into the air using a micro linear actuator. Each station was solar-powered and controlled by Arduinos that were linked to a central weather station using Xbee wireless modules (Digi International Inc.). The Arduinos also measured the total time of exposure using hall-effect sensors to verify the position of the cartridge (i.e., deployed or retracted). The decision to expose or retract the samplers was made every five minutes based on wind direction, wind speed, and time of day. Typically, the diffusive samplers were replaced with fresh cartridges every two weeks and the used samplers were analyzed in the laboratory using ion chromatography. Initial studies were conducted at a commercial dairy in northern Colorado. Ammonia emissions along the Front Range of Colorado can be transported into the mountains where atmospheric deposition of nitrogen can impact alpine ecosystems. Therefore, low-cost air quality monitoring equipment is needed that can be widely deployed in the region. Initial work at the dairy showed that ammonia concentrations ranged between 600 to 1200 ppb during the summer; the highest concentrations were downwind of a large anaerobic lagoon. Time-averaged ammonia concentrations were also used to approximate emissions using inverse dispersion models. This methodology provides a relatively low-cost technique for measuring the spatial and seasonal variations in ammonia near strong areal sources.

Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Shonkwiler, K. B.

2012-12-01

126

Extinction of premixed H{sub 2}/air flames: Chemical kinetics and molecular diffusion effects  

SciTech Connect

Laminar flame speed has traditionally been used for the partial validation of flame kinetics. In most cases, however, its accurate determination requires extensive data processing and/or extrapolations, thus rendering the measurement of this fundamental flame property indirect. Additionally, the presence of flame front instabilities does not conform to the definition of laminar flame speed. This is the case for Le<1 flames, with the most notable example being ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames, which develop cellular structures at low strain rates so that determination of laminar flame speeds for such mixtures is not possible. Thus, this low-temperature regime of H{sub 2} oxidation has not been validated systematically in flames. In the present investigation, an alternative/supplemental approach is proposed that includes the experimental determination of extinction strain rates for these flames, and these rates are compared with the predictions of direct numerical simulations. This approach is meaningful for two reasons: (1) Extinction strain rates can be measured directly, as opposed to laminar flame speeds, and (2) while the unstretched lean H{sub 2}/air flames are cellular, the stretched ones are not, thus making comparisons between experiment and simulations meaningful. Such comparisons revealed serious discrepancies between experiments and simulations for ultralean H{sub 2}/air flames by using four kinetic mechanisms. Additional studies were conducted for lean and near-stoichiometric H{sub 2}/air flames diluted with various amounts of N{sub 2}. Similarly to the ultralean flames, significant discrepancies between experimental and predicted extinction strain rates were also found. To identify the possible sources of such discrepancies, the effect of uncertainties on the diffusion coefficients was assessed and an improved treatment of diffusion coefficients was advanced and implemented. Under the conditions considered in this study, the sensitivity of diffusion coefficients to the extinction response was found to be significant and, for certain species, greater than that of the kinetic rate constants.

Dong, Yufei; Holley, Adam T.; Andac, Mustafa G.; Egolfopoulos, Fokion N.; Wang, Hai [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Davis, Scott G. [Exponent, Natick, MA 01760 (United States); Middha, Prankul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)

2005-09-01

127

Monolithic cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The purpose of this program was to evaluate LaB6 (210) and (310) oriented single crystal material for flat cathode applications and to deliver mounted LaB6 cathodes with (310) orientation for operation in RADC/Varian life test vehicles. To that end, the program was divided into four separate tasks, as shown in the report. This project was extended for 3 months past the initial program period so that unavoidable delays could be overcome and the project completed. The final report covers the entire period of the program, which terminated 29 March 1985.

Davis, P. R.; Swanson, L. W.

1985-11-01

128

The impact of detailed multicomponent transport and thermal diffusion effects on soot formation in ethylene\\/air flames  

Microsoft Academic Search

As the drive toward greater accuracy in flame simulation continues, there is a need for more detail in the modeling of soot formation and its related phenomena. In this study we investigate computationally the effect of multicomponent transport and thermal diffusion on soot formation in ethylene\\/air flames. In the counterflow configuration, laminar diffusion flames and partially premixed flames are investigated

S. B. Dworkin; M. D. Smooke; V. Giovangigli

2009-01-01

129

Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and desalination using a forward osmosis membrane in an air-cathode microbial osmotic fuel cell  

E-print Network

Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and desalination using a forward osmosis membrane in an air Keywords: Forward osmosis Desalination Fouling Microbial osmotic fuel cell a b s t r a c t A microbial osmotic fuel cell (MOFC) has a forward osmosis (FO) membrane situated between the electrodes that enable

130

Electro-scrubbing volatile organic carbons in the air stream with a gas diffusion electrode.  

PubMed

It is demonstrated that exposing the VOC air streams to the electro-scrubbing reactor with a gas diffusion electrode leads to an efficient removal of organics. The importance order of the influence factors on the electro-scrubbing reactor performance is: conductivity, voltage and air stream flow-rate. The effective conductivity and high voltages generally are beneficial to the removal process and the air flow-rate is not a significant factor compared with the other two, indicating that the reactor might have a consistently satisfying performance within a wide range of gas volumetric load. The mass transfer of both organics and oxygen in the reactor is estimated by mathematical model, and the calculation determines the concentration boundary conditions for the 2-ethoxyethyl acetate removal: if the 2-ethoxyethyl acetate concentration in the inflow air stream holds C(G,i) ? 0.7198%, the removal in the electro-scrubbing reactor is electrochemical reaction controlled; if C(G,i)>0.7198%, the controlling step will be the oxygen mass transfer from the air to the liquid in the electro-scrubbing reactor. The Apparent Current Efficiency of the electro-scrubbing reactor was also determined using COD data, which is significantly higher than some commercial metal oxide electrodes, showing that the reactor is energy efficient and has the promise for the future scale-up. PMID:21324588

Yang, Ji; Liu, Kaichen; Jia, Jinping; Cao, Limei

2011-04-15

131

Carbon nanotube cathode research at AFRL  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-wall and multi-wall nanotubes have shown some promise as field emission cathodes. Most applications have focused on small surface areas with such uses as flat panel displays. The Air Force Research Laboratory has begun to investigate the uses of these cathodes for larger areas. Several types of nanotube cathodes have been investigated. Each type is implemented in a 63 cm2

D. Shiffler; M. LaCour; K. Golby; M. Ruebush; M. Haworth; D. Zagar

2002-01-01

132

A mechanistic study of Soret diffusion in hydrogen-air flames  

SciTech Connect

The separate and combined effects of Soret diffusion of the hydrogen molecule (H{sub 2}) and radical (H) on the structure and propagation speed of the freely-propagating planar premixed flames, and the strain-induced extinction response of premixed and nonpremixed counterflow flames, were computationally studied for hydrogen-air mixtures using a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties. Results show that, except for the conservative freely-propagating planar flame, Soret diffusion of H{sub 2} increases the fuel concentration entering the flame structure and as such modifies the mixture stoichiometry and flame temperature, which could lead to substantial increase (decrease) of the flame speed for the lean (rich) mixtures respectively. On the other hand, Soret diffusion of H actively modifies its concentration and distribution in the reaction zone, which in turn affects the individual reaction rates. In particular, the reaction rates of the symmetric, twin, counterflow premixed flames, especially at near-extinction states, can be increased for lean flames but decreased for rich flames, whose active reaction regions are respectively located at, and away from, the stagnation surface. However, such a difference is eliminated for the single counterflow flame stabilized by an opposing cold nitrogen stream, as the active reaction zone up to the state of extinction is always located away from the stagnation surface. Finally, the reaction rate is increased in general for diffusion flames because the bell-shaped temperature distribution localizes the H concentration to the reaction region which has the maximum temperature. (author)

Yang, F. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China); Law, C.K. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Sung, C.J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States); Zhang, H.Q. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing (China)

2010-01-15

133

Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

1989-01-01

134

A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulse under a double hexagon needle-array electrode.  

PubMed

A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse is generated under a double hexagon needle-array electrode at atmospheric pressure. The images of the diffuse discharge, electric characteristics, and the optical emission spectra emitted from the diffuse air discharge plasma are obtained. Based on the waveforms of pulse voltage and current, the power consumption, and the power density of the diffuse air discharge plasma are investigated under different pulse peak voltages. The electron density and the electron temperature of the diffuse plasma are estimated to be approximately 1.42×10(11) cm(-3) and 4.4 eV, respectively. The optical emission spectra are arranged to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures by comparing experimental with simulated spectra. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the diffuse discharge plasma are also discussed under different pulse peak voltages and pulse repetition rates, respectively. In addition, the diffuse air discharge plasma can form an area of about 70×50 mm(2) on the surface of dielectric layer and can be scaled up to the required size. PMID:24374556

Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Jiang, Peng-Chao

2014-01-01

135

Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air  

SciTech Connect

A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities. 37 refs.

Pellett, G.L.; Northam, G.B.; Wilson, L.G. (NASA, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States) Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., Hampton, VA (United States))

1992-01-01

136

Sustained diffusive alternating current gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rapid transition from glow discharge to thermal arc has been a common problem in generating stable high-power non-thermal plasmas especially at ambient conditions. A sustained diffusive gliding arc discharge was generated in a large volume in atmospheric pressure air, driven by an alternating current (AC) power source. The plasma column extended beyond the water-cooled stainless steel electrodes and was stabilized by matching the flow speed of the turbulent air jet with the rated output power. Comprehensive investigations were performed using high-speed movies measured over the plasma column, synchronized with simultaneously recorded current and voltage waveforms. Dynamic details of the novel non-equilibrium discharge are revealed, which is characterized by a sinusoidal current waveform with amplitude stabilized at around 200 mA intermediate between thermal arc and glow discharge, shedding light to the governing mechanism of the sustained spark-suppressed AC gliding arc discharge.

Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Li, Zhongshan; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro

2014-12-01

137

Simultaneous Congo red decolorization and electricity generation in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell with different microfiltration, ultrafiltration and proton exchange membranes.  

PubMed

Different microfiltration membrane (MFM), proton exchange membrane (PEM) and ultrafiltration membranes (UFMs) with different molecular cutoff weights of 1K (UFM-1K), 5K (UFM-5K) and 10K (UFM-10K) were incorporated into air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) which were explored for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and electricity generation to investigate the effect of membrane on the performance of the MFC. Batch test results showed that the MFC with an UFM-1K produced the highest power density of 324 mW/m(2) coupled with an enhanced coulombic efficiency compared to MFM. The MFC with UMF-10K achieved the fastest decolorization rate (4.77 mg/L h), followed by MFM (3.61 mg/L h), UFM-5K (2.38 mg/L h), UFM-1K (2.02 mg/Lh) and PEM (1.72 mg/Lh). These results demonstrated the possibility of using various membranes in the system described here, and showed that UFM-1K was the best one based on the consideration of both cost and performance. PMID:21251817

Hou, Bin; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yong-you

2011-03-01

138

A novel method for effective diffusion coefficient measurement in gas diffusion media of polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel method for measuring effective diffusion coefficient of porous materials is developed. The oxygen concentration gradient is established by an air-breathing proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The porous sample is set in a sample holder located in the cathode plate of the PEMFC. At a given oxygen flux, the effective diffusion coefficients are related to the difference of oxygen concentration across the samples, which can be correlated with the differences of the output voltage of the PEMFC with and without inserting the sample in the cathode plate. Compared to the conventional electrical conductivity method, this method is more reliable for measuring non-wetting samples.

Yang, Linlin; Sun, Hai; Fu, Xudong; Wang, Suli; Jiang, Luhua; Sun, Gongquan

2014-07-01

139

Quantification of the uncertainties in the prediction of extinction of hydrogen-air diffusion flames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The study of the physical processes that lead to extinction of flames in gaseous hydrogen-air non-premixed combustion is of paramount importance for the reliable design of power plants and advanced propulsion systems in automobiles and hypersonic aircrafts. However, there remain several uncertainties in the experimental quantification of reaction rates of elementary steps in most of hydrogen-air mechanisms, which can produce hazards in hydrogen manipulation and engine malfunction. In this study, the effects of aleatory uncertainties in the chemical reaction-rate constants induced in hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion-flame extinction processes are addressed, with a probabilistic representation of the uncertain parameters sampled with a Markov-Chain Monte Carlo algorithm. Measurements of the reaction-rate constants and their associated uncertainty factors, reported earlier for the Stanford hydrogen-air detailed chemical mechanism, are used to study the propagation of uncertainties in the calculation of scalar dissipation rates at extinction. Non-intrusive methods are used to analyze the variablities, with the probability density function of the scalar dissipation rate being sampled around regions involving flame extinction and global sensitivity indices being computed by Monte Carlo sampling.

Kseib, Nicolas; Urzay, Javier; Iaccarino, Gianluca

2011-11-01

140

Stainless steel fiber felt as cathode diffusion backing and current collector for a micro direct methanol fuel cell with low methanol crossover  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with novel structure is designed and fabricated for a micro direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC), which used stainless steel fiber felt (SSFF) to replace the current collector and the backing layer at cathode. Result data shows that the novel structure can reduce the methanol crossover dramatically, as a result, achieves a better performance with a higher methanol concentration, a higher fuel utilization ratio and energy efficiency. In addition, the novel MEA also presents an improved water management at room temperature, allowing it to achieve a better performance. To elaborate the effect of the novel structure on anode or cathode electrode process, a reference electrode is built inside the single cell. The electrochemical results of half-cell test show that the novel MEA has a greatly reduced cathode polarization and a slightly increased anode polarization.

Li, Yang; Zhang, Xuelin; Nie, Li; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Xiaowei

2014-01-01

141

Erosion of a copper cathode in a negative corona discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The pulsed-periodic regime of a negative corona (Trichel pulses) in atmospheric-pressure air, which leads to explosion emission mechanisms (ecton generation) of pointed cathode erosion, is investigated. The jet erosion process at the copper cathode is discovered, and micrometer dendritelike structures formed by erosion products returning to the cathode are detected.

Asinovski?, É. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Samoylov, I. S.

2008-02-01

142

Effects of cathode spot dynamics on Trichel pulses  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative corona discharge has been investigated in air in the point-to-plane electrode configuration in Trichel pulse regime. Average discharge current was measured and oscillography of discharge current with simultaneous frontal and side video observation of cathode spot were performed. Observations showed that fixation of cathode spot in certain position on the cathode surface was always accompanied by Trichel pulse train

A. A. Petrov; R. H. Amirov; I. S. Samoylov

2009-01-01

143

Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

2011-01-01

144

Mineralization of sulfanilamide by electro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton in a pre-pilot plant with a Pt/air-diffusion cell.  

PubMed

The mineralization of sulfanilamide solutions at pH 3.0 was comparatively studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) using a 2.5 L pre-pilot plant containing a Pt/air-diffusion cell coupled with a solar photoreactor. Organics were primordially oxidized by hydroxyl radical (OH) formed from Fenton's reaction between H?O? generated at the cathode and added Fe(2+) and/or under the action of sunlight. A mineralization up to 94% was achieved using SPEF, whereas EF yielded much poorer degradation. The effect of current density and Fe(2+) and drug concentrations on the degradation rate, mineralization current efficiency and energy cost per unit DOC mass of EF and/or SPEF was examined. The sulfanilamide decay always followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, being more rapid in SPEF due to the additional generation of OH induced by sunlight on Fe(III) species. Catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone were identified as aromatic intermediates. The final solutions treated by EF contained Fe(III) complexes of maleic, fumaric, oxamic and mainly oxalic acids, which are hardly destroyed by OH. The quick photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate complexes by sunlight explains the higher oxidation ability of SPEF. The N content of sulfanilamide was mainly mineralized as NH?? ion and in much lesser extent as NO?? ion, whereas most of its initial S was converted into SO?²? ion. PMID:23561569

El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Arias, Conchita; Brillas, Enric

2013-05-01

145

Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.  

PubMed

We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed. PMID:23609636

Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

2013-04-22

146

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diffusion is the net movement of particles from areas of high concentration (number of particles per unit area) to low concentration. In this activity, students use a molecular dynamics model to view the behavior of diffusion in gases and liquids.

2012-07-19

147

Effect of the cathode gas diffusion layer on the water transport behavior and the performance of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol  

E-print Network

of passive direct methanol fuel cells operating with neat methanol Q.X. Wu, T.S. Zhao , W.W. Yang Department Direct methanol fuel cell Passive operation Neat methanol operation a b s t r a c t The passive operation of a direct methanol fuel cell with neat methanol requires the water that is pro- duced at the cathode

Zhao, Tianshou

148

Control of the structure and sooting characteristics of a coflow laminar methane\\/air diffusion flame using a central air jet: An experimental and numerical study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multi-port co-annular burners are widely used in practice to achieve low NOx and soot emissions from combustion devices. However, there is lack of fundamental studies on the structure and flame regime under different flow conditions. A conventional laminar axisymmetric coflow diffusion flame burner was modified by introducing a central air jet inside the fuel tube to investigate how the central

F. Liu; G. J. Smallwood

2011-01-01

149

24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF TOXIC VOCS IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - LABORATORY STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Diffusive sampling of a mixture of 42 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in humidified, purified air onto the solid adsorbent Carbopack X was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. The evaluation included variations in sample air temperature, relative humidity, and ozon...

150

In situ investigation of cathode and local biofilm microenvironments reveals important roles of OH- and oxygen transport in microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Mass transport within a cathode, including OH(-) transport and oxygen diffusion, is important for the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). However, little is known regarding how mass transport profiles are associated with MFC performance and how they are affected by biofilm that inevitably forms on the cathode surface. In this study, the OH(-) and oxygen profiles of a cathode biofilm were probed in situ in an MFC using microelectrodes. The pH of the catalyst layer interface increased from 7.0 ± 0.1 to 9.4 ± 0.3 in a buffered MFC with a bare cathode, which demonstrates significant accumulation of OH(-) in the cathode region. Furthermore, the pH of the interface increased to 10.0 ± 0.3 in the presence of the local biofilm, which indicates that OH(-) transport was severely blocked. As a result of the significant OH(-) accumulation, the maximum power density of the MFC decreased from 1.8 ± 0.1 W/m(2) to 1.5 ± 0.08 W/m(2). In contrast, oxygen crossover, which was significant under low current flow conditions, was limited by the cathode biofilm. As a result of the blocked oxygen crossover, higher MFC coulombic efficiency (CE) was achieved in the presence of the cathode biofilm. These results indicate that enhanced OH(-) transport and decreased oxygen crossover would be beneficial for high-performance MFC development. PMID:23537198

Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Tang, Jiahuan

2013-05-01

151

Spatially resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in methane-air diffusion flames.  

PubMed

A new setup for spatially resolved laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (SR-LIBS) is used for the first time to analyze methane-air diffusion flames. Using this configuration, background continuum emission is reduced, signal-to-background noise ratio is increased up to eight times, and spatial resolution is enhanced. The local equivalence ratio is also quantitatively estimated and the width of the secondary combustion region at a specified height above the burner is determined for two different methane flow rates. Furthermore, the threshold energy for spark formation is measured for regions inside and outside the flame. The results show that threshold energy is larger at the secondary combustion region, near the border of the flame, than inside the flame. PMID:21211152

Majd, Abdollah Eslami; Arabanian, Atoosa Sadat; Massudi, Reza; Nazeri, Majid

2011-01-01

152

Enhanced soot formation in flickering CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flames  

SciTech Connect

Optical methods are used to examine soot production in a co-flowing, axisymmetric CH{sub 4}/air diffusion flame in which the fuel flow rate is acoustically forced to create a time-varying flowfield. For a particular forcing condition in which tip clipping occurs (0.75 V loudspeaker excitation), elastic scattering of vertically polarized light from the soot particles increases by nearly an order of magnitude with respect to that observed for a steady flame with the same mean fuel flow rate. Peak soot volume fractions, as measured by time-resolved laser extinction/tomography at 632.8 and 454.5 run and calibrated laser-induced incandescence (LII), show a factor of 4-5 enhancement in this flickering flame. A Mie analysis suggests that most of the enhanced soot production results from the formation of larger particles in the time-varying flowfield.

Shaddix, C.R.; Harrington, J.E.; Smyth, K.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

1994-12-31

153

Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness. Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding (1979); this approach provided Successful Correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.

1999-01-01

154

Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix H  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness, Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding; this approach provided successful correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Ross, Howard B. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

155

Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

156

Large-Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Piloted Methane/Air Diffusion Flame  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the present study Large-Eddy Simulations for a turbulent, piloted methane/air diffusion flame have been performed and the results are compared to experimental data by Barlow et al. The Smagorinsky model is used to obtain the eddy viscosity, where the Smagorinsky constant is obtained by the Dynamic Model. The Lagrangian Flamelet Model is applied to describe turbulence-chemistry interactions. The model follows a conserved scalar approach, where the resolved mass fractions of chemical species are evaluated using a presumed pdf of the mixture fraction. The pdf is assumed to follow a ?-function, depending on the resolved mixture fraction and its subgrid-scale variance, which is also modeled using the Dynamic Procedure. In order to solve the unsteady flamelet equations, the temporal development of the scalar dissipation rate has to be specified from the solution of the turbulent flow field. In the present model, the conditional average of the scalar dissipation rate as a function of the axial distance from the nozzle is computed from the spatially filtered scalar dissipation rate, which is expressed in terms of the eddy diffusivity and the gradient of the resolved mixture fraction following the model of Girimaji et al.

Pitsch, Heinz; Steiner, Helfried

1999-11-01

157

Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2003-01-01

158

Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

159

Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2000-01-01

160

Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

161

Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

2001-01-01

162

Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.  

PubMed

The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation. PMID:23748698

Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

2013-07-21

163

Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

1995-01-01

164

Diffusion welding in air. [solid state welding of butt joint by fusion welding, surface cleaning, and heating  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Solid state welding a butt joint by fusion welding the peripheral surfaces to form a seal is described along with, autogenetically cleaning the faying or mating surfaces of the joint by heating the abutting surfaces to 1,200 C and heating to the diffusion welding temperature in air.

Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H. (inventors)

1974-01-01

165

Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material-air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs  

EPA Science Inventory

The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

166

Effect of biocover equipped with a novel passive air diffusion system on microbial methane oxidation and community of methanotrophs  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel biocover with passive air diffusion system (PADS) was designed in this study. Its effect on landfill gas components in the macrocosms of simulated biocover systems was also investigated. The results show that O2 concentration increased in the whole profile of the macrocosms equipped with PADS. When simulated landfill gas (SLFG) flow rate was no more than 40 mL

Zifang Chi; Wenjing Lu; Zishen Mou; Hongtao Wang; Yuyang Long; Zhenhan Duan

2012-01-01

167

Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/Water Interface  

E-print Network

Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/water interface to characterize the lateral mobilities of several long alkyl chain ferrocene amphiphiles strongly on the headgroup polarity, demonstrating that the immersion depth of the amphiphiles is the key

Majda, Marcin

168

Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

1989-01-01

169

Evaluation of passive diffusion bag and dialysis samplers in selected wells at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, July 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field comparisons of chemical concentrations obtained from dialysis samplers, passive diffusion bag samplers, and low-flow samplers showed generally close agreement in most of the 13 wells tested during July 2001 at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The data for chloride, sulfate, iron, alkalinity, arsenic, and methane appear to show that the dialysis samplers are capable of accurately collecting a passive sample for these constituents. In general, the comparisons of volatile organic compound concentrations showed a relatively close correspondence between the two different types of diffusion samples and between the diffusion samples and the low-flow samples collected in most wells. Divergence appears to have resulted primarily from the pumping method, either producing a mixed sample or water not characteristic of aquifer water moving through the borehole under ambient conditions. The fact that alkalinity was not detected in the passive diffusion bag samplers, highly alkaline waters without volatilization loss from effervescence, which can occur when a sample is acidified for preservation. Both dialysis and passive diffusion bag samplers are relatively inexpensive and can be deployed rapidly and easily. Passive diffusion bag samplers are intended for sampling volatile organic compounds only, but dialysis samplers can be used to sample both volatile organic compounds and inorganic solutes. Regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers, however, are subject to biodegradation and probably should be deployed no sooner than 2 weeks prior to recovery. 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, South Carolina. 2 Air Florce Center for Environmental Excellence, San Antionio, Texas.

Vroblesky, Don A.; Pravecek, Tasha

2002-01-01

170

Synthesis cathode material LiNi0.80Co0.15Al0.05O2 with two step solid-state method under air stream  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A facile generic strategy of solid-state reaction under air atmosphere is employed to prepare LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 layer structure micro-sphere as cathodes for Li-ion batteries. The impurity phase has been eliminated wholly without changing the R-3m space group of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2. The electrochemical performance of LiNi0.8Co0.15Al0.05O2 cathodes depend on the sintering step, temperature, particle size and uniformity. The sample pre-sintered at 540 °C for 12 h and then sintered at 720 °C for 28 h exhibits the best electrochemical performance, which delivers a reversible capacity of 180.4, 165.8, 154.7 and 135.6 mAhg-1 at 0.2 C, 1 C, 2 C and 5 C, respectively. The capacity retention keeps over 87% after 76 cycles at 1 C. This method is simple, cheap and mass-productive, and thus suitable to large scale production of NCA cathodes directly used for lithium ion batteries.

Xia, Shubiao; Zhang, Yingjie; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Yannan

2014-01-01

171

Dynamic Weakening (Extinction) of Simple Hydrocarbon-air Counterflow Diffusion Flames by Oscillatory Inflows  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This study of laminar non-premixed HC-air flames used an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system developed from a previously well-characterized 7.2-mm Pyrex-nozzle OJB system. Over 600 dynamic Flame Strength (FS) measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counterflow Diffusion Flames (CFDF's). Flames were stabilized using plug inflows having steady-plus-sinusoidal axial velocities of varied magnitude, frequency, f, up to 1600 Hz, and phase angle from 0 (most data) to 360 degrees. Dynamic FS is defined as the maximum average air input velocity (U(sub air), at nozzle exit) a CFDF can sustain before strain-induced extinction occurs due to prescribed oscillatory peak-to-peak velocity inputs superimposed on steady inputs. Initially, dynamic flame extinction data were obtained at low f, and were supported by 25-120 Hz Hot-Wire cold-flow velocity data at nozzle exits. Later, expanded extinction data were supported by 4-1600 Hz Probe Microphone (PM) pk/pk P data at nozzle exits. The PM data were first obtained without flows, and later with cold stagnating flows, which better represent speaker-diaphragm dynamics during runs. The PM approach enabled characterizations of Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) of CFDF's from 8 to 1600 Hz. DFW was defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = - 100 d(U(sub air) / U(sub air),0Hz) / d(pkpk P). The linear normalization with respect to acoustic pressure magnitude (and steady state (SS) FS) led to a DFW unaffected by strong internal resonances. For the C2H4/N2-air system, from 8 to 20 Hz, DFW is constant at 8.52 plus or minus 0.20 (% weakening)/Pa. This reflects a quasi-steady flame response to an acoustically induced dU(sub air)/dP. Also, it is surprisingly independent of C2H4/N2 mole fraction due to normalization by SS FS. From 20 to approximately 150 Hz, the C2H4/N2 air-flames weakened progressively less, with an inflection at approximately 70 Hz, and became asymptotically insensitive (DFW approximately 0) at approximately 300 Hz, which continued to 1600 Hz. The DFW of CH4-air flames followed a similar pattern, but showed much greater weakening than C2H4/N2-air flames; i.e., the quasi-steady DFW (8 to approximately 15 Hz) was 44.3 %/Pa, or approximately 5x larger, even though the 0 Hz (SS) FS was only 3.0 x smaller. The quasi-steady DFW's of C3H8-air and C2H6-air were intermediate at 34.8 and 20.9 %Pa, respectively. The DFW profiles of all four fuels, at various frequencies, correlated well but non-linearly with respective SS FS's. Notably, the DFW profile for C3H8 air fell more rapidly in the range greater than 15 to 60 Hz, compared with the 1- and 2-carbon fuels. This may indicate a shift in chemical kinetics, and/or O2 transport to a flame that moved closer to the fuel-side. In conclusion, Dynamic Flame Weakening limits appear significant and unique for each fuel, and correlate closely, but non-linearly, with Steady-State Flame Strengths at any given frequency. For reasons unknown, the dynamic flames didn't weaken more at intermediate frequencies (e.g., at 20-50 Hz) than they did at low frequencies (less than 15 Hz), where quasi-steady weakening appears to dominate. Quasi-steady flame weakening ostensibly represents a transient input strain rate maximum that just exceeds the steady-state strain-rate-limited extinction limit for a few cycles. Clearly, further detailed mechanistic understanding is needed in the fall-off region.

Pellett, G.; Kabaria, A.; Panigrahi, B.; Sammons, K.; Convery, J.; Wilson, L.

2005-01-01

172

Hollow cathode apparatus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A hollow cathode apparatus is described, which can be rapidly and reliably started. An ignitor positioned upstream from the hollow cathode, generates a puff of plasma that flows with the primary gas to be ionized through the cathode. The plasma puff creates a high voltage breakdown between the downstream end of the cathode and a keeper electrode, to heat the cathode to an electron-emitting temperature.

Aston, G. (inventor)

1984-01-01

173

Liftoff and blowoff of a diffusion flame between parallel streams of fuel and air  

SciTech Connect

A numerical analysis is presented to describe the liftoff and blowoff of a diffusion flame in the mixing layer between two parallel streams of fuel (mainly methane diluted with nitrogen) and air emerging from porous walls. The analysis, which takes into account the effects of thermal expansion, assumes a one-step overall Arrhenius reaction, where the activation energy E is allowed to vary to reproduce the variations of the planar flame propagation velocity with the equivalence ratio. First, we describe the steady flame-front structure when stabilized close to the porous wall (attached flame regime). Then, we analyze the case where the flame front is located far away from the porous wall, at a distance x{sub f}' such that, upstream of the flame front, the mixing layer has a self-similar structure (lifted flame regime). For steady lifted flames, the results, given here in the case when the fuel and air streams are injected with the same velocity, relate U{sub f}'/S{sub L}, the front velocity (relative to the upstream flow) measured with the planar stoichiometric flame velocity, with the Damkohler number D{sub m}=({delta}{sub m}/{delta}{sub L}){sup 2}, based on the thickness, {delta}{sub m}, of the nonreacting mixing layer at the flame-front position and the laminar flame thickness, {delta}{sub L}. For large values of D{sub m}, the results, presented here for a wide range of dilutions of the fuel stream, provide values of the front propagation velocity that are in good agreement with previous experimental results, yielding well-defined conditions for blowoff. The calculated flame-front velocity can also be used to describe the transient flame-front dynamics after ignition by an external energy source.

Fernandez-Tarrazo, Eduardo [I.N.T.A. Area de Propulsion-Edificio R02, Ctra. Ajalvir, km 4, 28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Vera, Marcos [Area de Mecanica de Fluidos, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Linan, Amable [Departamento de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Pza. Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2006-01-01

174

Carbon-containing cathodes for enhanced electron emission  

DOEpatents

A cathode has electropositive atoms directly bonded to a carbon-containing substrate. Preferably, the substrate comprises diamond or diamond-like (sp.sup.3) carbon, and the electropositive atoms are Cs. The cathode displays superior efficiency and durability. In one embodiment, the cathode has a negative electron affinity (NEA). The cathode can be used for field emission, thermionic emission, or photoemission. Upon exposure to air or oxygen, the cathode performance can be restored by annealing or other methods. Applications include detectors, electron multipliers, sensors, imaging systems, and displays, particularly flat panel displays.

Cao, Renyu (Cupertino, CA); Pan, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Vergara, German (Madrid, ES); Fox, Ciaran (Los Altos, CA)

2000-01-01

175

Soot formation and temperature field structure in laminar propane-air diffusion flames at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect

The effect of pressure on soot formation and the structure of the temperature field was studied in coflow propane-air laminar diffusion flames over the pressure range of 0.1 to 0.73 MPa in a high-pressure combustion chamber. The fuel flow rate was selected so that the soot was completely oxidized within the visible flame and the flame was stable at all pressures. Spectral soot emission was used to measure radially resolved soot volume fraction and soot temperature as a function of pressure. Additional soot volume fraction measurements were made at selected heights using line-of-sight light attenuation. Soot concentration values from these two techniques agreed to within 30% and both methods exhibited similar trends in the spatial distribution of soot concentration. Maximum line-of-sight soot concentration along the flame centerline scaled with pressure; the pressure exponent was about 1.4 for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Peak carbon conversion to soot, defined as the percentage of fuel carbon content converted to soot, also followed a power-law dependence on pressure, where the pressure exponent was near to unity for pressures between 0.2 and 0.73 MPa. Soot temperature measurements indicated that the overall temperatures decreased with increasing pressure; however, the temperature gradients increased with increasing pressure. (author)

Bento, Decio S.; Guelder, OEmer L. [Institute for Aerospace Studies, University of Toronto, 4925 Dufferin Street, Toronto, ON M3H 5T6 (Canada); Thomson, Kevin A. [National Research Council, ICPET Combustion Technology, 1200 Montreal Road M-9, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

2006-06-15

176

Simulation of air flow in the IEA Annex 20 test room—validation of a simplified model for the nozzle diffuser in isothermal test cases  

Microsoft Academic Search

The modeling of air supply devices has been identified from the International Energy Agency (IEA) Annex 20 project as one of the most important problems in applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict air flow pattern and air distribution in buildings, and the complicated HESCO nozzle diffuser used in the IEA Annex 20 test room has been proved to be

S. Luo; J. Heikkinen; Bernard Roux

2004-01-01

177

Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure  

SciTech Connect

A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an 710119 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an 710119 (China); Duan Yixiang [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an 710119 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Transient Optics and Photonics, Xi'an Institute of Optics and Precision Mechanics of CAS, Xi'an 710119 (China); Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

2013-01-21

178

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Diffusion is the movement of particles from an area of high concentration to an area of low concentration. The molecules move until equilibrium is reached. If a perfume is sprayed on one side of the room, the perfume molecules will eventually spread out all over the room until there are equal concentrations of the molecules throughout the space.

Christopher Thomas (None; )

2006-11-09

179

Raman measurement of mixing and finite-rate chemistry in a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering and laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) from a KrF excimer laser are combined to simultaneously measure temperature, major species concentrations (H[sub 2], O[sub 2], N[sub 2], H[sub 2]O), and OH radical concentration in a supersonic lifted co-flowing hydrogen-air diffusion flame. The axisymmetric flame is formed when a sonic jet of hydrogen mixes with a Mach

T. S. Cheng; J. A. Wehrmeyer; R. W. Pitz; O. Jr. Jarrett; G. B. Northam

1994-01-01

180

Diffusion of VoIP in Chinese large enterprises: the cases of Air China and Harvest Fund  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This research paper aims to apply the technology-organization-environment (TOE) framework to describe and discuss the critical factors concerning the diffusion of voice over internet protocol (VoIP) innovations among Chinese large enterprises, in particular, Air China and Harvest Fund. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper deploys a dual case study methodology and extensive triangulation, including review of archival data, in-depth interviews

Dimitris Assimakopoulos; Herman Wu

2010-01-01

181

Spatially resolved elemental analysis of a hydrogen–air diffusion flame by laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Laser-induced plasma spectroscopy (LIPS) was applied to direct multi-element analysis of chemical species in a hydrogen–air diffusion flame. The plasma was generated by focusing the second harmonic radiation from a Nd:YAG laser at a wavelength of 532 nm and the resulting plasma emission was detected by a multi-channel spectrometer. The spatial profiles obtained by LIPS measurements for the atomic emission

Shinsuke Itoh; Masahisa Shinoda; Kuniyuki Kitagawa; Norio Arai; Yong-Ill Lee; Daiqing Zhao; Hiroshi Yamashita

2001-01-01

182

Occupational dimethylformamide exposure. 1. Diffusive sampling of dimethylformamide vapor for determination of time-weighted average concentration in air.  

PubMed

A diffusive sampling method with water as absorbent was examined in comparison with 3 conventional methods of diffusive sampling with carbon cloth as absorbent, pumping through National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) charcoal tubes, and pumping through NIOSH silica gel tubes to measure time-weighted average concentration of dimethylformamide (DMF). DMF vapors of constant concentrations at 3-110 ppm were generated by bubbling air at constant velocities through liquid DMF followed by dilution with fresh air. Both types of diffusive samplers could either absorb or adsorb DMF in proportion to time (0.25-8 h) and concentration (3-58 ppm), except that the DMF adsorbed was below the measurable amount when carbon cloth samplers were exposed at 3 ppm for less than 1 h. When both diffusive samplers were loaded with DMF and kept in fresh air, the DMF in water samplers stayed unchanged for at least for 12 h. The DMF in carbon cloth samplers showed a decay with a half-time of 14.3 h. When the carbon cloth was taken out immediately after termination of DMF exposure, wrapped in aluminum foil, and kept refrigerated, however, there was no measurable decrease in DMF for at least 3 weeks. When the air was drawn at 0.2 l/min, a breakthrough of the silica gel tube took place at about 4,000 ppm.min (as the lower 95% confidence limit), whereas charcoal tubes could tolerate even heavier exposures, suggesting that both tubes are fit to measure the 8-h time-weighted average of DMF at 10 ppm. PMID:1577523

Yasugi, T; Kawai, T; Mizunuma, K; Horiguchi, S; Iguchi, H; Ikeda, M

1992-01-01

183

Analysis of the structure and mechanisms of extinction of a counterflow methanol-air diffusion flame  

SciTech Connect

Numerical calculations were performed to determine the structure and to clarify the extinction mechanisms of diffusion flames stabilized between counterflowing streams of methanol and air. The calculations were performed at a value of the thermodynamic pressure equal to 1 atmosphere, with different values for the rate of strain and with two different chemical kinetic mechanisms, mechanism a and mechanism b. Mechanism a and mechanism b have the same set of elementary reactions, but the rate constants for these elementary reactions were obtained from two different references. If mechanism a is used, the authors conclude that at low rates of strain the concentration of CH/sub 2/OH and HCO are in steady state and, if partial equilibrium is assumed for certain reactions, there exist algebraic relations among the concentrations of the radicals OH, H, and O. As the rate of strain is increased, HCO is no longer in steady state and no solution was obtained for a strain rate greater than 521 s/sup -1/. However, if mechanism b is used, the concentration of HCO alone is in steady state, and there also exist algebraic relations among the concentrations of the radicals OH, H, and O. As the rate of strain is increased, no solution was obtained for a strain rate greater than 168 s/sup -1/, and the authors speculate that extinction of the flame is due to a large value of the activation energy for a reaction controlling the pyrolysis of CH/sub 2/OH to CH/sub 2/O.

Seshadri, K.; Trevino, C.; Smooke, M.D.

1989-05-01

184

Multivariable optimization of PEMFC cathodes using an agglomerate model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A comprehensive numerical framework for cathode electrode design is presented and applied to predict the catalyst layer and the gas diffusion layer parameters that lead to an optimal electrode performance at different operating conditions. The design and optimization framework couples an agglomerate cathode catalyst layer model to a numerical gradient-based optimization algorithm. The set of optimal parameters is obtained by

M. Secanell; K. Karan; A. Suleman; N. Djilali

2007-01-01

185

Diffusion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Since the advent of the internet, a number of artists and related organizations have become interested in utilizing the web to promulgate new forms of artistic creation and their subsequent dissemination. Supported by the Arts Council of England, these Diffusion eBooks are essentially pdf files that readers can download, print out and make into booklets. As the site suggests, "the Diffusion format challenges conventions of interactivity-blending the physical and the virtual and breaking the dominance of mouse and screen as the primary forms of human computer interaction...the format's aim is to take the reader away from the screen and computer and engage them in the process of production." There are a number of creative booklets available here for visitors, complete with instruction on how to assemble them for the desired effect. For anyone with even a remote interest in the possibilities afforded by this rather curious new form of expression, this website is worth a look.

186

Pressed boride cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

Wolski, W.

1985-01-01

187

Explosive mechanism of cathode erosion in Trichel pulse negative corona  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. Cathode erosion has been investigated in Trichel pulse negative corona discharge in air in point-to-plane electrode configuration on tungsten, copper, graphite and aluminum cathodes. It is found that negative corona causes erosion of the cathode surface in form of nanometer-size craters and fissures. Observed etching may be explained in terms of electro- explosive processes. In Trichel

A. A. Petrov; R. H. Amirov; I. S. Samoylov

2009-01-01

188

A diffusion approximation approach to stochastic modeling of air conditioning type loads  

E-print Network

Process Markov Process . Diffusion Approximation. Deterministic Process Noise Process MODEL GENERALIZATION. Linearized Switching Process Markov Process Diffusion Approximation. Deterministic Process Noise Process . COMPUTER SIMULATION... and Lehoczky have applied a diffus1on approximation model for messaoes in a communicat1ons network I 14l. This approximat1on makes a discrete-valued Markov process, in th1s case (}(t), a continuous process with the same mean and variance as the discrete...

Roy, Teresa Henryka

1981-01-01

189

Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

2000-01-01

190

Interfacial diffusion of metal atoms during air annealing of chemically deposited ZnS-CuS and PbS-CuS thin films  

Microsoft Academic Search

The authors report on the interfacial diffusion of metal ions occurring during air annealing of multilayer CuS films (0.15-0.6[mu]m) deposited on thin coating of ZnS or PbS ([approximately]0.06 [mu]m) on glass substrates. All the films are deposited from chemical baths at room temperature. The interfacial diffusion on the metal atoms during the air annealing is illustrate by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

L. Huang; R. A. Zingaro; E. A. Meyers; P. K. Nair; M. T. S. Nair

1994-01-01

191

Discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide cathodes R.P. RAMASAMY1  

E-print Network

Discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide cathodes R.P. RAMASAMY1 , C. FEGER2 , T. STRANGE words: cathode performance, diffusion coefficient, impedance, lithium primary batteries, silver vanadium oxide Abstract The discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide (SVO) as a cathode in lithium

Popov, Branko N.

192

Polymer electroluminescent devices with zirconium carbide cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The behavior of polymeric electroluminescent devices made using ZrC cathodes, a soluble phenylene vinylene polymer, and Au anodes is reported. ZrC is a highly air-stable metal with a work function of about 3.6 eV. Polycrystalline thin films can be formed on sapphire with electron beam evaporation and subsequent annealing at ca. 500 deg C. The devices exhibit a lower turn-on voltage than corresponding devices with Al cathodes, but very low efficiency; their lifetime is not longer than with other cathodes. The current-luminance-voltage-time characteristics suggest that the recombination zone is close to the cathode, that the metal is not exidized and efficiently quenches the excitons, and that the negative charge carriers are effectively trapped by the polymer.

Sheats, James R.; Mackie, William A.; Anz, Samir; Xie, Tienbao

1997-12-01

193

COMPARISON OF 24H AVERAGE VOC MONITORING RESULTS FOR RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AND OUTDOOR AIR USING CARBOPACK X-FILLED DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS AND ACTIVE SAMPLING - A PILOT STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Analytical results obtained by thermal desorption GC/MS for 24h diffusive sampling of 11 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are compared with results of time-averaged active sampling at a known constant flow rate. Air samples were collected with co-located duplicate diffusive samp...

194

Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

Li, Lee, E-mail: leeli@mail.hust.edu.cn; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electric and Electronic Engineering, HuaZhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), Wuhan 430074 (China)

2014-01-14

195

On the air-filled effective porosity parameter of Rogers and Nielson's (1991) bulk radon diffusion coefficient in unsaturated soils.  

PubMed

The radon exhalation rate at the earth's surface from soil or rock with radium as its source is the main mechanism behind the radon activity concentrations observed in both indoor and outdoor environments. During the last two decades, many subsurface radon transport models have used Rogers and Nielson's formula for modeling the unsaturated soil bulk radon diffusion coefficient. This formula uses an "air-filled effective porosity" to account for radon adsorption and radon dissolution in the groundwater. This formula is reviewed here, and its hypotheses are examined for accuracy in dealing with subsurface radon transport problems. The author shows its limitations by comparing one dimensional steady-state analytical solutions of the two-phase (air/water) transport equation (Fick's law) with Rogers and Nielson's formula. For radon diffusion-dominated transport, the calculated Rogers and Nielson's radon exhalation rate is shown to be unrealistic as it is independent of the values of the radon adsorption and groundwater dissolution coefficients. For convective and diffusive transport, radon exhalation rates calculated using Fick's law and this formula agree only for high values of gas-phase velocity and groundwater saturation. However, these conditions are not usually met in most shallow subsurface environments where radon migration takes place under low gas phase velocities and low water saturation. PMID:24670909

Saâdi, Zakaria

2014-05-01

196

Sodium-ion diffusion mechanisms in the low cost high voltage cathode material Na2+?Fe2-?/2(SO4)3.  

PubMed

Bond-valence site energy modelling, classical molecular dynamics and DFT simulations were employed to clarify Na(+) ion migration in monoclinic Na2+?Fe2-?/2(SO4)3, the recently reported first representative of a new promising class of alluaudite-type high voltage cathode materials for sodium-ion batteries. Empirical potential parameters derived from our softBV bond valence parameter set reproduce experimental unit-cell parameters. Migration energy barrier calculations based on both these empirical and on ab initio approaches consistently show a strongly anisotropic and fairly fast Na(+) ion mobility along partially occupied Na(3) channels in the c-direction. Nominally fully occupied Na(1) sites are attached to these paths with a moderate activation energy as sources of mobile ions. At elevated temperatures separate parallel Na(2) channels contribute to the ionic conductivity. As such one-dimensional pathways are highly vulnerable to blocking by structural defects, the experimentally observed favourable rate performance can only be understood as a consequence of cross-linking of the channels to a more robust higher-dimensional migration pathway network. Our static and dynamic bond valence pathway models for representative local structure models reveal that this cross-linking is achieved by the iron deficiency of the compound: iron vacancies act as low-lying interstitial sites that can be reached from both types of channels with moderate activation energies. Structural relaxations around the vacancies however reduce the sodium mobility along the channels. An analogous dual effect of blocking migration along the channels and promoting perpendicular migration would result from Na(+)/Fe(2+) antisite defects. Hence, further new alluaudite type transition metal sulphates can only be expected to yield a high rate performance, if their synthesis ensures the presence of a comparable transition metal sub-stoichiometry and/or a suitably tailored concentration of sodium/transition metal antisite defects. PMID:25757515

Wong, L L; Chen, H M; Adams, S

2015-04-14

197

Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities.  

PubMed

Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339±29mW/m(2)), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444±8mW/m(2)) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use. PMID:25260178

Hoskins, Daniel L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

2014-11-01

198

Effect of air flow rate on oxygen transfer in an oxidation ditch equipped with fine bubble diffusers and slow speed mixers  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effect of air flow rate on oxygen transfer efficiency was examined in clean water and under process conditions in an oxidation ditch equipped with fine bubble membrane diffusers and large blade slow speed mixers. Under process conditions, an increase in the air flow rate resulted in a decrease of the oxygen transfer efficiency similar to that observed in clean

S. Gillot; A. Héduit

2000-01-01

199

Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 Air Contaminants on Critical Airside Strain Rates for Extinction of Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJB) were used to form dish shaped counterflow diffusion flames (CFDF), centered by opposing laminar jets of H2, N2 and both clean and contaminated air (O2/N2 mixtures) in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for flame extinction and restoration limits are shown versus wide ranges of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet, and also input H2 concentration. Blowoff, a sudden breaking of CFDF to a stable ring shape, occurs in highly stretched stagnation flows and is generally believed to measure kinetically limited flame reactivity. Restore, a sudden restoration of central flame, is a relatively new phenomenon which exhibits a H2 dependent hysteresis from Blowoff. For 25 percent O2 air mixtures, mole for mole replacement of 25 percent N2 contaminant by steam increased U(air) or flame strength at Blowoff by about 5 percent. This result is consistent with laminar burning velocity results from analogous substitution of steam for N2 in a premixed stoichiometric H2-O2-N2 (or steam) flame, shown by Koroll and Mulpuru to promote a 10 percent increase in experimental and calculated laminar burning velocity, due to enhanced third body efficiency of water in: H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M. When the OJB results were compared with Liu and MacFarlane's experimental laminar burning velocity of premixed stoichiometric H2 + air + steam, a crossover occurred, i.e., steam enhanced OJB flame strength at extinction relative to laminar burning velocity.

Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.; Guerra, Rosemary

1989-01-01

200

Mice lung disease follow-up with open-air fluorescence diffuse optical tomography  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A fluorescence diffuse optical tomography instrument including a dedicated reconstruction scheme which accounts for the medium optical heterogeneities is presented. It allows non-contact measurements and does not require animal immersion in an optical adaptation liquid.

Koenig, Anne; Gonon, Georges; Hervé, Lionel; Berger, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Boutet, Jérôme; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc; Peltié, Philippe; Rizo, Philippe

2009-07-01

201

Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management  

DOEpatents

A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

2013-08-27

202

The ratio of radial diffusion coefficient to mobility for electrons in helium, argon, air, methane and nitric oxide  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ratio of the radial diffusion coefficient to mobility Dr\\/ mu exp has been measured for the first time in five gases at high E\\/N (ratio of electric field to gas number density). The range of E\\/N was as follows: helium 3air 14

C. S. Lakshminarasimha; J. Lucas

1977-01-01

203

Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation  

SciTech Connect

The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

Idzerda, Yves

2013-09-30

204

Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

1987-01-01

205

Effect of biocover equipped with a novel passive air diffusion system on microbial methane oxidation and community of methanotrophs.  

PubMed

A novel biocover with passive air diffusion system (PADS) was designed in this study. Its effect on landfill gas components in the macrocosms of simulated biocover systems was also investigated. The results show that O2 concentration increased in the whole profile of the macrocosms equipped with PADS. When simulated landfill gas (SLFG) flow rate was no more than 40 mL min(-1), the methane oxidation rate was 100%. The highest CH4 oxidation capacity reached to 31.34 mol m(-3) day(-1). Molecular microbiology analysis of the soil samples taken from the above macrocosm showed that the growth of type I methanotrophs was enhanced, attributable to enhanced air diffusion and distribution, whereas the microbial diversity and population density of type II methanotrophs were not so affected, as evidenced by the absence of any difference between the biocover equipped with PADS and that of the control. According to a phylogenic analysis, Methylobacter Methylosarcinafor type I, and Methylocystis, Methylosinus for type II, were the most prevalent species in the macrocosm with PADS. PMID:22482286

Chi, Zifang; Lu, Wenjing; Mou, Zishen; Wang, Hongtao; Long, Yuyang; Duan, Zhenhan

2012-03-01

206

Electro-Explosive Mechanism of Carbon Cathode Destruction in Negative Corona Discharge in Trichel Pulse Regime  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erosion of the graphite cathode has been investigated in point-to-plane negative corona discharge in ambient air. Oscillography of discharge current and observation of cathode spot dynamics as well as electron micrography of the cathode surface has been performed. An attempt was made to explain cathode erosion in terms of local electro-explosions caused by pulsed discharge current. Difference of erosion pattern

Alexey A. PETROV; Ravil H. AMIROV; Erik I. ASINOVSKII; Igor S. SAMOYLOV

2009-01-01

207

Raman measurement of mixing and finite-rate chemistry in a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame  

SciTech Connect

Ultraviolet (UV) spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering and laser-induced predissociative fluorescence (LIPF) from a KrF excimer laser are combined to simultaneously measure temperature, major species concentrations (H[sub 2], O[sub 2], N[sub 2], H[sub 2]O), and OH radical concentration in a supersonic lifted co-flowing hydrogen-air diffusion flame. The axisymmetric flame is formed when a sonic jet of hydrogen mixes with a Mach 2 annular jet of vitiated air. Mean and rms profiles of temperature, species concentrations, and mixture fraction are obtained throughout the supersonic flame. Simultaneous measurements of the chemical species and temperature are compared with frozen chemistry and equilibrium chemistry limits to assess the local state of the mixing and chemistry. Upstream of the lifted flame base, a very small amount of reaction occurs form mixing with hot vitiated air. Downstream of the lifted flame base, strong turbulent mixing leads to sub equilibrium values of temperature and OH concentration. Due to the interaction of velocity and temperature in supersonic compressible flames, the fluctuations of temperature and species concentrations are found to be higher than subsonic flames. Farther downstream, slow three-body recombination reactions result in super equilibrium OH concentrations that depress temperatures below their equilibrium values.

Cheng, T.S.; Wehrmeyer, J.A.; Pitz, R.W. (Vanderbilt Univ., Nashville, TN (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Jarrett, O. Jr.; Northam, G.B. (NASA, Hampton, VA (United States). Langley Research Center)

1994-10-01

208

Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

1989-01-01

209

Different K+-Na+ inter-diffusion kinetics between the air side and tin side of an ion-exchanged float aluminosilicate glass  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The difference between the inter-diffusion kinetics of K+-Na+ in the air and tin sides of an ion-exchanged float aluminosilicate glass was investigated as a function of the exchange temperature and time. The potassium concentration profiles of the ion-exchanged glass surface were experimentally measured by electron microprobe analysis, and the diffusion coefficient was calculated by the Boltzmann-Montano approach. On the tin side of the ion-exchanged glass, the diffusion of K+-Na+ ions is hindered by tin. The diffusion coefficient is also more sensitive to temperature and time on the tin than on the air sides. The results would be useful in guiding the strengthening process of float glass by one step ion-exchange or two step ion-exchange to obtain engineered stress profile (ESP) glasses.

Jiang, Liangbao; Guo, Xintao; Li, Xiaoyu; Li, Lei; Zhang, Guanli; Yan, Yue

2013-01-01

210

Sensitivity of Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations to the vertical diffusion parameterization during convective meteorological situations  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations during photochemical smog episodes in Atlanta, Georgia, depend strongly on the numerical parameterization of the daytime vertical diffusivity. Results found suggest that vertical mixing is overestimated by the UAM-IV during unstable daytime conditions, as calculated vertical diffusivity values exceed measured and comparable literature values. Although deviations between measured and UAM-IV calculated air pollutant concentrations may only in part be due the UAM-IV diffusivity parameterization, results indicate the large error potential in vertical diffusivity parameterization. Easily implemented enhancements to UAM-IV algorithms are proposed, thus improving UAM-IV modeling performance during unstable stratification. 38 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

Nowacki, P.; Samson, P.J.; Sillman, S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)] [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

1996-10-01

211

Effect of ferrocene on soot in a prevaporized iso-octane\\/air diffusion flame  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports on ferrocene, or dicyclopentadienyl iron ((CâHâ)âFe) which is an organometallic compound of proven, considerable importance in relation to the control of soot resulting from the combustion of hydrocarbon fuels. Ferrocene as a fuel additive has been observed to suppress soot in oil-fired boilers and furnaces, jet engines, poly (vinyl chloride) combustion, acetylene pyrolysis, and laboratory-scale diffusion flames.

P BONCZYK

1991-01-01

212

Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

1998-01-01

213

Technology diffusion and environmental regulation: Evidence from electric power plants under the Clean Air Act  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Even though environmental policy can greatly affect the path of technology diffusion, the economics literature contains limited empirical evidence of this relationship. My research will contribute to the available evidence by providing insight into the technology adoption decisions of electric generating firms. Since policies are often evaluated based on the incentives they provide to promote adoption of new technologies, it is important that policy makers understand the relationship between technological diffusion and regulation structure to make informed decisions. Lessons learned from this study can be used to guide future policies such as those directed to mitigate climate change. I first explore the diffusion of scrubbers, a sulfur dioxide (SO 2) abatement technology, in response to federal market-based regulations and state command-and-control regulations. I develop a simple theoretical model to describe the adoption decisions of scrubbers and use a survival model to empirically test the theoretical model. I find that power plants with strict command-and-control regulations have a high probability of installing a scrubber. These findings suggest that although market-based regulations have encouraged diffusion, many scrubbers have been installed because of state regulatory pressure. Although tradable permit systems are thought to give firms more flexibility in choosing abatement technologies, I show that interactions between a permit system and pre-existing command-and-control regulations can limit that flexibility. In a separate analysis, I explore the diffusion of combined cycle (CC) generating units, which are natural gas-fired generating units that are cleaner and more efficient than alternative generating units. I model the decision to consider adoption of a CC generating unit and the extent to which the technology is adopted in response to environmental regulations imposed on new sources of pollutants. To accomplish this, I use a zero-inflated Poisson model and focus on both the decision to adopt a CC unit at an existing power plant as well as the firm-level decision to adopt a CC unit in either a new or an existing power plant. Evidence from this empirical investigation shows that environmental regulation has a significant effect on both the decision to consider adoption as well as the extent of adoption.

Frey, Elaine F.

214

Oxide cathodes produced by plasma deposition  

SciTech Connect

These are two distinct applications for high-current-density, long-life thermionic cathodes. The first application is as a substitute for explosive emission cathodes used in high-power microwave (HPM) devices being developed for Air Force programs. The second application is in SLAC`s X-band klystrons for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC, UCD, and LBL are developing a plasma deposition process that eliminates the problems with binders, carbonate reduction, peeling, and porosity. The emission layer is deposited using plasma deposition of metallic barium in vacuum with an oxygen background gas. An applied bias voltage drives the oxide plasma into the nickel surface. Since the oxide is deposited directly, it does not have problems with poisoning from a hydrocarbon binder. The density of the oxide layer is increased from the 40--50% for standard oxide cathodes to nearly 100% for plasma deposition.

Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G. [Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Pi, T.; Umstattd, R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Brown, I.; Montiero, O. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1997-12-31

215

Lightweight Cathodes For Nickel Batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Lightweight cathodes for rechargeable nickel-based electrochemical cells undergoing development. In cathodes, mats of nickel fibers are substrates providing structural support of, and electrical contact with, active cathode material. Offers specific energies greater than sintered nickel plaque cathodes. Electrodes used in rechargeable batteries for applications in which weight major concern, including laptop computers, cellular phones, flashlights, soldiers' backpacks, and electric vehicles.

Britton, Doris L.

1996-01-01

216

Simultaneous Raman/LIF measurements of major species and NO in turbulent H2/air diffusion flames  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A single-pulse spontaneous Raman scattering apparatus, based on a flashlamp-pumped dye laser, was used to determine the concentrations of the major species and the temperature in turbulent H2/N2/air jet diffusion flames. The concentrations of nitric oxide were simultaneously measured by Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) after excitation of the A 2 ? +- X 2 ? transition with a Nd: YAG-pumped dye laser. Some fundamentals of the employed methods, including the calibration procedure, quenching corrections, and accuracy are discussed. Besides a detailed study of the experimental technique, a main goal of the presented investigations was the generation of comprehensive data sets of high accuracy from well-defined turbulent flames which allow for a quantitative comparison with model calculations. Two flames with different fuel dilution and Reynolds numbers were investigated in a pattern of typically 100 measuring locations each comprising 300 single shots. In addition, four flames with different flow velocities but same fuel composition were compared with respect to their temperature and NO concentration profiles. The results show that differential diffusion plays an important role in these flames, especially near the flame base, where the temperature is increased above the adiabatic flame temperature and deviations from adiabatic equilibrium are large. The correlations between NO and mixture fraction and NO and temperature reveal characteristic features of the different flames.

Meier, W.; Vyrodov, A. O.; Bergmann, V.; Stricker, W.

1996-07-01

217

Understanding the degradation of Congo red and bacterial diversity in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell being evaluated for simultaneous azo dye removal from wastewater and bioelectricity generation.  

PubMed

We investigated the mechanism of Congo red degradation and bacterial diversity in a single-chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC) incorporating a microfiltration membrane and air-cathode. The MFC was operated continuously for more than 4 months using a mixture of Congo red and glucose as fuel. We demonstrated that the Congo red azo bonds were reduced at the anode to form aromatic amines. This is consistent with the known mechanism of anaerobic biodegradation of azo dyes. The MFC developed a less dense biofilm at the anode in the presence of Congo red compared to its absence indicating that Congo red degradation negatively affected biofilm formation. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and direct 16S ribosomal DNA gene nucleotide sequencing revealed that the microbial communities differed depending on whether Congo red was present in the MFC. Geobacter-like species known to generate electricity were detected in the presence or absence of Congo red. In contrast, Azospirillum, Methylobacterium, Rhodobacter, Desulfovibrio, Trichococcus, and Bacteroides species were only detected in its presence. These species were most likely responsible for degrading Congo red. PMID:22678023

Sun, Jian; Li, Youming; Hu, Yongyou; Hou, Bin; Zhang, Yaping; Li, Sizhe

2013-04-01

218

Cathodes - Technological review  

SciTech Connect

Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

2014-06-16

219

A sensitive diffusion sampler for the determination of volatile organic compounds in ambient air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We developed a diffusive sampling device (DSD-voc) for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which is suitable for collection of low level VOCs and analysis with thermal desorption. This sampling device is composed of two parts, an exposure part made of a porous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) filter, and an analysis part made of stainless-steel tubing. The DSD-voc collects VOCs through the mechanism of molecular diffusion. Collection is controlled by moving the adsorbent from the exposure part to the analysis part by changing the posture of the DSD-voc. Adsorbates in the DSD-voc were analyzed by GC/MS with a thermal desorption cold trap injector (TCT). The TCT has the advantage of being able to accept the entire quantity of VOCs. We connected a condenser between the DSD-voc and the trap tube to prevent moisture from freezing in the trap tube when the sampler was packed with strong adsorbent. We also examined the desorption efficiency for VOCs from several types of adsorbents (Carboxen TM 1000, Carbosieve TM G, Carbosieve S III, Carbotrap TM B, and activated carbon) over a wide range of temperatures. Carboxen 1000 was suitable for the determination of VOCs with a low boiling point range, from CFC12 to hexane, while Carbotrap B was suitable for VOCs from hexane to 1,4-dichlorobenzene. The limits of detection with Carboxen 1000 and Carbotrap B were 0.036-0.046 and 0.0035-0.014 ppb, respectively, for a sampling duration of 24 h. Coefficients of variation for concentrations of major VOCs ranged from 3.8 to 14%. It is possible to estimate atmospheric VOCs at sub-parts per billion (sub-ppb), with high sensitivity, by using both adsorbents in combination.

Uchiyama, Shigehisa; Asai, Masae; Hasegawa, Shuji

220

Arcjet cathode phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

1989-01-01

221

Arcjet Cathode Phenomena  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

1989-01-01

222

Monitoring of workers exposed to a mixture of toluene, styrene and methanol vapours by means of diffusive air sampling, blood analysis and urinalysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Exposure of 34 male workers to combined toluene, styrene and methanol was monitored by personal diffusive sampling of solvent vapours in breathing zone air, analysis of shift-end blood for the 3 solvents and analysis of shift-end urine for hippuric, mandelic and phenylglyoxylic acids and methanol. The exposure of most of the workers was below current occupational exposure limits. Regression

Toshio Kawai; Tomojiro Yasugi; Kazunori Mizunuma; Shun'ichi Horiguchi; Ikuharu Morioka; Kazuhisa Miyashita; Yoko Uchida; Masayuki Ikeda

1992-01-01

223

DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)  

EPA Science Inventory

Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

224

Evaluation of two types of diffusive samplers and adsorbents for measuring 1,3-butadiene and benzene in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

1,3-Butadiene and benzene are common air pollutants, the former being a suspected and the latter an established carcinogen. Road traffic and industry emissions are sources of these compounds. In order to assess the risk posed to the general population by ambient levels of these pollutants, diffusive samplers capable of monitoring them over both long timescales (weeks) and shorter periods (8-24 h) are needed. In this study, we evaluated a new diffusive sampler, the SKC-Ultra, and a partially validated sampler, the Radiello, both of which are compatible with thermal desorption. Two adsorbents, the graphitized carbon blacks Carbopack X and Carbograph 5, were also evaluated. Standard atmospheres of the target compounds were generated in order to determine uptake rates and to evaluate the effects of concentration, relative humidity, reverse-diffusion and storage of samplers. The samplers and adsorbents were also tested in a field study. Analysis and detection were performed using an automatic thermal desorber (ATD) connected to a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Both samplers showed much higher uptake rates (ca. 25-50 fold) than those reported for the Perkin-Elmer sampler. The 24 h uptake rates for 1,3-butadiene and benzene obtained using the SKC-Ultra filled with Carbopack X were 14.9±0.8 (SD) and 16.0±1.4 (SD) mL min -1, respectively, and the corresponding figures for the Radiello were 22.0±0.9 (SD) and 30.4±1.1 (SD) mL min -1. Varying the atmospheric concentrations of the compounds had no effect on the uptake rate for the Carbopack X adsorbent and the samplers could be stored up to one month after sampling. Uptake rates of 1,3-butadiene declined over longer periods (one week). This was probably due to reverse diffusion, and the effect was less pronounced with the SKC-Ultra sampler. In summary, we consider the two samplers to be suitable both for stationary and personal monitoring of 1,3-butadiene and benzene, for the general population and for workplaces.

Strandberg, Bo; Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Olsson, Katarina; Levin, Jan-Olof; Ljungqvist, Göran; Sundgren, Margit; Sällsten, Gerd; Barregard, Lars

225

A hybrid, infrared thermography: heat diffusion equation, method for the 3D air-temperature measurement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The question of how to map the 3D indoor temperature by infrared thermography is solved by a hybrid method which is a combination of infrared thermography and the well known heat diffusion equation. The idea is to use infrared thermography to get the surface temperature of each frontier of the 3D domain of interest. A suitable procedure is devoted to this, allowing an automatic scanning of the whole frontier, the registration of data and computation. These surface temperatures constitute the boundary conditions of the heat equation solved in the domain of interest. The solution of the heat equation allows analyzing and controlling the temperature of every point belonging to the considered domain. This temperature distribution is controlled over the time with a period of the same order than the necessary time to obtain the frontier temperatures and at the end to contribute to the analysis of the thermal comfort. The study is done for the steady-state conditions under various weather situations. In this case the temperature depends only on space coordinates. With such procedure, we can have an idea about the time necessary to reach thermal equilibrium; time which has a great impact on the thermal comfort sensation. The results yielded by this method are compared with those given by others techniques used for temperature measurement. Finally, the method is used to access 3D temperature distribution for various geometric shapes.

Djupkep Dizeu, F. B.; Maldague, X.; Bendada, A.; Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.

2011-05-01

226

Cathode materials review  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

2014-06-16

227

Measurements of MPD thruster cathode erosion for six different database of erosion measurements correlated with other parameters current levels at one mass flow rate using a new mass loss for the spot and diffuse modes of cathode operation. A number of detection system called Surface Layer Activation indicate that the erosion measurements have been made on different thruster cathode erosion rate follows an exponential dependence on the total configurations and different operating conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

diameter of the observed craters was quite uniform over the cathode erosion. To evaluate the relative importance of the various heat surface, indicating that the crater formation processes are relatively inputs responsible for the destructive spot operation and to insensitive to changes in the discharge occurring along the catode calculate the particle fluxes in the spot, the characteristic length axis.

J. E. Polk; A. J. Kellyt; R. G. Jahnt

228

Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

1979-01-01

229

Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

Sislian, J. P.

1978-01-01

230

A three-dimensional numerical simulation of the transport phenomena in the cathodic side of a PEMFC  

Microsoft Academic Search

A three-dimensional numerical model is developed to simulate the transport phenomena on the cathodic side of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) that is in contact with parallel and interdigitated gas distributors. The computational domain consists of a flow channel together with a gas diffusion layer on the cathode of a PEMFC. The effective diffusivities according to the Bruggman

J. J. Hwang; C. K. Chen; R. F. Savinell; C. C. Liu; J. Wainright

2004-01-01

231

Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

Huffman, Raegan L.

2002-01-01

232

Filtered cathodic arc source  

DOEpatents

A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA)

1994-01-01

233

A two-phase flow and transport model for the cathode of PEM fuel cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A unified two-phase flow mixture model has been developed to describe the flow and transport in the cathode for PEM fuel cells. The boundary condition at the gas diffuser\\/catalyst layer interface couples the flow, transport, electrical potential and current density in the anode, cathode catalyst layer and membrane. Fuel cell performance predicted by this model is compared with experimental results

Lixin You; Hongtan Liu

2002-01-01

234

Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source  

DOEpatents

A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

2003-04-15

235

Experimental study of vortex diffusers  

SciTech Connect

This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1995-11-01

236

Cathode material for lithium batteries  

DOEpatents

A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

2013-07-23

237

Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges  

SciTech Connect

The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D. [Departamento de Fisica, CCCEE, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do Municipio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

2013-02-14

238

Diffusion tube  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The diffusion tube was designed to operate below about 0.25 percent of water supersaturation. It is simply a long tube lined on the inside with a damp chamois cloth, and heated isothermally to a few degrees centigrade above the incoming air. The diffusion coefficient for water vapor is slightly larger than that for heat, making it possible to supersaturate the airflow. This is the same principle by which transient supersaturations may occur in parallel plate cloud chambers. Only the diffusion of vapor and heat from the walls into the moving air are considered.

Leaitch, R.; Megaw, W. J.

1981-01-01

239

On the Nature of Copper Cathode Erosion in Negative Corona Discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Erosion of the copper cathode in Trichel-pulse negative corona discharge was investigated in the atmospheric pressure air in point-to-plane electrode configuration. Nanometer-size craters were found on the cathode surface as a result of discharge treatment. Therefore, the current density on the cathode surface was estimated to be around 108 A\\/cm2. The value of the integral of specific current action of

Alexey A. Petrov; Ravil H. Amirov; Igor S. Samoylov

2009-01-01

240

Evaluation of passive diffusion bag samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers in selected wells at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, March-April 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During March-April 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Tech, and EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, tested diffusion samplers at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Samplers were deployed in three wells at the Main Base and two wells at Marianas Bonins (MARBO) Annex as potential ground-water monitoring alternatives. Prior to sampler deployment, the wells were tested using a borehole flowmeter to characterize vertical flow within each well. Three types of diffusion samplers were tested: passive diffusion bag (PDB) samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers. The primary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) tested in ground water at Andersen Air Force Base were trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene. In most comparisons, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations in PDB samples closely matched concentrations in pumped samples. Exceptions were in wells where the pumping or ambient flow produced vertical translocation of water in a chemically stratified aquifer. In these wells, PDB samplers probably would be a viable alternative sampling method if they were placed at appropriate depths. In the remaining three test wells, the trichloroethene or tetrachloroethene concentrations obtained with the diffusion samplers closely matched the result from pumped sampling. Chloride concentrations in nylon-screen samplers were compared with chloride concentrations in dialysis and pumped samples to test inorganic-solute diffusion into the samplers across a range of concentrations. The test showed that the results from nylon-screen samplers might have underestimated chloride concentrations at depths with elevated chloride concentrations. The reason for the discrepancy in this investigation is unknown, but may be related to nylon-screen-mesh size, which was smaller than that used in previous investigations.

Vroblesky, Don A.; Joshi, Manish; Morrell, Jeff; Peterson, J.E.

2003-01-01

241

Lattice Expansion of LSCF-6428 Cathodes Measured by In-situ XRD during SOFC Operation  

SciTech Connect

A new capability has been developed for analyzing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper describes the initial results of in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) of the cathode on an operating anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell. It has been demonstrated that XRD measurements of the cathode can be performed simultaneously with electrochemical measurements of cell performance or electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). While improvements to the technique are still to be made, the XRD pattern of a lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode with the composition La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428) was found to continually but gradually change over the course of more than 60 hours of operation in air under typical SOFC operating conditions. It was determined that the most significant change was a gradual increase in the cubic lattice parameters of the LSCF from 3.92502 Å (as determined from the integration of the first 20 hours of XRD patterns) to 3.92650 Å (from the integration of the last 20 hours). This analysis also revealed that there were several peaks from unidentified minor phases that increased in intensity over this timeframe. After a temporary loss of airflow early in the test, the cell generated between 225 and 250 mW/cm2 for the remainder of the test. A large low frequency arc in the impedance spectra suggests the cell performance was gas diffusion limited and that there is room for improvement in air delivery to the cell.

Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Edwards, Danny J.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2012-01-03

242

DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development  

SciTech Connect

In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined all the components in the cathode region and eliminated those parts that were suspected to be potential sources of contamination, e.g., feed-throughs with zinc coating. Finally, we considered a change in the cathode type, by using a different combination of impregnation and coating. Since the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL used a 12.5 cm diameter 311XW (barium oxide doped with scandium and coated with a osmium-tungsten thin film) cathode and emitted 2200A of beam current (i.e. 18 A/cm{sup 2}), it was reasonable to assume that DARHT can adopt this type of cathode to produce 2 kA (i.e., 10A/cm{sup 2}). However, it was later found that the 311XW has a higher radiation heat loss than the 612M and therefore resulted in a maximum operating temperature (as limited by filament damage) below that required to produce the high current. With the evidence provided by systematic emission tests using quarter-inch size cathodes, we confirmed that the 311XM (doped with scandium and has a osmium-ruthenium (M) coating) had the best combination of low work function and low radiation heat loss. Subsequently a 6.5-inch diameter 311XM cathode was installed in DARHT and 2 kA beam current was obtained on June 14, 2007. In testing the quarter-inch size cathode, we found that the beam current was sensitive to the partial pressure of various gases in the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, there was a hysteresis effect on the emission as a function of temperature. The phenomenon suggested that the work function of the cathode was dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between the diffusion of the impregnated material to the surface and the contamination rate from the surrounding gas. Water vapor was found to be the worst contaminant amongst the various gases that we have tested. Our data showed that the required vacuum for emitting at 10 A/cm{sup 2} is in the low 10{sup -8} Torr range.

Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

2009-03-09

243

Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out the back. This configuration replaces the previous sheathed heater design that limited the cycling-life of the cathode.

Goebel, Dan M.

2011-01-01

244

A compartment model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with ventilation-perfusion gradient and dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract.  

PubMed

This paper presents a model of alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion with dynamics of air transport through the respiratory tract. For this purpose electrical model representing the respiratory tract mechanics and differential equations representing oxygen membrane diffusion are combined. Relevant thermodynamic relations describing the mass of oxygen transported into the human body are proposed as the connection between these models, as well as the influence of ventilation-perfusion mismatch on the oxygen diffusion. The model is verified based on simulation results of varying exercise intensities and statistical calculations of the results obtained during various clinical trials. The benefit of the approach proposed is its application in simulation-based research aimed to generate quantitative data of normal and pathological conditions. Based on the model presented, taking into account many essential physiological processes and air transport dynamics, comprehensive and combined studies of the respiratory efficiency can be performed. The impact of physical exercise, precise changes in respiratory tract mechanics and alterations in breathing pattern can be analyzed together with the impact of various changes in alveolar-capillary oxygen diffusion. This may be useful in simulation of effects of many severe medical conditions and increased activity level. PMID:24950449

Jaworski, Jacek; Redlarski, Grzegorz

2014-08-01

245

Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

2006-05-26

246

Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (inventors)

1980-01-01

247

Effect of dielectric material on bipolar nanosecond pulse diffuse dielectric barrier discharge in air at atmospheric pressure.  

PubMed

In this paper, dielectric plates made by ceramic, quartz and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) respectively are employed to generate low gas temperature, diffuse dielectric barrier discharge plasma by using a needle-plate electrode configuration in air at atmospheric pressure. Both discharge images and the optical emission spectra are obtained while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. Plasma gas temperature is also calculated by comparing the experimental emission spectra with the best fitted spectra of N2 (C(3)?u?B(3)?g 1-3) and N2 (C(3)?u?B(3)?g 0-2). The effects of different pulse peak voltages and gas gap distances on the emission intensity of N2 (C(3)?u?B(3)?g, 0-0, 337.1 nm) and the plasma area on dielectric surface are investigated while ceramic, quartz and PTFE are used as dielectric material. It is found that the permittivity of dielectric material plays an important role in the discharge homogeneity, plasma gas temperature, emission spectra intensity of the discharge, etc. Dielectric with higher permittivity i.e., ceramic means brighter discharge luminosity and stronger emission spectra intensity of N2 (C(3)?u?B(3)?g, 0-0, 337.1 nm) among the three dielectric materials. However, more homogeneous, larger plasma area on dielectric surface and lower plasma gas temperature can be obtained under dielectric with lower permittivity i.e., PTFE. The emission spectra intensity and plasma gas temperature of the discharge while the dielectric plate is made by quartz are smaller than that while ceramic is used as dielectric material and bigger than that when PTFE is used as dielectric material. PMID:23673240

Tang, Kai; Wang, Wenchun; Yang, Dezheng; Zhang, Shuai; Yang, Yang; Liu, Zhijie

2013-08-01

248

Significant performance improvement in terms of reduced cathode flooding in polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a stainless-steel microcoil gas flow field  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Flooding at the cathode is the greatest barrier to increasing the power density of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and using them at high current densities. Previous studies have shown that flooding is caused by water accumulation in the gas diffusion layer, but only a few researchers have succeeded in overcoming this issue. In the present study, microcoils are used as the gas flow channel as well as the gas diffuser directly on the microporous layer (MPL), without using a conventional carbon-fiber gas diffusion layer (GDL), to enable flood-free performance. The current-voltage curves show flooding-free performance even under low air stoichiometry. However, the high-frequency resistance (HFR) in this case is slightly higher than that in grooved flow channels and GDLs. This is due to the differences in the electron conduction path, and the in-plane electron conductivity in the MPL is the key to enhancing the microcoil fuel cell performance.

Tanaka, Shiro; Shudo, Toshio

2014-02-01

249

"Hollow cathode" gun optics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The generation of an electron beam by a hollow cathode gun in a cusp magnetic field is discussed. Such a gun is proposed for an electron cooling device without toroids. In a section with a homogeneous magnetic field, this beam experiences a disturbance region near the axis where the electron temperature becomes higher. The main purpose of the article is to define conditions for generating the beam so as to restrict the extent of this region as much as possible. It is shown that a state with a virtual cathode in the vicinity of the zero magnetic field point is the most suitable for this aim. The experimental and essential analytical results are presented.

Ciullo, G.; Sharapa, A. N.; Shemyakin, A. V.; Tecchio, L.

1997-03-01

250

Characterization of Atomic and Electronic Structures of Electrochemically Active SOFC Cathode Surfaces  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the oxygen-reduction mechanism on mixed conducting cathode materials by means of quantum-chemical calculations coupled with direct experimental measurements, such as vibrational spectroscopy. We have made progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms of oxygen reduction of perovkite-type cathode materials for SOFCs using these quantum chemical calculations. We established computational framework for predicting properties such as oxygen diffusivity and reaction rate constants for adsorption, incorporation, and TPB reactions, and formulated predictions for LSM- and LSC-based cathode materials. We have also further developed Raman spectroscopy as well as SERS as a characterization tool for SOFC cathode materials. Raman spectroscopy was used to detect chemical changes in the cathode from operation conditions, and SERS was used to probe for pertinent adsorbed species in oxygen reduction. However, much work on the subject of unraveling oxygen reduction for SOFC cathodes remains to be done.

Kevin Blinn; Yongman Choi; Meilin Liu

2009-08-11

251

Cathodic protection of offshore pipelines  

Microsoft Academic Search

The cost of cathodic protection for minimizing corrosion in offshore natural gas transmission pipelines is insignificant compared with the overall pipeline cost. The cathodic system sometimes remains a last-minute design and procurement item, installed with little supervision and rarely checked until the pipeline has been in service for several years. Typical offshore cathodic-protection-system design parameters are (1) sacrificial zinc anodes

1981-01-01

252

Arc\\/Cathode Interaction Model  

Microsoft Academic Search

A 1-D model of the interaction between an electric arc and a solid refractory cathode has been developed. This model is based on the equilibrium of the charged particle fluxes in the cathode layer by considering current density conservation, and balance of energy at the sheath\\/presheath and at the sheath\\/cathode surface interfaces forming a closed system of equations. It allows

François Cayla; Pierre Freton; Jean-Jacques Gonzalez

2008-01-01

253

Three-dimensional visualization of morphology and ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) of a subdivision of the acinus using synchrotron radiation microtomography of the human lung specimens  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We have previously reported a synchrotron radiation (SR) microtomography system constructed at the bending magnet beamline at the SPring-8. This system has been applied to the lungs obtained at autopsy and inflated and fixed by Heitzman"s method. Normal lung and lung specimens with two different types of pathologic processes (fibrosis and emphysema) were included. Serial SR microtomographic images were stacked to yield the isotropic volumetric data with high-resolution (12 ?m3 in voxel size). Within the air spaces of a subdivision of the acinus, each voxel is segmented three-dimensionally using a region growing algorithm ("rolling ball algorithm"). For each voxel within the segmented air spaces, two types of voxel coding have been performed: single-seeded (SS) coding and boundary-seeded (BS) coding, in which the minimum distance from an initial point as the only seed point and all object boundary voxels as a seed set were calculated and assigned as the code values to each voxel, respectively. With these two codes, combinations of surface rendering and volume rendering techniques were applied to visualize three-dimensional morphology of a subdivision of the acinus. Furthermore, sequentially filling process of air into a subdivision of the acinus was simulated under several conditions to visualize the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion). A subdivision of the acinus was reconstructed three-dimensionally, demonstrating the normal architecture of the human lung. Significant differences in appearance of ventilation procedure were observed between normal and two pathologic processes due to the alteration of the lung architecture. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure of a subdivision of the acinus and visualization of the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) with SR microtomography would offer a new approach to study the morphology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the human respiratory system.

Shimizu, Kenji; Ikura, Hirohiko; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nagareda, Tomofumi; Yagi, Naoto; Umetani, Keiji; Imai, Yutaka

2004-04-01

254

UPDATING APPLIED DIFFUSION MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Most diffusion models currently used in air quality applications are substantially out of date with understanding of turbulence and diffusion in the planetary boundary layer. Under a Cooperative Agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency, the American Meteorological Socie...

255

On the mechanism of the cathode erosion in negative corona discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Negative corona discharge was investigated in atmospheric pressure air and SF6 in Trichel pulse and glow mode in point-to-plane electrode configuration. As a cathode pointed carbon, copper and aluminum pins with tip size 0.02-1 mm were used. It is found that negative corona causes the erosion of cathode surface in form of nanometer-size craters and fissures. Observed etching may be explained in terms of microexplosive process. This process is initiated by interaction of the cathode surface with the cathode-directed ionization wave. This wave is registered as a Trichel pulse. Local electric field of the head of wave gives rise to the field emission from the cathode surface which initiates microexplosion due to Joule heating. It is assumed that a single Trichel pulse causes the ejection of an erosion fragment from the cathode surface and current on the cathode surface runs through the cross-section of elementary erosion fragment. The value of Trichel pulse action integral which depends on the cathode current density and pulse duration and serves as a criterion of micro-explosion is 10^9 A^2s/cm^4. Hence the conclusion has been made that erosion of the cathode in Trichel pulse mode of negative corona was caused by microexplosive processes. General erosion picture of the cathode surface depends on the discharge dynamics. Correlation between discharge dynamics, erosion picture and Trichel pulse parameters was found.

Petrov, Alexey; Amirov, Ravil; Samoylov, Igor

2009-10-01

256

Oscillations of PEM fuel cells at low cathode humidification  

Microsoft Academic Search

Oscillatory fluctuations of a single polymer electrolyte fuel cell appear upon operation with a dry cathode air supply and a fully humidified anode stream. Periodic transitions between a low and a high current operation point of the oscillating state are observed. The transition time of 20–25s for the change from the low to the high operation is fast and does

Daniel G. Sanchez; Domingo Guinea Diaz; Renate Hiesgen; Ines Wehl; K. Andreas Friedrich

2010-01-01

257

Heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous cathodes of solid oxide fuel cells  

E-print Network

A general physics-based model is developed for heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous electrodes and used to predict and interpret the impedance of solid oxide fuel cells. This model describes the coupled processes of oxygen gas dissociative adsorption and surface diffusion of the oxygen intermediate to the triple phase boundary, where charge transfer occurs. The model accurately captures the Gerischer-like frequency dependence and the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the impedance of symmetric cathode cells. Digital image analysis of the microstructure of the cathode functional layer in four different cells directly confirms the predicted connection between geometrical properties and the impedance response. As in classical catalysis, the electrocatalytic activity is controlled by an effective Thiele modulus, which is the ratio of the surface diffusion length (mean distance from an adsorption site to the triple phase boundary) to the surface boundary layer length (square root of surface diffusivity div...

Fu, Y; Bertei, A; Qi, C; Mohanram, A; Pietras, J D; Bazant, M Z

2014-01-01

258

Schlieren characterization of gas flows generated by cathodic arcs in atmospheric pressure environment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Schlieren diagnostics of cathodic arc flows in air are presented. Three important processes are observed: (1) a luminous hemispherical region near the cathode with a radius of ?1 mm, identified as the cathodic metallic plasma; (2) a luminous plasma jet extending ?10 mm from the cathode, termed as the cathodic air jet (CAJ); (3) a background gas pushed to expand at subsonic velocities ?100 m/s. The gas is accelerated in the direction of the CAJ. The main collisional processes in the CAJ are identified using optical emission spectroscopy and mean free path analysis. The CAJ plasma is shown to be composed of N2+ and Cu+ ions. It is concluded that the CAJ length is determined by the dissociative recombination of N2+. With external magnetic field, the CAJ rotates according to the Lorentz force direction. Observing the CAJ motion and its affect on stationary and flowing background gas, it is concluded that the CAJ has significant directed thrust.

Kronhaus, I.; Eichler, S.; Schein, J.

2014-02-01

259

The Murchison Cathodic Protection System  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Cathodic Protection System installed on the Murchison Platform sets new standards for the operation of cathodic protection in the arduous conditions of the North Sea. It has demonstrated its effectiveness and flexibility since being commissioned in November 1980. Extensive data has been accumulated from the system monitors, comprising zinc reference potentials, current outputs from impressed and monitored sacrificial anodes,

E. A. Levings; J. E. Finnegan; W. M. McKie; R. D. Strommen

1983-01-01

260

Hot hollow cathode gun assembly  

DOEpatents

A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

Zeren, J.D.

1983-11-22

261

NO{sub x} emissions of a jet diffusion flame which is surrounded by a shroud of combustion air  

SciTech Connect

The present work reports an experimental study on the behavior of a jet flame surrounded by a shroud of combustion air. Measurements focussed on the flame length and the emissions of NO{sub x}, total unburned hydrocarbons, CO{sub 2}, and O{sub 2}. Four different fuel flow rates (40.0, 78.33, 138.33, and 166.6 cm/s), air flow rates up to 2500 cm{sup 3}/s and four different air injector diameters (0.079 cm, 0. 158 cm, 0.237 cm, and 0.316 cm) were used. The shroud of combustion air causes the flame length to decrease by a factor proportional to 1/[p{sub a}/p{sub f} + C{sub 2}({mu}{sub a}Re,a/{mu}{sub f}Re,f){sup 2}]{sup {1/2}}. A substantial shortening of the flame length occurred by increasing the air injection velocity keeping fuel rate fixed or conversely by lowering the fuel flow rate keeping air flow rate constant. NO{sub x} emissions ranging from 5 ppm to 64 ppm were observed and the emission of NO{sub x} decreased strongly with the increased air velocity. The decrease of NO{sub x} emissions was found to follow a similar scaling law as does the flame length. However, the emission of the total hydrocarbons increased with the increased air velocity or the decreased fuel flow rate. A crossover condition where both NO{sub x} and unburned- hydrocarbon emissions are low, was identified. At an air-to-fuel velocity ratio of about 1, the emissions of NO{sub x} and the total hydrocarbons were found to be under 20 ppm.

Tran, P.X.; White, F.P.; Mathur, M.P.; Ekmann, J.M.

1996-08-01

262

Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

1999-01-01

263

Frequency response characteristics of trichel pulses and the behavior of the cathode spot in a negative corona discharge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A negative corona discharge in the regime of Trichel pulses has been investigated in air at atmospheric pressure. Correlation between the behavior of the cathode spot and oscillograms of the discharge current has been revealed. The frequency response characteristics of the negative corona current have been measured as functions of voltage, tip curvature, interelectrode distance, and cathode material. It has been determined that the curvature of the tip surface in the cathode-spot localization region decisively affects the amplitude of pulses.

Asinovski?, É. I.; Petrov, A. A.; Samoylov, I. S.

2007-11-01

264

Linear air-fuel sensor development  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

Garzon, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Miller, C. [General Motors, Flint, MI (United States). GM/Delphi E. Division

1996-12-14

265

Modeling effects of particle size in LiMn2O4 cathode material on peak current level in lithium-ion batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mathematical simulation of the current transfer characteristics of submicron and nanodimensional objects has been used to predict some properties of a structured electrode material in lithium-ion batteries. A diffusion model of the intercalation-deintercalation (ID) process is presented. Using this model, the current density in cathode material particles (nanocrystals) has been numerically simulated and an equation for the current density in the absence of diffusion polarization is derived. The proposed model can be used to optimize the ID process for improving the functional properties of cathode materials and increasing the working life of cathodes. Results are illustrated by examples for LiMn2O4 cathode material.

Polyakov, S. N.

2011-01-01

266

Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been demonstrated to mitigate the effects of crossover and decrease the airflow required.

Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

2005-01-01

267

Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

Brophy, John R.

1992-01-01

268

Life test studies on MM-cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed metal matrix cathodes (MM-cathodes) were optimized and their life behavior was tested in different test vehicles. In two separate life test programs, 57 MM-cathodes with a W\\/Os matrix were investigated in test vehicles (tetrodes) where the cathode environmental was similar to that of a tube. In parallel, a further 100 MM-cathodes in other types of test vehicles were operated

S. J. Feltham; G. Kornfeld; R. Lotthammer; John L. Stevenson

1990-01-01

269

Life test studies on MM-cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mixed metal matrix cathodes (MM-cathodes) were optimized and their life behavior was tested in different test vehicles. In two separate life test programs, 57 MM-cathodes with a W\\/Os matrix were investigated in test vehicle (tetrodes) where the cathode environment was similar to that of a tube. In parallel, a further 100 MM-cathodes in other types of test vehicles were operated

S. J. Feltham; G. Kornfeld; R. Lotthammer; J. L. Stevenson

1990-01-01

270

Steady-state solution of the semi-empirical diffusion equation for area sources. [air pollution studies  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The problem investigated can be solved exactly in a simple manner if the equations are written in terms of a similarity variable. The exact solution is used to explore two questions of interest in the modelling of urban air pollution, taking into account the distribution of surface concentration downwind of an area source and the distribution of concentration with height.

Lebedeff, S. A.; Hameed, S.

1975-01-01

271

Nitric Oxide Emissions from Laminar Diffusion Flames: Effects of Air-Side versus Fuel-Side Diluent Addition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Flue gas recirculation (FGR) is a well-known method used to control oxides of nitrogen (NOx) in industrial burner applications. Recent small- and large-scale experiments have shown that introducing the recirculated flue gases with the fuel results in a much greater reduction in NOx, per unit mass of gas recirculated, compared to introducing the flue gases with the combustion air. At

James J. Feese; Stephen R. Turns

1998-01-01

272

Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube  

DOEpatents

A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

Boettcher, Gordon E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01

273

Performance of Stainless Steel Mesh Cathode and PVDF-graphite Cathode in Microbial Fuel Cells  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Inexpensive and conductive materials termed as stainless steel mesh and polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF)-graphite were currently used as the air cathode electrodes in MFCs for the investigation of power production. By loading PTFE (poly(tetrafluoroethylene)) on the surface of stainless steel mesh, electricity production reached 3 times as high as that of the naked stainless steel. A much high catalytic activity for oxygen reduction was exhibited by Pt based and PTFE loading stainless steel mesh cathode, with an electricity generation of 1144±44 mW/m2 (31±1 W/m3) and a Coulombic efficiency (CE) of 77±2%. When Pt was replaced by an inexpensive transition metal based catalyst (cobalt tetramethylphenylporphyrin, CoTMPP), power production and CE were 845±21 mW/m2 (23±1 W/m3) and 68±1%, respectively. Accordingly, power production from PVDF-graphite (hydrophobic) MFC and PVDF-graphite (hydrophile) MFC were 286±20 mW/m2(8±1 W/m3) and 158±13 mW/m2(4±0.4 W/m3), respectively using CoTMPP as catalyst. These results give us new insight into materials like stainless steel mesh and PVDF-graphite as low cost cathode for reducing the costs of MFCs for wastewater treatment applications.

Huang, Liping; Tian, Ying; Li, Mingliang; He, Gaohong; Li, Zhikao

2010-11-01

274

Numerical simulation of cathode plasma dynamics in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel algorithm for the simulation of cathode plasmas in particle-in-cell codes is described and applied to investigate cathode plasma evolution in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The MITL electron sheath is modeled by a fully kinetic electron species. Electron and ion macroparticles, both modeled as fluid species, form a dense plasma which is initially localized at the cathode surface. Energetic plasma electron particles can be converted to kinetic electrons to resupply the electron flux at the plasma edge (the "effective" cathode). Using this model, we compare results for the time evolution of the cathode plasma and MITL electron flow with a simplified (isothermal) diffusion model. Simulations in 1D show a slow diffusive expansion of the plasma from the cathode surface. But in multiple dimensions, the plasma can expand much more rapidly due to anomalous diffusion caused by an instability due to the strong coupling of a transverse magnetic mode in the electron sheath with the expanding resistive plasma layer.

Thoma, C.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Kiefer, M. L.

2015-03-01

275

Cold cathode vacuum gauging system  

SciTech Connect

A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

2004-03-09

276

Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell  

DOEpatents

An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01

277

Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.  

PubMed

Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NF?B signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-? (A?) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse A? plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NF?B, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders. PMID:21955814

Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

2012-01-01

278

Field evaluation of two diffusive samplers and two adsorbent media to determine 1,3-butadiene and benzene levels in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Two types of diffusive samplers, both of which are compatible with thermal desorption, but differ in their geometry—SKC-Ultra (badge-type) and Radiello (radial symmetry-type)—were evaluated indoors and outdoors under varying temperature, humidity and wind speed conditions, using the graphitized adsorbents Carbopack X or Carbograph 5 to measure 1,3-butadiene and benzene in ambient air. The results obtained by diffusive sampling were compared with results obtained using a conventional active sampling method over both long (1 week) and shorter periods (6-24 h). Analysis and detection were performed using an automatic thermal desorber (ATD) connected to a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Results from each sampler and adsorbent combination were examined using ordinary or multiple linear regression analysis. The overall uncertainty (OU) was also determined. In general, the results obtained with both samplers showed good agreement with those obtained by active sampling. Carbopack X appeared to be a more efficient adsorbent than Carbograph 5 for 1,3-butadiene, but the two adsorbents were equivalent for benzene. No effects of either humidity or air velocity were observed. Minor temperature effects were observed for both samplers for 1,3-butadiene. In summary, the results confirmed the accuracy of sampling rates previously determined for the two samplers and adsorbents. We consider the two samplers to be suitable for stationary and personal monitoring for the general population of 1,3-butadiene and benzene in various environments, indoors and outdoors. They are almost independent of meteorological conditions and may be suitable for monitoring industrial atmospheres.

Strandberg, Bo; Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Sundgren, Margit; Levin, Jan-Olof; Sällsten, Gerd; Barregard, Lars

279

High performance PEMFC stack with open-cathode at ambient pressure and temperature conditions  

Microsoft Academic Search

An open-air cathode proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed. This paper presents a study of the effect of several critical operating conditions on the performance of an 8-cell stack. The studied operating conditions such as cell temperature, air flow rate and hydrogen pressure and flow rate were varied in order to identify situations that could arise when the

D. T. Santa Rosa; D. G. Pinto; V. S. Silva; R. A. Silva; C. M. Rangel

2007-01-01

280

On the mechanism of the cathode erosion in negative corona discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

Negative corona discharge was investigated in atmospheric pressure air and SF6 in Trichel pulse and glow mode in point-to-plane electrode configuration. As a cathode pointed carbon, copper and aluminum pins with tip size 0.02-1 mm were used. It is found that negative corona causes the erosion of cathode surface in form of nanometer-size craters and fissures. Observed etching may be

Alexey Petrov; Ravil Amirov; Igor Samoylov

2009-01-01

281

Insights into PEMFC Performance Degradation from HCl in Air  

SciTech Connect

The performance degradation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied in the presence of HCl in the air stream. The cathode employing carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C) was exposed to 4 ppm HCl in air while the cell voltage was held at 0.6 V. The HCl poisoning results in generation of chloride and chloroplatinate ions on the surface of Pt/C catalyst as determined by a combination of electrochemical tests and ex-situ chlorine K-edge X-Ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The chloride ions inhibit the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and likely affect the wetting properties of diffusion media/catalyst layer, while the chloroplatinate ions are responsible for enhanced platinum particle growth most likely due to platinum dissolution-redeposition. The chloride ions can cause corrosion of the Pt nanoparticles in the presence of aqueous HCl in air even if no potential is applied. Although the majority of chloride ions are desorbed from the Pt surface by hydrogen treatment of the cathode, they partially remain in the system and re-adsorb on platinum at cell voltages of 0.5-0.9 V. Chloride ions are removed from the system and fuel cell performance at 0.5-0.7 V is restored by multiple exposures to low potentials.

O Baturina; A Epshteyn; P Northrup; K Swider-Lyons

2011-12-31

282

Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube  

DOEpatents

A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

Boettcher, G.E.

1998-03-10

283

The Maximum Drop-Height of a Droplet in a Vertical Countercurrent Water-Air Heat and Moisture Exchange Tower Attached to a Main Fan Diffuser in a Coal Mine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A vertical countercurrent water-air heat and moisture exchange tower attached to a main fan diffuser is designed. To reduce water loss blown away by the airflow from the exchange tower, the forces acting on droplets are analysed. Droplet motion may be classified under four conditions: (1) downward initial acceleration; (2) upward initial acceleration; (3) droplet blown away by airflow; (4) droplet suspension. With droplet break-up neglected, a general equation for the maximum droplet drop-height is presented and numerical calculations are performed. Equations for the maximum drop-height under Conditions 3 and 4 are deduced, and the equation for Condition 3 is applied to an engineering case study. The effect of air velocity on the maximum drop-height is more significant than that of other factors. The conclusions provide a novel approach to optimizing the design of vertical countercurrent water-air heat and moisture exchange towers attached to main fan diffusers.

Chen, S.; Cui, H.; Wang, H.; Zhao, J.

2014-10-01

284

High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

1987-06-01

285

Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

286

Investigating Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanode Performance Under Different Cathode Conditions  

SciTech Connect

A compact, three-in-one, flow-through, porous, electrode design with minimal electrode spacing and minimal dead volume was implemented to develop a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with improved anode performance. A biofilm-dominated anode consortium enriched under a multimode, continuous-flow regime was used. The increase in the power density of the MFC was investigated by changing the cathode (type, as well as catholyte strength) to determine whether anode was limiting. The power density obtained with an air-breathing cathode was 56 W/m3 of net anode volume (590 mW/m2) and 203 W/m3 (2160 mW/m2) with a 50-mM ferricyanide- based cathode. Increasing the ferricyanide concentration and ionic strength further increased the power density, reaching 304 W/m3 (3220 mW/m2, with 200 mM ferricyanide and 200 mM buffer concentration). The increasing trend in the power density indicated that the anode was not limiting and that higher power densities could be obtained using cathodes capable of higher rates of oxidation. The internal solution resistance for the MFC was 5 6 X, which supported the improved performance of the anode design. A new parameter defined as the ratio of projected surface area to total anode volume is suggested as a design parameter to relate volumetric and area-based power densities and to enable comparison of various MFC configurations.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Hamilton, Choo Yieng [ORNL; Aaron, D [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2009-01-01

287

Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment  

DOEpatents

An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01

288

Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures  

SciTech Connect

(1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

Eduardo Paz

2006-09-30

289

Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for  

E-print Network

1 Advanced Cathode Catalysts and Supports for PEM Fuel Cells Mark K. Debe 3M Company May 10, 2011 Advanced Cathode Catalysts ...... ..................... 2011 DOE Hydrogen Program Review, May 9-13 #12;3 Objectives: Development of a durable, low cost, high performance cathode electrode (catalyst and support

290

Step response analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) cathode through a transient model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Transient state response analysis of phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) cathode is important to understand various competitive processes like diffusion, reaction and product back diffusion occurring at various layers of the composite cathode. A two-dimensional unsteady state model for simulating PAFC cathode is developed as an extension of the previously developed steady-state model [S. Roy Choudhury, M.B. Deshmukh, R. Rengaswamy, A two-dimensional steady-state model for phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC), J. Power sources 112 (2002) 137-152]. The transient model is solved to study the impact of various parameters such as Tafel slope, diffusivity etc on the step response of the fuel cell. The effect of partial pressure variation in bulk gas for large sized PAFC cathode is also analysed. Trend analysis based on the model output is also experimentally verified using a small unit cell setup. The effect of various parameters on the settling time of the cathode, as revealed in this study, suggests possible development of a diagnostic tool employing such transient model.

Choudhury, Suman Roy; Choudhury, Suhasini Roy; Rangarajan, J.; Rengaswamy, R.

291

Generation Of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma By Diffusive And Constricted Discharges In Rest And Flowing Gases (Air And Nitrogen)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Weekly ionized non-thermal plasma (NTP) is of great interest for many applications because of its strong non-equilibrium state wherein an average electron energy Te exceeds markedly gas temperature Tg, i.e. electrons in the NTP are strongly overheated compared to neutral gas. Energetic electrons due to frequent collisions with the neutrals excite and dissociate effectively atoms and molecules of the plasma-forming gas that results in a creation of physically-, and bio-chemically active gaseous medium in a practically cold background gas. At present there are many kinds of plasma sources working at low and atmospheric pressure and using MW, RF, low frequency, pulsed and DC power supplies for NTP generation. The NTP at atmospheric pressure is of considerable interest for practice. A reason is that sustaining the NTP at atmospheric pressure at first allows us to avoid the use of expensive vacuum equipment and second gives opportunity to use the NTP for treatment of the exhausted gases and polluted liquids. The second opportunity cannot be realized at all with use of the NTP at low pressure. Main subject of this talk is low current atmospheric pressure gas discharges powering with DC power supplies. Plasma forming gases are air and nitrogen which are much cheaper compared to rare gases like He or Ar. Besides, great interest to molecular nitrogen as plasma forming gas is caused first of all its unique capability to accumulate huge energy in vibration, electron (metastables) and dissociated (atomic) states providing high chemical reactivity of the activated nitrogen. All active particles mentioned above have a long lifetime, and they can be therefore transported for a long distance away from place of their generation. Different current modes (diffusive and constricted) of these discharges are discussed. Experimental and numerical results on generation of chemically active species in the diffusive and constricted mode are presented. Some data on the usage of the atmospheric pressure NTP for gas cleanup, surface treatment and sterilization are given.

Akishev, Y.; Grushin, M.; Karalnik, V.; Kochetov, I.; Napartovich A.; Trushkin N.

2010-07-01

292

Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing  

SciTech Connect

Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200?nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2?Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6?Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

Ohtsu, Yasunori, E-mail: ohtsuy@cc.saga-u.ac.jp; Matsumoto, Naoki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Saga University, 1 Honjo-machi, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

2014-05-15

293

Transport coefficients of air, argon-air, nitrogen-air, and oxygen-air plasmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

Calculated values of the viscosity, thermal conductivity and electrical conductivity of air and mixtures of air and argon, air and nitrogen, and air and oxygen at high temperatures are presented. In addition, combined ordinary, pressure, and thermal diffusion coefficients are given for the gas mixtures. The calculations, which assione local thermodynamic equilibrium, are performed for atmospheric pressure plasmas in the

A. B. Murphy

1995-01-01

294

High Voltage Cathode Temperature Measurement  

Microsoft Academic Search

The problem of making accurate measurement of temperature of a high voltage cathode in an emission microscope is discussed. Temperatures to 1300°C with voltages to 50 kV were measured within approximately ±5°C. Radiation sensing measurement schemes were dismissed, primarily on the basis of limited accuracy due to emissivity variations. In the developed system the entire temperature measurement and control system

R. L. Forgacs; B. A. Parafin; E. Eichen

1965-01-01

295

Conservation in cathodic protection design  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sacrificial anode cathodic protection offers cost-effective corrosion protection of submerged marine structures. The longevity of the protection systems can be estimated with a limited degree of accuracy. Some intentional overcapacity must be included in the design. Specific parameters are defined with an intrinsic conservatism, to provide adequate reliability, thereby avoiding high overcapacity and high potential costs associated with subsea retrofitting

T. Sydberger; J. D. Edwards; I. B. Tiller

1997-01-01

296

Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry  

E-print Network

Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry for High Dimensional Data Matthew J. Hirn July 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Embedding of closed curve Figure: Left: A closed, non-self-intersecting curve in 3 dimensions. Right: Its embedding as a circle. #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Cartoon

Hirn, Matthew

297

Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun  

SciTech Connect

RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high accelerating gradient of the RF guns, potentially offering a long lived cathode with very low emittance. Testing this concept requires preparation of the cathode, transportation to the SRF gun and evaluation of the performance of the cathode and the gun at cryogenic temperatures. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the bulk GaAs in the preparation chamber. The highest quantum efficient was 10% at 532 nm that fell to 0.5% after 100 hours. We explored three different ways to activate the GaAs. We verified that the GaAs photocathode remains stable for 30 hours in a 10{sup -11} Torr vacuum. Passing the photocathode through the low 10{sup -9} Torr transfer section in several seconds caused the QE to drop to 0.8%. The photocathode with 0.8% QE can be tested for the SRF gun. The gun and beam pipe were prepared and assembled. After baking at 200 C baking, the vacuum of the gun and beam pipe can sustain a low 10{sup -11} Torr at room temperature. The final test to extract electrons from the gun is ongoing. In this paper, we discuss our progress with this SRF gun and the results of the photocathode in preparation chamber and in magnet transfer line.

Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

2011-03-28

298

Conflicting roles of nickel in controlling cathode performance in lithium ion batteries.  

PubMed

A variety of approaches are being made to enhance the performance of lithium ion batteries. Incorporating multivalence transition-metal ions into metal oxide cathodes has been identified as an essential approach to achieve the necessary high voltage and high capacity. However, the fundamental mechanism that limits their power rate and cycling stability remains unclear. The power rate strongly depends on the lithium ion drift speed in the cathode. Crystallographically, these transition-metal-based cathodes frequently have a layered structure. In the classic wisdom, it is accepted that lithium ion travels swiftly within the layers moving out/in of the cathode during the charge/discharge. Here, we report the unexpected discovery of a thermodynamically driven, yet kinetically controlled, surface modification in the widely explored lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode material, which may inhibit the battery charge/discharge rate. We found that during cathode synthesis and processing before electrochemical cycling in the cell nickel can preferentially move along the fast diffusion channels and selectively segregate at the surface facets terminated with a mix of anions and cations. This segregation essentially can lead to a higher lithium diffusion barrier near the surface region of the particle. Therefore, it appears that the transition-metal dopant may help to provide high capacity and/or high voltage but can be located in a "wrong" location that may slow down lithium diffusion, limiting battery performance. In this circumstance, limitations in the properties of lithium ion batteries using these cathode materials can be determined more by the materials synthesis issues than by the operation within the battery itself. PMID:22985059

Gu, Meng; Belharouak, Ilias; Genc, Arda; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Gao, Fei; Zhou, Guangwen; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R; Zhang, Ji-Guang; Browning, Nigel D; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chongmin

2012-10-10

299

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

Allan J. Jacobson

2005-11-17

300

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, further measurements of the oxygen deficient double perovskite PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} are reported. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Preliminary measurements in symmetric cells have shown low ASR values at 600 C. Here we describe the first complete cell measurements on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells.

Allan J. Jacobson

2006-06-30

301

Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source  

DOEpatents

A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

Falabella, S.

1995-11-21

302

Cathodes for molten-salt batteries  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

Argade, Shyam D.

1993-01-01

303

Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell  

DOEpatents

A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

Brown, Craig W.

2004-04-13

304

Cathodes for ceria-based fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

Work is underway to develop a solid oxide fuel cell that has a ceria-based electrolyte and operates at lower temperatures (500-600{degrees}C) than conventional zirconia-based cells. At present the performance of this ceria-based solid oxide fuel cell is limited by the polarization of conventional cathode materials. The performance of alternative cathodes was measured by impedance spectroscopy and dc polarization. The performance was found to improve by using a thin dense interface layer and by using two-phase cathodes with an electrolyte and an electronic phase. The cathode performance was also found to increase with increasing ionic conductivity for single phase cathodes.

Doshi, R.; Krumpelt, M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Ricvhards, V.L. [Tri-State Univ., Angola, IN (United States). Dept. of Mech. & Aerospace Engr.

1997-08-01

305

Titanium diffusion in olivine  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Diffusion of Ti has been characterized in natural olivine and synthetic forsterite. Experiments on the natural olivines were run under buffered conditions (IW and NNO), and those on synthetic forsterite were run in air. Titanium diffusion appears relatively insensitive to crystallographic orientation and oxygen fugacity under the range of investigated conditions, and diffusivities are similar for Fe-bearing olivine and forsterite. For Ti diffusion in synthetic forsterite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for diffusion over the temperature range 900-1400 °C:

Cherniak, Daniele J.; Liang, Yan

2014-12-01

306

The back-diffusion effect of air on the discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges using bare metal electrodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas using bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, deposition, surface treatment, disinfection, sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics, including the breakdown voltage and the discharge voltage for sustaining a stable and uniform ? mode discharge of the RF APGD plasmas are presented. The experiments are conducted by placing the home-made planar-type plasma generator in ambient and in a vacuum chamber, respectively, with helium as the primary plasma-forming gas. When the discharge processes occur in ambient, particularly for the lower plasma-working gas flow rates, the experimental measurements show that it is the back-diffusion effect of air in atmosphere, instead of the flow rate of the gas, that results in the obvious decrease in the breakdown voltage with increasing plasma-working gas flow rate. Further studies on the discharge characteristics, e.g. the luminous structures, the concentrations and distributions of chemically active species in plasmas, with different plasma-working gases or gas mixtures need to be conducted in future work.

Sun, Wen-Ting; Liang, Tian-Ran; Wang, Hua-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu

2007-05-01

307

Some new results on electron transport in the atmosphere. [Monte Carlo calculation of penetration, diffusion, and slowing down of electron beams in air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The penetration, diffusion and slowing down of electrons in a semi-infinite air medium has been studied by the Monte Carlo method. The results are applicable to the atmosphere at altitudes up to 300 km. Most of the results pertain to monoenergetic electron beams injected into the atmosphere at a height of 300 km, either vertically downwards or with a pitch-angle distribution isotropic over the downward hemisphere. Some results were also obtained for various initial pitch angles between 0 deg and 90 deg. Information has been generated concerning the following topics: (1) the backscattering of electrons from the atmosphere, expressed in terms of backscattering coefficients, angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected electrons, for incident energies T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (2) energy deposition by electrons as a function of the altitude, down to 80 km, for T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (3) the corresponding energy depostion by electron-produced bremsstrahlung, down to 30 km; (4) the evolution of the electron flux spectrum as function of the atmospheric depth, for T(o) between 2 keV and 20 keV. Energy deposition results are given for incident electron beams with exponential and power-exponential spectra.

Berger, M. J.; Seltzer, S. M.; Maeda, K.

1972-01-01

308

Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell  

DOEpatents

An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01

309

An Upflow Microbial Fuel Cell with an Interior Cathode: Assessment of  

E-print Network

, Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri 63103 An upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC) system with a U-shaped.62 ), charge-transfer resistance (7.05 ), and diffusion resistance (1.46 ). Electrolyte resistance dominated the anodic and the cathodic charge-transfer resistanceswereimportantlimitingfactors

310

Theoretical and Experimental Study of Vanadium-Based Fluorophosphate Cathodes for Rechargeable Batteries  

E-print Network

battery with an open framework for fast diffusion of mobile ions. Examples include sodium fluorophosphates less attractive as electrode materials. Na3V2O2(PO4)2F as a sodium ion battery cathode has Batteries Maowen Xu,,§, Penghao Xiao,, Shannon Stauffer, Jie Song, Graeme Henkelman,*,, and John B

Henkelman, Graeme

311

Electrochemical impedance of the cathode catalyst layer in polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A macrohomogeneous model that was studied in a previous publication under stationary conditions is used to calculate the small-signal dynamic response of the cathode catalyst layer in polymer electrolyte fuel cells. Within this approach the effects of reaction kinetics and double layer capacitance at the dispersed catalyst?electrolyte interface, proton conductivity of the electrolyte network within the layer and oxygen diffusion

M Eikerling; A. A Kornyshev

1999-01-01

312

Modelling the performance of the cathode catalyst layer of polymer electrolyte fuel cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

A known macrohomogeneous model for the cathode catalyst layer of a low temperature fuel cell, which includes the kinetics of oxygen reduction at the catalyst?electrolyte interface, proton transport through the polymer electrolyte network, and oxygen diffusion through hydrophobized voids, is considered. Analytical expressions in the relevant ranges of parameter values are obtained. These are the limits of (i) small currents,

M. Eikerling; A. A. Kornyshev

1998-01-01

313

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect

This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is LSCF < PSCF < SSCF < YSCF < LSM. The button cell results agree with this ordering indicating that this is an important tool for use in developing our understanding of electrode behavior in fuel cells.

Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

2002-03-31

314

The performance of perovskites and spinels as catalysts for oxygen reduction in solid oxide fuel cell cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The lack of understanding of the catalytic process at the state-of-the-art cathode material surface in solid oxide fuel cells, (La0.8Sr 0.2)0.98MnO3+delta (LSM), has hindered the design of better catalysts. The objectives of this study were to design a system enabling the comparison of catalytic activities of different cathode materials independently of morphological factors, as well as to resolve catalytic processes at the LSM surface. The selection and optimization of potential cathode materials were performed on the basis of thermal expansion, four-probe dc-conductivity and thermoelectric power measurements in air. The materials studied as potential cathodes were tungsten, niobium and molybdenum doped barium cobaltite perovskites, copper manganese, cobalt manganese and cobalt ferrite spinels as well as strontium doped lanthanum cobalt ferrites and lanthanum manganite perovskites. The doped barium cobaltites were found lo offer superior electrical conductivity when octahedral site transition metal average valence was mixed 3+ /4+ compared to mixed 2+/3+. On the other hand, the loss of conductivity associated with octahedral site doping rendered these materials inadequate for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) cathode applications. Copper manganese spMd was found to exhibit electrical conductivity as high as ˜200 S.cm-1 at 1073 K and thermal expansion ˜ 11 ppm/K between 298 K and 1200 K. Thermal and chrono-potentiometric studies were used to determine the oxygen diffusivity, in cobalt and strontium doped lanthanum iron perovskites (LSCF), and revealed that the activation of strontium doped lanthanum manganese perovskites (LSM) under cathodic bias is kinetically limited by its rate of oxygen surface exchange, suggesting that the cathodic activation of LSM is due to its change in oxygen content under bias. The electronic defect structure of the cubic spinels was resolved in a defect reaction model involving the thermally activated redox of Cu + and Mn4+ to Cu2+ and Mn3+, as well as the disproportionation of Jahn-Teller ion Mn3+ into Mn2+ and Mn4+ and demonstrated that copper doping enhanced the amount of Mn4+ on octahedral sites. Cyclic voltammetry and potential-dependent electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies of dense (La0.8Sr0.2)0.98MnO3+delta polycrystalline films revealed that the rate determining step in the oxygen reduction reaction, in the conditions of our study was the first charge transfer between oxygen ad-atoms and octahedral manganese III, as described by (S)Oad + MnxMn?O -adS +Mn•Mn. The catalytic activity of CuzMn3-- zO4 cubic spinets was found superior to that of LSM and of stoichiometrie CoFe2O4 and Co2MnO 4 spinal at intermediate temperature, suggesting that the Mn 3+/Mn4+ redox couple on octahedral sites plays a major role in the catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction on those transition metal oxide surfaces.

Martin, Boris E.

315

An Enhanced Numerical Method for Solving MultiComponent Flow in the Cathode Electrode of PEM Fuel Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper a numerical study of a two dimensional through-section electrode of the cathode-side Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) has been presented. To do so two numerical methods, namely, the GDQ and finite difference algorithms are applied. The model considers three gaseous components of oxygen, water vapor and nitrogen in the cathode-side

H. R. Shabgard; M. J. Kermani

316

Nickel-titanium-phosphate cathodes  

DOEpatents

Cathode materials having an improved electronic conductivity allowing for faster kinetics in the electrochemical reaction, as well as higher conductivity to meet the power requirements for many consumer applications, especially at low temperatures. The cathode material comprises a compound from the family of compounds where the basic unit is generally represented by Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. The structure of Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4 includes corner sharing octahedra [TiO.sub.6] running along the C-axis. The structure is such that nearly three Li atoms are being inserted in Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. A cell in accordance with the principles of the present invention is rechargable and demonstrates a high capacity of lithium intercalation and fast kinetics.

Belharouak, Ilias (Westmont, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

2008-12-16

317

Filters for cathodic arc plasmas  

DOEpatents

Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

2002-01-01

318

Conservation in cathodic protection design  

SciTech Connect

Sacrificial anode cathodic protection offers cost-effective corrosion protection of submerged marine structures. The longevity of the protection systems can be estimated with a limited degree of accuracy. Some intentional overcapacity must be included in the design. Specific parameters are defined with an intrinsic conservatism, to provide adequate reliability, thereby avoiding high overcapacity and high potential costs associated with subsea retrofitting of anodes, if the design proves to be insufficient.

Sydberger, T.; Edwards, J.D.; Tiller, I.B. [Det Norske Veritas, Hovik (Norway)

1997-02-01

319

Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

1989-01-01

320

Air Pollution.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

Scorer, Richard S.

321

Electrochemical behavior of niobium triselenide cathode in lithium secondary cells  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Niobium triselenide cathodes in Li ambient-temperature rechargeable batteries for space applications undergo a topotactic reaction, with three equivalents of Li at high positive potential furnishing high energy density. It also yields good electronic conductivity, a long life cycle, and high diffusivity for Li. An attempt is presently made to characterize the intercalation mechanism between Li and NbSe3 by means of an ac impedance study conducted at various charge stages in the process of SbSe3 reduction. An effort is also made to predict the charge state of NbSe3 nondestructively, on the basis of the impedance parameters.

Ratnakumar, B. V.; Di Stefano, S.; Bankston, C. P.

1988-01-01

322

Determination of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes in indoor air at environmental levels using diffusive samplers in combination with headspace solid-phase microextraction and high-resolution gas chromatography–flame ionization detection  

Microsoft Academic Search

An improved analytical method for passive air sampling is presented based on a combination of commercially available diffusive samplers with headspace solid-phase microextraction and high-resolution gas chromatography with flame ionization detection (HRGC–FID). This procedure is targeted for short-term BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-, m- and p-xylenes) determinations at environmental concentrations and can be applied for sampling intervals between 30

K Elke; E Jermann; J Begerow; L Dunemann

1998-01-01

323

Short-Time Oxidation Behavior of Low-Carbon, Low-Silicon Steel in Air at 850–1180 °C: II. Linear to Parabolic Transition Determined Using Existing Gas-Phase Transport and SolidPhase Diffusion Theories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Existing gas-phase transport and solid-phase diffusion theories are used to calculate the oxidation kinetics of low carbon\\u000a and low silicon steel in flowing air at 850–1180 °C. The linear-to-parabolic transition scale thickness derived is proportional\\u000a to the parabolic rate constant and inversely proportional to the linear rate constant. Calculated parabolic rate constants\\u000a are consistent with experimental results, whereas calculated linear rate

Rex Y. ChenW; W. Y. D. Yuen

2010-01-01

324

Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact  

SciTech Connect

This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling that the specimens were subjected to during testing. The Ag-LSCF composite contact materials proved more effective in trapping Cr within the contact material and preventing Cr migration into the cathode than the Ag-LSM composites. Ag-perovskite composite contact materials are promising candidates for use in intermediate-temperature SOFC stacks with ferritic stainless steel interconnects due to their ability to maintain acceptably low ASRs while reducing Cr migration into the cathode material.

J. H. Zhu

2009-07-31

325

Ti- and Zr-based metal-air batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We propose a high-temperature, rechargeable metal-air battery that relies on Ti or Zr metal as the anode and the shuttling of oxygen anions between the cathode and the anode through a solid-oxide ion-conducting electrolyte. The cathode has much in common with solid-oxide fuel cells. Key in the proposed battery is the use of Ti or Zr as the anode as these metals are unique in their ability to dissolve oxygen up to concentrations of 33% with minimal structural and volumetric changes. First-principles statistical mechanics calculations predict open circuit voltages around 2.5 V, substantially larger than the open circuit voltage of high-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells. The calculations predict the stability of TiO and ZrO monoxides along with TiOx and ZrOx (with x as high as ½) solid solutions. These suboxide phases are all predicted to be metallic, indicating that electron transport in the anodes will not be rate limiting. The oxygen diffusion coefficients in the Ti and Zr suboxides at high temperature (˜700-800 °C) are predicted to be comparable to that of Li ions in intercalation compounds. These properties suggest theoretical capacities as high as 840 mAh g-1 and 500 mAh g-1 for Ti and Zr based metal-air batteries respectively.

Van der Ven, Anton; Puchala, Brian; Nagase, Takeshi

2013-11-01

326

The CH4, CO2 and H2O flux at the lake-air interface based on the gradient diffusion method  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In studies of greenhouse gases cycle and lake-atmosphere interactions, it is important to identify the fluxes of CH4, CO2 and H2O at the lake-air interface. In this study, the CH4, CO2 and H2O (latent heat) fluxes at the lake-air interface were measured simultaneously based on the gradient diffusion (GD) method employing the Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) technology with high precision and temporal resolution. The experiment was conducted over a large freshwater lake (Lake Taihu) in eastern China. Zero-gradient test supported the accuracy of the measurement. The CO2 and latent heat fluxes measured by GD method were compared with the measurements of eddy covariance (EC) system, and CH4 flux of GD was compared with the water equilibrium (WE) method. The latent heat fluxes of GD and EC agreed well with index of agreement of 0.88, RMSE of 32.1 W m-2, the median value of GD and ED were 62.6 and 60.6 W m-2 respectively. The CO2 flux measured by GD was positive according to diurnal composite analysis, while EC measurement showed negative signals in the daytime. The median values of the GD and EC measurement during the observation period were 0.012 and -0.0025 mg m-2 s-1 respectively. The CH4 flux of GD was higher than WE measurement, the median value of midday GD and WE measurement were 0.13 and 0.055 ?g m-2 s-1 respectively. The difference of GD and EC in the CO2 flux measurement may contribute to the self-heating and fault signals of CO2 and H2O analyzer EC system, and the underestimation of CH4 flux of WE may due to the ignorance of ebullition. Taihu Ecosystem Research and Field Observation Station of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (31o24?N, 120o13?E), located in Meiliangwan (MLW) Bay, in the north part of Lake Taihu. Step changes in the CO2, CH4 and H2O mixing ratios in response to valve switching

Xiao, W.; Lee, X.; Liu, S.; Hu, Z.; Wang, W.; Lee, H.; Xiao, Q.

2012-12-01

327

H+ diffusion and electrochemical stability of Li1+x+yAlxTi2-xSiyP3-yO12 glass in aqueous Li/air battery electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

It is well known that LATP (Li1+x+y AlxTi2?x SiyP3?yO12) glass is a good lithium ion conductor. However, the interaction between LATP glass and H+ ions (including its diffusion and surface adsorption) needs to be well understood before the long-term application of LATP glass in an aqueous electrolyte based Li-air batteries where H+ always present. In this work, we investigate the H+ ion diffusion properties in LATP glass and their surface interactions using both experimental and modeling approaches. Our analysis indicates that the apparent H+ related current observed in the initial cyclic voltammetry scan should be attributed to the adsorption of H+ ions on the LATP glass rather than the bulk diffusion of H+ ions in the glass. Furthermore, the density functional theory calculations indicate that the H+ ion diffusion energy barrier (3.21 eV) is much higher than that of Li+ ion (0.79 eV) and Na+ ion (0.79 eV) in NASICON type LiTi2(PO4)3 material. As a result, the H+ ion conductivity in LATP glass is negligible at room temperature. However, significant surface corrosion was found after the LATP glass was soaked in strong alkaline electrolyte for extended time. Therefore, appropriate electrolytes have to be developed to prevent the corrosion of LATP glass before its practical application for Li-air batteries using aqueous electrolyte.

Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Shao, Yuyan; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Liu, Xingjiang; Zhang, Jiguang

2012-09-15

328

Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance In Lithium-ion Batteries  

SciTech Connect

A variety of approaches are being made to enhance the performance of lithium ion batteries. Incorporating multi-valence transition metal ions into metal oxide cathodes has been identified as an essential approach to achieve the necessary high voltage and high capacity. However, the fundamental mechanism that limits their power rate and cycling stability remains unclear. The power rate strongly depends on the lithium ion drift speed in the cathode. Crystallographically, these transition metal-based cathodes frequently have a layered structure. In the classic wisdom, it is accepted that lithium ion travels swiftly within the layers moving out/in of the cathode during the charge/discharge. Here, we report the unexpected discovery of a thermodynamically driven, yet kinetically controlled, surface modification in the widely explored lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode material, which may inhibit the battery charge/discharge rate. We found that during cathode synthesis and processing before electrochemical cycling in the cell nickel can preferentially move along the fast diffusion channels and selectively segregate at the surface facets terminated with a mix of anions and cations. This segregation essentially blocks the otherwise fast out/in pathways for lithium ions during the charge/discharge. Therefore, it appears that the transition metal dopant may help to provide high capacity and/or high voltage, but can be located in a “wrong” location that blocks or slows lithium diffusion, limiting battery performance. In this circumstance, limitations in the properties of Li-ion batteries using these cathode materials can be determined more by the materials synthesis issues than by the operation within the battery itself.

Gu, Meng; Belharouak, Ilias; Genc, Arda; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Gao, Fei; Zhou, Guangwen; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

2012-09-17

329

A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

2014-01-01

330

Co-flow anode/cathode supply heat exchanger for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly  

DOEpatents

In a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly, a co-flow heat exchanger is provided in the flow paths of the reformate gas and the cathode air ahead of the fuel cell stack, the reformate gas being on one side of the exchanger and the cathode air being on the other. The reformate gas is at a substantially higher temperature than is desired in the stack, and the cathode gas is substantially cooler than desired. In the co-flow heat exchanger, the temperatures of the reformate and cathode streams converge to nearly the same temperature at the outlet of the exchanger. Preferably, the heat exchanger is formed within an integrated component manifold (ICM) for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly.

Haltiner Jr., Karl J.; Kelly, Sean M.

2005-11-22

331

Development program on a cold cathode electron gun  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

1985-01-01

332

Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

Vaughn, Jason A.

1989-01-01

333

Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode  

SciTech Connect

Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O{sub 2} partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before the onset of poisoning occurs. Plasma cathodes used for electric thrusters are typically operated with xenon; however, gas phase barium, oxygen, and tungsten species may be found in small concentrations. The densities of these minor species are small compared with the plasma density, and thus, their presence in the discharge does not significantly alter the xenon plasma parameters. It is important, however, to consider the transport of these minor species as they may deposit on the emitter surface and affect the electron emission properties. In this work, we present the results of a material transport model used to predict oxygen fluxes to the cathode surface by solving the species conservation equations in a cathode with a 2.25?mm diameter orifice operated at a discharge current of 15?A, a Xe flow rate of 3.7 sccm, and 100?ppm of O{sub 2}. The dominant ionization process for O{sub 2} is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Ba is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O{sub 2} are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion-limited; therefore, the high resistance to oxygen poisoning observed in plasma cathodes likely results from surface processes not considered here.

Capece, Angela M., E-mail: acapece@pppl.gov; Shepherd, Joseph E. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

2014-04-21

334

Sun powers Libya cathodic-protection system  

Microsoft Academic Search

Well castings and part of the main 300-mile-long, 32-in diameter pipeline from Sarir to Tobruk are cathodically protected by solar power, which prevents galvanic action by applying an electric direct current of appropriate magnitude and polarity to the steel structures. They then act as cathodes and become the recipients of metallic ions. At each cathodic-protection station, the solar-generaor system consists

Currer

1982-01-01

335

Brightness of LaB6 cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single-crystal LaB6 cathodes were prepared by arc float zone refining and their stoichiomerty and impurity level have been determined. The brightnesses of cathodes were evaluated in a SEM modified to allow in situ measurement of the cathode tip temperature. Three crystallographic orientations were evaluated and the relative brightness was found to follow the order (100)?(321)?(110) with the value for the (100) orientation being around 106 A/cm2 sr at 1900 °K.

Noack, M. A.; Gibson, E. D.; Verhoeven, J. D.

1980-10-01

336

Interrelationship between marine biofouling and cathodic protection  

SciTech Connect

Microorganisms colonize and form a gelatinous biofilm on all engineering materials exposed in natural marine environments, including cathodically protected surfaces. The impact of cathodic protection (CP) potentials on the chemical/biological composition of the biofilm and the impact of the biofilms on potentials required for CP have been the subject of many recent investigations. Literature on these subjects will be reviewed with emphasis on clarifying interactions between living and nonliving deposits on cathodically protected metal surfaces.

Little, B.J.; Wagner, P.A. (Naval Research Lab., Stennis Space Center, MS (United States))

1993-09-01

337

Positive-streamer-like phenomena in point-plane corona gaps: Trichel pulses and high-pressure cathode sheath instabilities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current pulse shapes have been measured in negative and positive corona discharges mostly in dry air. Negative corona Trichel pulses and pulses corresponding to the primary streamer/cathode contact in a positive point-plane gap were found to exhibit remarkable similarities, indicating a positive-streamer-like mechanism for the Trichel pulse development. High-frequency instabilities of the high-pressure filamentary glow discharge, which can be responsible for the arcing from freshly polished cathodes, were observed and attributed to local positive-streamer-like breakdowns of the cathode sheath.

Cernák, Mirko; Hosokawa, Tatsuzo; Inoshima, Masayuki

1990-07-01

338

Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources  

DOEpatents

A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

Anders, Andre (Albany, CA)

2002-01-01

339

A analysis of the cathode coupled amplifier  

E-print Network

based 16 on the cathode-coupled circuit, that w111 operate up to three megacycles, free-running, and an r. f. oscillator that will go to frsquenc1es as high as 15B msgacyolss, us1ng a 6SN7 tube. A description of ths use of ths cathode 11 coupled...AN ANALySIS 0 TH CATHODE COOFL D ~iPLIPIER A Thesis by FORREST JACKS RETLING-. . R Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committee 'Head of Department August, 1951 AN ANALYSIS OF THE CATHODE COUPLED. AMPLIFIER by FORHEST JAMES...

Hetlinger, Forrest James

1951-01-01

340

Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P. [Accelerator and Pulse Power Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India); Patil, D. S. [Laser and Plasma Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400085 (India)

2011-10-15

341

Frequency response characteristics of trichel pulses and the behavior of the cathode spot in a negative corona discharge  

Microsoft Academic Search

A negative corona discharge in the regime of Trichel pulses has been investigated in air at atmospheric pressure. Correlation\\u000a between the behavior of the cathode spot and oscillograms of the discharge current has been revealed. The frequency response\\u000a characteristics of the negative corona current have been measured as functions of voltage, tip curvature, interelectrode distance,\\u000a and cathode material. It has

É. I. Asinovskii; A. A. Petrov; I. S. Samoylov

2007-01-01

342

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes  

E-print Network

and improved stability compared to Nafion. to the catalyst sites. Nafion. a r t i c l e i n f o Article history t Poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) was investigated as an alternative to Nafion as an air cathode catalyst

343

Study of water transport phenomena on cathode of PEMFCs using Monte Carlo simulation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This dissertation deals with the development of a three-dimensional computational model of water transport phenomena in the cathode catalyst layer (CCL) of PEMFCs. The catalyst layer in the numerical simulation was developed using the optimized sphere packing algorithm. The optimization technique named the adaptive random search technique (ARSET) was employed in this packing algorithm. The ARSET algorithm will generate the initial location of spheres and allow them to move in the random direction with the variable moving distance, randomly selected from the sampling range, based on the Lennard-jones potential of the current and new configuration. The solid fraction values obtained from this developed algorithm are in the range of 0.631 to 0.6384 while the actual processing time can significantly be reduced by 8% to 36% based on the number of spheres. The initial random number sampling range was investigated and the appropriate sampling range value is equal to 0.5. This numerically developed cathode catalyst layer has been used to simulate the diffusion processes of protons, in the form of hydronium, and oxygen molecules through the cathode catalyst layer. The movements of hydroniums and oxygen molecules are controlled by the random vectors and all of these moves has to obey the Lennard-Jones potential energy constrain. Chemical reaction between these two species will happen when they share the same neighborhood and result in the creation of water molecules. Like hydroniums and oxygen molecules, these newly-formed water molecules also diffuse through the cathode catalyst layer. It is important to investigate and study the distribution of hydronium oxygen molecule and water molecules during the diffusion process in order to understand the lifetime of the cathode catalyst layer. The effect of fuel flow rate on the water distribution has also been studied by varying the hydronium and oxygen molecule input. Based on the results of these simulations, the hydronium: oxygen input ratio of 3:2 has been found to be the best choice for this study. To study the effect of metal impurity and gas contamination on the cathode catalyst layer, the cathode catalyst layer structure is modified by adding the metal impurities and the gas contamination is introduced with the oxygen input. In this study, gas contamination has very little effect on the electrochemical reaction inside the cathode catalyst layer because this simulation is transient in nature and the percentage of the gas contamination is small, in the range of 0.0005% to 0.0015% for CO and 0.028% to 0.04% for CO2 . Metal impurities seem to have more effect on the performance of PEMFC because they not only change the structure of the developed cathode catalyst layer but also affect the movement of fuel and water product. Aluminum has the worst effect on the cathode catalyst layer structure because it yields the lowest amount of newly form water and the largest amount of trapped water product compared to iron of the same impurity percentage. For the iron impurity, it shows some positive effect on the life time of the cathode catalyst layer. At the 0.75 wt% of iron impurity, the amount of newly formed water is 6.59% lower than the pure carbon catalyst layer case but the amount of trapped water product is 11.64% lower than the pure catalyst layer. The lifetime of the impure cathode catalyst layer is longer than the pure one because the amount of water that is still trapped inside the pure cathode catalyst layer is higher than that of the impure one. Even though the impure cathode catalyst layer has a longer lifetime, it sacrifices the electrical power output because the electrochemical reaction occurrence inside the impure catalyst layer is lower.

Soontrapa, Karn

344

Preliminary assessment of using tree-tissue analysis and passive-diffusion samplers to evaluate trichloroethene contamination of ground water at Site SS-34N, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Two low-cost innovative sampling procedures for characterizing trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in ground water were evaluated for use at McChord Air Force Base (AFB) by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force McChord Air Force Base Installation Restoration Program, in 2001. Previous attempts to characterize the source of ground-water contamination in the heterogeneous glacial outwash aquifer at McChord site SS-34N using soil-gas surveys, direct-push exploration, and more than a dozen ground-water monitoring wells have had limited success. The procedures assessed in this study involved analysis of tree-tissue samples to map underlying ground-water contamination and deploying passive-diffusion samplers to measure TCE concentrations in existing monitoring wells. These procedures have been used successfully at other U.S. Department of Defense sites and have resulted in cost avoidance and accelerated site characterization. Despite the presence of TCE in ground water at site SS-34N, TCE was not detected in any of the 20 trees sampled at the site during either early spring or late summer sampling. The reason the tree tissue procedure was not successful at the McChord AFB site SS-34N may have been due to an inability of tree roots to extract moisture from a water table 30 feet below the land surface, or that concentrations of TCE in ground water were not large enough to be detectable in the tree tissue at the sampling point. Passive-diffusion samplers were placed near the top, middle, and bottom of screened intervals in three monitoring wells and TCE was observed in all samplers. Concentrations of TCE from the passive-diffusion samplers were generally similar to concentrations found in samples collected in the same wells using conventional pumping methods. In contrast to conventional pumping methods, the collection of ground-water samples using the passive-diffusion samples did not generate waste purge water that would require hazardous-waste disposal. In addition, the results from the passive-diffusion samples may show that TCE concentrations are stratified across some screened intervals. The overall results of the limited test of passive-diffusion samplers at site SS-34N were similar to more detailed tests conducted at other contaminated sites across the country and indicate that further evaluation of the use of passive-diffusion samplers at McChord site SS-34N is warranted.

Cox, S.E.

2002-01-01

345

Development of improved cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

The University of Missouri-Rolla conducted a 17 month research program focused on the development and evaluation of improved cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The objectives of this program were: (1) the development of cathode materials of improved stability in reducing environments; and (2) the development of cathode materials with improved electrical conductivity. The program was successful in identifying some potential candidate materials: Air sinterable (La,Ca)(Cr,Co)O{sub 3} compositions were developed and found to be more stable than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} towards reduction. Their conductivity at 1000{degrees}C ranged between 30 to 60 S/cm. Compositions within the (Y,Ca)(Cr,Co,Mn)O{sub 3} system were developed and found to have higher electrical conductivity than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} and preliminary results suggest that their stability towards reduction is superior.

Anderson, H.U.

1991-03-01

346

Synthesis, Characterization and Performance of Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lithium ion batteries provide a high energy density, higher voltage as well as a long shelf life compared to traditionally used lead acid, NiMH and NiCd batteries. Thus, they are a very promising energy storage system for our daily life. As one of the most important components in a battery, cathode materials have been investigated intensively in recent years as they play a key role in determining the cell voltage and discharge capacity in a battery. Both layered Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O 2 (NCM) and olivine-structured LiFePO4 (LFP) materials are promising cathode candidates. However, these cathodes also have some disadvantages that have hindered further commercialization. The main issue with NCM is its rapid performance decay upon cycling. In addition, LFP is hindered by a low rate capacity and low lithium ion diffusivity. We studied the crystal growth behavior and performance of both Li(Ni 1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in order to develop synthesis-structure-function relationships. Three different crystal growth behaviors were observed for the NCM annealing process: surface, volume and grain boundary diffusion. Further exploration of the mechanism of NCM performance decay revealed that microstructural changes were related to the strain accommodation ability in this system and that nanostructured materials were more stable during cycling. In the LFP synthesis, we observed both oriented attachment (OA) and Ostwald ripening (OR) during growth in a triethylene-glycol system. Both polycrystalline and single crystalline particles evolved as a function of a time-dependent pH change. Thus, the lithium ion diffusion rate of LiFePO4 was improved by tailoring the morphology and size though our modification of the precursor environment, revealing that polycrystalline LFP displayed better performance than single crystalline particles. Finally, the electronic conductivity of LiFePO4 was successfully increased via a polymer solution coating method. By producing more uniform, thin and coherent coatings on LiFePO4 particles, we were able to produce batteries with significantly less carbon (i.e., 0.41 wt.%) while has comparable performance (discharge capacity of 80mAh/g at 2C) compared to traditionally synthesized carbon-coated LiFePO4 with higher carbon loadings (ca. 2.64 wt.%). This will enable us to produce batteries with higher active material loading and therefore, significantly larger energy densities.

Zhu, Jianxin

347

Air pollution meteorology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air Pollution Meteorology is divided into three parts: air pollution fundamentals; concentration calculations and distributions; and pollution and meteorological interactions. The first section includes chapters on the following topics: the problem; measurements, sources, and standards; air stagnation and pollutant index; and effects. The second section of the book includes chapters on diffusion theory, the Gaussian plume dispersion model, plume rise,

Eagleman

1991-01-01

348

Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

Alinger, Matthew

2013-09-30

349

Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

2001-01-01

350

Cathode priming of a relativistic magnetron using multi-emission zones on projection ablation lithography cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A novel priming technique of magnetrons, cathode priming, has been demonstrated experimentally and computationally to reduce microwave start-oscillation in The University of Michigan relativistic magnetron. In cathode priming, N/2 emission zones are constructed in discrete patches around the azimuth of the cylindrical cathode in an N-cavity magnetron. This emission geometry favors excitation of the pi-mode, the most efficient mode in the relativistic magnetron. Microwave oscillation builds-up from noise, therefore priming is advantageous. Advantages of priming include faster start-oscillation, potentially longer pulse-lengths, suppression of mode competition, and frequency locking. Relativistic magnetron experiments demonstrated that cathode priming reduced the start-oscillation times from 114 ns to 99 ns when compared to non-cathode priming shots. Generated magnetron frequencies operated in pi-mode range more frequently with priming (33%) than without priming (20%). Peak electronic efficiency yielded the highest average with cathode priming at 17%. Three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations verified start-oscillation times were reduced with cathode priming, up to a factor of 3. In 3-D simulations, mode competition was suppressed in the startup phase with cathode priming. Without cathode priming the simulated relativistic magnetron initially operated in the 2pi/3-mode before transitioning into the pi-mode. The emission zones on the cathode have been fabricated by a new technique for explosive emission cathodes. This technique, denoted as Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL), involved micro-texturing of solid metal (Al 6061) cathodes by a KrF excimer laser to provide the electric field enhancement. Advantages to the PAL cathode compared to previously-used cotton cathode are: less out-gassing, resulting in lower base vacuum pressures; emission regions are heat-sinked to the cathode; and emission regions can be varied to provide the desired amount of electric field enhancement and cathode priming. PAL cathodes are capable of producing current densities of kA/cm2 with total crossed-field currents (for 6 cm2 area) between 2--10 kA. Experimentally, this all metal PAL cathode out-performed or was equal to the previously-used cotton fiber in every category (energy, pulselength, start-time) when used in the relativistic magnetron. Inferred plasma closure velocities were a factor of two lower with the PAL cathodes and in some shots exhibited zero plasma closure. Microwave pulselengths with PAL cathodes increased 57% to 212 ns, while microwave power averaged the same at 165 MW.

Jones, Michael Cameron

351

Investigation of a high enthalpy air arc heater  

Microsoft Academic Search

An experimental program was undertaken to develop a high enthalpy arc heater using air as the working fluid. Structurally the heater consists of a fluid convection cathode (FCC) and a ring anode. The FCC consists of a conical tungsten cathode surrounded by a concentric, closely-spaced shroud to form an annular nozzle to inject part of the working fluid into the

S. F. Kang; J. Fink; C. Sheer

1975-01-01

352

Development of aqueous-lithium batteries with a focus on cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Topics dealing with the advancement of the aqueous-lithium battery technology are discussed. First, results are presented from the characterization of various cathode candidates for the aqueous-lithium systems: both water and oxygen reducing. Among the water reducing cathodes, nickel and ruthenium cathodes have proven to be the best candidates. Planar nickel and ruthenium electrodes have been studied in 8M KOH using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and equivalent circuits at -1.2, -1.25, -1.35, -1.45, and -1.7 VSCE. Aging characteristics based on EIS are presented for the nickel and ruthenium electrodes at -1.25 and -1.45 V SCE. Electrochemical rate constants are also reported from the EIS data, which are based on the Volmer-Heyrovsky mechanism of the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). The kinetic parameters obtained from the mechanistic model agree with both the AC results obtained at all five cathodic overpotentials tested and the DC experimental results form nickel in 8M KOH. Among the oxygen reducing cathodes, four commercially available air cathodes form E-TEK, ERC, and Alupower were used to characterize the lithium-air system for a wide range of discharge rates. Secondly, a commercially available cation exchange membrane, NafionRTM 90209, has proven to be an effective means of controlling the electrolyte concentration of the battery if operating in an ocean environment. Finally, the characterization of aqueous-lithium single-celled batteries is presented for both lithium-air and lithium-water batteries. A novel idea for a lithium-water battery is also described, and results are presented for 8 days of continuous prototype operation. The specific energy density of the prototype, 4 kW-hr/kg, has almost doubled that of previous designed lithium-water systems, and the faradaic efficiency of the prototype exceeds 90%. The lithium-water prototype demonstrated that the system is promising, and efforts should continue for its development.

Vanvoorhis, Dewey J.

353

Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

2001-01-01

354

Vacuum microelectronics applications using carbon nanotube cathodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

We will present the recent advances in carbon nanotube bundle array based field emission electron source development. These cathodes are being applied for developing new vacuum microelectronic devices. Some application issues, cathode life time, current density influencing factors, and a novel electrode integration technique will be described.

H. M. Manohara; R. Toda; R. H. Lin; A. Liao; R. Kowalczyk; A. B. Kaul; M. M. Mojarradi

2008-01-01

355

Monochromatic imaging of cathodic arc plasma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Monochromatic imaging is presented as a powerful tool for plasma diagnostics, and specifically for the investigation of cathodic vacuum arc plasma. Two-dimensional (2-D) monochromatic images in the visible region of an aluminum cathodic arc burning in helium background gas are presented. Inversion of Abel's integral enables a reconstruction of the spatial distribution of the plasma emission coefficient. The qualitative and

U. Kinrot; S. Goldsmith; R. L. Boxman

1996-01-01

356

Genetic algorithms for inverse cathodic protection problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cathodic protection (CP) is a corrosion prevention technique which uses electrochemical properties of metals to insure that the structure to be protected becomes the cathode of an electrolytic cell. The technique is commonly used for protecting metallic structures placed in aggressive environments, e.g. ship hulls, offshore structures and underground pipelines.Mathematical models of CP problems require appropriate boundary conditions given by

Luiz C Wrobel; Panayiotis Miltiadou

2004-01-01

357

Bimetallic Cathode Materials for Lithium Based Batteries  

E-print Network

Bimetallic Cathode Materials for Lithium Based Batteries Frontiers in Materials Science Seminar for implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICDs) are based on the Lithium/Silver vanadium oxide (SVO, Ag2V4O11 to the favorable battery characteristics associated with Ag2VO2PO4 cathodes. Website/Bio Information: http://www.cbe.buffalo.edu/people/full_time/e_takeuchi.php

358

Manganese oxide cathodes for rechargeable batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Manganese oxides are considered as promising cathodes for rechargeable batteries due to their low cost and low toxicity as well as the abundant natural resources. In this dissertation, manganese oxides have been investigated as cathodes for both rechargeable lithium and alkaline batteries. Nanostructured lithium manganese oxides designed for rechargeable lithium cells have been synthesized by reducing lithium permanganate with methanol

Dongmin Im

2002-01-01

359

Serrated cathode dissolution under high current density: Morphology and root cause  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Excessive cathode dissolution due to high current densities is investigated. Such excessive dissolution is one of the key electromigration-induced degradation processes in micro systems, and exhibits a distinctive serrated morphology. In this study, Cu cathode and Cu anode connected with Sn is stressed at a 4.5 × 104 A/cm2 current density for time as long as 1500 h. Careful sequential micro polishing is able to establish for the first time that the serrated cathode interface in fact is the expression of rod-like indentations in three-dimensional morphology. This unique morphology supports the proposition that fast Cu diffusion through Cu6Sn5 grain boundaries is the root cause for this excessive dissolution.

Yang, T. L.; Ke, J. H.; Shih, W. L.; Lai, Y. S.; Kao, C. R.

2013-08-01

360

Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters  

SciTech Connect

Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

2008-09-12

361

Cathode effects in cylindrical Hall thrusters  

SciTech Connect

Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

Granstedt, E. M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

2008-11-15

362

Dual cathode system for electron beam instruments  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An electron beam source having a single electron optical axis is provided with two coplanar cathodes equally spaced on opposite sides from the electron optical axis. A switch permits selecting either cathode, and a deflection system comprised of electromagnets, each with separate pole pieces equally spaced from the plane of the cathodes and electron optical axis, first deflects the electron beam from a selected cathode toward the electron optical axis, and then in an opposite direction into convergence with the electron optical axis. The result is that the electron beam from one selected cathode undergoes a sigmoid deflection in two opposite directions, like the letter S, with the sigmoid deflection of each being a mirror image of the other.

Bradley, James G. (inventor); Conley, Joseph M. (inventor); Wittry, David B. (inventor)

1989-01-01

363

One-step fabrication of membraneless microbial fuel cell cathode by electropolymerization of polypyrrole onto stainless steel mesh.  

PubMed

A unique one-step method for fabrication of a membraneless microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathode was developed by coating a conductive polymer onto stainless steel mesh. The resulting polypyrrole/anthraquinone-2-sulfonate (PPy/AQS) film was synthesized via electropolymerization using AQS as the dopants. The scanning electron microscopy results indicated that the PPy/AQS film was uniformly formed on the metal mesh electrode without cracks on its surface and featuring a globular structure. Being equipped with such a cathode that was able to catalyze oxygen reduction and prevent water leakage, the membraneless MFC allowed power generation over 250h and exhibited a maximum power density of 575mWm(-2). Increasing film thickness seemed to result in a reduction in power performance due to the increased ohmic resistance of the cathode material and the enhanced difficulty for oxygen diffusion inside the cathode. PMID:21454069

Feng, Chunhua; Wan, Qunyi; Lv, Zhisheng; Yue, Xianjun; Chen, Yanfeng; Wei, Chaohai

2011-05-15

364

Use of Both Anode and Cathode Reactions in Wastewater Treatment  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Here, we describe the fundamentals, laboratory experiments, and environmental applications of indirect electrooxidation methods based on H2O2 electrogeneration such as electro-Fenton, photoelectro-Fenton and peroxicoagulation for the treatment of acidic wastewaters containing toxic and recalcitrant organics. These methods are electrochemical advanced oxidation processes that can be used in divided and undivided electrolytic cells in which pollutants are oxidized by hydroxyl radical (•OH) produced from anode and/or cathode reactions. H2O2 is generated from the two-electron reduction of O2 at reticulated vitreous carbon, graphite, carbon-felt, and O2-diffusion cathodes. The most usual method is electro-Fenton where Fe2 + added to the wastewater reacts with electrogenerated H2O2 to yield •OH and Fe3 + from Fenton's reaction. An advantage of this technique is that Fe2 + is continuously regenerated from cathodic reduction of Fe3 +. The characteristics of different electro-Fenton systems where pollutants are simultaneously destroyed by •OH formed in the medium from Fenton's reaction and at the anode surface from water oxidation are explained. The effect of the anode [Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD)] and cathode (carbon-felt or O2-diffusion) on the degradation rate of persistent industrial by-products, herbicides, pharmaceuticals, dyes, etc. is examined. Initial pollutants react much more rapidly with •OH formed in the medium and their degradation sequences are discussed from aromatic intermediates and finally short aliphatic acids are detected. The synergetic positive catalytic effect of Cu2 + on the electro-Fenton process is evidenced. The photoelectro-Fenton method involves the irradiation of the wastewater with UVA light that rapidly photodecomposes complexes of Fe3 + with final carboxylic acids enhancing total decontamination. The peroxicoagulation method uses a sacrificial Fe anode that is continuously oxidized to Fe2 + and organics are either mineralized with •OH formed from both electrogenerated Fe2 + and H2O2 or removed by parallel coagulation with the FeOH3 precipitate formed from the excess of Fe3 + generated from Fenton's reaction.

Brillas, Enric; Sirés, Ignasi; Cabot, Pere LluíS.

365

Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet  

SciTech Connect

Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell'Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2012-12-15

366

Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Dellasega, David; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni

2012-12-01

367

Cathode for an electrochemical cell  

DOEpatents

Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01

368

Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanostructured Manganese Oxide as Cathodic Catalyst in a Microbial Fuel Cell Fed with Leachate  

PubMed Central

Much effort has been devoted to the synthesis of novel nanostructured MnO2 materials because of their unique properties and potential applications as cathode catalyst in Microbial fuel cell. Hybrid MnO2 nanostructures were fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method in this study. Their crystal structures, morphology, and electrochemical characters were carried out by FESEM, N2-adsorption-desorption, and CV, indicating that the hydrothermally synthesized MnO2 (HSM) was structured by nanorods of high aspect ratio and multivalve nanoflowers and more positive than the naturally synthesized MnO2 (NSM), accompanied by a noticeable increase in oxygen reduction peak current. When the HSM was employed as the cathode catalyst in air-cathode MFC which fed with leachate, a maximum power density of 119.07?mW/m2 was delivered, 64.68% higher than that with the NSM as cathode catalyst. Furthermore, the HSM via a 4-e pathway, but the NSM via a 2-e pathway in alkaline solution, and as 4-e pathway is a more efficient oxygen reduction reaction, the HSM was more positive than NSM. Our study provides useful information on facile preparation of cost-effective cathodic catalyst in air-cathode MFC for wastewater treatment. PMID:24723824

Haoran, Yuan; Lifang, Deng; Tao, Lu; Yong, Chen

2014-01-01

369

Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can meet requirements for all applications, research into cathodes for Li-ion batteries is, as of this writ

Doeff, Marca M

2010-07-12

370

Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS.sub.x).sub.n, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode.

Okamoto, Yoshi (Fort Lee, NJ); Skotheim, Terje A. (Shoreham, NY); Lee, Hung S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1995-08-15

371

A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

1977-01-01

372

Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell  

DOEpatents

A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

1990-01-01

373

Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials  

DOEpatents

The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

1995-08-15

374

Thermionic Emission from Sintered Cathode of Thoria and Tungsten Mixture  

Microsoft Academic Search

To obtain suitable conductivity for direct heating, tungsten powder is added to sintered thoria cathodes. The thermionic properties of a cathode, sintered from a mixture of 67 percent thoria and 33 percent tungsten, were investigated. Emission constants were determined and the emission was found to be somewhat lower than that of cathodes sintered from pure thoria.Change of cathode activity with

H. Y. Fan

1949-01-01

375

Diffusion Flame Stabilization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

2007-01-01

376

Diffusion Flame Stabilization  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

2006-01-01

377

Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode  

DOEpatents

A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA)

2002-08-20

378

Studies of the performance of PEM fuel cell cathodes with the catalyst layer directly applied on Nafion membranes  

Microsoft Academic Search

The performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) with gas diffusion cathodes having the catalyst layer applied directly onto Nafion membranes is investigated with the aim at characterizing the effects of the Nafion content, the catalyst loading in the electrode and also of the membrane thickness and gases pressures. At high current densities the best fuel cell performance

Raimundo R. Passos; Valdecir A. Paganin; Edson A. Ticianelli

2006-01-01

379

Nd-nickelate solid oxide fuel cell cathode sensitivity to Cr and Si contamination  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stability of Nd-nickelate, considered as an alternative solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode material, was evaluated in this work on its tolerance towards contaminants. Symmetrical cells with Nd1.95NiO4+? (NNO) electrodes sintered on gadolinia-doped ceria electrolyte supports were monitored over time-spans of 1000 h at 700 °C under polarization in an air-flux with deliberate chromium contamination. Impedance spectroscopy pointed out a polarization increase with time by the growth of the low frequency arc describing the electrode's oxygen reduction and incorporation processes. Post-test observations revealed polluted cathode regions with increasing amounts of Cr accumulations towards the electrolyte/cathode interface. Cr deposits were evidenced to surround active nickelate grain surfaces forming Nd-containing Cr oxides. In addition to exogenous Cr contamination, endogenous contamination was revealed. Silicon, present as impurity material in the raw NNO powder (introduced by milling during powder processing), reacts during sintering steps to form Nd-silicate phases, which decreases the active cathode surface. Nd-depletion of the nickelate, as a result of secondary phase formation with the contaminants Cr and Si (NdCrO4 and Nd4Si3O12), then triggers the thermally-induced decomposition of NNO into stoichiometric Nd2NiO4+? and NiO. Summarized, the alternative Nd-nickelate cathode also suffers from degradation caused by pollutant species, like standard perovskites.

Andreas Schuler, J.; Lübbe, Henning; Hessler-Wyser, Aïcha; Van herle, Jan

2012-09-01

380

AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries  

PubMed Central

Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)?1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

2013-01-01

381

Requirements for long-life operation of inert gas hollow cathodes: Preliminary report  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An experimental investigation was initiated to establish conditioning procedures for reliable hollow cathode operation via the characterization of critical parameters in a representative cathode test facility. From vacuum pumpdown rates, it was found that approximately 1.5 hours were required to achieve pressure levels within 5 percent of the lowest attainable pressure for this facility, depending on the purge conditions. The facility atmosphere was determined by a residual gas analyzer to be composed of primarily air and water vapor. The effects of vacuum pumping and inert gas purging were evaluated. A maximum effective leakage rate of 2.0 x 10(exp -3)sccm was observed and its probable causes were examined. An extended test of a 0.64 cm diameter Mo-Re hollow cathode was successfully completed. This test ran for 504 hours at an emission current of 23.0 amperes and a xenon flow rate of 6.1 sccm. Discharge voltage rose continuously from 15 to 21 volts over the course of the test. The temperature of the cathode body during the test was relatively stable at 1160 C. Post-test examination revealed ion-bombardment texturing of the orifice plate to be the only detectable sign of wear on the hollow cathode.

Verhey, Timothy R.; Macrae, Gregory S.

1990-01-01

382

Catalyzed double layer cathodes for high performance and long life molten carbonate fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLCs) were prepared with a thin highly active LiCoO{sub 2}-layer by a new double layer tape casting/sintering procedure. The resulting metallic porous precursor plates were mounted into the MCFC and heated up by a special procedure to form LiCoO{sub 2} from air, Co and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} in a solid/gas reaction. MCFCs with highly active NiO/LiCoO{sub 2}-DLCs can operate over prolonged periods of time with a Ni-precipitation which is 10% lower than one finds with state of the art NiO cathodes. According to LiCoO{sub 2}-cathodes have theoretical life times of more than 100 000 hours at nonpressurized conditions. MCFCs with new NiO/LiCoO{sub 2} double layer cathodes (DLC) were investigated with regard to variable parameters of their microstructure. From the agglomerate model of the porous MCFC cathode, the dependence of the polarization resistance from the radius of the agglomerates and the inner agglomerate surface area was calculated.

Bischoff, M. [Motoren- und Turbinen Union Friedrichshafen GmbH, Munich (Germany); Jantsch, U.; Rohland, B. [Solar Energy & Hydrogen Research, Ulm (Germany)

1996-12-31

383

Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

2006-12-31

384

Stability of cobalt oxide infiltrated LSM/TZ8Y cathode for solid oxide fuel cells at intermediate temperatures  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The performance of a La0.4Sr0.6MnO3/8wt% Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 (LSM/YZ8Y) composite cathode was observed to increase by post-firing doping (infiltration) of cobalt nitrate into the pores of an LSM/TZ8Y cathode in solid oxide fuel cells. Results demonstrated that cobalt nitrate decomposed into nano-sized spinel structures of Co3O4 of sizes ranging from 40 to 60 nm. The stability of a Co3O4 infiltrated LSM/TZ8Y cathode was studied under both oxidizing and reducing environments at 700°C. This dissertation studied the coarsening effects of Co3O 4 nano-particles in the pores of LSM/TZ8Y cathodes and its chemical interaction between LSM and TZ8Y during 1000 hours of exposure to air. A scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the microstructure. Polarization curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to electrochemically characterize LSM/TZ8Y half cells (oxygen pump) with applied cathodic currents before and after Co3O4 infiltration. The chemical interactions of Co3O4 and an LSM/TZ8Y cathode were studied under the effects of a reducing atmosphere at various currents applied to the cathode, e.g., 500mA/cm2, 1500mA/cm2 and 3A/cm 2. The corresponding partial pressure of oxygen (P O2) at the cathode was observed and calculated from a built-in oxygen sensor which monitored applied cathodic currents. Chemical reactions were characterized through the use scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

Chen, Xuan

385

Improved magnetron cold-cathode ion source  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Cold cathode ionization source generates smaller amounts of spurious gases and has a higher sensitivity than commonly used hot-filament ion sources. Photon and X-ray background noise are reduced below detectable levels.

Roehrig, J.; Torney, F.

1970-01-01

386

High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte  

DOEpatents

A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm2.

Li, Shelly X.

2010-06-29

387

Improvements to a Transport Model of Asphalt Binder Oxidation in Pavements: Pavement Temperature Modeling, Oxygen Diffusivity in Asphalt Binders and Mastics, and Pavement Air Void Characterization  

E-print Network

in asphalt binders and mastics, and characterizing air voids in pavements, these key model elements were studied in turn. Hourly pavement temperatures were calculated with an improved one-dimensional heat transfer model, coupled with methods to obtain model...

Han, Rongbin

2012-07-16

388

Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

2011-01-01

389

Monitoring cathodic protection of well casings  

Microsoft Academic Search

Because conventional downhole logging of gas storage wells to determine cathodic-protection levels is expensive and inconvenient, a program was developed (1) to predict downhole casing-to-soil potentials from wellhead measurements in the presence of interference and (2 )to model the mutual interference effects occurring between the wells and the cathodic-protection systems. In the first phase of this project, a transmission-line model

Dabkowski

1980-01-01

390

Interfacial phenomena on selected cathode materials  

SciTech Connect

We have carried out a series of surface studies of selected cathode materials. Instrumental techniques such as Raman microscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the cathode surfaces. The goal of this study was to identify detrimental processes which occur at the electrode/electrolyte interface and can lead to electrode degradation and failure during cycling and/or storage at elevated temperatures.

Kostecki, Robert; Matsuo, Yoshiaki; McLarnon, Frank

2001-06-22

391

Anodes for Cathodic Protection of Reinforced Concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumable anodes were evaluated in the laboratory for use in cathodic protection systems for steel reinforced concrete bridges in coastal environments and in areas where de-icing salts are employed. The anode materials include Zn-hydrogel and thermal-sprayed Zn, Zn-15Al, and Al-12Zn-0.2In. These anodes were evaluated for service in both galvanic (GCP) and impressed current (ICCP) cathodic protection systems. ICCP anodes were

Sophie Bullard; C. B. Cryer; Gordon Holcomb; Stephen Cramer; H. M. Laylor; James Russell; Bernard Covino

2000-01-01

392

A calcium aluminate electride hollow cathode  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The development and testing of a hollow cathode utilizing C12A7 (12CaO?Al 2O3) electride as an insert are presented. Hollow cathodes are an integral part of electric propulsion thrusters on satellites and ground-based plasma sources for materials engineering. The power efficiency and durability of these components are critical, especially when used in flight applications. A low work function material internal to the cathode supplies the electrons needed to create the cathode plasma. Current state-of-the- art insert materials are either susceptible to poisoning or need to be heated to temperatures that result in a shortened cathode lifetime. C12A7 electride is a ceramic in which electrons contained in sub-nanometer sized lattice cages act as a conductive medium. Due to its unique atomic structure and large size, C12A7 electride has a predicted work function much lower than traditional insert materials. A novel, one-step fabrication process was developed that produced an amorphous form of C12A7 electride that had a measured work function 0.76 eV. A single electride hollow cathode was operated on xenon for over 60 hours over a two-month period that included 20 restarts and 11 chamber vent pump-down sequences with no sign of degradation, and on iodine for over 20 hours with no apparent reactivity issues. The operations of cathodes with three different orifice sizes were compared, and their effects on the interior cathode plasma modeled in a zero- dimensional phenomenological model.

Rand, Lauren Paula

393

Catalyst-infiltrated supporting cathode for thin-film SOFCs  

SciTech Connect

The fabrication and electrochemical performance of co-fired,LSM-SYSZ [i.e., La0.65Sr0.30MnO3 (LSM) - (Sc2O3)0.1(Y2O3)0.01(ZrO2)0.89] supported thin-film cells were examined using humidified hydrogen as a fuel. Co-firing of bi-layers and tri-layers was successful at 1250 C by optimizing the amount of carbon pore formers. A power density of a factor of 2.5 higher than that recently reported for the same type of cell at 800 C [3] was obtained for a cell with cobalt infiltration into the supporting cathode: the peak power densities were 455, 389, 285, 202, 141mW/cm2 at 800, 750, 700, 650, 600 C, respectively, and in most cases power densities at 0.7V exceeded more than 90 percent of the peak output. Increasing the cathode porosity from 43 to 53 percent improved peak power densities by as much as 1.3, shifting the diffusion limitation to high current densities. Cobalt infiltration into the support improved those by as much as a factor of 2 due to a significant reduction in non-ohmic resistance. These results demonstrate that cobalt catalyst-infiltrated LSM can be effective and low-cost supporting electrodes for reduced temperature, thin film SOFCs.

Yamahara, Keiji; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, Steven J.; De Jonghe,Lutgard C.

2004-04-12

394

COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.  

PubMed

Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100?), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100?), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge. PMID:25460980

Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

2015-01-01

395

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode  

E-print Network

capacity strongly affected reactor performance. The addition of a 50-mM phosphate buffer increased power, but that achievable power densities will depend on wastewater strength, solution conductivity, and buffering capacity wastewater treatment include: aerobic sequencing batch reactor (Wang et al. 2007), cross-flow ultrafiltration

396

Development of plasma cathode electron guns  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

1999-05-01

397

Numerical and Physical Simulation of the Low-Velocity Air Flow in a Diffuser with a Circular Cavity in the Case of Suction of the Air from the Central Cylindrical Body Positioned in the Cavity  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Comparative analysis of the results of solution of the steady-state Reynolds equations closed with the use of the shear-stress transfer model for the air fl ow in a divergent channel with suction of the air from the surface of the cylindrical central body positioned in the circular vortex cavity built in the lower wall of the channel with the corresponding experimental data has been performed.

Isaev, S. A.; Guvernyuk, S. V.; Zubin, M. A.; Baranov, P. A.; Ermakov, A. M.

2015-01-01

398

LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES  

SciTech Connect

This report represents a summary of the work carried out on this project which started October 1999 and ended March 2003. A list of the publications resulting from the work are contained in Appendix A. The most significant achievements are: (1) Dense nanocrystalline zirconia and ceria films were obtained at temperatures < 400 C. (2) Nanocrystalline films of both ceria and zirconia were characterized. (3) We showed that under anodic conditions 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films of Sc doped zirconia have sufficient electronic conductivity to prevent them from being useful as an electrolyte. (4) We have developed a process by which dense 0.5 to 5 micron thick dense films of either YSZ or ceria can be deposited on sintered porous substrates which serve as either the cathode or anode at temperatures as low as 400 C. (5) The program has provided the research to produce two PhD thesis for students, one is now working in the solid oxide fuel cell field. (6) The results of the research have resulted in 69 papers published, 3 papers submitted or being prepared for publication, 50 oral presentations and 3 patent disclosures.

Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

2003-03-31

399

24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDY  

EPA Science Inventory

Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hr onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X packed in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm o.d., 5 mm i.d., and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) has been evaluated in con...

400

24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

401

Improving Best Air Conditioner Efficiency by 20-30% through a High Efficiency Fan and Diffuser Stage Coupled with an Evaporative Condenser Pre-Cooler  

SciTech Connect

The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) conducted a research project to improve the best residential air conditioner condenser technology currently available on the market by retrofitting a commercially-available unit with both a high efficiency fan system and an evaporative pre-cooler. The objective was to integrate these two concepts to achieve an ultra-efficient residential air conditioner design. The project produced a working prototype that was 30% more efficient compared to the best currently-available technologies; the peak the energy efficiency ratio (EER) was improved by 41%. Efficiency at the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standard B-condition which is used to estimate seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), was raised from a nominal 21 Btu/Wh to 32 Btu/Wh.

Parker, Danny S; Sherwin, John R; Raustad, Richard

2014-04-10

402

Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this configuration with possibly an even longer emitter life. This cathode is specifically designed to integrate on the centerline of a high-power Hall thruster, thus eliminating the asymmetries in the plasma discharge common to cathodes previously mounted externally to the thruster s magnetic circuit. An alternative configuration for the cathode uses an external propellant feed. This diverts a fraction of the total cathode flow to an external feed, which can improve the cathode coupling efficiency at lower total mass flow rates. This can improve the overall thruster efficiency, thereby decreasing the required propellant loads for different missions. Depending on the particular mission, reductions in propellant loads can lead to mission enabling capabilities by allowing launch vehicle step-down, greater payload capability, or by extending the life of a spacecraft.

Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

2010-01-01

403

Effect of fuel rate and annealing process of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material for Li-ion batteries synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method  

SciTech Connect

In this study the effect of fuel rate and annealing on particle formation of LiFePO{sub 4} as battery cathode using flame spray pyrolysis method was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical study was done using ANSYS FLUENT program. In experimentally, LiFePO{sub 4} was synthesized from inorganic aqueous solution followed by annealing. LPG was used as fuel and air was used as oxidizer and carrier gas. Annealing process attempted in inert atmosphere at 700°C for 240 min. Numerical result showed that the increase of fuel rate caused the increase of flame temperature. Microscopic observation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that all particles have sphere and polydisperse. Increasing fuel rate caused decreasing particle size and increasing particles crystallinity. This phenomenon attributed to the flame temperature. However, all produced particles still have more amorphous phase. Therefore, annealing needed to increase particles crystallinity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that all particles have PO4 function group. Increasing fuel rate led to the increase of infrared spectrum absorption corresponding to the increase of particles crystallinity. This result indicated that phosphate group vibrated easily in crystalline phase. From Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, annealing can cause the increase of Li{sup +} diffusivity. The diffusivity coefficient of without and with annealing particles were 6.84399×10{sup ?10} and 8.59888×10{sup ?10} cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1}, respectively.

Halim, Abdul; Setyawan, Heru; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng [Chemical Engineering, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Kampus Sukolilo Surabaya Indonesia 60111 (Indonesia)

2014-02-24

404

Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Electric thrusters generate high exhaust velocities and can achieve specific impulses in excess of 1000 s. The low thrust generation and high specific impulse make electric propulsion ideal for interplanetary missions, spacecraft station keeping, and orbit raising maneuvers. Consequently, these devices have been used on a variety of space missions including Deep Space 1, Dawn, and hundreds of commercial spacecraft in Earth orbit. In order to provide the required total impulses, thruster burn time can often exceed 10,000 hours, making thruster lifetime essential. One of the main life-limiting components on ion engines is the hollow cathode, which serves as the electron source for ionization of the xenon propellant gas. Reactive contaminants such as oxygen can modify the cathode surface morphology and degrade the electron emission properties. Hollow cathodes that operate with reactive impurities in the propellant will experience higher operating temperatures, which increase evaporation of the emission materials and reduce cathode life. A deeper understanding of the mechanisms initiating cathode failure will improve thruster operation, increase lifetime, and ultimately reduce cost. A significant amount of work has been done previously to understand the effects of oxygen poisoning on vacuum cathodes; however, the xenon plasma adds complexity, and its role during cathode poisoning is not completely understood. The work presented here represents the first attempt at understanding how oxygen impurities in the xenon discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and affect operation of a 4:1:1 BaO-CaO-Al2O3 hollow cathode. A combination of experimentation and modeling was used to investigate how oxygen impurities in the discharge plasma alter the emitter surface and reduce the electron emission capability. The experimental effort involved operating a 4:1:1 hollow cathode at various conditions with oxygen impurities in the xenon flow. Since direct measurements of the emitter surface state cannot be obtained because of the cathode geometry and high particles fluxes, measurements of the emitter temperature using a two-color pyrometer were used to determine the oxygen surface coverage and characterize the rate processes that occur during poisoning. A model describing the material transport in the plasma discharge was developed and is used to predict the barium and oxygen fluxes to the emitter surface during cathode operation by solving the species continuity and momentum equations. The dominant ionization process for molecular oxygen in the plasma gas is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Barium is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion limited. Experimental results indicate that the oxygen poisoning rate is slow and that the oxygen poisoning coverage on the emitter surface is less than 3%. A time-dependent model of the reaction kinetics of oxygen and barium at the tungsten surface was developed using the experimental results. The experiments and kinetics model indicate that the dominant processes at the emitter surface are dissociative adsorption of O2, sputtering of the O2 precursor, and desorption of O. Ion sputtering of the weakly bound O2 precursor state limits the poisoning rate and yields low oxygen coverage. Removal of chemisorbed atomic oxygen is dominated by thermal processes. Based on the low oxygen coverage and long poisoning transients, plasma cathodes appear to be able to withstand higher oxygen concentrations than vacuum cathodes.

Capece, Angela Maria

405

Self-organization in cathode boundary layer discharges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Cathode boundary layer (CBL) discharge, which has been developed as a UV light source, operates in a direct current between a planar cathode and a ring-shape anode that are separated by a dielectric with an opening of the same diameter as the anode. The nonthermal CBL discharges operate in a medium pressure range down to 30 Torr, emitting excimer radiation when operated with noble gases. The radiant excimer emittance at 172 nm in xenon reaches 1.7 W/cm2, and a maximum excimer efficiency of 6% has been obtained. The high excimer radiant emittance, in addition to low cost and simple geometry compared to other UV sources, makes CBL discharges an excellent choice for deep UV lamps and a candidate for integrated flat UV panels (Moselhy et al. 2004). It has been found that CBL discharges spontaneously give rise to regularly arranged filaments, i.e., self-organization, at a low current, e.g., less than 0.2 mA at 75 Torr (Schoenbach et al. 2004). In this thesis, the self-organization of direct current xenon discharges in the CBL configuration and parallel-plate geometry have been studied for a pressure range from 30 to 140 Torr and currents from 20 muA to 1 mA. Comprehensive examinations have been performed to investigate the behavior of those filaments by the use of optical, electrical, and spectral measurements. Side-on and end-on observations of the discharges have provided information on axial structure and distance of the filaments from the cathode fall. The electrical measurement has recorded a discrete I-V characteristic associated with the change of the numbers of the filaments. The spectral measurement provides scaling information on the relative population of high-lying states (1s 4, 1s5, and 2p6) of excited xenon atoms. Moreover, temperature measurement has revealed that the thermal electron emission from the cathode surface is negligible for the formation of filaments. The reactor geometry with parallel-plate electrodes analogously gives self-organization. The gas species, the cathode material, and the reactor geometry are varied to facilitate the understanding of the CBL xenon discharges and the self-organization. When krypton is used instead of xenon, rather homogeneous plasma far from organized pattern formation is observed with decreasing current. Of the tested aluminum, copper, and tungsten cathodes, the aluminum cathode achieved higher excimer intensity at 250 Torr than that of the molybdenum cathode by a factor of two. The diameter of the plasma reactor was reduced to 300 mum, and it gave rise to a single filament, illuminating with an enhanced excimer power density of 500 mW/cm2 at 62 Torr. Three mechanisms of these self-organizations are given and discussed in this thesis. The first mechanism explains that the axial electric field can initiate instability. This instability is caused by N-shaped negative differential conductivity (NNDC) in the vicinity of negative glow, which is attributed to electron-electron collisions. Positive feedback of the current density and the electric field due to the NNDC causes fluctuation to develop. Another positive feedback effect of the gas temperature is that the first Townsend coefficient can become dominant as, the current density increases. The filaments are assumed to undergo Coulomb force from the positively charged cathode fall channels and positive space charges on the surface of the surrounding dielectric spacer. The calculations, based on these assumptions on the Coulombic interactions, showed good agreement with experimental data. The second mechanism for the pattern formation is presented as to the development of Turing instability. The discussion is based on the idea that the regular arrangement of filaments is merely a result of general phenomena such as diffusion, ionization, or drift. A reaction-diffusion process with respect to the variation of local current density j and voltage v is the physical effect in the discharge. The numerical calculation was performed and obtained was a 2-D patterned structure exhibiting resemblance to the observed pattern. The tran

Takano, Nobuhiko

406

Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

Qin, Y.; He, F.; Jiang, X. X.; Xie, K.; Ouyang, J. T.

2014-07-01

407

2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review  

SciTech Connect

The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

Daniel, Claus [ORNL] [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL] [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL] [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01

408

Micro-engineered cathode interface studies  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this work is to increase the performance of the cathode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) operating at 1,000 C by decreasing the polarization resistance from 0.2 {Omega}-cm{sup 2} at 300 mA/cm{sup 2}. Decreased polarization resistance will allow operation at higher current densities. This work is in support of the Westinghouse tubular SOFC technology using YSZ electrolyte and strontium doped lanthanum manganite (LSM) cathode. As a result of work performed last year at Argonne National Laboratory and information derived from the literature, the limitations at the cathode/electrolyte interface can be classified into two main areas. First, the ionic conductivity of the LSM cathode material is low which limits the reaction zone to an area very close to the interface, while the rest of the cathode thickness acts essentially as current collector with channels for gas access. Second, the electronic conductivity in YSZ is very low which limits the reaction zone to areas that are the boundaries between LSM and YSZ rather than the YSZ surface away from LSM at the interface. Possible solutions to this problem being pursued are: (1) introducing an ionic conducting YSZ phase in LSM to form a porous two-phase mixture of LSM and YSZ; (2) applying a thin interlayer between the electrolyte and the cathode where the interlayer has high ionic and electronic conductivity and high catalytic activity for reduction of O{sub 2}; (3) increasing the ionic conductivity in the LSM by suitable doping; and (4) increasing the electronic conductivity in the electrolyte by doping or by depositing an appropriate mixed conducting layer on the YSZ before applying the cathode.

Doshi, R.; Kueper, T.; Nagy, Z.; Krumpelt, M.

1997-08-01

409

DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS  

EPA Science Inventory

Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

410

Hydrogen production through steam electrolysis: Control strategies for a cathode-supported intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hydrogen production via steam electrolysis may involve less electrical energy consumption than conventional low temperature water electrolysis, reflecting the favourable thermodynamics and kinetics at elevated temperatures. The present paper reports on the development of a one-dimensional dynamic model of a cathode-supported planar intermediate temperature solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack with air flow introduced through the cells. The model, which

J. Udagawa; P. Aguiar; N. P. Brandon

2008-01-01

411

Diffusive exchange of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons across the air-water interface of the Patapsco River, an urbanized subestuary of the Chesapeake Bay  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air-water exchange fluxes of 13 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined along a transect in the Patapsco River from the Inner Harbor of Baltimore, MD, to the mainstem of the northern Chesapeake Bay. Sampling took place at six sites during three sampling intensives (June 1996, February 1997, and July 1997) and at one site every ninth day between March 1997

Holly A. Bamford; John H. Offenberg; Randolph K. Larsen; Fung-Chi Ko; Joel E. Baker

1999-01-01

412

Development of Ni1-xCoxO as the cathode/interconnect contact for solid oxide fuel cells  

SciTech Connect

A new type of material, Ni1-xCoxO, was developed for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode/interconnect contact applications. The phase structure, coefficient of thermal expansion, sintering behavior, electrical property, and mechanical bonding strength of these materials were evaluated against the requirements of the SOFC cathode/interconnect contact. A dense cathode/interconnect contact layer was developed through reaction sintering from Ni and Co metal powders. An area specific resistance (ASR) as low as 5.5 mohm.cm2 was observed after 1000 h exposure in air at 800 °C for the LSM/Ni0.33Co0.67O/AISI441 assembly. Average mechanical strengths of 6.8 and 5.0 MPa were obtained for the cathode/contact/cathode and interconnect/contact/interconnect structures, respectively. The significantly low ASR was probably due to the dense structure and therefore improved electrical conductivity of the Ni0.33Co0.67O contact and the good bonding of the interfaces between the contact and the cathode, and between the contact and the interconnect.

Lu, Zigui; Xia, Guanguang; Templeton, Joshua D.; Li, Xiaohong S.; Nie, Zimin; Yang, Zhenguo; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

2011-06-01

413

Removal of Volatile Organic Compounds in Atmospheric Pressure Air by Means of Direct Current Glow Discharges  

Microsoft Academic Search

A nonthermal plasma with an electron density on the order of$10 ^12~hbox cm^-3$and a gas temperature of 2000 K was generated in atmospheric pressure air, using a microhollow cathode discharge as plasma cathode. The plasma was sustained in a$sim!!1~hbox mm^3$micro reactor, by a voltage of 470 V between the plasma cathode and a planar anode, and at currents ranging from

Chunqi Jiang; Abdel-Aleam H. Mohamed; Robert H. Stark; James H. Yuan; Karl H. Schoenbach

2005-01-01

414

Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

Spindt, C. A.

1983-01-01

415

RHETT/EPDM Flight Hollow Cathode  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Under the sponsorship of the BMDO Russian Hall Electric Thruster Technology program two xenon hollow cathodes, a flight unit and a flight spare were fabricated, acceptance tested and delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use on the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module. These hollow cathodes, based on the International Space Station plasma contactor design, were fabricated at the NASA Lewis Research Center for use with a D-55 anode layer thruster in the first on-orbit operational application of this technology. The 2.2 Ampere nominal emission current of this device was obtained with a xenon flow rate of 0.6 mg/s. Ignition of the cathode discharge was accomplished through preheating the active electron emitter with a resistive heating element before application of a 650 volt ignition pulse between the emitter and an external starting electrode. The successful acceptance testing of the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module utilizing these cathodes demonstrated the suitability of cathodes based on barium impregnated inserts in an enclosed keeper configuration for use with Hall thruster propulsion systems.

Manzella, David; Patterson, Michael; Pastel, Michael

1997-01-01

416

Diffusion /Osmosis  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This project is use to review the concepts of diffusion and osmosis 1. Watch the tutorials on diffusion and osmosis. Take the online quiz at the end of each one. Diffusion Animation Osmosis Animation 2. Do the interactive lab on diffusion. Stop when you get to the calculating water potential section. Diffusion/Osmosis Interactive Demo 3. Play the Quia review games. Quia Games- matching/concetration Quia Jeopardy 4. Check out the Elodea leaf cells. Be able to ...

Jensen

2007-11-26

417

Air cycle machine for an aircraft environmental control system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An ECS system includes an ACM mounted adjacent an air-liquid heat exchanger through a diffuser that contains a diffuser plate. The diffuser plate receives airflow from the ACM which strikes the diffuser plate and flows radially outward and around the diffuser plate and into the air-liquid heat exchanger to provide minimal pressure loss and proper flow distribution into the air-liquid heat exchanger with significantly less packaging space.

Decrisantis, Angelo A. (Inventor); O'Coin, James R. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

2010-01-01

418

Heat treatment of cathodic arc deposited amorphous hard carbon films  

SciTech Connect

Amorphous hard carbon films of varying sp{sup 2}/sp{sup 3} fractions have been deposited on Si using filtered cathodic are deposition with pulsed biasing. The films were heat treated in air up to 550 C. Raman investigation and nanoindentation were performed to study the modification of the films caused by the heat treatment. It was found that films containing a high sp{sup 3} fraction sustain their hardness for temperatures at least up to 400 C, their structure for temperatures up to 500 C, and show a low thickness loss during heat treatment. Films containing at low sp{sup 3} fraction graphitize during the heat treatment, show changes in structure and hardness, and a considerable thickness loss.

Anders, S.; Ager, J.W. III; Brown, I.G. [and others

1997-02-01

419

Composite Cathode for High-Power Density Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) operating temperature will play a key role in reducing the stack cost by allowing the use of low-cost metallic interconnects and new approaches to sealing, while making applications such as transportation more feasible. Reported results for anode-supported SOFCs show that cathode polarization resistance is the primary barrier to achieving high power densities at operating temperatures of 700 C and lower. This project aims to identify and develop composite cathodes that could reduce SOFC operating temperatures below 700 C. This effort focuses on study and use of (La,Sr)(Co,Fe)O{sub 3} (LSCF) based composite cathodes, which have arguably the best potential to substantially improve on the currently-used, (La,Sr)MnO{sub 3}-Yttria-stabilized Zirconia. During this Phase I, it was successfully demonstrated that high performances can be achieved with LSCF/Gadolinium-Doped Ceria composite cathodes on Ni-based anode supported cells operating at 700 C or lower. We studied electrochemical reactions at LSCF/Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) interfaces, and observed chemical reactions between LSCF and YSZ. By using ceria electrolytes or YSZ electrolytes with ceria diffusion barrier layers, the chemical reactions between LSCF and electrolytes were prevented under cathode firing conditions necessary for the optimal adhesion of the cathodes. The protection provided by ceria layer is expected to be adequate for stable long-term cathode performances, but more testing is needed to verify this. Using ceria-based barrier layers, high performance Ni-YSZ anode supported cells have been demonstrated with maximum power densities of 0.8W/cm2 at 700 C and 1.6W/cm{sup 2} at 800 C. Ni-SDC anode supported cells with SDC electrolytes yielded >1W/cm{sup 2} at 600 C. We speculate that the power output of Ni-YSZ anode supported cell at 700 C and lower, was limited by the quality of the Ceria and Ceria YSZ interface. Improvements in the low-temperature performances are expected based on further development of barrier layer fabrication processes and optimization of cathode microstructure.

Ilwon Kim; Scott Barnett; Yi Jiang; Manoj Pillai; Nikkia McDonald; Dan Gostovic; Zhongryang Zhan; Jiang Liu

2004-01-31

420

All particle simulations of cathodic arc plasmas  

SciTech Connect

The early stages of the expansion of fully ionized cathode spot cathodic arc plasmas from a localized initial volume are simulated by an all particle molecular dynamics model. The particles are given an initial temperature and interact by Coulomb forces. Although there are limits on the number of particles and the starting density, the model is relevant in describing processes occurring in cells that are the smallest structures of a cathodic arc. Our model predicts that a cell undergoes an explosive expansion leading to a halo of electrons surrounding an ion-rich core. The ion kinetic energies are lower than experimental observation but may be consistent with them after extrapolation to higher initial densities. For mixed charge state plasmas, the ion kinetic energy increases with ion charge state.

Cooper, I.J.; McKenzie, D.R. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

2006-05-01

421

Cathodic protection in simulated geothermal environments  

SciTech Connect

The results of cathodic protection of carbon steel and AISI Type 316 stainless steel in simulated geothermal brines are described. Impressed current tests on carbon steel and stainless steel were conducted under controlled potential, and cathodic protection of carbon steel using zinc sacrificial anodes was studied by monitoring the galvanic current and potential of the couple with a zero-resistance ammeter. Weight-loss measurements and photomicrographs of test coupons were taken whenever necessary to determine the nature of attack and degree of protection. Tests were generally conducted at 90/sup 0/C. However, some tests on carbon steel were conducted up to 150/sup 0/C in a titanium autoclave. Results show that the weight loss of carbon steel can be reduced significantly and the pitting corrosion of the stainless steel can be prevented by shifting the potentials of the metals 60 to 80 mV cathodic to their respective open-circuit potentials.

Bandy, R.; van Rooyen, D.

1983-01-01

422

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1989-12-01

423

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h kg -1 theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h kg -1 have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. We, at JPL, are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. Our approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, our studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl 2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

424

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1990-01-01

425

Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

1989-01-01

426

Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode  

DOEpatents

A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

1987-02-02

427

Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode  

DOEpatents

A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Moussa, David (San Francisco, CA); Wilde, Stephen B. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

1991-01-01

428

Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method  

DOEpatents

A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

Krauss, Alan R. (24461 W. Blvd. De John, Naperville, IL 60564)

1999-01-01

429

A diffusive badge sampler for volatile organic compounds in ambient air and determination using a thermal desorption-GC/MS system.  

PubMed

A sensitive personal badge sampler packed with Carbopack B for ambient levels of volatile organic compounds and an analytical system using a thermal desorption-preconcentration-GC/MS have been developed. The capacity of the new sampler was sufficient for an 8-h sampling period, and the analytical method was sensitive enough for the measurement of sub-ppb levels for a 2-h sampling period. The samplers were compared to diffusive samplers (OVM 3500) for typical environmental concentrations. There was a good correlation between the results obtained with the new samplers and the OVM samplers. PMID:11811425

Yamamoto, Noriko; Matsubasa, Tomoko; Kumagai, Nami; Mori, Sachiko; Suzuki, Koji

2002-01-15

430

Transparent polymer cathode for organic photovoltaic devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

We demonstrate a prototype solar cell with a transparent polymer cathode, and indium-tin-oxide (ITO)\\/poly (3, 4-ethylene dioxythiophene)-poly (styrene sulphonate) (PEDOT:PSS) anode. As an active layer, thin film of a bulk heterojunction of polyfluorene copolymer poly[2,7-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorene)-alt-5,5-(4?,7?-di-2thienyl-2?,1?3?-benzothiadiazole)] (APFO-3) and an electron acceptor molecule [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) (1:4wt.) was sandwiched between the two transparent polymer electrodes. The cathode is another form

Abay Gadisa; Kristofer Tvingstedt; Shimelis Admassie; L. Lindell; X. Crispin; Mats R. Andersson; W. R. Salaneck; Olle Inganäs

2006-01-01

431

/C Composite Cathode for Li Ion Battery  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Li3V2(PO4)3/C composites were prepared at different temperatures and assembled as cathodes for Li ion batteries. Their structure and electrochemical properties were properly characterized. The internal and charge transfer resistance of the Li3V2(PO4)3/C cathodes were obtained by simulating the ac impedance spectra with equivalent circuits. The Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite sintered at 1123 K (850 °C) exhibits excellent electrochemical performances because of its smaller internal resistance and charge transfer resistance, as well as faster Li ion inserting/extracting rates.

Wang, Shulan; Liu, Xuan; Li, Huiqing; Li, Li

2014-12-01

432

Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields  

SciTech Connect

Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch