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Sample records for air diffusion cathode

  1. Development of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells

    E-print Network

    to a polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon black DL ($11/m2 ). The power density produced with a PVDF (20%, w/v) DL membrane of 1400 pressure) with a mesh supporter, compared to 0.2 ± 0.05 m for the wipe DL. The elimination of carbon blackDevelopment of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells

  2. Development of carbon free diffusion layer for activated carbon air cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wulin; Kim, Kyoung-Yeol; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-12-01

    The fabrication of activated carbon air cathodes for larger-scale microbial fuel cells requires a diffusion layer (DL) that is highly resistant to water leakage, oxygen permeable, and made using inexpensive materials. A hydrophobic polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) membrane synthesized using a simple phase inversion process was examined as a low cost ($0.9/m(2)), carbon-free DL that prevented water leakage at high pressure heads compared to a polytetrafluoroethylene/carbon black DL ($11/m(2)). The power density produced with a PVDF (20%, w/v) DL membrane of 1400±7mW/m(2) was similar to that obtained using a wipe DL [cloth coated with poly(dimethylsiloxane)]. Water head tolerance reached 1.9m (?19kPa) with no mesh supporter, and 2.1m (?21kPa, maximum testing pressure) with a mesh supporter, compared to 0.2±0.05m for the wipe DL. The elimination of carbon black from the DL greatly simplified the fabrication procedure and further reduced overall cathode costs. PMID:26342345

  3. Air cathode structure manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Momyer, William R. (Palo Alto, CA); Littauer, Ernest L. (Los Altos Hills, CA)

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  4. Investigation of the Gas-Diffusion-Electrode Used as Lithium/Air Cathode in Non-aqueous Electrolyte and the Importance of Carbon Material Porosity

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, D.; Yang, X.; Tran, C.

    2010-04-02

    The gas-diffusion-electrode used in a Li-air cell has been studied in a unique homemade electrochemical cell. Three major obstacles for the development of a feasible Li-air system were discussed with a focus on the development of a functional gas-diffusion-electrode in non-aqueous electrolytes and the way of avoiding the passivation of gas-diffusion-electrodes caused by the deposition of the reduction products. It is the first time that the importance of establishing the 3-phase electrochemical interface in non-aqueous electrolyte is demonstrated by creating air-diffusion paths and an air saturated portion for an air cathode. A model mechanism of electrode passivation by the reaction products was also proposed. Lithium oxides formed during O{sub 2} reduction tend to block small pores, preventing them from further utilization in the electrochemical reaction. On the other hand, lithium oxides would accumulate inside the large pores during the reduction until the density of oxides becomes high enough to choke-off the mass transfer. Carbon materials with a high surface area associated with larger pores should be selected to make the gas-diffusion-electrode for Li-air battery. For the first time, a near linear relationship between the capacity of GDE in a non-aqueous electrolyte and the average pore diameter was demonstrated, which could be used to estimate the capacity of the GDE quantitatively.

  5. Degradation characteristics of air cathode in zinc air fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Ze; Pei, Pucheng; Wang, Keliang; Wang, Xizhong; Xu, Huachi; Liu, Yongfeng; peng, Guanlin

    2015-01-01

    The zinc air fuel cell (ZAFC) is a promising candidate for electrical energy storage and electric vehicle propulsion. However, its limited durability has become a major obstacle for its successful commercialization. In this study, 2-cell stacks, 25 cm² cells and three-electrode half-cells are constructed to experimentally investigate the degradation characteristics of the air cathode. The results of electrochemical tests reveal that the peak power density for the 25 cm2 cell with a new air cathode is 454 mW cm-2, which is twice as the value of the used air cathode. The electrochemical impedance analysis shows that both the charge transfer resistance and the mass transfer resistance of the used air cathodes have increased, suggesting that the catalyst surface area and gas diffusion coefficient have decreased significantly. Additionally, the microstructure and morphology of the catalytic layer (CL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are characterized by scanning electron microscopes (SEM). SEM results confirm that the micropores in CL and GDL of the used air cathode are seriously clogged, and many catalyst particles are lost. Therefore, the performance degradation is mainly due to the clogging of micropores and loss of catalyst particles. Furthermore, hypotheses of degradation mechanism and mitigation strategies for GDL and CL are discussed briefly.

  6. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m-2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation.

  7. Gas transport evaluation in lithium-air batteries with micro/nano-structured cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoning; Wen, Kechun; Song, Yuanqiang; Ye, Luhan; Zhang, Kelvin H. L.; Pan, Yu; Lv, Weiqiang; Liao, Yulong; He, Weidong

    2015-01-01

    Inefficient gas transport in the porous cathode is disastrous for the lithium-air battery to achieve a high electrochemical performance. Previous evaluation of the cathode diffusivity relies on indirect calculations based on multiple V-I data obtained over the intact battery system, which inevitably induces evaluation uncertainty and material waste. In this report, an electrochemical device is designed for the out-of-cell diffusivity measurement in the lithium-air battery with micro/nano-sized cathodes. With the measured diffusivity, a few electrochemical parameters including the limiting current density and the concentration polarization associated with the porous cathodes can thus be directly evaluated. The work facilitates the development of highly-efficient cathode materials in the general field of metal-air battery field.

  8. Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-12-01

    An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 ?m pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

  9. Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells Qiao Yang a

    E-print Network

    Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells Qiao Yang January 2012 Available online 30 January 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Spacer Oxygen demand Scale up a b s t r a c t Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require more compact reactor designs

  10. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Shi, Juan; Liang, Peng; Wei, Jincheng; Huang, Xia; Zhang, Chuanyi; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-01

    Catalysts and catalyst binders are significant portions of the cost of microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. Many materials have been tested as aqueous cathodes, but air-cathodes are needed to avoid energy demands for water aeration. Packed-bed air-cathodes were constructed without expensive binders or diffusion layers using four inexpensive carbon-based materials. Cathodes made from activated carbon produced the largest maximum power density of 676 ± 93 mW/m(2), followed by semi-coke (376 ± 47 mW/m(2)), graphite (122 ± 14 mW/m(2)) and carbon felt (60 ± 43 mW/m(2)). Increasing the mass of activated carbon and semi-coke from 5 to ? 15 g significantly reduced power generation because of a reduction in oxygen transfer due to a thicker water layer in the cathode (?3 or ?6 cm). These results indicate that a thin packed layer of activated carbon or semi-coke can be used to make inexpensive air-cathodes for MFCs. PMID:23732924

  11. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  12. Battery with modular air cathode and anode cage

    DOEpatents

    Niksa, Marilyn J. (Painesville, OH); Pohto, Gerald R. (Mentor, OH); Lakatos, Leslie K. (Mentor, OH); Wheeler, Douglas J. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Niksa, Andrew J. (Painesville, OH); Schue, Thomas J. (Huntsburg, OH)

    1987-01-01

    A battery assembly of the consumable metal anode type has now been constructed for ready assembly as well as disassembly. In a non-conductive and at least substantially inert cell body, space is provided for receiving an open-structured, non-consumable anode cage. The cage has an open top for facilitating insertion of an anode. A modular cathode is used, comprising a peripheral current conductor frame clamped about a grid reinforced air cathode in sheet form. The air cathode may be double gridded. The cathode frame can be sealed, during assembly, with electrolyte-resistant-sealant as well as with adhesive. The resulting cathode module can be assembled outside the cell body and readily inserted therein, or can later be easily removed therefrom.

  13. Battery with modular air cathode and anode cage

    DOEpatents

    Niksa, Marilyn J. (Painesville, OH); Pohto, Gerald R. (Mentor, OH); Lakatos, Leslie K. (Mentor, OH); Wheeler, Douglas J. (Cleveland Heights, OH); Niksa, Andrew J. (Painesville, OH); Schue, Thomas J. (Huntsburg, OH); Turk, Thomas R. (Mentor, OH)

    1988-01-01

    A battery assembly of the consumable metal anode type has now been constructed for ready assembly as well as disassembly. In a non-conductive and at least substantially inert cell body, space is provided for receiving an open-structured, non-consumable anode cage. The cage has an open top for facilitating insertion of an anode. A modular cathode is used, comprising a peripheral current conductor frame clamped about a grid reinforced air cathode in sheet form. The air cathode may be double gridded. The cathode frame can be sealed, during assembly, with electrolyte-resistant-sealant as well as with adhesive. The resulting cathode module can be assembled outside the cell body and readily inserted therein, or can later be easily removed therefrom.

  14. Lithium AMTEC with gas-diffusion cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Lysenko, G.P.

    1996-12-31

    To determine optimal geometrical parameters of a gas-diffusion electrode for the alkali metal AMTEC, there has been developed a model of such an electrode of regular structure made up by identical electrically conducting spherical particles having contact with the solid electrolyte and each other over circular surfaces. Calculations run using this model allowed to assess the gas-diffusion electrode geometry. Theoretical and experimental performance of sodium AMTEC have been compared which showed their good match. However, sodium solid electrolytes due to decomposition at the operating temperatures rather quickly loses its surface`s properties. Use of modified lithium oxide as a lithium electrolyte proved stable performance of solid electrolyte at the temperatures up to 1,200 K with lithium working fluid.

  15. Effects of hydraulic pressure on the performance of single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoan; Liu, Weifeng; Guo, Jian; Sun, Dan; Pan, Bin; Ye, Yaoli; Ding, Weijun; Huang, Haobin; Li, Fujian

    2014-06-15

    Scaling up of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) without losing power density requires a thorough understanding of the effect of hydraulic pressure on MFC performance. In this work, the performance of an activated carbon air-cathode MFC was evaluated under different hydraulic pressures. The MFC under 100 mmH2O hydraulic pressure produced a maximum power density of 1260 ± 24 mW m(-2), while the power density decreased by 24.4% and 44.7% as the hydraulic pressure increased to 500 mmH2O and 2000 mmH2O, respectively. Notably, the performance of both the anode and the cathode had decreased under high hydraulic pressures. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy tests of the cathode indicated that both charge transfer resistance and diffusion transfer resistance increased with the increase in hydraulic pressure. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR-amplified partial 16S rRNA genes demonstrated that the similarity among anodic biofilm communities under different hydraulic pressures was ? 90%, and the communities of all MFCs were dominated by Geobacter sp. These results suggested that the reduction in power output of the single chamber air-cathode MFC under high hydraulic pressures can be attributed to water flooding of the cathode and suppression the metabolism of anodic exoelectrogenic bacteria. PMID:24514078

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode

    E-print Network

    in the water consists of sugar, starch, and protein (Speece 1996). Biological methods usually used for breweryENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Brewery wastewater treatment using air-cathode microbial fuel cells wastewater treatment using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require a better understanding of how operational

  17. Ab initio screening of lithium diffusion rates in transition metal oxide cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    E-print Network

    Moore, Charles J. (Charles Jacob)

    2012-01-01

    A screening metric for diffusion limitations in lithium ion battery cathodes is derived using transition state theory and common materials properties. The metric relies on net activation barrier for lithium diffusion. ...

  18. Microbial fuel cell cathodes with poly(dimethylsiloxane) diffusion layers constructed around stainless steel mesh current collectors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fang; Saito, Tomonori; Cheng, Shaoan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

    2010-02-15

    A new and simplified approach for making cathodes for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) was developed by using metal mesh current collectors and inexpensive polymer/carbon diffusion layers (DLs). Rather than adding a current collector to a cathode material such as carbon cloth, we constructed the cathode around the metal mesh itself, thereby avoiding the need for the carbon cloth or other supporting material. A base layer of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) and carbon black was applied to the air-side of a stainless steel mesh, and Pt on carbon black with Nafion binder was applied to the solution-side as catalyst for oxygen reduction. The PDMS prevented water leakage and functioned as a DL by limiting oxygen transfer through the cathode and improving coulombic efficiency. PDMS is hydrophobic, stable, and less expensive than other DL materials, such as PTFE, that are commonly applied to air cathodes. Multiple PDMS/carbon layers were applied in order to optimize the performance of the cathode. Two PDMS/carbon layers achieved the highest maximum power density of 1610 +/- 56 mW/m(2) (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 47.0 +/- 1.6 W/m(3) based on liquid volume). This power output was comparable to the best result of 1635 +/- 62 mW/m(2) obtained using carbon cloth with three PDMS/carbon layers and a Pt catalyst. The coulombic efficiency of the mesh cathodes reached more than 80%, and was much higher than the maximum of 57% obtained with carbon cloth. These findings demonstrate that cathodes can be constructed around metal mesh materials such as stainless steel, and that an inexpensive coating of PDMS can prevent water leakage and lead to improved coulombic efficiencies. PMID:20099808

  19. Two types of diffusions at the cathode/electrolyte interface in IT-SOFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhipeng; Mori, Toshiyuki; Auchterlonie, Graeme John; Zou Jin; Drennan, John

    2011-09-15

    Analytical transmission electron microscopy, in particular with the combination of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS), has been performed to investigate the microstructure and microchemistry of the interfacial region between the cathode (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, LSCF) and the electrolyte (Gd-doped ceria, GDC). Two types of diffusions, mutual diffusion between cathode and electrolyte as well as the diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified. These diffusions suggest that the chemical stability of LSCF and GDC are not as good as previously reported. The results are more noteworthy if we take into consideration the fact that such interdiffusions occur even during the sintering process of cell preparation. - Graphical Abstract: Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and the diffusion along grain boundaries, occurred at the cathode/electrolyte interface of intermediate temperature solid state fuel cells, during cell preparation. The mutual diffusion is denoted by black arrows and the diffusion along grain boundaries assigned by pink arrows. Highlights: > All the cations in cathode (LSCF) and electrolyte (GDC) can mutually diffuse into each other. > Diffusing elements will segregate at grain boundaries or triple junctions around the cathode/electrolyte interface. > Two types of diffusions, the mutual diffusion and diffusion along grain boundaries, have been clarified thereafter.

  20. Lithium-Air Battery: High Performance Cathodes for Lithium-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    2010-08-01

    BEEST Project: Researchers at Missouri S&T are developing an affordable lithium-air (Li-Air) battery that could enable an EV to travel up to 350 miles on a single charge. Today’s EVs run on Li-Ion batteries, which are expensive and suffer from low energy density compared with gasoline. This new Li-Air battery could perform as well as gasoline and store 3 times more energy than current Li-Ion batteries. A Li-Air battery uses an air cathode to breathe oxygen into the battery from the surrounding air, like a human lung. The oxygen and lithium react in the battery to produce electricity. Current Li-Air batteries are limited by the rate at which they can draw oxygen from the air. The team is designing a battery using hierarchical electrode structures to enhance air breathing and effective catalysts to accelerate electricity production.

  1. Influence of different morphology of three-dimensional Cu(x)O with mixed facets modified air-cathodes on microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziqi; Li, Kexun; Zhang, Xi; Ge, Baochao; Pu, Liangtao

    2015-11-01

    Three kinds of three-dimensional (3D) CuxO catalysts were prepared to modify activated carbon air-cathode using a facile electrochemical method with addition of surfactants. The maximum power density of MFC using SC-Cu air cathode (added sodium citrate into the electrolyte solution in electrodeposition process) was 1550±47 mW m(-2), almost 77% higher than AC cathode. Specifically, the charge transfer resistance significantly decreased by 89% from 9.3980 ? to 1.0640 ? compared to the control. Lumphy and mutually embedded filmy sheet structure were observed in SEM, which provided sufficient active sites for oxygen adsorption and diffusion. In XRD and TEM result, CuxO with mixed facets showed special structure which had a better performance. Crystallization condition of electrodeposited materials played a significant role in their nature electrochemical properties, morphology controlled by surfactant of CuxO exhibited high properties on the air-cathode MFC. PMID:26122090

  2. Diffusion of hexanoic acid (1); air (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) hexanoic acid; (2) air

  3. Diffusion of air (1); furfural (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) air; (2) furfural

  4. Bent paths of a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Shao, Tao; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Wang, Ruixue; Sorokin, Dmitry A.; Yan, Ping

    2015-03-01

    Diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons can produce large-area homogeneous discharges at elevated pressures, which is an intriguing phenomenon in the physics of pulsed discharges. In this paper, runaway-electron-preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) was obtained in a wide pressure range (0.05-0.25 MPa), and under certain conditions a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader could be observed to propagate at some angles to the applied (background) electric field lines. For a 16-mm gap at an air pressure of 0.08-0.1 MPa, the percentage of pulses in which such propagation is observed is about 5%-50% of their total number, and in the other pulses such bent paths could not be observed because there is even no streamer or cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges. In our opinion, such propagation of the positive streamer and the cathode-directed spark leader at some angle to the background electric field lines owes to different increase rates of the electron density in different regions of the discharge volume under REP DD conditions. Therefore, during the formation of a REP DD, the increase of the electron density is inhomogeneous and nonsimultaneous, resulting in an electron density gradient at the ionization wave front.

  5. Bent paths of a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Cheng; Shao, Tao Wang, Ruixue; Yan, Ping; Tarasenko, Viktor F.; Beloplotov, Dmitry V.; Lomaev, Mikhail I.; Sorokin, Dmitry A.

    2015-03-15

    Diffuse discharges preionized by runaway electrons can produce large-area homogeneous discharges at elevated pressures, which is an intriguing phenomenon in the physics of pulsed discharges. In this paper, runaway-electron-preionized diffuse discharge (REP DD) was obtained in a wide pressure range (0.05–0.25?MPa), and under certain conditions a positive streamer and a cathode-directed spark leader could be observed to propagate at some angles to the applied (background) electric field lines. For a 16-mm gap at an air pressure of 0.08–0.1?MPa, the percentage of pulses in which such propagation is observed is about 5%–50% of their total number, and in the other pulses such bent paths could not be observed because there is even no streamer or cathode-directed spark leader in diffuse discharges. In our opinion, such propagation of the positive streamer and the cathode-directed spark leader at some angle to the background electric field lines owes to different increase rates of the electron density in different regions of the discharge volume under REP DD conditions. Therefore, during the formation of a REP DD, the increase of the electron density is inhomogeneous and nonsimultaneous, resulting in an electron density gradient at the ionization wave front.

  6. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates 

    E-print Network

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22

    room. A small office room with ceiling based room air distribution method is considered for CFD analysis. The CFD results are validated with experimental measured data for the designed diffuser flow rate. A parametric study on different turbulence...

  7. A hybrid Li-air battery with buckypaper air cathode and sulfuric acid electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Li, YF; Huang, K; Xing, YC

    2012-10-30

    We demonstrate a type of carbon nanotube based buckypaper cathode in a hybrid electrolyte Li-air battery (HyLAB) that showed outstanding discharging performances. The HyLAB has sulfuric acid as the catholyte and a large active electrode area (10 cm(2)). The active cathode layer was made from a buckypaper with 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon nanotubes (Pt/CNTs) for oxygen reduction and evolution. A similar cathode was constructed with a catalyst of 5 wt.% Pt supported on carbon black (Pt/CB). It is demonstrated that sulfuric acid can achieve high discharging current densities while maintaining relatively high cell potentials. The cell with Pt/CNTs showed a much better performance than with Pt/CB at high current densities. The HyLAB with Pt/CNTs achieved a discharging capacity of 306 mAh/g and a cell voltage of 3.15 V at 0.2 mA/cm(2). The corresponding specific energy is 1067 Wh/kg based on the total weight of the sulfuric acid. Slow decrease in performance was observed, but it can be recovered by refilling the cell with new electrolyte after continuous discharging of more than 75 h. A charge-discharge experiment at 0.2 mA/cm(2) showed that the cell was rechargeable with a capacity of more than 300 mAh/g. (c) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeling of hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaac, Kakkattukuzhy

    1988-01-01

    The present research objective is to determine the effects of contaminants on extinction limits of simple, well defined, counterflow Hydrogen 2-air diffusion flames, with combustion at 1 atmosphere. Results of extinction studies and other flame characterizations, with appropriate mechanistic modeling (presently underway), will be used to rationalize the observed effects of contamination over a reasonably wide range of diffusion flame conditions. The knowledge gained should help efforts to anticipate the effects of contaminants on combustion processes in Hydrogen 2-fueled scramjets.

  9. Development and evaluation of carbon and binder loading in low-cost activated carbon cathodes for air-cathode microbial fuel cells{

    E-print Network

    Development and evaluation of carbon and binder loading in low-cost activated carbon cathodes carbon (AC) air cathodes were constructed using variable amounts of carbon (43­171 mg cm22 ) and an inexpensive binder (10 wt% polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE), and with or without a porous cloth wipe

  10. Measurement of Temperature and Reaction Species in the Cathode Diffusion Layer of a Free-Convection Fuel Cell

    E-print Network

    Santiago, Juan G.

    immediately above the planar, horizontal cathode of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell PEMFC driven cell systems. Nonuniform temperature and concentration effects have been studied to some extentMeasurement of Temperature and Reaction Species in the Cathode Diffusion Layer of a Free

  11. Isotope effect of mercury diffusion in air

    PubMed Central

    Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Esser, Bradley K.; Williams, Ross W.; Hunt, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying and reducing impacts from mercury sources in the environment remains a considerable challenge and requires process based models to quantify mercury stocks and flows. The stable isotope composition of mercury in environmental samples can help address this challenge by serving as a tracer of specific sources and processes. Mercury isotope variations are small and result only from isotope fractionation during transport, equilibrium, and transformation processes. Because these processes occur in both industrial and environmental settings, knowledge of their associated isotope effects is required to interpret mercury isotope data. To improve the mechanistic modeling of mercury isotope effects during gas phase diffusion, an experimental program tested the applicability of kinetic gas theory. Gas-phase elemental mercury diffusion through small bore needles from finite sources demonstrated mass dependent diffusivities leading to isotope fractionation described by a Rayleigh distillation model. The measured relative atomic diffusivities among mercury isotopes in air are large and in agreement with kinetic gas theory. Mercury diffusion in air offers a reasonable explanation of recent field results reported in the literature. PMID:24364380

  12. Titanium-Aluminum Bilayer Cathode for Small-Molecular Organic Solar Cells with Prolonged Life upon Exposure to Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huanqi; Takezoe, Hideo; Ishikawa, Ken

    2013-04-01

    The in-air stability of unencapsulated small-molecular organic solar cells (OSCs) was improved by 3 orders of magnitude by using a Ti (inner)-Al (exposed to air) bilayer cathode, in comparison with that of Al-monolayer-cathode OSCs. The stability of the unencapsulated bilayer-cathode OSCs (AlTi-OSCs) was comparable to that of encapsulated ones. These devices were degradation-free in air for more than 3 months. Under weathering tests, the unencapsulated AlTi-OSCs recovered their performance in the idle periods. This provides us with an effective and economical approach to prevent degradation of the extensively studied aluminum-cathode OSCs.

  13. Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells Xiaoyuan Zhang a,b

    E-print Network

    and semi- coke air-cathodes were most cost- effective. Oxygen transfer limited performance with thicker form 3 May 2013 Accepted 5 May 2013 Available online 16 May 2013 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Packed-bed air-cathode Granular activated carbon Granular semi-coke Oxygen transfer a b s t r a c t Catalysts

  14. Study of an unitised bidirectional vanadium/air redox flow battery comprising a two-layered cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    grosse Austing, Jan; Nunes Kirchner, Carolina; Hammer, Eva-Maria; Komsiyska, Lidiya; Wittstock, Gunther

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a unitised bidirectional vanadium/air redox flow battery (VARFB) is described. It contains a two-layered cathode consisting of a gas diffusion electrode (GDE) with Pt/C catalyst for discharging and of an IrO2 modified graphite felt for charging. A simple routine is shown for the modification of a graphite felt with IrO2. A maximum energy efficiency of 41.7% at a current density of 20 mA cm-2 as well as an average discharge power density of 34.6 mW cm-2 at 40 mA cm-2 were obtained for VARFB operation at room temperature with the novel cathode setup. A dynamic hydrogen electrode was used to monitor half cell potentials during operation allowing to quantify the contribution of the cathode to the overall performance of the VARFB. Four consecutive cycles revealed that crossover of vanadium ions took place and irreversible degradation processes within the reaction unit lead to a performance decrease.

  15. Enhanced water desalination efficiency in an air-cathode stacked microbial electrodeionization cell (SMEDIC)

    E-print Network

    Enhanced water desalination efficiency in an air-cathode stacked microbial electrodeionization cell (SMEDIC) Noura A. Shehab a , Gary L. Amy a , Bruce E. Logan b , Pascal E. Saikaly a,n a Water Desalination June 2014 Available online 8 July 2014 Keywords: Microbial desalination cell Ion exchange resin

  16. Rechargeable Li-CO2 batteries with carbon nanotubes as air cathodes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Qiang; Zhang, Zhang; Chen, Yanan; Xie, Zhaojun; Wei, Jinping; Zhou, Zhen

    2015-09-17

    Rechargeable Li-CO2 batteries offer great promise by combining carbon capture and energy technology. However, the discharge product Li2CO3 is difficult to decompose upon recharging. In this work, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with high electrical conductivity and porous three-dimensional networks were firstly explored as air cathodes for rechargeable Li-CO2 batteries. PMID:26290015

  17. Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure

    E-print Network

    Increased performance of single-chamber microbial fuel cells using an improved cathode structure Maximum power densities by air-driven microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are considerably influenced by cathode reserved. Keywords: Microbial fuel cell; Air cathode; Diffusion layer; PTFE coating; Coulombic efficiency 1

  18. Study of azo dye decolorization and determination of cathode microorganism profile in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kumru, Mert; Eren, Hilal; Catal, Tunc; Bermek, Hakan; Akarsuba?i, Alper Tunga

    2012-09-01

    Five textile azo dyes, as part of an artificial mixture, were treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells while simultaneously utilizing acetate for electricity production. Remazol Black, Remazol Brilliant Blue, Remazol Turquoise Blue, Reactive Yellow and Reactive Red at concentrations of 40 or 80 mg L(-1) were decolorized to a similar extent, at averages of 78, 95, 53, 93 and 74%, respectively, in 24 hours. During the process of decolorization, electricity generation from acetate oxidation continued. Power densities obtained in the presence of textile dyes ranged from 347 to 521 mW m(-2) at the current density range of 0.071 - 0.086 mA cm(-2). Microbial community analyses of cathode biofilm exhibited dynamic changes in abundant species following dye decolorization. Upon the addition of the first dye, a major change (63%) in microbial diversity was observed; however, subsequent addition of other dyes did not affect the community profile significantly. Actinobacteria, Aquamicrobium, Mesorhizobium, Ochrobactrum, Thauera, Paracoccus, Achromobacter and Chelatacoccus affiliated phylotypes were the major phylotypes detected. Our results demonstrate that microbial fuel cells could be a promising alternative for treatment of textile wastewaters and an active bacterial community can rapidly be established for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and sustainable electricity generation. PMID:23240212

  19. Oxygen availability effect on the performance of air-breathing cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Mateo, Sara; Rodrigo, Manuel; Fonseca, Luis Pina; Cañizares, Pablo; Fernandez-Morales, Francisco Jesus

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the oxygen availability over the performance of an air-breathing microbial fuel cell (MFC) was studied by limiting the oxygen supply to the cathode. It was found that anodic reaction was the limiting stage in the performance of the MFC while oxygen was fully available at cathode. As the cathode was depleted of oxygen, the current density becomes limited by oxygen transport to the electrode surface. The exerted current density was maintained when oxygen mole fraction was higher than 10% due to the very good performance of the cathodic catalysts. However, the current density drastically falls when working at lower concentrations because of mass transfer limitations. In this sense it must be highlighted that the maximum exerted power, when oxygen mole fraction was higher than 10%, was almost three times higher than that obtained when oxygen mole fraction was 5%. Regarding to the wastewater treatment, a significant decrease in the COD removal was obtained when the MFC performance was reduced due to the limited availability of oxygen, which indicates the significant role of the electrogenic microorganisms in the COD removal in MFC. In addition, the low availability of oxygen at the cathode leads to a lower presence of oxygen at the anode, resulting in an increase in the coulombic efficiency. PMID:25962613

  20. Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters, and graphite fiber brush anodes

    E-print Network

    Scalable air cathode microbial fuel cells using glass fiber separators, plastic mesh supporters that brush anodes, combined with a glass fiber separator and a plastic mesh supporter, produce a useful MFC the membrane against the cathode (Zhang et al., 2010a). Glass fiber mats can be used as sep- arators. They have

  1. Bifunctional quaternary ammonium compounds to inhibit biofilm growth and enhance performance for activated carbon air-cathode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Liu, Yinan; An, Jingkun; Feng, Cuijuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The slow diffusion of hydroxyl out of the catalyst layer as well as the biofouling on the surface of cathode are two problems affecting power for membrane-less air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In order to solve both of them simultaneously, here we simply modify activated carbon air-cathode using a bifunctional quaternary ammonium compound (QAC) by forced evaporation. The maximum power density reaches 1041 ± 12 mW m-2 in an unbuffered medium (0.5 g L-1 NaCl), which is 17% higher than the control, probably due to the accelerated anion transport in the catalyst layer. After 2 months, the protein content reduced by a factor of 26 and the power density increases by 33%, indicating that the QAC modification can effectively inhibit the growth of cathodic biofilm and improve the stability of performance. The addition of NaOH and QAC epoxy have a negative effect on power production due to the clogging of pores in catalyst layer.

  2. Supporting Information Power generation by packed-bed air-cathode microbial fuel cells

    E-print Network

    activated carbon (GAC), (B) granular semicoke (GS), (C) carbon felt cube (CFC), and (D) granular graphite (GG). #12;3 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 Voltage(V) Time (h) GAC GS Fig. S2 Voltage generation by packed-bed air-cathode MFCs with GAC and GS (under 1000 ) #12;4 0 100 200 300 400

  3. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs. PMID:25957076

  4. Bilirubin oxidase based enzymatic air-breathing cathode: Operation under pristine and contaminated conditions.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Erable, Benjamin; Schuler, Andrew; Atanassov, Plamen

    2016-04-01

    The performance of bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based air breathing cathode was constantly monitored over 45days. The effect of electrolyte composition on the cathode oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) output was investigated. Particularly, deactivation of the electrocatalytic activity of the enzyme in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution and in activated sludge (AS) was evaluated. The greatest drop in current density was observed during the first 3days of constant operation with a decrease of ~60?Acm(-2)day(-1). The rate of decrease slowed to ~10?Acm(-2)day(-1) (day 3 to 9) and then to ~1.5?Acm(-2)day(-1) thereafter (day 9 to 45). Despite the constant decrease in output, the BOx cathode generated residual current after 45days operations with an open circuit potential (OCP) of 475mV vs. Ag/AgCl. Enzyme deactivation was also studied in AS to simulate an environment close to the real waste operation with pollutants, solid particles and bacteria. The presence of low-molecular weight soluble contaminants was identified as the main reason for an immediate enzymatic deactivation within few hours of cathode operation. The presence of solid particles and bacteria does not affect the natural degradation of the enzyme. PMID:26544631

  5. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

  6. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries.

  7. One-dimensional manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres as bi-functional cathode catalysts for rechargeable metal-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyu-Nam; Hwang, Soo Min; Park, Min-Sik; Kim, Ki Jae; Kim, Jae-Geun; Dou, Shi Xue; Kim, Jung Ho; Lee, Jong-Won

    2015-01-01

    Rechargeable metal-air batteries are considered a promising energy storage solution owing to their high theoretical energy density. The major obstacles to realising this technology include the slow kinetics of oxygen reduction and evolution on the cathode (air electrode) upon battery discharging and charging, respectively. Here, we report non-precious metal oxide catalysts based on spinel-type manganese-cobalt oxide nanofibres fabricated by an electrospinning technique. The spinel oxide nanofibres exhibit high catalytic activity towards both oxygen reduction and evolution in an alkaline electrolyte. When incorporated as cathode catalysts in Zn-air batteries, the fibrous spinel oxides considerably reduce the discharge-charge voltage gaps (improve the round-trip efficiency) in comparison to the catalyst-free cathode. Moreover, the nanofibre catalysts remain stable over the course of repeated discharge-charge cycling; however, carbon corrosion in the catalyst/carbon composite cathode degrades the cycling performance of the batteries. PMID:25563733

  8. Diffusion of hexanoic acid methyl ester (1); air (2)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkelmann, J.

    This document is part of Subvolume A `Gases in Gases, Liquids and their Mixtures' of Volume 15 `Diffusion in Gases, Liquids and Electrolytes' of Landolt-Börnstein Group IV `Physical Chemistry'. It is part of the chapter of the chapter `Diffusion in Pure Gases' and contains data on diffusion of (1) hexanoic acid methyl ester; (2) air

  9. Use of pyrolyzed iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid modified activated carbon as air-cathode catalyst in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Xue; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-08-28

    Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). To enhance the catalytic activity of AC cathodes, AC powders were pyrolyzed with iron ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (FeEDTA) at a weight ratio of FeEDTA:AC = 0.2:1. MFCs with FeEDTA modified AC cathodes and a stainless steel mesh current collector produced a maximum power density of 1580 ± 80 mW/m(2), which was 10% higher than that of plain AC cathodes (1440 ± 60 mW/m(2)) and comparable to Pt cathodes (1550 ± 10 mW/m(2)). Further increases in the ratio of FeEDTA:AC resulted in a decrease in performance. The durability of AC-based cathodes was much better than Pt-catalyzed cathodes. After 4.5 months of operation, the maximum power density of Pt cathode MFCs was 50% lower than MFCs with the AC cathodes. Pyridinic nitrogen, quaternary nitrogen and iron species likely contributed to the increased activity of FeEDTA modified AC. These results show that pyrolyzing AC with FeEDTA is a cost-effective and durable way to increase the catalytic activity of AC. PMID:23902951

  10. Electrophoretic Deposition for Inexpensive Carbon Nano-Composite Lithium Air Battery Cathodes Vanderbilt Institute of Nanoscale Science and Engineering Research Experience for Undergraduates Summer 2013

    E-print Network

    substrate Etch away substrate with Ferric Chloride Assemble Coin Cell Porous cap Carbon matrix cathodeElectrophoretic Deposition for Inexpensive Carbon Nano-Composite Lithium Air Battery Cathodes such as carbon nano- tube carpets [3], show great promise as cathode materials. We believe that car- bon

  11. Performance equations for cathodes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells with non-uniform water flooding in gas diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsuen, Hsiao-Kuo

    The performance equations for cathodes of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) that describe the dependence of cathode potential on current density are developed. Formulation of the performance equations starts from the reduction of a one-dimensional model that considers, in detail, the potential losses pertinent to the limitations of electron conduction, oxygen diffusion, proton migration, and the oxygen reduction reaction. In particular, non-uniform accumulation of liquid water in the gas diffuser, which partially blocks the gas channels and imposes a greater resistance for oxygen transport, is taken into account. Reduction of the one-dimensional model is implemented by approximating the oxygen concentration profile in the catalyst layer with a parabolic polynomial or a piecewise parabolic one determined by the occurrence of oxygen depletion. The final forms of the equations are obtained by applying the method of weighted residuals over the catalyst layer. The weighting function is selected in such a way that the weighted residuals can be analytically integrated. Potential losses caused by the various limiting processes can be quantitatively estimated by the performance equations. Thus, they provide a convenient diagnostic tool for the cathode performance. Computational results reveal that the performance equations agree well with the original one-dimensional model over an extensive range of parameter values. This indicates that the present performance equations can be used as a substitute for the one-dimensional model to provide quantitatively correct predictions for the cathode performance of PEFCs.

  12. Enhanced performance of an air-cathode microbial fuel cell with oxygen supply from an externally connected algal bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Kim, Jung Rae; Jeon, Byong-Hun; Min, Booki

    2015-11-01

    An algae bioreactor (ABR) was externally connected to air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) to increase power generation by supplying a high amount of oxygen to cathode electrode. The MFC with oxygen fed from ABR produced maximum cell voltage and cathode potential at a fixed loading of 459 mV and 10 mV, respectively. During polarization analysis, the MFC displayed a maximum power density of 0.63 W/m(2) (at 2.06 A/m(2)) using 39.2% O2 from ABR, which was approximately 30% higher compared with use of atmospheric air (0.44 W/m(2), 20.8% O2,). The cyclic voltammogram analysis exhibited a higher reduction current of -137 mA with 46.5% O2 compared to atmospheric air (-115 mA). Oxygen supply by algae bioreactor to air-cathode MFC could also maintain better MFC performance in long term operation by minimizing cathode potential drop over time. PMID:26188984

  13. A single-chamber microbial fuel cell without an air cathode.

    PubMed

    Nimje, Vanita Roshan; Chen, Chien-Cheng; Chen, Hau-Ren; Chen, Chien-Yen; Tseng, Min-Jen; Cheng, Kai-Chien; Shih, Ruey-Chyuan; Chang, Young-Fo

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) represent a novel technology for wastewater treatment with electricity production. Electricity generation with simultaneous nitrate reduction in a single-chamber MFC without air cathode was studied, using glucose (1 mM) as the carbon source and nitrate (1 mM) as the final electron acceptor employed by Bacillus subtilis under anaerobic conditions. Increasing current as a function of decreased nitrate concentration and an increase in biomass were observed with a maximum current of 0.4 mA obtained at an external resistance (R(ext)) of 1 K? without a platinum catalyst of air cathode. A decreased current with complete nitrate reduction, with further recovery of the current immediately after nitrate addition, indicated the dependence of B. subtilis on nitrate as an electron acceptor to efficiently produce electricity. A power density of 0.0019 mW/cm(2) was achieved at an R(ext) of 220 ?. Cyclic voltammograms (CV) showed direct electron transfer with the involvement of mediators in the MFC. The low coulombic efficiency (CE) of 11% was mainly attributed to glucose fermentation. These results demonstrated that electricity generation is possible from wastewater containing nitrate, and this represents an alternative technology for the cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment of wastewater. PMID:22489190

  14. Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F W Thomas; Hor, T S Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

    2015-02-01

    An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm(-2)) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications. PMID:25522330

  15. Thermal diffusion effects in hydrogen-air and methane-air flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ern, Alexandre; Giovangigli, Vincent

    1998-12-01

    The influence of thermal diffusion on the structure of hydrogen-air and methane-air flames is investigated numerically using complex chemistry and detailed transport models. All the transport coefficients in the mixture, including thermal diffusion coefficients, are evaluated using new algorithms which provide, at moderate computational costs, accurate approximations derived rigorously from the kinetic theory of gases. Our numerical results show that thermal diffusion is important for an accurate prediction of flame structure.

  16. Enhanced hydroxyl radical generation in the combined ozonation and electrolysis process using carbon nanotubes containing gas diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donghai; Lu, Guanghua; Zhang, Ran; Lin, Qiuhong; Yan, Zhenhua; Liu, Jianchao; Li, Yi

    2015-10-01

    Combination of ozone together with electrolysis (ozone-electrolysis) is a promising wastewater treatment technology. This work investigated the potential use of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based gas diffusion cathode (GDC) for ozone-electrolysis process employing hydroxyl radicals (·OH) production as an indicator. Compared with conventional active carbon (AC)-polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and carbon black (CB)-PTFE cathodes, the production of ·OH in the coupled process was improved using CNTs-PTFE GDC. Appropriate addition of acetylene black (AB) and pore-forming agent Na2SO4 could enhance the efficiency of CNTs-PTFE GDC. The optimum GDC composition was obtained by response surface methodology (RSM) analysis and was determined as CNTs 31.2 wt%, PTFE 60.6 wt%, AB 3.5 wt%, and Na2SO4 4.7 wt%. Moreover, the optimized CNT-based GDC exhibited much more effective than traditional Ti and graphite cathodes in Acid Orange 7 (AO7) mineralization and possessed the desirable stability without performance decay after ten times reaction. The comparison tests revealed that peroxone reaction was the main pathway of ·OH production in the present system, and cathodic reduction of ozone could significantly promote ·OH generation. These results suggested that application of CNT-based GDC offers considerable advantages in ozone-electrolysis of organic wastewater. PMID:26036588

  17. Olive mill wastewater treatment in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Bermek, Hakan; Catal, Tunc; Akan, S Süha; Uluta?, Mehmet Sefa; Kumru, Mert; Özgüven, Mine; Liu, Hong; Özçelik, Beraat; Akarsuba??, Alper Tunga

    2014-04-01

    Olive mill wastewaters create significant environmental issues in olive-processing countries. One of the most hazardous groups of pollutants in these wastewaters is phenolic compounds. Here, olive mill wastewater was used as substrate and treated in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells. Olive mill wastewater yielded a maximum voltage of 381 mV on an external resistance of 1 k?. Notable decreases in the contents of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid, tyrosol, gallic acid and p-coumaric acid were detected. Chemical oxygen demand removal rates were 65 % while removal of total phenolics by the process was lower (49 %). Microbial community analysis during the olive mill wastewater treating MFC has shown that both exoelectrogenic and phenol-degrading microorganisms have been enriched during the operation. Brevundimonas-, Sphingomonas- and Novosphingobium-related phylotypes were enriched on the anode biofilm, while Alphaproteobacteria and Bacteriodetes dominated the cathode biofilm. As one of the novel studies, it has been demonstrated that recalcitrant olive mill wastewaters could be treated and utilized for power generation in microbial fuel cells. PMID:24165748

  18. Soot Formation in Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sunderland, P. B.; Faeth, G. M.

    1994-01-01

    Soot processes within hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames are important because they affect the durability and performance of propulsion systems, the hazards of unwanted fires, the pollutant and particulate emissions from combustion processes, and the potential for developing computational combustion. Motivated by these observations, this investigation involved an experimental study of the structure and soot properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames, seeking an improved understanding of soot formation (growth and nucleation) within diffusion flames. The present study extends earlier work in this laboratory concerning laminar smoke points (l) and soot formation in acetylene/air laminar jet diffusion flames (2), emphasizing soot formation in hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames for fuels other than acetylene. In the flame system, acetylene is the dominant gas species in the soot formation region and both nucleation and growth were successfully attributed to first-order reactions of acetylene, with nucleation exhibiting an activation energy of 32 kcal/gmol while growth involved negligible activation energy and a collision efficiency of O.53%. In addition, soot growth in the acetylene diffusion flames was comparable to new soot in premixed flame (which also has been attributed to first-order acetylene reactions). In view of this status, a major issue is the nature of soot formation processes in diffusion flame involving hydrocarbon fuels other than acetylene. In particular, information is needed about th dominant gas species in the soot formation region and the impact of gas species other than acetylene on soot nucleation and growth.

  19. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells Bioresource Technology, Volume 176, 2015, Pages 23-31.

    E-print Network

    Search... COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells Bioresource Technology circuit (0.10 h-1 ), but CEs were much lower (15­24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100 ), COD removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary

  20. Hybrid Li-air battery cathodes with sparse carbon nanotube arrays directly grown on carbon fiber papers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, YF; Huang, ZP; Huang, K; Carnahan, D; Xing, YC

    2013-11-01

    Sparsely populated, vertically aligned nitrogen doped carbon nanotube arrays (CNTAs) with dislocated-graphene stacking were grown directly on carbon fiber papers and investigated as hierarchical air cathodes in hybrid Li-air batteries with aqueous catholytes. The CNTAs were made with electrodeposited Ni nanocatalysts, followed by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The thus obtained CNTAs can reach a population number density as low as similar to 10(7) per cm(2) on the carbon fibers, achieving an extremely high porosity of over 99% for the active layer in the cathode. The sparse CNTAs not only provide effective pathways for the reacting species, but also show a significantly high catalytic activity, which is found to be comparable to that of a supported Pt electrocatalyst. The high activity of the CNTAs is attributed to the rich graphene edges exposed on the CNT surface and nitrogen doping. Hybrid Li-air batteries with such cathodes have shown a consistent discharging capacity of 710 mA h g(-1) and a specific energy of 2057 W h kg(-1) at 0.5 mA cm(-2). Stable charge-discharge cycling at 0.5 mA cm(-2) showed an average potential difference of 1.35 V, indicative of a relatively small overpotential and high round trip efficiency (71%). Furthermore, the hybrid Li-air battery based on the hierarchical cathode can reach a power density as high as 10.4 mW cm(-2).

  1. Mineralization of pentachlorophenol with enhanced degradation and power generation from air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liping; Gan, Linlin; Wang, Ning; Quan, Xie; Logan, Bruce E; Chen, Guohua

    2012-09-01

    The combined anaerobic-aerobic conditions in air-cathode single-chamber MFCs were used to completely mineralize pentachlorophenol (PCP; 5 mg/L), in the presence of acetate or glucose. Degradation rates of 0.140 ± 0.011 mg/L-h (acetate) and 0.117 ± 0.009 mg/L-h (glucose) were obtained with maximum power densities of 7.7 ± 1.1 W/m(3) (264 ± 39 W/m(2), acetate) and 5.1 ± 0.1 W/m(3) (175 ± 5 W/m(2), glucose). At a higher PCP concentration of 15 mg/L, PCP degradation rates increased to 0.171 ± 0.01 mg/L-h (acetate) and 0.159 ± 0.011 mg/L-h (glucose). However, power was inversely proportional to initial PCP concentration, with decreases of 0.255 W/mg PCP (acetate) and 0.184 W/mg PCP (glucose). High pH (9.0, acetate; 8.0, glucose) was beneficial to exoelectrogenic activities and power generation, whereas an acidic pH = 5.0 decreased power but increased PCP degradation rates (0.195 ± 0.002 mg/L-h, acetate; 0.173 ± 0.005 mg/L-h, glucose). Increasing temperature from 22 to 35°C enhanced power production by 37% (glucose) to 70% (acetate), and PCP degradation rates (0.188 ± 0.01 mg/L-h, acetate; 0.172 ± 0.009 mg/L-h, glucose). Dominant exoelectrogens of Pseudomonas (acetate) and Klebsiella (glucose) were identified in the biofilms. These results demonstrate that PCP degradation using air-cathode single-chamber MFCs may be a promising process for remediation of water contaminated with PCP as well as for power generation. PMID:22392229

  2. Co3O4 nanoparticles decorated carbon nanofiber mat as binder-free air-cathode for high performance rechargeable zinc-air batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bing; Ge, Xiaoming; Goh, F. W. Thomas; Hor, T. S. Andy; Geng, Dongsheng; Du, Guojun; Liu, Zhaolin; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Xiaogang; Zong, Yun

    2015-01-01

    An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications.An efficient, durable and low cost air-cathode is essential for a high performance metal-air battery for practical applications. Herein, we report a composite bifunctional catalyst, Co3O4 nanoparticles-decorated carbon nanofibers (CNFs), working as an efficient air-cathode in high performance rechargeable Zn-air batteries (ZnABs). The particles-on-fibers nanohybrid materials were derived from electrospun metal-ion containing polymer fibers followed by thermal carbonization and a post annealing process in air at a moderate temperature. Electrochemical studies suggest that the nanohybrid material effectively catalyzes oxygen reduction reaction via an ideal 4-electron transfer process and outperforms Pt/C in catalyzing oxygen evolution reactions. Accordingly, the prototype ZnABs exhibit a low discharge-charge voltage gap (e.g. 0.7 V, discharge-charge at 2 mA cm-2) with higher stability and longer cycle life compared to their counterparts constructed using Pt/C in air-cathode. Importantly, the hybrid nanofiber mat readily serves as an integrated air-cathode without the need of any further modification. Benefitting from its efficient catalytic activities and structural advantages, particularly the 3D architecture of highly conductive CNFs and the high loading density of strongly attached Co3O4 NPs on their surfaces, the resultant ZnABs show significantly improved performance with respect to the rate capability, cycling stability and current density, promising good potential in practical applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TGA curves of as electrospun Co(ii)-PAN fiber and C-CoPAN900 EDX and XPS spectra of the C-CoPAN900 photo of a home-built Zn-air cell and the preparation method of conventional catalyst electrode; polarization curves and corresponding power density plots of the battery using conventional type cathode of C-CoPN900 and commercial Pt/C catalyst; the electrocatalytic properties of hybrid CNFs obtained from varied weight ratios of PAN to cobalt acetate, e.g. 16 : 1 and 8 : 1, and their corresponding TGA curves; a comparison of the Zn-air battery performance of this work with recent literatures. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr05988c

  3. Increasing power generation for scaling up single-chamber air cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) requires a better understanding the importance of the different factors such as electrode surface area and reactor geometry relative to solution conditions such as conductivity and substrate concentration. It is shown here that the substrate concentration has significant effect on anode but not cathode performance, while the solution conductivity has a significant effect on the cathode but not the anode. The cathode surface area is always important for increasing power. Doubling the cathode size can increase power by 62% with domestic wastewater, but doubling the anode size increases power by 12%. Volumetric power density was shown to be a linear function of cathode specific surface area (ratio of cathode surface area to reactor volume), but the impact of cathode size on power generation depended on the substrate strength (COD) and conductivity. These results demonstrate the cathode specific surface area is the most critical factor for scaling-up MFCs to obtain high power densities. PMID:21273062

  4. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott (Richland, WA); Hardy, John S. (Richland, WA); Kim, Jin Yong (Richland, WA); Choi, Jung-Pyung (Richland, WA)

    2010-04-06

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  5. Diffusion barriers in modified air brazes

    DOEpatents

    Weil, Kenneth Scott; Hardy, John S; Kim, Jin Yong; Choi, Jung-Pyung

    2013-04-23

    A method for joining two ceramic parts, or a ceramic part and a metal part, and the joint formed thereby. The method provides two or more parts, a braze consisting of a mixture of copper oxide and silver, a diffusion barrier, and then heats the braze for a time and at a temperature sufficient to form the braze into a bond holding the two or more parts together. The diffusion barrier is an oxidizable metal that forms either a homogeneous component of the braze, a heterogeneous component of the braze, a separate layer bordering the braze, or combinations thereof. The oxidizable metal is selected from the group Al, Mg, Cr, Si, Ni, Co, Mn, Ti, Zr, Hf, Pt, Pd, Au, lanthanides, and combinations thereof.

  6. Accelerated OH(-) transport in activated carbon air cathode by modification of quaternary ammonium for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Feng, Cuijuan; Ding, Ning; Zhang, Qingrui; Li, Nan; Li, Xiaojing; Zhang, Yueyong; Zhou, Qixing

    2014-04-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a promising catalyst for the air cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs) because of its high performance and low cost. To increase the performance of AC air cathodes, the acceleration of OH(-) transport is one of the most important methods, but it has not been widely investigated. Here we added quaternary ammonium to ACs by in situ anchoring of a quaternary ammonium/epoxide-reacting compound (QAE) or ex situ mixing with anion exchange resins in order to modify ACs from not only the external surface but also inside the pores. In 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS), the in situ anchoring of QAE was a more effective way to increase the power. The highest power density of 2781 ± 36 mW/m(2), which is 10% higher than that of the control, was obtained using QAE-anchored AC cathodes. When the medium was switched to an unbuffered NaCl solution, the increase in maximum power density (885 ± 25 mW/m(2)) was in accordance with the anion exchange capacity (0.219 mmol/g). The highest power density of the anion exchange resin-mixed air cathode was 51% higher than that of the control, indicating that anion exchange is urgently needed in real wastewaters. Excess anchoring of QAE blocked both the mesopores and micropores, causing the power output to be inhibited. PMID:24597673

  7. ANALYTICAL DIFFUSION MODEL FOR LONG DISTANCE TRANSPORT OF AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A steady-state two-dimensional diffusion model suitable for predicting ambient air pollutant concentrations averaged over a long time period (e.g., month, season, or year) and resulting from the transport of pollutants for distances greater than about 100 km from the source is de...

  8. Electronic modification of Pt via Ti and Se as tolerant cathodes in air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jiwei; Habrioux, Aurélien; Morais, Cláudia; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2014-07-21

    We reported herein on the use of tolerant cathode catalysts such as carbon supported Pt(x)Ti(y) and/or Pt(x)Se(y) nanomaterials in an air-breathing methanol microfluidic fuel cell. In order to show the improvement of mixed-reactant fuel cell (MRFC) performances obtained with the developed tolerant catalysts, a classical Pt/C nanomaterial was used for comparison. Using 5 M methanol concentration in a situation where the fuel crossover is 100% (MRFC-mixed reactant fuel cell application), the maximum power density of the fuel cell with a Pt/C cathodic catalyst decreased by 80% in comparison with what is observed in the laminar flow fuel cell (LFFC) configuration. With Pt(x)Ti(y)/C and Pt(x)Se(y)/C cathode nanomaterials, the performance loss was only 55% and 20%, respectively. The evaluation of the tolerant cathode catalysts in an air-breathing microfluidic fuel cell suggests the development of a novel nanometric system that will not be size restricted. These interesting results are the consequence of the high methanol tolerance of these advanced electrocatalysts via surface electronic modification of Pt. Herein we used X-ray photoelectron and in situ FTIR spectroscopies to investigate the origin of the high methanol tolerance on modified Pt catalysts. PMID:24473103

  9. Solid oxide fuel cell power plant having a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section of a multi-section cathode air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Saito, Kazuo; Lin, Yao

    2015-02-17

    The multi-section cathode air heat exchanger (102) includes at least a first heat exchanger section (104), and a fixed contact oxidation catalyzed section (126) secured adjacent each other in a stack association. Cool cathode inlet air flows through cool air channels (110) of the at least first (104) and oxidation catalyzed sections (126). Hot anode exhaust flows through hot air channels (124) of the oxidation catalyzed section (126) and is combusted therein. The combusted anode exhaust then flows through hot air channels (112) of the first section (104) of the cathode air heat exchanger (102). The cool and hot air channels (110, 112) are secured in direct heat exchange relationship with each other so that temperatures of the heat exchanger (102) do not exceed 800.degree. C. to minimize requirements for using expensive, high-temperature alloys.

  10. Electricity generation from fermented primary sludge using single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Ren, Lijiao; Pu, Yuepu; Logan, Bruce E

    2013-01-01

    Single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were used to generate electricity from fermented primary sludge. Fermentation (30 °C, 9 days) decreased total suspended solids (26.1-16.5 g/L), volatile suspended solids (24.1-15.3g/L) and pH (5.7-4.5), and increased conductivity (2.4-4.7 mS/cm), soluble COD (2.66-15.5 g/L), and volatile fatty acids (1.9-10.1g/L). To lower the COD and increase pH, fermentation supernatant was diluted with primary effluent before being used in the MFCs. The maximum power density was 0.32 ± 0.01 W/m(2), compared to 0.24 ± 0.03 W/m(2) with only primary effluent. Power densities were higher with phosphate buffer added to the supernatant (1.03 ± 0.06 W/m(2)) or the solution (0.87 ± 0.05 W/m(2)). Coulombic efficiencies ranged from 18% to 57%, and sCOD removals from 84% to 94%. These results demonstrated that sludge can effectively be used for power generation when fermented and then diluted with only primary effluent. PMID:23186679

  11. Anolyte recirculation effects in buffered and unbuffered single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Zhu, Xun; Kashima, Hiroyuki; Li, Jun; Ye, Ding-ding; Liao, Qiang; Regan, John M

    2015-03-01

    Two identical microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with a floating air-cathode were operated under either buffered (MFC-B) or bufferless (MFC-BL) conditions to investigate anolyte recirculation effects on enhancing proton transfer. With an external resistance of 50 ? and recirculation rate of 1.0 ml/min, MFC-BL had a 27% lower voltage (9.7% lower maximal power density) but a 64% higher Coulombic efficiency (CE) than MFC-B. MFC-B had a decreased voltage output, batch time, and CE with increasing recirculation rate resulting from more oxygen transfer into the anode. However, increasing the recirculation rate within a low range significantly enhanced proton transfer in MFC-BL, resulting in a higher voltage output, a longer batch time, and a higher CE. A further increase in recirculation rate decreased the batch time and CE of MFC-BL due to excess oxygen transfer into anode outweighing the proton-transfer benefits. The unbuffered MFC had an optimal recirculation rate of 0.35 ml/min. PMID:25514399

  12. Effect of helium injection on diffusion dominated air ingress accidents in pebble bed reactors

    E-print Network

    Yurko, Joseph Paul

    2010-01-01

    The primary objective of this thesis was to validate the sustained counter air diffusion (SCAD) method at preventing natural circulation onset in diffusion dominated air ingress accidents. The analysis presented in this ...

  13. Using ammonium bicarbonate as pore former in activated carbon catalyst layer to enhance performance of air cathode microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Qu, Youpeng; Liu, Jia; He, Weihua; Wang, Haiman; Feng, Yujie

    2014-12-01

    The rolling catalyst layers in air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are prepared by introducing NH4HCO3 as pore former (PF) with four PF/activated carbon mass ratios of 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 1.0. The maximum power density of 892 ± 8 mW m-2 is obtained by cathodes with the mass ratio of 0.2, which is 33% higher than that of the control reactor (without PF, 671 ± 22 mW m-2). Pore analysis indicates the porosity increases by 38% and the major pore range concentrates between 0.5 ?m-0.8 ?m which likely facilitates to enrich the active reaction sites compared to 0.8 ?m-3.0 ?m in the control and other PF-cathodes. In addition, pore structure endows the cathode improved exchange current density by 2.4 times and decreased charge transfer resistance by 44%, which are the essential reasons to enhance the oxygen reduction. These results show that addition of NH4HCO3 proves an effective way to change the porosity and pore distribution of catalyst layers and then enhance the MFC performance.

  14. Nitrogen removal in a single-chamber microbial fuel cell with nitrifying biofilm enriched at the air cathode.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hengjing; Saito, Tomonori; Regan, John M

    2012-05-01

    Nitrogen removal is needed in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the treatment of most waste streams. Current designs couple biological denitrification with side-stream or combined nitrification sustained by upstream or direct aeration, which negates some of the energy-saving benefits of MFC technology. To achieve simultaneous nitrification and denitrification, without extra energy input for aeration, the air cathode of a single-chamber MFC was pre-enriched with a nitrifying biofilm. Diethylamine-functionalized polymer (DEA) was used as the Pt catalyst binder on the cathode to improve the differential nitrifying biofilm establishment. With pre-enriched nitrifying biofilm, MFCs with the DEA binder had an ammonia removal efficiency of up to 96.8% and a maximum power density of 900 ± 25 mW/m(2), compared to 90.7% and 945 ± 42 mW/m(2) with a Nafion binder. A control with Nafion that lacked nitrifier pre-enrichment removed less ammonia and had lower power production (54.5% initially, 750 mW/m(2)). The nitrifying biofilm MFCs had lower Coulombic efficiencies (up to 27%) than the control reactor (up to 36%). The maximum total nitrogen removal efficiency reached 93.9% for MFCs with the DEA binder. The DEA binder accelerated nitrifier biofilm enrichment on the cathode, and enhanced system stability. These results demonstrated that with proper cathode pre-enrichment it is possible to simultaneously remove organics and ammonia in a single-chamber MFC without supplemental aeration. PMID:22386083

  15. Minimum interspatial electrode spacing to optimize air-cathode microbial fuel cell operation with a membrane electrode assembly.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jung Mi; Kondaveeti, Sanath; Lee, Tae Ho; Song, Young Chae; Min, Booki

    2015-12-01

    An optimum electrode spacing of less than 1cm was determined for an air cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) system. The lag period decreased as the electrode spacing increased and the voltage generation increased. Stable power density increased from 93 mW/m(2) to 248 mW/m(2) when the electrode distance increased from 0mm to 9 mm. In the polarization test, a maximum power density (400 mW/m(2)) was obtained at a distance of 6mm. The oxygen mass transfer coefficient (KO=4.60×10(-5) cm/s) with a 0mm spacing was five times higher than that at a 9 mm spacing (0.89×10(-5) cm/s). Long-term operation of the MFC exhibited relatively stable anode potentials of -285±25 (0 mm) and -517±20 mV (3, 6, and 9 mm) and a gradual decrease in cathode potential for all distances, especially with 0-mm spacing. The performance of air cathode MFCs can be improved using minimum electrode spacing rather than no spacing. PMID:26286838

  16. Fabrication and Performance of All-Solid-State Li-Air Battery with SWCNTs/LAGP Cathode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yijie; Li, Bojie; Kitaura, Hirokazu; Zhang, Xueping; Han, Min; He, Ping; Zhou, Haoshen

    2015-08-12

    The all-solid-state Li-air battery has been fabricated, which is constructed by a lithium foil anode, a NASICON-type solid state electrolyte Li1+xAlyGe2-y(PO4)3 (LAGP) and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)/LAGP nanoparticles composite as air electrode. Its electrochemical performance was investigated in air atmosphere. Particularly, this battery exhibited a larger capacity about 2800 mAh g(-1) for the first cycle, while comparatively the battery with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs)/LAGP as cathode had a capacity of only about 1700 mAh g(-1). Also, the battery with SWCNTs/LAGP showed improved cycling performance with a reversible capacity of 1000 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 200 mA g(-1). Our result demonstrated that the all-solid-state Li-air battery with SWCNTs/LAGP as cathode catalyst has a considerable potential for practical application. PMID:26177186

  17. Electricity generation and nutrients removal from high-strength liquid manure by air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hongjian; Wu, Xiao; Nelson, Chad; Miller, Curtis; Zhu, Jun

    2016-02-23

    Air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are widely tested to recover electrical energy from waste streams containing organic matter. When high-strength wastewater, such as liquid animal manure, is used as a medium, inhibition on anode and cathode catalysts potentially impairs the effectiveness of MFC performance in power generation and pollutant removal. This study evaluated possible inhibitive effects of liquid swine manure components on MFC power generation, improved liquid manure-fed MFCs performance by pretreatment (dilution and selective adsorption), and modeled the kinetics of organic matter and nutrients removal kinetics. Parameters monitored included pH, conductivity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), volatile fatty acids (VFAs), total ammoniacal nitrogen (TAN), nitrite, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations. The removals of VFA and TAN were efficient, indicated by the short half-life times of 4.99 and 7.84 d, respectively. The mechanism for phosphate decrease was principally the salt precipitation on cathode, but the removal was incomplete after 42-d operation. MFC with an external resistor of 2.2 k? and fed with swine wastewater generated relatively small power (28.2 ?W), energy efficiency (0.37%) and Coulombic efficiency (1.5%). Dilution of swine wastewater dramatically improved the power generation as the inhibitory effect was decreased. Zeolite and granular activated carbon were effective in the selective adsorption of ammonia or organic matter in swine wastewater, and so substantially improved the power generation, energy efficiency, and Coulombic efficiency. A smaller external resistor in the circuit was also observed to promote the organic matter degradation and thus to shorten the treatment time. Overall, air-cathode MFCs are promising for generating electrical power from livestock wastewater and meanwhile reducing the level of organic matter and nutrients. PMID:26654000

  18. Degrading a mixture of three textile dyes using photo-assisted electrochemical process with BDD anode and O?-diffusion cathode.

    PubMed

    Khataee, Alireza; Safarpour, Mahdie; Vahid, Behrouz; Akbarpour, Amaneh

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, degradation of a mixture of three azo dyes was studied by the photo-assisted electrochemical process using an O?-diffusion cathode containing carbon nanotubes and boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode. The concentration of three textile dyes (C.I. Acid Orange 8 (AO8), C.I. Acid Orange 10 (AO10), and C.I. Acid Orange 12 (AO12)) was determined simultaneously despite the severe overlap of their spectra. For this purpose, partial least square (PLS), as a multivariate calibration method, was utilized based on recording UV-Vis spectra during the decolorization process. Moreover, the central composite design was used for the modeling of photo-assisted electrochemical decolorization of the aqueous solutions containing three dyes. The investigated parameters were the initial concentration of three dyes, applied current and reaction time. Analysis of variance (ANOVA) revealed that the obtained regression models match the experimental results well with R (Khataee et al. 2010, Clean-Soil Air Water 38 (1):96-103, 2010) of 0.972, 0.971, and 0.957 for AO8, AO10, and AO12, respectively. Three-dimensional surface and contour plots were applied to describe the relation between experimental conditions and the observed response. The results of TOC analysis confirmed good ability of proposed photo-assisted electrochemical process for degradation and mineralization of textile industry wastewater. PMID:24723345

  19. Integrating NiCo Alloys with Their Oxides as Efficient Bifunctional Cathode Catalysts for Rechargeable Zinc-Air Batteries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xien; Park, Minjoon; Kim, Min Gyu; Gupta, Shiva; Wu, Gang; Cho, Jaephil

    2015-08-10

    The lack of high-efficient, low-cost, and durable bifunctional electrocatalysts that act simultaneously for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the oxygen evolution reaction (OER) is currently one of the major obstacles to commercializing the electrical rechargeability of zinc-air batteries. A nanocomposite CoO-NiO-NiCo bifunctional electrocatalyst supported by nitrogen-doped multiwall carbon nanotubes (NCNT/CoO-NiO-NiCo) exhibits excellent activity and stability for the ORR/OER in alkaline media. More importantly, real air cathodes made from the bifunctional NCNT/CoO-NiO-NiCo catalysts further demonstrated superior performance to state-of-the-art Pt/C or Pt/C+IrO2 catalysts in primary and rechargeable zinc-air batteries. PMID:26118973

  20. Using elastin protein to develop highly efficient air cathodes for lithium-O2 batteries.

    PubMed

    Guo, Guilue; Yao, Xin; Ang, Huixiang; Tan, Huiteng; Zhang, Yu; Guo, Yuanyuan; Fong, Eileen; Yan, Qingyu

    2016-01-29

    Transition metal-nitrogen/carbon (M-N/C, M = Fe, Co) catalysts are synthesized using environmentally friendly histidine-tag-rich elastin protein beads, metal sulfate and water soluble carbon nanotubes followed by post-annealing and acid leaching processes. The obtained catalysts are used as cathode materials in lithium-O2 batteries. It has been discovered that during discharge, Li2O2 nanoparticles first nucleate and grow around the bead-decorated CNT regions (M-N/C centres) and coat on the catalysts at a high degree of discharge. The Fe-N/C catalyst-based cathodes deliver a capacity of 12 441 mAh g(-1) at a current density of 100 mA g(-1). When they were cycled at a limited capacity of 800 mAh g(-1) at current densities of 200 or 400 mA g(-1), these cathodes showed stable charge voltages of ?3.65 or 3.90 V, corresponding to energy efficiencies of ?71.2 or 65.1%, respectively. These results are considerably superior to those of the cathodes based on bare annealed CNTs, which prove that the Fe-N/C catalysts developed here are promising for use in non-aqueous lithium-O2 battery cathodes. PMID:26657319

  1. The performance and mechanism of modified activated carbon air cathode by non-stoichiometric nano Fe3O4 in the microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhou; Yan, Litao; Li, Kexun; Ge, Baochao; Pu, Liangtao; Zhang, Xi

    2015-12-15

    Cathodic catalyst is one of the key materials in microbial fuel cell (MFC). The addition of non-stoichiometric nano Fe3O4 in activated carbon (NSFe3O4/AC) air cathode was beneficial to boosting the charge transfer of the cathode accompanying with the enhancement of power performance in MFC. The air cathode modified by NSFe3O4 (5%, Wt%) increased the maximum power density by 83.3% from 780 mW/m(2) to 1430 mW/m(2) compared with bare air cathode. The modified cathodes showed enhanced electrochemical properties and appeared the maximum exchange current density of 18.71×10(-4) A/cm(2) for oxygen reduction reaction. The mechanism of oxygen reduction for the NSFe3O4/AC catalyst was a 4-electron pathway. The oxygen vacancy of the NSFe3O4 played a crucial role in electrochemical catalytic activity. The great catalytic performance made NSFe3O4 have a promising outlook applied in MFC. PMID:26264265

  2. Spatial distribution of bacterial communities on volumetric and planar anodes in single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Vargas, Ignacio T; Albert, Istvan U; Regan, John M

    2013-11-01

    Pyrosequencing was used to characterize bacterial communities in air-cathode microbial fuel cells across a volumetric (graphite fiber brush) and a planar (carbon cloth) anode, where different physical and chemical gradients would be expected associated with the distance between anode location and the air cathode. As expected, the stable operational voltage and the coulombic efficiency (CE) were higher for the volumetric anode than the planar anode (0.57?V and CE?=?22% vs. 0.51?V and CE?=?12%). The genus Geobacter was the only known exoelectrogen among the observed dominant groups, comprising 57?±?4% of recovered sequences for the brush and 27?±?5% for the carbon-cloth anode. While the bacterial communities differed between the two anode materials, results showed that Geobacter spp. and other dominant bacterial groups were homogenously distributed across both planar and volumetric anodes. This lends support to previous community analysis interpretations based on a single biofilm sampling location in these systems. PMID:23616357

  3. The performance of phosphorus (P)-doped activated carbon as a catalyst in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhihao; Li, Kexun; Pu, Liangtao

    2014-10-01

    To observe the influence of P-doped activated carbon (AC) in air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs), AC was treated with H3PO4 (1M) at 80°C and 400°C respectively, and then was used as catalyst layer in the air-cathode. The maximum power densities were: 1096±33mW/m(2) (SP2, AC treated at 400°C), 954±36mW/m(2) (SP1, AC treated at 80°C), which were 55%, 35% higher than the control (708±27mW/m(2), untreated AC), respectively. The results of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) showed that the total resistance was decreased and the pore structure was changed. The analysis of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) demonstrated that P-doped functional group was produced in SP2, which caused the 15% greater power density than SP1 by increasing O2 adsorption. What is more important, the chemically modified method is simple and economical. PMID:25151475

  4. Study of the Durability of Doped Lanthanum Manganite and Cobaltite Cathode Materials under “Real World” Air Exposure Atmospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj; Ramprasad, Rampi; Minh, Nguyen; Misture, Scott

    2014-11-30

    The overall objective of the program is to develop and validate mechanisms responsible for the overall structural and chemical degradation of lanthanum manganite as well as lanthanum ferrite cobaltite based cathode when exposed to “real world” air atmosphere exposure conditions during SOFC systems operation. Of particular interest are the evaluation and analysis of degradation phenomena related to and responsible for (a) products formation and interactions with air contaminants, (b) dopant segregation and oxide exolution at free surfaces, (c) cation interdiffusion and reaction products formation at the buried interfaces, (d) interface morphology changes, lattice transformation and the development of interfacial porosity and (e) micro-cracking and delamination from the stack repeat units. Reaction processes have been studied using electrochemical and high temperature materials compatibility tests followed by structural and chemical characterization. Degradation hypothesis has been proposed and validated through further experimentation and computational simulation.

  5. Micro hollow cathode discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, K.H.; Peterkin, F.E.; Verhappen, R.

    1995-12-31

    Hollow cathode discharges are glow discharges with the cathode fall and negative glow confined in a cavity in the cathode. For the discharge to develop, the cathode hole dimensions must be on the order of the mean free path. By reducing the cathode hole dimensions it is therefore possible to increase the pressure. Stable hollow cathode discharges in air have been observed at almost one atmosphere when the cathode diameter was reduced to 20 micrometers. In order to study the electrical parameters of a micro hollow cathode discharge, a set of experiments has been performed in argon at pressures in the torr range and a cathode hole diameter of 0.7 mm in molybdenum. The current-voltage characteristics and the appearance of the discharge plasma showed two distinct regions. At lower voltage or pressure the current varies linearly with voltage and the hollow cathode plasma is concentrated around the axis of the cathode hole (low glow mode). At higher values of voltage or pressure the current increases nonlinearly, up to a point where a transition into a low voltage hollow cathode arc was observed, and the plasma column expands and fills almost the entire cathode hole (high glow mode). Spectral measurements showed that the transition from the low glow mode into the high glow mode is related to an increased density of electrode vapor in the hollow cathode discharge. Up to the breakdown into a hollow cathode arc, the current voltage characteristic of the discharge has a positive slope. In this range, hollow cathode discharges can be operated in parallel without a ballast resistor.

  6. Bio-electrochemical characterization of air-cathode microbial fuel cells with microporous polyethylene/silica membrane as separator.

    PubMed

    Kircheva, Nina; Outin, Jonathan; Perrier, Gérard; Ramousse, Julien; Merlin, Gérard; Lyautey, Emilie

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this work was to study the behavior over time of a separator made of a low-cost and non-selective microporous polyethylene membrane (RhinoHide®) in an air-cathode microbial fuel cell with a reticulated vitreous carbon foam bioanode. Performances of the microporous polyethylene membrane (RhinoHide®) were compared with Nafion®-117 as a cationic exchange membrane. A non-parametric test (Mann-Whitney) done on the different sets of coulombic or energy efficiency data showed no significant difference between the two types of tested membrane (p<0.05). Volumetric power densities were ranging from 30 to 90 W·m(-3) of RVC foam for both membranes. Similar amounts of biomass were observed on both sides of the polyethylene membrane illustrating bacterial permeability of this type of separator. A monospecific denitrifying population on cathodic side of RhinoHide® membrane has been identified. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used at OCV conditions to characterize electrochemical behavior of MFCs by equivalent electrical circuit fitted on both Nyquist and Bode plots. Resistances and pseudo-capacitances from EIS analyses do not differ in such a way that the nature of the membrane could be considered as responsible. PMID:26073676

  7. Graphene oxide electrocatalyst on MnO2 air cathode as an efficient electron pump for enhanced oxygen reduction in alkaline solution

    PubMed Central

    Basirun, Wan Jeffrey; Sookhakian, Mehran; Baradaran, Saeid; Endut, Zulkarnain; Mahmoudian, Mohammad Reza; Ebadi, Mehdi; Yousefi, Ramin; Ghadimi, Hanieh; Ahmed, Sohail

    2015-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) was deposited on the surface of a MnO2 air cathode by thermal evaporation at 50°C from a GO colloidal suspension. Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy confirmed the presence of GO on the MnO2 air cathode (GO-MnO2). Voltammetry and chrono-amperometry showed increased currents for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 6?M KOH solution for GO-MnO2 compared to the MnO2 cathode. The GO-MnO2 was used as an air cathode in an alkaline tin-air cell and produced a maximum power density of 13?mW cm?2, in contrast to MnO2, which produced a maximum power density of 9.2?mW cm?2. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that the chemical step for the ORR is the rate determining step, as proposed earlier by different researchers. It is suggested that the presence of GO and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) on the MnO2 surface are responsible for the increased rate of this step, whereby GO and ERGO accelerate the process of electron donation to the MnO2 and to adsorbed oxygen atoms. PMID:25765731

  8. Simultaneous processes of electricity generation and ceftriaxone sodium degradation in an air-cathode single chamber microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Qing; Kong, Fanying; Zheng, Hongtao; Yin, Jinling; Cao, Dianxue; Ren, Yueming; Wang, Guiling

    2011-03-01

    A single chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) with an air-cathode is successfully demonstrated using glucose-ceftriaxone sodium mixtures or ceftriaxone sodium as fuel. Results show that the ceftriaxone sodium can be biodegraded and produce electricity simultaneously. Interestingly, these ceftriaxone sodium-glucose mixtures play an active role in production of electricity. The maximum power density is increased in comparison to 1000 mg L-1 glucose (19 W m-3) by 495% for 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium + 1000 mg L-1 glucose (113 W m-3), while the maximum power density is 11 W m-3 using 50 mg L-1 ceftriaxone sodium as the sole fuel. Moreover, ceftriaxone sodium biodegradation rate reaches 91% within 24 h using the MFC in comparison with 51% using the traditional anaerobic reactor. These results indicate that some toxic and bio-refractory organics such as antibiotic wastewater might be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology.

  9. Effects of proton exchange membrane on the performance and microbial community composition of air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yun-Yeong; Kim, Tae Gwan; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2015-10-10

    This study investigated the effects of proton exchange membranes (PEMs) on performance and microbial community of air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Air-cathode MFCs with reactor volume of 1L were constructed in duplicate with or without PEM (designated as ACM-MFC and AC-MFC, respectively) and fed with a mixture of glucose and acetate (1:1, w:w). The maximum power density and coulombic efficiency did not differ between MFCs in the absence or presence of a PEM. However, PEM use adversely affected maximum voltage production and the rate of organic compound removal (p<0.05). Quantitative droplet digital PCR indicated that AC-MFCs had a greater bacterial population than ACM-MFCs (p<0.05). Likewise, ribosomal tag pyrosequencing revealed that the diversity index of bacterial communities was greater for AC-MFCs (p<0.05). Network analysis revealed that the most abundant genus was Enterococcus, which comprised ?62% of the community and was positively associated with PEM and negatively associated with the rate of chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal (Pearson correlation>0.9 and p<0.05). Geobacter, which is known as an exoelectrogen, was positively associated with maximum power density and negatively associated with PEM. Thus, these results suggest that the absence of PEM favored the growth of Geobacter, a key player for electricity generation in MFC systems. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that MFC systems without PEM are more efficient with respect to power production and COD removal as well as exoelectrogen growth. PMID:26235818

  10. Electricity generation of microbial fuel cell with waterproof breathable membrane cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Defeng; Tang, Yu; Mei, Xiaoxue; Liu, Bingfeng

    2015-12-01

    Simplification of fabrication and reduction of capital cost are important for scale-up and application of microbial electrochemical systems (MES). A fast and inexpensive method of making cathode was developed via assembling stainless steel mesh (SSM) with waterproof breathable membrane (WBM). Three assemble types of cathodes were fabricated; Pt@SSM/WBM (SSM as cathode skeleton, WBM as diffusion layer, platinum (Pt) catalyst applied on SSM), SSM/Pt@WBM and Pt@WBM. SSM/Pt@WBM cathode showed relatively preferable with long-term stability and favorable power output (24.7 W/m3). Compared to conventional cathode fabrication, air-cathode was made for 0.5 h. The results indicated that the novel fabrication method could remarkably reduce capital cost and simplify fabrication procedures with a comparable power output, making MFC more prospective for future application.

  11. Similarity laws for cathode-directed streamers in gaps with an inhomogeneous field at elevated air pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotov, O. V.; Golota, V. I.; Kadolin, B. B.; Karas', V. I.; Ostroushko, V. N.; Zavada, L. M.; Shulika, A. Yu.

    2010-11-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of cathode-directed streamers in the gap closure regime without a transition into spark breakdown. Spatiotemporal, electrodynamic, and spectroscopic characteristics of streamer discharges in air at different pressures were studied. Similarity laws for streamer discharges were formulated. These laws allow one to compare the discharge current characteristics and streamer propagation dynamics at different pressures. Substantial influence of gas photoionization on the deviations from the similarity laws was revealed. The existence of a pressure range in which the discharges develop in a similar way was demonstrated experimentally. In particular, for fixed values of the product pd and discharge voltage U, the average streamer velocity is also fixed. It is found that, although the similarity laws are violated in the interstreamer pause of the discharge, the average discharge current and the product of the pressure and the streamer repetition period remain the same at different pressures. The radiation spectra of the second positive system of nitrogen (the C{sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}-B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} transitions) in a wavelength range of 300-400 nm at air pressures of 1-3 atm were recorded. It is shown that, in the entire pressure range under study, the profiles of the observed radiation bands practically remain unchanged and the relative intensities of the spectral lines corresponding to the {sup 3{Pi}}{sub u}-B{sup 3{Pi}}{sub g} transitions are preserved.

  12. Comparison of Electrode Reduction Activities of Geobacter sulfurreducens and an Enriched Consortium in an Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cell? †

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Watanabe, Kazuya; Yabuki, Soichi; Logan, Bruce E.; Sekiguchi, Yuji

    2008-01-01

    An electricity-generating bacterium, Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA, was inoculated into a single-chamber, air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) in order to determine the maximum electron transfer rate from bacteria to the anode. To create anodic reaction-limiting conditions, where electron transfer from bacteria to the anode is the rate-limiting step, anodes with electrogenic biofilms were reduced in size and tests were conducted using anodes of six different sizes. The smallest anode (7 cm2, or 1.5 times larger than the cathode) achieved an anodic reaction-limiting condition as a result of a limited mass of bacteria on the electrode. Under these conditions, the limiting current density reached a maximum of 1,530 mA/m2, and power density reached a maximum of 461 mW/m2. Per-biomass efficiency of the electron transfer rate was constant at 32 fmol cell?1 day?1 (178 ?mol g of protein?1 min?1), a rate comparable to that with solid iron as the electron acceptor but lower than rates achieved with fumarate or soluble iron. In comparison, an enriched electricity-generating consortium reached 374 ?mol g of protein?1 min?1 under the same conditions, suggesting that the consortium had a much greater capacity for electrode reduction. These results demonstrate that per-biomass electrode reduction rates (calculated by current density and biomass density on the anode) can be used to help make better comparisons of electrogenic activity in MFCs. PMID:18836002

  13. Effects of cathode and electrolyte properties on lithium-air battery performance: Computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Artem V.; Chertovich, Alexander V.; Itkis, Daniil M.; Goodilin, Eugene A.; Khokhlov, Alexei R.

    2015-04-01

    Li/O2 batteries draw much attention due to its outstanding theoretical specific energy, but the value of practically achievable specific energy is still under the question. In this paper we employ a numerical model of Li/O2 cell, which takes into account mass transport processes, to simulate non-uniform product precipitation at different discharge current densities in acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide and 1,2-dimethoxyethane-based electrolytes. Even for 1,2-dimethoxyethane, which has the highest oxygen mobility and solubility, oxygen transport restrictions at 1 mA/cm2 lead to cell-level specific energy of about 650 Wh/kg if a pure oxygen is supplied to the cell. Finally, in order to assist the ongoing search for new cathode materials, which can be alternative to carbon, we also investigate the effect of electrode material density on cell-level specific energy and show that materials with densities up to 10 g/cm3 can be used without serious penalty to the specific energy.

  14. The Importance of Nanometric Passivating Films on Cathodes forLi - Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Brian D.; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zach; Mehdi, Beata L.; Browning, Nigel D.; Nazar, Linda F.

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm*can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance.

  15. The importance of nanometric passivating films on cathodes for Li-air batteries.

    PubMed

    Adams, Brian D; Black, Robert; Radtke, Claudio; Williams, Zack; Mehdi, B Layla; Browning, Nigel D; Nazar, Linda F

    2014-12-23

    Recently, there has been a transition from fully carbonaceous positive electrodes for the aprotic lithium oxygen battery to alternative materials and the use of redox mediator additives, in an attempt to lower the large electrochemical overpotentials associated with the charge reaction. However, the stabilizing or catalytic effect of these materials can become complicated due to the presence of major side-reactions observed during dis(charge). Here, we isolate the charge reaction from the discharge by utilizing electrodes prefilled with commercial lithium peroxide with a crystallite size of about 200-800 nm. Using a combination of S/TEM, online mass spectrometry, XPS, and electrochemical methods to probe the nature of surface films on carbon and conductive Ti-based nanoparticles, we show that oxygen evolution from lithium peroxide is strongly dependent on their surface properties. Insulating TiO2 surface layers on TiC and TiN - even as thin as 3 nm-can completely inhibit the charge reaction under these conditions. On the other hand, TiC, which lacks this oxide film, readily facilitates oxidation of the bulk Li2O2 crystallites, at a much lower overpotential relative to carbon. Since oxidation of lithium oxygen battery cathodes is inevitable in these systems, precise control of the surface chemistry at the nanoscale becomes of upmost importance. PMID:25364863

  16. Surface Study of Lithium-Air Battery Oxygen Cathodes in Different Solvent-Electrolyte pairs.

    PubMed

    Marchini, F; Herrera, S; Torres, W; Tesio, A Y; Williams, F J; Calvo, E J

    2015-08-25

    The O2/Li2O2 electrode reaction has been studied on low surface area Au electrodes in three solvent-electrolyte pairs (0.1 M LiPF6/DMSO, LiPF6/ACN, and LiBF4/ACN) using an electrochemical cell coupled to UHV XPS spectrometer, EQCM, AFM, and DEMS. The XPS spectra of the surfaces after treatment at selected electrode potentials for the O2 reduction and reoxidation of the surface show the presence of C and S from solvent decomposition and of F and P from electrolyte decomposition. Furthermore, Li 1s and O 1s peaks due to Li2O2 and decomposition products such as carbonate, organics, LiF, high oxidation sulfur, and phosphorus compounds were also observed. Using ACN instead of DMSO results in less solvent decomposition, whereas using LiBF4 results in less electrolyte decomposition. XPS, AFM, and EQCM show that O2 reduction products removal only takes place at very high overpotentials. In agreement with XPS which shows removal of carbonate surface species, DEMS confirms evolution of CO2 and consumption of O2 at 4.5 V, but LiF cannot be removed completely in a round trip of the Li-O2 battery cathode. PMID:26222833

  17. The addition of ortho-hexagon nano spinel Co3O4 to improve the performance of activated carbon air cathode microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Ge, Baochao; Li, Kexun; Fu, Zhou; Pu, Liangtao; Zhang, Xi

    2015-11-01

    Commercial Co3O4 and ortho-hexagon spinel nano-Co3O4 (OHSNC) were doped in the AC at a different percentage (5%, 10% and 15%) to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cell (MFC). The maximum power density of MFC with 10% OHSNC doped cathode was 1500±14 mW m(-2), which was 97.36% and 41.24% higher than that with the bare AC air cathode and commercial Co3O4 respectively. The electrocatalytic behavior for their better performance was discussed in detail with the help of various structural and electrochemical techniques. The OHSNC was characterized via X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results showed that the improved performance owed to the enhancement of both kinetics activity and the number of electron transfer in the ORR, and the internal resistance was largely reduced. Therefore, OHSNC was proved to be an excellent cathodic catalyst in AC air cathode MFC. PMID:26112347

  18. Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Kakarla, Ramesh; Moon, Jung Mi; Min, Booki

    2015-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/g- COD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation. PMID:25674807

  19. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode

    E-print Network

    Accepted 7 June 2010 Available online 26 June 2010 Keywords: Desalination Microbial fuel cell Microbial, bioenergy can be produced by means of anaerobic digestion (biogas) or microbial fuel cell ­ MFC (bioEfficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air

  20. MEASUREMENT OF EFFECTIVE AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENTS FOR TRICHLOROETHENE IN UNDISTURBED SOIL CORES. (R826162)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    In this study, we measure effective diffusion coefficients for trichloroethene in undisturbed soil samples taken from Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey. The measured effective diffusion coefficients ranged from 0.0053 to 0.0609 cm2/s over a range of air...

  1. A best fit approach to estimating multiple diffuse source terms using ambient air monitoring data and an air dispersion model.

    PubMed

    MacQueen, Donald; Bertoldo, Nicholas; Wegrecki, Anthony

    2013-08-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory uses CAP88-PC Version 1.0 modeling software to demonstrate compliance with the Code of Federal Regulations Title 40 Part 61 Subpart H (National Emission Standards for Emissions of Radionuclides Other Than Radon From Department of Energy Facilities). Annual air emissions from both well characterized stack sources and difficult to characterize diffuse sources must be assessed. This paper describes a process that uses a mathematical optimization routine to find a set of estimated diffuse source terms that together with the measured stack source terms provides a best fit of modeled air concentrations to measured air concentrations at available sampling locations. The estimated and measured source terms may then be used in subsequent CAP88-PC modeling to estimate dose at the off-site maximally exposed individual. LLNL has found this process to be an effective way to deal with the required assessment of diffuse sources that have otherwise been difficult to assess. PMID:23803667

  2. Enrichment of anodic biofilm inoculated with anaerobic or aerobic sludge in single chambered air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chongyang; Wang, Aijie; Wu, Wei-Min; Yin, Yalin; Zhao, Yang-Guo

    2014-09-01

    Aerobic sludge after anaerobic pretreatment and anaerobic sludge were separately used as inoculum to start up air-cathode single-chamber MFCs. Aerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs arrived at 0.27 V with a maximum power density of 5.79 W m(-3), while anaerobic sludge-inoculated MFCs reached 0.21 V with 3.66 W m(-3). Microbial analysis with DGGE profiling and high-throughput sequencing indicated that aerobic sludge contained more diverse bacterial populations than anaerobic sludge. Nitrospira species dominated in aerobic sludge, while anaerobic sludge was dominated by Desulfurella and Acidithiobacillus species. Microbial community structure and composition in anodic biofilms enriched, respectively from aerobic and anaerobic sludges tended gradually to be similar. Potentially exoelectrogenic Geobacter and Anaeromusa species, biofilm-forming Zoogloea and Acinetobacter species were abundant in both anodic biofilms. This study indicated that aerobic sludge performed better for MFCs startup, and the enrichment of anodic microbial consortium with different inocula but same substrate resulted in uniformity of functional microbial communities. PMID:24973773

  3. A small-scale air-cathode microbial fuel cell for on-line monitoring of water quality.

    PubMed

    Di Lorenzo, Mirella; Thomson, Alexander R; Schneider, Kenneth; Cameron, Petra J; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2014-12-15

    The heavy use of chemicals for agricultural, industrial and domestic purposes has increased the risk of freshwater contamination worldwide. Consequently, the demand for efficient new analytical tools for on-line and on-site water quality monitoring has become particularly urgent. In this study, a small-scale single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (SCMFC), fabricated by rapid prototyping layer-by-layer 3D printing, was tested as a biosensor for continuous water quality monitoring. When acetate was fed as the rate-limiting substrate, the SCMFC acted as a sensor for chemical oxygen demand (COD) in water. The linear detection range was 3-164 ppm, with a sensitivity of 0.05 ?A mM(-1) cm(-2) with respect to the anode total surface area. The response time was as fast as 2.8 min. At saturating acetate concentrations (COD>164 ppm), the miniature SCMFC could rapidly detect the presence of cadmium in water with high sensitivity (0.2 ?g l(-1) cm(-2)) and a lower detection limit of only 1 ?g l(-1). The biosensor dynamic range was 1-25 ?g l(-1). Within this range of concentrations, cadmium affected only temporarily the electroactive biofilm at the anode. When the SCMFCs were again fed with fresh wastewater and no pollutant, the initial steady-state current was recovered within 12 min. PMID:25005554

  4. Sustainable design of high-performance microsized microbial fuel cell with carbon nanotube anode and air cathode.

    PubMed

    Mink, Justine E; Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2013-08-27

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a promising alternative energy source that both generates electricity and cleans water. Fueled by liquid wastes such as wastewater or industrial wastes, the microbial fuel cell converts waste into energy. Microsized MFCs are essentially miniature energy harvesters that can be used to power on-chip electronics, lab-on-a-chip devices, and/or sensors. As MFCs are a relatively new technology, microsized MFCs are also an important rapid testing platform for the comparison and introduction of new conditions or materials into macroscale MFCs, especially nanoscale materials that have high potential for enhanced power production. Here we report a 75 ?L microsized MFC on silicon using CMOS-compatible processes and employ a novel nanomaterial with exceptional electrochemical properties, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs), as the on-chip anode. We used this device to compare the usage of the more commonly used but highly expensive anode material gold, as well as a more inexpensive substitute, nickel. This is the first anode material study done using the most sustainably designed microsized MFC to date, which utilizes ambient oxygen as the electron acceptor with an air cathode instead of the chemical ferricyanide and without a membrane. Ferricyanide is unsustainable, as the chemical must be continuously refilled, while using oxygen, naturally found in air, makes the device mobile and is a key step in commercializing this for portable technology such as lab-on-a-chip for point-of-care diagnostics. At 880 mA/m(2) and 19 mW/m(2) the MWCNT anode outperformed the others in both current and power densities with between 6 and 20 times better performance. All devices were run for over 15 days, indicating a stable and high-endurance energy harvester already capable of producing enough power for ultra-low-power electronics and able to consistently power them over time. PMID:23899322

  5. Electrochemical properties of graphene flakes as an air cathode material for Li-O2 batteries in an ether-based electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Young; Lee, Ho-Taek; Kim, Kwang-Bum

    2013-12-14

    We employed graphene flakes as an air-cathode material for Li-O2 batteries and investigated their electrochemical properties in the dimethyl ether electrolyte. Graphene flakes were prepared by microwave-assisted reduction of graphene oxide, and their electrochemical properties were compared with those of Ketjen Black and carbon nanotubes. The catalytic effect of the prepared graphene flake-air cathode was demonstrated using cyclic voltammetry and discharge-charge testing performed under a limited discharge capacity. The catalytic effect of graphene flakes was also supported by morphological and spectroscopic analysis of the discharge-charge products formed on the graphene surface. Scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy revealed that Li2O2, Li2O, and Li2CO3 were the main discharge products on all carbon-air cathode surfaces. Raman spectroscopy revealed that LiRCO3 was additionally formed on Ketjen Black and carbon nanotubes during the first discharge; however, its formation was not observed on the graphene flakes. The catalytic effect of the graphene flakes and the absence of LiRCO3 in the discharge product could explain the higher Coulombic efficiency in the discharge-charge tests. PMID:24166701

  6. Prediction of Air Mixing From High Sidewall Diffusers in Cooling Mode: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Ridouane, E. H.; Gawlik, K.

    2011-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics modeling was used to evaluate the performance of high sidewall air supply in cooling mode. The research focused on the design, placement, and operation of air supply diffusers located high on a sidewall and return grilles located near the floor on the same sidewall. Parameters of the study are the supply velocity, supply temperature, diffuser dimensions and room dimensions. Thermal loads characteristic of high performance homes were applied at the walls and room temperature was controlled via a thermostat. The results are intended to provide information to guide the selection of high sidewall supply diffusers to provide proper room mixing for cooling of high performance homes.

  7. DNS of autoignition in turbulent diffusion H2/air and Krishnan Mahesh

    E-print Network

    Mahesh, Krishnan

    DNS of auto­ignition in turbulent diffusion H2/air flames Jeff Doom and Krishnan Mahesh University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455, USA Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to study auto. The chemical mechanism is a nine species, nineteen reaction mechanism for H2 and Air from Mueller at el.2

  8. EXTINCTION STUDIES OF PROPANE/AIR COUNTERFLOW DIFFUSION FLAMES: THE EFFECTIVENESS OF AEROSOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The fire suppression effectiveness of solid aerosols as suitable halon replacements has examined. Experiments were performed in a counterflow diffusion burner, consisting of two 1 cm i.d. tubes separated by 1 cm. Aerosols were delivered to propane/air flames in the air flow. Both...

  9. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-15

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18?×?15?×?15?cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  10. PASSIVE/DIFFUSIVE SAMPLERS FOR PESTICIDES IN RESIDENTIAL INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pesticides applied indoors vaporize from treated surfaces (e.g., carpets and baseboards) resulting in elevated air concentrations that may persist for long periods after applications. Estimating long-term respiratory exposures to pesticide vapors in residential indoor environme...

  11. Effect of pressure on structure and NO sub X formation in CO-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maahs, H. G.; Miller, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    A study was made of nitric oxide formation in a laminar CO-air diffusion flame over a pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The carbon monoxide (CO) issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port coaxially into a coflowing stream of air confined within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. Nitric oxide concentrations from the flame were measured at two carbon monoxide (fuel) flow rates: 73 standard cubic/min and 146 sccm. Comparison of the present data with data in the literature for a methane-air diffusion flame shows that for flames of comparable flame height (8 to 10 mm) and pseudoequivalence ratio (0.162), the molar emission index of a CO-air flame is significantly greater than that of a methane-air flame.

  12. NITRIC ACID-AIR DIFFUSION COEFFICIENT: EXPERIMENTAL DETERMINATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Trace gaseous HNO3 in air is removed in a laminar flow nylon tube. The HNO3 deposition pattern was obtained by sectioning the tube, extracting with an aqueous solution, and measuring the concentration by ion chromatography. Mass transport analysis of the deposition pattern demons...

  13. Novel strategy to mitigate cathode catalyst degradation during air/air startup cycling via the atmospheric resistive switching mechanism of a hydrogen anode with a platinum catalyst supported on tantalum-doped titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shintani, Haruhiko; Kojima, Yuya; Kakinuma, Katsuyoshi; Watanabe, Masahiro; Uchida, Makoto

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new strategy for alleviating the reverse current phenomenon using a unique "atmospheric resistive switching mechanism" (ARSM) of a metal oxide semiconductor support, such that the electrical resistivity changes depending on the gas atmosphere. The membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) using Ta-doped TiO2-supported platinum (Pt/Ta-TiO2) as the anode catalyst showed approximately one order of magnitude greater resistance in air than in hydrogen. The overpotential of the hydrogen oxidation reaction was negligible up to at least 1.5 A cm-2. The losses of electrochemically active surface area and carbon corrosion of the cathode catalyst during air/air startup cycling were significantly suppressed by the use of the Pt/Ta-TiO2 anode. The decrease in the degradation is attributed to a reduction of the reverse current due to a low oxygen reduction reaction rate at the anode, which showed high resistivity in air. These results demonstrate the effectiveness of the ARSM in mitigating cathode catalyst degradation during air/air startup cycling.

  14. Pore Scale Modeling of the Reactive Transport of Chromium in the Cathode of a Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, Emily M.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Amon, Cristina

    2011-01-01

    We present a pore scale model of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode. Volatile chromium species are known to migrate from the current collector of the SOFC into the cathode where over time they decrease the voltage output of the fuel cell. A pore scale model is used to investigate the reactive transport of chromium species in the cathode and to study the driving forces of chromium poisoning. A multi-scale modeling approach is proposed which uses a cell level model of the cathode, air channel and current collector to determine the boundary conditions for a pore scale model of a section of the cathode. The pore scale model uses a discrete representation of the cathode to explicitly model the surface reactions of oxygen and chromium with a cathode material. The pore scale model is used to study the reaction mechanisms of chromium by considering the effects of reaction rates, diffusion coefficients, chromium vaporization, and oxygen consumption on chromium’s deposition in the cathode. The study shows that chromium poisoning is most significantly affected by the chromium reaction rates in the cathode and that the reaction rates are a function of the local current density in the cathode.

  15. Effects of Coaxial Air on Nitrogen-Diluted Hydrogen Jet Diffusion Flame Length and NOx Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, N.T.; Chen, R.-H.; Strakey, P.A.

    2007-10-01

    Turbulent nitrogen-diluted hydrogen jet diffusion flames with high velocity coaxial air flows are investigated for their NOx emission levels. This study is motivated by the DOE turbine program’s goal of achieving 2 ppm dry low NOx from turbine combustors running on nitrogen-diluted high-hydrogen fuels. In this study, effects of coaxial air velocity and momentum are varied while maintaining low overall equivalence ratios to eliminate the effects of recirculation of combustion products on flame lengths, flame temperatures, and resulting NOx emission levels. The nature of flame length and NOx emission scaling relationships are found to vary, depending on whether the combined fuel and coaxial air jet is fuel-rich or fuel-lean. In the absence of differential diffusion effects, flame lengths agree well with predicted trends, and NOx emissions levels are shown to decrease with increasing coaxial air velocity, as expected. Normalizing the NOx emission index with a flame residence time reveals some interesting trends, and indicates that a global flame strain based on the difference between the fuel and coaxial air velocities, as is traditionally used, is not a viable parameter for scaling the normalized NOx emissions of coaxial air jet diffusion flames.

  16. A THEORETICAL ANALYSIS OF NITRIC OXIDE PRODUCTION IN A METHANE/AIR TURBULENT DIFFUSION FLAME

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a theoretical analysis of nitric oxide production in a methane/air turbulent diffusion flame. In the coherent flame model used, the chemical reactions take place in laminar flame elements which are lengthened by the turbulent fluid motion and shortened...

  17. High pressure flame system for pollution studies with results for methane-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, I. M.; Maahs, H. G.

    1977-01-01

    A high pressure flame system was designed and constructed for studying nitrogen oxide formation in fuel air combustion. Its advantages and limitations were demonstrated by tests with a confined laminar methane air diffusion flame over the pressure range from 1 to 50 atm. The methane issued from a 3.06 mm diameter port concentrically into a stream of air contained within a 20.5 mm diameter chimney. As the combustion pressure is increased, the flame changes in shape from wide and convex to slender and concave, and there is a marked increase in the amount of luminous carbon. The height of the flame changes only moderately with pressure.

  18. Palladium-assisted electrodehalogenation of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane on lead cathodes combined with hydrogen diffusion anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Cabot, P.L.; Centelles, M.; Segarra, L.; Casado, J.

    1997-11-01

    In this work, the efficiency and product formation in the electroreduction of 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane (CFC 113) to obtain completely dechlorinated products has been studied using constant-current electrolysis at different current densities, gas chromatography, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray. While chlorotrifluoroethene was the main product obtained from CFC 113 in MeOH-water solutions containing NH{sub 4}Cl, different and suitable conditions which lead to its complete dechlorination are described in this paper. In the presence of small amounts of Pd{sup 2+} in solution, a very thin film of Pd black was electrodeposited on the Pb cathode and the efficiency of the CFC 113 electroreduction was about 98%. The efficiency was much smaller and the product composition very different in the absence of Pd{sup 2+} in solution, even in the presence of Pd black electrodeposited on the cathode. In the presence of Pd{sup 2+}, the main products in the gas were difluoroethene and trifluoroethene. Small amounts of 1,2-dichloro-1,1,2-trifluoroethane, chlorotrifluoroethene, difluoroethane, and fluoroethane were also present in the gas phase. The liquid composition was enriched in the less volatile compounds. A possible reaction pathway involving the removal of halides by successive reactions is discussed. The anode employed in these experiments was a thin Pd foil with electrodeposited Pd black, which permitted hydrogen diffusion and its further oxidation to H{sup +}. Because of this reaction, contamination of the working electrolyte by other oxidation products such as Cl{sub 2} or MeOH derivatives were avoided. This system allows new electrosynthetic processes along with CFC electrodegradation.

  19. Wastewater treatment, energy recovery and desalination using a forward osmosis membrane in an air-cathode microbial osmotic fuel cell

    E-print Network

    -cathode microbial osmotic fuel cell Craig M. Werner a,n , Bruce E. Logan b , Pascal E. Saikaly a , Gary L. Amy Keywords: Forward osmosis Desalination Fouling Microbial osmotic fuel cell a b s t r a c t A microbial was compared to conventional microbial fuel cells containing a cation (CEM) or anion exchange membrane (AEM

  20. Low-current electric arc in the open air between the end of the cathode and long vertical anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazmeev, Kh K.; Tazmeev, B. Kh

    2015-11-01

    The electrical discharge was investigated experimentally in the open atmosphere at currents less than 1 A. The cylindrical rods and flat plates were used as anode. They were installed in front of the cathode rod vertically or obliquely. The modes in which the discharge makes regular self-oscillations were detected. Electric field intensity in the discharge column and the electron temperature were calculated.

  1. Air-breathing laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Jayashree, Ranga S; Gancs, Lajos; Choban, Eric R; Primak, Alex; Natarajan, Dilip; Markoski, Larry J; Kenis, Paul J A

    2005-12-01

    This communication reports the design and characterization of an air-breathing laminar flow-based microfluidic fuel cell (LFFC). The performance of previous LFFC designs was cathode-limited due to the poor solubility and slow transport of oxygen in aqueous media. Introduction of an air-breathing gas diffusion electrode as the cathode addresses these mass transfer issues. With this design change, the cathode is exposed to a higher oxygen concentration, and more importantly, the rate of oxygen replenishment in the depletion boundary layer on the cathode is greatly enhanced as a result of the 4 orders of magnitude higher diffusion coefficient of oxygen in air as opposed to that in aqueous media. The power densities of the present air-breathing LFFCs are 5 times higher (26 mW/cm2) than those for LFFCs operated using formic acid solutions as the fuel stream and an oxygen-saturated aqueous stream at the cathode ( approximately 5 mW/cm2). With the performance-limiting issues at the cathode mitigated, these air-breathing LFFCs can now be further developed to fully exploit their advantages of direct control over fuel crossover and the ability to individually tailor the chemical composition of the cathode and anode media to enhance electrode performance and fuel utilization, thus increasing the potential of laminar flow-based fuel cells. PMID:16316201

  2. Trioxane-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames in Normal and Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linteris, Gregory T.; Urban, David L.

    2001-01-01

    Trioxane, a weakly bound polymer of formaldehyde (C3H6O3, m.p. 61 C, b.p. 115 C), is a uniquely suited compound for studying material flammability. Like many of the more commonly used materials for such tests (e.g., delrin, polyethylene, acrylic sheet, wood, and paper), it displays relevant phenomena (internal heat conduction, melting, vaporization, thermal decomposition, and gas phase reaction of the decomposition products). Unlike the other materials, however, it is non-sooting and has simple and well-known chemical kinetic pathways for its combustion. Hence it should prove to be much more useful for numerical modeling of surface combustion than the complex fuels typically used. We have performed the first exploratory tests of trioxane combustion in the counterflow configuration to determine its potential as a surrogate solid fuel which allows detailed modeling. The experiments were performed in the spring and summer of 1998 at the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, MD, and at NASA-GRC in Cleveland. Using counterflow flames at 1-g, we measured the fuel consumption rate and the extinction conditions with added N2 in the air; at mg conditions, we observed the ignition characteristics and flame shape from video images. We have performed numerical calculations of the flame structure, but these are not described here due to space limitations. This paper summarizes some burning characteristics of trioxane relevant to its use for studying flame spread and fire suppression.

  3. Study on Thermal Diffusion in Artificial Air Near the Critical Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, A.; Maeda, T.

    2008-03-01

    Air is absolutely essential for our everyday life and also very important in the field of industry. The major part of it is composed of nitrogen and oxygen. We investigated the Soret effect in artificial air, which was a nitrogen-oxygen binary mixture with the composition of 0.791 mole fraction of nitrogen and 0.209 mole fraction of oxygen near the critical point. In the case of the artificial air, the estimated critical temperature and the estimated critical pressure are 132.61 K and 3.8381 MPa, respectively. We carried out the experiments by using a single stage two-chamber cell. We made a temperature difference between the two chambers, which were separated by a porous diaphragm. After an experiment had run for sufficient time to reach steady state, the concentration of oxygen in each chamber was measured by using a gas chromatograph. From the experiments, we observed that the thermal diffusion factor showed a strong drop near the critical point. The thermal diffusion ratio indicated was negative and behaved like 3He-overflow="scroll">4He mixtures. There has been no report that the thermal diffusion ratio of the nitrogen-oxygen system behaves just like the mixture of such substances. We discuss the thermal diffusion in the nitrogen-oxygen binary mixture near the critical point.

  4. Surface hardening of stainless steel by runaway electrons preionized diffuse discharge in air atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erofeev, M. V.; Shulepov, M. A.; Oskomov, K. V.; Tarasenko, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper we present microhardness measurements of stainless steel surface treated by diffuse discharge in air atmosphere. The cleaning from carbon in comparison to the initial sample was observed at a depth exceeding 20 nm. The oxygen concentration was also increased in comparison to that in the initial sample at a depth of up to about 50 nm. Comparative analysis shows that after treatment the microhardness of stainless steel surface increased in 2 times due to interaction of near-surface layers with product of plasma chemical reactions produced in diffuse discharge.

  5. Strain-induced extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames - Effects of steam, CO2, N2, and O2 additives to air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental study was performed using axisymmetric nozzle and tubular opposed jet burners to measure the effects of laminar plug flow and parabolic input velocity profiles on the extinction limits of H2-air counterflow diffusion flames. Extinction limits were quantified by 'flame strength', (average axial air jet velocity) at blowoff of the central flame. The effects of key air contaminants, on the extinction limits, are characterized and analyzed relative to utilization of combustion contaminated vitiated air in high enthalpy supersonic test facilities.

  6. Fuel cell stack with passive air supply

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2006-01-17

    A fuel cell stack has a plurality of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) where each PEFC includes a rectangular membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having a fuel flow field along a first axis and an air flow field along a second axis perpendicular to the first axis, where the fuel flow field is long relative to the air flow field. A cathode air flow field in each PEFC has air flow channels for air flow parallel to the second axis and that directly open to atmospheric air for air diffusion within the channels into contact with the MEA.

  7. Efficiency and air-stability improvement of flexible inverted polymer solar cells using ZnO/poly(ethylene glycol) hybrids as cathode buffer layers.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ting; Li, Fan; Yuan, Kai; Chen, Yiwang

    2013-06-26

    The flexible inverted polymer solar cells composed of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT):(6,6)-phenyl-C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) blends on the flexible poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrates were fabricated, which showed improving device performance by using solution-processed ZnO/poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hybrids as cathode buffer layers compared to the devices using the pristine ZnO as cathode buffer layers. It is mainly attributed to the effective passivation of the ZnO surface traps, suppression of the interfacial charge recombination, decrease of the work function and improvement of the energy-level alignment between ZnO and PC61BM. When the PEG was introduced into the ZnO, the large aggregates was dispersed and yielded large ZnO nanoclusters containing less domain boundaries. The performance of devices with ZnO/PEG6000 (with averaged molecular weight of 6000) hybrids exhibited the best power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.3% compared to the devices with ZnO/PEG400 (with averaged molecular weight of 400) and ZnO/PEG20000 (with averaged molecular weight of 20000). It was found that the short PEG backbone (e.g., Mw = 400) containing less oxygen could not effectively passivate ZnO surface traps, meanwhile, longer PEG backbone (e.g., Mw = 20000) could lead to the formation of the charge transport barrier because of the insulating nature of PEG. Furthermore, solar cells with the ZnO/PEG buffer also showed better air-stability. The 23% degradation was observed after 14 days, compared to the 45% degradation of devices with the pristine ZnO buffer. In addition, due to the simplicity and low-temperature process, the ZnO/PEG hybrids can be well-suitable as cathode buffer for large area roll-to-roll manufacturing of printed polymer solar cells. PMID:23738498

  8. The performance of nano urchin-like NiCo2O4 modified activated carbon as air cathode for microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Baochao; Li, Kexun; Fu, Zhou; Pu, Liangtao; Zhang, Xi; Liu, Ziqi; Huang, Kan

    2016-01-01

    A nano urchin-like NiCo2O4 has been successfully synthesized via a facile and scalable hydrothermal method. A NiCo2O4 modified active carbon air cathode was designed, optimized and fabricated. The maximum power density of the microbial fuel cell with newly developed cathode is 2.28 time higher than bare active carbon and is comparable to the commercial available Pt/C, reaching 1730 ± 14 mW m-2. The modified active carbon showed remarkable improvement in activity towards the oxygen reduction reaction, which was due to the lower charger transfer, lower activation barrier, and higher exchange current density. Electrochemical evaluation showed a direct four-electron the oxygen reduction reaction on NiCo2O4 modified active carbon, compared to a two-stage process on bare active carbon. The non-precious NiCo2O4 could be considered as a promising alternative to the costly Pt.

  9. In Situ Photocatalytically Heterostructured ZnO-Ag Nanoparticle Composites as Effective Cathode-Modifying Layers for Air-Processed Polymer Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Kai; Chen, Lie; Chen, Yiwang

    2015-08-10

    A heterostructured semiconductor-metal ZnO-Ag nanoparticle (NP) composite was constructed through a straightforward photocatalytic strategy by using UV irradiation of ZnO NPs and an aqueous solution of Ag precursor. The ZnO-Ag NP composites serve as an effective cathode-modifying layer in polymer solar cells (PSCs) with increased short-circuit current density owing to the light-trapping effect, and improved optical and electrical conductivity properties compared with pure ZnO NPs. The Ag NPs, which are photodeposited in situ on ZnO NPs, can act as effective antennas for incident light to maximize light harvesting and minimize radiative decay or nonradiative losses, consequently resulting in the enhanced photogeneration of excitons in PSCs. Systematic photoelectron and -physical investigations confirm that heterostructured ZnO-Ag NPs can significantly improve charge separation, transport, and collection, as well as lower charge recombination at the cathode interface, leading to a 14.0?% improvement in air-processed device power conversion efficiency. In addition, this processable, cost-effective, and scalable approach is compatible with roll-to-roll manufacturing of large-scale PSCs. PMID:26135916

  10. Lateral diffusion of amphiphiles and macromolecules at the air/water interface

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sanghoon; Yu, Hyuk

    1992-05-14

    We report a lateral diffusion study on the air/water interface of a surface-active protein, bacterial lipase from Pseudomonas fluorescens, and vinyl polymer, poly(tert-butyl methacrylate), with the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. For the validation of implementating the technique and the calibration of our instrument, we relied on a phospholipid system that Peters and Beck have used earlier and found that our results were in accord with theirs within 20% in absolute magnitude. For both the phospholipid and lipase, we analyzed the lateral diffusion data in terms of the free area model of Sackmann and Traeuble. We conclude that the results of lipase could be interpreted by invoking a conformational change induced by lateral compression in the monolayer state and those of the polymer, by postulating the quenching of the diffusion process when its concentration crosses over from the dilute regime to the semidilute regime. 37 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Characteristics of Gaseous Diffusion Flames with High Temperature Combustion Air in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghaderi, M.; Gupta, A. K.

    2003-01-01

    The characteristics of gaseous diffusion flames have been obtained using high temperature combustion air under microgravity conditions. The time resolved flame images under free fall microgravity conditions were obtained from the video images obtained. The tests results reported here were conducted using propane as the fuel and about 1000 C combustion air. The burner included a 0.686 mm diameter central fuel jet injected into the surrounding high temperature combustion air. The fuel jet exit Reynolds number was 63. Several measurements were taken at different air preheats and fuel jet exit Reynolds number. The resulting hybrid color flame was found to be blue at the base of the flame followed by a yellow color flame. The length and width of flame during the entire free fall conditions has been examined. Also the relative flame length and width for blue and yellow portion of the flame has been examined under microgravity conditions. The results show that the flame length decreases and width increases with high air preheats in microgravity condition. In microgravity conditions the flame length is larger with normal temperature combustion air than high temperature air.

  12. Acidic and alkaline pretreatments of activated carbon and their effects on the performance of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Gao, Ningshengjie; Zhou, Qixing; Dong, Heng; Yu, Hongbing; Feng, Yujie

    2013-09-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is a high performing and cost effective catalyst for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) of air-cathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Acidic (HNO3) and alkaline (KOH) pretreatments on AC at low temperature (85°C) are conducted to enhance the performance of MFCs. The alkaline pretreatment increased the power density by 16% from 804±70 to 957±31 mW m(-2), possibly due to the decrease of ohmic resistance (from 20.58 to 19.20 ?) and the increase of ORR activities provided by the adsorbed hydroxide ion and extra micropore area/volume after alkaline pretreatment. However, acidic pretreatment decreased the power output to 537±36 mW m(-2), which can be mainly attributed to the corrosion by adsorbed proton at the interface of AC powder and stainless steel mesh and the decreased pore area. PMID:23890977

  13. Effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames under normal and microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaderi Yeganeh, Mohammad

    Global energy consumption has been increasing around the world, owing to the rapid growth of industrialization and improvements in the standard of living. As a result, more carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide are being released into the environment. Therefore, techniques for achieving combustion at reduced carbon dioxide and nitric oxide emission levels have drawn increased attention. Combustion with a highly preheated air and low-oxygen concentration has been shown to provide significant energy savings, reduce pollution and equipment size, and uniform thermal characteristics within the combustion chamber. However, the fundamental understanding of this technique is limited. The motivation of the present study is to identify the effects of preheated combustion air on laminar coflow diffusion flames. Combustion characteristics of laminar coflow diffusion flames are evaluated for the effects of preheated combustion air temperature under normal and low-gravity conditions. Experimental measurements are conducted using direct flame photography, particle image velocimetry (PIV) and optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics. Laminar coflow diffusion flames are examined under four experimental conditions: normal-temperature/normal-gravity (case I), preheated-temperature/normal gravity (case II), normal-temperature/low-gravity (case III), and preheated-temperature/low-gravity (case IV). Comparisons between these four cases yield significant insights. In our studies, increasing the combustion air temperature by 400 K (from 300 K to 700 K), causes a 37.1% reduction in the flame length and about a 25% increase in peak flame temperature. The results also show that a 400 K increase in the preheated air temperature increases CH concentration of the flame by about 83.3% (CH is a marker for the rate of chemical reaction), and also increases the C2 concentration by about 60% (C2 is a marker for the soot precursor). It can therefore be concluded that preheating the combustion air increases the energy release intensity, flame temperature, C2 concentration, and, presumably, NOx production. Our work is the first to consider preheated temperature/low-gravity combustion. The results of our experiments reveal new insights. Where as increasing the temperature of the combustion air reduces the laminar flame width under normal gravity, we find that, in a low-gravity environment, increasing the combustion air temperature causes a significant increase in the flame width.

  14. Measurement of the radon diffusion through a nylon foil for different air humidities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan; Smolek, Karel

    2015-08-01

    The dependency of the radon penetration through a nylon foil on air humidity was measured. Such information is needed for the tracking part of the SuperNEMO detector, which is planned to be shielded against radon by nylon foil and in which the air humidity is not negligible. The long term measurements of radon penetration through nylon foils for different air humidities were performed with the radon diffusion setup constructed at the IEAP, CTU in Prague. The setup consists of two stainless steel hemispheres with Si detector in each of them. Both hemispheres are separated by the tested foil. While the left hemisphere contains high Rn activity, the right part contains only activity caused by the radon penetration through the tested foil. Obtained results of this study with a nylon foil with the thickness of 50 µm are presented.

  15. Cathodic arcs

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  16. Improvement of microbial fuel cell cathodes using cost-effective polyvinylidene fluoride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhaozheng; Su, Min; Wei, Liling; Han, Hongliang; Jia, Qibo; Shen, Jianquan

    2015-01-01

    In this study polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) is investigated as an alternative to polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) for air-cathode diffusion layers (DLs) in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for the improvement of MFC power generation. It is found that the cathode fabricated with PVDF achieves a higher maximum power density (MPD) than a PTFE cathode. Successive PVDF or PVDF/carbon black DLs are applied on the base layers in order to optimize cathode performance. The results show significant improvements in such performances as the coulombic efficiency (CE), MPD, and water loss. In electrochemical tests, the cathode coated with four PVDF DLs has the largest current response at a given applied potential, yielding the highest MPD of 0.123 mW cm-2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) and largest CE (10.7%) in the MFC test. Carbon black is added to the DLs in order to test its effect on the MFC power generation. Cathodes made from pure PVDF DLs perform better than those containing PVDF/carbon black DLs in electrochemical and MFC tests. In addition, a smaller MFC (28 mL) produces a much higher MPD than a larger MFC (700 mL), resulting in an increase in the CE.

  17. Arduino-based control system for measuring ammonia in air using conditionally-deployed diffusive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ham, J. M.; Williams, C.; Shonkwiler, K. B.

    2012-12-01

    Arduino microcontrollers, wireless modules, and other low-cost hardware were used to develop a new type of air sampler for monitoring ammonia at strong areal sources like dairies, cattle feedlots, and waste treatment facilities. Ammonia was sampled at multiple locations on the periphery of an operation using Radiello diffusive passive samplers (Cod. RAD168- and RAD1201-Sigma-Aldrich). However, the samplers were not continuously exposed to the air. Instead, each sampling station included two diffusive samplers housed in specialized tubes that sealed the cartridges from the atmosphere. If a user-defined set of wind and weather conditions were met, the Radiellos were deployed into the air using a micro linear actuator. Each station was solar-powered and controlled by Arduinos that were linked to a central weather station using Xbee wireless modules (Digi International Inc.). The Arduinos also measured the total time of exposure using hall-effect sensors to verify the position of the cartridge (i.e., deployed or retracted). The decision to expose or retract the samplers was made every five minutes based on wind direction, wind speed, and time of day. Typically, the diffusive samplers were replaced with fresh cartridges every two weeks and the used samplers were analyzed in the laboratory using ion chromatography. Initial studies were conducted at a commercial dairy in northern Colorado. Ammonia emissions along the Front Range of Colorado can be transported into the mountains where atmospheric deposition of nitrogen can impact alpine ecosystems. Therefore, low-cost air quality monitoring equipment is needed that can be widely deployed in the region. Initial work at the dairy showed that ammonia concentrations ranged between 600 to 1200 ppb during the summer; the highest concentrations were downwind of a large anaerobic lagoon. Time-averaged ammonia concentrations were also used to approximate emissions using inverse dispersion models. This methodology provides a relatively low-cost technique for measuring the spatial and seasonal variations in ammonia near strong areal sources.

  18. Oxygen transport resistance correlated to liquid water saturation in the gas diffusion layer of PEM fuel cells

    E-print Network

    Mench, Matthew M.

    Oxygen transport resistance correlated to liquid water saturation in the gas diffusion layer of PEM effective porosity and tortuosity encountered by oxygen diffusing to the catalyst layer. This additional transport resistance reduces the partial pressure of oxygen at the catalyst surface of an air-fed cathode

  19. A mechanistic study of Soret diffusion in hydrogen-air flames

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, F.; Law, C.K.; Sung, C.J.; Zhang, H.Q.

    2010-01-15

    The separate and combined effects of Soret diffusion of the hydrogen molecule (H{sub 2}) and radical (H) on the structure and propagation speed of the freely-propagating planar premixed flames, and the strain-induced extinction response of premixed and nonpremixed counterflow flames, were computationally studied for hydrogen-air mixtures using a detailed reaction mechanism and transport properties. Results show that, except for the conservative freely-propagating planar flame, Soret diffusion of H{sub 2} increases the fuel concentration entering the flame structure and as such modifies the mixture stoichiometry and flame temperature, which could lead to substantial increase (decrease) of the flame speed for the lean (rich) mixtures respectively. On the other hand, Soret diffusion of H actively modifies its concentration and distribution in the reaction zone, which in turn affects the individual reaction rates. In particular, the reaction rates of the symmetric, twin, counterflow premixed flames, especially at near-extinction states, can be increased for lean flames but decreased for rich flames, whose active reaction regions are respectively located at, and away from, the stagnation surface. However, such a difference is eliminated for the single counterflow flame stabilized by an opposing cold nitrogen stream, as the active reaction zone up to the state of extinction is always located away from the stagnation surface. Finally, the reaction rate is increased in general for diffusion flames because the bell-shaped temperature distribution localizes the H concentration to the reaction region which has the maximum temperature. (author)

  20. Analysis of opposed jet hydrogen-air counter flow diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. H.; Isaac, K. M.

    1989-01-01

    A computational simulation of the opposed-jet diffusion flame is performed to study its structure and extinction limits. The present analysis concentrates on the nitrogen-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flame, which provides the basic information for many vehicle designs such as the aerospace plane for which hydrogen is a candidate as the fuel. The computer program uses the time-marching technique to solve the energy and species equations coupled with the momentum equation solved by the collocation method. The procedure is implemented in two stages. In the first stage, a one-step forward overal chemical reaction is chosen with the gas phase chemical reaction rate determined by comparison with experimental data. In the second stage, a complete chemical reaction mechanism is introduced with detailed thermodynamic and transport property calculations. Comparison between experimental extinction data and theoretical predictions is discussed. The effects of thermal diffusion as well as Lewis number and Prandtl number variations on the diffusion flame are also presented.

  1. Two-dimensional diffusion of amphiphiles in phospholipid monolayers at the air-water interface.

    PubMed Central

    Caruso, F; Grieser, F; Thistlethwaite, P J; Almgren, M

    1993-01-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy has been used to examine lateral diffusion in dipalmitoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoyl-L-alpha-phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) monolayers at the air-water interface, by studying the fluorescence quenching of a pyrene-labeled phospholipid (pyrene-DPPE) by two amphiphilic quenchers. Steady-state fluorescence measurements revealed pyrene-DPPE to be homogeneously distributed in the DMPC lipid matrix for all measured surface pressures and only in the liquid-expanded (LE) phase of the DPPC monolayer. Time-resolved fluorescence decays for pyrene-DPPE in DMPC and DPPC (LE phase) in the absence of quencher were best described by a single-exponential function, also suggesting a homogeneous distribution of pyrene-DPPE within the monolayer films. Addition of quencher to the monolayer film produced nonexponential decay behavior, which is adequately described by the continuum theory of diffusion-controlled quenching in a two-dimensional environment. Steady-state fluorescence measurements yielded lateral diffusion coefficients significantly larger than those obtained from time-resolved data. The difference in these values was ascribed to the influence of static quenching in the case of the steady-state measurements. The lateral diffusion coefficients obtained in the DMPC monolayers were found to decrease with increasing surface pressure, reflecting a decrease in monolayer fluidity with compression. PMID:8312487

  2. CO2/oxalate Cathodes as Safe and Efficient Alternatives in High Energy Density Metal-Air Type Rechargeable Batteries

    E-print Network

    Nemeth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    We present theoretical analysis on why and how rechargeable metal-air type batteries can be made significantly safer and more practical by utilizing CO2/oxalate conversions instead of O2/peroxide or O2/hydroxide ones, in the positive electrode. Metal-air batteries, such as the Li-air one, may have very large energy densities, comparable to that of gasoline, theoretically allowing for long range all-electric vehicles. There are, however, still significant challenges, especially related to the safety of their underlying chemistries, the robustness of their recharging and the need of supplying high purity O2 from air to the battery. We point out that the CO2/oxalate reversible electrochemical conversion is a viable alternative of the O2-based ones, allowing for similarly high energy density and almost identical voltage, while being much safer through the elimination of aggressive oxidant peroxides and the use of thermally stable, non-oxidative and environmentally benign oxalates instead.

  3. Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air-Cathode Catalyst in Microbial Fuel Cells

    E-print Network

    Use of Pyrolyzed Iron Ethylenediaminetetraacetic Acid Modified Activated Carbon as Air States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Activated carbon (AC) is a cost-effective catalyst. KEYWORDS: microbial fuel cell, oxygen reduction reaction, catalyst, activated carbon, iron

  4. Surface-Tuned Co3O4 Nanoparticles Dispersed on Nitrogen-Doped Graphene as an Efficient Cathode Electrocatalyst for Mechanical Rechargeable Zinc-Air Battery Application.

    PubMed

    Singh, Santosh K; Dhavale, Vishal M; Kurungot, Sreekumar

    2015-09-30

    The most vital component of the fuel cells and metal-air batteries is the electrocatalyst, which can facilitate the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at a significantly reduced overpotential. The present work deals with the development of surface-tuned cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanoparticles dispersed on nitrogen-doped graphene as a potential ORR electrocatalyst possessing some unique advantages. The thermally reduced nitrogen-doped graphene (NGr) was decorated with three different morphologies of Co3O4 nanoparticles, viz., cubic, blunt edged cubic, and spherical, by using a simple hydrothermal method. We found that the spherical Co3O4 nanoparticle supported NGr catalyst (Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h) has acquired a significant activity makeover to display the ORR activity closely matching with the state-of-the-art Pt supported carbon (PtC) catalyst in alkaline medium. Subsequently, the Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has been utilized as the air electrode in a Zn-air battery, which was found to show comparable performance to the system derived from PtC. Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h catalyst has shown several hours of flat discharge profile at the discharge rates of 10, 20, and 50 mA/cm(2) with a specific capacity and energy density of ?590 mAh/g-Zn and ?840 Wh/kg-Zn, respectively, in the primary Zn-air battery system. In conjunction, Co3O4-SP/NGr-24h has outperformed as an air electrode in mechanical rechargeable Zn-air battery as well, which has shown consistent flat discharge profile with minimal voltage loss at a discharge rate of 50 mA/cm(2). The present results, thus demonstrate that the proper combination of the tuned morphology of Co3O4 with NGr will be a promising and inexpensive material for efficient and ecofriendly cathodes for Zn-air batteries. PMID:26376490

  5. A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by nanosecond pulse under a double hexagon needle-array electrode.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi-Jie; Wang, Wen-Chun; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Sen; Zhang, Shuai; Tang, Kai; Jiang, Peng-Chao

    2014-01-01

    A large-area diffuse air discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse is generated under a double hexagon needle-array electrode at atmospheric pressure. The images of the diffuse discharge, electric characteristics, and the optical emission spectra emitted from the diffuse air discharge plasma are obtained. Based on the waveforms of pulse voltage and current, the power consumption, and the power density of the diffuse air discharge plasma are investigated under different pulse peak voltages. The electron density and the electron temperature of the diffuse plasma are estimated to be approximately 1.42×10(11) cm(-3) and 4.4 eV, respectively. The optical emission spectra are arranged to determine the rotational and vibrational temperatures by comparing experimental with simulated spectra. Meanwhile, the rotational and vibrational temperatures of the diffuse discharge plasma are also discussed under different pulse peak voltages and pulse repetition rates, respectively. In addition, the diffuse air discharge plasma can form an area of about 70×50 mm(2) on the surface of dielectric layer and can be scaled up to the required size. PMID:24374556

  6. Diffuse scattering from hemispherical nanoparticles at the air-silicon interface.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Anthony; Ahmed, Badar; Reehal, Haricharan; Xie, Fang

    2013-10-18

    There has been much recent interest in the application of plasmonics to improve the efficiency of silicon solar cells. In this paper we use finite difference time domain calculations to investigate the placement of hemispherical gold nanoparticles on the rear surface of a silicon solar cell. The results indicate that nanoparticles protruding into the silicon, rather than into air, have a larger scattering efficiency and diffuse scattering into the semiconductor. This finding could lead to improved light trapping within a thin silicon solar cell device. PMID:24045859

  7. Structure and Extinction of Non-Diluted Hydrogen-Air Diffusion Flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño, C.; Mauss, F.

    In this paper we study the structure of non-diluted hydrogen-air diffusion flames using both a starting kinetic mechanism and a reduced two-step mechanism with atomic hydrogen as an intermediate non-steady state species. The extinction conditions were calculated for pressures from 0.5 up to 40 atm. It is shown that a two-step mechanism is capable of reproducing the structure and extinction in the pressure range mentioned. Four different sets of approximations were used for the steady-state concentration of OH and HO2. The errors introduced in these approximations are presented and the best choice is indicated.

  8. Sustained diffusive alternating current gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Li, Zhongshan; Ehn, Andreas; Aldén, Marcus; Larsson, Anders; Kusano, Yukihiro

    2014-12-01

    Rapid transition from glow discharge to thermal arc has been a common problem in generating stable high-power non-thermal plasmas especially at ambient conditions. A sustained diffusive gliding arc discharge was generated in a large volume in atmospheric pressure air, driven by an alternating current (AC) power source. The plasma column extended beyond the water-cooled stainless steel electrodes and was stabilized by matching the flow speed of the turbulent air jet with the rated output power. Comprehensive investigations were performed using high-speed movies measured over the plasma column, synchronized with simultaneously recorded current and voltage waveforms. Dynamic details of the novel non-equilibrium discharge are revealed, which is characterized by a sinusoidal current waveform with amplitude stabilized at around 200 mA intermediate between thermal arc and glow discharge, shedding light to the governing mechanism of the sustained spark-suppressed AC gliding arc discharge.

  9. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-04-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm-2 and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm-2 in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm-2 and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air.

  10. Ag-Cu nanoalloyed film as a high-performance cathode electrocatalytic material for zinc-air battery.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yimin; Chen, Fuyi; Jin, Yachao; Liu, Zongwen

    2015-01-01

    A novel Ag50Cu50 film electrocatalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) was prepared by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) method. The electrocatalyst actually is Ag-Cu alloyed nanoparticles embedded in amorphous Cu film, based on transmission electron microscopy (TEM) characterization. The rotating disk electrode (RDE) measurements provide evidence that the ORR proceed via a four-electron pathway on the electrocatalysts in alkaline solution. And it is much more efficient than pure Ag catalyst. The catalytic layer has maximum power density of 67 mW cm(-2) and an acceptable cell voltage at 0.863 V when current densities increased up to 100 mA cm(-2) in the Ag50Cu50-based primary zinc-air battery. The resulting rechargeable zinc-air battery exhibits low charge-discharge voltage polarization of 1.1 V at 20 mAcm(-2) and high durability over 100 cycles in natural air. PMID:25977668

  11. Diffusion denuder assembly for collection and determination of gases in air

    SciTech Connect

    Lewin, E.E.; Hansen, K.A.

    1984-04-01

    In air pollution studies a widely used collection arrangement consists of an aerosol filter followed by a wet impinger or specially prepared filter for retention of a gaseous pollutant. However, it was shown that in many cases this method can lead to undesirable changes of the sample during collection. For example, an absorption of gaseous ammonia on the collected aerosol can result in partial neutralization of the particulate matter. It is the aim of this work to construct a system suitable for direct determination of the gaseous components and for collecting a reasonable volume of air. Also, it was decided to design an apparatus which allowed easy, quick, reproducible, and clean coating and extraction procedures and enable us to use the fairly low extraction volumes for exposed tubes. The present paper describes the construction and features of such a diffusion denuder assembly (DDA), preparation of tubes and samples, and testing of the applicability of this system for collecting ammonia and gaseous nitric acid. Knowledge of concentrations of ammonia and acidic gases in air is a prerequisite for the understanding of processes important for acidification of dry and wet deposition. The system described for collecting and treating gaseous samples can be helpful in obtaining reliable results on content of these important species in air.

  12. Cooling channels design analysis with chaotic laminar trajectory for closed cathode air-cooled PEM fuel cells using non-reacting numerical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, W. Mohamed W. A.

    2015-09-01

    The thermal management of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cells contributes directly to the overall power output of the system. For a closed cathode PEM fuel cell design, the use of air as a cooling agent is a non-conventional method due to the large heat load involved, but it offers a great advantage for minimizing the system size. Geometrical aspects of the cooling channels have been identified as the basic parameter for improved cooling performance. Numerical investigation using STAR-CCM computational fluid dynamics platform was applied for non-reacting cooling effectiveness study of various channel geometries for fuel cell application. The aspect ratio of channels and the flow trajectory are the parametric variations. A single cooling plate domain was selected with an applied heat flux of 2400 W/m2 while the cooling air are simulated at Reynolds number of 400 that corresponds to normal air flow velocities using standard 6W fans. Three channel designs of similar number of channels (20 channels) are presented here to analyze the effects of having chaotic laminar flow trajectory compared to the usual straight path trajectory. The total heat transfer between the cooling channel walls and coolant were translated into temperature distribution, maximum temperature gradient, average plate temperature and overall cooling effectiveness analyses. The numerical analysis shows that the chaotic flow promotes a 5% to 10% improvement in cooling effectiveness, depending on the single-axis or multi-axis flow paths applied. Plate temperature uniformity is also more realizable using the chaotic flow designs.

  13. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Laminar-Jet Diffusion Flames in Coflowing Air. Appendix F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of steady nonbuoyant round luminous hydrocarbon-fueled laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflowing air were studied both experimentally and theoretically. Flame shapes were measured from photographs of flames burning at low pressures in order to minimize the effects of buoyancy. Test conditions involved acetylene-, propylene. and 1,3-butadiene-fueled flames having initial reactant temperatures of 300 K, ambient pressures of 19-50 kPa, jet-exit Reynolds numbers of 18-121, and initial air/fuel velocity ratios of 0.22-32.45 to yield luminous flame lengths of 21-198 mm. The present flames were close to the laminar smoke point but were not soot emitting. Simple expressions to estimate the shapes of nonbuoyant laminar-jet diffusion flames in coflow were found by extending an earlier analysis of Mahalingam et al. These formulas provided a good correlation of present measurements except near the burner exit where self-similar approximations used in the simplified analysis are no longer appropriate.

  14. Simultaneous Congo red decolorization and electricity generation in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cell with different microfiltration, ultrafiltration and proton exchange membranes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Bin; Sun, Jian; Hu, Yong-you

    2011-03-01

    Different microfiltration membrane (MFM), proton exchange membrane (PEM) and ultrafiltration membranes (UFMs) with different molecular cutoff weights of 1K (UFM-1K), 5K (UFM-5K) and 10K (UFM-10K) were incorporated into air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) which were explored for simultaneous azo dye decolorization and electricity generation to investigate the effect of membrane on the performance of the MFC. Batch test results showed that the MFC with an UFM-1K produced the highest power density of 324 mW/m(2) coupled with an enhanced coulombic efficiency compared to MFM. The MFC with UMF-10K achieved the fastest decolorization rate (4.77 mg/L h), followed by MFM (3.61 mg/L h), UFM-5K (2.38 mg/L h), UFM-1K (2.02 mg/Lh) and PEM (1.72 mg/Lh). These results demonstrated the possibility of using various membranes in the system described here, and showed that UFM-1K was the best one based on the consideration of both cost and performance. PMID:21251817

  15. Mineralization of sulfanilamide by electro-Fenton and solar photoelectro-Fenton in a pre-pilot plant with a Pt/air-diffusion cell.

    PubMed

    El-Ghenymy, Abdellatif; Cabot, Pere Lluís; Centellas, Francesc; Garrido, José Antonio; Rodríguez, Rosa María; Arias, Conchita; Brillas, Enric

    2013-05-01

    The mineralization of sulfanilamide solutions at pH 3.0 was comparatively studied by electro-Fenton (EF) and solar photoelectro-Fenton (SPEF) using a 2.5 L pre-pilot plant containing a Pt/air-diffusion cell coupled with a solar photoreactor. Organics were primordially oxidized by hydroxyl radical (OH) formed from Fenton's reaction between H?O? generated at the cathode and added Fe(2+) and/or under the action of sunlight. A mineralization up to 94% was achieved using SPEF, whereas EF yielded much poorer degradation. The effect of current density and Fe(2+) and drug concentrations on the degradation rate, mineralization current efficiency and energy cost per unit DOC mass of EF and/or SPEF was examined. The sulfanilamide decay always followed a pseudo first-order kinetics, being more rapid in SPEF due to the additional generation of OH induced by sunlight on Fe(III) species. Catechol, resorcinol, hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone were identified as aromatic intermediates. The final solutions treated by EF contained Fe(III) complexes of maleic, fumaric, oxamic and mainly oxalic acids, which are hardly destroyed by OH. The quick photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate complexes by sunlight explains the higher oxidation ability of SPEF. The N content of sulfanilamide was mainly mineralized as NH?? ion and in much lesser extent as NO?? ion, whereas most of its initial S was converted into SO?²? ion. PMID:23561569

  16. Multiple Hollow Cathode Wear Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.

    1994-01-01

    A hollow cathode-based plasma contactor has been baselined for use on the Space Station to reduce station charging. The plasma contactor provides a low impedance connection to space plasma via a plasma produced by an arc discharge. The hollow cathode of the plasma contactor is a refractory metal tube, through which xenon gas flows, which has a disk-shaped plate with a centered orifice at the downstream end of the tube. Within the cathode, arc attachment occurs primarily on a Type S low work function insert that is next to the orifice plate. This low work function insert is used to reduce cathode operating temperatures and energy requirements and, therefore, achieve increased efficiency and longevity. The operating characteristics and lifetime capabilities of this hollow cathode, however, are greatly reduced by oxygen bearing contaminants in the xenon gas. Furthermore, an optimized activation process, where the cathode is heated prior to ignition by an external heater to drive contaminants such as oxygen and moisture from the insert absorbed during exposure to ambient air, is necessary both for cathode longevity and a simplified power processor. In order to achieve the two year (approximately 17,500 hours) continuous operating lifetime requirement for the plasma contactor, a test program was initiated at NASA Lewis Research Center to demonstrate the extended lifetime capabilities of the hollow cathode. To date, xenon hollow cathodes have demonstrated extended lifetimes with one test having operated in excess of 8000 hours in an ongoing test utilizing contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey. The objectives of this study were to verify the transportability of the contamination control protocols developed by Sarver-Verhey and to evaluate cathode contamination control procedures, activation processes, and cathode-to-cathode dispersions in operating characteristics with time. These were accomplished by conducting a 2000 hour wear test of four hollow cathodes with different xenon gas purities and activation processes. The following will be presented: a description of the facility and test hardware, testing procedures and operating conditions, a discussion of test results, and conclusions.

  17. Laser filamentation induced air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Wang, Cheng; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Zhanxin; Wang, Wentao; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Chuang; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2013-04-22

    We numerically simulated the air-flow motion in a diffusion cloud chamber induced by femtosecond laser filaments for different chopping rates. A two dimensional model was employed, where the laser filaments were treated as a heat flux source. The simulated patterns of flow fields and maximum velocity of updraft compare well with the experimental results for the chopping rates of 1, 5, 15 and 150 Hz. A quantitative inconsistency appears between simulated and experimental maximum velocity of updraft for 1 kHz repetition rate although a similar pattern of flow field is obtained, and the possible reasons were analyzed. Based on the present simulated results, the experimental observation of more water condensation/snow at higher chopping rate can be explained. These results indicate that the specific way of laser filament heating plays a significant role in the laser-induced motion of air flow, and at the same time, our previous conclusion of air flow having an important effect on water condensation/snow is confirmed. PMID:23609636

  18. An atmospheric air gas-liquid diffuse discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container used for water sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Yang, De-Zheng; Wang, Wen-Chun; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhi-Jie; Tang, Kai; Song, Ying

    2013-12-01

    In this Letter, we report that the air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in quartz container with different bottom structures at atmospheric pressure. Optical diagnostic measurements show that bountiful chemically and biologically active species, which are beneficial for effective sterilization in some areas, are produced. Such diffuse plasmas are then used to treat drinking water containing the common microorganisms (Candida albicans and Escherichia coli). It is found that these plasmas can sterilize the microorganisms efficiently.

  19. Exploratory investigation of the use of area suction to eliminate air-flow separation in diffusers having large expansion angles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holzhauser, Curt A; Hall, Leo P

    1956-01-01

    Tests were made at a mean inlet Mach number of 0.2 with area suction applied to conical diffusers with expansion angles of 30 degrees and 50 degrees and exit to inlet area ratios of 2. Air-flow separation was eliminated with suction mass flows of 3 and 4 percent of the inlet mass flows for the 30 degrees and 50 degrees diffusers, respectively.

  20. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  1. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF TOXIC VOCS IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - LABORATORY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of a mixture of 42 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in humidified, purified air onto the solid adsorbent Carbopack X was evaluated under controlled laboratory conditions. The evaluation included variations in sample air temperature, relative humidity, and ozon...

  2. Magnetically Diffused Radial Electric-Arc Air Heater Employing Water-Cooled Copper Electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, R. F.; Davis, D. D., Jr.

    1962-01-01

    A magnetically rotated electric-arc air heater has been developed that is novel in that an intense magnetic field of the order of 10,000 to 25,000 gauss is employed. This field is supplied by a coil that is connected in series with the arc. Experimentation with this heater has shown that the presence of an intense magnetic field transverse to the arc results in diffusion of the arc and that the arc has a positive effective resistance. With the field coil in series with the arc, highly stable arc operation is obtained from a battery power supply. External ballast is not required to stabilize the arc when it is operating at maximum power level. The electrode erosion rate is so low that the airstream contamination is no more than 0.07 percent and may be substantially less.

  3. Soot Oxidation in Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, propylene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2,C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962), because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  4. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Ross, Howard B. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness, Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding; this approach provided successful correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  5. Soot Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Faeth, G. M.

    2000-01-01

    Soot oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round jets burning in coflowing air considering acetylene, ethylene, proplyene and propane as fuels. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation mainly occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of stable major gas species (N2, H2O, H2, 02, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, C3H6, and C3H8) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by the deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption technique and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. It was found that soot surface oxidation rates are not particularly affected by fuel type for laminar diffusion flames and are described reasonably well by the OH surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.10, (standard deviation of 0.07) with no significant effect of fuel type in this behavior; these findings are in good agreement with the classical laminar premixed flame measurements of Neoh et al. Finally, direct rates of surface oxidation by O2 were small compared to OH oxidation for present conditions, based on estimated O2 oxidation rates due to Nagle and Strickland-Constable, because soot oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 1.2% by volume.

  6. Shapes of Nonbuoyant Round Luminous Hydrocarbon/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, K.-C.; Faeth, G. M.; Sunderland, P. B.; Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.

    1999-01-01

    The shapes (luminous flame boundaries) of round luminous nonbuoyant soot-containing hydrocarbon/air laminar jet diffusion flames at microgravity were found from color video images obtained on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Test conditions included ethylene- and propane-fueled flames burning in still air at an ambient temperature of 300 K, ambient pressures of 35-130 kPa, initial jet diameters of 1.6 and 2.7 mm, and jet exit Reynolds numbers of 45-170. Present test times were 100-200 s and yielded steady axisymmetric flames that were close to the laminar smoke point (including flames both emitting and not emitting soot) with luminous flame lengths of 15-63 mm. The present soot-containing flames had larger luminous flame lengths than earlier ground-based observations having similar burner configurations: 40% larger than the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing low gravity flames observed using an aircraft (KC-135) facility due to reduced effects of accelerative disturbances and unsteadiness; roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-containing normal gravity flames due to the absence of effects of buoyant mixing and roughly twice as large as the luminous flame lengths of soot-free low gravity flames observed using drop tower facilities due to the presence of soot luminosity and possible reduced effects of unsteadiness. Simplified expressions to estimate the luminous flame boundaries of round nonbuoyant laminar jet diffusion flames were obtained from the classical analysis of Spalding (1979); this approach provided Successful Correlations of flame shapes for both soot-free and soot-containing flames, except when the soot-containing flames were in the opened-tip configuration that is reached at fuel flow rates near and greater than the laminar smoke point fuel flow rate.

  7. Soot Surface Oxidation in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; El-Leathy, A. M.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Soot surface oxidation was studied experimentally in laminar hydrocarbon/air diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were carried out along the axes of round fuel jets burning in coflowing dry air considering acetylene-nitrogen, ethylene, propyiene-nitrogen, propane and acetylene-benzene-nitrogen in the fuel stream. Measurements were limited to the initial stages of soot oxidation (carbon consumption less than 70%) where soot oxidation occurs at the surface of primary soot particles. The following properties were measured as a function of distance above the burner exit: soot concentrations by deconvoluted laser extinction, soot temperatures by deconvoluted multiline emission, soot structure by thermophoretic sampling and analysis using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), concentrations of major stable gas species (N2, H2O, H2, O2, CO, CO2, CH4, C2H2, C2H6, C3H6, C3H8, and C6H6) by sampling and gas chromatography, concentrations of some radical species (H, OH, O) by deconvoluted Li/LiOH atomic absorption and flow velocities by laser velocimetry. For present test conditions, it was found that soot surface oxidation rates were not affected by fuel type, that direct rates of soot surface oxidation by O2 estimated from Nagle and Strickland-Constable (1962) were small compared to observed soot surface oxidation rates because soot surface oxidation was completed near the flame sheet where O2 concentrations were less than 3% by volume, and that soot surface oxidation rates were described by the OH soot surface oxidation mechanism with a collision efficiency of 0.14 and an uncertainty (95% confidence) of +/- 0.04 when allowing for direct soot surface oxidation by O2, which is in reasonably good agreement with earlier observations of soot surface oxidation rates in both premixed and diffusion flames at atmospheric pressure.

  8. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix H

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  9. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation-O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  10. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix B

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and O2 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  11. Soot Formation in Laminar Acetylene/Air Diffusion Flames at Atmospheric Pressure. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, F.; Faeth, G. M.; Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The flame structure and soot-formation (soot nucleation and growth) properties of axisymmetric laminar coflowing jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Test conditions involved acetylene-nitrogen jets burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure. Measurements were limited to the axes of the flames and included soot concentrations, soot temperatures, soot structure, major gas species concentrations, radical species (H, OH, and O) concentrations, and gas velocities. The results show that as distance increases along the axes of the flames, detectable soot formation begins when significant H concentrations are present, and ends when acetylene concentrations become small. Species potentially associated with soot oxidation--O2, CO2, H2O, O, and OH-are present throughout the soot-formation region so that soot formation and oxidation proceed at the same time. Strong rates of soot growth compared to soot nucleation early in the soot-formation process, combined with increased rates of soot nucleation and oxidation as soot formation proceeds, causes primary soot particle diameters to reach a maximum relatively early in the soot-formation process. Aggregation of primary soot particles proceeds, however, until the final stages of soot oxidation. Present measurements of soot growth (corrected for soot oxidation) in laminar diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot growth in laminar premixed flames and exhibited encouraging agreement with existing hydrogen-abstraction/carbon-addition (HACA) soot growth mechanisms in the literature that were developed based on measurements within laminar premixed flames. Measured primary soot particle nucleation rates in the present laminar diffusion flames also were consistent with corresponding rates measured in laminar premixed flames and yielded a crude correlation in terms of acetylene and H concentrations and the temperature.

  12. Soot Surface Growth in Laminar Hydrocarbon/Air Diffusion Flames. Appendix J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    El-Leathy, A. M.; Xu, F.; Kim, C. H.; Faeth, G. M.; Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor); Urban, D. L. (Technical Monitor); Yuan, Z.-G. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The structure and soot surface growth properties of round laminar jet diffusion flames were studied experimentally. Measurements were made along the axes of ethylene-, propylene-propane- and acetylene-benzene-fueled flames burning in coflowing air at atmospheric pressure with the reactants at normal temperature. The measurements included soot structure, soot concentrations, soot temperatures, major gas species concentrations, some radial species (H, OH and 0) concentrations, and gas velocities. These measurements yielded the local flame properties that are thought to affect soot surface growth as well as local soot surface growth rates. When present results were combined with similar earlier observations of acetylene-fueled laminar jet diffusion flames, the results suggested that soot surface growth involved decomposition of the original fuel to form acetylene and H, which were the main reactants for soot surface growth, and that the main effect of the parent fuel on soot surface growth involved its yield of acetylene and H for present test conditions. Thus, as the distance increased along the axes of the flames, soot formation (which was dominated by soot surface growth) began near the cool core of the flow once acetylene and H appeared together and ended near the flame sheet when acetylene disappeared. Species mainly responsible for soot oxidation - OH and 02 were present throughout the soot formation region so that soot surface growth and oxidation proceeded at the same time. Present measurements of soot surface growth rates (corrected for soot surface oxidation) in laminar jet diffusion flames were consistent with earlier measurements of soot surface growth rates in laminar premixed flames and exhibited good agreement with existing Hydrogen-Abstraction/Carbon-Addition (HACA) soot surface growth mechanisms in the literature with steric factors in these mechanisms having values on the order of unity, as anticipated.

  13. Chemical response of methane/air diffusion flames to unsteady strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.

    1999-07-01

    Effects of unsteady strain rate on the response of methane/air diffusion flames are studied numerically. The numerical simulations are carried out for the finite-domain opposed flow configuration in which the nozzle exit velocities are prescribed as a function of time. The chemical kinetics is computed with the GRI mechanism v2.11 including NO{sub x} in methane/air combustion. The response of individual species to monochromatic oscillation in strain rate with various frequencies reveals that the fluctuation of slow species, such as CO and NO{sub x}, is quickly suppressed as the flow time scale decreases. Furthermore, it is observed that the maximum CO concentration is very insensitive to the variation in the scalar dissipation rate. It is also demonstrated that, for high-frequency oscillations, the scalar dissipation rate is a more appropriate parameter than strain rate to characterize the unsteady flame behavior. An extinction event due to an abrupt imposition of high strain rates is simulated by an impulsive velocity with various frequencies. For a fast impulse, a substantial overshoot in NO{sub 2} concentration is observed immediately after extinction. The overall fuel burning rate shows a weak response to the variation in characteristic unsteady time scale, while the emission indices for NO{sub x} show a monotonic decay in response as the impulse frequency increases.

  14. Chemical response of methane/air diffusion flames to unsteady strain rate

    SciTech Connect

    Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H.; Chen, J.Y.

    1998-03-01

    Effects of unsteady strain rate on the response of methane/air diffusion flames are studied. The authors use the finite-domain opposed flow configuration in which the nozzle exit velocity is imposed as a function of time. The GRI mechanism v2.11 is used for the detailed methane/air chemistry. The response of individual species to monochromatic oscillation in strain rate with various frequencies reveals that the fluctuation of slow species, such as CO and NO{sub x}, is more rapidly suppressed as the flow time scale decreases. It is also observed that the maximum CO concentration is very insensitive to the variation in the scalar dissipation rate. An extinction event due to an abrupt imposition of high strain rates is also simulated by an impulsive velocity with various frequencies. For a fast impulse, a substantial overshoot in NO{sub 2} concentration is observed after extinction. Finally, the overall fuel burning rate shows a nonmonotonic response to the variation in characteristic unsteady time scale, while the emission indices for NO{sub x} shows monotonic decay in response as frequency is increased.

  15. Velocity Fields of Axisymmetric Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames from LDV, PIV, and Numerical Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Humphreys, William M., Jr.; Bartram, Scott M.; Gartrell, Luther R.; Isaac, K. M.

    1995-01-01

    Laminar fuel-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) were studied using axisymmetric convergent-nozzle and straight-tube opposed jet burners (OJBs). The subject diagnostics were used to probe a systematic set of H2/N2-air CFDFs over wide ranges of fuel input (22 to 100% Ha), and input axial strain rate (130 to 1700 Us) just upstream of the airside edge, for both plug-flow and parabolic input velocity profiles. Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) was applied along the centerline of seeded air flows from a convergent nozzle OJB (7.2 mm i.d.), and Particle Imaging Velocimetry (PIV) was applied on the entire airside of both nozzle and tube OJBs (7 and 5 mm i.d.) to characterize global velocity structure. Data are compared to numerical results from a one-dimensional (1-D) CFDF code based on a stream function solution for a potential flow input boundary condition. Axial strain rate inputs at the airside edge of nozzle-OJB flows, using LDV and PIV, were consistent with 1-D impingement theory, and supported earlier diagnostic studies. The LDV results also characterized a heat-release hump. Radial strain rates in the flame substantially exceeded 1-D numerical predictions. Whereas the 1-D model closely predicted the max I min axial velocity ratio in the hot layer, it overpredicted its thickness. The results also support previously measured effects of plug-flow and parabolic input strain rates on CFDF extinction limits. Finally, the submillimeter-scale LDV and PIV diagnostics were tested under severe conditions, which reinforced their use with subcentimeter OJB tools to assess effects of aerodynamic strain, and fueVair composition, on laminar CFDF properties, including extinction.

  16. A low diffusive Lagrange-Remap scheme for the simulation of violent air-water free-surface flows.

    E-print Network

    for the solution of the volume-averaged equations, and a low diffusive compressive scheme for the advection, multiphase flow, air-water flow, free boundary, interface capturing, compressible fluid, finite volume. Among the family of conservative Finite Volume methods (FVM), the Lagrange-Remapped solvers [Van Leer

  17. Diffusion welding in air. [solid state welding of butt joint by fusion welding, surface cleaning, and heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. J.; Holko, K. H. (inventors)

    1974-01-01

    Solid state welding a butt joint by fusion welding the peripheral surfaces to form a seal is described along with, autogenetically cleaning the faying or mating surfaces of the joint by heating the abutting surfaces to 1,200 C and heating to the diffusion welding temperature in air.

  18. Experimental Method Development for Estimating Solid-phase Diffusion Coefficients and Material/Air Partition Coefficients of SVOCs

    EPA Science Inventory

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material-air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to es...

  19. Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/Water Interface

    E-print Network

    Majda, Marcin

    Headgroup Immersion Depth and Its Effect on the Lateral Diffusion of Amphiphiles at the Air/water interface to characterize the lateral mobilities of several long alkyl chain ferrocene amphiphiles strongly on the headgroup polarity, demonstrating that the immersion depth of the amphiphiles is the key

  20. Microengineered cathode interface studies

    SciTech Connect

    Kueper, T.; Doshi, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-10-01

    The overpotential at the cathode/electrolyte interface has been recognized as an important limitation on the performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This project is an effort to gain a scientific understanding of which interface features and conditions contribute to cathode polarization in SOFCs. The paper discusses three possible rate-limiting factors in the cathode reaction. The paper studies the electronic conductivity in the electrolyte, the ionic conductivity in the cathode, cathode geometry near the interface, and cathode surface area.

  1. Evaluation of passive diffusion bag and dialysis samplers in selected wells at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii, July 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Pravecek, Tasha

    2002-01-01

    Field comparisons of chemical concentrations obtained from dialysis samplers, passive diffusion bag samplers, and low-flow samplers showed generally close agreement in most of the 13 wells tested during July 2001 at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. The data for chloride, sulfate, iron, alkalinity, arsenic, and methane appear to show that the dialysis samplers are capable of accurately collecting a passive sample for these constituents. In general, the comparisons of volatile organic compound concentrations showed a relatively close correspondence between the two different types of diffusion samples and between the diffusion samples and the low-flow samples collected in most wells. Divergence appears to have resulted primarily from the pumping method, either producing a mixed sample or water not characteristic of aquifer water moving through the borehole under ambient conditions. The fact that alkalinity was not detected in the passive diffusion bag samplers, highly alkaline waters without volatilization loss from effervescence, which can occur when a sample is acidified for preservation. Both dialysis and passive diffusion bag samplers are relatively inexpensive and can be deployed rapidly and easily. Passive diffusion bag samplers are intended for sampling volatile organic compounds only, but dialysis samplers can be used to sample both volatile organic compounds and inorganic solutes. Regenerated cellulose dialysis samplers, however, are subject to biodegradation and probably should be deployed no sooner than 2 weeks prior to recovery. 1 U.S. Geological Survey, Columbia, South Carolina. 2 Air Florce Center for Environmental Excellence, San Antionio, Texas.

  2. Enhanced nitrogen removal in single-chamber microbial fuel cells with increased gas diffusion areas.

    PubMed

    Yan, Hengjing; Regan, John M

    2013-03-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with nitrifiers pre-enriched at the air cathodes have previously been demonstrated as a passive strategy for integrating nitrogen removal into current-generating bioelectrochemical systems. To further define system design parameters for this strategy, we investigated in this study the effects of oxygen diffusion area and COD/N ratio in continuous-flow reactors. Doubling the gas diffusion area by adding an additional air cathode or a diffusion cloth significantly increased the ammonia and COD removal rates (by up to 115% and 39%), ammonia removal efficiency (by up to 134%), the cell voltage and cathode potentials, and the power densities (by a factor of approximately 2). When the COD/N ratio was lowered from 13 to 3, we found up to 244% higher ammonia removal rate but at least 19% lower ammonia removal efficiency. An increase of COD removal rate by up to 27% was also found when the COD/N ratio was lowered from 11 to 3. The Coulombic efficiency was not affected by the additional air cathode, but decreased by an average of 11% with the addition of a diffusion cloth. Ammonia removal by assimilation was also estimated to understand the ammonia removal mechanism in these systems. These results showed that the doubling of gas diffusion area enhanced N and COD removal rates without compromising electrochemical performance. PMID:23097182

  3. Opposed jet diffusion flames of nitrogen-diluted hydrogen vs air - Axial LDA and CARS surveys; fuel/air rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Jarrett, Olin, Jr.; Antcliff, R. R.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study of H-air counterflow diffusion flames (CFDFs) is reported. Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners were used to form dish-shaped CFDFs centered by opposing laminar jets of H2/N2 and air in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for extinction and flame restoration limits are shown versus input H2 concentration. LDA velocity data and CARS temperature and absolute N2, O2 density data give detailed flame structure on the air side of the stagnation point. The results show that air jet velocity is a more fundamental and appropriate measure of H2-air CFDF extinction than input H2 mass flux or fuel jet velocity. It is proposed that the observed constancy of air jet velocity for fuel mixtures containing 80 to 100 percent H2 measure a maximum, kinetically controlled rate at which the CFDF can consume oxygen in air. Fuel velocity mainly measures the input jet momentum required to center an H2/N2 versus air CFDF.

  4. Dynamic Weakening (Extinction) of Simple Hydrocarbon-air Counterflow Diffusion Flames by Oscillatory Inflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G.; Kabaria, A.; Panigrahi, B.; Sammons, K.; Convery, J.; Wilson, L.

    2005-01-01

    This study of laminar non-premixed HC-air flames used an Oscillatory-input Opposed Jet Burner (OOJB) system developed from a previously well-characterized 7.2-mm Pyrex-nozzle OJB system. Over 600 dynamic Flame Strength (FS) measurements were obtained on unanchored (free-floating) laminar Counterflow Diffusion Flames (CFDF's). Flames were stabilized using plug inflows having steady-plus-sinusoidal axial velocities of varied magnitude, frequency, f, up to 1600 Hz, and phase angle from 0 (most data) to 360 degrees. Dynamic FS is defined as the maximum average air input velocity (U(sub air), at nozzle exit) a CFDF can sustain before strain-induced extinction occurs due to prescribed oscillatory peak-to-peak velocity inputs superimposed on steady inputs. Initially, dynamic flame extinction data were obtained at low f, and were supported by 25-120 Hz Hot-Wire cold-flow velocity data at nozzle exits. Later, expanded extinction data were supported by 4-1600 Hz Probe Microphone (PM) pk/pk P data at nozzle exits. The PM data were first obtained without flows, and later with cold stagnating flows, which better represent speaker-diaphragm dynamics during runs. The PM approach enabled characterizations of Dynamic Flame Weakening (DFW) of CFDF's from 8 to 1600 Hz. DFW was defined as % decrease in FS per Pascal of pk/pk P oscillation, namely, DFW = - 100 d(U(sub air) / U(sub air),0Hz) / d(pkpk P). The linear normalization with respect to acoustic pressure magnitude (and steady state (SS) FS) led to a DFW unaffected by strong internal resonances. For the C2H4/N2-air system, from 8 to 20 Hz, DFW is constant at 8.52 plus or minus 0.20 (% weakening)/Pa. This reflects a quasi-steady flame response to an acoustically induced dU(sub air)/dP. Also, it is surprisingly independent of C2H4/N2 mole fraction due to normalization by SS FS. From 20 to approximately 150 Hz, the C2H4/N2 air-flames weakened progressively less, with an inflection at approximately 70 Hz, and became asymptotically insensitive (DFW approximately 0) at approximately 300 Hz, which continued to 1600 Hz. The DFW of CH4-air flames followed a similar pattern, but showed much greater weakening than C2H4/N2-air flames; i.e., the quasi-steady DFW (8 to approximately 15 Hz) was 44.3 %/Pa, or approximately 5x larger, even though the 0 Hz (SS) FS was only 3.0 x smaller. The quasi-steady DFW's of C3H8-air and C2H6-air were intermediate at 34.8 and 20.9 %Pa, respectively. The DFW profiles of all four fuels, at various frequencies, correlated well but non-linearly with respective SS FS's. Notably, the DFW profile for C3H8 air fell more rapidly in the range greater than 15 to 60 Hz, compared with the 1- and 2-carbon fuels. This may indicate a shift in chemical kinetics, and/or O2 transport to a flame that moved closer to the fuel-side. In conclusion, Dynamic Flame Weakening limits appear significant and unique for each fuel, and correlate closely, but non-linearly, with Steady-State Flame Strengths at any given frequency. For reasons unknown, the dynamic flames didn't weaken more at intermediate frequencies (e.g., at 20-50 Hz) than they did at low frequencies (less than 15 Hz), where quasi-steady weakening appears to dominate. Quasi-steady flame weakening ostensibly represents a transient input strain rate maximum that just exceeds the steady-state strain-rate-limited extinction limit for a few cycles. Clearly, further detailed mechanistic understanding is needed in the fall-off region.

  5. Hollow cathodes for arcjet thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luebben, Craig R.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1987-01-01

    In an attempt to prevent exterior spot emission, hollow cathode bodies and orifice plates were constructed from boron nitride which is an electrical insulator, but the orifice plates melted and/or eroded at high interelectrode pressures. The most suitable hollow cathodes tested included a refractory metal orifice plate in a boron nitride body, with the insert insulated electrically from the orifice plate. In addition, the hollow cathode interior was evacuated to assure a low pressure at the insert surface, thus promoting diffuse electron emission. At high interelectrode pressures, the electrons tended to flow through the orifice plate rather than through the orifice, which could result in overheating of the orifice plate. Using a carefully aligned centerline anode, electron flow through the orifice could be sustained at interelectrode pressures up to 500 torr - but the current flow path still occasionally jumped from the orifice to the orifice plate. Based on these tests, it appears that a hollow cathode would operate most effectively at pressures in the arcjet regime with a refractory, chemically stable, and electrically insulating cathode body and orifice plate.

  6. Study on electrical characteristics of barrier-free atmospheric air diffuse discharge generated by nanosecond pulses and long wire electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Teng, Yun; Liu, Lun; Pan, Yuan

    2014-07-15

    In room-temperature atmospheric air, the large-scale diffuse plasmas can be generated via high-voltage nanosecond pulses with short rise-time and wire electrodes. Diffuse discharge with the wire electrode length up to 110.0?cm and the discharge spacing of several centimeters has been investigated in this paper. Electrical characteristics of diffuse discharge have been analyzed by their optical photographs and measuring of the voltage and current waveforms. Experimental results show the electrode spacing, and the length of wire electrodes can influence the intensity and mode transition of diffuse discharge. The characteristic of current waveforms is that there are several current oscillation peaks at the time of applied pulsed voltage peak, and at the tail of applied pulse, the conduction current component will compensate the displacement one so that the measured current is unidirectional in diffuse discharge mode. The transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge is always with the increasing of conduction current density. As for nanosecond pulses with long tail, the long wire electrodes are help for generating non-equilibrium diffuse plasmas.

  7. Rechargeability of Li-air cathodes pre-filled with discharge products using an ether-based electrolyte solution: implications for cycle-life of Li-air cells.

    PubMed

    Meini, Stefano; Tsiouvaras, Nikolaos; Schwenke, K Uta; Piana, Michele; Beyer, Hans; Lange, Lukas; Gasteiger, Hubert A

    2013-07-21

    The instability of currently used electrolyte solutions and of the carbon support during charge-discharge in non-aqueous lithium-oxygen cells can lead to discharge products other than the desired Li2O2, such as Li2CO3, which is believed to reduce cycle-life. Similarly, discharge in an O2 atmosphere which contains H2O and CO2 impurities would lead to LiOH and Li2CO3 discharge products. In this work we therefore investigate the rechargeability of model cathodes pre-filled with four possible Li-air cell discharge products, namely Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, and Li2O. Using Online Electrochemical Mass Spectrometry (OEMS), we determined the charge voltages and the gases evolved upon charge of pre-filled electrodes, thus determining the reversibility of the formation/electrooxidation reactions. We show that Li2O2 is the only reversible discharge product in ether-based electrolyte solutions, and that the formation of Li2CO3, LiOH, or Li2O is either irreversible and/or reacts with the electrolyte solution or the carbon during its oxidation. PMID:23748698

  8. Liftoff and blowoff of a diffusion flame between parallel streams of fuel and air

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-Tarrazo, Eduardo; Vera, Marcos; Linan, Amable

    2006-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented to describe the liftoff and blowoff of a diffusion flame in the mixing layer between two parallel streams of fuel (mainly methane diluted with nitrogen) and air emerging from porous walls. The analysis, which takes into account the effects of thermal expansion, assumes a one-step overall Arrhenius reaction, where the activation energy E is allowed to vary to reproduce the variations of the planar flame propagation velocity with the equivalence ratio. First, we describe the steady flame-front structure when stabilized close to the porous wall (attached flame regime). Then, we analyze the case where the flame front is located far away from the porous wall, at a distance x{sub f}' such that, upstream of the flame front, the mixing layer has a self-similar structure (lifted flame regime). For steady lifted flames, the results, given here in the case when the fuel and air streams are injected with the same velocity, relate U{sub f}'/S{sub L}, the front velocity (relative to the upstream flow) measured with the planar stoichiometric flame velocity, with the Damkohler number D{sub m}=({delta}{sub m}/{delta}{sub L}){sup 2}, based on the thickness, {delta}{sub m}, of the nonreacting mixing layer at the flame-front position and the laminar flame thickness, {delta}{sub L}. For large values of D{sub m}, the results, presented here for a wide range of dilutions of the fuel stream, provide values of the front propagation velocity that are in good agreement with previous experimental results, yielding well-defined conditions for blowoff. The calculated flame-front velocity can also be used to describe the transient flame-front dynamics after ignition by an external energy source.

  9. Air Dehydration Membranes for Nonaqueous Lithium-Air Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jian; Xu, Wu; Li, Xiaohong S.; Liu, Wei

    2010-06-11

    In this paper, several types of new membranes were innovated and used as an O2-selective and H2O barrier films attached onto the cathode of non-aqueous Li-air batteries for continuous supplying of dry air into the batteries from ambient air. The membranes were prepared by depositing an O2/H2O selective coating layer on the exterior surface of a newly-invented thin porous Ni substrate sheet at thickness of ~50µm. The coatings tried include hydrophobic silicalite type zeolite and Teflon (PTFE) materials. The melted PTFE-membrane on the porous Ni sheet at 360?C enabled the Li-air batteries with Ketjen black carbon air electrodes to operate in ambient air (with 20% RH) for 21 days with a specific capacity of 1022 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 2792 Wh/kg carbon. Its performance is much better than the battery assembled with the same battery material but by use of a commercial, porous PTFE diffusion membranes as the moisture barrier layer on the cathode, which only had a discharge time of five and half days corresponding to a specific capacity of 267 mAh/g carbon and a specific energy of 704Wh/kg carbon. The Li-air battery with the present selective membrane barrier layer even showed better performance in ambient air operation (20% RH) than the reference battery tested in the dry air box (< 1% RH).

  10. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230/s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit In the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experiments] conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous Annie lengths of 49-64 mm. Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging, soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, not structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer. The present flames were larger, and emitted soot men readily, than comparable observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  11. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    SciTech Connect

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-03-15

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  12. Development of a diffuse air-argon plasma source using a dielectric-barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Tang Jie; Jiang Weiman; Zhao Wei; Wang Yishan; Li Shibo; Wang Haojing; Duan Yixiang; Research Center of Analytical Instrumentation, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064

    2013-01-21

    A stable diffuse large-volume air plasma source was developed by using argon-induced dielectric-barrier discharges at atmospheric pressure. This plasma source can be operated in a filamentary discharge with the average areal power density of 0.27 W/cm{sup 2} and the gas temperature of 315{+-}3 K. Spatial measurement of emission spectrum and temperature indicates that this plasma is uniform in the central region along the transverse direction. It is also found that the formation of diffuse air plasma mainly lies in the creation of sufficient seed electrons by the Penning effect through collisions between two argon or nitrogen metastables at low electric fields.

  13. Carbon-containing cathodes for enhanced electron emission

    DOEpatents

    Cao, Renyu (Cupertino, CA); Pan, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Vergara, German (Madrid, ES); Fox, Ciaran (Los Altos, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A cathode has electropositive atoms directly bonded to a carbon-containing substrate. Preferably, the substrate comprises diamond or diamond-like (sp.sup.3) carbon, and the electropositive atoms are Cs. The cathode displays superior efficiency and durability. In one embodiment, the cathode has a negative electron affinity (NEA). The cathode can be used for field emission, thermionic emission, or photoemission. Upon exposure to air or oxygen, the cathode performance can be restored by annealing or other methods. Applications include detectors, electron multipliers, sensors, imaging systems, and displays, particularly flat panel displays.

  14. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still had a thin coating of glassy carbon surrounding them in a sheath-like manner. This glassy carbon, or nano-crystalline graphite, is likely to be a poor conductor due to phonon scattering, and should actually be deleterious for extracting electrons with electric fields. While we did not achieve the field emission reported for single-wall carbon nanotubes that spurred the idea for this project, at the year's very end, we had a breakthrough in materials growth and learned to control the growth of very-small diameter nanotubes ranging from 1.4 to 7 nm. The 1.4-nm nanotubes are single-walled and grow at only 530 C. This is the lowest temperature known to result in single-wall carbon nanotubes, and may be very important for many applications that where certain substrates could not be used due to the high temperatures commonly used for CNT growth. Critically important for field emission, these small diameter nanotubes, consisting of only a few concentric graphene cylindrical walls, do not show the presence of a poorly-conductive sheath material. Therefore, these nanotubes will almost definitely have superior field emission properties to those we already measured, and it is possible that they could provide the necessary field emission to make this project successful. Controlled spacing and lengths of these single-wall nanotubes have yet to be explored, along with correlating their structures to their improved field emission. Unfortunately, we did not discover the methods to grow these highly-crystalline and small diameter CNTs until late in the year. Since we did not achieve the necessary emission properties by mid-year, the project was ''prematurely'' terminated prior to the start of the second year. However, it should be noted that with the late developments, this work has not hit the proverbial ''brick wall''. Clearly the potential still exists to reproduce and even exceed the high emission results reported for randomly-oriented and curly single-wall carbon nanotubes, both in terms of total field emitting currents and perhaps more importantly, in reproducibility.

  15. Effect of dynamic diffusion of air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media on the microhardness of ionic crystals with juvenile surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klyavin, O. V.; Fedorov, V. Yu.; Chernov, Yu. M.; Shpeizman, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The load dependences of the microhardness of surface layers of NaCl and LiF ionic single crystals with juvenile surfaces and surfaces exposed to air for a long time measured in the air, nitrogen, and helium gaseous media have been investigated. It has been found that there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness as a function of the load for LiF crystals indented in helium and after their aging in air, as well as a weaker effect of the nitrogen and air gaseous media on the studied dependences as compared to NaCl crystals. It has also been found that, after the aging of the surface of NaCl crystals in air, there is a change in the sign of the derivative of the microhardness in the nitrogen and air gaseous media, as well as a pronounced change in the microhardness as a function of the time of aging the samples in air as compared to the weaker effect of the gaseous medium for LiF crystals. The obtained data have been analyzed in terms of the phenomenon of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of particles from the external medium into crystalline materials during their plastic deformation along the nucleating and moving dislocations. It has been shown that this phenomenon affects the microhardness through changes in the intensity of dislocation multiplication upon the formation of indentation rosettes in different gaseous media. The performed investigation of the microhardness of the juvenile surface of NaCl and LiF crystals in different gaseous media has revealed for the first time a different character of dislocation-dynamic diffusion of these media in a "pure" form.

  16. Air

    MedlinePLUS

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  17. Using a glass fiber separator in a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell shortens start-up time and improves anode performance at ambient and mesophilic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Liang, Peng; Shi, Juan; Wei, Jincheng; Huang, Xia

    2013-02-01

    A shorter start-up time and highly negative anode potentials are needed to improve single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Using a glass fiber separator reduced the start-up time from 10d to 8d at 20°C, and from 4d to 2d at 30°C, and enhanced coulombic efficiency (CE) from <60% to 89% (20°C) and 87% (30°C). Separators also reduced anode potentials by 20-190mV, charge transfer resistances by 76% (20°C) and 19% (30°C), and increased CV peak currents by 24% (20°C) and 8% (30°C) and the potential range for redox activity (-0.55 to 0.10mV vs. -0.49 to -0.24mV at 20°C). Using a glass fiber separator in an air-cathode MFC, combined with inoculation at a mesophilic temperature, are excellent strategies to shorten start-up time and to enhance anode performance and CE. PMID:23334007

  18. Diffusion sampler testing at Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego County, California, November 1999 to January 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peters, Brian C.

    2000-01-01

    Volatile organic compound concentrations in water from diffusion samplers were compared to concentrations in water obtained by low-flow purging at 15 observation wells at the Naval Air Station North Island, San Diego, California. Multiple diffusion samplers were installed in the wells. In general, comparisons using bladder pumps and diffusion samplers showed similar volatile organic carbon concentrations. In some wells, sharp concentration gradients were observed, such as an increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene concentration from 100 to 2,600 micrograms per liter over a vertical distance of only 3.4 feet. In areas where such sharp gradients were observed, concentrations in water obtained by low-flow sampling at times reflected an average concentration over the area of influence; however, concentrations obtained by using the diffusion sampler seemed to represent the immediate vicinity of the sampler. When peristaltic pumps were used to collect ground-water samples by low-flow purging, the volatile organic compound concentrations commonly were lower than concentrations obtained by using diffusion samplers. This difference may be due to loss of volatiles by degassing under negative pressures in the sampling lines induced while using the peristaltic pump, mixing in the well screen, or possible short-circuiting of water from an adjacent depth. Diffusion samplers placed in buckets of freephase jet fuel (JP-5) and Stoddard solvent from observation wells did not show evidence of structural integrity loss during the 2 months of equilibration, and volatile organic compounds detected in the free-phase fuel also were detected in the water from the diffusion samplers.

  19. Counterflow diffusion flames of hydrogen, and hydrogen plus methane, ethylene, propane, and silane vs. air - Strain rates at extinction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, L. G.

    1991-01-01

    Five coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJBs) with tube diameter D(T) of 1.8-10 mm and 5 mm conical nozzles were used to form dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of nitrogen and hydrocarbon-diluted H2 versus air in an argon-purged chamber at 1 atm. Area-averaged air jet velocities at blowoff of the central flame, U(air), characterized extinction of the airside flame as functions of input H2 concentration on the fuelside. A master plot of extensive U(air) data at blowoff versus D(T) shows that U(air) varies linearly with D(T). This and other data sets are used to find that nozzle OJB results for U(air)/diameter average 4.24 + or - 0.28 times larger than tubular OJB results for the same fuel compositions. Critical radial velocity gradients consistent with one-dimensional stagnation point boundary theory and with plug flow inputs are estimated. The results compare favorably with published numerical results based only on potential flow.

  20. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 air contaminants on critical airside strain rates for extinction of hydrogen-air counterflow diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Northam, G. B.; Wilson, L. G.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Dish-shaped counterflow diffusion flames centered by opposing laminar jets of H2 and clean and contaminant O2/N2 mixtures in an argon bath at 1 atm were used to study the effects of contaminants on critical airside strain. The jet velocities for both flame extinction and restoration are found for a wide range of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet. The tests are also conducted for a variety of input H2 concentrations. The results are compared with those from several other studies.

  1. Opposed jet burner studies of effects of CO, CO2, and N2 air-contaminants on hydrogen-air diffusion flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guerra, Rosemary; Pellett, Gerald L.; Northam, G. Burton; Wilson, Lloyd G.

    1987-01-01

    The blowoff/restore characteristics for jets of various H2/N2 mixtures opposed to jets of air contaminated by N2, CO, and CO2 have been determined using a counterflow diffusion flame formed by a tubular opposed jet burner. Both blowoff and restore limits are found to be sensitive to fuel and air composition. Empirically derived variations in the limits of the average mass flux of incoming H2 with percent contaminant, at fixed incoming fuel and H2/O2 inputs, are used to quantify the effects of oxygen dilution, flame augmentation, and flame retardation by N2, CO, and CO2 contaminants. The implications of the results are discussed.

  2. Surface diffusion control of the photocatalytic oxidation in air/TiO2 heterogeneous reactors

    E-print Network

    Tsekov, R

    2015-01-01

    The diffusion of superoxide radical anions on the surface of TiO2 catalysts is theoretically considered as an important step in the kinetics of photocatalytic oxidation of toxic pollutants. A detailed analysis is performed to discriminate the effects of rotation, anion and adsorption bonds vibrations on the diffusion coefficient. A resonant dependence of the diffusivity on the lattice parameters of the TiO2 surface is discovered showing that the most rapid diffusion takes place when the lattice parameters are twice larger than the bond length of the superoxide radical anions. Whereas the rotation and vibrations normal to the catalyst surface are important, the anion bond vibrations do not affect the diffusivity due to their low amplitudes as compared to the lattice parameters.

  3. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R. (San Jose, CA); Ives, R. Lawrence (Saratoga, CA)

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  4. Nonlinear analysis of polymer electrolyte fuel cell dynamics with cathode two-phase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkholder, Michael; Litster, Shawn

    2013-11-01

    Water management in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) must be optimized to minimize parasitic costs. Removing water with excessive air flow rates at low-current, low-power conditions can be very parasitic, but these conditions can be unstable from the two-phase slug flow in the cathode air-delivery microchannels that occurs from the intrinsically low air and water flow rates. In this work, we use nonlinear analysis to understand the effect that varying currents and air flow rates have on PEFC dynamics. We estimate the dimension and entropy invariants indicative of dynamical complexity and stability from a reconstructed state space embedded using PEFC voltage data. We show that the estimated invariants can be correlated to the channel two-phase flow regime. We also investigate autocorrelation in the voltage signal by using diffusion analysis to estimate Hurst exponents. Lastly, we propose a reduced order map for application to real time PEFC water management.

  5. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  6. Discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide cathodes R.P. RAMASAMY1

    E-print Network

    Popov, Branko N.

    Discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide cathodes R.P. RAMASAMY1 , C. FEGER2 , T. STRANGE words: cathode performance, diffusion coefficient, impedance, lithium primary batteries, silver vanadium oxide Abstract The discharge characteristics of silver vanadium oxide (SVO) as a cathode in lithium

  7. Pressed boride cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolski, W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of experimental studies of emission cathodes made from lanthanum, yttrium, and gadolinium hexaborides are presented. Maximum thermal emission was obtained from lanthanum hexaboride electrodes. The hexaboride cathodes operated stably under conditions of large current density power draw, at high voltages and poor vacuum. A microtron electron gun with a lanthanum hexaboride cathode is described.

  8. Low cost fuel cell diffusion layer configured for optimized anode water management

    DOEpatents

    Owejan, Jon P; Nicotera, Paul D; Mench, Matthew M; Evans, Robert E

    2013-08-27

    A fuel cell comprises a cathode gas diffusion layer, a cathode catalyst layer, an anode gas diffusion layer, an anode catalyst layer and an electrolyte. The diffusion resistance of the anode gas diffusion layer when operated with anode fuel is higher than the diffusion resistance of the cathode gas diffusion layer. The anode gas diffusion layer may comprise filler particles having in-plane platelet geometries and be made of lower cost materials and manufacturing processes than currently available commercial carbon fiber substrates. The diffusion resistance difference between the anode gas diffusion layer and the cathode gas diffusion layer may allow for passive water balance control.

  9. Nanoflakes-assembled three-dimensional hollow-porous v2 o5 as lithium storage cathodes with high-rate capacity.

    PubMed

    Mai, Liqiang; An, Qinyou; Wei, Qiulong; Fei, Jiayang; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Xu; Zhao, Yunlong; Yan, Mengyu; Wen, Wen; Xu, Lin

    2014-08-13

    Three-dimensional (3D) hollow-porous vanadium pentoxide (V2 O5 ) quasi-microspheres are synthesized by a facile solvothermal method followed by annealing at 450 °C in air. The interconnected hollow-porous networks facilitate the kinetics of lithium-ion diffusion and improve the performance of V2 O5 to achieve a high capacity and remarkable rate capability as a cathode material for lithium batteries. PMID:24711281

  10. Effects of H2O, CO2, and N2 Air Contaminants on Critical Airside Strain Rates for Extinction of Hydrogen-Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.; Guerra, Rosemary

    1989-01-01

    Coaxial tubular opposed jet burners (OJB) were used to form dish shaped counterflow diffusion flames (CFDF), centered by opposing laminar jets of H2, N2 and both clean and contaminated air (O2/N2 mixtures) in an argon bath at 1 atm. Jet velocities for flame extinction and restoration limits are shown versus wide ranges of contaminant and O2 concentrations in the air jet, and also input H2 concentration. Blowoff, a sudden breaking of CFDF to a stable ring shape, occurs in highly stretched stagnation flows and is generally believed to measure kinetically limited flame reactivity. Restore, a sudden restoration of central flame, is a relatively new phenomenon which exhibits a H2 dependent hysteresis from Blowoff. For 25 percent O2 air mixtures, mole for mole replacement of 25 percent N2 contaminant by steam increased U(air) or flame strength at Blowoff by about 5 percent. This result is consistent with laminar burning velocity results from analogous substitution of steam for N2 in a premixed stoichiometric H2-O2-N2 (or steam) flame, shown by Koroll and Mulpuru to promote a 10 percent increase in experimental and calculated laminar burning velocity, due to enhanced third body efficiency of water in: H + O2 + M yields HO2 + M. When the OJB results were compared with Liu and MacFarlane's experimental laminar burning velocity of premixed stoichiometric H2 + air + steam, a crossover occurred, i.e., steam enhanced OJB flame strength at extinction relative to laminar burning velocity.

  11. Sublimation kinetics and diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX in air by thermogravimetry.

    PubMed

    Hikal, Walid M; Weeks, Brandon L

    2014-07-01

    The diffusion coefficients of explosives are crucial in their trace detection and lifetime estimation. We report on the experimental values of diffusion coefficients of three of the most important explosives in both military and industry: TNT, PETN, and RDX. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) was used to determine the sublimation rates of TNT, PETN, and RDX powders in the form of cylindrical billets. The TGA was calibrated using ferrocene as a standard material of well-characterized sublimation rates and vapor pressures to determine the vapor pressures of TNT, PETN, and RDX. The determined sublimation rates and vapor pressures were used to indirectly determine the diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX for the first time. A linear log-log dependence of the diffusion coefficients on temperature is observed for the three materials. The diffusion coefficients of TNT, PETN, and RDX at 273 K were determined to be 5.76×10(-6)m(2)/sec, 4.94×10(-6)m(2)/s, and 5.89×10(-6)m(2)/s, respectively. Values are in excellent agreement with the theoretical values in literature. PMID:24840410

  12. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Singh, Prabhakar; Mahapatra, Manoj K.; Wachsman, E. D.; Liu, Meilin; Gerdes, Kirk R.

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.

  13. Spray-on polyvinyl alcohol separators and impact on power production in air-cathode microbial fuel cells with different solution conductivities.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Daniel L; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Hickner, Michael A; Logan, Bruce E

    2014-11-01

    Separators are used to protect cathodes from biofouling and to avoid electrode short-circuiting, but they can adversely affect microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance. A spray method was used to apply a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) separator to the cathode. Power densities were unaffected by the PVA separator (339±29mW/m(2)), compared to a control lacking a separator in a low conductivity solution (1mS/cm) similar to wastewater. Power was reduced with separators in solutions typical of laboratory tests (7-13mS/cm), compared to separatorless controls. The PVA separator produced more power in a separator assembly (SEA) configuration (444±8mW/m(2)) in the 1mS/cm solution, but power was reduced if a PVA or wipe separator was used in higher conductivity solutions with either Pt or activated carbon catalysts. Spray and cast PVA separators performed similarly, but the spray method is preferred as it was easier to apply and use. PMID:25260178

  14. Combustion rate limits of hydrogen plus hydrocarbon fuel: Air diffusion flames from an opposed jet burner technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, Lloyd G.; Reeves, Ronald N.; Northam, G. Burton

    1987-01-01

    Combustion of H2/hydrocarbon (HC) fuel mixtures may be considered in certain volume-limited supersonic airbreathing propulsion applications. Effects of HC addition to H2 were evaluated, using a recent argon-bathed, coaxial, tubular opposed jet burner (OJB) technique to measure the extinction limits of counterflow diffusion flames. The OJB flames were formed by a laminar jet of (N2 and/or HC)-diluted H2 mixture opposed by a similar jet of air at ambient conditions. The OJB data, derived from respective binary mixtures of H2 and methane, ethylene, or propane HCs, were used to characterize BLOWOFF and RESTORE. BLOWOFF is a sudden breaking of the dish-shaped OJB flame to a stable torus or ring shape, and RESTORE marks sudden restoration of the central flame by radial inward flame propagation. BLOWOFF is a measure of kinetically-limited flame reactivity/speed under highly stretched, but relatively ideal impingement flow conditions. RESTORE measures inward radial flame propagation rate, which is sensitive to ignition processes in the cool central core. It is concluded that relatively small molar amounts of added HC greatly reduce the reactivity characteristics of counterflow hydrogen-air diffusion flames, for ambient initial conditions.

  15. LAMINAR METHANE-AIR DIFFUSION FLAME WITH CHLORINE IMPURITIES: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extended abstract gives preliminary results of exploratory tests, conducted by adding chlorine to the fuel side of a well characterized methane-air flame, to study the fundamental processes accompanying the combustion of chlorinated hydrocarbons. (NOTE: Formation of products ...

  16. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    SciTech Connect

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-?} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  17. Sensitivity of Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations to the vertical diffusion parameterization during convective meteorological situations

    SciTech Connect

    Nowacki, P.; Samson, P.J.; Sillman, S.

    1996-10-01

    It is shown that Urban Airshed Model (UAM-IV) calculated air pollutant concentrations during photochemical smog episodes in Atlanta, Georgia, depend strongly on the numerical parameterization of the daytime vertical diffusivity. Results found suggest that vertical mixing is overestimated by the UAM-IV during unstable daytime conditions, as calculated vertical diffusivity values exceed measured and comparable literature values. Although deviations between measured and UAM-IV calculated air pollutant concentrations may only in part be due the UAM-IV diffusivity parameterization, results indicate the large error potential in vertical diffusivity parameterization. Easily implemented enhancements to UAM-IV algorithms are proposed, thus improving UAM-IV modeling performance during unstable stratification. 38 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Noise control of pneumatic percussion drills. [considering air exhaust flow diffusion and vibration damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darabont, A.; Soiman, S.

    1974-01-01

    Noise sources in pneumatic drills are studied bringing to light the fact that air exhaust is the most important source. The present state of the art of noise control is discussed for pneumatic percussion drills abroad, indicating the different solutions adopted in this respect. Drills produced in Rumania are described and the results of noise measurements are shown.

  19. CO2 isotopes as tracers of firn air diffusion and age in an Arctic ice cap with summer melting, Devon Island, Canada

    E-print Network

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    CO2 isotopes as tracers of firn air diffusion and age in an Arctic ice cap with summer melting zone from 50 to 60 m depth. A firn-ice age profile was produced from density measurements of 54.9 (+6.0/À12.0) years for firn air at 60 m depth in 140-year-old ice. Thus CO2 has a mean age 85

  20. Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

  1. Experimental method development for estimating solid-phase diffusion coefficients and material/air partition coefficients of SVOCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoyu; Guo, Zhishi; Roache, Nancy F.

    2014-06-01

    The solid-phase diffusion coefficient (Dm) and material/air partition coefficient (Kma) are key parameters for characterizing the sources and transport of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) in the indoor environment. In this work, a new experimental method was developed to estimate parameters Dm and Kma. The SVOCs chosen for study were polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, including PCB-52, PCB-66, PCB-101, PCB-110, and PCB-118. The test materials included polypropylene, high density polyethylene, low density polyethylene, polytetrafluoroethylene, polyether ether ketone, glass, stainless steel and concrete. Two 53-L environmental chambers were connected in series, with the relatively stable SVOCs source in the source chamber and the test materials, made as small “buttons”, in the test chamber. Prior to loading the test chamber with the test materials, the test chamber had been dosed with SVOCs for 12 days to “coat” the chamber walls. During the tests, the material buttons were removed from the test chamber at different exposure times to determine the amount of SVOC absorbed by the buttons. SVOC concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the test chamber were also monitored. The data were used to estimate the partition and diffusion coefficients by fitting a sink model to the experimental data. The parameters obtained were employed to predict the accumulation of SVOCs in the sink materials using an existing mass transfer model. The model prediction agreed reasonably well with the experimental data.

  2. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  3. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    DOEpatents

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  4. DIFFUSIVE EXCHANGE OF GASEOUS POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS AND POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS ACROSS THE AIR-WATER INTERFACE OF THE CHESAPEAKE BAY. (R825245)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dissolved and gas-phase concentrations of nine polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 46 polychlorinated biphenyl congeners were measured at eight sites on the Chesapeake Bay at four different times of the year to estimate net diffusive air-water gas exchange rates. Gaseous PAHs ar...

  5. Application of a Reynolds Stress turbulence model to a supersonic hydrogen-air diffusion flame

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandrasekhar, R.; Tiwari, S. N.

    1991-01-01

    A second-order differential Reynolds Stress turbulence model has been applied to the Favre-averaged Navier-Stokes equations for the study of supersonic flows undergoing hydrogen-air chemical reactions. An assumed Beta Probability Density Function is applied to account for the chemical source terms in the conservation equations. An algebraic Reynolds Flux model is used for the fluctuating density-velocity as well as the species mass fraction-velocity correlations. The variances of temperature and species fluctuations are also modelled using an algebraic flux technique. A seven-species, seven-reaction finite rate chemistry mechanism is used to simulate the combustion processes. The resulting formulation is validated by comparison with experimental data on reacting supersonic axisymmetric jets. Results obtained for specific conditions indicate that the effect of chemical reaction on the turbulence is significant.

  6. Lightweight Cathodes For Nickel Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britton, Doris L.

    1996-01-01

    Lightweight cathodes for rechargeable nickel-based electrochemical cells undergoing development. In cathodes, mats of nickel fibers are substrates providing structural support of, and electrical contact with, active cathode material. Offers specific energies greater than sintered nickel plaque cathodes. Electrodes used in rechargeable batteries for applications in which weight major concern, including laptop computers, cellular phones, flashlights, soldiers' backpacks, and electric vehicles.

  7. A model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Brophy, J. R.

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a new model of hollow cathode plasma chemistry based on the observation that xenon ion mobility is diffusion limited due to resonant charge exchange reactions. The model shows that vapor phase barium atoms are ionized almost immediately and electric fields accelerate the ions upstream from the emission zone. We have also applied the model to the orifice region, where the resultant ion generation profile correlates with previously reported orifice erosion.

  8. Cathodes - Technological review

    SciTech Connect

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-16

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  9. Cathodes - Technological review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina

    2014-06-01

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  10. Analysis of turbulent free-jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.; Glass, I. I.; Evans, J. S.

    1979-01-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of the nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of an axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel ambient air stream. The effective turbulent transport properties are determined by means of a two-equation model of turbulence. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight elementary reactions among six chemical species: H, O, H2O, OH, O2 and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations was solved by using an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions were obtained at two downstream locations for some important variables affecting the flow development, such as the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate. The results show that these variables attain their peak values on the axis of symmetry. The computed distribution of velocity, temperature, and mass fractions of the chemical species gives a complete description of the flow field. The numerical predictions were compared with two sets of experimental data. Good qualitative agreement was obtained.

  11. Analysis of turbulent free jet hydrogen-air diffusion flames with finite chemical reaction rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sislian, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    The nonequilibrium flow field resulting from the turbulent mixing and combustion of a supersonic axisymmetric hydrogen jet in a supersonic parallel coflowing air stream is analyzed. Effective turbulent transport properties are determined using the (K-epsilon) model. The finite-rate chemistry model considers eight reactions between six chemical species, H, O, H2O, OH, O2, and H2. The governing set of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by an implicit finite-difference procedure. Radial distributions are obtained at two downstream locations of variables such as turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent dissipation rate, turbulent scale length, and viscosity. The results show that these variables attain peak values at the axis of symmetry. Computed distributions of velocity, temperature, and mass fraction are also given. A direct analytical approach to account for the effect of species concentration fluctuations on the mean production rate of species (the phenomenon of unmixedness) is also presented. However, the use of the method does not seem justified in view of the excessive computer time required to solve the resulting system of equations.

  12. Comparison of passive diffusion bag samplers and submersible pump sampling methods for monitoring volatile organic compounds in ground water at Area 6, Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huffman, Raegan L.

    2002-01-01

    Ground-water samples were collected in April 1999 at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, with passive diffusion samplers and a submersible pump to compare concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in water samples collected using the two sampling methods. Single diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 10-foot screened intervals, and multiple diffusion samplers were installed in wells with 20- to 40-foot screened intervals. The diffusion samplers were recovered after 20 days and the wells were then sampled using a submersible pump. VOC concentrations in the 10-foot screened wells in water samples collected with diffusion samplers closely matched concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump. Analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected from the 20- to 40-foot screened wells with multiple diffusion samplers indicated vertical concentration variation within the screened interval, whereas the analysis of VOC concentrations in samples collected with the submersible pump indicated mixing during pumping. The results obtained using the two sampling methods indicate that the samples collected with the diffusion samplers were comparable with and can be considerably less expensive than samples collected using a submersible pump.

  13. Experimental study of vortex diffusers

    SciTech Connect

    Shakerin, S.; Miller, P.L.

    1995-11-01

    This report documents experimental research performed on vortex diffusers used in ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The main objectives of the research were (1) to study the flow characteristics of isothermal jets issuing from vortex diffusers, (2) to compare the vortex diffuser`s performance with that of a conventional diffuser, and (3) to prepare a report that disseminates the results to the designers of ventilation and air-conditioning systems. The researchers considered three diffusers: a conventional round ceiling diffuser and two different styles of vortex diffusers. Overall, the vortex diffusers create slightly more induction of ambient air in comparison to the conventional diffuser.

  14. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  15. Arcjet Cathode Phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  16. Cathode materials review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus Mohanty, Debasish Li, Jianlin Wood, David L.

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  17. Cathode materials review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  18. Experimental determination of the velocity and strain rate field in a laminar H2/Air counter-flow diffusion flame via LDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Dancey, C. L.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the axial and radial components of velocity on the air side of stagnation in an axisymmetric H2/Air laminar counter-flow diffusion flame are reported. Results include the two-dimensional velocity field and computed velocity gradients (strain rates) along the stagnation streamline at two 'characteristic' strain rates, below the extinction limit. The measurements generally verify the modeling assumptions appropriate to the model of Kee et al. (1988). The 'traditional' potential flow model is not consistent with the measured results.

  19. Evaluation of passive diffusion bag samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers in selected wells at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, March-April 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Joshi, Manish; Morrell, Jeff; Peterson, J.E.

    2003-01-01

    During March-April 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Tech, and EA Engineering, Science, and Technology, Inc., in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, tested diffusion samplers at Andersen Air Force Base, Guam. Samplers were deployed in three wells at the Main Base and two wells at Marianas Bonins (MARBO) Annex as potential ground-water monitoring alternatives. Prior to sampler deployment, the wells were tested using a borehole flowmeter to characterize vertical flow within each well. Three types of diffusion samplers were tested: passive diffusion bag (PDB) samplers, dialysis samplers, and nylon-screen samplers. The primary volatile organic compounds (VOCs) tested in ground water at Andersen Air Force Base were trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene. In most comparisons, trichloroethene and tetrachloroethene concentrations in PDB samples closely matched concentrations in pumped samples. Exceptions were in wells where the pumping or ambient flow produced vertical translocation of water in a chemically stratified aquifer. In these wells, PDB samplers probably would be a viable alternative sampling method if they were placed at appropriate depths. In the remaining three test wells, the trichloroethene or tetrachloroethene concentrations obtained with the diffusion samplers closely matched the result from pumped sampling. Chloride concentrations in nylon-screen samplers were compared with chloride concentrations in dialysis and pumped samples to test inorganic-solute diffusion into the samplers across a range of concentrations. The test showed that the results from nylon-screen samplers might have underestimated chloride concentrations at depths with elevated chloride concentrations. The reason for the discrepancy in this investigation is unknown, but may be related to nylon-screen-mesh size, which was smaller than that used in previous investigations.

  20. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-18

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45[degree] to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures.

  1. Filtered cathodic arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA); Sanders, David M. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  2. Joule heat generation in thermionic cathodes of high-pressure arc discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Benilov, M. S.; Cunha, M. D.

    2013-02-14

    The nonlinear surface heating model of plasma-cathode interaction in high-pressure arcs is extended to take into account the Joule effect inside the cathode body. Calculation results are given for different modes of current transfer to tungsten cathodes of different configurations in argon plasmas of atmospheric or higher pressures. Special attention is paid to analysis of energy balances of the cathode and the near-cathode plasma layer. In all the cases, the variation of potential inside the cathode is much smaller than the near-cathode voltage drop. However, this variation can be comparable to the volt equivalent of the energy flux from the plasma to the cathode and then the Joule effect is essential. Such is the case of the diffuse and mixed modes on rod cathodes at high currents, where the Joule heating causes a dramatic change of thermal and electrical regimes of the cathode. The Joule heating has virtually no effect over characteristics of spots on rod and infinite planar cathodes.

  3. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA)

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  5. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2015-01-13

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  6. Lattice Expansion of LSCF-6428 Cathodes Measured by In-situ XRD during SOFC Operation

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, John S.; Templeton, Jared W.; Edwards, Danny J.; Lu, Zigui; Stevenson, Jeffry W.

    2012-01-03

    A new capability has been developed for analyzing solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). This paper describes the initial results of in-situ x-ray diffraction (XRD) of the cathode on an operating anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell. It has been demonstrated that XRD measurements of the cathode can be performed simultaneously with electrochemical measurements of cell performance or electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). While improvements to the technique are still to be made, the XRD pattern of a lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode with the composition La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-? (LSCF-6428) was found to continually but gradually change over the course of more than 60 hours of operation in air under typical SOFC operating conditions. It was determined that the most significant change was a gradual increase in the cubic lattice parameters of the LSCF from 3.92502 Å (as determined from the integration of the first 20 hours of XRD patterns) to 3.92650 Å (from the integration of the last 20 hours). This analysis also revealed that there were several peaks from unidentified minor phases that increased in intensity over this timeframe. After a temporary loss of airflow early in the test, the cell generated between 225 and 250 mW/cm2 for the remainder of the test. A large low frequency arc in the impedance spectra suggests the cell performance was gas diffusion limited and that there is room for improvement in air delivery to the cell.

  7. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    SciTech Connect

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined all the components in the cathode region and eliminated those parts that were suspected to be potential sources of contamination, e.g., feed-throughs with zinc coating. Finally, we considered a change in the cathode type, by using a different combination of impregnation and coating. Since the ETA-II accelerator at LLNL used a 12.5 cm diameter 311XW (barium oxide doped with scandium and coated with a osmium-tungsten thin film) cathode and emitted 2200A of beam current (i.e. 18 A/cm{sup 2}), it was reasonable to assume that DARHT can adopt this type of cathode to produce 2 kA (i.e., 10A/cm{sup 2}). However, it was later found that the 311XW has a higher radiation heat loss than the 612M and therefore resulted in a maximum operating temperature (as limited by filament damage) below that required to produce the high current. With the evidence provided by systematic emission tests using quarter-inch size cathodes, we confirmed that the 311XM (doped with scandium and has a osmium-ruthenium (M) coating) had the best combination of low work function and low radiation heat loss. Subsequently a 6.5-inch diameter 311XM cathode was installed in DARHT and 2 kA beam current was obtained on June 14, 2007. In testing the quarter-inch size cathode, we found that the beam current was sensitive to the partial pressure of various gases in the vacuum chamber. Furthermore, there was a hysteresis effect on the emission as a function of temperature. The phenomenon suggested that the work function of the cathode was dependent on the dynamic equilibrium between the diffusion of the impregnated material to the surface and the contamination rate from the surrounding gas. Water vapor was found to be the worst contaminant amongst the various gases that we have tested. Our data showed that the required vacuum for emitting at 10 A/cm{sup 2} is in the low 10{sup -8} Torr range.

  8. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out the back. This configuration replaces the previous sheathed heater design that limited the cycling-life of the cathode.

  9. A Hollow Cathode Magnetron (HCM)

    SciTech Connect

    S.A. Cohen; Z. Wang

    1998-04-01

    A new type of plasma sputtering device, named the hollow cathode magnetron (HCM), has been developed by surrounding a planar magnetron cathode with a hollow cathode structure (HCS). Operating characteristics of HCMs, current-voltage ( I-V ) curves for fixed discharge pressure and voltage-pressure ( V-p ) curves for fixed cathode current, are measured. Such characteristics are compared with their planar magnetron counterparts. New operation regimes, such as substantially lower pressures (0.3 mTorr), were discovered for HCMs. Cathode erosion profiles show marked improvement over planar magnetron in terms of material utilization. The use of HCMs for thin film deposition are discussed.

  10. Local ion nitriding process with hollow cathode effect computer modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanov, K. N.; Khusainov, Yu G.; Zolotov, I. V.

    2015-11-01

    Modelling of glow discharge plasma with hollow cathode effect (HCE) was carried out. The computer model that allows predicting the temperature distribution during local ion nitriding with HCE and depth of the diffusion zone after the treatment was developed. The influence on the HCE on the temperature distribution for the gear was studied.

  11. Significant performance improvement in terms of reduced cathode flooding in polymer electrolyte fuel cell using a stainless-steel microcoil gas flow field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shiro; Shudo, Toshio

    2014-02-01

    Flooding at the cathode is the greatest barrier to increasing the power density of polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) and using them at high current densities. Previous studies have shown that flooding is caused by water accumulation in the gas diffusion layer, but only a few researchers have succeeded in overcoming this issue. In the present study, microcoils are used as the gas flow channel as well as the gas diffuser directly on the microporous layer (MPL), without using a conventional carbon-fiber gas diffusion layer (GDL), to enable flood-free performance. The current-voltage curves show flooding-free performance even under low air stoichiometry. However, the high-frequency resistance (HFR) in this case is slightly higher than that in grooved flow channels and GDLs. This is due to the differences in the electron conduction path, and the in-plane electron conductivity in the MPL is the key to enhancing the microcoil fuel cell performance.

  12. Synopsis of Cathode #4 Activation

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-05-26

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature.

  13. Hydrogen hollow cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J., Jr.; Sovey, J. S.; Roman, R. F. (inventors)

    1980-01-01

    A source of hydrogen ions is disclosed and includes a chamber having at one end a cathode which provides electrons and through which hydrogen gas flows into the chamber. Screen and accelerator grids are provided at the other end of the chamber. A baffle plate is disposed between the cathode and the grids and a cylindrical baffle is disposed coaxially with the cathode at the one end of the chamber. The cylindrical baffle is of greater diameter than the baffle plate to provide discharge impedance and also to protect the cathode from ion flux. An anode electrode draws the electrons away from the cathode. The hollow cathode includes a tubular insert of tungsten impregnated with a low work function material to provide ample electrons. A heater is provided around the hollow cathode to initiate electron emission from the low work function material.

  14. Characterization of Atomic and Electronic Structures of Electrochemically Active SOFC Cathode Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kevin Blinn; Yongman Choi; Meilin Liu

    2009-08-11

    The objective of this project is to gain a fundamental understanding of the oxygen-reduction mechanism on mixed conducting cathode materials by means of quantum-chemical calculations coupled with direct experimental measurements, such as vibrational spectroscopy. We have made progress in the elucidation of the mechanisms of oxygen reduction of perovkite-type cathode materials for SOFCs using these quantum chemical calculations. We established computational framework for predicting properties such as oxygen diffusivity and reaction rate constants for adsorption, incorporation, and TPB reactions, and formulated predictions for LSM- and LSC-based cathode materials. We have also further developed Raman spectroscopy as well as SERS as a characterization tool for SOFC cathode materials. Raman spectroscopy was used to detect chemical changes in the cathode from operation conditions, and SERS was used to probe for pertinent adsorbed species in oxygen reduction. However, much work on the subject of unraveling oxygen reduction for SOFC cathodes remains to be done.

  15. Three-dimensional visualization of morphology and ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) of a subdivision of the acinus using synchrotron radiation microtomography of the human lung specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimizu, Kenji; Ikura, Hirohiko; Ikezoe, Junpei; Nagareda, Tomofumi; Yagi, Naoto; Umetani, Keiji; Imai, Yutaka

    2004-04-01

    We have previously reported a synchrotron radiation (SR) microtomography system constructed at the bending magnet beamline at the SPring-8. This system has been applied to the lungs obtained at autopsy and inflated and fixed by Heitzman"s method. Normal lung and lung specimens with two different types of pathologic processes (fibrosis and emphysema) were included. Serial SR microtomographic images were stacked to yield the isotropic volumetric data with high-resolution (12 ?m3 in voxel size). Within the air spaces of a subdivision of the acinus, each voxel is segmented three-dimensionally using a region growing algorithm ("rolling ball algorithm"). For each voxel within the segmented air spaces, two types of voxel coding have been performed: single-seeded (SS) coding and boundary-seeded (BS) coding, in which the minimum distance from an initial point as the only seed point and all object boundary voxels as a seed set were calculated and assigned as the code values to each voxel, respectively. With these two codes, combinations of surface rendering and volume rendering techniques were applied to visualize three-dimensional morphology of a subdivision of the acinus. Furthermore, sequentially filling process of air into a subdivision of the acinus was simulated under several conditions to visualize the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion). A subdivision of the acinus was reconstructed three-dimensionally, demonstrating the normal architecture of the human lung. Significant differences in appearance of ventilation procedure were observed between normal and two pathologic processes due to the alteration of the lung architecture. Three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure of a subdivision of the acinus and visualization of the ventilation procedure (air flow and diffusion) with SR microtomography would offer a new approach to study the morphology, physiology, and pathophysiology of the human respiratory system.

  16. "Hollow cathode" gun optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciullo, G.; Sharapa, A. N.; Shemyakin, A. V.; Tecchio, L.

    1997-03-01

    The generation of an electron beam by a hollow cathode gun in a cusp magnetic field is discussed. Such a gun is proposed for an electron cooling device without toroids. In a section with a homogeneous magnetic field, this beam experiences a disturbance region near the axis where the electron temperature becomes higher. The main purpose of the article is to define conditions for generating the beam so as to restrict the extent of this region as much as possible. It is shown that a state with a virtual cathode in the vicinity of the zero magnetic field point is the most suitable for this aim. The experimental and essential analytical results are presented.

  17. Two-dimensional imaging of molecular hydrogen in H2-air diffusion flames using two-photon laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, W.; Kumar, V.; Glesk, I.; Miles, R.; Diskin, G.

    1991-01-01

    The use of a tunable ArF laser at 193.26 nm to record simultaneous single-laser-shot, planar images of molecular hydrogen and hot oxygen in a turbulent H2-air diffusion flame. Excitation spectra of fuel and oxidant-rich flame zones confirm a partial overlap of the two-photon H2 and single-photon O2 Schumann-Runge absorption bands. UV Rayleigh scattering images of flame structure and estimated detection limits for the H2 two-photon imaging are also presented.

  18. The cathode plasma simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the interface between the plasma and the cathode regions. This sheath model [3] has been fully combined in the 1D simulation. That is, the sheath model calculates the heat flux and the sheath voltage by giving the temperature and the current density. This sheath model must be included in the simulation, as the sheath region is treated differently from the main plasma region. For our 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation, the dimensions of the cathode, the anode, the total current, the pressure, the type of gases, the work function can be changed in the input process as needed for particular interested. Also, the sheath model is still included and fully integrated in this 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation at the cathode surface grids. In addition, the focus of the 2D cylindrical symmetry simulation is to connect the properties on the plasma and the cathode regions on the cathode surface until the MPD thruster reach steady state and estimate the plasma arc attachement edge, electroarc edge, on the cathode surface. Finally, we can understand more about the behavior of an MPD thruster under many different conditions of 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations.

  19. Quantifying the Water Content in the Cathode of Enzyme Fuel Cells via Neutron Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Aaron, D; Borole, Abhijeet P; Hussey , Daniel; Jacobson, David; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2011-01-01

    Neutron imaging was used to study cathode water content over time in a three-dimensional-cathode enzyme fuel cell (EFC). A porous carbon felt cathode allowed air to flow through the electrode. A solution with laccase and a mediator formed an aqueous layer on the electrode surface. Water loss was observed in situ via neutron imaging for varying experimental conditions, including flow rates of hydrogen and air, cathode inlet humidity, volume of enzyme solution, and its composition. Cathode water loss occurred for all experimental conditions, but the loss rate was noticeably reduced when a high-salt-concentration enzyme solution was used in the cathode in conjunction with increased humidity in the air feed stream. Results from neutron imaging and power density analysis were used in analyzing the causes that could contribute to EFC water loss. An increase in temperature due to the exothermic cathode reaction is considered a plausible cause of cathode water loss via evaporation. This is the first reported application of neutron imaging as a technique to study EFC water management. The results suggest that neutron imaging can be employed to provide a better understanding of EFC phenomena and thereby contribute to design and operational improvements of EFCs.

  20. An explosive emission cathode in a thermionic cathode environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlise, Charles; Umstattd, Ryan

    2003-10-01

    Present-day high power microwave devices suffer from a lack of reliable, reproducible cathodes for generating the requisite GW-level electron beam in a vacuum. Standard explosive emission cathodes have been limited to 10's or 100's of ns due to the expansion of cathode-generated plasma and the ensuing impedance collapse that debilitates microwave output. Traditional thermionic cathodes do not suffer from this drawback of plasma generation, but have not yet been demonstrated to provide the required emission current densities. It is expected that if the plasma could be made cooler and less dense, explosive emission would be more stable. Cesium iodide (CsI) has been found to slow the impedance collapse in many explosive emission cathodes. Herein we will examine diode impedance collapse, gas production, and cathode conditioning in an effort to perform an evaluation of explosive cathode performance in a typical thermionic electron gun environment. These results will then be used to help demarcate the parameter space over which these CsI-coated carbon fiber cathodes are viable candidates for the electron beam source in next-generation high power microwave devices.

  1. THE CATHODE RAY OSCILLOSCOPE PHYSICS 359E

    E-print Network

    Landstreet, John D.

    THE CATHODE RAY OSCILLOSCOPE PHYSICS 359E INTRODUCTION The cathode ray oscilloscope is a vital of the cathode ray tube, which forms the heart of the oscilloscope. The procedure will be devoted to refining

  2. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  3. Thermionic cathode heater

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.E.; Frutiger, W.A.; Hall, K.E.

    1987-01-06

    A heater is described for insertion into a thermionic cathode capable of providing a strip electron beam, the heater comprising: a first current carrying means extending in a predetermined direction; and a second current carrying means disposed in series with and substantially surrounding the first current carrying means along the predetermined direction. The means substantially prevents the creation of a magnetic field causing deflection of the electron beam by the heater when electric current flows in opposite directions along the first and second carrying means; the second current carrying means having a higher resistance to electrical current and generating greater I/sup 2/R heating than the first current carrying means.

  4. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Results show that the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid and that the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline. Moreover, the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  5. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    DOEpatents

    Zeren, J.D.

    1983-11-22

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  6. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  7. Composite Cathode-Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangal, Mukund D.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed composite cathode-ray tube consists of rectangular array of cathode-ray tubes joined at edges, sharing common vacuum. Each electron gun generates independent image on portion of screen. Composite tube operates most advantageously under digital control to make available several display modes. Brightness and resolution of large images increased. Useful for classroom presentations, conferences, and the like.

  8. Hot hollow cathode gun assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeren, J. D.

    1983-11-01

    A hot hollow cathode deposition gun assembly is disclosed. The device includes a hollow body having a cylindrical outer surface and an end plate for holding an adjustable heat sink, the hot hollow cathode gun, two magnets for steering the plasma from the gun into a crucible on the heat sink, and a shutter for selectively covering and uncovering the crucible.

  9. Diffuse CO 2 soil degassing and CO 2 and H 2S concentrations in air and related hazards at Vulcano Island (Aeolian arc, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carapezza, M. L.; Barberi, F.; Ranaldi, M.; Ricci, T.; Tarchini, L.; Barrancos, J.; Fischer, C.; Perez, N.; Weber, K.; Di Piazza, A.; Gattuso, A.

    2011-10-01

    La Fossa crater on Vulcano Island is quiescent since 1890. Periodically it undergoes "crises" characterized by marked increase of temperature (T), gas output and concentration of magmatic components in the crater fumaroles (T may exceed 600 °C). During these crises, which so far did not lead to any eruptive reactivation, the diffuse CO 2 soil degassing also increases and in December 2005 an anomalous CO 2 flux of 1350 tons/day was estimated by 1588 measurements over a surface of 1.66 km 2 extending from La Fossa crater to the inhabited zone of Vulcano Porto. The crater area and two other anomalously degassing sites (Levante Beach and Palizzi) have been periodically investigated from December 2004 to August 2010 for diffuse CO 2 soil flux. They show a marked variation with time of the degassing rate, with synchronous maxima in December 2005. Carbon dioxide soil flux and environmental parameters have been also continuously monitored for over one year by an automatic station at Vulcano Porto. In order to assess the hazard of the endogenous gas emissions, CO 2 and H 2S air concentrations have been measured by Tunable Diode Laser profiles near the fumaroles of the crater rim and of the Levante Beach area, where also the viscous gas flux has been estimated. In addition, CO 2 air concentration has been measured both indoor and outdoor in an inhabited sector of Vulcano Porto. Results show that in some sites usually frequented by tourists there is a dangerous H 2S air concentration and CO 2 exceeds the hazardous thresholds in some Vulcano houses. These zones should be immediately monitored for gas hazard should a new crisis arise.

  10. Microhollow cathode discharge and breakdown in micron separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sismanoglu, B. N.; Amorim, J.

    2008-02-01

    One important mechanism in the prebreakdown phase is the quantum tunnelling of electrons from the metal cathode to the gas, lowering the breakdown voltage. Considerable departures from the classical Paschen's curve for pd lower than 1.0 Torr cm in microhollow cathodes with D = 200 ? m and electrode spacing of 5 ? m and 20 ? m in air were observed. Fowler-Nordheim approach was employed to characterize the presence of field emission of electrons which modify the classical voltage versus current curve for pressures lower than 40 Torr.

  11. Coating of porous carbon for use in lithium air batteries

    DOEpatents

    Amine, Khalil; Lu, Jun; Du, Peng; Lei, Yu; Elam, Jeffrey W

    2015-04-14

    A cathode includes a carbon material having a surface, the surface having a first thin layer of an inert material and a first catalyst overlaying the first thin layer, the first catalyst including metal or metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the cathode is configured for use as the cathode of a lithium-air battery.

  12. Air-cooled, hydrogen-air fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shelekhin, Alexander B. (Inventor); Bushnell, Calvin L. (Inventor); Pien, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An air-cooled, hydrogen-air solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell with a membrane electrode assembly operatively associated with a fluid flow plate having at least one plate cooling channel extending through the plate and at least one air distribution hole extending from a surface of the cathode flow field into the plate cooling channel.

  13. Linear air-fuel sensor development

    SciTech Connect

    Garzon, F.; Miller, C.

    1996-12-14

    The electrochemical zirconia solid electrolyte oxygen sensor, is extensively used for monitoring oxygen concentrations in various fields. They are currently utilized in automobiles to monitor the exhaust gas composition and control the air-to-fuel ratio, thus reducing harmful emission components and improving fuel economy. Zirconia oxygen sensors, are divided into two classes of devices: (1) potentiometric or logarithmic air/fuel sensors; and (2) amperometric or linear air/fuel sensors. The potentiometric sensors are ideally suited to monitor the air-to-fuel ratio close to the complete combustion stoichiometry; a value of about 14.8 to 1 parts by volume. This occurs because the oxygen concentration changes by many orders of magnitude as the air/fuel ratio is varied through the stoichiometric value. However, the potentiometric sensor is not very sensitive to changes in oxygen partial pressure away from the stoichiometric point due to the logarithmic dependence of the output voltage signal on the oxygen partial pressure. It is often advantageous to operate gasoline power piston engines with excess combustion air; this improves fuel economy and reduces hydrocarbon emissions. To maintain stable combustion away from stoichiometry, and enable engines to operate in the excess oxygen (lean burn) region several limiting-current amperometric sensors have been reported. These sensors are based on the electrochemical oxygen ion pumping of a zirconia electrolyte. They typically show reproducible limiting current plateaus with an applied voltage caused by the gas diffusion overpotential at the cathode.

  14. Determining the Thermal Diffusion Factor for 40Ar/36Ar in Air To Aid Paleoreconstruction of Abrupt Climate Change

    E-print Network

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    Institution of Oceanography, 9500 Gilman DriVe, La Jolla, California 92093-0244 ReceiVed: December 24, 2002 in Greenland ice cores. For one abrupt warming event 15,000 years ago, near the end of the last glacial period in air should be used for paleoenvironmental studies. Introduction The cold, dry conditions of the last

  15. Variable seasonal coupling between air and ground temperatures: A simple representation in terms of subsurface thermal diffusivity

    E-print Network

    van Keken, Peter

    , ground freezing and thawing, and evapotranspiration [Schmidt et al., 2001; Zhang et al., 2001; BakerVariable seasonal coupling between air and ground temperatures: A simple representation in terms (SAT) and ground surface temperature (GST). Here we describe a simple representation of this coupling

  16. Steady-state solution of the semi-empirical diffusion equation for area sources. [air pollution studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebedeff, S. A.; Hameed, S.

    1975-01-01

    The problem investigated can be solved exactly in a simple manner if the equations are written in terms of a similarity variable. The exact solution is used to explore two questions of interest in the modelling of urban air pollution, taking into account the distribution of surface concentration downwind of an area source and the distribution of concentration with height.

  17. High current hollow cathode phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedly, Verlin J.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1990-01-01

    Experimental results show that the energies of ions produced near a hollow cathode orifice can be several times the anode-to-cathode potential difference generally considered available to accelerate them. These energies (of order 50 eV) are sufficient to induce substantial sputter erosion rates. Increases in discharge current (to 60 A) cause the energies and current densities of these jet ions to increase substantially. A model describing jet ion generation is proposed. The effects of discharge current on cathode internal pressure are also examined experimentally and described phenomenologically.

  18. Magnetized hollow cathode activated magnetron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baránková, H.; Bardos, L.; Bardos, A.

    2015-10-01

    Planar magnetron in which the target is coupled with a magnetized hollow cathode is presented. Detailed principles of such arrangements are explained. The hollow cathode activated magnetron produces intense and stable plasmas in a wider interval of the working gas pressures as compared to the conventional magnetrons at the same power. The developed arrangements enhance sputtering from the magnetron target by the high-density hollow cathode plasma and increase the number of sputtered/evaporated species. Results of the test experiments of these arrangements on a commercial planar magnetron with the Ti target are presented and their capabilities discussed.

  19. Development of an automated method for simultaneous determination of low molecular weight aliphatic amines and ammonia in ambient air by diffusion scrubber coupled to ion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Chang, In-Hyoung; Lee, Chong-Geun; Lee, Dong Soo

    2003-11-15

    A method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of low molecular weight aliphatic amines and ammonia in the atmosphere. Analyte gases are collected quantitatively in high-purity deionized water of a planar diffusion scrubber, and the resultant solution is analyzed by ion chromatography. A 1-h cycle analysis could be continuously repeated. The calibrations for the amines are linear between 5 and 500 pptv. The detection limits are a few pptv with RSD of less than 3%. The calibration for ammonia shows severe curvature at high concentrations so that second-order fitting is required for accurate determination. This method was successfully applied to the environmental air analyses. The major amines in the atmosphere were trimethylamine, dimethylamine, and methylamine, and the temporal variations were closely correlated with that of ammonia, implying their identical emission sources. PMID:14615993

  20. Effect of Cathode Position on Hall-Effect Thruster Performance and Cathode Coupling Voltage

    E-print Network

    King, Lyon B.

    is the cathode. The cathode in an HET is a plasma source which provides free electrons which serve two purposes and sustain the plasma discharge near the exit plane of the HET. The cathode coupling voltage (Vcg) is oneEffect of Cathode Position on Hall-Effect Thruster Performance and Cathode Coupling Voltage Jason D

  1. Effect of Cathode Position on Hall-Effect Thruster Performance and Cathode Coupling Voltage

    E-print Network

    King, Lyon B.

    is the cathode. The cathode in an HET is a plasma source which provides free electrons which serve two purposes with the plasma potential infinitely far from the spacecraft. Since the anode is usually referenced to the cathodeEffect of Cathode Position on Hall-Effect Thruster Performance and Cathode Coupling Voltage Jason D

  2. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been demonstrated to mitigate the effects of crossover and decrease the airflow required.

  3. Seasonality of diffusive exchange of polychlorinated biphenyls and hexachlorobenzene across the air-sea interface of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Fang, Meng-Der; Ko, Fung-Chi; Baker, Joel E; Lee, Chon-Lin

    2008-12-15

    Gaseous and dissolved concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) were measured in the ambient air and water of Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon, Taiwan, from December 2003 to January 2005. During the rainy season (April to September), gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations were low due to both scavenging by precipitation and dilution by prevailing southwesterly winds blown from the atmosphere of the South China Sea. In contrast, trace precipitation and prevailing northeasterly winds during the dry season (October to March) resulted in higher gaseous PCB and HCB concentrations. Instantaneous air-water exchange fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB were calculated from 22 pairs of air and water samples from Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. All net fluxes of PCB homologues and HCB in this study are from water to air (net volatilization). The highest net volatile flux observed was +172 ng m(-)(2) day(-1) (dichlorobiphenyls) in December, 2003 due to the high wind speed and high dissolved concentration. The PCB homologues and HCB fluxes were significantly governed by dissolved concentrations in Kaohsiung Harbor lagoon. For low molecular weight PCBs (LMW PCBs), their fluxes were also significantly correlated with wind speed. The net PCB and HCB fluxes suggest that the annual sums of 69 PCBs and HCB measured in this study were mainly volatile (57.4 x 10(3) and 28.3 x 10(3) ng m(-2) yr(-1), respectively) and estimated yearly, 1.5 kg and 0.76 kg of PCBs and HCB were emitted from the harbor lagoon surface waters to the ambient atmosphere. The average tPCB flux in this study was about one-tenth of tPCB fluxes seen in New York Harbor and in the Delaware River, which are reported to be greatly impacted by PCBs. PMID:18977513

  4. Neuroinflammation, hyperphosphorylated tau, diffuse amyloid plaques, and down-regulation of the cellular prion protein in air pollution exposed children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Kavanaugh, Michael; Block, Michelle; D'Angiulli, Amedeo; Delgado-Chávez, Ricardo; Torres-Jardón, Ricardo; González-Maciel, Angelica; Reynoso-Robles, Rafael; Osnaya, Norma; Villarreal-Calderon, Rodolfo; Guo, Ruixin; Hua, Zhaowei; Zhu, Hongtu; Perry, George; Diaz, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Air pollution exposures have been linked to neuroinflammation and neuropathology. Autopsy samples of the frontal cortex from control (n = 8) and pollution-exposed (n = 35) children and young adults were analyzed by RT-PCR (n = 43) and microarray analysis (n = 12) for gene expression changes in oxidative stress, DNA damage signaling, NF?B signaling, inflammation, and neurodegeneration pathways. The effect of apolipoprotein E (APOE) genotype on the presence of protein aggregates associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology was also explored. Exposed urbanites displayed differential (>2-fold) regulation of 134 genes. Forty percent exhibited tau hyperphosphorylation with pre-tangle material and 51% had amyloid-? (A?) diffuse plaques compared with 0% in controls. APOE4 carriers had greater hyperphosphorylated tau and diffuse A? plaques versus E3 carriers (Q = 7.82, p = 0.005). Upregulated gene network clusters included IL1, NF?B, TNF, IFN, and TLRs. A 15-fold frontal down-regulation of the prion-related protein (PrP(C)) was seen in highly exposed subjects. The down-regulation of the PrP(C) is critical given its important roles for neuroprotection, neurodegeneration, and mood disorder states. Elevation of indices of neuroinflammation and oxidative stress, down-regulation of the PrP(C) and AD-associated pathology are present in young megacity residents. The inducible regulation of gene expression suggests they are evolving different mechanisms in an attempt to cope with the constant state of inflammation and oxidative stress related to their environmental exposures. Together, these data support a role for air pollution in CNS damage and its impact upon the developing brain and the potential etiology of AD and mood disorders. PMID:21955814

  5. Field evaluation of two diffusive samplers and two adsorbent media to determine 1,3-butadiene and benzene levels in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strandberg, Bo; Sunesson, Anna-Lena; Sundgren, Margit; Levin, Jan-Olof; Sällsten, Gerd; Barregard, Lars

    Two types of diffusive samplers, both of which are compatible with thermal desorption, but differ in their geometry—SKC-Ultra (badge-type) and Radiello (radial symmetry-type)—were evaluated indoors and outdoors under varying temperature, humidity and wind speed conditions, using the graphitized adsorbents Carbopack X or Carbograph 5 to measure 1,3-butadiene and benzene in ambient air. The results obtained by diffusive sampling were compared with results obtained using a conventional active sampling method over both long (1 week) and shorter periods (6-24 h). Analysis and detection were performed using an automatic thermal desorber (ATD) connected to a gas chromatograph-flame ionization detector (GC/FID). Results from each sampler and adsorbent combination were examined using ordinary or multiple linear regression analysis. The overall uncertainty (OU) was also determined. In general, the results obtained with both samplers showed good agreement with those obtained by active sampling. Carbopack X appeared to be a more efficient adsorbent than Carbograph 5 for 1,3-butadiene, but the two adsorbents were equivalent for benzene. No effects of either humidity or air velocity were observed. Minor temperature effects were observed for both samplers for 1,3-butadiene. In summary, the results confirmed the accuracy of sampling rates previously determined for the two samplers and adsorbents. We consider the two samplers to be suitable for stationary and personal monitoring for the general population of 1,3-butadiene and benzene in various environments, indoors and outdoors. They are almost independent of meteorological conditions and may be suitable for monitoring industrial atmospheres.

  6. Numerical simulation of cathode plasma dynamics in magnetically insulated vacuum transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, C.; Genoni, T. C.; Welch, D. R.; Rose, D. V.; Clark, R. E.; Miller, C. L.; Stygar, W. A.; Kiefer, M. L.

    2015-03-15

    A novel algorithm for the simulation of cathode plasmas in particle-in-cell codes is described and applied to investigate cathode plasma evolution in magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs). The MITL electron sheath is modeled by a fully kinetic electron species. Electron and ion macroparticles, both modeled as fluid species, form a dense plasma which is initially localized at the cathode surface. Energetic plasma electron particles can be converted to kinetic electrons to resupply the electron flux at the plasma edge (the “effective” cathode). Using this model, we compare results for the time evolution of the cathode plasma and MITL electron flow with a simplified (isothermal) diffusion model. Simulations in 1D show a slow diffusive expansion of the plasma from the cathode surface. But in multiple dimensions, the plasma can expand much more rapidly due to anomalous diffusion caused by an instability due to the strong coupling of a transverse magnetic mode in the electron sheath with the expanding resistive plasma layer.

  7. Effects of heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch on flame-front instability and extinction of propane/air mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ishizuka, S.; Miyasaka, K.; Law, C. K.

    1982-01-01

    Flame configurations, flame-front cellular instability, and extinction of propane/air mixtures in the stagnation-point flow are experimentally studied for their dependence on downstream heat loss, preferential diffusion, and flame stretch. Boundaries for lean- and rich-limit extinction, stabilization of corrugated flames, and local extinction caused by sharp curvatures are mapped for varying propane concentrations and freestream velocities. Flame location and temperature at extinction are determined as functions of stagnation surface temperature, extent of preheating, propane concentration, and freestream velocity. Results substantiate the theoretical predictions of the different extinction modes for lean and rich flames in the absence of downstream heat loss, and yield useful insight on the extinction characteristics when finite downstream heat loss does exist. It is further shown that flame-front instability occurs only for rich mixtures in accordance with preferential diffusion considerations, and that flame stretch has a stabilizing effect such that flame-front instability is completely inhibited before the onset of extinction.

  8. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission.

  9. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  10. RF gun with ferroelectric cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodak, Igor V.; Kushnir, Volodymyr A.

    2006-06-01

    RF guns generate bunched electron beams with pulse current Ip˜10 -1-10 3 A and current pulse duration ?p˜10 -6-10 -12 s. The parameters are defined by the type of a cathode used mainly. We propose to apply a ferroelectric cathode in RF gun for the generation of electron beams with Ip more than few amperes, ?p˜10 -8 s and current density of electron emission in a ferroelectric cathode jcfe may be ˜10 3 A/cm 2. We consider results of experimental study of S-band RF gun with ferroelectric plasma cathode. Obtained maximum Ip at RF gun output is 9 A with ?p?40-90 ns and electron energy We?500 keV.

  11. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, Gordon E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging.

  12. Oxygen transport resistance at gas diffusion layer - Air channel interface with film flow of water in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koz, Mustafa; Kandlikar, Satish G.

    2016-01-01

    Water present as films on the gas diffusion layer-air channel interface in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) alters the oxygen transport resistance, which is expressed through Sherwood number (Sh). The effect of multiple films along the flow length on Sh is investigated through 3D and stationary simulations. The effects of air Péclet number, non-dimensional film width, length, and spacing are studied. Using the simulation results, non-dimensional correlations are developed for local Sh within a mean absolute percentage error of 9%. These correlations can be used for simulating PEMFC performance over temperature and relative humidity ranges of 20-80 °C and 0-100%, respectively. Sh on the film side can be up to 31% lower than that for a dry channel, while a film may reduce the interfacial width by up to 39%. The corresponding increase in transport resistance results in lowering the voltage by 5 and 8 mV respectively at a current density of 1.5 A cm-2. However, their combined effect leads to a voltage loss of 20 mV due to this additional mass transport resistance. It is therefore important to incorporate the additional resistance introduced by the films while modeling fuel cell performance.

  13. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. Presented are: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions: (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  14. Opposed jet burner studies of silane-methane, silane-hydrogen, and hydrogen diffusion flames with air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, G. L.; Guerra, Rosemary; Wilson, L. G.; Northam, G. B.

    1986-01-01

    An atmospheric pressure tubular opposed jet burner technique was used to characterize certain diffusion-flame transitions and associated burning rates for N2-diluted mixtures of highly-reactive fuels. The paper presents: (1) details of the technique, with emphasis on features permitting the study of flames involving pyrophoric gases and particle-forming combustion reactions; (2) discoveries on the properties of these flames which correspond to physically and chemically distinct stages of silane and hydrogen combustion; and (3) unburnt gas velocity data obtained from flames based on SiH4-CH4-N2, SiH4-H2-N2, and H2-N2 fuel mixtures, and plotted as functions of combustible-fuel mole fraction and fuel/oxygen molar input flow ratios. In addition, these burning velocity results are analyzed and interpreted.

  15. Cold cathode vacuum gauging system

    DOEpatents

    Denny, Edward C. (Knoxville, TN)

    2004-03-09

    A vacuum gauging system of the cold cathode type is provided for measuring the pressure of a plurality of separate vacuum systems, such as in a gas centrifuge cascade. Each casing is fitted with a gauge tube assembly which communicates with the vacuum system in the centrifuge casing. Each gauge tube contains an anode which may be in the form of a slender rod or wire hoop and a cathode which may be formed by the wall of the gauge tube. The tube is provided with an insulated high voltage connector to the anode which has a terminal for external connection outside the vacuum casing. The tube extends from the casing so that a portable magnet assembly may be inserted about the tube to provide a magnetic field in the area between the anode and cathode necessary for pressure measurements in a cold cathode-type vacuum gauge arrangement. The portable magnetic assembly is provided with a connector which engages the external high voltage terminal for providing power to the anode within in the gauge tube. Measurement is made in the same manner as the prior cold cathode gauges in that the current through the anode to the cathode is measured as an indication of the pressure. By providing the portable magnetic assembly, a considerable savings in cost, installation, and maintenance of vacuum gauges for pressure measurement in a gas centrifuge cascade is realizable.

  16. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM); Gottesfeld, Shimshon (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  17. Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry

    E-print Network

    Hirn, Matthew

    Diffusion Geometry Diffusion Geometry for High Dimensional Data Matthew J. Hirn July 3, 2013 #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Embedding of closed curve Figure: Left: A closed, non-self-intersecting curve in 3 dimensions. Right: Its embedding as a circle. #12;Diffusion Geometry Introduction Cartoon

  18. Seasonal, anthropogenic, air mass, and meteorological influences on the atmospheric concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs): Evidence for the importance of diffuse combustion sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.G.M.; Green, N.J.L.; Lohmann, R.; Jones, K.C.

    1999-09-01

    Sampling programs were undertaken to establish air polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) concentrations at a semirural site on the northwest coast of England in autumn and summer and to investigate factors causing their variability. Changing source inputs, meteorological parameters, air masses, and the impact of a festival when it is customary to light fireworks and bonfires were investigated. Various lines of evidence from the study point to diffuse, combustion-related sources being a major influence on ambient air concentrations. Higher PCDD/F concentrations were generally associated with air masses that had originated and moved over land, particularly during periods of low ambient temperature. Low concentrations were associated with air masses that had arrived from the Atlantic Ocean/Irish Sea to the west of the sampling site and had little or no contact with urban/industrialized areas. Concentrations in the autumn months were 2 to 10 times higher than those found in the summer.

  19. Pyrometric cathode temperature measurements in metal halide lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, M.; Schneidenbach, H.; Kettlitz, M.

    2013-10-01

    Time-averaged temperature distributions along the electrodes of vertically operated high-intensity discharge lamps with cylindrical quartz burners filled with mercury and additives of NaI, TlI and DyI3 have been measured. The lamps have been driven by 120 Hz switched-dc currents between 0.4 and 1.78 A and the measurements have been performed during the cathodic phase at the lower electrode. All considered currents are characterized by a diffuse arc attachment. For the correction of disturbing effects the measured distributions have been fitted with solutions of the quasi-one-dimensional and steady-state energy balance of a rod-shaped tungsten cathode. A model of the near-cathode layer in a multi-species plasma has been applied for the determination of the boundary layer characteristics where the work function has been treated as a free parameter. The required plasma component concentrations have been estimated from spectroscopic measurements in the arc column. The fit procedure includes the adjustment of the extension of the lateral arc attachment region which has a distinct impact on the determined tip temperature, power input from the plasma into the cathode and the work function. For the latter the tungsten value has been verified in the pure Hg lamp, but strong deviations result in the case of a TlI admixture. The lamp with DyI3 clearly shows the gas-phase emitter effect of lowering the work function induced by Dy.

  20. Titanium diffusion in olivine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherniak, Daniele J.; Liang, Yan

    2014-12-01

    Diffusion of Ti has been characterized in natural olivine and synthetic forsterite. Experiments on the natural olivines were run under buffered conditions (IW and NNO), and those on synthetic forsterite were run in air. Titanium diffusion appears relatively insensitive to crystallographic orientation and oxygen fugacity under the range of investigated conditions, and diffusivities are similar for Fe-bearing olivine and forsterite. For Ti diffusion in synthetic forsterite, we obtain the following Arrhenius relation for diffusion over the temperature range 900-1400 °C:

  1. Generation Of Atmospheric Pressure Non-Thermal Plasma By Diffusive And Constricted Discharges In Rest And Flowing Gases (Air And Nitrogen)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akishev, Y.; Grushin, M.; Karalnik, V.; Kochetov, I.; Napartovich A.; Trushkin N.

    2010-07-01

    Weekly ionized non-thermal plasma (NTP) is of great interest for many applications because of its strong non-equilibrium state wherein an average electron energy Te exceeds markedly gas temperature Tg, i.e. electrons in the NTP are strongly overheated compared to neutral gas. Energetic electrons due to frequent collisions with the neutrals excite and dissociate effectively atoms and molecules of the plasma-forming gas that results in a creation of physically-, and bio-chemically active gaseous medium in a practically cold background gas. At present there are many kinds of plasma sources working at low and atmospheric pressure and using MW, RF, low frequency, pulsed and DC power supplies for NTP generation. The NTP at atmospheric pressure is of considerable interest for practice. A reason is that sustaining the NTP at atmospheric pressure at first allows us to avoid the use of expensive vacuum equipment and second gives opportunity to use the NTP for treatment of the exhausted gases and polluted liquids. The second opportunity cannot be realized at all with use of the NTP at low pressure. Main subject of this talk is low current atmospheric pressure gas discharges powering with DC power supplies. Plasma forming gases are air and nitrogen which are much cheaper compared to rare gases like He or Ar. Besides, great interest to molecular nitrogen as plasma forming gas is caused first of all its unique capability to accumulate huge energy in vibration, electron (metastables) and dissociated (atomic) states providing high chemical reactivity of the activated nitrogen. All active particles mentioned above have a long lifetime, and they can be therefore transported for a long distance away from place of their generation. Different current modes (diffusive and constricted) of these discharges are discussed. Experimental and numerical results on generation of chemically active species in the diffusive and constricted mode are presented. Some data on the usage of the atmospheric pressure NTP for gas cleanup, surface treatment and sterilization are given.

  2. Characterization and optimization of cathodic conditions for H2O2 synthesis in microbial electrochemical cells.

    PubMed

    Sim, Junyoung; An, Junyeong; Elbeshbishy, Elsayed; Ryu, Hodon; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-11-01

    Cathode potential and O2 supply methods were investigated to improve H2O2 synthesis in an electrochemical cell, and optimal cathode conditions were applied for microbial electrochemical cells (MECs). Using aqueous O2 for the cathode significantly improved current density, but H2O2 conversion efficiency was negligible at 0.3-12%. Current density decreased for passive O2 diffusion to the cathode, but H2O2 conversion efficiency increased by 65%. An MEC equipped with a gas diffusion cathode was operated with acetate medium and domestic wastewater, which presented relatively high H2O2 conversion efficiency from 36% to 47%, although cathode overpotential was fluctuated. Due to different current densities, the maximum H2O2 production rate was 141 mg H2O2/L-h in the MEC fed with acetate medium, but it became low at 6 mg H2O2/L-h in the MEC fed with the wastewater. Our study clearly indicates that improving anodic current density and mitigating membrane fouling would be key parameters for large-scale H2O2-MECs. PMID:26141667

  3. Structural control and impedance analysis of cathode for direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kazuyoshi; Okajima, Keiichi; Sudoh, Masao

    The effect of the Nafion content and loading method in the catalyst layer of the cathode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC) was investigated. The impedance of the full cell and cathode were determined by ac impedance spectroscopy. The Nafion content of 1.0 mg cm -2 improved the current density at a cell voltage of 0.4 V up to 258 mA cm -2 versus 128 mA cm -2 at a content of 0.5 mg cm -2. The increase in the Nafion content decreased the diameter of the arc at low frequencies. For the electrode prepared by the spray method (SME), the cell performance and cathode performance using a dynamic hydrogen electrode (DHE) as the reference electrode was higher than those of the electrode prepared by the paste method (PME) by decreasing the cathode potential. From the ac impedance measurement of the cathode, the diffusion resistance of the SME electrode had the lowest interfacial resistance of the cathode electrodes. The higher cell performance was mostly dependent on the diffusion resistance. The SME with a porous structure and a catalyst layer thickness of 50 ?m were characterized by SEM and BET adsorption measurements.

  4. Insights into PEMFC Performance Degradation from HCl in Air

    SciTech Connect

    O Baturina; A Epshteyn; P Northrup; K Swider-Lyons

    2011-12-31

    The performance degradation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) is studied in the presence of HCl in the air stream. The cathode employing carbon-supported platinum nanoparticles (Pt/C) was exposed to 4 ppm HCl in air while the cell voltage was held at 0.6 V. The HCl poisoning results in generation of chloride and chloroplatinate ions on the surface of Pt/C catalyst as determined by a combination of electrochemical tests and ex-situ chlorine K-edge X-Ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The chloride ions inhibit the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and likely affect the wetting properties of diffusion media/catalyst layer, while the chloroplatinate ions are responsible for enhanced platinum particle growth most likely due to platinum dissolution-redeposition. The chloride ions can cause corrosion of the Pt nanoparticles in the presence of aqueous HCl in air even if no potential is applied. Although the majority of chloride ions are desorbed from the Pt surface by hydrogen treatment of the cathode, they partially remain in the system and re-adsorb on platinum at cell voltages of 0.5-0.9 V. Chloride ions are removed from the system and fuel cell performance at 0.5-0.7 V is restored by multiple exposures to low potentials.

  5. A Steady-State Impedance Model for a PEMFC Cathode Qingzhi Guo* and Ralph E. White**,z

    E-print Network

    -state polarization model2 and considered the coexistence of three phases, gas phase, liquid phase, and solid phase the gas diffusion layer and the catalyst layer of the electrode. Liquid-phase diffusion of O2 is assumed faster than liquid-phase O2 transport. Even if the volume fraction of gas pores in the cathode CAL

  6. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-03-10

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, are disclosed with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by carbon vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 15 figs.

  7. Cold cathode vacuum discharge tube

    DOEpatents

    Boettcher, G.E.

    1998-04-14

    A cold cathode vacuum discharge tube, and method for making same, with an interior surface of the trigger probe coated with carbon deposited by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) or diamond-like carbon (DLC) deposition are disclosed. Preferably a solid graphite insert is employed in the probe-cathode structure in place of an aluminum bushing employed in the prior art. The CVD or DLC probe face is laser scribed to allow resistance trimming to match available trigger voltage signals and to reduce electrical aging. 14 figs.

  8. Hall-Effect ThrusterCathode Coupling The Effect of Cathode Position and Magnetic Field Topology

    E-print Network

    King, Lyon B.

    role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plumeHall-Effect Thruster­Cathode Coupling The Effect of Cathode Position and Magnetic Field Topology

  9. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.C. . Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  10. Some new results on electron transport in the atmosphere. [Monte Carlo calculation of penetration, diffusion, and slowing down of electron beams in air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berger, M. J.; Seltzer, S. M.; Maeda, K.

    1972-01-01

    The penetration, diffusion and slowing down of electrons in a semi-infinite air medium has been studied by the Monte Carlo method. The results are applicable to the atmosphere at altitudes up to 300 km. Most of the results pertain to monoenergetic electron beams injected into the atmosphere at a height of 300 km, either vertically downwards or with a pitch-angle distribution isotropic over the downward hemisphere. Some results were also obtained for various initial pitch angles between 0 deg and 90 deg. Information has been generated concerning the following topics: (1) the backscattering of electrons from the atmosphere, expressed in terms of backscattering coefficients, angular distributions and energy spectra of reflected electrons, for incident energies T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (2) energy deposition by electrons as a function of the altitude, down to 80 km, for T(o) between 2 keV and 2 MeV; (3) the corresponding energy depostion by electron-produced bremsstrahlung, down to 30 km; (4) the evolution of the electron flux spectrum as function of the atmospheric depth, for T(o) between 2 keV and 20 keV. Energy deposition results are given for incident electron beams with exponential and power-exponential spectra.

  11. The back-diffusion effect of air on the discharge characteristics of atmospheric-pressure radio-frequency glow discharges using bare metal electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Wen-Ting; Liang, Tian-Ran; Wang, Hua-Bo; Li, He-Ping; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2007-05-01

    Radio-frequency (RF), atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) plasmas using bare metal electrodes have promising prospects in the fields of plasma-aided etching, deposition, surface treatment, disinfection, sterilization, etc. In this paper, the discharge characteristics, including the breakdown voltage and the discharge voltage for sustaining a stable and uniform ? mode discharge of the RF APGD plasmas are presented. The experiments are conducted by placing the home-made planar-type plasma generator in ambient and in a vacuum chamber, respectively, with helium as the primary plasma-forming gas. When the discharge processes occur in ambient, particularly for the lower plasma-working gas flow rates, the experimental measurements show that it is the back-diffusion effect of air in atmosphere, instead of the flow rate of the gas, that results in the obvious decrease in the breakdown voltage with increasing plasma-working gas flow rate. Further studies on the discharge characteristics, e.g. the luminous structures, the concentrations and distributions of chemically active species in plasmas, with different plasma-working gases or gas mixtures need to be conducted in future work.

  12. Structure and Soot Properties of Nonbuoyant Ethylene/Air Laminar Jet Diffusion Flames. Appendix E; Repr. from AIAA Journal, v. 36 p 1346-1360

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, D. L.; Yuan, Z.-G.; Sunderland, P. B.; Linteris, G. T.; Voss, J. E.; Lin, K.-C.; Dai, Z.; Sun, K.; Faeth, G. M.; Ross, Howard D. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The structure and soot properties of round, soot-emitting, nonbuoyant, laminar jet diffusion flames are described, based on long-duration (175-230-s) experiments at microgravity carried out on orbit in the Space Shuttle Columbia. Experimental conditions included ethylene-fueled flames burning in still air at nominal pressures of 50 and 100 kPa and an ambient temperature of 300 K with luminous flame lengths of 49-64 mm Measurements included luminous flame shapes using color video imaging soot concentration (volume fraction) distributions using deconvoluted laser extinction imaging, soot temperature distributions using deconvoluted multiline emission imaging, gas temperature distributions at fuel-lean (plume) conditions using thermocouple probes, soot structure distributions using thermophoretic sampling and analysis by transmission electron microscopy, and flame radiation using a radiometer.The present flames were larger, and emitted soot more readily, than comparable flames observed during ground-based microgravity experiments due to closer approach to steady conditions resulting from the longer test times and the reduced gravitational disturbances of the space-based experiments.

  13. Observation of radio frequency ring-shaped hollow cathode discharge plasma with MgO and Al electrodes for plasma processing

    SciTech Connect

    Ohtsu, Yasunori Matsumoto, Naoki

    2014-05-15

    Various high-density plasma sources have been proposed for plasma processing. Especially, the hollow cathode discharge is one of the powerful ones. In this work, radio-frequency (RF) driven ring-shaped hollow cathode discharges with high secondary-electron emission have been investigated, using an aluminum (Al) cathode, coated or not with magnesium oxide (MgO). The thickness of MgO thin film is approximately 200?nm. The RF discharge voltage for the coated cathode is almost the same as that for the uncoated one, in a wide range of Ar gas pressure, from 5.3 to 53.2?Pa. The results reveal that the plasma density has a peak at an Ar gas pressure of 10.6?Pa for both cathodes. The plasma density for the coated cathode is about 1.5–3 times higher than that for the uncoated one, at various gas pressures. To the contrary, the electron temperature for the coated cathode is lower than temperature obtained with the uncoated cathode, at various gas pressures. Radial profiles of electron saturation current, which is proportional to plasma flux, are also examined for a wide range of gas pressure. Radial profiles of electron temperature at various axial positions are almost uniform for both cathodes so that the diffusion process due to density gradient is dominant for plasma transport. The secondary electrons emitted from the coated cathode contribute to the improvement of the plasma flux radial profile obtained using the uncoated cathode.

  14. Investigating Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanode Performance Under Different Cathode Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Hamilton, Choo Yieng; Aaron, D; Tsouris, Costas

    2009-01-01

    A compact, three-in-one, flow-through, porous, electrode design with minimal electrode spacing and minimal dead volume was implemented to develop a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with improved anode performance. A biofilm-dominated anode consortium enriched under a multimode, continuous-flow regime was used. The increase in the power density of the MFC was investigated by changing the cathode (type, as well as catholyte strength) to determine whether anode was limiting. The power density obtained with an air-breathing cathode was 56 W/m3 of net anode volume (590 mW/m2) and 203 W/m3 (2160 mW/m2) with a 50-mM ferricyanide- based cathode. Increasing the ferricyanide concentration and ionic strength further increased the power density, reaching 304 W/m3 (3220 mW/m2, with 200 mM ferricyanide and 200 mM buffer concentration). The increasing trend in the power density indicated that the anode was not limiting and that higher power densities could be obtained using cathodes capable of higher rates of oxidation. The internal solution resistance for the MFC was 5 6 X, which supported the improved performance of the anode design. A new parameter defined as the ratio of projected surface area to total anode volume is suggested as a design parameter to relate volumetric and area-based power densities and to enable comparison of various MFC configurations.

  15. Ferroelectric Emission Cathodes for Low-Power Electric Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovaleski, Scott D.; Burke, Tom (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Low- or no-flow electron emitters are required for low-power electric thrusters, spacecraft plasma contactors, and electrodynamic tether systems to reduce or eliminate the need for propellant/expellant. Expellant-less neutralizers can improve the viability of very low-power colloid thrusters, field emission electric propulsion devices, ion engines, Hall thrusters, and gridded vacuum arc thrusters. The NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is evaluating ferroelectric emission (FEE) cathodes as zero expellant flow rate cathode sources for the applications listed above. At GRC, low voltage (100s to approx. 1500 V) operation of FEE cathodes is examined. Initial experiments, with unipolar, bipolar, and RF burst applied voltage, have produced current pulses 250 to 1000 ns in duration with peak currents of up to 2 A at voltages at or below 1500 V. In particular, FEE cathodes driven by RF burst voltages from 1400 to 2000 V peak to peak, at burst frequencies from 70 to 400 kHz, emitted average current densities from 0.1 to 0.7 A/sq cm. Pulse repeatability as a function of input voltage has been initially established. Reliable emission has been achieved in air background at pressures as high as 10(exp -6) Torr.

  16. Dual-Cathode Electron-Beam Source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, James G.; Conley, Joseph M.; Wittry, David B.

    1988-01-01

    Beam from either cathode electromagnetically aligned with exit port. Electron beam from either of two cathodes deflected by magnetic and electric fields to central axis. Mechanical alignment of beam easy because cathode axes, anode apertures, and electron trajectories coplanar. Applications where uninterrupted service needed: scanning electron microscopes, transmission electron microscopes, electron-beam lithography equipment, Auger instruments, and microfocused x-ray sources.

  17. Remote control for anode-cathode adjustment

    DOEpatents

    Roose, Lars D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    An apparatus for remotely adjusting the anode-cathode gap in a pulse power machine has an electric motor located within a hollow cathode inside the vacuum chamber of the pulse power machine. Input information for controlling the motor for adjusting the anode-cathode gap is fed into the apparatus using optical waveguides. The motor, controlled by the input information, drives a worm gear that moves a cathode tip. When the motor drives in one rotational direction, the cathode is moved toward the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is diminished. When the motor drives in the other direction, the cathode is moved away from the anode and the size of the anode-cathode gap is increased. The motor is powered by batteries housed in the hollow cathode. The batteries may be rechargeable, and they may be recharged by a photovoltaic cell in combination with an optical waveguide that receives recharging energy from outside the hollow cathode. Alternatively, the anode-cathode gap can be remotely adjusted by a manually-turned handle connected to mechanical linkage which is connected to a jack assembly. The jack assembly converts rotational motion of the handle and mechanical linkage to linear motion of the cathode moving toward or away from the anode.

  18. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2005-11-17

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  19. Testing a GaAs cathode in SRF gun

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, E.; Kewisch, J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Burrill, A.; Rao, T.; Wu, Q.; Holmes, D.

    2011-03-28

    RF electron guns with a strained superlattice GaAs cathode are expected to generate polarized electron beams of higher brightness and lower emittance than do DC guns, due to their higher field gradient at the cathode's surface and lower cathode temperature. We plan to install a bulk GaAs:Cs in a SRF gun to evaluate the performance of both the gun and the cathode in this environment. The status of this project is: In our 1.3 GHz 1/2 cell SRF gun, the vacuum can be maintained at nearly 10{sup -12} Torr because of cryo-pumping at 2K. With conventional activation of bulk GaAs, we obtained a QE of 10% at 532 nm, with lifetime of more than 3 days in the preparation chamber and have shown that it can survive in transport from the preparation chamber to the gun. The beam line has been assembled and we are exploring the best conditions for baking the cathode under vacuum. We report here the progress of our test of the GaAs cathode in the SRF gun. Future particle accelerators, such as eRHIC and the ILC require high-brightness, high-current polarized electrons. Strained superlattice GaAs:Cs has been shown to be an efficient cathode for producing polarized electrons. Activation of GaAs with Cs,O(F) lowers the electron affinity and makes it energetically possible for all the electrons, excited into the conduction band that drift or diffuse to the emission surface, to escape into the vacuum. Presently, all operating polarized electron sources, such as the CEBAF, are DC guns. In these devices, the excellent ultra-high vacuum extends the lifetime of the cathode. However, the low field gradient on the photocathode's emission surface of the DC guns limits the beam quality. The higher accelerating gradients, possible in the RF guns, generate a far better beam. Until recently, most RF guns operated at room temperature, limiting the vacuum to {approx}10{sup -9} Torr. This destroys the GaAs's NEA surface. The SRF guns combine the excellent vacuum conditions of DC guns and the high accelerating gradient of the RF guns, potentially offering a long lived cathode with very low emittance. Testing this concept requires preparation of the cathode, transportation to the SRF gun and evaluation of the performance of the cathode and the gun at cryogenic temperatures. In our work at BNL, we successfully activated the bulk GaAs in the preparation chamber. The highest quantum efficient was 10% at 532 nm that fell to 0.5% after 100 hours. We explored three different ways to activate the GaAs. We verified that the GaAs photocathode remains stable for 30 hours in a 10{sup -11} Torr vacuum. Passing the photocathode through the low 10{sup -9} Torr transfer section in several seconds caused the QE to drop to 0.8%. The photocathode with 0.8% QE can be tested for the SRF gun. The gun and beam pipe were prepared and assembled. After baking at 200 C baking, the vacuum of the gun and beam pipe can sustain a low 10{sup -11} Torr at room temperature. The final test to extract electrons from the gun is ongoing. In this paper, we discuss our progress with this SRF gun and the results of the photocathode in preparation chamber and in magnet transfer line.

  20. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 ?m has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract. note number. be ONLY)

  1. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  2. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  3. Magnetic-cusp, cathodic-arc source

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, S.

    1995-11-21

    A magnetic-cusp for a cathodic-arc source wherein the arc is confined to the desired cathode surface, provides a current path for electrons from the cathode to the anode, and utilizes electric and magnetic fields to guide ions from the cathode to a point of use, such as substrates to be coated. The magnetic-cusp insures arc stability by an easy magnetic path from anode to cathode, while the straight-through arrangement leads to high ion transmission. 3 figs.

  4. Application of hollow cathode effect for local ion nitriding of machine parts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budilov, V. V.; Ramazanov, K. N.; Khusainov, Yu G.; Zolotov, I. V.; Babenko, N. S.

    2015-11-01

    Influence of hollow cathode effect (HCE) on local ion nitriding process of 16Kh3NVFMB-Sh steel was studied. Microstructures of nitrided layer, phase composition, microhardness profiles through the diffusion layer were obtained and investigated. Influence of ion nitriding duration on nitrided case depth and wear resistance was studied. Technology of ion nitriding with application to HCE for gear part was developed.

  5. Doped carbon-sulfur species nanocomposite cathode for Li--S batteries

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Donghai; Xu, Tianren; Song, Jiangxuan

    2015-12-29

    We report a heteroatom-doped carbon framework that acts both as conductive network and polysulfide immobilizer for lithium-sulfur cathodes. The doped carbon forms chemical bonding with elemental sulfur and/or sulfur compound. This can significantly inhibit the diffusion of lithium polysulfides in the electrolyte, leading to high capacity retention and high coulombic efficiency.

  6. Study of Discharging Characteristics of Hollow Cathode Surge Protective Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Xueling; Chen, Jingliang; Xu, Xiaowei; Liu, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2010-02-01

    A hollow cathode surge protective gap (HCSPG) was designed, and the discharge characteristics was investigated in an air and nitrogen gas environment. For both the gap spacing D and the hole diameter varphi of HCSPG of 3 mm, the voltage protective value Up of HCSPG is about 3.5 kV and its converting time tc exceeds 100 ns at an air pressure from 10 Pa to 100 Pa. The maximum converting time tc from glow to arc discharging reaches 1600 ns at an air pressure of 100 Pa, while the minimum converting time tc is 120 ns at 10 Pa. For a triggered HCSPG, Up is reduced to about 1.6 kV while the converting time is 120 ns with a semiconductor trigger device and 50 ns with a dielectric porcelain trigger device under an air pressure of 100 Pa.

  7. Temperature Distributions in Hollow Cathode Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polk, Jay; Marrese, Colleen; Thornber, Ben; Dang, Lisa; Johnson, Lee

    2004-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the emitter. To support development of cathode life models we have developed a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements ofthe external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. Initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode with the same geometry as a cathode that failed after operating at 12 A emission current for 27800 hours are discussed.

  8. H+ diffusion and electrochemical stability of Li1+x+yAlxTi2-xSiyP3-yO12 glass in aqueous Li/air battery electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Fei; Xu, Wu; Shao, Yuyan; Chen, Xilin; Wang, Zhiguo; Gao, Fei; Liu, Xingjiang; Zhang, Jiguang

    2012-09-15

    It is well known that LATP (Li1+x+y AlxTi2?x SiyP3?yO12) glass is a good lithium ion conductor. However, the interaction between LATP glass and H+ ions (including its diffusion and surface adsorption) needs to be well understood before the long-term application of LATP glass in an aqueous electrolyte based Li-air batteries where H+ always present. In this work, we investigate the H+ ion diffusion properties in LATP glass and their surface interactions using both experimental and modeling approaches. Our analysis indicates that the apparent H+ related current observed in the initial cyclic voltammetry scan should be attributed to the adsorption of H+ ions on the LATP glass rather than the bulk diffusion of H+ ions in the glass. Furthermore, the density functional theory calculations indicate that the H+ ion diffusion energy barrier (3.21 eV) is much higher than that of Li+ ion (0.79 eV) and Na+ ion (0.79 eV) in NASICON type LiTi2(PO4)3 material. As a result, the H+ ion conductivity in LATP glass is negligible at room temperature. However, significant surface corrosion was found after the LATP glass was soaked in strong alkaline electrolyte for extended time. Therefore, appropriate electrolytes have to be developed to prevent the corrosion of LATP glass before its practical application for Li-air batteries using aqueous electrolyte.

  9. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming (Los Alamos, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  10. A Computational and Experimental Study of Coflow Laminar Methane/Air Diffusion Flames: Effects of Fuel Dilution, Inlet Velocity, and Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cao, S.; Ma, B.; Bennett, B. A. V.; Giassi, D.; Stocker, D. P.; Takahashi, F.; Long, M. B.; Smooke, M. D.

    2014-01-01

    The influences of fuel dilution, inlet velocity, and gravity on the shape and structure of laminar coflow CH4-air diffusion flames were investigated computationally and experimentally. A series of nitrogen-diluted flames measured in the Structure and Liftoff in Combustion Experiment (SLICE) on board the International Space Station was assessed numerically under microgravity (mu g) and normal gravity (1g) conditions with CH4 mole fraction ranging from 0.4 to 1.0 and average inlet velocity ranging from 23 to 90 cm/s. Computationally, the MC-Smooth vorticity-velocity formulation was employed to describe the reactive gaseous mixture, and soot evolution was modeled by sectional aerosol equations. The governing equations and boundary conditions were discretized on a two-dimensional computational domain by finite differences, and the resulting set of fully coupled, strongly nonlinear equations was solved simultaneously at all points using a damped, modified Newton's method. Experimentally, flame shape and soot temperature were determined by flame emission images recorded by a digital color camera. Very good agreement between computation and measurement was obtained, and the conclusions were as follows. (1) Buoyant and nonbuoyant luminous flame lengths are proportional to the mass flow rate of the fuel mixture; computed and measured nonbuoyant flames are noticeably longer than their 1g counterparts; the effect of fuel dilution on flame shape (i.e., flame length and flame radius) is negligible when the flame shape is normalized by the methane flow rate. (2) Buoyancy-induced reduction of the flame radius through radially inward convection near the flame front is demonstrated. (3) Buoyant and nonbuoyant flame structure is mainly controlled by the fuel mass flow rate, and the effects from fuel dilution and inlet velocity are secondary.

  11. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is LSCF < PSCF < SSCF < YSCF < LSM. The button cell results agree with this ordering indicating that this is an important tool for use in developing our understanding of electrode behavior in fuel cells.

  12. Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scorer, Richard S.

    The purpose of this book is to describe the basic mechanisms whereby pollution is transported and diffused in the atmosphere. It is designed to give practitioners an understanding of basic mechanics and physics so they may have a correct basis on which to formulate their decisions related to practical air pollution control problems. Since many…

  13. Preliminary assessment of using tree-tissue analysis and passive-diffusion samplers to evaluate trichloroethene contamination of ground water at Site SS-34N, McChord Air Force Base, Washington, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.

    2002-01-01

    Two low-cost innovative sampling procedures for characterizing trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in ground water were evaluated for use at McChord Air Force Base (AFB) by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force McChord Air Force Base Installation Restoration Program, in 2001. Previous attempts to characterize the source of ground-water contamination in the heterogeneous glacial outwash aquifer at McChord site SS-34N using soil-gas surveys, direct-push exploration, and more than a dozen ground-water monitoring wells have had limited success. The procedures assessed in this study involved analysis of tree-tissue samples to map underlying ground-water contamination and deploying passive-diffusion samplers to measure TCE concentrations in existing monitoring wells. These procedures have been used successfully at other U.S. Department of Defense sites and have resulted in cost avoidance and accelerated site characterization. Despite the presence of TCE in ground water at site SS-34N, TCE was not detected in any of the 20 trees sampled at the site during either early spring or late summer sampling. The reason the tree tissue procedure was not successful at the McChord AFB site SS-34N may have been due to an inability of tree roots to extract moisture from a water table 30 feet below the land surface, or that concentrations of TCE in ground water were not large enough to be detectable in the tree tissue at the sampling point. Passive-diffusion samplers were placed near the top, middle, and bottom of screened intervals in three monitoring wells and TCE was observed in all samplers. Concentrations of TCE from the passive-diffusion samplers were generally similar to concentrations found in samples collected in the same wells using conventional pumping methods. In contrast to conventional pumping methods, the collection of ground-water samples using the passive-diffusion samples did not generate waste purge water that would require hazardous-waste disposal. In addition, the results from the passive-diffusion samples may show that TCE concentrations are stratified across some screened intervals. The overall results of the limited test of passive-diffusion samplers at site SS-34N were similar to more detailed tests conducted at other contaminated sites across the country and indicate that further evaluation of the use of passive-diffusion samplers at McChord site SS-34N is warranted.

  14. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 {mu}m range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at {approx}400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and {approx}2% for argon fluoride. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Nickel-titanium-phosphate cathodes

    DOEpatents

    Belharouak, Ilias (Westmont, IL); Amine, Khalil (Downers Grove, IL)

    2008-12-16

    Cathode materials having an improved electronic conductivity allowing for faster kinetics in the electrochemical reaction, as well as higher conductivity to meet the power requirements for many consumer applications, especially at low temperatures. The cathode material comprises a compound from the family of compounds where the basic unit is generally represented by Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. The structure of Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4 includes corner sharing octahedra [TiO.sub.6] running along the C-axis. The structure is such that nearly three Li atoms are being inserted in Li.sub.xNi.sub.0.5TiOPO.sub.4. A cell in accordance with the principles of the present invention is rechargable and demonstrates a high capacity of lithium intercalation and fast kinetics.

  16. Filters for cathodic arc plasmas

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA); MacGill, Robert A. (Richmond, CA); Bilek, Marcela M. M. (Engadine, AU); Brown, Ian G. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasmas are contaminated with macroparticles. A variety of magnetic plasma filters has been used with various success in removing the macroparticles from the plasma. An open-architecture, bent solenoid filter, with additional field coils at the filter entrance and exit, improves macroparticle filtering. In particular, a double-bent filter that is twisted out of plane forms a very compact and efficient filter. The coil turns further have a flat cross-section to promote macroparticle reflection out of the filter volume. An output conditioning system formed of an expander coil, a straightener coil, and a homogenizer, may be used with the magnetic filter for expanding the filtered plasma beam to cover a larger area of the target. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this filter can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  17. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 ?m range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  18. Non-isothermal electrochemical model for lithium-ion cells with composite cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Suman; Patil, Rajkumar S.; Ramachandran, Sanoop; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Oh, Dukjin; Yeo, Taejung; Doo, Seokgwang

    2015-06-01

    Transition metal oxide cathodes for Li-ion batteries offer high energy density and high voltage. Composites of these materials have shown excellent life expectancy and improved thermal performance. In the present work, a comprehensive non-isothermal electrochemical model for a Lithium ion cell with a composite cathode is developed. The present work builds on lithium concentration-dependent diffusivity and thermal gradient of cathode potential, obtained from experiments. The model validation is performed for a wide range of temperature and discharge rates. Excellent agreement is found for high and room temperature with moderate success at low temperatures, which can be attributed to the low fidelity of material properties at low temperature. Although the cell operation is limited by electronic conductivity of NCA at room temperature, at low temperatures a shift in controlling process is seen, and operation is limited by electrolyte transport. At room temperature, the lithium transport in Cathode appears to be the main source of heat generation with entropic heat as the primary contributor at low discharge rates and ohmic heat at high discharge rates respectively. Improvement in electronic conductivity of the cathode is expected to improve the performance of these composite cathodes and pave way for its wider commercialization.

  19. Conflicting Roles Of Nickel In Controlling Cathode Performance In Lithium-ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Belharouak, Ilias; Genc, Arda; Wang, Zhiguo; Wang, Dapeng; Amine, Khalil; Gao, Fei; Zhou, Guangwen; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Zhang, Jiguang; Browning, Nigel D.; Liu, Jun; Wang, Chong M.

    2012-09-17

    A variety of approaches are being made to enhance the performance of lithium ion batteries. Incorporating multi-valence transition metal ions into metal oxide cathodes has been identified as an essential approach to achieve the necessary high voltage and high capacity. However, the fundamental mechanism that limits their power rate and cycling stability remains unclear. The power rate strongly depends on the lithium ion drift speed in the cathode. Crystallographically, these transition metal-based cathodes frequently have a layered structure. In the classic wisdom, it is accepted that lithium ion travels swiftly within the layers moving out/in of the cathode during the charge/discharge. Here, we report the unexpected discovery of a thermodynamically driven, yet kinetically controlled, surface modification in the widely explored lithium nickel manganese oxide cathode material, which may inhibit the battery charge/discharge rate. We found that during cathode synthesis and processing before electrochemical cycling in the cell nickel can preferentially move along the fast diffusion channels and selectively segregate at the surface facets terminated with a mix of anions and cations. This segregation essentially blocks the otherwise fast out/in pathways for lithium ions during the charge/discharge. Therefore, it appears that the transition metal dopant may help to provide high capacity and/or high voltage, but can be located in a “wrong” location that blocks or slows lithium diffusion, limiting battery performance. In this circumstance, limitations in the properties of Li-ion batteries using these cathode materials can be determined more by the materials synthesis issues than by the operation within the battery itself.

  20. NEXIS Reservoir Cathode 2000 Hour Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason; Schneider, Todd; Polk, Jay; Goebel, Dan; Ohlinger, Wayne; Hill, D. Norm

    2004-01-01

    The current design of the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) employs a reservoir cathode as both the discharge and neutralizer cathode to meet the 10 yr thruster design life. The main difference between a reservoir cathode and a conventional discharge cathode is the source material (barium-containing compound) is contained within a reservoir instead of in an impregnated insert in the hollow tube. However, reservoir cathodes do not have much life test history associated with them. In order to demonstrate the feasibility of using a reservoir cathode as an integral part of the NEXIS ion thruster, a 2000 hr life test was performed. Several proof-of-concept (POC) reservoir cathodes were built early in the NEXIS program to conduct performance testing as well as life tests. One of the POC cathodes was sent to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) where it was tested for 2000 hrs in a vacuum chamber. The cathode was operated at the NEXIS design point of 25 A discharge current and a xenon flow rate of 5.5 sccm during the 2000 hr test. The cathode performance parameters, including discharge current, discharge voltage, keeper current; keeper voltage, and flow rate were monitored throughout test. Also, the temperature upstream of cathode heater, the temperature downstream of the cathode heater, and the temperature of the orifice plate were monitored throughout the life of the test. The results of the 2000 hr test will be described in this paper. Included in the results will be time history of discharge current, discharge voltage, and flow rate. Also, a time history of the cathode temperature will be provided.

  1. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  2. High contrast cathode ray tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisovicz, E. J.; Catlaw, T. G. (inventors)

    1971-01-01

    A layer of material is described, which contains fine grains of phosphor material stimulated by electrons to produce visible radiation. The layer, which also contains fine grains of cobalt oxide, is deposited on the glass screen of a cathode ray tube to provide high contrast, by absorbing most of the visible radiation which is directed to the layer through the screen, while not materially affecting the visible light which the phosphor material produces in response to the electron stimulation.

  3. Arc-cathode interaction study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, X.; Heberlein, J.

    1992-01-01

    Insufficient electrode life and uncertainties in that life are major problems hampering the development in many plasma application areas which make use of plasma torches, arc heaters, and arc jet thrusters. In spite of a considerable amount of work published dealing with arc-cathode phenomena, our present understanding is still incomplete because different physical phenomena dominate for different combinations of experimental parameters. The objective of our present research project is to gain a better understanding of the behavior of arc-cathode surface interaction over a wide range of parameters, and furthermore to develop guidelines for better thermal design of the electrode and the selection of materials. This report will present the research results and progress obtained on the arc-cathode interaction studies at the University of Minnesota. It includes results which have been obtained under programs other than the NASA funded program. Some of the results have been submitted in an informal interim progress report, and all of the results have been presented in a seminar during a visit to the NASA Lewis Research Center on October 16, 1992.

  4. Novel Composite Materials for SOFC Cathode-Interconnect Contact

    SciTech Connect

    J. H. Zhu

    2009-07-31

    This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions of our University Coal Research Project, which focused on developing a new class of electrically-conductive, Cr-blocking, damage-tolerant Ag-perovksite composite materials for the cathode-interconnect contact of intermediate-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stacks. The Ag evaporation rate increased linearly with air flow rate initially and became constant for the air flow rate {ge} {approx} 1.0 cm {center_dot} s{sup -1}. An activation energy of 280 KJ.mol{sup -1} was obtained for Ag evaporation in both air and Ar+5%H{sub 2}+3%H{sub 2}O. The exposure environment had no measurable influence on the Ag evaporation rate as well as its dependence on the gas flow rate, while different surface morphological features were developed after thermal exposure in the oxidizing and reducing environments. Pure Ag is too volatile at the SOFC operating temperature and its evaporation rate needs to be reduced to facilitate its application as the cathode-interconnect contact. Based on extensive evaporation testing, it was found that none of the alloying additions reduced the evaporation rate of Ag over the long-term exposure, except the noble metals Au, Pt, and Pd; however, these noble elements are too expensive to justify their practical use in contact materials. Furthermore, the addition of La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM) into Ag to form a composite material also did not significantly modify the Ag evaporation rate. The Ag-perovskite composites with the perovskite being either (La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4})(Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2})O{sub 3} (LSCF) or LSM were systematically evaluated as the contact material between the ferritic interconnect alloy Crofer 22 APU and the LSM cathode. The area specific resistances (ASRs) of the test specimens were shown to be highly dependent on the volume percentage and the type of the perovskite present in the composite contact material as well as the amount of thermal cycling that the specimens were subjected to during testing. The Ag-LSCF composite contact materials proved more effective in trapping Cr within the contact material and preventing Cr migration into the cathode than the Ag-LSM composites. Ag-perovskite composite contact materials are promising candidates for use in intermediate-temperature SOFC stacks with ferritic stainless steel interconnects due to their ability to maintain acceptably low ASRs while reducing Cr migration into the cathode material.

  5. Oxygen transport in the internal xenon plasma of a dispenser hollow cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Capece, Angela M. Shepherd, Joseph E.; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.

    2014-04-21

    Reactive gases such as oxygen and water vapor modify the surface morphology of BaO dispenser cathodes and degrade the electron emission properties. For vacuum cathodes operating at fixed temperature, the emission current drops rapidly when oxygen adsorbs on top of the low work function surface. Previous experiments have shown that plasma cathodes are more resistant to oxygen poisoning and can operate with O{sub 2} partial pressures one to two orders of magnitude higher than vacuum cathodes before the onset of poisoning occurs. Plasma cathodes used for electric thrusters are typically operated with xenon; however, gas phase barium, oxygen, and tungsten species may be found in small concentrations. The densities of these minor species are small compared with the plasma density, and thus, their presence in the discharge does not significantly alter the xenon plasma parameters. It is important, however, to consider the transport of these minor species as they may deposit on the emitter surface and affect the electron emission properties. In this work, we present the results of a material transport model used to predict oxygen fluxes to the cathode surface by solving the species conservation equations in a cathode with a 2.25?mm diameter orifice operated at a discharge current of 15?A, a Xe flow rate of 3.7 sccm, and 100?ppm of O{sub 2}. The dominant ionization process for O{sub 2} is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Ba is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O{sub 2} are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion-limited; therefore, the high resistance to oxygen poisoning observed in plasma cathodes likely results from surface processes not considered here.

  6. Characterization of hollow cathode, ring cusp discharge chambers. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Jason A.

    1989-01-01

    An experimental study into the effects of changes in such physical design parameters as hollow cathode position, anode position and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance, is described. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction and ion beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate specific means by which changes in these design parameters induce changes in performance, i.e., through changes in the loss rates of primary electrons to the anode, of ions to discharge chamber walls or of ions to cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid, (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density on the discharge chamber centerline, and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface and so there are no steep magnetic flux density gradients near the walls through which ions can be lost by Bohm diffusion. The uniformity of the plasma density at the grids can also be improved by moving the point of primary electron injection into the discharge chamber off of the chamber centerline. Other results show the discharge chamber losses decrease when a filament cathode is substituted for a hollow cathode to the extent of the hollow cathode operating power. When plasma ion energy cost is determined in such a way that the cost of operating the hollow cathode is subtracted out, the performance using either electron source is similar.

  7. Co-flow anode/cathode supply heat exchanger for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Haltiner, Jr., Karl J.; Kelly, Sean M.

    2005-11-22

    In a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly, a co-flow heat exchanger is provided in the flow paths of the reformate gas and the cathode air ahead of the fuel cell stack, the reformate gas being on one side of the exchanger and the cathode air being on the other. The reformate gas is at a substantially higher temperature than is desired in the stack, and the cathode gas is substantially cooler than desired. In the co-flow heat exchanger, the temperatures of the reformate and cathode streams converge to nearly the same temperature at the outlet of the exchanger. Preferably, the heat exchanger is formed within an integrated component manifold (ICM) for a solid-oxide fuel cell assembly.

  8. Formation of stable direct current microhollow cathode discharge by venturi gas flow system for remote plasma source in atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Ki Wan; Lee, Tae Il; Hwang, Hyeon Seok; Noh, Joo Hyon; Baik, Hong Koo; Song, Kie Moon

    2008-02-11

    We introduce a microhollow cathode configuration with venturi gas flow to ambient air in order to obtain glow discharge at atmospheric pressure. Stable microhollow cathode discharge was formed in a 200 {mu}m diameter at 9 mA and the optimum value of gas velocityxdiameter for hollow cathode effect was obtained in our system. In order to confirm hollow cathode effect, we measured the enhancement of E/N strength for 200 {mu}m (0.31 m{sup 2}/s) and 500 {mu}m (0.78 m{sup 2}/s) air discharge at 8 mA under the velocity of 156 m/s. As a result, an increase of 46.7% in E/N strength of the discharge of 200 {mu}m hole was obtained compare to that of 500 {mu}m.

  9. Development program on a cold cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    During this phase of the cathode development program, SRI improved the multiple electron beam exposure system used to print hole patterns for the cathode arrays, studied anisotropic etch processes, conducted cathode investigations using an emission microscope, reviewed possible alternate materials for cathode fabrication, studied cathode storage techniques, conducted high power operation experiments, and demonstrated high-current-density operation with small arrays of tips.

  10. Hollow cathode, quasi-steady MPD arc

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parmentier, N.; Jahn, R. G.

    1971-01-01

    A quasi-steady MPD accelerator has been operated with four different hollow cathodes over a power range from 5 kilowatts to 5 megawatts. The absolute level of the argon mass flow, as well as the fractional division of the flow between the cathode and the six standard chamber injectors, is varied over a range of 1 to 12 grams per second. For a fixed total current, it is observed that the voltage increases monotonically with mass flow rate, compared to the usual experience with solid cathodes where the voltage decreases with mass flow rate. For a fixed percentage of flow through the cathode, each hollow cathode configuration displays a minimum impedance at a particular value of the total mass flow. It is asserted that in order to keep the discharge inside the hollow cathode the magnetic pressure and gasdynamic pressure have to match inside the cavity.

  11. Decay of the zincate concentration gradient at an alkaline zinc cathode after charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, H. E.; May, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    The study was carried out by observing the decay of the zincate concentration gradient at a horizontal zinc cathode after charging. This decay was found to approximate first order kinetics as expected from a proposed boundary layer model. The decay half life was shown to be a linear function of the thickness of porous zinc deposit on the cathode indicating a very rapid transport of zincate through porous zinc metal. The rapid transport is attributed to an electrochemical mechanism. The data also indicated a relatively sharp transition between the diffusion and convection transport regions. The diffusion of zincate ion through asbestos submerged in alkaline electrolyte was shown to be comparable with that predicted from the bulk diffusion coefficient of the zincate ion in alkali.

  12. Cathodic protection design for aboveground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Koszewski, L.; Quincy, G.L.

    1995-12-31

    The application of cathodic protection for aboveground storage tank (AST) bottoms has been accomplished in a variety of approaches, with varying degrees of success. Recent State regulations, requiring corrosion protection for new tanks and secondary containment for double bottom tanks, have prompted new application techniques to be developed for AST cathodic protection. Improved design applications are now available to todays` tank owners and operators to provide effective long term cathodic protection.

  13. A direct density modulation cathode in magnetron

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Jun; Liu, Yong-gui; Yang, Han-wu; Shu, Ting

    2013-09-15

    A direct Density Modulation Cathode (DMC) in magnetron is proposed in this paper. By removing the velocity modulation process, electron spokes corresponding to the dominant operating mode can be quickly formed when the DMC is used. Based on theoretical analysis, particle-in-cell simulations and experimental investigations are carried out for demonstration. The final results show that compared with conventional solid cathode and transparent cathode, the DMC can increase 68% and even 146% of relative microwave widths, respectively.

  14. A Two Frequency Thermionic Cathode Electron Gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edelen, Jon; Biedron, Sandra; Harris, John; Lewellen, John; Milton, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    When an un-gated thermionic cathode is operated in an RF gun, some fraction of the emitted electrons will return to the cathode due to the change in sign of the electric field in the gun. This back-bombardment current causes heating of the cathode, and this reduces the ability of the cathode heater to control the bunch charge. In this paper, we investigate the use of a two frequency TM010 / TM020 electron gun to mitigate this effect. Simulations revealed that for a 100-pC bunch charge operating at 10MV/m gradient the harmonic field produced a 63% reduction in the back-bombardment power.

  15. Emission properties of explosive field emission cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, Amitava; Patel, Ankur; Menon, Rakhee; Sharma, Archana; Chakravarthy, D. P.; Patil, D. S.

    2011-10-15

    The research results of the explosive field emission cathode plasma expansion velocity and the initial emission area in the planar diode configuration with cathodes made of graphite, stainless steel, polymer velvet, carbon coated, and carbon fiber (needle type) cathodes are presented. The experiments have been performed at the electron accelerator LIA-200 (200 kV, 100 ns, and 4 kA). The diode voltage has been varied from 28-225 kV, whereas the current density has been varied from 86-928 A/cm{sup 2} with 100 ns pulse duration. The experimentally obtained electron beam diode perveance has been compared with the 1 dimensional Child-Langmuir- law. It was found that initially only a part of the cathode take part in the emission process. The plasma expands at 1.7-5.2 cm/{mu}s for 4 mm anode-cathode gap for various cathode materials. It was found that the plasma expansion velocity increases with the decrease in the cathode diameter. At the beginning of the accelerating pulse, the entire cathode area participates in the electron emission process only for the multiple needle type carbon fiber cathode.

  16. Development of High Energy Cathode (PNNL)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jiguang; Liu, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Lithium ion batteries with high energy densities are required to reach DOE’s goal on early commercialization of electrical vehicles, including HEV, PHEV and EV. To increase the energy of cathode, voltage or/and capacity of cathode need to be increased. During FY10, we have investigated cathode materials with high operation voltages, for example LiMnPO4, and renewable organic cathode with high capacities. Environmentally friendly materials and low cost synthesis approaches have been intentionally explored during our efforts.

  17. Arc initiation in cathodic arc plasma sources

    DOEpatents

    Anders, Andre (Albany, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A "triggerless" arc initiation method and apparatus is based on simply switching the arc supply voltage to the electrodes (anode and cathode). Neither a mechanical trigger electrode nor a high voltage flashover from a trigger electrode is required. A conducting path between the anode and cathode is provided, which allows a hot spot to form at a location where the path connects to the cathode. While the conductive path is eroded by the cathode spot action, plasma deposition ensures the ongoing repair of the conducting path. Arc initiation is achieved by simply applying the relatively low voltage of the arc power supply, e.g. 500 V-1 kV, with the insulator between the anode and cathode coated with a conducting layer and the current at the layer-cathode interface concentrated at one or a few contact points. The local power density at these contact points is sufficient for plasma production and thus arc initiation. A conductive surface layer, such as graphite or the material being deposited, is formed on the surface of the insulator which separates the cathode from the anode. The mechanism of plasma production (and arc initiation) is based on explosive destruction of the layer-cathode interface caused by joule heating. The current flow between the thin insulator coating and cathode occurs at only a few contact points so the current density is high.

  18. Synthesis, Characterization and Performance of Cathodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianxin

    Lithium ion batteries provide a high energy density, higher voltage as well as a long shelf life compared to traditionally used lead acid, NiMH and NiCd batteries. Thus, they are a very promising energy storage system for our daily life. As one of the most important components in a battery, cathode materials have been investigated intensively in recent years as they play a key role in determining the cell voltage and discharge capacity in a battery. Both layered Li(Ni1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O 2 (NCM) and olivine-structured LiFePO4 (LFP) materials are promising cathode candidates. However, these cathodes also have some disadvantages that have hindered further commercialization. The main issue with NCM is its rapid performance decay upon cycling. In addition, LFP is hindered by a low rate capacity and low lithium ion diffusivity. We studied the crystal growth behavior and performance of both Li(Ni 1/3Co1/3Mn1/3)O2 and LiFePO4 cathodes in order to develop synthesis-structure-function relationships. Three different crystal growth behaviors were observed for the NCM annealing process: surface, volume and grain boundary diffusion. Further exploration of the mechanism of NCM performance decay revealed that microstructural changes were related to the strain accommodation ability in this system and that nanostructured materials were more stable during cycling. In the LFP synthesis, we observed both oriented attachment (OA) and Ostwald ripening (OR) during growth in a triethylene-glycol system. Both polycrystalline and single crystalline particles evolved as a function of a time-dependent pH change. Thus, the lithium ion diffusion rate of LiFePO4 was improved by tailoring the morphology and size though our modification of the precursor environment, revealing that polycrystalline LFP displayed better performance than single crystalline particles. Finally, the electronic conductivity of LiFePO4 was successfully increased via a polymer solution coating method. By producing more uniform, thin and coherent coatings on LiFePO4 particles, we were able to produce batteries with significantly less carbon (i.e., 0.41 wt.%) while has comparable performance (discharge capacity of 80mAh/g at 2C) compared to traditionally synthesized carbon-coated LiFePO4 with higher carbon loadings (ca. 2.64 wt.%). This will enable us to produce batteries with higher active material loading and therefore, significantly larger energy densities.

  19. Electrical performance of low cost cathodes prepared by plasma sputtering deposition in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Olivier; Tang, Zhe; Fung, Martin P H; Chua, Daniel H C; Chang, In Seop; Ng, How Y

    2012-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could potentially be utilized for a variety of applications in the future from biosensors to wastewater treatment. However, the amount of costly platinum (Pt) used as a catalyst should be minimized via innovative deposition methods such as sputtering. In addition, alternative and low-cost catalysts, such as cobalt (Co), should be sought. In this study, ultra low Pt or Co cathodes (0.1 mg cm(-2)) were manufactured by plasma sputtering deposition and scanning electron micrographs revealed nano-clusters of metal catalyst in a porous structure favorable to the three-phase heterogeneous catalytic reaction. When operated in single-chamber air-cathode MFCs, sputtered-Co cathodes generated on average the same power as sputtered-Pt cathodes (0.27 mW cell(-1)) and only 27% less than conventional Pt-ink cathodes with a catalyst load 5 times higher (0.5 mg cm(-2)). Finally, microscopy and molecular analyses showed evidence of biocatalysis activity on metal-free cathodes. PMID:22061267

  20. Three-dimensional effects of liquid water flooding in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell

    E-print Network

    Natarajan, Dilip; Van Nguyen, Trung

    2003-03-27

    , they ignored the diffusion layer and accounted only for the membrane with a catalyst interface on the anode and cathode sides. Fuller et al 7 also developed a similar model around the same time. Both these models concentrated on the temperature and water... and not in the diffusion layer and does not account for the dimension along the length of the channel. Gurau et al 9 developed a two-dimensional model for the entire fuel cell sandwich employing conventional gas distributors that accounted for the diffusion layer...

  1. Cell level modeling of the hygrothermal characteristics of open cathode polymer electrolyte

    E-print Network

    Bahrami, Majid

    membrane fuel cells Mehdi Andisheh-Tadbir a , Andrew Desouza b , Majid Bahrami a , Erik Kjeang a,* a School: Fuel cell Open cathode Air-cooled Hygrothermal Temperature Relative humidity a b s t r a c t Open- to medium-power polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stacks. Elimination of balance

  2. Hall Thruster Cluster Operation with a Shared Cathode Mitchell L. R. Walker

    E-print Network

    Walker, Mitchell

    Hall Thruster Cluster Operation with a Shared Cathode Mitchell L. R. Walker and Alec D. Gallimore the operation of the CDT itself [2­4]. The U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), NASA John H. Glenn high-power goal (i.e., the use of smaller Hall thrusters in a propulsion array [5]). Clustering allows

  3. Development of improved cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, H.U.

    1991-03-01

    The University of Missouri-Rolla conducted a 17 month research program focused on the development and evaluation of improved cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The objectives of this program were: (1) the development of cathode materials of improved stability in reducing environments; and (2) the development of cathode materials with improved electrical conductivity. The program was successful in identifying some potential candidate materials: Air sinterable (La,Ca)(Cr,Co)O{sub 3} compositions were developed and found to be more stable than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} towards reduction. Their conductivity at 1000{degrees}C ranged between 30 to 60 S/cm. Compositions within the (Y,Ca)(Cr,Co,Mn)O{sub 3} system were developed and found to have higher electrical conductivity than La{sub .8}Sr{sub .2}MnO{sub 3} and preliminary results suggest that their stability towards reduction is superior.

  4. Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Alinger, Matthew

    2013-09-30

    This final report summarizes the progress made during the October 1, 2008 - September 30, 2013 period under Cooperative Agreement DE-NT0004109 for the U. S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (USDOE/NETL) entitled “Performance Degradation of LSCF Cathodes”. The primary objective of this program is to develop a performance degradation mitigation path for high performing, cost-effective solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Strategies to mitigate performance degradation are developed and implemented. In addition, thermal spray manufacturing of SOFCs is explored. Combined, this work establishes a basis for cost-effective SOFC cells.

  5. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, Viswanath R.

    2007-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm) (Fig. 1, left). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated (Fig. 1, right). A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  6. Diffusion Flame Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takahashi, Fumiaki; Katta, V. R.

    2006-01-01

    Diffusion flames are commonly used for industrial burners in furnaces and flares. Oxygen/fuel burners are usually diffusion burners, primarily for safety reasons, to prevent flashback and explosion in a potentially dangerous system. Furthermore, in most fires, condensed materials pyrolyze, vaporize, and burn in air as diffusion flames. As a result of the interaction of a diffusion flame with burner or condensed-fuel surfaces, a quenched space is formed, thus leaving a diffusion flame edge, which plays an important role in flame holding in combustion systems and fire spread through condensed fuels. Despite a long history of jet diffusion flame studies, lifting/blowoff mechanisms have not yet been fully understood, compared to those of premixed flames. In this study, the structure and stability of diffusion flames of gaseous hydrocarbon fuels in coflowing air at normal earth gravity have been investigated experimentally and computationally. Measurements of the critical mean jet velocity (U(sub jc)) of methane, ethane, or propane at lifting or blowoff were made as a function of the coflowing air velocity (U(sub a)) using a tube burner (i.d.: 2.87 mm). By using a computational fluid dynamics code with 33 species and 112 elementary reaction steps, the internal chemical-kinetic structures of the stabilizing region of methane and propane flames were investigated. A peak reactivity spot, i.e., reaction kernel, is formed in the flame stabilizing region due to back-diffusion of heat and radical species against an oxygen-rich incoming flow, thus holding the trailing diffusion flame. The simulated flame base moved downstream under flow conditions close to the measured stability limit.

  7. Fuel Cell Electocatalysts: Anodes and Cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, Philip

    2000-03-01

    The current state-of-the-art catalyst for both the oxygen and hydrogen electrodes in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is based on Pt. When using pure hydrogen as the fuel, essentially the same Pt catalyst is used at both electrodes, although in different amounts. Neither the hydrogen oxidation nor the oxygen reduction reaction exhibit a significant variation in kinetics with Pt(hkl) crystal face in perfluorosulfonic acid electrolytes, i.e. the reactions are structure insensitive. An electronic effect does, however, adversely influence electrode kinetics for Pt particles smaller than 2 nm. Thus, a catalyst consisting of 2-3 nm Pt particles uniformly dispersed on a high area carbon support is currently the optimum catalyst for hydrogen-air PEM fuel cells. When the fuel is impure hydrogen, containing finite (> 1 ppm) amounts of CO, then the anode must use a different catalyst, one that will not be poisoned by the CO. These catalysts are still under development. The most promising are alloys of Pt with more oxophilic metals like Ru and Mo. These catalysts function by electrochemically oxidizing CO at the same rate as the adsorption rate, thus preventing poisoning of the surface by adsorbed CO. Prospects for non-Pt cathode catalysts will be discussed.

  8. Processes For Cleaning a Cathode Tube and Assemblies In A Hollow Cathode Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J. (Inventor); Verhey, Timothy R. R. (Inventor); Soulas, George C. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a process for cleaning a cathode tube and other subassemblies in a hollow cathode assembly. In the disclosed process, hand covering elastomer gloves are used for handling all cathode assembly parts. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are cleaned with a lint-free cloth damped with acetone, then wiped with alcohol, immersed in ethyl alcohol or acetone, and ultrasonic agitation is applied, heating to 60 C. for ethyl alcohol or 56 C. for acetone. The cathode tube and other subassemblies are dried by blowing with nitrogen gas.

  9. Cathode priming of a relativistic magnetron using multi-emission zones on projection ablation lithography cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Michael Cameron

    A novel priming technique of magnetrons, cathode priming, has been demonstrated experimentally and computationally to reduce microwave start-oscillation in The University of Michigan relativistic magnetron. In cathode priming, N/2 emission zones are constructed in discrete patches around the azimuth of the cylindrical cathode in an N-cavity magnetron. This emission geometry favors excitation of the pi-mode, the most efficient mode in the relativistic magnetron. Microwave oscillation builds-up from noise, therefore priming is advantageous. Advantages of priming include faster start-oscillation, potentially longer pulse-lengths, suppression of mode competition, and frequency locking. Relativistic magnetron experiments demonstrated that cathode priming reduced the start-oscillation times from 114 ns to 99 ns when compared to non-cathode priming shots. Generated magnetron frequencies operated in pi-mode range more frequently with priming (33%) than without priming (20%). Peak electronic efficiency yielded the highest average with cathode priming at 17%. Three-dimensional, electromagnetic, particle-in-cell simulations verified start-oscillation times were reduced with cathode priming, up to a factor of 3. In 3-D simulations, mode competition was suppressed in the startup phase with cathode priming. Without cathode priming the simulated relativistic magnetron initially operated in the 2pi/3-mode before transitioning into the pi-mode. The emission zones on the cathode have been fabricated by a new technique for explosive emission cathodes. This technique, denoted as Projection Ablation Lithography (PAL), involved micro-texturing of solid metal (Al 6061) cathodes by a KrF excimer laser to provide the electric field enhancement. Advantages to the PAL cathode compared to previously-used cotton cathode are: less out-gassing, resulting in lower base vacuum pressures; emission regions are heat-sinked to the cathode; and emission regions can be varied to provide the desired amount of electric field enhancement and cathode priming. PAL cathodes are capable of producing current densities of kA/cm2 with total crossed-field currents (for 6 cm2 area) between 2--10 kA. Experimentally, this all metal PAL cathode out-performed or was equal to the previously-used cotton fiber in every category (energy, pulselength, start-time) when used in the relativistic magnetron. Inferred plasma closure velocities were a factor of two lower with the PAL cathodes and in some shots exhibited zero plasma closure. Microwave pulselengths with PAL cathodes increased 57% to 212 ns, while microwave power averaged the same at 165 MW.

  10. Nanostructured MnO2-Based Cathodes for Li-Ion/Polymer Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skandan, Ganesh; Singhal, Amit

    2005-01-01

    Nanostructured MnO2-based cathodes for Li-ion/polymer electrochemical cells have been investigated in a continuing effort to develop safe, high-energy-density, reliable, low-toxicity, rechargeable batteries for a variety of applications in NASA programs and in mass-produced commercial electronic equipment. Whereas the energy densities of state-of-the-art lithium-ion/polymer batteries range from 150 to 175 W h/kg, the goal of this effort is to increase the typical energy density to about 250 W h/kg. It is also expected that an incidental benefit of this effort will be increases in power densities because the distances over which Li ions must diffuse through nanostructured cathode materials are smaller than those through solid bulk cathode materials.

  11. A New Mechanism in Electrochemical Process for Arsenic Oxidation: Production of H2O2 from Anodic O2 Reduction on the Cathode under Automatically Developed Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ao; Yuan, Songhu; Zhang, Peng; Tong, Man

    2015-05-01

    Electrochemical cathodes are often used to reduce contaminants or produce oxidizing substances (i.e., H2O2). Alkaline conditions develop automatically around the cathode in electrochemical processes, and O2 diffuses onto the cathode easily. However, limited attention is paid to contaminant transformation by the reactive species produced on the cathode under oxic and alkaline conditions due to the inapplicability of pH for Fenton reaction. In this study, a new oxidation mechanism on the cathode is presented for contaminant transformation under automatically developed alkaline conditions. In an electrochemical sand column, 6.67 ?M As(III) was oxidized by 36% when it passed through the cathode under the conditions of 30 mA current, an initial pH of 7.5 and a flow rate of 2 mL/min. Under the alkaline conditions (pH 10.0-11.0) that developed automatically around the cathode, the reduction potential of As(III) decreased greatly, allowing a pronounced oxidation by the small quantities of H2O2 produced from O2 reduction on the cathode. As(III) oxidation was further increased by the presence of soil pore water and groundwater solutes of HCO3-, Ca2+, Mg2+ and humic acid. The new oxidation mechanism found for the cathode under localized alkaline conditions supplements the fundamentals of contaminant transformation in electrochemical processes. PMID:25853500

  12. Short communication Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of

    E-print Network

    that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressureShort communication Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air t s High humidity or increased water pressure reduced power production. Cathode performance decreased due

  13. Regenerable Field Emission Cathode for Spacecraft Neutralization

    E-print Network

    King, Lyon B.

    Regenerable Field Emission Cathode for Spacecraft Neutralization Jason M. Makela, Robert L a cathode for propellant ionization. However, a neutralizer is still necessary to maintain spacecraft neutrality, because an operating FEEP thruster will still cause a global charge imbalance on a spacecraft

  14. Multi-cathode unbalanced magnetron sputtering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sproul, William D.

    1991-01-01

    Ion bombardment of a growing film during deposition is necessary in many instances to ensure a fully dense coating, particularly for hard coatings. Until the recent advent of unbalanced magnetron (UBM) cathodes, reactive sputtering had not been able to achieve the same degree of ion bombardment as other physical vapor deposition processes. The amount of ion bombardment of the substrate depends on the plasma density at the substrate, and in a UBM system the amount of bombardment will depend on the degree of unbalance of the cathode. In multi-cathode systems, the magnetic fields between the cathodes must be linked to confine the fast electrons that collide with the gas atoms. Any break in this linkage results in electrons being lost and a low plasma density. Modeling of the magnetic fields in a UBM cathode using a finite element analysis program has provided great insight into the interaction between the magnetic fields in multi-cathode systems. Large multi-cathode systems will require very strong magnets or many cathodes in order to maintain the magnetic field strength needed to achieve a high plasma density. Electromagnets offer the possibility of independent control of the plasma density. Such a system would be a large-scale version of an ion beam enhanced deposition (IBED) system, but, for the UBM system where the plasma would completely surround the substrate, the acronym IBED might now stand for Ion Blanket Enhanced Deposition.

  15. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  16. Offshore well casing cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Hamberg, A.; Orton, M.D.; Smith, S.N.

    1987-01-01

    Many papers have been published on cathodic protection of offshore platforms, but few references are made on the extent of protection of the well casings attached to the structures. Others reported tests in the Arabian Gulf which showed the galvanic anodes protected the wells to a depth of approximately 3200 ft (976 m) and that 300 A were required to completely protect bare well casings attached to a six-well platform in 40 ft (12 m) of water. Recent tests in deeper water (170 ft (52 m() showed the structure galvanic anodes deliver approximately 8 A per well and protect the bare casing to approximately 3000 ft (915 m). An impressed current cathodic protection system with 600 A applied to anodes placed 400 ft (122 m) from the structure protected the structure and six bare well casings to 8000 ft (2440 m). A protection criterion of 0.1 mA/ft/sup 2/ (1.1 mA/m/sup 2/) in the lower cemented zone was proposed. Impressed current anodes placed closer than 400 ft (122 m) from the structure did not protect the wells to the required depth.

  17. Cathode effects in cylindrical Hall thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E. M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-11-15

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  18. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    SciTech Connect

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  19. Electrochemical performance of silver/molybdotungstate-amorphous-electrolyte cells with charge-transfer-complex cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sathya Sainath Prasad, P.; Radhakrishna, S.

    For the quaternary fast ion conducting system AgI?Ag 2O?MoO 3?WO 3, the highest ionic conductivity, 5.1 × 10 -2 (? cm) -1, was observed when using an amorphous electrolyte composition of 80%AgI-13.33%Ag 2O-6.66% (0.7MoO 3-0.3WO 3). This electrolyte was used in the fabrication of solid-state electrochemical cells with the configuration (anode)/(amorphous electrolyte)/(cathode). The anode consisted of silver while a variety of organic charge-transfer-complex materials was employed as cathodes. The latter included phenothiazene, pyrene, and 2-perylene·3I 2. Cell performance was assessed by studying open-circuit voltage (OCV), anodic and cathodic polarisation, current discharge capability, and load discharge characteristics. It was found that the cell with a 2-perylene·3I 2 cathode yielded the highest OCV (657 mV) without any anodic or cathodic polarisation. The cell exhibited an internal resistance of 32 ? and a short-circuit current of 10 mA with a rechargeability having marginal coulombic efficiency. The diffusion co-efficients of silver ion were evaluated from the time dependence of cell voltage as a function of current density. The optimum current density ( i.e., that giving no polarisation) was fixed and the load curves were recorded to evaluate the applicability of the cells to micropower sources and low-energy-density silver batteries.

  20. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    SciTech Connect

    Causa, Federica; Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni; Dellasega, David

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  1. Hydrothermal Synthesis of Nanostructured Manganese Oxide as Cathodic Catalyst in a Microbial Fuel Cell Fed with Leachate

    PubMed Central

    Haoran, Yuan; Lifang, Deng; Tao, Lu; Yong, Chen

    2014-01-01

    Much effort has been devoted to the synthesis of novel nanostructured MnO2 materials because of their unique properties and potential applications as cathode catalyst in Microbial fuel cell. Hybrid MnO2 nanostructures were fabricated by a simple hydrothermal method in this study. Their crystal structures, morphology, and electrochemical characters were carried out by FESEM, N2-adsorption-desorption, and CV, indicating that the hydrothermally synthesized MnO2 (HSM) was structured by nanorods of high aspect ratio and multivalve nanoflowers and more positive than the naturally synthesized MnO2 (NSM), accompanied by a noticeable increase in oxygen reduction peak current. When the HSM was employed as the cathode catalyst in air-cathode MFC which fed with leachate, a maximum power density of 119.07?mW/m2 was delivered, 64.68% higher than that with the NSM as cathode catalyst. Furthermore, the HSM via a 4-e pathway, but the NSM via a 2-e pathway in alkaline solution, and as 4-e pathway is a more efficient oxygen reduction reaction, the HSM was more positive than NSM. Our study provides useful information on facile preparation of cost-effective cathodic catalyst in air-cathode MFC for wastewater treatment. PMID:24723824

  2. Cathodic Arc Deposition of Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Ian G.

    1998-08-01

    Cathodic arc deposition is a plasma-based technology for the fabrication of films. The process can be carried out either at high vacuum or in a low pressure gaseous environment, and films can be formed for example of metals, ceramics, diamond-like carbon, some semiconductors and superconductors, and more. The plasma stream can be filtered to remove microdroplet contamination, and the ion energy can be controlled by substrate bias, thereby transforming the straightforward deposition method into hybrids with other surface modification processes such as ion beam-assisted deposition, ion beam mixing, and ion implantation. The method provides a versatile and powerful plasma tool for the synthesis of novel and technically important surfaces.

  3. Cathode for an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Bates, John B. (Oak Ridge, TN); Dudney, Nancy J. (Knoxville, TN); Gruzalski, Greg R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Luck, Christopher F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    Described is a thin-film battery, especially a thin-film microbattery, and a method for making same having application as a backup or primary integrated power source for electronic devices. The battery includes a novel electrolyte which is electrochemically stable and does not react with the lithium anode and a novel vanadium oxide cathode. Configured as a microbattery, the battery can be fabricated directly onto a semiconductor chip, onto the semiconductor die or onto any portion of the chip carrier. The battery can be fabricated to any specified size or shape to meet the requirements of a particular application. The battery is fabricated of solid state materials and is capable of operation between -15.degree. C. and 150.degree. C.

  4. Cathodic oxygen consumption and electrically induced osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Brighton, C T; Adler, S; Black, J; Itada, N; Friedenberg, Z B

    1975-01-01

    Small amounts of electric current stimulate bone formation in the region of a cathode. The purpose of this experiment is to compare changes in oxygen and hydroxyl ion concentration that occur at the cathode at current levels known to be capable of inducing osteogenesis (10-20 muamps) with those changes that occur at current levels known to be toxic to bone (100 muamps). An oxygen consumption chamber containing an oxygen electrode is fitted with two stainless steel electrodes which are connected to a constant current source. At the cathode, with a current of 100 muamps, oxygen is consumed at nearly stoichiometric rates. At higher current (100 muamps) levels, cathodic oxygen consumption gives way to hydrogen evolution. Cathodic hydroxyl ion production is directly proportional to current. It is concluded from these in vitro experiments that at 10-20 muamps the oxygen tension in the vicinity of the cathode is lowered and the pH is moderately increased. At 100 muamps the oxygen tension is not lowered, but the pH is increased dramatically. If these same changes occur in the vicinity of a cathode in vivo, then lowering the local tissue oxygen tension and raising the local pH may be mechanisms operative in electrically induced bone formation. PMID:236849

  5. Specific features of an electric discharge operating between an electrolytic anode and a metal cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Gaisin, A. F.; Sarimov, L. R.

    2011-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies of a high-current electric discharge operating between an St45 steel cathode and a service water anode in a wide range of air pressures. Peculiarities of discharge ignition and specific features of cathode and anode spots were revealed. The behavior of the current density on a service water anode was investigated for the first time. Comparison of the current densities j on the steel cathode and service water anode shows that, in the parameter range under study, Hehl's law is not satisfied on the water anode. The two-dimensional distribution of the potential inside and on the surface of the service water anode was measured.

  6. Stabilization mechanisms of aluminum-titanium bilayer cathodes in organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huanqi; Tanaka, Masaki; Ishikawa, Ken

    2013-09-01

    A major concern in organic solar cells today is to continue to improve their stability. Aluminum-titanium bilayer cathodes have been reported to prolong the shelf-lives of organic solar cells to be more than 3 months in air without encapsulation. However, the stabilization mechanism was unsolved, and further investigation into the mechanism was required. We probed the surface morphology of different cathodes with atomic force microscope and explored elemental depth profiles in different devices with time of flight-secondary ion mass spectrometry to analyze the mechanism, in addition to optimization of the cell structure. Based on the experimental observations, we attribute the improved shelf-lives to three functions of the bilayer cathodes, e.g., the elimination of large cracks, the suppression of interdiffusion, and the sustainable oxygen scavenging. These findings provide information useful for rationally designing efficient structures that stabilize organic solar cells.

  7. Device lifetime improvement of polymer-based bulk heterojunction solar cells by incorporating copper oxide layer at Al cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mingdong; Xie, Fangyan; Xie, Weiguang; Zheng, Shizhao; Ke, Ning; Chen, Jian; Zhao, Ni; Xu, J. B.

    2011-05-01

    Organic solar cells are commonly susceptible to degradation in air. We present that insertion of a thin layer of thermally evaporated copper oxide (CuOx) between the organic active layer and the Al cathode can greatly extend the lifetime of P3HT:PCBM based bulk heterojunction solar cells. The performance can be further improved by applying an interfacial bilayer of CuOx/LiF. Our results suggest that the CuOx functions not only as a charge transport layer but also as a protection layer, which prevents formation of thick organic-Al interdiffusion area. This leads to a more air-resistive cathode/organic interface.

  8. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs), plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs), and electric vehicles (EVs); a market predicted to be potentially ten times greater than that of consumer electronics. In fact, only Liion batteries can meet the requirements for PHEVs as set by the U.S. Advanced Battery Consortium (USABC), although they still fall slightly short of EV goals. In the case of Li-ion batteries, the trade-off between power and energy shown in Figure 1 is a function both of device design and the electrode materials that are used. Thus, a high power battery (e.g., one intended for an HEV) will not necessarily contain the same electrode materials as one designed for high energy (i.e., for an EV). As is shown in Figure 1, power translates into acceleration, and energy into range, or miles traveled, for vehicular uses. Furthermore, performance, cost, and abuse-tolerance requirements for traction batteries differ considerably from those for consumer electronics batteries. Vehicular applications are particularly sensitive to cost; currently, Li-ion batteries are priced at about $1000/kWh, whereas the USABC goal is $150/kWh. The three most expensive components of a Li-ion battery, no matter what the configuration, are the cathode, the separator, and the electrolyte. Reduction of cost has been one of the primary driving forces for the investigation of new cathode materials to replace expensive LiCoO{sub 2}, particularly for vehicular applications. Another extremely important factor is safety under abuse conditions such as overcharge. This is particularly relevant for the large battery packs intended for vehicular uses, which are designed with multiple cells wired in series arrays. Premature failure of one cell in a string may cause others to go into overcharge during passage of current. These considerations have led to the development of several different types of cathode materials, as will be covered in the next section. Because there is not yet one ideal material that can meet requirements for all applications, research into cathodes for Li-ion batteries is, as of this writ

  9. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBONPAK X SOLID ADSORBENT WITH THEMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hours onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X contained in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm OD, 5 mm ID, and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/GC/MS has been evaluated in controlled tests. A test matrix of 42 tr...

  10. 24-HOUR DIFFUSIVE SAMPLING OF 1,3-BUTADIENE IN AIR ONTO CARBOPACK X SOLID ADSORBENT FOLLOWED BY THERMAL DESORPTION/GC/MS ANALYSIS - FEASIBILITY STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diffusive sampling of 1,3-butadiene for 24 hr onto the graphitic adsorbent Carbopack X packed in a stainless steel tube badge (6.3 mm o.d., 5 mm i.d., and 90 mm in length) with analysis by thermal desorption/gas chromatography (GC)/mass spectrometry (MS) has been evaluated in con...

  11. Cathode for molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D. (New Lenox, IL); Mrazek, Franklin C. (Hickory Hills, IL)

    1990-01-01

    A porous sintered cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell and method of making same, the cathode including a skeletal structure of a first electronically conductive material slightly soluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell covered by fine particles of a second material of possibly lesser electronic conductivity insoluble in the electrolyte present in the molten carbonate fuel cell, the cathode having a porosity in the range of from about 60% to about 70% at steady-state cell operating conditions consisting of both macro-pores and micro-pores.

  12. A hollow cathode hydrogen ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sovey, J. S.; Mirtich, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    High current density ion sources have been used to heat plasmas in controlled thermonuclear reaction experiments. High beam currents imply relatively high emission currents from cathodes which have generally taken the form of tungsten filaments. A hydrogen ion source is described which was primarily developed to assess the emission current capability and design requirements for hollow cathodes for application in neutral injection devices. The hydrogen source produced ions by electron bombardment via a single hollow cathode. Source design followed mercury ion thruster technology, using a weak magnetic field to enhance ionization efficiency.

  13. Plasma-based multistage virtual cathode radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Su Dong; Tang Changjian

    2011-12-15

    A plasma-based multistage virtual cathode radiation is proposed. Multistage virtual cathode can be formed as an electron beam passes through a high dense ion background. The reflected electrons can be coupled with transverse magnetic wave, and electromagnetic radiation is detected. Unlike the traditional virtual cathode devices, the beam current can be decreased greatly due to the effect of ions, and single mode operation can be achieved by adjusting the beam density. Besides, the radiation frequency, which is proportional to the beam density, covers from 10 to 100 GHz. The output power flux density reaches a magnitude of GWm{sup -2}.

  14. Hollow cathode electron gun research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Gundersen, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This work was in support of the development of a high-perveance, low-emittance, high-current hollow-cathode electron beam gun for applications including the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT). The motivation for developing the hollow-cathode electron beam gun was described in the proposal by B.M. Penetrante, Supermissive hollow-cathode electron gun, (LDRD Project No. 92-LW-42). The work at the University of Southern California provided technical support in production and testing of prototypes.

  15. Cells having cathodes containing polycarbon disulfide materials

    DOEpatents

    Okamoto, Y.; Skotheim, T.A.; Lee, H.S.

    1995-08-15

    The present invention relates to an electric current producing cell which contains an anode, a cathode having as a cathode-active material one or more carbon-sulfur compounds of the formula (CS{sub x}){sub n}, in which x takes values from 1.2 to 2.3 and n is greater or equal to 2, and where the redox process does not involve polymerization and de-polymerization by forming and breaking S--S bonds in the polymer backbone. The cell also contains an electrolyte which is chemically inert with respect to the anode and the cathode. 5 figs.

  16. Physics Of The Plasma-Cathode Interface Of Glow Discharge In Oxygen With Aluminium Cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wro?ski, Z.

    2008-03-01

    Glow discharge in oxygen with aluminium cathode has peculiar characteristics. It works at the product (p?Lcf) of gas pressure and the cathode space length, smaller than in other cases, e.g. even Ne/Al discharge. Numerical modelling of electrodynamic structure of the cathode region suggests low multiplication of electron fluxes and consequently high electron emission from the "oxidised" cathode surface at relatively low anode-cathode voltages Uac. The above facts explain a low efficiency of the sputtering of "oxidised" Al-cathodes when determined experimentally. Numerical modelling allows the quantitative explanation of the line emission intensity of oxygen molecules such as its "linear "dependence on both gas pressure and discharge current density, Jd. However in the case of line emission of sputtered Al atoms and reflected "free" O atoms we are able only to draw some qualitative conclusions

  17. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  18. Low temperature aluminum reduction cell using hollow cathode

    DOEpatents

    Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA)

    2002-08-20

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell containing alumina dissolved in an electrolyte. A plurality of non-consumable anodes are disposed substantially vertically in the electrolyte along with a plurality of monolithic hollow cathodes. Each cathode has a top and bottom and the cathodes are disposed vertically in the electrolyte and the anodes and the cathodes are arranged in alternating relationship. Each of the cathodes is comprised of a first side facing a first opposing anode and a second side facing a second opposing anode. The first and second sides are joined by ends to form a reservoir in the hollow cathode for collecting aluminum therein deposited at the cathode.

  19. On electric field magnitude on the cathode surface in the negative corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A.; Savinov, S.; Pestovskii, N.; Korostylev, E.; Amirov, R.; Samoylov, I.; Barengolts, S.

    2013-09-01

    Negative corona discharge has been studied in air in the Trichel pulse mode in point-to-plane configuration on graphite cathodes. Electric field magnitude of the positive space charge in the active phase of a Trichel pulse has been estimated on the range of 107 V/cm. The discharge flame on the cathode surface is localized in the region with maximum electric field. The wandering of the discharge is self-organized in such way that the electric field magnitude caused by the positive space charge in the region of the discharge flame localization exceeds the field magnitude on the microasperities in some distance from this region. So the proposed estimate of electric field magnitude is based on the results of the topography analysis of the cathode surface and on the results of registration of the discharge wandering over the cathode surface. Microasperities formed due to redeposition of erosion products with field magnification coefficient 10-102 were found. Finally the occurrence of electric field with magnitude 108 V/cm argues in favor of electroexplosive mechanism of cathode erosion in the negative corona discharge. The work is made under support of RBRF grants 12-08-01223 and 12-08-33031 and under financial support of Ministry of Education and Science of Russian Federation.

  20. AFM as an analysis tool for high-capacity sulfur cathodes for Li–S batteries

    PubMed Central

    Sörgel, Seniz; Costa, Rémi; Carlé, Linus; Galm, Ines; Cañas, Natalia; Pascucci, Brigitta; Friedrich, K Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Summary In this work, material-sensitive atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to analyse the cathodes of lithium–sulfur batteries. A comparison of their nanoscale electrical, electrochemical, and morphological properties was performed with samples prepared by either suspension-spraying or doctor-blade coating with different binders. Morphological studies of the cathodes before and after the electrochemical tests were performed by using AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cathodes that contained polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) and were prepared by spray-coating exhibited a superior stability of the morphology and the electric network associated with the capacity and cycling stability of these batteries. A reduction of the conductive area determined by conductive AFM was found to correlate to the battery capacity loss for all cathodes. X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements of Li2S exposed to ambient air showed that insulating Li2S hydrolyses to insulating LiOH. This validates the significance of electrical ex-situ AFM analysis after cycling. Conductive tapping mode AFM indicated the existence of large carbon-coated sulfur particles. Based on the analytical findings, the first results of an optimized cathode showed a much improved discharge capacity of 800 mA·g(sulfur)?1 after 43 cycles. PMID:24205455

  1. Kinetic mechanism of molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air-fuel plasmas.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Igor V; Li, Ting; Lempert, Walter R

    2015-08-13

    This work describes the kinetic mechanism of coupled molecular energy transfer and chemical reactions in low-temperature air, H2-air and hydrocarbon-air plasmas sustained by nanosecond pulse discharges (single-pulse or repetitive pulse burst). The model incorporates electron impact processes, state-specific N2 vibrational energy transfer, reactions of excited electronic species of N2, O2, N and O, and 'conventional' chemical reactions (Konnov mechanism). Effects of diffusion and conduction heat transfer, energy coupled to the cathode layer and gasdynamic compression/expansion are incorporated as quasi-zero-dimensional corrections. The model is exercised using a combination of freeware (Bolsig+) and commercial software (ChemKin-Pro). The model predictions are validated using time-resolved measurements of temperature and N2 vibrational level populations in nanosecond pulse discharges in air in plane-to-plane and sphere-to-sphere geometry; temperature and OH number density after nanosecond pulse burst discharges in lean H2-air, CH4-air and C2H4-air mixtures; and temperature after the nanosecond pulse discharge burst during plasma-assisted ignition of lean H2-mixtures, showing good agreement with the data. The model predictions for OH number density in lean C3H8-air mixtures differ from the experimental results, over-predicting its absolute value and failing to predict transient OH rise and decay after the discharge burst. The agreement with the data for C3H8-air is improved considerably if a different conventional hydrocarbon chemistry reaction set (LLNL methane-n-butane flame mechanism) is used. The results of mechanism validation demonstrate its applicability for analysis of plasma chemical oxidation and ignition of low-temperature H2-air, CH4-air and C2H4-air mixtures using nanosecond pulse discharges. Kinetic modelling of low-temperature plasma excited propane-air mixtures demonstrates the need for development of a more accurate 'conventional' chemistry mechanism. PMID:26170427

  2. Characteristics of combustor diffusers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, A.

    Combustor diffusers in aircraft engines are required to maintain stable and efficient combustion, to provide the turbine nozzles with an acceptable temperature profile as well as with sufficient cooling air and to minimise total pressure losses. Their importance is growing as compressor discharge velocities increase and combustion requirements become more challenging. In spite of the progress of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in recent years, the development of combustor diffusers is still mainly based on experimental work. This review deals in a general fashion with flow phenomena in diffusers, explains problems the designer is confronted with and then discusses results of tests conducted on various combustor diffusers. In addition to the evidence available in the open literature, unpublished material of extensive research work carried out at MTU Motoren und Turbinen-Union München is presented and future developments are outlined. A short summary of CFD methods is included.

  3. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    DOEpatents

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  4. Improving Best Air Conditioner Efficiency by 20-30% through a High Efficiency Fan and Diffuser Stage Coupled with an Evaporative Condenser Pre-Cooler

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Danny S; Sherwin, John R; Raustad, Richard

    2014-04-10

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) conducted a research project to improve the best residential air conditioner condenser technology currently available on the market by retrofitting a commercially-available unit with both a high efficiency fan system and an evaporative pre-cooler. The objective was to integrate these two concepts to achieve an ultra-efficient residential air conditioner design. The project produced a working prototype that was 30% more efficient compared to the best currently-available technologies; the peak the energy efficiency ratio (EER) was improved by 41%. Efficiency at the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Institute (ARI) standard B-condition which is used to estimate seasonal energy efficiency ratio (SEER), was raised from a nominal 21 Btu/Wh to 32 Btu/Wh.

  5. The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ngo, Mai T.; Schoenbach, Karl H.; Gerdin, Glenn A.; Lee, Ja H.

    1990-01-01

    The temporal development of hollow cathode discharges was studied by means of electrical and optical diagnostic techniques. The results indicate that the discharge develops in two stages. The initial breakdown occurs along the longest straight path of the system, i.e., from the anode to the bottom of the cathode hole. This predischarge is confined to a narrow filament along the axis and carries a current of up to hundreds of milliamperes. The resulting distortion of the electric field in the cathode hole is assumed to cause a radial breakdown from the filamentary plasma on the axis to the edge of the cathode hole. After this second breakdown, an increase in current by more than three orders of magnitude is observed. Measurements with axial magnetic fields support the two-stage model.

  6. Time-shared Cathode Ray Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herndon, E. S.

    1969-01-01

    Time-shared cathode tube provides high quality display at low cost display stations which utilize television moniters. It updates a cluster of graphic displays from a computer and is useful in systems not equipped for graphics time-sharing.

  7. Improved magnetron cold-cathode ion source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roehrig, J.; Torney, F.

    1970-01-01

    Cold cathode ionization source generates smaller amounts of spurious gases and has a higher sensitivity than commonly used hot-filament ion sources. Photon and X-ray background noise are reduced below detectable levels.

  8. Interfacial phenomena on selected cathode materials

    SciTech Connect

    Kostecki, Robert; Matsuo, Yoshiaki; McLarnon, Frank

    2001-06-22

    We have carried out a series of surface studies of selected cathode materials. Instrumental techniques such as Raman microscopy, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), and atomic force microscopy were used to investigate the cathode surfaces. The goal of this study was to identify detrimental processes which occur at the electrode/electrolyte interface and can lead to electrode degradation and failure during cycling and/or storage at elevated temperatures.

  9. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  10. ON DIFFUSION IN HETEROGENEOUS MEDIA YOUXUE ZHANG*,

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Youxue

    materials), multi-grain single-phase solid in which grain boundary diffusion may contribute significantly, elemental diffusion during mantle partial melting and in melt mush, drying and dyeing of textiles, transport of air and moisture in soils, drying of paint, wood, and concrete, diffusion of gases in rubber, movement

  11. Alternative cathodes for molten carbonate fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, I.; Lanagan, M.; Roche, M.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is developing advanced cathodes for pressurized operation of the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). The present cathode, lithiated nickel oxide, tends to transport to the anode of the MCFC, where it is deposited as metallic nickel. The rate of transport increases with increasing CO{sub 2} pressure. This increase is due to an increased solubility of nickel oxide (NiO) in the molten carbonate electrolyte. An alternative cathode is lithium cobaltate (LiCoO{sub 2})-Solid solutions of LiCoO{sub 2} in LiFeO{sub 2} show promise for long-lived cathode materials. We have found that small additions of LiCoO{sub 2} to LiFeO{sub 2} markedly decrease the resistivity of the cathode material. Cells containing the LiCoO{sub 2}-LiFeO{sub 2} cathodes have stable performance for more than 2100 h of operation and display lower cobalt migration.

  12. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  13. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100?), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100?), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge. PMID:25460980

  14. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    SciTech Connect

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-06-15

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5 cm and orifice diameter of 0.3 cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25 A and a flow rate of 5.5 sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635 cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1 cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25 sccm and discharge current of 12 A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow 'sheath funneling' into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1 A/mm{sup 2} in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the power deposited at the emitter surface by returning electrons is found to be twice that deposited by ions. A previous study suggested that the computed particle flux and energy of ions to the emitter of the 1.5 cm cathode were not high enough to change the barium evaporation rate compared to thermally induced evaporation. The same suggestion is made here for the 0.635 cm cathode. The peak ion flux to the emitter is found to be 1.2 A/cm{sup 2} (7.6x10{sup 18}/s cm{sup 2}), and the corresponding peak sheath drop is 2.9 V. Consequently, once the emitter operating temperature is known it is possible to determine directly the barium depletion-limited life of these cathodes using existing vacuum-cathode data.

  15. Effect of fuel rate and annealing process of LiFePO{sub 4} cathode material for Li-ion batteries synthesized by flame spray pyrolysis method

    SciTech Connect

    Halim, Abdul; Setyawan, Heru; Machmudah, Siti; Nurtono, Tantular; Winardi, Sugeng

    2014-02-24

    In this study the effect of fuel rate and annealing on particle formation of LiFePO{sub 4} as battery cathode using flame spray pyrolysis method was investigated numerically and experimentally. Numerical study was done using ANSYS FLUENT program. In experimentally, LiFePO{sub 4} was synthesized from inorganic aqueous solution followed by annealing. LPG was used as fuel and air was used as oxidizer and carrier gas. Annealing process attempted in inert atmosphere at 700°C for 240 min. Numerical result showed that the increase of fuel rate caused the increase of flame temperature. Microscopic observation using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) revealed that all particles have sphere and polydisperse. Increasing fuel rate caused decreasing particle size and increasing particles crystallinity. This phenomenon attributed to the flame temperature. However, all produced particles still have more amorphous phase. Therefore, annealing needed to increase particles crystallinity. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis showed that all particles have PO4 function group. Increasing fuel rate led to the increase of infrared spectrum absorption corresponding to the increase of particles crystallinity. This result indicated that phosphate group vibrated easily in crystalline phase. From Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) analysis, annealing can cause the increase of Li{sup +} diffusivity. The diffusivity coefficient of without and with annealing particles were 6.84399×10{sup ?10} and 8.59888×10{sup ?10} cm{sup 2} s{sup ?1}, respectively.

  16. DESCRIPTION OF ATMOSPHERIC TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Key differences among many types of air quality models are the way atmospheric advection and turbulent diffusion processes are treated. Gaussian models use analytical solutions of the advection-diffusion equations. Lagrangian models use a hypothetical air parcel concept effecti...

  17. Experimental Investigation of Thruster Cathode Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crofton, Mark

    2004-11-01

    Advanced ion propulsion technologies are being developed under the Nuclear Electric Xenon Ion System (NEXIS) program for use in outer planet exploration. A revolutionary approach to thruster cathode design is dictated by the very high lifetime and propellant throughput requirements for nuclear electric applications. In conventional dispenser hollow cathodes used in thrusters, processes leading to depletion, inadequate transport, or insufficient production of barium are among those limiting the lifetime. A reservoir hollow cathode is being developed to address each of these failure mechanisms, exploiting four design variables - matrix material, source material, geometry, and thermal design - to essentially eliminate established failure modes. The very long anticipated lifetime necessitates new life validation methods to augment or replace the conventional lifetest approach. One important tool for quickly evaluating design changes is the ability to measure barium density inside a hollow cathode and/or in the plume. The dependence of barium density on temperature and other factors is an extremely important indicator of cathode health, particularly if the ratio Ba:BaO is also obtained. Comparison of barium production for reservoir and conventional cathodes will enable an assessment of the efficacy of reservoir designs and the goal of reducing barium consumption at a given emission current level. This study describes benchmark measurements made on a conventional cathode previously operated in a 20-kW NEXIS laboratory engine. Data on cathode operation and life-limiting processes were obtained through direct, real-time monitoring of atoms and molecules. A high-resolution, tunable laser system was employed to detect absorption of the low-density barium atoms inside the cathode. The plume was monitored also, using a quadrupole mass spectrometer to monitor multiple species and measure ion charge ratios. Data obtained with retarding potential analyzers or other means are available for comparison. Detection of other important species associated with cathode function, including Ba+ and BaO, and oxides of tungsten such as WO3 or WO3-, is of great interest for reasons to be discussed.

  18. Electrical properties of a-C:Mo films produced by dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Sansongsiri, Sakon; Anders, Andre; Yodsombat, Banchob

    2008-01-20

    Molybdenum-containing amorphous carbon (a-C:Mo) thin films were prepared using a dual-cathode filtered cathodic arc plasma source with a molybdenum and a carbon (graphite) cathode. The Mo content in the films was controlled by varying the deposition pulse ratio of Mo and C. Film sheet resistance was measured in situ at process temperature, which was close to room temperature, as well as ex situ as a function of temperature (300-515 K) in ambient air. Film resistivity and electrical activation energy were derived for different Mo and C ratios and substrate bias. Film thickness was in the range 8-28 nm. Film resistivity varied from 3.55x10-4 Omega m to 2.27x10-6 Omega m when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased from 0.05 to 0.4, with no substrate bias applied. With carbon-selective bias, the film resistivity was in the range of 4.59x10-2 and 4.05 Omega m at a Mo/C pulse ratio of 0.05. The electrical activation energy decreased from 3.80x10-2 to 3.36x10-4 eV when the Mo/C pulse ratio was increased in the absence of bias, and from 0.19 to 0.14 eV for carbon-selective bias conditions. The resistivity of the film shifts systematically with the amounts of Mo and upon application of substrate bias voltage. The intensity ratio of the Raman D-peak and G-peak (ID/IG) correlated with the pre-exponential factor (sigma 0) which included charge carrier density and density of states.

  19. Air cycle machine for an aircraft environmental control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decrisantis, Angelo A. (Inventor); O'Coin, James R. (Inventor); Taddey, Edmund P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An ECS system includes an ACM mounted adjacent an air-liquid heat exchanger through a diffuser that contains a diffuser plate. The diffuser plate receives airflow from the ACM which strikes the diffuser plate and flows radially outward and around the diffuser plate and into the air-liquid heat exchanger to provide minimal pressure loss and proper flow distribution into the air-liquid heat exchanger with significantly less packaging space.

  20. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this configuration with possibly an even longer emitter life. This cathode is specifically designed to integrate on the centerline of a high-power Hall thruster, thus eliminating the asymmetries in the plasma discharge common to cathodes previously mounted externally to the thruster s magnetic circuit. An alternative configuration for the cathode uses an external propellant feed. This diverts a fraction of the total cathode flow to an external feed, which can improve the cathode coupling efficiency at lower total mass flow rates. This can improve the overall thruster efficiency, thereby decreasing the required propellant loads for different missions. Depending on the particular mission, reductions in propellant loads can lead to mission enabling capabilities by allowing launch vehicle step-down, greater payload capability, or by extending the life of a spacecraft.

  1. Self-pulsing of hollow cathode discharge in various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Qin, Y.; He, F. Jiang, X. X.; Ouyang, J. T.; Xie, K.

    2014-07-15

    In this paper, we investigate the self-pulsing phenomenon of cavity discharge in a cylindrical hollow cathode in various gases including argon, helium, nitrogen, oxygen, and air. The current-voltage characteristics of the cavity discharge, the waveforms of the self-pulsing current and voltage as well as the repetition frequency were measured. The results show that the pulsing frequency ranges from a few to tens kilohertz and depends on the averaged current and the pressure in all gases. The pulsing frequency will increase with the averaged current and decrease with the pressure. The rising time of the current pulse is nearly constant in a given gas or mixture. The self-pulsing does not depend on the external ballast but is affected significantly by the external capacitor in parallel with the discharge cell. The low-current self-pulsing in hollow cathode discharge is the mode transition between Townsend and glow discharges. It can be described by the charging-discharging process of an equivalent circuit consisting of capacitors and resistors.

  2. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell cathode contamination - Acetylene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Y.; St-Pierre, Jean

    2015-04-01

    Acetylene adsorption on PEMFC electrodes and contamination in single cells are investigated with 300 ppm acetylene at a cathode held at 80 °C. The results of adsorption experiments suggest that acetylene adsorbs readily on electrodes and is reduced to ethylene and ethane under an open circuit potential of H2/N2, as the adsorbates can be electro-oxidized at high potentials. The cell voltage response shows that 300 ppm acetylene results in a cell performance loss of approximately 88%. The voltage degradation curve is divided into two stages by an inflection point, which suggests that potential-dependent processes are involved in acetylene poisoning. These potential-dependent processes may include acetylene oxidation and reduction as well as accumulation of intermediates on the electrode surface. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis suggests that acetylene affects the oxygen reduction reaction and may also affect mass transport processes. Acetylene also may be reduced in the steady poisoning state of the operating cell. After neat air operation, the cyclic voltammetry results imply that the cathode catalyst surface is almost completely restored, with no contaminant residues remaining in the MEA. Linear scanning voltammetry measurements show no change in hydrogen crossover caused by contamination, and polarization curves confirm complete recovery of cell performance.

  3. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood III, David L

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  4. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  5. Removal of Interstitial H2O in Hexacyanometallates for a Superior Cathode of a Sodium-Ion Battery

    E-print Network

    Henkelman, Graeme

    Removal of Interstitial H2O in Hexacyanometallates for a Superior Cathode of a Sodium-Ion Battery makes a sodium-ion rechargeable battery preferable to a lithium-ion battery for large-scale storage and to increase dramatically power generation and transmission efficiency.1 To date, pumped-hydro and compressed-air

  6. Quantum diffusion

    E-print Network

    Roumen Tsekov

    2011-04-20

    Quantum diffusion is studied via dissipative Madelung hydrodynamics. Initially the wave packet spreads ballistically, than passes for an instant through normal diffusion and later tends asymptotically to a sub-diffusive law. It is shown that the apparent quantum diffusion coefficient is not a universal physical parameter since it depends on the initial wave packet preparation. The overdamped quantum diffusion of an electron in the field of a periodic potential is also investigated; in this case the wave packet spreads logarithmically in time. Thermo-quantum diffusion of heavier particles as hydrogen, deuterium and tritium atoms in periodic potentials is studied and a simple estimate of the tunneling effect is obtained in the frames of a quasi-equilibrium semiclassical approach. The effective thermo-quantum temperature is also discussed in relation to the known temperature dependence of muon diffusivity in solids.

  7. Studies on an experimental quartz tube hollow cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegfried, D. E.; Wilbur, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    An experimental study is described in which a quartz tube, hollow cathode was operated in a test fixture allowing the simultaneous measurement of internal cathode pressure, insert temperature profiles, and the emission currents from various cathode components as a function of discharge current and propellant (mercury) mass flow rate for a number of different cathode orifice diameters. Results show that the insert temperature profile is essentially independent of orifice diameter but depends strongly on internal cathode pressure and emission current. The product of internal cathode pressure and insert diameter is shown to be important in determining the emission location and the minimum keeper voltage.

  8. Ring cusp/hollow cathode discharge chamber performance studies. [ion propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, J. A.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    1988-01-01

    An experimental study was performed to determine the effects of hollow cathode position, anode position, and ring cusp magnetic field configuration and strength on discharge chamber performance. The results are presented in terms of comparative plasma ion energy cost, extracted ion fraction, and beam profile data. Such comparisons are used to demonstrate whether changes in performance are caused by changes in the loss rate of primary electrons to the anode or the loss rate of ions to discharge chamber walls or cathode and anode surfaces. Results show: (1) the rate of primary electron loss to the anode decreases as the anode is moved downstream of the ring cusp toward the screen grid; (2) the loss rate of ions to hollow cathode surfaces are excessive if the cathode is located upstream of a point of peak magnetic flux density at the discharge chamber centerline; and (3) the fraction of the ions produced that are lost to discharge chamber walls and ring magnet surfaces is reduced by positioning of the magnet rings so the plasma density is uniform over the grid surface, and adjusting their strength to a level where it is sufficient to prevent excessive ion losses by Bohm diffusion.

  9. Hot-cathode preionization studies in CCT

    SciTech Connect

    Darrow, D.S.; Ono, M. . Plasma Physics Lab.); Pribyl, P.A.; Taylor, R.J. . Tokamak Fusion Lab.)

    1991-07-01

    A hot LaB{sub 6} cathode was used to ionize the gas in the vessel of CCT at the start of tokamak discharges. Substantial plasma densities could be obtained in the preionization phase, resulting in reliable breakdown and initiation of q{sub a} {approx equal} 3 discharges at loop voltages of 4.2 V/turn, considerably lower than the 33 V/turn required with no preionization and the 20 V/turn required when a 15 kHz oscillator was the preionization source. When inductive effects were subtracted, the cathode preionization produced a loop voltage attributable to plasma resistance of 4 V/turn, while the oscillator-produced plasma required 12 V/turn. Repeatable cathode-enhanced breakdowns could be obtained at voltages as low as 3.4 V/turn for discharges with higher q{sub a}. With the cathode-enhanced plasma, the initial value of dI{sub p}/d{Phi}{sub OH} is higher than that with the oscillator-produced plasma. The spectrum of visible light emitted from cathode-initiated discharges shows no additional impurities present beyond those seen in a normal plasma. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  10. RHETT/EPDM Flight Hollow Cathode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzella, David; Patterson, Michael; Pastel, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the BMDO Russian Hall Electric Thruster Technology program two xenon hollow cathodes, a flight unit and a flight spare were fabricated, acceptance tested and delivered to the Naval Research Laboratory for use on the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module. These hollow cathodes, based on the International Space Station plasma contactor design, were fabricated at the NASA Lewis Research Center for use with a D-55 anode layer thruster in the first on-orbit operational application of this technology. The 2.2 Ampere nominal emission current of this device was obtained with a xenon flow rate of 0.6 mg/s. Ignition of the cathode discharge was accomplished through preheating the active electron emitter with a resistive heating element before application of a 650 volt ignition pulse between the emitter and an external starting electrode. The successful acceptance testing of the Electric Propulsion Demonstration Module utilizing these cathodes demonstrated the suitability of cathodes based on barium impregnated inserts in an enclosed keeper configuration for use with Hall thruster propulsion systems.

  11. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  12. Spindt cold cathode electron gun development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode array and an electron gun based on this emitter array are summarized. Fabricating state of the art cathodes for testing at NASA and NRL, advancing the fabrication technology, developing wedge shaped emitters, and performing emission tests are covered. An anistropic dry etching process (reactive ion beam etching) developed that leads to increasing the packing density of the emitter tips to about 5 x 10 to the 6th power/square cm. Tests with small arrays of emitter tips having about 10 tips has demonstrated current densities of over 100 A/sq cm. Several times using cathodes having a packing density of 1.25 x 10 to the 6th power tips/sq cm. Indications are that the higher packing density achievable with the dry etch process may extend this capability to the 500 A/sq cm range and beyond. The wedge emitter geometry was developed and shown to produce emission. This geometry can (in principle) extend the current density capability of the cathodes beyond the 500 A/sq cm level. An emission microscope was built and tested for use with the cathodes.

  13. Na(+) diffusion kinetics in nanoporous metal-hexacyanoferrates.

    PubMed

    Takachi, Masamitsu; Fukuzumi, Yuya; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2015-12-22

    Metal-hexacyanoferrates (metal-HCFs) are promising candidates for cathode materials of sodium-ion secondary batteries (SIBs). Here, we systematically investigated Na(+) diffusion constants (D) and the activation energies (Ea) of metal-HCFs against the framework size (= a/2). We found that the magnitude of D (Ea) systematically increases (decreases) with increases in a, indicating that steric hindrance plays a dominant role in Na(+) diffusion. PMID:26415909

  14. Pyrrole copolymers with enhanced ion diffusion rates for lithium batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, P.; Gardlund, Z.; Huntoon, T.; Hall, H.K.; Padias, A.

    1998-07-01

    Copolymers of pyrrole with a polyether-substituted pyrrole were tested as cathodes for lithium batteries. The charge and discharge characteristics showed that anion transport was much faster in the copolymer than in polypyrrole. As a result these electrodes store and release much more charge at higher current densities but are similar to polypyrrole at low currents. Pulse and relaxation measurements of the ion diffusion showed that this difference was due to a ten-fold increase in the anion diffusion coefficient.

  15. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Moussa, D.; Wilde, S.B.

    1987-02-02

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic field which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  16. Field free, directly heated lanthanum boride cathode

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA); Moussa, David (San Francisco, CA); Wilde, Stephen B. (Pleasant Hill, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A directly heated cylindrical lanthanum boride cathode assembly is disclosed which minimizes generation of magnetic fields which would interfere with electron emission from the cathode. The cathode assembly comprises a lanthanum boride cylinder in electrical contact at one end with a central support shaft which functions as one electrode to carry current to the lanthanum boride cylinder and in electrical contact, at its opposite end with a second electrode which is coaxially position around the central support shaft so that magnetic fields generated by heater current flowing in one direction through the central support shaft are cancelled by an opposite magnetic field generated by current flowing through the lanthanum boride cylinder and the coaxial electrode in a direction opposite to the current flow in the central shaft.

  17. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Distefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1989-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 Wh/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 Wh/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Researchers at JPL are evaluating various new cathode materials for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far studies have focused on alternate metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as tetracyanoethylene (TCNE).

  18. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Krauss, Alan R. (24461 W. Blvd. De John, Naperville, IL 60564)

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  19. Advanced rechargeable sodium batteries with novel cathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Di Stefano, S.; Ratnakumar, B. V.; Bankston, C. P.

    1990-01-01

    Various high energy density rechargeable batteries are being considered for future space applications. Of these, the sodium-sulfur battery is one of the leading candidates. The primary advantage is the high energy density (760 W h/kg theoretical). Energy densities in excess of 180 W h/kg have been realized in practical batteries. More recently, cathodes other than sulfur are being evaluated. Various new cathode materials are presently being evaluated for use in high energy density sodium batteries for advanced space applications. The approach is to carry out basic electrochemical studies of these materials in a sodium cell configuration in order to understand their fundamental behaviors. Thus far, the studies have focussed on alternative metal chlorides such as CuCl2 and organic cathode materials such as TCNE.

  20. Modeling of Mode Transition Behavior in Argon Microhollow Cathode Discharges

    E-print Network

    Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    Modeling of Mode Transition Behavior in Argon Microhollow Cathode Discharges Thomas Deconinck diagnostics difficult. The microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) refers to a canonical microdischarge generated of MHCD operation. At low current (hollow region

  1. High pressure working mode of hollow cathode arc discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minoo, H.; Popovici, C.

    1985-01-01

    The behavior of high pressure cathotrons is discussed. Methods of preheating either the gas or the cathode itself are detailed together with various geometries for the hollow cathode. Three special configurations were tested, and the results are analyzed.

  2. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-07-29

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode.

  3. Engineering-Scale Liquid Cadmium Cathode Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    D Vaden; B. R. Westphal; S. X. Li; T. A. Johnson; K. B. Davies; D. M. Pace

    2006-08-01

    Recovery of transuranic actinides (TRU) using electrorefining is a process being investigated as part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). TRU recovery via electrorefining onto a solid cathode is very difficult as the thermodynamic properties of transuranics are not favourable for them to remain in the metal phase while significant quantities of uranium trichloride exist in the electrolyte. Theoretically, the concentration of transuranics in the electrolyte must be approximately 106 greater than the uranium concentration in the electrolyte to produce a transuranic deposit on a solid cathode. Using liquid cadmium as a cathode contained within a LiCl-KCl eutectic salt, the co-deposition of uranium and transuranics is feasible because the activity of the transuranics in liquid cadmium is very small. Depositing transuranics and uranium in a liquid cadmium cathode (LCC) theoretically requires the concentration of transuranics to be two to three times the uranium concentration in the electrolyte. Three LCC experiments were performed in an Engineering scale elecdtrorefiner, which is located in the argon hot cell of the Fuel Conditioning Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex on the Idaho National Laboratory. Figure 1 contains photographs of the LCC assembly in the hot cell prior to the experiment and a cadmium ingot produced after the first LCC test. Figure 1. Liquid Cadmium Cathode (left) and Cadmium Ingot (right) The primary goal of the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments was to electrochemically collect kilogram quantities of uranium and plutonium via a LCC. The secondary goal was to examine fission product contaminations in the materials collected by the LCC. Each LCC experiment used chopped spent nuclear fuel from the blanket region of the Experimental Breeder Reactor II loaded into steel baskets as the anode with the LCC containing 26 kg of cadmium metal. In each experiment, between one and two kilograms of heavy metal was collected in the LCC after passing an integrated current over 500 amp hours. Analysis of samples from the liquid cadmium cathode ingots showed detectable amounts of transuranics and rare-earth elements. Acknowledgements K. B. Davies and D. M. Pace for the mechanical and electrical engineering needed to prepare the equipment for the engineering-scale liquid cadmium cathode experiments.

  4. Fabrication Of Metal Chloride Cathodes By Sintering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Di Stefano, Salvador; Bankston, C. Perry

    1992-01-01

    Transition-metal chloride cathodes for use in high-temperature rechargeable sodium batteries prepared by sintering transition-metal powders mixed with sodium chloride. Need for difficult and dangerous chlorination process eliminated. Proportions of transition metal and sodium chloride in mixture adjusted to suit specific requirements. Cathodes integral to sodium/metal-chloride batteries, which have advantages over sodium/sulfur batteries including energy densities, increased safety, reduced material and thermal-management problems, and ease of operation and assembly. Being evaluated for supplying electrical power during peak demand and electric vehicles.

  5. /C Composite Cathode for Li Ion Battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shulan; Liu, Xuan; Li, Huiqing; Li, Li

    2014-12-01

    Li3V2(PO4)3/C composites were prepared at different temperatures and assembled as cathodes for Li ion batteries. Their structure and electrochemical properties were properly characterized. The internal and charge transfer resistance of the Li3V2(PO4)3/C cathodes were obtained by simulating the ac impedance spectra with equivalent circuits. The Li3V2(PO4)3/C composite sintered at 1123 K (850 °C) exhibits excellent electrochemical performances because of its smaller internal resistance and charge transfer resistance, as well as faster Li ion inserting/extracting rates.

  6. A cathodically protected electrical substation ground grid

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.P.; Holm, W.K.

    1983-09-01

    This paper presents a discussion on the design of a cathodically protected electrical substation grounding system in which a steel ground grid and steel ground rods were used in place of the commonly used copper ground grid and copperweld ground rods. Several electrical constraints are presented which discuss common electrical utility requirements, safety considerations and economic factors. The grounding system materials which were chosen are discussed along with the means of cathodic protection. Finally, the design, construction and testing considerations are presented as an aid to others who wish to design a similar system.

  7. Low-current hollow-cathode discharge in a trigger unit of a cold cathode thyratron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landl, N. V.; Korolev, Y. D.; Frants, O. B.; Geyman, V. G.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with the investigations of the effect of cathode emissivity on the regimes of low-current hollow-cathode glow discharge. It is shown that an increase in the emissivity due to the so-called high-emissivity tablet allows the essential decrease in the discharge initiation voltage and the discharge burning voltage. The model of current sustaining for the hollow-cathode discharge, which takes into account the external emission current has been developed. On basis of the model, the current-voltage characteristics of the discharge have been interpreted.

  8. Observation and interpretation of energy efficient, diffuse direct current glow discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Jiang, Weiman; Li, Jing; Wang, Yishan; Zhao, Wei; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-08-01

    A diffuse direct-current glow discharge was realized with low energy consumption and high energy utilization efficiency at atmospheric pressure. The formation of diffuse discharge was demonstrated by examining and comparing the electrical properties and optical emissions of plasmas. In combination with theoretical derivation and calculation, we draw guidelines that appearance of nitrogen ions at low electron density is crucial to enhance the ambipolar diffusion for the expansion of discharge channel and the increasing ambipolar diffusion near the cathode plays a key role in the onset of diffuse discharge. An individual-discharge-channel expansion model is proposed to explain the diffuse discharge formation.

  9. Microwave generators: oscillating virtual cathodes and reflexing electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Thode, L.E.

    1983-01-01

    Simulation of the generation of a relativistic electron beam in a foil diode configuration and of the subsequent intense microwave generation resulting from the formation of the virtual cathode is presented. The oscillating virtual cathode and the trapped beam electrons between the real and the virtual cathodes were found to generate microwaves. Generation of high-power microwaves with about 10% efficiency might be reasonably expected from such a virtual-cathode configuration.

  10. Use of Molten Salt Fluxes and Cathodic Protection for Preventing the Oxidation of Titanium at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, Carsten; Fray, Derek J.

    2014-12-01

    The current study demonstrates that it is possible to protect both solid and liquid titanium and titanium alloys from attack from air by cathodically polarizing the titanium component using an electro-active high-temperature molten salt flux and a moderate polarization potential. The electrolytic cell used comprises a cathode of either solid titanium or liquid titanium alloy, an electrolyte based on molten calcium chloride or fluoride salt, and an anode consisting of an inert oxygen-evolving material such as iridium metal. The new approach renders possible the processing of titanium at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen-containing atmospheres.

  11. Effects of cathode design parameters on in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of electrically-activated silver-based iontophoretic system.

    PubMed

    Tan, Zhuo; Ganapathy, Anirudh; Orndorff, Paul E; Shirwaiker, Rohan A

    2015-01-01

    Post-operative infection is a major risk associated with implantable devices. Prior studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ionic silver as an alternative to antibiotic-based infection prophylaxis and treatment. The focus of this study is on an electrically activated implant system engineered for active release of antimicrobial silver ions. The objective was to evaluate the effects of the cathode design, especially the cathode material, on the in vitro antimicrobial efficacy of the system. A modified Kirby-Bauer diffusion technique was used for the antimicrobial efficacy evaluations (24 h testing interval). In phase-1 of the study, a three-way ANOVA (n = 6, ? = 0.05) was performed to determine the effects of cathode material (silver, titanium, and stainless steel), cathode surface area and electrode separation distance on the efficacy of the system against Staphylococcus aureus. The results show that within the design space tested, none of these parameters had a statistically significant effect on the antimicrobiality of the system (P > 0.15). Subsequently, one-way ANOVA (n = 6, ? = 0.05) was conducted in phase-2 to validate the inference regarding the non-significance of the cathode material to the system efficacy using a broader spectrum of pathogens (methicillin-resistant S. aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus agalactiae and Aspergillus flavus) responsible for osteomyelitis. The results confirmed the lack of statistical difference between efficacies of the three cathode material configurations against all pathogens tested (P > 0.58). Overall, the results demonstrate the ability to alter the cathode material and related design parameters in order to minimize the silver usage in the system without adversely affecting its antimicrobial efficacy. PMID:25589207

  12. High-voltage virtual-cathode microwave simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Thode, L.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential is sufficiently large to cause electron reflection. The region associated with electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and by reflexing electrons trapped in the potential well formed between the real and virtual cathodes. A virtual-cathode device based on the first mechanism is a vircator while one based on latter mechanism is a reflex diode. A large number of low-voltage virtual-cathode microwave configurations have been investigated. Initial simulations of a high-voltage virtual-cathode device using a self-consistent particle-in-cell code indicated reasonable conversion efficiency with no frequency chirping. The nonchirping character of the high-voltage virtual-cathode device lead to the interesting possibility of locking four very-high-power microwave devices together using the four transmission lines available at Aurora. Subsequently, in support of two high-voltage experiments, simulations were used to investigate the effect of field-emission threshold and velvet position on the cathode; anode and cathode shape; anode-cathode gap spacing; output waveguide radius; diode voltage; a cathode-coaxial-cavity resonator; a high-frequency ac-voltage drive; anode foil scattering and energy loss; and ion emission on the microwave frequency and power. Microwave

  13. The loss of material from the cathode of metal arcs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seeliger, R.; Wulfhekel, H.

    1985-01-01

    A study was made of the effect of arc length, cathode thickness, current strength, gas pressure and the chemical nature of the cathode material and filling gases upon the material loss from Cu, Fe, and Ag cathodes in arcs. The results show that the analysis of the phenomenon is complex and the energy balance is difficult to formulate.

  14. Ferroelectric cathodes in transverse magnetic fields A. Dunaevsky,a)

    E-print Network

    differently affects the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ``bright'' and ``dark'' emission modes was applied at the location of the ferroelectric cathode in an electron gun for TWT amplifiers, whichFerroelectric cathodes in transverse magnetic fields A. Dunaevsky,a) Y. Raitses, and N. J. Fisch

  15. Model of hollow cathode operation and life limiting mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, I.; Anderson, J. R.; Polk, J. E.; Goebel, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we apply results from the extensive traveling wave tube vacuum barium impregnated cathode literature to the hollow cathodes used in ion thrusters. We show that the observed space station cathode life is in general agreement with published barium evaporation rates.

  16. Combined plasma and thermal hollow cathode insert model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Ira; Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ionnis G.; Goebel, Dan m.; Hornbeck, Sarah E.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we present the first results from a Hollow Cathode Thermal (HCThermal) model that uses the spatially distributed plasma fluxes calculated by the InsertRegion of an Orificed Cathode (IROrCa2D) code as the heat source to predict the hollow cathode and insert temperatures.

  17. Energetic ion production and electrode erosion in hollow cathode discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, Dan M.; Jameson, Kristina; Katz, Ira; Mikellides, Ioannis

    2005-01-01

    Ions with energies significantly in excess of the discharge voltage have been reported in high current hollow cathode discharges. Models of DC potential hills downstream of the cathode and ion acoustic instabilities in a double layer postulated in the cathode orifice have been proposed to explain these energetic ions, but have not been substantiated in experiments.

  18. High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial

    E-print Network

    High Surface Area Stainless Steel Brushes as Cathodes in Microbial Electrolysis Cells D O U G L show here that high surface area stainless steel brush cathodes produce hydrogen at rates. Using a stainless steel brush cathode with a specific surface area of 810 m2 /m3 , hydrogen was produced

  19. Cathode fall thickness of abnormal glow discharges between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii at low pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Yangyang; Luo, Haiyun; Zou, Xiaobing; Wang, Xinxin

    2015-02-15

    In order to investigate the influence of electrode radius on the characteristics of cathode fall thickness, experiments of low-pressure (20?Pa ? p???30?Pa) abnormal glow discharge were carried out between parallel-plane electrodes in different radii keeping gap distance unchanged. Axial distributions of light intensity were obtained from the discharge images captured using a Charge Coupled Device camera. The assumption that the position of the negative glow peak coincides with the edge of cathode fall layer was verified based on a two-dimensional model, and the cathode fall thicknesses, d{sub c}, were calculated from the axial distributions of light intensity. It was observed that the position of peak emission shifts closer to the cathode as current or pressure grows. The dependence of cathode fall thickness on the gas pressure and normalized current J/p{sup 2} was presented, and it was found that for discharges between electrodes in large radius the curves of pd{sub c} against J/p{sup 2} were superimposed on each other, however, this phenomenon will not hold for discharges between the smaller electrodes. The reason for this phenomenon is that the transverse diffusions of charged particles are not the same in two gaps between electrodes with different radii.

  20. Expansion of the cathode spot and generation of shock waves in the plasma of a volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure helium

    SciTech Connect

    Omarov, O. A.; Kurbanismailov, V. S.; Arslanbekov, M. A.; Gadzhiev, M. Kh.; Ragimkhanov, G. B.; Al-Shatravi, Ali J. G.

    2012-01-15

    The expansion of the cathode spot and the generation of shock waves during the formation and development of a pulsed volume discharge in atmospheric-pressure helium were studied by analyzing the emission spectra of the cathode plasma and the spatiotemporal behavior of the plasma glow. The transition of a diffuse volume discharge in a centimeter-long gap into a high-current diffuse mode when the gas pressure increased from 1 to 5 atm and the applied voltage rose from the statistical breakdown voltage to a 100% overvoltage was investigated. Analytical expressions for the radius of the cathode spot and its expansion velocity obtained in the framework of a spherically symmetric model agree satisfactorily with the experimental data.

  1. Robust commercial diffuse reflector for UV-VIS-NIR applications.

    PubMed

    Mason, John D; Cone, Michael T; Donelon, Matthew; Wigle, Jeffery C; Noojin, Gary D; Fry, Edward S

    2015-09-01

    We report the development and testing of a new commercially available diffuse reflecting material with reflectivities in the visible comparable to industry-leading products. This new diffuse reflector consists of solid quartz in which there is a dense distribution of tiny pockets of air. The multiple reflections by the quartz-air interfaces of these air pockets transforms a highly transmissive base material into a highly diffuse reflecting material. PMID:26368875

  2. Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . .

    E-print Network

    Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . . Diffusion- . . . Application: . . . Summary and . . . First #12;Fokker-Planck . . . Diffusion . . . Diffusion- . . . Application: . . . Summary and . . . Topics: 1. Fokker-Planck transport equation 2. Diffusion approximation 3. Diffusion-convection transport

  3. Luminescent screen composition for cathode ray tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilborn, E. H.

    1968-01-01

    Screen composition for cathode ray tubes exhibits differential color of emission as a function of beam current variation at a constant accelerating voltage. The screen consists of a mixture of phosphors which emit different hues, have different current saturation values and exhibit a nonlinear current-brightness characteristic.

  4. Kinetics of oxygen reduction in perovskite cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells: A combined modeling and experimental approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miara, Lincoln James

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have the potential to replace conventional stationary power generation technologies; however, there are major obstacles to commercialization, the most problematic of which is poor cathode performance. Commercialization of SOFCs will follow when the mechanisms occurring at the cathode are more thoroughly understood and adapted for market use. The catalytic reduction of oxygen occurring in SOFC cathodes consists of many elementary steps such as gas phase diffusion, chemical and/or electrochemical reactions which lead to the adsorption and dissociation of molecular oxygen onto the cathode surface, mass transport of oxygen species along the surface and/or through the bulk of the cathode, and full reduction and incorporation of the oxygen at the cathode/electrolyte two or three phase boundary. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) is the main technique used to identify the occurrence of these different processes, but when this technique is used without an explicit model describing the kinetics it is difficult to unravel the interdependence of each of these processes. The purpose of this dissertation is to identify the heterogeneous reactions occurring at the cathode of an SOFC by combining experimental EIS results with mathematical models describing the time dependent behavior of the system. This analysis is performed on two different systems. In the first case, experimental EIS results from patterned half cells composed of Ca-doped lanthanum manganite (LCM)| yttria-doped ZrO2 (YSZ) are modeled to investigate the temperature and partial pressure of oxygen, pO2, dependence of oxygen adsorption/dissociation onto the LCM surface, surface diffusion of atomic oxygen, and electrochemical reduction and incorporation of the oxygen into the electrolyte in the vicinity of the triple phase boundary (TPB). This model determines the time-independent state-space equations from which the Faradaic admittance transfer function is obtained. The unknown rate constants (kad, k des, k1, k1¯ ), and parameters (Ds, Q°, n) arising from the governing equations are estimated from a combination of experiments, mathematical analysis, and numerical data analysis. In the second system, dense patterned films of cathode with composition: La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-delta (LSCF-6428) were fabricated on Ga-doped CeO2 coated YSZ substrates. These samples were analyzed by EIS over a temperature and pO 2 range of 600--800 °C and 10-3--1.00 atm, respectively. To understand the EIS results, a 2-dimensional model was developed which accounted for surface oxygen exchange, and both surface and bulk transport of oxygen to the electrolyte interface. The results were obtained by numerically solving a stationary partial differential equation describing the oxygen vacancy distribution in the cathode. From these results, the model impedance was derived and then fitted to the experimental EIS results. From the fitting results the contributions to the impedance from each of the processes were estimated. Also, the surface exchange rate was estimated over the experimental operating conditions. Finally, the results suggest that the surface diffusion occurred by an interstitial type mechanism in this material. The cathode surface is intimately involved in most of the oxygen reduction processes; however, the surface structure and chemistry is typically treated as an extension of the bulk without consideration of the actual surface properties. Recent evidence suggests that significant changes occur to the surface during operation which in turn leads to changes in electrochemical performance. To investigate these phenomena, well-oriented thin films (250 nm in thickness) of Sr-doped lanthanum manginite (LSM) films were grown on single crystals of YSZ (111). Films which were cathodically biased with a -1 V applied dc potential were compared to control samples. The cathodic bias results in both an enhancement in electrochemical performance and a change in surface chemistry. The changes in electrochemical performance were monitored by ES, while the s

  5. Metal-air battery with easily removable anodes

    SciTech Connect

    Niksa, A.J.; Nikasa, M.J.; Noscal, J.M.; Sovich, T.J.

    1990-08-21

    This patent describes a metal-air battery. It comprises: one or more cells. Each cell comprising;a frame having opposed faces; an air cathode sealed to each face of the frame; an access opening in the frame; an anode blank comprising a consumable end inserted through the access opening into the space between the air cathodes and an exposed end protruding from the opening for replacement of the anode blank through the opening; and a labyrinth seal molded directly onto the anode blank between the consumable end and the exposed end sealing the access opening.

  6. Cathode interface structure in organic semiconductor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turak, Ayse Zeren

    As organic semiconductor technology matures, enhancement requires understanding/engineering of the cathode/organic interface. In this work, using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and common materials for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), the expected interfacial structure in conventionally fabricated devices has been described and some simple predictive methods developed. The buried electrode/active layer interface was examined by analysing: (1) both sides of the interface in conventionally fabricated devices under high vacuum with the unique peel-off technique, and (2) monolayers of one material grown atop another. Connections were drawn between the interfacial structures in devices, those observed during traditional surface science investigations, and the device behaviour. A critical insight is that no one metal or metal/interlayer combination may be used as a universal cathode. Rather, certain criteria for interfacial structure and stability must be confirmed to ensure adequate performance. This can be determined through simple material property information, such as lattice constants, or with inorganic analogues for organic molecules. For combinations of metals and 8-tris(hydroxyquinoline aluminum) (Alq 3), interfacial reactions can be predicted by assuming Al2O 3 as an inorganic analogue. Using this analogue, molecular fragmentation may be described as a simple metal-exchange oxidation-reduction reaction. As cathode complexity increases, such simple descriptions lose validity. This work shows that all three components (organic/LiF/metal) are required to adequately describe the interfacial structure of bi-layer cathodes. The major conclusions regarding the role of LiF are: (1) that 5-10A LiF changes the cathode oxidation behaviour, predicted by the lattice mismatch of the interlayer with the metal. Oxidation is suppressed for Al, which is well matched to LiF; for Mg, which has poor matching, preferential formation of carbonates occurs. Device behaviour is related to the metal oxidation, such that Al/LiF cathodes are superior to Mg/LiF ones. (2) that near the interface, LiF forms charge transfer complexes with electron transporting molecules. (3) that the cathode should be considered a metal-insulator-metal capacitor with the organic layer acting as the bottom electrode. The usable thickness of LiF is dependent on the conductivity of the layer. These insights indicate some of the conditions necessary for adequate device performance and longevity, useful for future device optimization.

  7. Fuel Cell Cathode Contamination: Comparison of Prevention Strategies and their Viability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejaswi, Arjun

    Fuel cells are a major area of research in ongoing efforts to find alternate sources of energy. Today these efforts have become ever the more necessary in the face of spiraling costs of conventional sources of energy and concerns about global warming. Most fuel cells consume hydrogen to produce, for the most part, only water in their exhaust. They are also capable of achieving significantly higher efficiencies than conventional automobile internal combustion engines. Since cost still remains one of the most intractable challenges to the advent of fuel cells, it is imperative that every effort be made to lower the costs of fuel cell production, operation and maintenance as well as improving overall efficiency. The air circulation system of a fuel cell is designed to provide oxygen to the cathode of the fuel cell. Air taken from the surroundings, however, often contains pollutants including dust, SO2, NO 2 and various other gases. These gases may severely degrade various components of system, especially for polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) type fuel cells, including the catalyst, membrane electrode assembly and other components. Moreover, these pollutants may lead to specific behavior based on ambient air composition at the test site thereby confusing researchers. In order to address these issues, this study seeks to identify these pollutants and examine the mitigation strategies to mitigate them. Also discussed is whether these pollutants have an effect debilitating enough to justify the extra cost and potential parasitic losses associated with these mitigation strategies. Adsorptive filtration is identified as the most appropriate cathode side air quality system for fuel cells. Performance of cathode side fuel cell filters are examined under varying relative humidity, temperature, air flow rate and pollutant concentration conditions. An estimated filter survival time under realistic conditions is also suggested.

  8. New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Allan J. Jacobson

    2006-09-30

    Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with the perovskite compositions that were being investigated at PNNL, in order to assess the relative importance of the intrinsic properties such as oxygen ion diffusion and surface exchange rates as predictors of performance in cell tests. We then used these measurements to select new materials for scaled up synthesis and performance evaluation in single cell tests. The results of the single cell tests than provided feedback to the materials synthesis and selection steps. In this summary, the following studies are reported: (1) Synthesis, characterization, and DC conductivity measurements of the P1 compositions La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3-x} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3-x} were completed. A combinational approach for preparing a range P1 (La,Sr)FeO{sub 3} compositions as thin films was investigated. Synthesis and heat treatment of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. (2) Oxygen transport properties of K1 compositions La{sub x}Pr{sub 2-x}NiO{sub 4+d} (x =2.0, 1.9, 1.2, 1.0 and 0) measured by electrical conductivity relaxation are presented in this report. Area specific resistances determined by ac impedance measurements for La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} on CGO are encouraging and suggest that further optimization of the electrode microstructure will enable the target to be reached. (3) The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) were determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The first complete cell measurements were performed on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells. (4) The oxygen exchange kinetics of highly epitaxial thin films of PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (PBCO) has been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation and isotope exchange and depth profiling and confirm the high electronic conductivit

  9. Post-mortem analysis of a long-term tested proton exchange membrane fuel cell stack under low cathode humidification conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Nam-In; Seo, Yongho; Kim, Ki Buem; Lee, Naesung; Lee, Jin-Hwa; Song, Inseob; Choi, Hanshin; Park, Jun-Young

    2014-05-01

    During continuous power operation for 2740 h, the major mechanisms and patterns of performance degradation in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack are investigated under low cathode humidification with simulated reformate fuel gases through the use of various physicochemical and electrochemical analysis tools. As operating time increases, the operating voltages and open-circuit voltages (OCVs) of the stack decrease with the large voltage distributions. In the post-mortem analysis of the stack, the delamination of the catalyst layer (CL) of unstable operating membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) is significant near the cathode gas inlets. This observation is in agreement with the results of OCV, hydrogen crossover current, and anode off-gas measurements. This phenomenon may be due to the acceleration of carbon corrosion in the cathode during the frequent start-up and shut-down process, because the local cathode potential can reach more than 1.5 V in the air/fuel boundary. Additionally, the frequent membrane hydration and dehydration by the accumulation of excess water (through electrochemical reaction) and faster water evaporation (under dry-air cathode conditions and high operating temperatures) may accelerate the interface delamination between the membrane and cathode CL with a substantially uneven distribution of water.

  10. Heat transfer, diffusion, and evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nusselt, Wilhelm

    1954-01-01

    Although it has long been known that the differential equations of the heat-transfer and diffusion processes are identical, application to technical problems has only recently been made. In 1916 it was shown that the speed of oxidation of the carbon in iron ore depends upon the speed with which the oxygen of the combustion air diffuses through the core of gas surrounding the carbon surface. The identity previously referred to was then used to calculate the amount of oxygen diffusing to the carbon surface on the basis of the heat transfer between the gas stream and the carbon surface. Then in 1921, H. Thoma reversed that procedure; he used diffusion experiments to determine heat-transfer coefficients. Recently Lohrisch has extended this work by experiment. A technically very important application of the identity of heat transfer and diffusion is that of the cooling tower, since in this case both processes occur simultaneously.

  11. Lithium-Air Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Dobley, Arthur; Seymour, Frasier W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) primary batteries have a theoretical specific capacity of 11,400 Wh/kg, the highest of any common metal-air system. NASA is developing Li-air technology for a Mobile Oxygen Concentrator for Spacecraft Emergencies, an application which requires an extremely lightweight primary battery that can discharge over 24 hours continuously. Several vendors were funded through the NASA SBIR program to develop Li-air technology to fulfill the requirements of this application. New catalysts and carbon cathode structures were developed to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction and increase surface area to improve cell performance. Techniques to stabilize the lithium metal anode surface were explored. Experimental results for prototype laboratory cells are given. Projections are made for the performance of hypothetical cells constructed from the materials that were developed.

  12. Carbon fiber paper cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Kercher, Andrew K; Kiggans, Jim; Dudney, Nancy J

    2010-01-01

    A novel lithium ion battery cathode structure was produced which has the potential for excellent capacity retention and good thermal management. In these cathodes, the active cathode material (lithium iron phosphate) was carbon bonded to a thermally and electrically conductive carbon fiber paper (CFP) support. Electrochemical testing was performed on Swagelok cells consisting of CFP cathodes and lithium anodes. High specific energy, near-theoretical capacity, and good cycling performance were demonstrated for 0.11 mm and 0.37 mm thick CFP cathodes.

  13. Long lifetime hollow cathodes for 30-cm mercury ion thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirtich, M. J.; Kerslake, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental investigation of hollow cathodes for 30-cm Hg bombardment thrusters was carried out. Both main and neutralizer cathode configurations were tested with both rolled foil inserts coated with low work function material and impregnated porous tungsten inserts. Temperature measurements of an impregnated insert at various positions in the cathode were made. These, along with the cathode thermal profile are presented. A theory for rolled foil and impregnated insert operation and lifetime in hollow cathodes is developed. Several endurance tests, as long as 18000 hours at emission currents of up to 12 amps were attained with no degradation in performance.

  14. Development program on a Spindt cold-cathode electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    A thin film field emission cathode (TFFEC) array and a cold cathode electron gun based on the emitter were developed. A microwave tube gun that uses the thin film field emission cathode as an electron source is produced. State-of-the-art cathodes were fabricated and tested. The tip-packing density of the arrays were increased thereby increasing the cathode's current density capability. The TFFEC is based on the well known field emission effect and was conceived to exploit the advantages of that phenomenon while minimizing the difficulties associated with conventional field emission structures, e.g. limited life and high voltage requirements. Field emission follows the Fowler-Nordheim equation.

  15. Electrochemical Wear of Carbon Cathodes in Electrowinning of Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschöpe, Kati; Støre, Anne; Solheim, Asbjørn; Skybakmoen, Egil; Grande, Tor; Ratvik, Arne Petter

    2013-11-01

    Cathode wear is the main factor limiting the lifetime of high-amperage aluminum electrolysis cells with graphitized cathodes. The current article deals with an investigation of cathode wear in a laboratory cell, where the cathode is directly exposed to the electrolyte during electrolysis. The wear was shown to be electrochemical in nature and dependent on the current density, the rotation speed, and the depth of prefabricated slots in the cylindrical cathodes. The wear mechanism is discussed with respect to kinetics influencing the electrochemistry as well as the solubility of aluminum carbide in the electrolyte.

  16. Current collectors for rechargeable Li-Air batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Veith, Gabriel M; Dudney, Nancy J

    2011-01-01

    Here we report the negative influence of porous nickel foam for use as current collectors in rechargeable Li-air batteries. Uncoated nickel foam promotes the decomposition of LiPF6-organic carbonate electrolytes under normal charging conditions reported for rechargeable Li-air cells. We have identified Ni free porous carbon supports as more appropriate cathode current collectors.

  17. Cathode scraper system and method of using the same for removing uranium

    DOEpatents

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2015-02-03

    Embodiments include a cathode scraper system and/or method of using the same for removing uranium. The cathode scraper system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly includes a plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper system also includes a cathode scraper assembly configured to remove purified uranium deposited on the plurality of cathode rods. The cathode scraper assembly includes a plurality of scrapers arranged in a lattice, and each scraper of the plurality of scrapers is arranged to correspond to a different cathode rod.

  18. Preparation of a fouling-resistant sustainable cathode for a single-chambered microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Pritha; Ghangrekar, M M

    2014-01-01

    Two different binder materials of varying water affinity, viz. poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) and poly-tetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), and biocide vanillin were tested for cathode fouling in a single chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell (MFC) constructed with a low-cost baked clayware cylinder and operated under fed-batch mode. PVA and PTFE loadings of 0.5 mg/cm(2) were used for MFC-1 and MFC-2, respectively as a binder; and a 1:1 mixture of PVA + PTFE was used as binder in MFC-3 with same binder loading. Vanillin was mixed with PVA and also applied at a loading of 0.5 mg/cm(2) for MFC-4. Results showed organic matter removal efficiencies around 90% for all MFCs both before and after fouling. Coulombic efficiency was, however, found to decrease 50% after fouling in the MFC-3 coated with both PVA and PTFE. After 5 weeks of operation, due to fouling 56, 40 and 69% reduction in power densities were observed in MFC-1, MFC-2 and MFC-3, respectively. In the MFC-4 having PVA and vanillin, the least fouling was observed. A consistent volumetric power of 233 mW/m(3) was observed for MFC-4, thus potentially offering a suitable solution to alleviate the problem of fouling in the making of single-chamber air-cathode MFCs. PMID:24552738

  19. Scenario for Hollow Cathode End-Of-Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarver-Verhey, Timothy R.

    2000-01-01

    Recent successful hollow cathode life tests have demonstrated that lifetimes can meet the requirements of several space applications. However, there are no methods for assessing cathode lifetime short of demonstrating the requirement. Previous attempts to estimate or predict cathode lifetime were based on relatively simple chemical depletion models derived from the dispenser cathode community. To address this lack of predicative capability, a scenario for hollow cathode lifetime under steady-state operating conditions is proposed. This scenario has been derived primarily from the operating behavior and post-test condition of a hollow cathode that was operated for 28,000 hours. In this scenario, the insert chemistry evolves through three relatively distinct phases over the course of the cathode lifetime. These phases are believed to correspond to demonstrable changes in cathode operation. The implications for cathode lifetime limits resulting from this scenario are examined, including methods to assess cathode lifetime without operating to End-of- Life and methods to extend the cathode lifetime.

  20. Emission current control system for multiple hollow cathode devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beattie, John R. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emission current control system for balancing the individual emission currents from an array of hollow cathodes has current sensors for determining the current drawn by each cathode from a power supply. Each current sensor has an output signal which has a magnitude proportional to the current. The current sensor output signals are averaged, the average value so obtained being applied to a respective controller for controlling the flow of an ion source material through each cathode. Also applied to each controller are the respective sensor output signals for each cathode and a common reference signal. The flow of source material through each hollow cathode is thereby made proportional to the current drawn by that cathode, the average current drawn by all of the cathodes, and the reference signal. Thus, the emission current of each cathode is controlled such that each is made substantially equal to the emission current of each of the other cathodes. When utilized as a component of a multiple hollow cathode ion propulsion motor, the emission current control system of the invention provides for balancing the thrust of the motor about the thrust axis and also for preventing premature failure of a hollow cathode source due to operation above a maximum rated emission current.

  1. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.

    2004-09-07

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  2. Polymeric hydrogen diffusion barrier, high-pressure storage tank so equipped, method of fabricating a storage tank and method of preventing hydrogen diffusion

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-07-22

    An electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier which comprises an anode layer, a cathode layer, and an intermediate electrolyte layer, which is conductive to protons and substantially impermeable to hydrogen. A catalytic metal present in or adjacent to the anode layer catalyzes an electrochemical reaction that converts any hydrogen that diffuses through the electrolyte layer to protons and electrons. The protons and electrons are transported to the cathode layer and reacted to form hydrogen. The hydrogen diffusion barrier is applied to a polymeric substrate used in a storage tank to store hydrogen under high pressure. A storage tank equipped with the electrochemically active hydrogen diffusion barrier, a method of fabricating the storage tank, and a method of preventing hydrogen from diffusing out of a storage tank are also disclosed.

  3. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, D.H.; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; Harkay, K.; Hernandez-Garcia; Legg, R.; Padmore, H.; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; Wan, W.

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  4. Membrane-less cloth cathode assembly (CCA) for scalable microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Li; Zhou, Shungui; Wang, Yueqiang; Liu, Chengshuai; Geng, Shu

    2009-08-15

    One of the main challenges for scaling up microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies is developing low-cost cathode architectures that can generate high power output. This study developed a simple method to convert non-conductive material (canvas cloth) into an electrically conductive and catalytically active cloth cathode assembly (CCA) in one step. The membrane-less CCA was simply constructed by coating the cloth with conductive paint (nickel-based or graphite-based) and non-precious metal catalyst (MnO(2)). Under the fed-batch mode, the tubular air-chamber MFCs equipped with Ni-CCA and graphite-CCA generated the maximum power densities of 86.03 and 24.67 mW m(-2) (normalized to the projected cathode surface area), or 9.87 and 2.83 W m(-3) (normalized to the reactor liquid volume), respectively. The higher power output of Ni-CCA-MFC was associated with the lower volume resistivity of Ni-CCA (1.35 x 10(-2)Omega cm) than that of graphite-CCA (225 x 10(-2)Omega cm). At an external resistance of 100 Omega, Ni-CCA-MFC and graphite-CCA-MFC removed approximately 95% COD in brewery wastewater within 13 and 18d, and achieved coulombic efficiencies of 30.2% and 19.5%, respectively. The accumulated net water loss through the cloth by electro-osmotic drag exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.999) with produced coulombs. With a comparable power production, such CCAs only cost less than 5% of the previously reported membrane cathode assembly. The new cathode configuration here is a mechanically durable, economical system for MFC scalability. PMID:19556120

  5. Cathode spot motion in a vacuum arc with a long roof-shaped cathode under magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beilis, I. I.; Sagi, B.; Zhitomirsky, V.; Boxman, R. L.

    2015-06-01

    Vacuum arc cathode spot motion was investigated on a "roof-shaped" aluminum cathode under an external magnetic field. The cathode included a flat roof-top and four sloped sides, inclined by an angle ?. A high speed camera was used to observe cathode spot motion. The spot velocity on the slopes and the distribution of cathode spots on the roof and slopes was determined. It was obtained that under a magnetic field, the spot motion on the roof was slow (<1 m/s) and mainly random, while on the slopes fast retrograde motion was observed. This velocity increased linearly with the magnetic field and decreased slightly with ?.

  6. Amorphous V2O5-P2O5 as high-voltage cathodes for magnesium batteries.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Timothy S; Kato, Keiko; Germain, Jason; Guo, Jinghua; Glans, Per-Anders; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Holmes, Daniel; Fan, Xudong; Mizuno, Fuminori

    2015-11-01

    A deep investigation of amorphous V2O5-P2O5 powders for magnesium batteries communicates the vital properties to achieving the superior electrochemical performance at a 75?:?25 V2O5?:?P2O5 molar ratio. The manipulation of the inter-layer spacing and amorphization of V2O5 can enhance Mg(2+) diffusion and afford a cathode with high-voltage reversibility. PMID:26360296

  7. Electrospray emitters For diffusion vacuum pumps

    E-print Network

    Diaz Gómez Maqueo, Pablo (Pablo Ly)

    2011-01-01

    Following similar principles as regular diffusion vacuum pumps, an electrospray emitter is set to produce a jet of charged particles that will drag air molecules out of a volume. To be a feasible concept, the emitted ...

  8. Effect of flow pulsation on mass transport in a cathode channel of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hun Sik; Kim, Yun Ho; Kim, Seo Young; Hyun, Jae Min

    2012-09-01

    An experimental and theoretical study on the cathode flow pulsation in a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is performed. A 10-cell PEM fuel cell stack with open-air cathode channels is employed to investigate the effects of the cathode flow pulsation on the overall performance. The polarization and corresponding power curves obtained show that both the limiting current density and the maximum power density are substantially enhanced when the pulsating component is added to the cathode mainstream flow. The flow pulsation at Re = 77 provides the maximum increment of 40% and 35.5% in the limiting current density and in the maximum power density, respectively. The enhancement of the overall performance is more pronounced at low Reynolds numbers. Also, the theoretical mass transport analysis in the pulsating cathode flow channel is carried out to verify the present experimental results. The momentum and species conservation equations are analytically solved, and the effective time-averaged dispersion coefficient is defined to account for the enhanced mass transport by the flow pulsation. Comprehensive analytical solutions show that the effect of the relevant parameters is in well accordance with the experimental results.

  9. Establishing reliable good initial quantum efficiency and in-situ laser cleaning for the copper cathodes in the RF gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, F.; Sheppard, J. C.; Vecchione, T.; Jongewaard, E.; Brachmann, A.; Corbett, J.; Gilevich, S.; Weathersby, S.

    2015-05-01

    Establishing good initial quantum efficiency (QE) and reliable in-situ cleaning for copper cathode in the RF gun is of critical importance for the RF gun operations. Recent studies on the SLAC RF gun test bed indicated that the pre-cleaning (plasma cleaning) in the test chamber followed by copper cathode exposure to air for cathode change leads to a very low initial QE in the RF gun, and also demonstrated that without the pre-cleaning good initial QE >4×10-5 can be routinely achieved in the RF gun with the cathodes of QE <1×10-7 measured in the test chamber. QE can decay over the time in the RF gun. The in-situ laser cleaning technique for copper cathodes in the RF gun is established and refined in comparison to previous cleaning at the linac coherent light source, resulting in an improved QE and emittance evolutions. The physics of the laser cleaning process is discussed. It is believed that the reflectivity change is one of the major factors for the QE boost with the laser cleaning.

  10. Sterilization of dielectric containers using a fore-vacuum pressure plasma-cathode electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotukhin, D.; Burdovitsini, V.; Oks, E.; Tyunkov, A.; Yushkov, Yu

    2015-11-01

    We describe our work on sterilization of 10 ml glass and 60 ml plastic cylindrical containers using a fore-vacuum pressure, plasma-cathode, electron beam source. Beam plasma is formed inside the vessel by injection of a low-energy electron beam at 3 - 6 keV energy and current of 50 mA, at a working gas (air) pressure of 8 Pa. The gas composition was tracked by a quadrupole gas analyzer type RGA-100. As a test biological object for sterilization we used E. coli ATCC 25922 bacteria, the inner surface of each vessel was inoculated with a bacterial suspension. We find a smooth dependence of the degree of sterilization on the total energy density injected into the vessel. The efficacy of sterilization of container inner surfaces using a fore-vacuum pressure, plasma-cathode e-beam source of relatively low energy (a few keV) electrons is thus demonstrated.

  11. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  12. Review of HxPyOz-Catalyzed H + OH Recombination in Scramjet Nozzle Expansions; and Possible Phosphoric Acid Enhancement of Scramjet Flameholding, from Extinction of H3PO4 + H2 - Air Counterflow Diffusion Flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pellett, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    Recent detailed articles by Twarowski indicate that small quantities of phosphorus oxides and acids in the fuel-rich combustion products of H2 + phosphine (PH3) + air should significantly catalyze H, OH and O recombination kinetics during high-speed nozzle expansions -- to reform H2O, release heat, and approach equilibrium more rapidly and closely than uncatalyzed kinetics. This paper is an initial feasibility study to determine (a) if addition of phosphoric acid vapor (H3PO4) to a H2 fuel jet -- which is much safer than using PH3 -- will allow combustion in a high-speed scramjet engine test without adverse effects on localized flameholding, and (b) if phosphorus-containing exhaust emissions are environmentally acceptable. A well-characterized axisymmetric straight-tube opposed jet burner (OJB) tool is used to evaluate H3PO4 addition effects on the air velocity extinction limit (flame strength) of a H2 versus air counterflow diffusion flame. Addition of nitric oxide (NO), also believed to promote catalytic H-atom recombination, was evaluated for comparison. Two to five mass percent H3PO4 in the H2 jet increased flame strength 4.2%, whereas airside addition decreased it 1%. Adding 5% NO to the H2 caused a 2% decrease. Products of H-atom attack on H3PO4 produced an intense green chemiluminescence near the stagnation point. The resultant exothermic production of phosphorus oxides and acids, with accelerated H-atom recombination, released sufficient heat near the stagnation point to increase flame strength. In conclusion, the addition of H3PO4 vapor (or more reactive P sources) to hydrogen in scramjet engine tests may positively affect flameholding stability in the combustor and thrust production during supersonic expansion -- a possible dual benefit with system design / performance implications. Finally, a preliminary assessment of possible environmental effects indicates that scramjet exhaust emissions should consist of phosphoric acid aerosol, with gradual conversion to phosphate aerosol. This is compared to various natural abundances and sources.

  13. Erosion behaviour of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    E-print Network

    Franz, Robert; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Al$_{x}$Cr$_{1-x}$ composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres and their erosion behaviour was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres were non-uniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded centre region of the cathodes.

  14. The effect of cathode geometry on barium transport in hollow cathode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Polk, James E. Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2014-05-14

    The effect of barium transport on the operation of dispenser hollow cathodes was investigated in numerical modeling of a cathode with two different orifice sizes. Despite large differences in cathode emitter temperature, emitted electron current density, internal xenon neutral and plasma densities, and size of the plasma-surface interaction region, the barium transport in the two geometries is qualitatively very similar. Barium is produced in the insert and flows to the surface through the porous structure. A buildup of neutral Ba pressure in the plasma over the emitter surface can suppress the reactions supplying the Ba, restricting the net production rate. Neutral Ba flows into the dense Xe plasma and has a high probability of being ionized at the periphery of this zone. The steady state neutral Ba density distribution is determined by a balance between pressure gradient forces and the drag force associated with collisions between neutral Ba and neutral Xe atoms. A small fraction of the neutral Ba is lost upstream. The majority of the neutral Ba is ionized in the high temperature Xe plasma and is pushed back to the emitter surface by the electric field. The steady state Ba{sup +} ion density distribution results from a balance between electrostatic and pressure forces, neutral Xe drag and Xe{sup +} ion drag with the dominant forces dependent on location in the discharge. These results indicate that hollow cathodes are very effective at recycling Ba within the discharge and therefore maintain a high coverage of Ba on the emitter surface, which reduces the work function and sustains high electron emission current densities at moderate temperatures. Barium recycling is more effective in the cathode with the smaller orifice because the Ba is ionized in the dense Xe plasma concentrated just upstream of the orifice and pushed back into the hollow cathode. Despite a lower emitter temperature, the large orifice cathode has a higher Ba loss rate through the orifice because the Xe plasma density peaks further upstream.

  15. Maximum theoretical power density of lithium-air batteries with mixed electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, M.; Bevara, V.; Andrei, P.

    2015-07-01

    An analytical model is developed for the discharge voltage of Li-air batteries with mixed organic/aqueous electrolyte and used to analyze the effects of the oxygen dissolution, solubility, pressure, and diffusivity, reaction rates, and internal resistance on the power density of Li-air batteries. By carefully identifying the model parameters using experimental data it is shown that, for discharge currents above 25 mA cm-2 the power of these batteries is mainly limited by the large internal resistance of the membrane and membrane/electrolyte interfaces (which is currently larger than 100 ? cm2), while for smaller discharge currents the power is limited by the low oxygen concentration at the reaction sites. The maximum power density can be increased by approximately 1.5 times if the internal resistance is decreased from 100 ? cm2 to 25 ? cm2. This relatively small increase in the power density is due to the low dissolution rate and solubility of the oxygen in the liquid electrolyte. Finally, when the battery is operated at maximum discharge power, the oxygen diffusion length in the aqueous electrolyte is under 1 ?m, which shows that one needs to use partly wet cathodes in order to achieve high power densities in these batteries.

  16. An Air Quality Data Analysis System for Interrelating Effects, Standards and Needed Source Reductions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larsen, Ralph I.

    1973-01-01

    Makes recommendations for a single air quality data system (using average time) for interrelating air pollution effects, air quality standards, air quality monitoring, diffusion calculations, source-reduction calculations, and emission standards. (JR)

  17. Cathodic protection requirements for deepwater systems

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, C.M.; Hanson, H.R.; Kane, R.D.; Farquhar, G.B.

    1999-07-01

    Field and laboratory experience related to requirements for cathodic protection (CP) in deep water are reviewed with emphasis on identification of the major variables that need to be specified for successful deepwater CP designs for offshore structures. The subject is addressed based on the historical development of cathodic protection design methodologies for offshore structures focusing on sacrificial anode systems and trends that have resulted in specific changes in design requirements. Three main subjects are discussed: (1) application of existing industry standards such as NACE RP0176; (2) environmental factors--dissolved oxygen, temperature, salinity, pH, water velocity and fouling; and (3) calcareous deposits--difference between shallow and deep waters. Current practice of design criteria and systems for deepwater applications is assessed, including initial polarization, use of coatings and anode materials. The results from laboratory tests are compared with available documented service experiences and field tests results.

  18. NUMERICAL MODELING OF CATHODE CONTACT MATERIAL DENSIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppel, Brian J.; Liu, Wenning N.; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2011-11-01

    Numerical modeling was used to simulate the constrained sintering process of the cathode contact layer during assembly of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). A finite element model based on the continuum theory for sintering of porous bodies was developed and used to investigate candidate low-temperature cathode contact materials. Constitutive parameters for various contact materials under investigation were estimated from dilatometry screening tests, and the influence of processing time, processing temperature, initial grain size, and applied compressive stress on the free sintering response was predicted for selected candidate materials. The densification behavior and generated stresses within a 5-cell planar SOFC stack during sintering, high temperature operation, and room temperature shutdown were predicted. Insufficient constrained densification was observed in the stack at the proposed heat treatment, but beneficial effects of reduced grain size, compressive stack preload, and reduced thermal expansion coefficient on the contact layer densification and stresses were observed.

  19. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode Pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, M.A.

    1995-04-25

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal. 5 figs.

  20. Magnetron cathodes in plasma electrode pockels cells

    DOEpatents

    Rhodes, Mark A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1995-01-01

    Magnetron cathodes, which produce high current discharges, form greatly improved plasma electrodes on each side of an electro-optic crystal. The plasma electrode has a low pressure gas region on both sides of the crystal. When the gas is ionized, e.g., by a glow discharge in the low pressure gas, the plasma formed is a good conductor. The gas electrode acts as a highly uniform conducting electrode. Since the plasma is transparent to a high energy laser beam passing through the crystal, the plasma is transparent. A crystal exposed from two sides to such a plasma can be charged up uniformly to any desired voltage. A typical configuration utilizes helium at 50 millitorr operating. pressure and 2 kA discharge current. The magnetron cathode produces a more uniform plasma and allows a reduced operating pressure which leads to lower plasma resistivity and a more uniform charge on the crystal.