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1

Cognitive Task Analysis and Intelligent Computer-Based Training Systems: Lessons Learned from Coached Practice Environments in Air Force Avionics.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper describes some results of a collaborative effort between the University of Pittsburgh and the Air Force to develop advanced troubleshooting training for F-15 maintenance technicians. The focus is on the cognitive task methodology used in the development of three intelligent tutoring systems to inform their instructional content and…

Katz, Sandra N.; Hall, Ellen; Lesgold, Alan

2

Mission computer replacement prototype for Special Operations Forces aircraft: an application of commercial technology to avionics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Attempts to improve the reliability and maintainability of Special Operations Forces (SOF) fixed wing aircraft avionics by developing the mission computer replacement prototype (MCRP), are described. The purpose of the MCRP is to design, build, and demonstrate a replacement mission computer that is applicable across SOF aircraft. Our goal is to develop an open architecture mission computer based on industry

H. Lowery; B. Mitchell

2000-01-01

3

Air Force Link  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Appropriately enough, this website is "dedicated to the men and women who made the U.S. Air Force what it is today." As an official website of the United States Air Force, the Air Force Link Heritage website presents a wide range of materials that detail the history of this division of the Armed Forces. Here visitors will find a "This Week in History" feature which presents summary details of important events in the organization's past, such as the dates of important test flights and important air battles. Within the "Categories" area, visitors can delve into Air Force history. Neatly divided into decades, each section allows visitors to view photographs of important persons in the Air Force during the period, along with documents that relate various aspects of the group's history. Finally, the site also contains a set of links to other useful sites, such as the American Airpower Heritage Museum and the National Museum of Naval Aviation.

4

Air Force Seal Programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to control leakage at the required conditions. This presentation briefly describes current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engines.

Mayhew, Ellen R.

1996-01-01

5

Air Force seal activities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue

Ellen R. Mayhew

1994-01-01

6

Air Force seal activities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

Mayhew, Ellen R.

1994-01-01

7

Air Force seal activities  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seal technology development is an important part of the Air Force's participation in the Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) initiative, the joint DOD, NASA, ARPA, and industry endeavor to double turbine engine capabilities by the turn of the century. Significant performance and efficiency improvements can be obtained through reducing internal flow system leakage, but seal environment requirements continue to become more extreme as the engine thermodynamic cycles advance towards these IHPTET goals. Brush seal technology continues to be pursued by the Air Force to reduce leakage at the required conditions. Likewise, challenges in engine mainshaft air/oil seals are also being addressed. Counter-rotating intershaft applications within the IHPTET initiative involve very high rubbing velocities. This viewgraph presentation briefly describes past and current seal research and development programs and gives a summary of seal applications in demonstrator and developmental engine testing.

Mayhew, Ellen R.

1994-07-01

8

Digital Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Digital Avionics activities played an important role in the advancements made in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. This document profiles advances made in each of these areas by the aerospace industry, NASA centers, and the U.S. military. Emerging communication technologies covered in this document include Internet connectivity onboard aircraft, wireless broadband communication for aircraft, and a mobile router for aircraft to communicate in multiple communication networks over the course of a flight. Military technologies covered in this document include avionics for unmanned combat air vehicles and microsatellites, and head-up displays. Other technologies covered in this document include an electronic flight bag for the Boeing 777, and surveillance systems for managing airport operations.

Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

2003-01-01

9

Air Force Historical Research Agency  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Website from the US Air Force provides a brief description of the overall holdings of the agency, which are comprised of over "70,000,000 pages devoted to the history of the service, and represent the world's largest and most valuable organized collection of documents on US military aviation." The site also supplies detailed descriptions of the personal papers of Air Force members held by the agency and gives bibliographic information on 200 historical studies conducted by the agency on topics of Air Force history. Also included here are a substantive account of Air Force involvement in the Korean War; an online text on Air Force heraldry; detailed descriptions of the Air Force's force structure from 1939 to the present, giving an accounting of the types and quantities of different crafts held by the Force; and more information about Air Force organization and unit history.

10

Avionics Instrument Systems Specialist (AFSC 32551).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This six-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for avionics instrument systems specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are career field familiarization (career field progression and training, security, occupational safety and health, and career field reference material);…

Miller, Lawrence B.; Crowcroft, Robert A.

11

Expanding AirSTAR Capability for Flight Research in an Existing Avionics Design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project is an Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) test bed for experimental flight control laws and vehicle dynamics research. During its development, the test bed has gone through a number of system permutations, each meant to add functionality to the concept of operations of the system. This enabled the build-up of not only the system itself, but also the support infrastructure and processes necessary to support flight operations. These permutations were grouped into project phases and the move from Phase-III to Phase-IV was marked by a significant increase in research capability and necessary safety systems due to the integration of an Internal Pilot into the control system chain already established for the External Pilot. The major system changes in Phase-IV operations necessitated a new safety and failsafe system to properly integrate both the Internal and External Pilots and to meet acceptable project safety margins. This work involved retrofitting an existing data system into the evolved concept of operations. Moving from the first Phase-IV aircraft to the dynamically scaled aircraft further involved restructuring the system to better guard against electromagnetic interference (EMI), and the entire avionics wiring harness was redesigned in order to facilitate better maintenance and access to onboard electronics. This retrofit and harness re-design will be explored and how it integrates with the evolved Phase-IV operations.

Laughter, Sean A.

2012-01-01

12

Air Force Historical Research Agency  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Started in World War II in Washington, D.C., the Air Force Historical Research Agency (AFHRA) has the largest collection of US military aviation documents, with more than 70,000,000 pages all told within their holdings. Since 1949, it has been housed at Maxwell Air Force Base in Alabama, and is open to the general public, military students, researchers, and scholars. Visitors will find some interesting reading under the Studies tab, which includes "Numbered USAF Historical Studies", some of which are designated Secret, and others Unclassified. Also interesting are the "Short Studies on Recent Operations" available in PDF, and including such topics as "Weather in Air Campaigns, 1990-2003" and "The U.S. Air Force Response to Hurricane Katrina". Nearby, under "Other Studies", visitors will find "A Study of Females on Minuteman/Peacekeeper Crews, 31 January 1985" and "Chronology: 100 Years of Flight".

13

AFRL plug-and-play Spacecraft Avionics Experiment (SAE)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) developed an initial plug-and-play capability for spacecraft to better define interfaces, similar to USB on personal computers, in order to simplify spacecraft development and reduce cost and schedule. Much of this improved definition involves standardizing software interfaces between spacecraft components and a spacecraft network. The Spacecraft Avionics Experiment (SAE) was developed and flown as

Maurice Martin; Jeff Summers; James Lyke

2012-01-01

14

U.S. Air Force Fact Sheet Air Force Reserve Officer Training Corps  

E-print Network

July 1993, Air Training Command merged with Air University to form Air Education and Training Command. Air University became a direct reporting unit under Air Education and Training Command and Air Force for Officer Accessions and Citizen Development. Senior ROTC Program The four-year Air Force ROTC program

Su, Xiao

15

Forced air heat sink apparatus  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A high efficiency forced air heat sink assembly employs a split feed transverse flow configuration to minimize the length of the air flow path through at least two separated fin structures. Different embodiments use different fin structure material configurations including honeycomb, corrugated and serpentine. Each such embodiment uses a thermally conductive plate having opposed exterior surfaces; one for receiving a component to be cooled and one for receiving the fin structures. The serpentine structured fin embodiment employs a plurality of fin supports extending from the plate and forming a plurality of channels for receiving the fin structures. A high thermal conductivity bondant, such as metal-filled epoxy, may be used to bond the fin structures to either the plate or the fin supports. Dip brazing and soldering may also be employed depending upon the materials selected.

Rippel, Wally E. (Inventor)

1989-01-01

16

Air Force brush seal programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aggressive pursuit of increased performance in gas turbine engines is driving the thermodynamic cycle to higher pressure ratios, bypass ratios, and turbine inlet temperatures. As these parameters increase, internal air system and resultant thermodynamic cycle losses increase. This conflict of reducing internal airflows while increasing thermodynamic efficiency and performance is putting more emphasis on improvements to the internal flow system. One improvement that has been and continues to be pursued by the Air Force for both man-rated and expendable turbine engine applications is the brush seal. This presentation briefly describes both past and current brush seal research and development programs and gives a summary of demonstrator and developmental engine testing of brush seals.

Dowler, Connie

1993-10-01

17

Air Force brush seal programs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aggressive pursuit of increased performance in gas turbine engines is driving the thermodynamic cycle to higher pressure ratios, bypass ratios, and turbine inlet temperatures. As these parameters increase, internal air system and resultant thermodynamic cycle losses increase. This conflict of reducing internal airflows while increasing thermodynamic efficiency and performance is putting more emphasis on improvements to the internal flow system. One improvement that has been and continues to be pursued by the Air Force for both man-rated and expendable turbine engine applications is the brush seal. This presentation briefly describes both past and current brush seal research and development programs and gives a summary of demonstrator and developmental engine testing of brush seals.

Dowler, Connie

1993-01-01

18

Avion Online  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The first Aviation/Aerospace Newspaper to be available on the Internet via the World Wide Web is The Avion Online. Produced at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, this weekly college newspaper specializes in coverage of aerospace activity, such as the space shuttle, and aviation topics like the Lockheed/Martin merger. Get weekly reports from students who are studying the very stories they are reporting.

19

Avionics and control system development for mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles  

E-print Network

A flight control system was developed to achieve mid-air rendezvous of two unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) as a part of the Parent Child Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (PCUAV) project at MIT and the Draper Laboratory. A lateral ...

Park, Sanghyuk, 1973-

2004-01-01

20

Real-time operating system for advanced avionics architecture  

Microsoft Academic Search

A real-time operating system, the Ada Avionics Real-Time Software (AARTS) Operating System (AOS), is discussed, which under development for the US Air Force. The AOS is intended to mitigate problems with Ada executing in real time on 16-bit data processors in a distributed architecture configuration. The AOS consists of a three part executive: system executive, kernel executive, and distributive executive.

S. L. Benning; R. S. Evans

1988-01-01

21

NASA/Air Force Cost Model: NAFCOM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA/Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM) is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects and is primarily used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels.

Winn, Sharon D.; Hamcher, John W. (Technical Monitor)

2002-01-01

22

Wood stove with safety forced air system  

SciTech Connect

A high efficiency, air-tight wood stove has a firebox with front, side, rear, top and bottom walls, primary air introducing means for admitting combustion air into the firebox, air flow means adjacent the bottom of the firebox for directing a flow of air upwardly across at least one firebox wall, at least one supplemental air inlet for diverting a portion of the air from the air flow means into the firebox, fan means for forcing air through the air flow means and through the supplemental air inlet, the size of the primary air introducing means being chosen to automatically restrict the combustion in the firebox if the fan means stops to maintain the temperature of the stove and surroundings at safe levels.

Erickson, A.J.; Thulman, R.D.

1982-08-03

23

Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Mid-1980's Maintenance Task Analysis. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The fundamental objective of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) Life Cycle Cost (LCC) Study is to provide the Air Force with an enhanced in-house capability to incorporate LCC considerations during all stages of the system acquisition process. The purpose of this report is to describe the technical approach, results, and conclusions…

Czuchry, Andrew J.; And Others

24

Next-generation avionics packaging and cooling `test results from a prototype system'  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reports on the design, material characteristics, and test results obtained under the US Air Force's advanced aircraft avionics packaging technologies (AAAPT) program, whose charter is to investigate new designs and technologies for reliable packaging, interconnection, and thermal management. Under this program, AT&T Bell Laboratories has completed the preliminary testing of and is evaluating a number of promising materials

J. D. Seals

1991-01-01

25

Next-generation avionics packaging and cooling 'test results from a prototype system'  

Microsoft Academic Search

The author reports on the design, material characteristics, and test results obtained under the US Air Force's advanced aircraft avionics packaging technologies (AAAPT) program, whose charter is to investigate new designs and technologies for reliable packaging, interconnection, and thermal management. Under this program, AT&T Bell Laboratories has completed the preliminary testing of and is evaluating a number of promising materials

J. D. Seals

1991-01-01

26

Digital Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The field of digital avionics experienced another year of important advances in civil aviation, military systems, and space applications. As a result of the events of 9/11/2001, NASA has pursued activities to apply its aerospace technologies toward improved aviation security. Both NASA Glenn Research Center and Langley Research Center have performed flight research demonstrations using advanced datalink concepts to transmit live pictures from inside a jetliner, and to downlink the contents of the plane's 'black box' recorder in real time. The U.S. Navy and General Electric demonstrated survivable engine control (SEC) algorithms during engine ground tests at the Weapons Survivability Laboratory at China Lake. The scientists at Boeing Satellite Systems advanced the field of stellar inertial technology with the development of a new method for positioning optical star trackers on satellites.

Koelbl, Terry G.; Ponchak, Denise; Lamarche, Teresa

2002-01-01

27

32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...842.11 Air Force claims organization. Air Force claims channels are: (a) Continental United States (CONUS), Azores, Panama and Iceland: (1) Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). (2) SJAs of bases, single base GCM...

2010-07-01

28

United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

2000-01-01

29

Forces on a saltating grain in air.  

PubMed

A wind tunnel experiment was performed to measure the trajectories of individual sand grains. Then, the acceleration given by the numerical differentiation was used to assess the relative importance of different external forces on a saltating sand grain in air. It is reconfirmed that the gravitational force and drag are the most important to grain motion. The lift also has certain influence. However, the present research does not support that the electrostatic force is significant. PMID:24091939

Wang, Zhen-Ting; Zhang, Chun-Lai; Wang, Hong-Tao

2013-10-01

30

Air Force brush seal programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

Aggressive pursuit of increased performance in gas turbine engines is driving the thermodynamic cycle to higher pressure ratios, bypass ratios, and turbine inlet temperatures. As these parameters increase, internal air system and resultant thermodynamic cycle losses increase. This conflict of reducing internal airflows while increasing thermodynamic efficiency and performance is putting more emphasis on improvements to the internal flow system.

Connie Dowler

1993-01-01

31

Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard General of the Air Force/Army  

E-print Network

Air Force | Army | Marine Corps Navy & Coast Guard O-10 General of the Air Force/Army (Reserved for Wartime) Fleet Admiral (Reserved for Wartime) General Admiral | Commandant of the Coast Guard O-9 Corps Navy & Coast Guard WarrantOfficers No Warrant Officer Rank Warrant Officer 1 Chief Warrant Officer

32

Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As part of NASA's Avionics Steering Committee's stated goal to advance the avionics discipline ahead of program and project needs, the committee initiated a multi-Center technology roadmapping activity to create a comprehensive avionics roadmap. The roadmap is intended to strategically guide avionics technology development to effectively meet future NASA missions needs. The scope of the roadmap aligns with the twelve avionics elements defined in the ASC charter, but is subdivided into the following five areas: Foundational Technology (including devices and components), Command and Data Handling, Spaceflight Instrumentation, Communication and Tracking, and Human Interfaces.

Hodson, Robert; McCabe, Mary; Paulick, Paul; Ruffner, Tim; Some, Rafi; Chen, Yuan; Vitalpur, Sharada; Hughes, Mark; Ling, Kuok; Redifer, Matt; Wallace, Shawn

2013-01-01

33

Air Force cryocooler development for spacecraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

An overview is given of Air Force sponsored cryocooler development for long duration spacecraft missions. Alternate approaches are being pursued to insure eventual success. The types of closed cycle cryocoolers that are now in advanced development include Vuilleumier, turbo-Brayton, and rotary-reciprocating refrigerators. Linear Stirling coolers with magnetic bearings have also been jointly sponsored by NASA and the Air Force. Technology is also being explored for future coolers using magnetic materials at low temperatures and for refrigerators with sorption compresssors. All of these cryocoolers are presently configured primarily for use with infrared sensor systems, but the designs could be adapted for use with cryogenic fluid storage systems or other applications.

Haskin, William L.

1987-01-01

34

32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Force claims organization. Air Force claims channels are: (a) Continental United States (CONUS), Azores, Panama and Iceland: (1) Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). (2) SJAs of bases, single base GCM authorities, stations and...

2014-07-01

35

32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Force claims organization. Air Force claims channels are: (a) Continental United States (CONUS), Azores, Panama and Iceland: (1) Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). (2) SJAs of bases, single base GCM authorities, stations and...

2012-07-01

36

32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Force claims organization. Air Force claims channels are: (a) Continental United States (CONUS), Azores, Panama and Iceland: (1) Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). (2) SJAs of bases, single base GCM authorities, stations and...

2011-07-01

37

32 CFR 842.11 - Air Force claims organization.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Force claims organization. Air Force claims channels are: (a) Continental United States (CONUS), Azores, Panama and Iceland: (1) Headquarters US Air Force (HQ USAF). (2) SJAs of bases, single base GCM authorities, stations and...

2013-07-01

38

Air Force Convair F-102 at Wallops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two models of the Air Force's Convair F-102 sit poised for launch from Langley's Wallops Island facility. The Coke Bottle shape of the model on the bottom follows the area rule. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, (page 60), by James Schultz.

1953-01-01

39

Air Force Convair F-102 at Wallops  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Two models of the Air Force's Convair F-102 sit poised for launch from Langley's Wallops Island facility. The coke bottle shape of the model on the bottom follows the area rule. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication, by James Schultz (page 60).

1954-01-01

40

Multiple Miniature Avionic Displays  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A display screen for displaying multiple sets of information is provided. In one embodiment, an aviation display screen includes a main window and a plurality of miniature windows. The main window is adapted to illustrate one set of information. Each miniature window is adapted to display a set of avionic information. The avionic display is further adapted to toggle a select set of avionic information in one of the miniature windows into the main window.

Rye, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Dorneich, Michael C. (Inventor); Gannon, Aaron J. (Inventor)

2008-01-01

41

4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. Edwards Air Force ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

4. BUILDING 8767, INTERIOR. Looking west. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Observation Bunkers for Test Stand 1-A, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

42

DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM Edwards Air Force ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

DETAIL, CONTROL BOOTH, RP1 TANK FARM - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Combined Fuel Storage Tank Farm, Test Area 1-120, north end of Jupiter Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

43

77 FR 55465 - US Air Force Exclusive Patent License  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...AGENCY: Air Force Research Laboratory Information Directorate, Rome, New York, Department of the Air Force, DOD. ACTION: Notice...the Staff Judge Advocate, AFRL/RIJ, 26 Electronic Parkway, Rome, New York 13441-4514. Telephone: (315) 330-2087;...

2012-09-10

44

Avionics System Architecture Tool  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Avionics System Architecture Tool (ASAT) is a computer program intended for use during the avionics-system-architecture- design phase of the process of designing a spacecraft for a specific mission. ASAT enables simulation of the dynamics of the command-and-data-handling functions of the spacecraft avionics in the scenarios in which the spacecraft is expected to operate. ASAT is built upon I-Logix Statemate MAGNUM, providing a complement of dynamic system modeling tools, including a graphical user interface (GUI), modeling checking capabilities, and a simulation engine. ASAT augments this with a library of predefined avionics components and additional software to support building and analyzing avionics hardware architectures using these components.

Chau, Savio; Hall, Ronald; Traylor, marcus; Whitfield, Adrian

2005-01-01

45

Air Force construction automation/robotics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Air Force has several missions which generate unique requirements that are being met through the development of construction robotic technology. One especially important mission will be the conduct of Department of Defense (DOD) space activities. Space operations and other missions place construction/repair equipment operators in dangerous environments and potentially harmful situations. Additionally, force reductions require that human resources be leveraged to the maximum extent possible, and more stringent construction repair requirements push for increased automation. To solve these problems, the U.S. Air Force is undertaking a research and development effort at Tyndall AFB, FL, to develop robotic construction/repair equipment. This development effort involves the following technologies: teleoperation, telerobotics, construction operations (excavation, grading, leveling, tool change), robotic vehicle communications, vehicle navigation, mission/vehicle task control architecture, and associated computing environment. The ultimate goal is the fielding of a robotic repair capability operating at the level of supervised autonomy. This paper will discuss current and planned efforts in space construction/repair, explosive ordnance disposal, hazardous waste cleanup, and fire fighting.

Nease, A. D.; Alexander, E. F.

1993-01-01

46

Keesler Air Force Base team tours Stennis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Stennis Space Center Deputy Director Patrick Scheuermann (seated, center) welcomed members of the Keesler Air Force Base management team from Biloxi during a Nov. 4 tour of the rocket engine test facility. During the visit, Keesler team members toured several areas, including the A-3 Test Stand construction site and the Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne engine assembly facility. Management team members visiting Stennis included Brig. Gen. Ian R. Dickinson (seated, right), commander of the Keesler base, and Col. Christopher Valle (seated, left), vice commander of the base.

2009-01-01

47

Air Force ROTC Wins Best in the Nation Honors Montgomery, AL --US Air Force  

E-print Network

Secretary of the Air Force, the Honorable Michael B. Donley. Lt Col Mike Angle said "it takes a supportive that enhance the AFROTC program. Angle also said "it took a lot of hard work and dedication from my talented of this community synergized with the phenomenal talents of the Detachment 800 cadre and cadets and culminated

Wang, Xiaorui "Ray"

48

76 FR 18537 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION: Meeting...

2011-04-04

49

75 FR 13514 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Air Force, U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. ACTION:...

2010-03-22

50

Ares I Avionics Introduction  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Ares I is the next generation human-rated launcher for the United States Constellation program. This system is required to provide single fault tolerance within defined crew safety and mission reliability limits. As part of the effort to achieve those safety goals, Ares I includes an avionics subsystem built as a multistring, voting architecture. The avionics design draws upon experience gained from building fly-by-wire systems for Shuttle, X- 38, and Seawolf. Architectural drivers for the avionics design include using proven technologies with existing suppliers of space rated parts for critical functions (to reduce overall development risk), easing the software development effort by using an off-theshelf, DO-178B certifiable, ARINC-653 operating system in the main flight computers, minimizing mutual data and power connections that might lead to a common-mode hardware failure of the redundant avionics strings, and centralizing overall Ares I command & control within the Upper Stage.

Marchant, Christopher C.

2009-01-01

51

2013 aircrew, avionics, and operations survey, part 2.  

PubMed

In this second half of a 2-part series, chief/lead pilots were invited to complete a 40-question survey modeled on the AirMed 2000 Helicopter Avionics and Operations Survey via an online survey. The survey was available to rotor-wing (RW) and fixed-wing air medical transport services in the United States, although year 2000 comparative data are RW only. Topics surveyed include flight hours, aircraft models, avionics, interiors, staffing, weather minimums, and maintenance facilities. PMID:24182880

Greene, Michael J

2013-01-01

52

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Solid Rocket Booster Disassembly & Refurbishment Complex, Thrust Vector Control Deservicing Facility, Hangar Road, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

53

Avionics System Architecture for NASA Orion Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation reviews the Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle avionics architecture. The contents include: 1) What is Orion?; 2) Orion Concept of Operations; 3) Orion Subsystems; 4) Orion Avionics Architecture; 5) Orion Avionics-Network; 6) Orion Network Unification; 7) Orion Avionics-Integrity; 8) Orion Avionics-Partitioning; and 9) Orion Avionics-Redundancy.

Baggerman, Clint

2010-01-01

54

32 CFR 989.7 - Requests from Non-Air Force agencies or entities.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Force property or programs, or requires Air Force approval. (c) The Air Force may require the requester to...contractor selected and supervised by the Air Force. The EPF may permit requesters to submit draft EAs for their proposed...

2010-07-01

55

United States Air Force Child Care Center Infant Care Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Intended to guide Air Force infant caregivers in providing high quality group care for infants 6 weeks to 6 months of age, this infant care guide must be used in conjunction with other Air Force regulations on day care, such as AFR 215-1, Volume VI (to be renumbered AFR 215-27). After a brief introductory chapter (Chapter I), Chapter II indicates…

Craig, Ardyn; And Others

56

19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

19. DETAIL OF AIR FORCE WEATHER INFORMATION TERMINAL AND CHART RECORDER LOCATED IMMEDIATELY NORTH OF CONSOLE IN PHOTOS A-15 THROUGH A-18. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Operations Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

57

Some Factors Influencing Air Force Simulator Training Effectiveness. Technical Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study of U.S. Air Force simulator training was conducted to identify factors that influence the effectiveness of such training and to learn how its effectiveness is being determined. The research consisted of a survey of ten representative Air Force simulator training programs and a review of the simulator training research literature. A number…

Caro, Paul W.

58

Flight Avionics Hardware Roadmap  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Avionics Technology Roadmap takes an 80% approach to technology investment in spacecraft avionics. It delineates a suite of technologies covering foundational, component, and subsystem-levels, which directly support 80% of future NASA space mission needs. The roadmap eschews high cost, limited utility technologies in favor of lower cost, and broadly applicable technologies with high return on investment. The roadmap is also phased to support future NASA mission needs and desires, with a view towards creating an optimized investment portfolio that matures specific, high impact technologies on a schedule that matches optimum insertion points of these technologies into NASA missions. The roadmap looks out over 15+ years and covers some 114 technologies, 58 of which are targeted for TRL6 within 5 years, with 23 additional technologies to be at TRL6 by 2020. Of that number, only a few are recommended for near term investment: 1. Rad Hard High Performance Computing 2. Extreme temperature capable electronics and packaging 3. RFID/SAW-based spacecraft sensors and instruments 4. Lightweight, low power 2D displays suitable for crewed missions 5. Radiation tolerant Graphics Processing Unit to drive crew displays 6. Distributed/reconfigurable, extreme temperature and radiation tolerant, spacecraft sensor controller and sensor modules 7. Spacecraft to spacecraft, long link data communication protocols 8. High performance and extreme temperature capable C&DH subsystem In addition, the roadmap team recommends several other activities that it believes are necessary to advance avionics technology across NASA: center dot Engage the OCT roadmap teams to coordinate avionics technology advances and infusion into these roadmaps and their mission set center dot Charter a team to develop a set of use cases for future avionics capabilities in order to decouple this roadmap from specific missions center dot Partner with the Software Steering Committee to coordinate computing hardware and software technology roadmaps and investment recommendations center dot Continue monitoring foundational technologies upon which future avionics technologies will be dependent, e.g., RHBD and COTS semiconductor technologies

Some, Raphael; Goforth, Monte; Chen, Yuan; Powell, Wes; Paulick, Paul; Vitalpur, Sharada; Buscher, Deborah; Wade, Ray; West, John; Redifer, Matt; Partridge, Harry; Sherman, Aaron; McCabe, Mary

2014-01-01

59

Basic avionics module design for general aviation aircraft  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The design of an advanced digital avionics system (basic avionics module) for general aviation aircraft operated with a single pilot under IFR conditions is described. The microprocessor based system provided all avionic functions, including flight management, navigation, and lateral flight control. The mode selection was interactive with the pilot. The system used a navigation map data base to provide operation in the current and planned air traffic control environment. The system design included software design listings for some of the required modules. The distributed microcomputer uses the IEEE 488 bus for interconnecting the microcomputer and sensors.

Smyth, R. K.; Smyth, D. E.

1978-01-01

60

Space shuttle avionics system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle avionics system, which was conceived in the early 1970's and became operational in the 1980's represents a significant advancement of avionics system technology in the areas of systems and redundacy management, digital data base technology, flight software, flight control integration, digital fly-by-wire technology, crew display interface, and operational concepts. The origins and the evolution of the system are traced; the requirements, the constraints, and other factors which led to the final configuration are outlined; and the functional operation of the system is described. An overall system block diagram is included.

Hanaway, John F.; Moorehead, Robert W.

1989-01-01

61

Comparison of Enlisted Air Force Accessions: 1972-1974.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was conducted to determine if the Air Force has been able to sustain the quality of its force during 1973-74 as compared to 1972, the last year of the Selective Service Draft Lottery System. Data were collected on male and female non-prior service basic trainees who enlisted in the Air Force in 1972 (4,688 females and 81,563 males), 1973…

Vitola, Bart M.; And Others

62

Air Force transportation problem The Air Force wants to introduce a new shielding material for its B-52  

E-print Network

Air Force transportation problem The Air Force wants to introduce a new shielding material for its 854 1 #12;An LP formulation This is an example of a transportation problem: material has to be transported from a collection of sources to a collection of destinations. We set up fifteen variables, xij, i

Galvin, David

63

Contracting: Air force procurement of prototype fuels dispensing system  

SciTech Connect

In September 1985 the Air Force awarded Gull, Incorporated, a firm, fixed-price contract to design, fabricate, furnish, test, and install an automated data collection and fuels dispensing prototype system to determine the feasibility and cost effectiveness of automation for improved petroleum fuels accountability. In October 1985 Liquid Controls Corporation protested the award contending that Gull's product would not meet the contract specifications. The Air Force concluded that the allegations were speculative and did not show a deficiency in the Air Force determination of responsible bidder. GAO dismissed the protest. Contract modification provides for installation of the prototype system by June 1987.

Not Available

1987-01-01

64

77 FR 24480 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors, Department of Defense. ACTION: Meeting...

2012-04-24

65

78 FR 54634 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors, DOD. SUMMARY: In accordance with 10...

2013-09-05

66

77 FR 33202 - Department of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Suite A195, Wilmington, Massachusetts 01887, a partially exclusive license, the exclusive portion limited to the field of cyber security for industrial control systems, in any right, title and interest the Air Force has in U.S. Patent...

2012-06-05

67

7. Launch closure, view towards northwest Ellsworth Air Force ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

7. Launch closure, view towards northwest - Ellsworth Air Force Base, Delta Flight, Launch Facility D-6, 4 miles north of Badlands National Park Headquarters, 4.5 miles east of Jackson County line on county road, Interior, Jackson County, SD

68

Interior, looking northwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, looking northwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

69

Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

70

Looking north Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Looking north - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

71

Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

72

General view. View to southwest Offutt Air Force Base, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

General view. View to southwest - Offutt Air Force Base, Looking Glass Airborne Command Post, Vehicle Refueling Station, Northeast of AGE Storage Facility at far northwest end of Project Looking Glass Historic District, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

73

View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

View of building 11070 showing vents and forced air system on east side, looking southwest. - Naval Ordnance Test Station Inyokern, China Lake Pilot Plant, Maintenance Shop, C Street, China Lake, Kern County, CA

74

Portfolio management in the Air Force : current status and opportunities  

E-print Network

There are hundreds of weapons programs, under the management of the United States Air Force worth billions of dollars. These programs are being developed to fulfill a need in the U.S. defense strategy. Bringing these weapon ...

Morgan, Dave B

2011-01-01

75

Exterior, looking west Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Exterior, looking west - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

76

Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Clean Lubrication Oil Storage Tank & Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

77

Exterior, looking southwest Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Exterior, looking southwest - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

78

Interior, looking northeast Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Interior, looking northeast - Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Emergency Generator Enclosure, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

79

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

80

Energy Savings Performance Contract- Robins Air Force Base, Georgia  

E-print Network

saving projects is through private sector financing, also known as Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC). Robins Air Force Base, located in middle Georgia, has recently implemented such a contract. Using an Army Corps of Engineers area...

Edge, J. S.

81

Standard operating procedure for air quality stationary source management at Air Force installations in the Air Force Materiel Command  

SciTech Connect

To sustain compliance and avoid future enforcement actions associated with air quality stationary sources and to provide installation commanders with a certification process for Title V permitting, and Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Stationary Source Management has been developed. The SOP consists of two major sections: Stationary Source Planning and Administration, and Stationary Source Operations These two main sections are further subdivided into twelve subsections which delineate requirements (e.g. maintaining inventories, applying for and maintaining permits, keeping records, reporting and certifying compliance) and assign ownership of processes and responsibilities (e.g. appointing a manager/alternate for each identified stationary air source). In addition, the SOP suggests training that should be provided from operator to commander levels to ensure that all personnel involved with a stationary air source are aware of their responsibilities. Implementation of the SOP should provide for the essential control necessary for installation commanders to eliminate stationary air source non-compliance and to certify compliance in accordance with the Title V Operating Permit requirements. This paper will discuss: the background and purpose for the SOPs content, the twelve subsections of the SOP, the success of implementation at various installations, the relevance or the recommended training, the success of negotiating with various labor unions for SOP implementation and the success of the SOP in reference to its intended purpose.

Powell, C.M.; Ryckman, S.J. [Headquarters Air Force Materiel Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States). Environmental Compliance Branch

1997-12-31

82

Forced convection heat transfer to air/water vapor mixtures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Heat transfer coefficients were measured using both dry and humid air in the same forced convection cooling scheme and were compared using appropriate nondimensional parameters (Nusselt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers). A forced convection scheme with a complex flow field, two dimensional arrays of circular jets with crossflow, was utilized with humidity ratios (mass ratio of water vapor to air) up to 0.23. The dynamic viscosity, thermal conductivity and specific heat of air, steam and air/steam mixtures are examined. Methods for determining gaseous mixture properties from the properties of their pure components are reviewed as well as methods for determining these properties with good confidence. The need for more experimentally determined property data for humid air is discussed. It is concluded that dimensionless forms of forced convection heat transfer data and empirical correlations based on measurements with dry air may be applied to conditions involving humid air with the same confidence as for the dry air case itself, provided that the thermophysical properties of the humid air mixtures are known with the same confidence as their dry air counterparts.

Richards, D. R.; Florschuetz, L. W.

1984-01-01

83

77 FR 5781 - Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Record of Decision for the Air Space Training Initiative Shaw Air Force Base, South Carolina Final Environmental Impact Statement ACTION: Notice of...

2012-02-06

84

High performance forced air cooling scheme employing microchannel heat exchangers  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper, a high performance forced air cooing scheme is theoretically and experimentally investigated which employs microchannel parallel plate-fin heat sinks and tubes to deliver the air to and optionally from the heat sink. The performance of the cooling system is modeled in terms of thermal resistance, pressure drop, and pumping power. Optimizations are performed and design trade-offs discussed.

Michael B. Kleiner; Stefan A. Kuhn; Karl Haberger

1995-01-01

85

STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Shuttle Endeavour, after completing a mission of almost 17 days duration in space, touches down on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995. In this photo the nose gear is still in the air as the orbiter touches down.

1995-01-01

86

An Air Force Logistics Management Index for effective aircraft operation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Air power plays a critical role in modern war. In order to maintain the highest possible level of aircraft readiness, logistics management for aircraft operation must be conducted well. In this study, we use a Structural Equation Model (SEM) to develop an Air Force Logistics Management Index (ALMI) for effective aircraft operation. An individual ALMI rating is estimated for various

Kyung Bok Yoon; Hong Sik Kim; So Young Sohn

2008-01-01

87

General aviation avionics equipment maintenance  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Maintenance of general aviation avionics equipment was investigated with emphasis on single engine and light twin engine general aviation aircraft. Factors considered include the regulatory agencies, avionics manufacturers, avionics repair stations, the statistical character of the general aviation community, and owners and operators. The maintenance, environment, and performance, repair costs, and reliability of avionics were defined. It is concluded that a significant economic stratification is reflected in the maintenance problems encountered, that careful attention to installations and use practices can have a very positive impact on maintenance problems, and that new technologies and a general growth in general aviation will impact maintenance.

Parker, C. D.; Tommerdahl, J. B.

1978-01-01

88

Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Utility Building Plan, elevations and sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, COmbat Operations Center, Utility Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 57, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/57, Rev. "B"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966 "drawings updated." Various scales. 29 x 41 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Utility Building, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

89

Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS): Impact of DAIS Concept on Life Cycle Cost. Final Report.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Designed to identify and quantify the potential impacts of the Digital Avionics Information System (DAIS) on weapon system personnel requirements and life cycle cost (LCC), this study postulated a typical close-air-support (CAS) mission avionics suite to serve as a basis for comparing present day and DAIS configuration specifications. The purpose…

Goclowski, John C.; And Others

90

Force approximation for a plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air  

SciTech Connect

A plasma actuator has been studied using a self-consistent multibody system of quiescent air, plasma, and dielectric. Equations governing the motion of charged and neutral species have been solved with Poisson's equation. Based on first principles analysis, a functional relationship between electrodynamic force and electrical and physical control parameters has been approximated and numerically tested for air. The magnitude of approximated force increases with the fourth power of the amplitude of rf potential. Thus, the induced fluid velocity also increases. The induced velocity shows momentum injection very close to the actuator surface. There is, however, a very small increase in the induced velocity with the forcing frequency. For the specific range of operational parameters considered, the proposed force relation may help speed up the plasma actuator design process.

Singh, Kunwar Pal; Roy, Subrata [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory and Test Facility, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2008-01-01

91

Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 2: Avionics functional requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Flight and ground operational phases of the tug/shuttle system are analyzed to determine the general avionics support functions that are needed during each of the mission phases and sub-phases. Each of these general support functions is then expanded into specific avionics system requirements, which are then allocated to the appropriate avionics subsystems. This process is then repeated at the next lower level of detail where these subsystem requirements are allocated to each of the major components that comprise a subsystem.

1975-01-01

92

Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The feasibility of developing an integrated avionics system suitable for general aviation was determined. A design of reliable integrated avionics which provides expanded functional capability that significantly enhances the utility and safety of general aviation at a cost commensurate with the general aviation market was developed. The use of a data bus, microprocessors, electronic displays and data entry devices, and improved function capabilities were emphasized. An avionics system capable of evaluating the most critical and promising elements of an integrated system was designed, built and flight tested in a twin engine general aviation aircraft.

1982-01-01

93

Air forces on airfoils moving faster than sound  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

We are undertaking the task of computing the air forces on a slightly cambered airfoil in the absence of friction and with an infinite aspect ratio. We also assume in advance that the leading edge is very sharp and that its tangent lies in the direction of motion.

Ackeret, J

1925-01-01

94

Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Form O: Development and Standardization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents the rationale, development, and standardization of the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Form O. The test is used to select individuals for officer commissioning programs, and candidates for pilot and navigator training. Form O contains 380 items organized in 16 subtests. All items are administered in a single test…

Rogers, Deborah L.; And Others

95

Synergy Pays Off--Air Force Fights Delinquency  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Michigan Youth Service Personnel, the men at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, and the residents around Oscoda, Michigan, implemented and carried out an exemplary youth camping program dedicated to helping troubled boys achieve a far brighter future than would ordinarily be expected. The program was evaluated by Florida Technological University.…

Unkovic, Charles M.; And Others

1975-01-01

96

Forces Acting on a Ball in an Air Jet  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The forces acting on a ball in an air jet have been measured using simple equipment. Such measurements allow quite a precise, non-ambiguous description and understanding of the physical mechanism which explains the famous levitating ball experiment. (Contains 7 figures.)

Lopez-Arias, T.; Gratton, L. M.; Zendri, G.; Oss, S.

2011-01-01

97

Assessment of Air Force Accessions by Draft-Vulnerability Category.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This work assesses the characteristics of current Air Force accessions. On the basis of draft lottery numbers, four groups of basic trainees enlisting in early 1970 were defined in terms of their draft vulnerability at the time of enlistment. These groups, designated as high, moderate, low, and no threat, were compared on a number of dimensions.…

Vitola, Bart M.; Valentine, Lonnie D., Jr.

98

Effect of Air Force Recruiting Incentives on Volunteer Enlistment.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The study was conducted to examine the manner in which various aspects of the Air Force are viewed by incoming recruits and to determine how these perceptions were related to volunteer enlistment decisions. Survey questionnaires were administered to basic trainees in FY 1971 (8,007) and FY 1972 (9,331). Respondents were asked to indicate their…

Alley, William E.

99

Training augmentation device for the Air Force satellite Control Network  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

From the 1960's and into the early 1980's satellite operations and control were conducted by Air Force Systems Command (AFSC), now Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC), out of the Satellite Control Facility at Onizuka AFB, CA. AFSC was responsible for acquiring satellite command and control systems and conducting routine satellite operations. The daily operations, consisting of satellite health and status contacts and station keeping activities, were performed for AFSC by a Mission Control Team (MCT) staffed by civilian contractors who were responsible for providing their own technically 'qualified' personnel as satellite operators. An MCT consists of five positions: mission planner, ground controller, planner analyst, orbit analyst, and ranger controller. Most of the training consisted of On-the-Job-Training (OJT) with junior personnel apprenticed to senior personnel until they could demonstrate job proficiency. With most of the satellite operators having 15 to 25 years of experience, there was minimal risk to the mission. In the mid 1980's Air Force Space Command (AFSPACOM) assumed operational responsibility for a newly established control node at Falcon AFB (FAFB) in CO. The satellites and ground system program offices (SPO's) are organized under AFSC's Space and Missiles Systems Center (SMC) to function as a systems engineering and acquisition agency for AFSPACECOM. The collection of the satellite control nodes, ground tracking stations, computer processing equipment, and connecting communications links is referred to as the Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN).

Shoates, Keith B.

1993-01-01

100

Small satellites and the DARPA\\/Air Force FALCON program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The FALCON program is a technology demonstration effort with three major components: a Small Launch Vehicle (SLV), a Hypersonic Technology Vehicle (HTV), and a Hypersonic Cruise Vehicle (HCV). Sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) and executed jointly by the United States Air Force and DARPA with NASA participation, the objectives are to develop and demonstrate technologies that

Steven H. Walker; Robert L. Sackheim

2005-01-01

101

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Scholars Program is currently  

E-print Network

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Scholars Program is currently accepting applications for paid internship opportunities available at: · Kirtland AFB in Albuquerque, NM · Eglin AFB in Valparaiso, Florida · AFRL Maui Optical and Super Computing Site (AMOS) in Maui, Hawaii OPPORTUNITIES

Johnson, Eric E.

102

Overview of Air Force Research Laboratory cryogenic technology development programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents an overview of the cryogenic refrigerator and cryogenic integration programs in development and characterization under the Cryogenic Technology Group, Space Vehicles Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). The vision statement for the group is to support the pace community as the center of excellence for developing and transitioning space cryogenic thermal management technologies. The primary

Thomas M. Davis; B. J. Tomlinson

1998-01-01

103

Flux Compression Generator Development at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) maintains an extensive capability for the design, analysis, construction and testing of explosive pulsed power (EPP) components. Three flux compression generators (FCGs) were designed as part of an EPP technology development effort sponsored by AFRL and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). A secondary-stage, high-current FCG was designed to deliver 10 MA into

T. C. Cavazos; D. G. Gale; C. E. Roth; J. V. Parker; W. E. Sommars; S. K. Coffey; F. M. Lehr; W. D. Tucker; G. F. Kiuttu; J. H. Degnan

2005-01-01

104

11. EXTERIOR VIEW OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MAN EXAMINING ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

11. EXTERIOR VIEW OF UNITED STATES AIR FORCE MAN EXAMINING CONTENTS OF SHIELDING TANK AS FUEL ELEMENT ASSEMBLY IS RAISED AND LOWERED. INEL PHOTO NUMBER 65-6172, TAKEN NOVEMBER 10, 1965. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Advanced Reentry Vehicle Fusing System, Scoville, Butte County, ID

105

32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements...excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological contaminants. When...obtain a certificate as to the extent of contamination and clearance thereof from the...

2011-07-01

106

32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements...excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological contaminants. When...obtain a certificate as to the extent of contamination and clearance thereof from the...

2010-07-01

107

32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements...excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological contaminants. When...obtain a certificate as to the extent of contamination and clearance thereof from the...

2012-07-01

108

32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements...excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological contaminants. When...obtain a certificate as to the extent of contamination and clearance thereof from the...

2013-07-01

109

32 CFR 644.516 - Clearance of Air Force lands.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Clearance of Explosive Hazards and Other Contamination from Proposed Excess Land and Improvements...excess Air Force land of explosives or chemical/biological contaminants. When...obtain a certificate as to the extent of contamination and clearance thereof from the...

2014-07-01

110

STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main landing gear is on the ground and the nose gear is about to touch down as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

1994-01-01

111

STS-67 landing at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The drag chute is fully deployed in this view of the Space Shuttle Endeavour as it completes a mission of almost 17 days duration in space on runway 22 at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California. Landing occurred at 1:46 p.m. (EST), March 18, 1995.

1995-01-01

112

STS-66 landing at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The drag chute is fully deployed as the Space Shuttle Atlantis heads toward a stop at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California, ending a successful 10 day, 22 hour and 34 minute space mission. Landing occured at 7:34 a.m. (PST), November 14, 1994.

1994-01-01

113

Information Assurance within the United States Air Force  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

According to the Department of Defense (DoD), a review of information assurance (IA) in the United States Air Force (USAF) in 2009, cyber security is jeopardized because of information loss. This situation has occurred in large part because of less than optimal training practices or adherence to training protocols. The purpose of this study was…

Cherry, John D.

2010-01-01

114

Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Sections. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/15, Rev. "A"; file drawer 1290. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. pencil on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

115

Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Elevations. March Air Force Base, Riverside, California, Combat Operations Center, Combat Operations Building. By Moffatt and Nichol, Engineers, 122 West Fifth Street, Long Beach, California; for the Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Office of the District Engineer, Los Angeles, California. Drawing no. AW-60-02-03, sheet no. 14, approved March, 1962; specifications no. ENG-04-353-62-66; D.O. series AW 1596/14, Rev. "B"; file drawer 77-1/102. Last revised 3 October 1966. Scale one-eighth inch to one foot. 30x36 inches. photocopy on paper - March Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command, Combat Operations Center, 5220 Riverside Drive, Moreno Valley, Riverside County, CA

116

Avionics Maintenance Technology Program Standards.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication contains statewide standards for the avionics maintenance technology program in Georgia. The standards are divided into the following categories: foundations, diploma/degree (philosophy, purpose, goals, program objectives, availability, evaluation); admissions, diploma/degree (admission requirements, provisional admission…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

117

An assessment of General Aviation utilization of advanced avionics technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Needs of the general aviation industry for services and facilities which might be supplied by NASA were examined. In the data collection phase, twenty-one individuals from nine manufacturing companies in general aviation were interviewed against a carefully prepared meeting format. General aviation avionics manufacturers were credited with a high degree of technology transfer from the forcing industries such as television, automotive, and computers and a demonstrated ability to apply advanced technology such as large scale integration and microprocessors to avionics functions in an innovative and cost effective manner. The industry's traditional resistance to any unnecessary regimentation or standardization was confirmed. Industry's self sufficiency in applying advanced technology to avionics product development was amply demonstrated. NASA research capability could be supportive in areas of basic mechanics of turbulence in weather and alternative means for its sensing.

Quinby, G. F.

1980-01-01

118

Sensitivity of contrail cirrus radiative forcing to air traffic scheduling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Air traffic effects high cloudiness and therefore the Earth's radiation budget by producing contrail cirrus. Contrail cirrus comprise of line-shaped contrails and irregularly shaped ice clouds that originate from them. The warming effect of contrail cirrus is disproportionally large at night, since at daytime the cooling due to the short wave cloud albedo effect acts toward compensating the long wave warming effect. Therefore it has been suggested to restrict air traffic to daytime in order to reduce its climate impact. The potential for reducing the contrail cirrus radiative forcing by shifting air traffic to daytime depends on the diurnal cycle of contrail cirrus coverage which is in turn determined by the diurnal cycle of air traffic and the contrail cirrus lifetimes. Simulations with a global atmospheric general circulation model indicate that the annual mean contrail cirrus coverage may be almost constant over the day even in areas where air traffic is close to zero at night. A conceptual model describing the temporal evolution of contrail cirrus coverage reveals that this is due to the large variability in contrail cirrus lifetimes in combination with the spreading of contrail cirrus. This large variability of lifetimes is consistent with observational evidence but more observations are needed to constrain the contrail lifetime distribution. An idealized mitigation experiment, shifting nighttime flights to daytime, indicates that contrail cirrus radiative forcing is not significantly changed.

Newinger, Christina; Burkhardt, Ulrike

2012-05-01

119

Eielson Air Force Base Operable Unit 2 baseline risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

Operable Unit 2 at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, is one of several operable units characterized by petroleum, oil, and lubricant contamination, and by the presence of organic products floating at the water table, as a result of Air Force operations since the 1940s. The base is approximately 19,270 acres in size, and comprises the areas for military operations and a residential neighborhood for military dependents. Within Operable Unit 2, there are seven source areas. These source areas were grouped together primarily because of the contaminants released and hence are not necessarily in geographical proximity. Source area ST10 includes a surface water body (Hardfill Lake) next to a fuel spill area. The primary constituents of concern for human health include benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX). Monitored data showed these volatile constituents to be present in groundwater wells. The data also showed an elevated level of trace metals in groundwater.

Lewis, R.E.; Jarvis, T.T.; Jarvis, M.R.; Whelan, G.

1994-10-01

120

Air Force Research Laboratory's focused long term challenges  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) mission is to provide support to the Air Force (AF) and the warfighters with an understanding of the science and technology that will form the foundation of future capabilities. AFRL has developed a strategic research and development process that translates the Department of Defense future capability needs into mid-term attributes, described in terms of technology achievements. Specific capabilities, like the delivery of a close-in sensing platform, require technologies from many different disciplines and require aligning priorities for nurturing and developing core competencies. AFRL's strategic vision is built upon the AF Science & Technology (S&T) Vision of Anticipate, Find, Fix, Track, Target, Engage, and Access - Anything, Anywhere, Anytime. In order to realize this vision, AFRL has developed Focused Long Term Challenges (FLTCs) that describe the AF problem space and constitute the AFRL long term S&T planning.

Rose, Leo J.

2008-04-01

121

Coronary heart disease: an expensive Air Force problem.  

PubMed

Death or disability from CHD is a major public health problem that costs the Air Force about $50 million annually. Statistically, 20% of 30,000 pilots in the Air Force could have a significant degree of coronary atherosclerosis. In-flight incapacitation due to "heart attack" is a real possibility. Fortunately, aircraft accidents related to coronary events have been very uncommon. The basic mechanisms leading to the development of CHD, a multifactorial condition, are not fully understood. The significance of various risk factors associated with an increased incidence of CHD are discussed. It is hoped that preventive programs designed to identify, educate, and treat those at high risk will reduce the incidence of premature death and disability due to CHD. Two such programs (HEW's MRFIT and USAF's HEART) are briefly described. The costs, benefits, risks, sensitivity, and predictive value of tests available to detect CHD in asymptomatic individuals are outlined. PMID:7417179

DeHart, R M

1980-09-01

122

Physical work capacity of Bulgarian Air Force pilots.  

PubMed

A thorough study was performed on physical work capacity (PWC) of 135 males from the Bulgarian Air Force, aged 18 to 59 years. VO2max was measured directly by means of maximum cycle ergometry testing. The following mean values were obtained: 2.94, 3.03, 3.18 and 2.78 l.min-1 for the age groups 18-25, 35-40, 41-50 and above 50 years, respectively. The relative VO2max mean values per kg BW for the above age groups were 46.15, 35.89, 39.57 and 34.15 ml.kg-1.min-1, respectively. The obtained data, even though not definitive, helped to develop standards for the evaluation of the physical work capacity of pilots. Comparison of our results with those of Bulgarian and foreign investigators has shown that the PWC of Bulgarian pilots is greater than the PWC of some heavy physical workers. It is similar to the norms of Andersen /1/ and Shvartz and Reibold /2/. In accordance the PWC of Bulgarian pilots below 29 years old and 40-49 years old is greater than the working norms for US Air Force personnel. For unknown reasons, the PWC of pilots 35-40 years old is lower than the generally accepted norms for this age group. Testing of the PWC of air force personnel has two general aeromedical goals--establishment of the cardiovascular fitness level and establishment of a baseline for comparison and improvement of PWC by implementation of physical fitness training programs. In the last few years a thorough study was carried out at the Bulgarian Institute of Aviation Medicine for determination of the PWC of Bulgarian Air Force personnel.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8029529

Nancheva, R; Minkovski, L

1994-01-01

123

Geothermal-resource verification for Air Force bases  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the various types of geothermal energy reviews some legal uncertainties of the resource and then describes a methodology to evaluate geothermal resources for applications to US Air Force bases. Estimates suggest that exploration costs will be $50,000 to $300,000, which, if favorable, would lead to drilling a $500,000 exploration well. Successful identification and development of a geothermal resource could provide all base, fixed system needs with an inexpensive, renewable energy source.

Grant, P.R. Jr.

1981-06-01

124

Air Force research in human sensory feedback for telepresence  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Telepresence operations require high quality information transfer between the human master and the remotely located slave. Present Air Force research focuses on the human aspects of the information needed to complete the control/feedback loop. Work in three key areas of human sensory feedback for manipulation of objects are described. Specific projects in each key area are outlined, including research tools (hardware), planned research, and test results. Nonmanipulative feedback technologies are mentioned to complete the advanced teleoperation discussions.

Julian, Ronald G.

1993-01-01

125

Cooling of Air-cooled Engines by Forced Circulation of Air  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents the results of experiments on aerodynamic fuselages in which an air current is forced into the nose of the fuselage by the action of several fans revolving with the propeller. The air is then guided by special deflectors which cause it to flow along the exhaust pipes and cylinders and then, after having been utilized, pass out through annular ports. This system of cooling worked perfectly at all speeds.

1926-01-01

126

75 FR 32750 - US Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...of Launch Vehicle Systems for the US Air Force'', ``Operating Next-Generation...Unmanned Aircraft Systems for Irregular Warfare'', and ``Next Generation Electronic...the Administrative Assistant of the Air Force, in consultation with the...

2010-06-09

127

78 FR 10608 - David Grant United States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...States Air Force Medical Center Specialty Care Travel Reimbursement Demonstration Project...will increase utilization of the direct care system by selected beneficiaries....

2013-02-14

128

33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560 Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

2012-07-01

129

33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560 Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

2011-07-01

130

33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560 Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

2013-07-01

131

33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560 Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

2010-07-01

132

33 CFR 334.560 - Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted area... DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.560 Banana River at Patrick Air Force Base, Fla.; restricted...

2014-07-01

133

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2011-07-01

134

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2012-07-01

135

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2014-07-01

136

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2010-07-01

137

32 CFR 728.25 - Army and Air Force National Guard personnel.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...to members of the Army and Air Force National Guard who contract a...full-time National Guard duty, (including...from that duty. The authorizing letter...Air Force National Guard unit's commanding...MTFs may perform the requested...

2013-07-01

138

Damage Assessment of Structures an Air Force Office of Scientific Research  

E-print Network

Damage Assessment of Structures an Air Force Office of Scientific Research Structural Mechanics Perspective Victor Giurgiutiu, PhD Air Force Office of Scientific Research Structural Mechanics Program 875 Mechanics program of the Air Force Office of Scientific Research on the damage assessment of structures

Giurgiutiu, Victor

139

78 FR 43184 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Requirements, Headquarters, U.S. Air Force, Vice Admiral Kurt Tidd...James McLaughlin, Commander, 24th Air Force and Commander, Air Forces Cyber, Joint Base San Antonio...the use of and response to cyber warfare, General McLaughlin will...

2013-07-19

140

Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* J. Hansen, M. Sato  

E-print Network

Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* J. Hansen, M. Sato NASA Goddard;Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture* Jim Hansen March 11, 2009 Climate. Air Pollutant Climate Forcings within the Big Climate Picture co-authors or colleagues providing data

Hansen, James E.

141

78 FR 61343 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the...National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...testimonies, site visits, and other data collected to date. Agenda...Commission for a U.S. Air Force structure that--(a) Meets...

2013-10-03

142

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but

W. H. Wolfe; J. E. Michalek; J. C. Miner; A. Rahe; J. Silva; W. F. Thomas; M. B. Lustik; W. D. Grubbs; R. H. Roegner; T. G. Karrison; D. E. Williams

1990-01-01

143

Evaluating Cadet Leadership Positions at the U.S. Air Force Academy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Air Force relies on effective leadership to complete its mission. The U.S. Air Force Academy exists to develop leaders of character for the Air Force through a four-year program. Part of this program involves cadets participating in leadership positions. By exploring nine types of cadet leadership positions, this dissertation aims to…

Didier, Jeremy M.

2012-01-01

144

75 FR 22560 - Federal Advisory Committee; U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Charter Renewal  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...for the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board, and this...for the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Designated...meetings of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board. The Designated...for the planned meeting in question. Dated: April 23,...

2010-04-29

145

78 FR 40446 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-07-05

146

78 FR 58525 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-09-24

147

78 FR 46928 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-08-02

148

78 FR 51175 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-08-20

149

78 FR 46329 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-07-31

150

78 FR 59343 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-09-26

151

78 FR 33394 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-06-04

152

78 FR 40730 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-07-08

153

78 FR 22852 - Establishment of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Establishment of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: DoD. ACTION...charter for the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (hereinafter referred...results of the study. In considering the structure of the Air Force, the Commission...

2013-04-17

154

78 FR 36751 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-06-19

155

78 FR 61342 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-10-03

156

78 FR 43865 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-07-22

157

78 FR 53133 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-08-28

158

78 FR 56219 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force AGENCY: Director of...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force (``the Commission...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-09-12

159

Response of air stagnation frequency to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing  

PubMed Central

Stagnant atmospheric conditions can lead to hazardous air quality by allowing ozone and particulate matter to accumulate and persist in the near-surface environment. By changing atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns, global warming could alter the meteorological factors that regulate air stagnation frequency. We analyze the response of the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) Air Stagnation Index (ASI) to anthropogenically enhanced radiative forcing using global climate model projections of late-21st century climate change (SRES A1B scenario). Our results indicate that the atmospheric conditions over the highly populated, highly industrialized regions of the eastern United States, Mediterranean Europe, and eastern China are particularly sensitive to global warming, with the occurrence of stagnant conditions projected to increase 12-to-25% relative to late-20th century stagnation frequencies (3-18+ days/year). Changes in the position/strength of the polar jet, in the occurrence of light surface winds, and in the number of precipitation-free days all contribute to more frequent late-21st century air mass stagnation over these high-population regions. In addition, we find substantial inter-model spread in the simulated response of stagnation conditions over some regions using either native or bias corrected global climate model simulations, suggesting that changes in the atmospheric circulation and/or the distribution of precipitation represent important sources of uncertainty in the response of air quality to global warming. PMID:23284587

Horton, Daniel E.; Harshvardhan; Diffenbaugh, Noah S.

2012-01-01

160

32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school. 903.6 Section 903.6 National Defense...DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force...

2012-07-01

161

32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school. 903.6 Section 903.6 National Defense...DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force...

2013-07-01

162

32 CFR 903.6 - Reassignment of Air Force members to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...to become cadet candidates at the preparatory school. 903.6 Section 903.6 National Defense...DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE MILITARY TRAINING AND SCHOOLS AIR FORCE ACADEMY PREPARATORY SCHOOL § 903.6 Reassignment of Air Force...

2014-07-01

163

78 FR 78943 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...and reserve component force structures. -- Whether the contribution...increase of reserve component structure for classified mission areas...force mix models using actual data from Integrated Security...

2013-12-27

164

Nano-Satellite Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Abstract NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) is currently developing a new class of satellites called the nano-satellite (nano-sat). A major objective of this development effort is to provide the technology required to enable a constellation of tens to hundreds of nano-satellites to make both remote and in-situ measurements from space. The Nano-sat will be a spacecraft weighing a maximum of 10 kg, including the propellant mass, and producing at least 5 Watts of power to operate the spacecraft. The electronics are required to survive a total radiation dose rate of 100 krads for a mission lifetime of two years. There are many unique challenges that must be met in order to develop the avionics for such a spacecraft. The first challenge is to develop an architecture that will operate on the allotted 5 Watts and meet the diverging requirements of multiple missions. This architecture will need to incorporate a multitude of new advanced microelectronic technologies. The microelectronics developed must be a modular and scalable packaging of technology to solve the problem of developing a solution to both reduce cost and meet the requirements of various missions. This development will utilize the most cost effective approach, whether infusing commercially driven semiconductor devices into spacecraft applications or partnering with industry to design and develop low cost, low power, low mass, and high capacity data processing devices. This paper will discuss the nano-sat architecture and the major technologies that will be developed. The major technologies that will be covered include: (1) Light weight Low Power Electronics Packaging, (2) Radiation Hard/Tolerant, Low Power Processing Platforms, (3) High capacity Low Power Memory Systems (4) Radiation Hard reconfiguragble field programmable gate array (rFPGA)

Culver, Harry

1999-01-01

165

Eielson Air Force Base OU-1 baseline risk assessment  

SciTech Connect

This Baseline Risk Assessment report is the second volume in a set of three volumes for operable Unit 1 (OU-1). The companion documents contain the Remedial Investigation and the Feasibility Study. Operable Unit 1 (OU-1) is one of several groups of hazardous waste sites located at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB) near Fairbanks, Alaska. The operable units at Eielson are typically characterized by petroleum, oil, lubricant/solvent contamination, and by the presence of organics floating at the water table. In 1989 and 1990, firms under contract to the Air Force conducted field studies to gather information about the extent of chemical contamination in soil, groundwater, and soil air pore space (soil gas) at the site. This report documents the results of a baseline risk assessment, which uses the 1989 and 1991 site characterization database to quantify the potential human health risk associated with past Base industrial activities in the vicinity of OU-1. Background data collected in 1992 were also used in the preparation of this report.

Jarvis, M.T.; Jarvis, T.T.; Van Houten, N.C.; Lewis, R.E.

1993-09-01

166

A decade of measured greenhouse forcings from AIRS  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Increased greenhouse gasses reduce the transmission of Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) to space along spectral absorption lines eventually causing the Earth's temperature to rise in order to preserve energy equilibrium. This greenhouse forcing effect can be directly observed in the Outgoing Longwave Spectra (OLS) from space-borne infrared instruments with sufficiently high resolving power 3, 8. In 2001, Harries et. al observed significant increases in greenhouse forcings by direct inter-comparison of the IRIS spectra 1970 and the IMG spectra 19978. We have extended this effort by measuring the annual rate of change of AIRS all-sky Outgoing Longwave Spectra (OLS) with respect to greenhouse forcings. Our calculations make use of a 2°x2° degree monthly gridded Brightness Temperature (BT) product. Decadal trends for AIRS spectra from 2002-2012 indicate continued decrease of -0.06 K/yr in the trend of CO2 BT (700cm-1 and 2250cm-1), a decrease of -0.04 K/yr of O3 BT (1050 cm-1), and a decrease of -0.03 K/yr of the CH4 BT (1300cm-1). Observed decreases in BT trends are expected due to ten years of increased greenhouse gasses even though global surface temperatures have not risen substantially over the last decade.

Chapman, D.; Nguyen, P.; Halem, M.

2013-05-01

167

Why social network analysis is important to Air Force applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Social network analysis is a powerful tool used to help analysts discover relationships amongst groups of people as well as individuals. It is the mathematics behind such social networks as Facebook and MySpace. These networks alone cause a huge amount of data to be generated and the issue is only compounded once one adds in other electronic media such as e-mails and twitter. In this paper we outline the basics of social network analysis and how it may be used in current and future Air Force applications.

Havig, Paul R.; McIntire, John P.; Geiselman, Eric; Mohd-Zaid, Fairul

2012-06-01

168

Vandenberg Air Force Base Pressure Gradient Wind Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Warning category winds can adversely impact day-to-day space lift operations at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB) in California. NASA's Launch Services Program and other programs at VAFB use wind forecasts issued by the 30 Operational Support Squadron Weather Flight (30 OSSWF) to determine if they need to limit activities or protect property such as a launch vehicle. The 30 OSSWF tasked the AMU to develop an automated Excel graphical user interface that includes pressure gradient thresholds between specific observing stations under different synoptic regimes to aid forecasters when issuing wind warnings. This required the AMU to determine if relationships between the variables existed.

Shafer, Jaclyn A.

2013-01-01

169

Avionics Maintenance Technology Program Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This program guide presents the avionics maintenance technology curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The general information section contains the following for both the diploma program and the associate degree program: purpose and objectives; program description, including admissions, typical job titles, and accreditation and…

Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

170

Femoral neck stress fracture in Air Force basic trainees.  

PubMed

Stress fractures are a common overuse problem among military trainees resulting in preventable morbidity, prolonged training, and long-term disability following military service. Femoral neck stress fractures (FNSFs) account for 2% of all stress fractures but result in disproportionate burden in terms of cost and convalescence. The purpose of this study was to describe and investigate FNSF in U.S. Air Force basic trainees and to present new data on risks factors for developing FNSF. We examined 47 cases of FNSF occurring in Air Force basic trainees between 2008 and 2011 and 94 controls using a matched case-control model. Analysis with t tests and conditional logistic regression found the risk of FNSF was not associated with body mass index or abdominal circumference. Female gender (p < 0.001) and slower run time significantly increased risk of FNSF (1.49 OR, p < 0.001; 95% CI 1.19-1.86). A greater number of push-up and sit-up repetitions significantly reduced risk of FNSF (0.55 OR, p = 0.03; 95% CI 0.32-0.93; 0.62 OR, p = 0.04; 95% CI 0.4-0.98) for females. In this study body mass index was not correlated with FNSF risk; however, physical fitness level on arrival to training and female gender were significantly associated with risk of FNSF. PMID:24402986

Kupferer, Kevin R; Bush, David M; Cornell, John E; Lawrence, Valerie A; Alexander, Jeffrey L; Ramos, Rosemarie G; Curtis, Denice

2014-01-01

171

Annual Risk of Tuberculosis Infection in Hellenic Air Force Recruits  

PubMed Central

Background: The annual risk of Tuberculosis infection (ARTI) is a key indicator in epidemiology, of the extent of transmission in a community. There have been several suggested methods in order to evaluate the prevalence of Tuberculosis infection using tuberculin skin data. This survey estimates the ARTI in young Hellenic air force recruits. The effect of BCG vaccination has also been investigated. Materials and Methods: During the period November 2006-November 2007 tuberculin skin tests were conducted to estimate the prevalence of mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and also to determine the ARTI. Tuberculin PPD-RT 23, dose 2 IU was used in 7.492 Greek air force military recruits with a mean age of 23.57 years. All recruits were examined for previous bacill Calmette-Guérin vaccination through BCG scar. A vast number of personal, epidemiological significance, data of the participants was collected. Results: The ARTI was 0.2%, in those who were not previously BCG vaccinated; this was derived from a tuberculin skin test cut-off point of 10 mm. There were not any statistically significant differences, neither between urban and rural population concerning the positivity of the tuberculin skin test, nor among the population in recent contact with immigrants from high-incidence countries. Conclusion: The estimated ARTI among non BCG vaccinated young Greek men is 0.2%. PMID:24459536

Garyfalia, Vlachou; Irini, Gerogianni; Vasilios, Skoufaras; Konstantinos, Gourgoulianis

2013-01-01

172

Air compliance through pollution prevention at Air Force Materiel Command facilities.  

SciTech Connect

Options for air compliance through pollution prevention (P2) have been identified at 14 facilities of the US Air Force Materiel Command, ranging from depots with significant light industrial activity to laboratories. Previous P2 efforts concentrated on reducing hazardous and solid wastes, with any reduction in air impacts generally being a collateral benefit. This work focused on reducing air emissions and air compliance vulnerabilities. P2 options were identified in three stages. First, potentially applicable P2 options were identified from Internet and published information. Attention was given to identifying the types of sources to which an option could be applied, the option's state of development, and constraints that could limit its application. Traditional P2 options involving technology or equipment changes and material substitution were considered. In addition, newer approaches based on administrative ''controls'' were considered. These included inserting P2 into operating permits in exchange for administrative relief, privatization, derating boilers, and reducing an installation's potential to emit and compliance vulnerability by separating sources not under the Air Force's ''common control.'' Next, criteria and toxic emissions inventories by source category were prepared from inventory data supplied by facilities. The major problems at this stage were differences in the levels of detail provided by facilities and in the categories used by different installations. Emitting categories were matched to P2 option categories to identify candidate options. Candidates were screened to account for local regulations and technical information about sources in the inventories. When possible, emission reductions were estimated to help facility personnel prioritize options. Some options identified are being actively pursued by facilities to determine their site-specific feasibility. Although much work has been done to implement material substitution programs, this work indicates that different priorities and additional opportunities might result from using air emissions and compliance vulnerability as driving metrics.

Kolpa, R.; Ryckman, S.J. Jr.; Smith, A.E.

1999-03-19

173

Integrated Training System for Air Force On-the-Job Training: Specification Development. Final Technical Paper.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Air Force conducted this study for two purposes: (1) to define the system of Air Force On-the-Job Training (OJT); and (2) to prepare a set of functional specifications for an integrated, base-level OJT evaluation and management system with linkages to the Major Commands and Air Staff. The study was conducted in four phases. During the first…

Carson, Stuart B.; And Others.

174

78 FR 75334 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...in order to make the future structure of the U.S. Air Force more...stakeholder interests in the future structure of the U.S. Air Force and...preference for any particular force structure as stated in this notice...Program Evaluation. Classified data will also be [[Page...

2013-12-11

175

78 FR 37798 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...debates that affected the force structure outcome from the Fiscal Year...6. Operational readiness data from Status of Resources Training...National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force was...

2013-06-24

176

Why Is Outdoor Recreation Worth $30 Million to the Air Force?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Air Force outdoor recreation program evolved from the Army "rest and recreation" areas set up during World War II. During the last decade, financial pressures and eroding support for recreation programs forced a reexamination of the objectives of such programs. Starting with the premise that the Air Force was the main customer and that…

Heeg, Phillip

177

Air emissions inventory guidance document for stationary sources at Air Force installations. Final report, December 1997--April 99  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a guidance document for the preparation of stationary source air emissions inventories at US Air Force installations. Air emissions inventories are prepared at Air Force installations to comply with Federal, State, and local air quality regulatory requirements. Inventories are also used in the implementation of various environmental programs, including pollution prevention opportunities, emissions trading, risk assessments, and environmental auditing. In the past, inventories have been prepared at Air Force installations using a wide variety of different procedures and formats. The purpose of this document is to provide a uniform and logical approach for preparing these inventories. This approach will enhance the Air Force`s ability to utilize inventory data, as well as eliminate many of the common errors typically found in air emissions inventories. The report provides recommended methodologies for calculating both actual and potential emissions from the most common types of stationary sources (emission units/processes) found at Air Force installations. The report also contains the latest Environmental Protection Agency emission factors associated with these source types. The pollutants addressed in this report include the criteria pollutants, hazardous air pollutants, and ozone-depleting substances.

O`Brien, R.J.; Blasch, K.W.; Johnson, G.T.

1999-05-01

178

Air Force accepts first OTH-B radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The East Coast over-the-horizon backscatter (OTH-B) radar system, officially accepted by the U.S. Air Force, is described. The system's range is almost 10 times that of conventional line-of-sight radars, which are limited by the curvative of the earth. The OTH-B radar increases threat warning times from minutes to hours, and covers a much wider area - over 4.5 million square miles - than conventional systems. The system includes an operations center, a transmitter site, and a 4980-ft receiver array with 246 monopole receiver elements about 100 miles away. The transmit and receive sites are separated to allow continuous operation of the transmitters without interference in the receivers. Communications among the sites are conducted by both wideband and narrowband troposcatter radio and fiber-optic links. Radar operation is described, and plans for the future sites are outlined.

Schneiderman, Ron

1990-05-01

179

Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Air Force facility  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Space Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (SNTP) Program is an initiative within the US Air Force to acquire and validate advanced technologies that could be used to sustain superior capabilities in the area or space nuclear propulsion. The SNTP Program has a specific objective of demonstrating the feasibility of the particle bed reactor (PBR) concept. The term PIPET refers to a project within the SNTP Program responsible for the design, development, construction, and operation of a test reactor facility, including all support systems, that is intended to resolve program technology issues and test goals. A nuclear test facility has been designed that meets SNTP Facility requirements. The design approach taken to meet SNTP requirements has resulted in a nuclear test facility that should encompass a wide range of nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) test requirements that may be generated within other programs. The SNTP PIPET project is actively working with DOE and NASA to assess this possibility.

Beck, David F.

1993-01-01

180

Air Force Satellite Control Network and SDI development  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Air Force Satellite Control Network (AFSCN) represents a military, worldwide network of control centers and remote tracking sites (RTS). A relatively large and growing constellation of DOD satellites is supported. The near term and long term plans for the AFSCN are discussed, taking into account also the impact of the Space Defense Initiative (SDI) on the AFSCN. It is pointed out that the SDI adds a new dimension to the support provided by the AFSCN to the DOD satellites, because some SDI scenarios being considered include many more satellite platforms, each containing multiple kinetic energy weapons. Space-ground link sites are discussed along with AFSCN control sites, and communication between RTS and control centers. Attention is given to changing roles and responsibilities, the Satellite Test Center (STC) as an excellent site for the R and D phase of SDI development, and an operational concept for a highly proliferated weapons platforms architecture, and goals of developing more survivable satellite systems.

Bleier, T.

181

Nanotechnology strategic plan for the U.S. Air Force  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

I will review recent advances in DoD nanoscience and technology (NST) at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) in the areas of nano-materials, nano-electronics, and nano-energetics. NST will profoundly change all critical aspects of maintaining a technologically superior national defense capability. In this talk, I will focus on programmatic priorities for AFRL basic and applied R&D in the seven selected priority areas that comprise the AFRL Strategic Nanotech Plan. The goal of this plan is to focus, prioritize and guide future AF funding in nanotechnology. The selected topics include: tailorable dielectrics, reconfigurable optical response materials, adaptive structural materials, quantum confined optical sensors and sources, nanotechnology for RF, as well as several cross-cutting topics such as self-assembly, interfaces, and modeling and simulation.

Freund, Minoru M.

2004-12-01

182

Wastewater pretreatment at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

SciTech Connect

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida provides berthing services for US military ships and submarines including the storage and pretreatment of various types of onboard wastewater. CCAFS required an upgrade to the current pretreatment processes to adequately treat shipboard, bilge and missile tube wastewaters prior to discharge to a new base sewage treatment plant. A wastewater characterization showed that the nature of the onboard wastewaters is quite unique and highly variable. Due to the unusual characteristics of these wastewaters, treatability testing was performed on representative samples of these wastewater to simulate pH adjustment, gravity oil separation and dissolved air flotation (DAF). Based on the results of that readability tests and other design requirements, three pretreatment systems were designed, one for each type of wastewater. Due to the location and the high profile nature of the project, several special design issues were involved including special aesthetics requirements, environmental restrictions, special clear zones from munitions storage and multiple review agencies. The project was completed within the required schedule and budget constraints.

Garrett, D.W.; Zanoni, P.D.

1999-07-01

183

Air Force's First C-17 Flies into Retirement - Duration: 1:01.  

NASA Video Gallery

The U.S. Air Force has retired its first C-17 transport after 21 years as a flight test aircraft and use in joint NASA-USAF propulsion research. NASA research pilot Frank Batteas, who was an Air Fo...

184

2013 Data Update: Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States  

E-print Network

This document is an update to MIT Small Community Air Service White Paper No. 1—Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States1. This report provides updated analysis and data appendices ...

Wittman, M.D.

2014-05-20

185

Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States  

E-print Network

This report, Trends and Market Forces Shaping Small Community Air Service in the United States, is the first in a series of papers written under the umbrella of the MIT Small Community Air Service White Paper series. The ...

Wittman, Michael D.

2013-05-07

186

Avionics wind tunnel laboratory interface development  

Microsoft Academic Search

An innovative concept for in-house laboratory research, test and evaluation is being developed within the Avionics Directorate of Wright Laboratory. This concept involves placing advanced avionics hardware and software technologies into realistic testing environments analogous to placing test structures in a wind tunnel environment; hence, the title Avionics Wind Tunnel. These environments are generated, controlled and coordinated through pilot-in-the-loop interactions

D. Howell; J. Woodyard; J. Wiseman; R. Clericus

1993-01-01

187

Multifiber optical connectors for avionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Until now, there has been no reasonably priced high-density avionics fiber optic connector. AVMACTM connector assemblies, designed to meet this need, consist of Berg AVMAC connectors (F/O contacts), Gore ribbon cable, and HiRelcoTM special self-locking plugs and receptacles. Berg Electronics' MACII multifiber array connector has been used in the telecommunications industry for over 10 years. The 18-fiber version was modified to meet the avionics environment, by using high temperature plastic and epoxy. Also, modified cable assembly techniques were developed for the special cable used. W.L. Core and Associates designed and manufactured the high temperature ruggedized ribbon cable, using patented GORE-TEXTM ribbon buffer to protect the 18 polyimide coated fibers in the harsh environments specified for avionics applications. New materials were introduced to the commercial Gore ribbon design to meet the McDonnell Douglas Aerospace temperature specifications. The HiRel connector design incorporates the optical fiber ribbon contact and cable assembly into a modified close tolerance Mil-C-83723 connection system to meet the environmental requirements and withstand the high vibration of modern aircraft, and also provide an environmental seal and strain relief. The ability to assemble the connector around a pre-terminated optical link is a key feature, which minimizes assembly and maintenance time over cable assembly life. McDonnell Douglas Aerospace is testing AVMAC qualification cables.

Lubowe, Anthony G.; Million, Troy P.; Sayegh, Emile G.; Baumann, Fred

1996-10-01

188

Noxious Weed Monitoring at the US Air Force Academy-Year 2 Results  

E-print Network

Noxious Weed Monitoring at the US Air Force Academy- Year 2 Results June 26, 2007 Prepared For: U.......................................................................... 7 RESULTS........................................................................ 10 OTHER RESULTS

189

Optimisation d'un systeme d'antigivrage a air chaud pour aile d'avion basee sur la methode du krigeage dual  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The aim of this thesis is to apply a new methodology of optimization based on the dual kriging method to a hot air anti-icing system for airplanes wings. The anti-icing system consists of a piccolo tube placed along the span of the wing, in the leading edge area. The hot air is injected through small nozzles and impact on the inner wall of the wing. The objective function targeted by the optimization is the effectiveness of the heat transfer of the anti-icing system. This heat transfer effectiveness is regarded as being the ratio of the wing inner wall heat flux and the sum of all the nozzles heat flows of the anti-icing system. The methodology adopted to optimize an anti-icing system consists of three steps. The first step is to build a database according to the Box-Behnken design of experiment. The objective function is then modeled by the dual kriging method and finally the SQP optimization method is applied. One of the advantages of the dual kriging is that the model passes exactly through all measurement points, but it can also take into account the numerical errors and deviates from these points. Moreover, the kriged model can be updated at each new numerical simulation. These features of the dual kriging seem to give a good tool to build the response surfaces necessary for the anti-icing system optimization. The first chapter presents a literature review and the optimization problem related to the antiicing system. Chapters two, three and four present the three articles submitted. Chapter two is devoted to the validation of CFD codes used to perform the numerical simulations of an anti-icing system and to compute the conjugate heat transfer (CHT). The CHT is calculated by taking into account the external flow around the airfoil, the internal flow in the anti-icing system, and the conduction in the wing. The heat transfer coefficient at the external skin of the airfoil is almost the same if the external flow is taken into account or no. Therefore, only the internal flow is considered in the following articles. Chapter three concerns the design of experiment (DoE) matrix and the construction of a second order parametric model. The objective function model is based on the Box-Behnken DoE. The parametric model that results from numerical simulations serve for comparison with the kriged model of the third article. Chapter four applies the dual kriging method to model the heat transfer effectiveness of the anti-icing system and use the model for optimization. The possibility of including the numerical error in the results is explored. For the test cases studied, introduction of the numerical error in the optimization process does not improve the results. Dual kriging method is also used to model the distribution of the local heat flux and to interpolate the local heat flux corresponding to the optimal design of the anti-icing system.

Hannat, Ridha

190

PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO JP-8 JET FUEL VAPORS AND EXHAUST AT AIR FORCE BASES  

EPA Science Inventory

JP-8 jet fuel (similar to commercial/international jet A-1 fuel) is the standard military fuel for all types of vehicles, including the U.S. Air Force aircraft inventory. As such, JP-8 presents the most common chemical exposure in the Air Force, particularly for flight and gro...

191

DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF STRUCTURES AN AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH  

E-print Network

in assuring the safety and operational readiness of Air Force fleet. The current fleet has many aging aircraft1 DAMAGE ASSESSMENT OF STRUCTURES AN AIR FORCE OFFICE OF SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH STRUCTURAL MECHANICS statement A: approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited Keywords: Damage assessment, aging

Giurgiutiu, Victor

192

Air Force Institute of Technology, Civil Engineering School: Environmental Protection Course.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains information assembled by the Civil Engineering School to meet the initial requirements of NEPA 1969 and Executive Orders which required the Air Force to implement an effective environmental protection program. This course presents the various aspects of Air Force environmental protection problems which military personnel…

Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. School of Engineering.

193

75 FR 30689 - Modification of Class C Airspace; Beale Air Force Base, CA  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Modification of Class C Airspace; Beale Air Force Base, CA AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration...legal description of the Beale Air Force Base (AFB), CA, Class C airspace area by...10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1...

2010-06-02

194

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2011-07-01

195

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2013-07-01

196

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2014-07-01

197

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2012-07-01

198

33 CFR 165.768 - Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. 165.768 Section 165...Security Zone; MacDill Air Force Base, Tampa Bay, FL. (a) Location. ...of this title. All waters within Tampa Bay, Florida in the vicinity of...

2010-07-01

199

On-site fuel cell energy systems: The US Air Force Field Test Demonstration Plan  

Microsoft Academic Search

The large scale application of fuel cell energy systems, electrochemical energy conversion devices, to facility operations, could result in significant benefits to the public and to the U.S. Air Force. This report summarizes the advantages and potential applications of fuel cells on an Air Force base, highlights the pertinent operational characteristics of a fuel cell, identifies the ongoing governmental and

M. A. Aimone

1980-01-01

200

The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test: Validity, Fairness, and Bias. Technical Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Air Force has long recognized the importance of selecting the most qualified officers possible. For more than 60 years, it has relied on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) as one measure of those qualifications. A variety of concerns have been raised about whether the AFOQT is biased, too expensive, or even valid for predicting…

Hardison, Chaitra M.; Sims, Carra S.; Wong, Eunice C.

2010-01-01

201

Paleo-channel deposition of natural uranium at a US Air Force landfill  

Microsoft Academic Search

Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The US Air Force sought to identify the source of radionuclides that were detected in groundwater surrounding a closed solid waste landfill at the former Lowry Air Force Base in Denver, Colorado, USA. Gross alpha, gross beta, and uranium levels in groundwater were thought to exceed US drinking water standards

Carl Young; Joseph Weismann; Daniel Caputo

2007-01-01

202

Sitewide feasibility study Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The Sitewide Feasibility Study (FS) is required under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), the National Contingency Plan (NCP), and the Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) for Eielson Air Force Base (AFB). It is based on findings presented in the Sitewide Remedial Investigation (RI) Report (USAF 1995a), and the Sitewide Baseline Risk Assessment (BLRA) Report (USAF 1995b). Under the FFA, 64 potential source areas were placed in one of six operable units, based on similar contaminant and environmental characteristics, or were included for evaluation under a Source Evaluation Report (SER). The sitewide RI was directed at contamination that was not confined to an operable unit (OU) or SER source area. The objectives of the sitewide RI were to: Provide information about site characteristics to support individual OU RI/FS efforts and the sitewide RI/FS, including site hydrogeology and determination of background soil and groundwater characteristics; identify and characterize contamination that is not confined or attributable to a specific source area through sitewide monitoring of groundwater and surface water; evaluate cumulative risks to human health and the environment from contamination on a sitewide basis; and provide a mechanism for continued cohesive sitewide monitoring.

Last, G.V.; Lanigan, D.C.; Josephson, G.B.; Bagaasen, L.M.

1995-09-01

203

Capillary forces between sediment particles and an air-water interface.  

PubMed

In the vadose zone, air-water interfaces play an important role in particle fate and transport, as particles can attach to the air-water interfaces by action of capillary forces. This attachment can either retard or enhance the movement of particles, depending on whether the air-water interfaces are stationary or mobile. Here we use three standard PTFE particles (sphere, circular cylinder, and tent) and seven natural mineral particles (basalt, granite, hematite, magnetite, mica, milky quartz, and clear quartz) to quantify the capillary forces between an air-water interface and the different particles. Capillary forces were determined experimentally using tensiometry, and theoretically assuming volume-equivalent spherical, ellipsoidal, and circular cylinder shapes. We experimentally distinguished between the maximum capillary force and the snap-off force when the air-water interface detaches from the particle. Theoretical and experimental values of capillary forces were of similar order of magnitude. The sphere gave the smallest theoretical capillary force, and the circular cylinder had the largest force due to pinning of the air-water interface. Pinning was less pronounced for natural particles when compared to the circular cylinder. Ellipsoids gave the best agreement with measured forces, suggesting that this shape can provide a reasonable estimation of capillary forces for many natural particles. PMID:22423648

Chatterjee, Nirmalya; Lapin, Sergey; Flury, Markus

2012-04-17

204

Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

Smith, Wayne D.

1989-01-01

205

Effect of inlet flow distortions on fan performance in forced draught air-cooled heat exchangers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forced flow air-cooled heat exchangers (ACHEs) as found in the petro-chemical, process and power industries use fans arranged in single or multiple fan rows to force air over finned tube bundles. Any flow disturvances or distortions experienced at the inlets of these fans tend to reduce the effectiveness of the ACHE.The reduction of the air flow rate through ACHE models

C. A. Salta; D. G. Kröger

1995-01-01

206

Ozone air quality and radiative forcing consequences of changes in ozone precursor emissions  

E-print Network

Ozone air quality and radiative forcing consequences of changes in ozone precursor emissions J; published 27 March 2007. [1] Changes in emissions of ozone (O3) precursors affect both air quality. Fiore, V. Naik, L. W. Horowitz, M. D. Schwarzkopf, and D. L. Mauzerall (2007), Ozone air quality

Mauzerall, Denise

207

SR-71B - in Flight - View from Air Force Tanker  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This look-down view shows NASA 831, an SR-71B flown by Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, as it cruises over the Mojave Desert. The photo was from an Air Force refueling tanker taken on a 1997 mission. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This aircraft was returned to the USAF inventory and was the first aircraft reactivated for USAF reconnaissance purposes

1997-01-01

208

Relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Scores and Success in Air Weapons Controller Training. Interim Report for the Period November 1982-February 1984.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This project investigated the relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) composite scores and student performance in Air Force air weapons controller training. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of using AFOQT scores as one selection criteria for entry to the air weapons controller field. An analysis of…

Finegold, Lawrence S.; Rogers, Deborah

209

An avionics scenario and command model description for Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper presents a description of a model for a space vehicle operational scenario and the commands for avionics. This model will be used in developing a dynamic architecture simulation model using the Statemate CASE tool for validation of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA has been proposed as an avionics architecture standard to NASA through its Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group (SATWG) and has been accepted by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) for conversion into an SAE Avionics Standard. This architecture was developed for the Flight Data Systems Division (FDSD) of the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) by the Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Company (LESC), Houston, Texas. This SGOAA includes a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing external and internal hardware architecture, and a nine class model of interfaces. The SGOAA is both scalable and recursive and can be applied to any hierarchical level of hardware/software processing systems.

Stovall, John R.; Wray, Richard B.

1994-01-01

210

The importance of the diurnal and annual cycle of air traffic for contrail radiative forcing.  

PubMed

Air traffic condensation trails, or contrails, are believed to have a net atmospheric warming effect, although one that is currently small compared to that induced by other sources of human emissions. However, the comparably large growth rate of air traffic requires an improved understanding of the resulting impact of aircraft radiative forcing on climate. Contrails have an effect on the Earth's energy balance similar to that of high thin ice clouds. Their trapping of outgoing longwave radiation emitted by the Earth and atmosphere (positive radiative forcing) is partly compensated by their reflection of incoming solar radiation (negative radiative forcing). On average, the longwave effect dominates and the net contrail radiative forcing is believed to be positive. Over daily and annual timescales, varying levels of air traffic, meteorological conditions, and solar insolation influence the net forcing effect of contrails. Here we determine the factors most important for contrail climate forcing using a sophisticated radiative transfer model for a site in southeast England, located in the entrance to the North Atlantic flight corridor. We find that night-time flights during winter (December to February) are responsible for most of the contrail radiative forcing. Night flights account for only 25 per cent of daily air traffic, but contribute 60 to 80 per cent of the contrail forcing. Further, winter flights account for only 22 per cent of annual air traffic, but contribute half of the annual mean forcing. These results suggest that flight rescheduling could help to minimize the climate impact of aviation. PMID:16778887

Stuber, Nicola; Forster, Piers; Rädel, Gaby; Shine, Keith

2006-06-15

211

Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA): Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A space generic open avionics architecture created for NASA is described. It will serve as the basis for entities in spacecraft core avionics, capable of being tailored by NASA for future space program avionics ranging from small vehicles such as Moon ascent/descent vehicles to large ones such as Mars transfer vehicles or orbiting stations. The standard consists of: (1) a system architecture; (2) a generic processing hardware architecture; (3) a six class architecture interface model; (4) a system services functional subsystem architectural model; and (5) an operations control functional subsystem architectural model.

Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

1992-01-01

212

Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 1: Investigation report  

SciTech Connect

This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations.

Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Hau, J. [and others

1995-08-01

213

Flying knights or Flying scientists? a cognitive history of the US Air Force Fighter Pilot in air-to-air combat, 1950-1980  

E-print Network

US Air Force fighter aircraft underwent a remarkable transformation in the period from 1950 to 1980. Whereas the lone fighter pilots of earlier fame relied on the power of their eyesight, the finesse of their piloting ...

Fino, Steven A. (Steven Andrew)

2014-01-01

214

HumanWildlife Conflicts 3(2):199207, Fall 2009 A decade of U.S. Air Force bat strikes  

E-print Network

.S. Air Force, Air Force Safety Center, Bird/Wildlife Aircraft Strike Haz- ard Team, 9700 G Avenue SE were reported to the U.S. Air Force (USAF) Safety Center by aircraft personnel or ground crew and sent for identification. Key words: aircraft, altitude, bat, Chiroptera, human­wildlife conflicts, migration, safety

215

77 FR 33202 - Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force Modernizations and Enhancement...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Statement AGENCY: The United States Air Force, DoD. ACTION: Notification...on behalf of the U.S. Air Force and U.S. Army is issuing...All substantive comments on the Draft EIS received during the public...Henry Williams Jr., Acting Air Force Federal Register...

2012-06-05

216

77 FR 30509 - Notice To Extend Public Comment Period for United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...SUMMARY: The U.S. Air Force is issuing this notice...later than June 4, 2012. The Air Force has extended the deadline...All substantive comments on the Draft EIS received during the public...Williams Jr., DAF, Acting Air Force Federal Register...

2012-05-23

217

78 FR 63452 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force; Correction to Meetings of...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force; Correction to Meetings...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force on October 24, 2013...Officer, National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force, 1950 Defense...

2013-10-24

218

78 FR 47675 - Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force; Cancellation of August 6...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force; Cancellation of August...meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force. Under the provisions...announces that the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force meeting scheduled...

2013-08-06

219

SR-71 Tail #844 Landing at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

With distinctive heat waves trailing behind its engines, NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's SR-71A, tail number 844, lands at the Edwards AFB runway after a 1996 flight. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990 through 1994, Dryden also had another 'A' model, NASA 832, military serial 61-7971. This aircraft was returned to the USAF inventory and was the first aircraft reactivated for USAF reconnaissance purposes in 1995. It has since returned to Dryden along

1996-01-01

220

Avionics and controls research and technology  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The workshop provided a forum for industry and universities to discuss the state-of-the-art, identify the technology needs and opportunities, and describe the role of NASA in avionics and controls research.

Rediess, H. A. (editor); Mciver, D. E. (editor)

1979-01-01

221

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Electric Substation, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

222

78 FR 13329 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Cadet Focus Group, an Upperclassmen Cadet Focus Group, an Athletic Department Update, a Superintendent's Update, a Character...this BoV meeting, contact Capt Bobby Hale, Accessions and Training Division, AF/A1PT, 1040 Air Force Pentagon,...

2013-02-27

223

TEMPORAL GEOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF THE FT-2-PLUME AT THE WURTSMITH AIR FORCE BASE, OSCODA, MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the Subsurface cont...

224

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Satellite Communications Terminal, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

225

77 FR 22770 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board; Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...surveillance, and reconnaissance data collection and exploitation; ensuring cyber situational awareness for commanders; and extended use of Air Force Space Command space-based sensors. In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and...

2012-04-17

226

Temporal Geophysical Investigations of the FT-2-Plume at the Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan  

EPA Science Inventory

The decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) facility has been the focus of several geophysical investigations. After several decades of fire training exercises, significant amounts of hydrocarbons and some solvents seeped into the subsurface cont...

227

75 FR 66743 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Fix USAFA'' initiative to renovate aging infrastructure; an overview of Academy science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and cyber programs; status of Congressional nomination outreach program; and an update on the Air Force Academy...

2010-10-29

228

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

Not Available

1991-10-01

229

Complexity within the Air Force acquisition system gaining insight from a theory of collapse  

E-print Network

Joseph Tainter's theory of societal collapse is applied in an examination of the U.S. Air Force's aircraft acquisition system in order to gain insight into the enterprise's lagging performance. Theories of collapse at both ...

Marticello, Daniel Nicholas, Jr

2012-01-01

230

Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S8, Launch ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Dyess Air Force Base, Atlas F Missle Site S-8, Launch Control Center (LCC), Approximately 3 miles east of Winters, 500 feet southwest of Highway 17700, northwest of Launch Facility, Winters, Runnels County, TX

231

Noxious Weed Survey of the U.S. Air Force Academy and  

E-print Network

Noxious Weed Survey of the U.S. Air Force Academy and Farish Outdoor Recreation Area Colorado ....................................................................................... 9 WEED MAPPING RATIONALE FOR SUGGESTED MANAGEMENT PRIORITIES IN TABLE 3............................ 13 NOXIOUS WEED STATUS

232

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This report contains information related to the sampling and chemical analysis of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of a field investigation of ground water contamination.

Not Available

1992-03-01

233

NATURAL ATTENUATION OF FUEL HYDROCARBONS AT MULTIPLE AIR FORCE BASE DEMONSTRATION SITES: SYMPOSIUM/ CONFERENCE  

EPA Science Inventory

NRMRL-ADA-01241 Kampbell*, D.H., Hanson, Jerry E., Henry, BM, and Hicks, John R. "Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbons at Multiple Air Force Base Demonstration Sites." In: AEHS Contaminated Soil ...

234

N zero gravity, aboard the space shuttle Columbia's upcoming flight, Air Force Colonel  

E-print Network

N zero gravity, aboard the space shuttle Columbia's upcoming flight, Air Force Colonel Ilan Ramon. By comparing the behavior of the genetically altered cells in space and on earth, Prof. Gazit hopes to discover

Linial, Michal

235

QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for ...

236

QUALITY MANAGEMENT DURING SELECTION OF TECHNOLOGIES; EXAMPLE SITE MARCH AIR FORCE BASE, USA  

EPA Science Inventory

This paper describes the remedial approach, organizational structure and key elements facilitating effective and efficient remediation of contaminated sites at March Air Force Base (AFB), California. The U.S. implementation and quality assurance approach to site remediation for a...

237

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry PhasedArray Warning ...  

Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

Beale Air Force Base, Perimeter Acquisition Vehicle Entry Phased-Array Warning System, Civil Engineering Storage Building, End of Spencer Paul Road, north of Warren Shingle Road (14th Street), Marysville, Yuba County, CA

238

Avionics Simulation, Development and Software Engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

During this reporting period, all technical responsibilities were accomplished as planned. A close working relationship was maintained with personnel of the MSFC Avionics Department Software Group (ED14), the MSFC EXPRESS Project Office (FD31), and the Huntsville Boeing Company. Accomplishments included: performing special tasks; supporting Software Review Board (SRB), Avionics Test Bed (ATB), and EXPRESS Software Control Panel (ESCP) activities; participating in technical meetings; and coordinating issues between the Boeing Company and the MSFC Project Office.

2002-01-01

239

Avionics Box Cold Plate Damage Prevention  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Over the years there have been several occurrences of damage to Space Shuttle Orbiter cold plates during removal and replacement of avionics boxes. Thus a process improvement team was put together to determine ways to prevent these kinds of damage. From this effort there were many solutions including, protective covers, training, and improved operations instructions. The focus of this paper is to explain the cold plate damage problem and the corrective actions for preventing future damage to aerospace avionics cold plate designs.

Stambolian, Damon; Larcher, Steven; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald

2011-01-01

240

Microsatellite based, on-orbit servicing work at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

On-orbit servicing can dramatically reduce the life cycle cost, and increase the utility, of expensive space assets. However, previous servicing attempts have generally been too large, complex, and expensive to be effective. Newer, streamlined approaches, such as the Air Force's Modular On-orbit Servicing (MOS) concept, might make on-orbit servicing feasible. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) is developing many of

Richard W. Madison; Kirtland AFB

2000-01-01

241

Small and Microthruster Propulsion Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Clusters of satellites flying in cooperative formation require small and precise thruster operations to maintain formation integrity. Satellites in the 100-kg size class benefit from small thrusters for primary propulsion and micropropulsion for precision positioning and attitude control. A review of the research and development of small and micropropulsion thrusters at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB is presented with an emphasis on the propulsion package in development for the Air Force Research Laboratory TechSat21 flight in 2003.

Dulligan, Michael; Gulczinski, Frank; Spanjers, Greg

2000-03-01

242

An electronic flight bag for NextGen avionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The introduction of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) initiative by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will impose new requirements for cockpit avionics. A similar program is also taking place in Europe by the European Organisation for the Safety of Air Navigation (Eurocontrol) called the Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) initiative. NextGen will require aircraft to utilize Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) in/out technology, requiring substantial changes to existing cockpit display systems. There are two ways that aircraft operators can upgrade their aircraft in order to utilize ADS-B technology. The first is to replace existing primary flight displays with new displays that are ADS-B compatible. The second, less costly approach is to install an advanced Class 3 Electronic Flight Bag (EFB) system. The installation of Class 3 EFBs in the cockpit will allow aircraft operators to utilize ADS-B technology in a lesser amount of time with a decreased cost of implementation and will provide additional benefits to the operator. This paper describes a Class 3 EFB, the NexisTM Flight-Intelligence System, which has been designed to allow users a direct interface with NextGen avionics sensors while additionally providing the pilot with all the necessary information to meet NextGen requirements.

Zelazo, D. Eyton

2012-06-01

243

Salt nuclei in marine air as a function of altitude and wind force  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large differences are shown to occur in the numbers and sizes of sea-salt particles in marine air over the sea as the altitude, position, and the time of sampling are varied. Increases in the amount of air-borne salt near cloud base are related to increases in wind force at the sea surface. The greatest proportionate increase in particle number occurs

A. H. Woodcock

1953-01-01

244

76 FR 28215 - U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory Board Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Sustaining Air Force Aging Aircraft into the 21st Century, Munitions for the 2025+ Environment and Force Structure, and Sensor Data Exploitation. Pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 552b, as amended, and 41 CFR 102-3.155, the Administrative...

2011-05-16

245

Occupational Analysis of Air Force Reserve and Air National Guard Nurses. Final Report for Period January 1974-July 1975.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An occupational survey comparing active duty and Reserve Forces nurses was conducted to support a Nursing Resources Study Group gathering information on current and future nurse requirements. Job inventory booklets were sent to chief nurses at Reserve and Air National Guard locations which were administered during unit training meetings. Returned…

Bergmann, Joseph A.; Smith, Michael C.

246

This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CCR9701973. This effort was also sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and Air Force Research Laboratory, Air Force  

E-print Network

was also sponsored by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and Air Force Research Laboratory, Air was also supported in part by the Air Force Material Command, Rome Laboratory, and the Advanced Research representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of the Defense Advanced

Carzaniga, Antonio

247

Alternate concepts study extension. Volume 2: Part 4: Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A recommended baseline system is presented along with alternate avionics systems, Mark 2 avionics, booster avionics, and a cost summary. Analyses and discussions are included on the Mark 1 orbiter avionics subsystems, electrical ground support equipment, and the computer programs. Results indicate a need to define all subsystems of the baseline system, an installation study to determine the impact on the crew station, and a study on access for maintenance.

1971-01-01

248

Applying Ada to Beech Starship avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

As Ada solidified in its development, it became evident that it offered advantages for avionics systems because of it support for modern software engineering principles and real time applications. An Ada programming support environment was developed for two major avionics subsystems in the Beech Starship. The two subsystems include electronic flight instrument displays and the flight management computer system. Both of these systems use multiple Intel 80186 microprocessors. The flight management computer provides flight planning, navigation displays, primary flight display of checklists and other pilot advisory information. Together these systems represent nearly 80,000 lines of Ada source code and to date approximately 30 man years of effort. The Beech Starship avionics systems are in flight testing.

Funk, David W.

1986-01-01

249

HH-65A Dolphin digital integrated avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Communication, navigation, flight control, and search sensor management are avionics functions which constitute every Search and Rescue (SAR) operation. Routine cockpit duties monopolize crew attention during SAR operations and thus impair crew effectiveness. The United States Coast Guard challenged industry to build an avionics system that automates routine tasks and frees the crew to focus on the mission tasks. The HH-64A SAR avionics systems of communication, navigation, search sensors, and flight control have existed independently. On the SRR helicopter, the flight management system (FMS) was introduced. H coordinates or integrates these functions. The pilot interacts with the FMS rather than the individual subsystems, using simple, straightforward procedures to address distinct mission tasks and the flight management system, in turn, orchestrates integrated system response.

Huntoon, R. B.

1984-01-01

250

Avionic System for the CIRA USV Program  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the Avionic System that TSDev has developed for the Centro Italiano Ricerche Aerospaziali (CIRA) Flight Test Bed (FTB) in the framework of the Italian Unmanned Space Vehicle (USV) program. The FTB Avionic System is composed by a number of units able to provide the vehicle with all the functionality required by an unmanned aerospace flight. The architecture of the avionics has been defined so to guarantee modularity, upgradeability, and high performances. Custom solutions for most of the required functionality have allowed to fulfil the very demanding requirements in terms of mass, power, and volume. Very interesting reliability levels have been obtained by properly selecting the components and adopting hot redundancy at least for the most critical functions.

Capuano, G.; Longobardi, P.; Cacace, F.; Richiello, C.; Di Donato, M. P.

2007-08-01

251

Vertical Guidance Performance Analysis of the L1–L5 Dual-Frequency GPS/WAAS User Avionics Sensor  

PubMed Central

This paper investigates the potential vertical guidance performance of global positioning system (GPS)/wide area augmentation system (WAAS) user avionics sensor when the modernized GPS and Galileo are available. This paper will first investigate the airborne receiver code noise and multipath (CNMP) confidence (?air). The ?air will be the dominant factor in the availability analysis of an L1–L5 dual-frequency GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor. This paper uses the MATLAB Algorithm Availability Simulation Tool (MAAST) to determine the required values for the ?air, so that an L1–L5 dual-frequency GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor can meet the vertical guidance requirements of APproach with Vertical guidance (APV) II and CATegory (CAT) I over conterminous United States (CONUS). A modified MAAST that includes the Galileo satellite constellation is used to determine under what user configurations WAAS could be an APV II system or a CAT I system over CONUS. Furthermore, this paper examines the combinations of possible improvements in signal models and the addition of Galileo to determine if GPS/WAAS user avionics sensor could achieve 10 m Vertical Alert Limit (VAL) within the service volume. Finally, this paper presents the future vertical guidance performance of GPS user avionics sensor for the United States’ WAAS, Japanese MTSAT-based satellite augmentation system (MSAS) and European geostationary navigation overlay service (EGNOS). PMID:22319263

Jan, Shau-Shiun

2010-01-01

252

Reconfigurable fault tolerant avionics system  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper presents the design of a reconfigurable avionics system based on modern Static Random Access Memory (SRAM)-based Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) to be used in future generations of nano satellites. A major concern in satellite systems and especially nano satellites is to build robust systems with low-power consumption profiles. The system is designed to be flexible by providing the capability of reconfiguring itself based on its orbital position. As Single Event Upsets (SEU) do not have the same severity and intensity in all orbital locations, having the maximum at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA) and the polar cusps, the system does not have to be fully protected all the time in its orbit. An acceptable level of protection against high-energy cosmic rays and charged particles roaming in space is provided within the majority of the orbit through software fault tolerance. Check pointing and roll back, besides control flow assertions, is used for that level of protection. In the minority part of the orbit where severe SEUs are expected to exist, a reconfiguration for the system FPGA is initiated where the processor systems are triplicated and protection through Triple Modular Redundancy (TMR) with feedback is provided. This technique of reconfiguring the system as per the level of the threat expected from SEU-induced faults helps in reducing the average dynamic power consumption of the system to one-third of its maximum. This technique can be viewed as a smart protection through system reconfiguration. The system is built on the commercial version of the (XC5VLX50) Xilinx Virtex5 FPGA on bulk silicon with 324 IO. Simulations of orbit SEU rates were carried out using the SPENVIS web-based software package.

Ibrahim, M. M.; Asami, K.; Cho, Mengu

253

Systems Engineering and Reusable Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

One concept for future space flights is to construct building blocks for a wide variety of avionics systems. Once a unit has served its original purpose, it can be removed from the original vehicle and reused in a similar or dissimilar function, depending on the function blocks the unit contains. For example: Once a lunar lander has reached the moon's surface, an engine controller for the Lunar Decent Module would be removed and used for a lunar rover motor control unit or for a Environmental Control Unit for a Lunar Habitat. This senior design project included the investigation of a wide range of functions of space vehicles and possible uses. Specifically, this includes: (1) Determining and specifying the basic functioning blocks of space vehicles. (2) Building and demonstrating a concept model. (3) Showing high reliability is maintained. The specific implementation of this senior design project included a large project team made up of Systems, Electrical, Computer, and Mechanical Engineers/Technologists. The efforts were made up of several sub-groups that each worked on a part of the entire project. The large size and complexity made this project one of the more difficult to manage and advise. Typical projects only have 3-4 students, but this project had 10 students from five different disciplines. This paper describes the difference of this large project compared to typical projects, and the challenges encountered. It also describes how the systems engineering approach was successfully implemented so that the students were able to meet nearly all of the project requirements.

Conrad, James M.; Murphy, Gloria

2010-01-01

254

System implementation for US Air Force Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS)  

SciTech Connect

The Global Theater Weather Analysis and Prediction System (GTWAPS) is intended to provide war fighters and decision makers with timely, accurate, and tailored meteorological and oceanographic (METOC) information to enhance effective employment of battlefield forces. Of critical importance to providing METOC theater information is the generation of meteorological parameters produced by numerical prediction models and application software at the Air Force Global Weather Central (AFGWC), Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Ultimately, application-derived data will be produced by the regional Joint METOC Forecast Units and by the deployed teams within a theater. The USAF Air Staff contracted with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for assistance in defining a hardware and software solution using off-the-shelf technology that would give the USAF the flexibility of testing various meteorological models and the ability to use the system within their daily operational constraints.

Simunich, K.L.; Pinkerton, S.C.; Michalakes, J.G.; Christiansen, J.H.

1997-03-01

255

Health status of air force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: I. Physical health  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1,299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer.

Wolfe, W.H.; Michalek, J.E.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA)); Rahe, A. (QuesTech Inc., San Antonio, TX (USA)); Silva, J. (Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD (USA)); Thomas, W.F.; Lustik, M.B.; Grubbs, W.D.; Roegner, R.H. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (USA)); Karrison, T.G. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA)); Williams, D.E. (Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-10-10

256

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam: II. Mortality  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the current health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. This report compares the noncombat mortality of 1261 Ranch Hand veterans to that of a comparison population of 19,101 other Air Force veterans primarily involved in cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. The indirectly standardized all-cause death rate among Ranch Hands is 2.5 deaths per 1,000 person-years, the same as that among comparison subjects. After adjustment for age, rank, and occupation, the all-cause standardized mortality ratio was 1.0. In adjusted cause-specific analyses, the authors found no significant group differences regarding accidental, malignant neoplasm, and circulatory deaths. These data are not supportive to a hypothesis of increases mortality among Ranch Hands.

Michalek, J.E.; Wolfe, W.H.; Miner, J.C. (School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks Air Force Base, TX (USA))

1990-10-10

257

Health status of Air Force veterans occupationally exposed to herbicides in Vietnam. I. Physical health.  

PubMed

The Air Force Health Study is a 20-year comprehensive assessment of the health of Air Force veterans of Operation Ranch Hand, the unit responsible for aerial spraying of herbicides in Vietnam. The study compares the health and noncombat mortality of Ranch Hand veterans with a comparison group of Air Force veterans primarily involved with cargo missions in Southeast Asia but who were not exposed to herbicides. This report summarizes the health of these veterans as determined at the third in a series of physical examinations. Nine hundred ninety-five Ranch Hands and 1299 comparison subjects attended the second follow-up examination in 1987. The two groups were similar in reported health problems, diagnosed skin conditions, and hepatic, cardiovascular, and immune profiles. Ranch Hands have experienced significantly more basal cell carcinomas than comparison subjects. The two groups were not different with respect to melanoma and systemic cancer. PMID:2402041

Wolfe, W H; Michalek, J E; Miner, J C; Rahe, A; Silva, J; Thomas, W F; Grubbs, W D; Lustik, M B; Karrison, T G; Roegner, R H

1990-10-10

258

Infrared Avionics Signal Distribution Using WDM  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Supporting analog RF signal transmission over optical fibers, this project demonstrates a successful application of wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) to the avionics environment. We characterize the simultaneous transmission of four RF signals (channels) over a single optical fiber. At different points along a fiber optic backbone, these four analog channels are sequentially multiplexed and demultiplexed to more closely emulate the conditions in existing onboard aircraft. We present data from measurements of optical power, transmission response (loss and gain), reflection response, group delay that defines phase distortion, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and dynamic range that defines nonlinear distortion. The data indicate that WDM is very suitable for avionics applications.

Atiquzzaman, Mohammed; Sluss, James J., Jr.

2004-01-01

259

Evaluation of the TCE catalytic oxidation unit at Wurtsmith Air Force Base  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wurtsmith Air Force Base is the site of an air-stripping-with-emissions-control system to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chiefly trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a fluidized-bed catalytic oxidation unit for destroying halogenated organics with respect to catalyst bed temperature and operating time. The objectives included identification of any products of incomplete

T. D. Hylton

1992-01-01

260

Calculation of losses and temperature rise for high frequency transformer under forced-air convection  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a method for loss calculation, including core losses and winding losses, and temperature rise in high frequency transformer design under forced-air convection. Analytical models of winding losses for multiple-layer copper foil and Litz wire windings with MMF boundary conditions have been developed. Geometric parameters of conductor and distribution of magneto-motive forces are considered in the formulation of

Ren-Chun Chang; Chien-Kuo Chen; Chien-Yue Wang; Ying-Yu Tzou

2010-01-01

261

78 FR 9038 - Office of the Secretary of the Air Force Acceptance of Group Application Under Public Law 95-202...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of the Air Force Office of the Secretary of the Air Force Acceptance of Group Application Under Public...1000.20: U.S. and Foreign Employees of Air America, Inc. Under the provisions of...

2013-02-07

262

Space shuttle engineering and operations support. Avionics system engineering  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) requirements for supporting the Spacelab/orbiter avionics verification process are defined. The principal topics are a Spacelab avionics hardware assessment, test operations center/electronic systems test laboratory (TOC/ESL) data processing requirements definition, SAIL (Building 16) payload accommodations study, and projected funding and test scheduling. Because of the complex nature of the Spacelab/orbiter computer systems, the PCM data link, and the high rate digital data system hardware/software relationships, early avionics interface verification is required. The SAIL is a prime candidate test location to accomplish this early avionics verification.

Broome, P. A.; Neubaur, R. J.; Welsh, R. T.

1976-01-01

263

Using Modern Design Tools for Digital Avionics Development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Using Modem Design Tools for Digital Avionics Development Shrinking development time and increased complexity of new avionics forces the designer to use modem tools and methods during hardware development. Engineers at the Marshall Space Flight Center have successfully upgraded their design flow and used it to develop a Mongoose V based radiation tolerant processor board for the International Space Station's Water Recovery System. The design flow, based on hardware description languages, simulation, synthesis, hardware models, and full functional software model libraries, allowed designers to fully simulate the processor board from reset, through initialization before any boards were built. The fidelity of a digital simulation is limited to the accuracy of the models used and how realistically the designer drives the circuit's inputs during simulation. By using the actual silicon during simulation, device modeling errors are reduced. Numerous design flaws were discovered early in the design phase when they could be easily fixed. The use of hardware models and actual MIPS software loaded into full functional memory models also provided checkout of the software development environment. This paper will describe the design flow used to develop the processor board and give examples of errors that were found using the tools. An overview of the processor board firmware will also be covered.

Hyde, David W.; Lakin, David R., II; Asquith, Thomas E.

2000-01-01

264

Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Avionics and Software Overview  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This viewgraph presentation gives an overall description of the avionics and software functions of the Ares I Upper Stage Crew Launch Vehicle. The contents include: 1) IUA Team - Development Approach Roadmap; 2) Ares I US Avionics and Software Development Approach; 3) NDT Responsibilities; 4) Ares I Upper Stage Avionics Locations; 5) Ares I Overall Avionics & Software Functions; 6) Block Diagram Version of Avionics Architecture; 7) Instrument Unit Avionics Preliminary Design; and 8) Upper Stage Avionics External Interfaces.

Nola, Charles L.

2008-01-01

265

Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Building a Better Approach for (Human) Spaceflight Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The field of Avionics is advancing far more rapidly in terrestrial applications than in space flight applications. Spaceflight Avionics are not keeping pace with expectations set by terrestrial experience, nor are they keeping pace with the need for increasingly complex automation and crew interfaces as we move beyond Low Earth Orbit. NASA must take advantage of the strides being made by both space-related and terrestrial industries to drive our development and sustaining costs down. This paper describes ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionic architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. Results from the AAE project's FY13 efforts are discussed, along with the status of FY14 efforts and future plans.

Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Hames, Kevin L.; Vitalpur, Sharada V.

2014-01-01

266

History of wildland fires on Vandenberg Air Force Base, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The fire history of the past 50 years for Vandenberg AFB, California was determined using aerial photography, field investigation, and historical and current written records. This constitutes a record of the vegetation age classes for the entire base. The location, cause, and fuel type for sixty fires from this time period were determined. The fires were mapped and entered into a geographic infomation system (GIS) for Vandenberg. Fire history maps derived from this GIS were printed at 1:9600 scale and are on deposit at the Vandenberg Environmental Task Force Office. Although some ecologically significant plant communities on Vandenberg are adapted to fire, no natural fire frequency could be determined, since only one fire possibly caused by lightning occurred in the area now within the base since 1937. Observations made during this study suggest that burning may encourage the invasion of exotic species into chaparral, in particular Burton Mesa or sandhill chaparral, an unusual and geographically limited form of chaparral found on the base.

Hickson, Diana E.

1988-01-01

267

Sensitivity of Forced Air Distribution System Efficiency to Climate, Duct Location, Air Leakage and Insulation  

E-print Network

, Air Leakage and Insulation Iain S. Walker Energy Performance of Buildings Group Indoor Environment ................................................................................................................................................ 4 Duct Insulation, Location and Leakage Examples............................................................... 4 Figure 2. Sheet metal ducts in a basement insulated with asbestos

268

Reuse and Interoperability of Avionics for Space Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The space environment presents unique challenges for avionics. Launch survivability, thermal management, radiation protection, and other factors are important for successful space designs. Many existing avionics designs use custom hardware and software to meet the requirements of space systems. Although some space vendors have moved more towards a standard product line approach to avionics, the space industry still lacks similar standards and common practices for avionics development. This lack of commonality manifests itself in limited reuse and a lack of interoperability. To address NASA s need for interoperable avionics that facilitate reuse, several hardware and software approaches are discussed. Experiences with existing space boards and the application of terrestrial standards is outlined. Enhancements and extensions to these standards are considered. A modular stack-based approach to space avionics is presented. Software and reconfigurable logic cores are considered for extending interoperability and reuse. Finally, some of the issues associated with the design of reusable interoperable avionics are discussed.

Hodson, Robert F.

2007-01-01

269

Artificial intelligence and expert systems for avionics  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is based upon a technical report prepared for the Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center's Directorate for Aircraft Safety, Flight Safety Research Branch. It includes an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) technology, avionic related applications of AT-based systems, and certification issues relating to AT

Lee H. Harrison; Pamela J. Saunders; Peter J. Saraceni

1993-01-01

270

A Distributed Avionics Package for Small UAVs  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the design and implementation of a distributed computing architec- ture used to accommodate a wide range of operational environments. The architecture's advantages include fault-tolerance and redundancy through an abstracted high and low- level bus protocol, and significant system scaling enabled by its modular nature. The current implementation was created for use in an avionics context, where it

Jack Elston; Brian Argrow; Eric Frew

2005-01-01

271

Reference Avionics Architecture for Lunar Surface Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Developing and delivering infrastructure capable of supporting long-term manned operations to the lunar surface has been a primary objective of the Constellation Program in the Exploration Systems Mission Directorate. Several concepts have been developed related to development and deployment lunar exploration vehicles and assets that provide critical functionality such as transportation, habitation, and communication, to name a few. Together, these systems perform complex safety-critical functions, largely dependent on avionics for control and behavior of system functions. These functions are implemented using interchangeable, modular avionics designed for lunar transit and lunar surface deployment. Systems are optimized towards reuse and commonality of form and interface and can be configured via software or component integration for special purpose applications. There are two core concepts in the reference avionics architecture described in this report. The first concept uses distributed, smart systems to manage complexity, simplify integration, and facilitate commonality. The second core concept is to employ extensive commonality between elements and subsystems. These two concepts are used in the context of developing reference designs for many lunar surface exploration vehicles and elements. These concepts are repeated constantly as architectural patterns in a conceptual architectural framework. This report describes the use of these architectural patterns in a reference avionics architecture for Lunar surface systems elements.

Somervill, Kevin M.; Lapin, Jonathan C.; Schmidt, Oron L.

2010-01-01

272

Generalized Training Devices for Avionic Systems Maintenance.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research study was conducted to determine the feasibility and desirability of developing generalized training equipment for use in avionic systems maintenance training. The study consisted of a group of survey and analytic tasks to provide useful guidance to serve the needs of the Naval Aviation community in future years. The study had four…

Parker, Edward L.

273

Avionics. Progress Record and Theory Outline.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This combination progress record and course outline is designed for use by individuals teaching a course in avionics that is intended to prepare students for employment in the field of aerospace electronics. Included among the topics addressed in the course are the following: shop practices, aircraft and the theory of flight, electron physics,…

Connecticut State Dept. of Education, Hartford. Div. of Vocational-Technical Schools.

274

World status of avionic AMLCD panels  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The avionics-grade active-matrix liquid-crystal display (AMLCD) is a highly-specialized display in a custom niche market. In Japan, the commercial AMLCD manufacturers have limited interest in this market for logical, business reasons. The sources of panels are now limited to Toshiba in Japan and OIS Optical Imaging Systems in the U.S. Several avionic electronics manufacturers have established their own source/relationships. The major ones are Honeywell with Hosiden, Sextant Avionique with Thomson LCD, and Litton Systems Canada Limited with their in-house source. The avionics AMLCD panel industry is less than ten years old and will not be mature for another ten years. The panel is perceived to be the ultimate display for avionics, satisfying all aviation display application needs. There is no flat panel option. As the industry matures, the CRT and classical instruments will continue to be replaced. Ultimately, the entire cockpit display ensemble will be AMLCD, as is the case in the new Boeing 777. The entire cockpit display set will be reduced to data bus, computers, and AMLCD panels.

Tannas, Lawrence E., Jr.

1994-06-01

275

Miniature High-Let Radiation Spectrometer for Space and Avionics Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This paper reports on the design and characterization of a small, low power, and low weight instrument, a High-LET Radiation Spectrometer (HiLRS), that measures energy deposited by heavy ions in microelectronic devices. The HILRS operates on pulse-height analysis principles and is designed for space and avionics applications. The detector component in the instrument is based on large scale arrays of p-n junctions. In this system, the pulse amplitude from a particle hit is directly proportional to the particle LET. A prototype flight unit has been fabricated and calibrated using several heavy ions with varying LETs and protons with several energies. The unit has been delivered to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) c/o the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, for integration into the military Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV), a US-UK cooperative mission. Another version of HILRS is being prepared for delivery in April to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project, to fly on the HST Orbital Systems Test (HOST) Platform on a shuttle mission.

Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Brucker, G. J.

1998-01-01

276

Miniature high-let radiation spectrometer for space and avionics applications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper reports on the design and characterization of a small, low-power, and low-weight instrument, a High-LET Radiation Spectrometer (HiLRS), that measures energy deposited by heavy ions in microelectronic devices. The HiLRS operates on pulse-height analysis principles and is designed for space and avionics applications. The detector component in the instrument is based on large scale arrays of p-n junctions. In this system, the pulse amplitude from a particle hit is directly proportional to the particle LET. A prototype flight unit has been fabricated and calibrated using several heavy ions with varying LETs and protons with several energies. The unit has been delivered to the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) c/o the Air Force Research Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM, for integration into the military Space Technology Research Vehicle (STRV), a US-UK cooperative mission. Another version of HiLRS is being prepared for delivery in April to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) project, to fly on the HST Orbital Systems Test (HOST) platform on a shuttle mission.

Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Stauffer, Craig A.; Brucker, G. J.

277

Field measurements of interactions between furnaces and forced air distribution systems  

E-print Network

to distribute this energy throughout the house (forced air ducts, hot water radiators, radiant panels etc This work was supported by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies, Existing Buildings Energy Research Program

278

Air Force Research Laboratory space technology strategic investment model: analysis and outcomes for warfighter capabilities  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Research Laboratory utilizes a value model as a primary input for space technology planning and budgeting. The Space Sector at AFRL headquarters manages space technology investment across all the geographically disparate technical directorates and ensures that integrated planning is achieved across the space community. The space investment portfolio must ultimately balance near, mid, and far-term investments across

Bruce Preiss; Lloyd Greene; Jamie Kriebel; Robert Wasson

2006-01-01

279

Attenuated geophysical signatures associated with ongoing remediation efforts at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous geophysical investigations (1996, 1997, 2003, and 2004) conducted at the decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) showed a clearly defined high conductivity anomaly associated with hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone and ground water near the source area. The source of the geophysical anomalies was attributed to biogeochemical modifications of the contaminated zone resulting from

V. Che-Alota; E. A. Atekwana; W. A. Sauck; J. T. Nolan; L. D. Slater

2007-01-01

280

Women in the Military Academies: US Air Force Academy (Part 2 of 3).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses the evolution and structure of fitness programs for women at the U.S. Air Force Academy from 1977-87. Women's fitness level has continued to improve, although curriculum and physical fitness tests have remained the same for both sexes. (SM)

Petosa, Scott

1989-01-01

281

FIELD EXPERIMENTATION OF COTS-BASED UAV NETWORKING Air Force Research Laboratory  

E-print Network

1 of 7 FIELD EXPERIMENTATION OF COTS-BASED UAV NETWORKING Dan Hague Air Force Research Laboratory Vehicles (UAVs). This new capability has inspired many novel application ideas in UAV networking. We argue that field experimentation of UAV networking is essential in collecting link meas- urement data, developing

Kung, H. T.

282

The Effects of Basic Military Training on the Attitude of Air Force Enlistees.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report discusses the objectives and current practices in basic military training in relation to the attitudes and experience of recent recruits into the Air Force. Selected research studies bearing on effective training and career motivation are discussed. Suggestions are made for adaptation of basic training procedures to changing attitudes…

Harburg, Fred D.

283

Visual scan adaptation during repeated visual search Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH, USAChristopher W. Myers  

E-print Network

Visual scan adaptation during repeated visual search Air Force Research Laboratory, Dayton, OH. Gray There is no consensus as to how to characterize eye fixations during visual search. On the one are reported that demonstrate the repetition and adaptation of visual scans during visual search, supporting

Gray, Wayne

284

Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Update: 2000–2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-life evaluation data for space cryocoolers is essential for performance and reliability assessments of this technology. With a design life of 10 or more years, and no accepted accelerated testing methodology, the importance of continual real time operations monitoring and periodic retesting is paramount. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), under sponsorship from the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and Space

E. Oliver; S. A. Yarbrough; N. S. Abhyankar; B. J. Tomlinson

2004-01-01

285

Air Force Research Laboratory Spacecraft Cryocooler Endurance Evaluation Update: 2000-2002  

Microsoft Academic Search

Long-life evaluation data for space cryocoolers is essential for performance and reliability assessments of this technology. With a design life of 10 or more years, and no accepted accelerated testing methodology, the importance of continual real time operations monitoring and periodic retesting is paramount. The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), under sponsorship from the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and Space

E. Oliver; S. A. Yarbrough; N. S. Abhyankar; B. J. Tomlinson

2004-01-01

286

Review of Cold Cathode Research at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Over the last decade, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Directed Energy Directorate (AFRL\\/DE) has engaged in a high current density field emission cathode research program. This program explored the aspects of cathode materials as well as the details of cathode geometries and emission physics. This paper summarizes the results of this ongoing research effort to date. We review the history

Don Shiffler; Michael Haworth; Keith Cartwright; Ryan Umstattd; Mitch Ruebush; Susan Heidger; Matthew Lacour; Ken Golby; Don Sullivan; Peter Duselis; John Luginsland

2008-01-01

287

SIMULATION OF INTRINSIC BIOREMEDIATION PROCESSES AT WURTSMITH AIR FORCE BASE, MICHIGAN  

EPA Science Inventory

In October, 1988, a KC-135 aircraft crashed at Wurtsmith Air Force base (AFB), Oscoda, Michigan during an attempted landing. Approximately 3000 gallons of jet fuel (JP-4) were spilled onto the ground, with a large portion of the fuel entering the subsurface. Previous investigat...

288

Small and microthruster propulsion research at the Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary form only given. Clusters of satellites flying in cooperative formation require small and precise thruster operations to maintain formation integrity. Satellites in the 100-kg size class benefit from small thrusters for primary propulsion and micropropulsion for precision positioning and attitude control. A review of the research and development of small and micropropulsion thrusters at the Air Force Research Laboratory,

Michael Dulligan; Frank Gulczinski; Greg Spanjers

2000-01-01

289

Air Force Commanders and Barriers to Entry into a Doctoral Business Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The authors examined professionally qualified Air Force commanders' barriers to entry into a business doctoral degree program related to the factors of time, financial means, academics, and motivation. Of the 116 present commanders, 63% were interested in pursuing a doctorate in business. For the commanders interested in obtaining a doctorate…

Williams, Tony; LeMire, Steven D.

2011-01-01

290

Analysis of consistency of application of the Endangered Species Act on selected Air Force installations  

SciTech Connect

Air Force compliance with the Endangered Species Act of 1973, as amended (16 USC 1531, et seq.) was assessed through an examination of the natural resource management programs on selected installations. Four installations with an endangered species in common, the red cockaded woodpecker (Pocoides borealis) and a single installation, Andersen Air Force Base, Guam, with nine endangered species were selected for analysis. The Air Force is not in complete compliance with the Act. Natural resource managers are not employed at three of the five installations. The endangered species programs do not dominate the resource management programs as strict interpretation of the law would require. Determination of compliance is not only a factor of the evaluation of the biological program, it must include an assessment of the guidance and regulation provided by the law. A sufficient body of case law has not been developed to fully define compliance, however, the indications are that strict interpretation of the Act is neither ecologically nor politically possible. The Air Force cannot comply with the law biologically, politically, or budgetarily.

Scott, J.

1986-01-01

291

Laminar Forced Convection Heat Transfer From Isothermal Bodies With Unity Aspect Ratio in Coaxial Air Flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article a semianalytical approach is employed to obtain dimensionless heat transfer correlations for forced convection over three geometries—sphere, cone, and cylinder with unity aspect ratio in laminar axial air flow. The comparison of the present results for a sphere with the previous work shows very good agreement. For example, the average difference between the results of the present

Yaser Hadad; Khosrow Jafarpur

2012-01-01

292

Cognitive and Teaching Style Preferences of Officers Attending the Air Force Reserve Officer Training Instructor Course  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the cognitive style and teaching style preferences of instructors enrolled in the Reserve Officer Training Corps instructor course at the Academic Instructor School at Maxwell Air Force base. Sixty-five cases were examined for two research questions: (1) To what extent is there…

Kraska, Marie; Harris, Stephen

2007-01-01

293

Lateral spread of sonic boom measurements from US Air Force boomfile flight tests  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of sonic boom flight tests were conducted by the US Air Force at Edwards AFB in 1987 with current supersonic DOD aircraft. These tests involved 43 flights by various aircraft at different Mach number and altitude combinations. The measured peak overpressures to predicted values as a function of lateral distance are compared. Some of the flights are combined

J. Micah Downing

1992-01-01

294

An Investigation of Interpersonal-Psychological Variables in Air Force Suicides: A Controlled-Comparison Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Joiner's (2005) theory attributes suicide to an individual's acquired capability to enact self-harm, perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness. This study evaluated whether Joiner's theory could differentiate United States (US) Air Force (AF) personnel (n = 60) who died by suicide from a living active duty AF personnel comparison sample (n = 122). Responses from AF personnel on several scales assessing Joiner's constructs were compared

Elicia Nademin; David A. Jobes; Steven E. Pflanz; Aaron M. Jacoby; Marjan Ghahramanlou-Holloway; Rick Campise; Thomas Joiner; Barry M. Wagner; Leigh Johnson

2008-01-01

295

Note on the air forces on a wing caused by pitching.  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The following contains information on the air forces on a wing produced by it's pitching at a finite rate of angular velocity. The condition of smooth flow at the region of the trailing edge is maintained. The wing then experiences the same lift as if moving with the momentary velocity of the rear edge.

Munk, Max M

1925-01-01

296

IN SITU BIOVENTING: TWO USEPA AND AIR FORCE SPONSORED FIELD STUDIES  

EPA Science Inventory

Bioventing is the process of delivering oxygen by forced air movement through organically contaminated unsaturated soils in order to stimulate in situ biodegradation in an otherwise oxygen-limited environment. his paper is a report on progress of two ongoing bioventing field stud...

297

Fatigue in Aviation: A Survey of the Awareness and Attitudes of Indian Air Force Pilots  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sleep loss and circadian rhythm disruptions cause fatigue in aircrew and thus affect flight safety. Intervention programs for fatigue in any organization should be based on relevant indigenous data. This study was undertaken to develop an understanding of fatigue among aircrew of the Indian Air Force (IAF). This questionnaire study was carried out at the Institute of Aerospace Medicine, Bangalore,

Narinder Taneja

2007-01-01

298

Probing the Hydrophobic Interaction between Air Bubbles and Partially Hydrophobic Surfaces Using Atomic Force Microscopy  

E-print Network

to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope and partially hydrophobized mica surfaces. No bubble attachment was observed for bare hydrophilic mica, but attachment behaviors and attraction with an exponential decay length of 0.8-1.0 nm were observed between the air bubble and partially hydrophobized mica

Chan, Derek Y C

299

Commitment to Liberal Education at the United States Air Force Academy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Located just north of Colorado Springs, Colorado, the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is one of the nation's federally funded military service academies. With an enrollment of approximately 4,400 undergraduates, the academy offers an integrated four-year curriculum of academics, athletics, leadership and character development, military…

Enger, Rolf C.; Jones, Steven K.; Born, Dana H.

2010-01-01

300

Individual Oral Exams in Mathematics Courses: 10 Years of Experience at the Air Force Academy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the last 10 years faculty members in the Department of Mathematical Sciences at the United States Air Force Academy have incorporated individual oral exams into mathematics courses. We have experimented with various approaches, shared results and ideas with other department members, and refined our techniques. We have found that this…

Boedigheimer, Ralph; Ghrist, Michelle; Peterson, Dale; Kallemyn, Benjamin

2015-01-01

301

Landing of STS-59 Shuttle Endeavour at Edwards Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The main landing gear of the Space Shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base to complete the 11 day STS-59/SRL-1 mission. Landing occured at 9:54 a.m., April 20, 1994. Mission duration was 11 days, 5 hours, 49 minutes.

1994-01-01

302

Force approximation for a plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata Roya  

E-print Network

Force approximation for a plasma actuator operating in atmospheric air Kunwar Pal Singh and Subrata November 2006; published online 10 January 2008 A plasma actuator has been studied using a self momentum injection very close to the actuator surface. There is, however, a very small increase

Roy, Subrata

303

CloudSat Preps for Launch at Vandenberg Air Force Base, CA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The CloudSat spacecraft sits encapsulated within its Boeing Delta launch vehicle dual payload attach fitting at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. CloudSat will share its ride to orbit late next month with NASA's CALIPSO spacecraft. The two spacecraft are designed to reveal the secrets of clouds and aerosols.

2005-01-01

304

Secular changes in body dimensions of Royal Australian Air Force aircrew (1971–2005)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The aim of this study was to quantify the secular changes in body dimensions of Royal Australian Air Force aircrew. Following corrections for methodological differences, two samples (matched for age and overall body size) of male aircrew measured in 1971 (n = 220) and 2005 (n = 220) were compared across 13 absolute and proportional body dimensions. Changes in means were expressed as standardised

Grant R. Tomkinson; Adam J. Clark; Peter Blanchonette

2010-01-01

305

A Need-focused Approach to Air Force Engine Health Management Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper outlines the work that the author has done to develop a structure to help direct engine health management (EHM) research. It discusses the definitions of the relevant EHM terms, outlines the essential elements of an EHM system, deduces the aims of an EHM system through the contributions it can make to the top-level Air Force goals, and uses

R. A. Wade

2005-01-01

306

Cost Analysis of Air Force On-the-Job Training: Development and Demonstration of a Methodology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A research project was developed to construct and demonstrate a methodology for estimating the costs of conducting on-the-job training (OJT) in the Air Force. The project focused on the formal upgrade training to the three, five, and seven skill levels. Project efforts involved five major tasks: literature review, cost factor identification, cost…

Eisele, Charles R.; And Others

307

FEASIBILITY OF PRODUCING COMMODITIES AND ELECTRICITY FOR SPACE SHUTTLE OPERATIONS AT VANDENBERG AIR FORCE BASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The report gives results of a preliminary screening study of the technical and economic feasibility of the on-site production of commodities (liquid propellant and gases) and electricity to support space shuttle launch activities at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). Both commerci...

308

STEAM ENHANCED REMEDIATION RESEARCH FOR DNAPL IN FRACTURED ROCK, LORING AIR FORCE BASE, LIMESTONE, MAINE  

EPA Science Inventory

This report details a research project on Steam Enhanced Remediation (SER) for the recovery of volatile organic compounds from fractured limestone that was carried out at the Quarry at the former Loring Air Force Base in Limestone, Maine. This project was carried out by USEPA, Ma...

309

75 FR 36643 - U.S. Air Force Academy Board of Visitors Notice of Meeting  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...in consultation with the Office of the Air Force General Counsel...to attend this BoV meeting, contact Mr. David Boyle, USAFA Programs...would like to attend, please contact the USAFA Public Affairs Office, (719) 333-7731 for...

2010-06-28

310

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

Not Available

1992-03-01

311

Geodatabase of environmental information for Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas, 1990-2004  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Introduction: Air Force Plant 4 (AFP4) and adjacent Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base (NAS-JRB) at Fort Worth, Tex., constitute a government-owned, contractor-operated (GOCO) facility that has been in operation since 1942. Contaminants from the facility, primarily volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and metals, have entered the groundwater-flow system through leakage from waste-disposal sites (landfills and pits) and from manufacturing processes (U.S. Air Force, Aeronautical Systems Center, 1995).

Shah, Sachin D.; Quigley, Sean M.

2005-01-01

312

Supplemental record of decision on the disposal of Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Iosco County, Michigan  

SciTech Connect

This Supplemental Record of Decision (SROD) documents the Air Force`s decisions regarding the disposal of Wurtsmith Air Force Base (AFB), Michigan (MI), and supplements the `Record of Decision (ROD) for the Disposal of Portions of Wurtsmith AFB, MI`, dated December 12, 1994. Both the ROD and the SROD are decision documents for the Final Environmental Impact Statement (FEIS) Disposal and Reuse of Wurtsmith AFB, MI. The FEIS was filed with the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and made available to the public on September 24, 1993. The SROD was developed in accordance with Council on Environmental Quality Title 40 CFR Part 1505.2. The decisions included in it have been made in consideration of the information contained in the FEIS.

NONE

1996-06-07

313

German Air Forces experiences with plastic media blasting and future requirements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

German Air Force (GAF) has been researching a method of paint removal for a couple of years to replace the chemical method still in use. This is to improve corrosion prevention, environmental protection and health care. With the support of German aerospace company MBB and the University of the Armed Forces in Munich GAF selected Plastic Media Blasting (PMB) as the most suitable method. Having a stripping facility for the entire aircraft at MBB Manching already in existence, GAF decided that the next step forward to gain more experiences is to establish a smaller 'stripping cabin' at an air force base. This cabin is suitable for stripping removable parts and components of aircraft and equipment with the max. size of a half dismantled TORNADO wing. With these gained experiences GAF will be in position to formulate the specific requirements for an entire on-base aircraft stripping plant which will be suitable for F-4's, TORNADO's and EFA's, too.

Stoermer, Matthias

1993-03-01

314

The Early Development of Satellite Characterization Capabilities at the Air Force Laboratories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This presentation overviews the development of optical Space Object Identification (SOI) techniques at the Air Force laboratories during the two-decade "pre-operational" period prior to 1980 when the Groundbased Electro-Optical Deep Space Surveillance (GEODSS) sensors were deployed. Beginning with the launch of Sputnik in 1957, the United States Air Force has actively pursued the development and application of optical sensor technology for the detection, tracking, and characterization of artificial satellites. Until the mid-1980s, these activities were primarily conducted within Air Force research and development laboratories which supplied data to the operational components on a contributing basis. This presentation traces the early evolution of the optical space surveillance technologies from the early experimental sensors that led to the current generation of operationally deployed and research systems. The contributions of the participating Air Force organizations and facilities will be reviewed with special emphasis on the development of technologies for the characterization of spacecraft using optical signatures and imagery. The presentation will include descriptions and photographs of the early facilities and instrumentation, and examples of the SOI collection and analysis techniques employed. In this early period, computer support was limited so all aspects of space surveillance relied heavily on manual interaction. Many military, government, educational, and contractor agencies supported the development of instrumentation and analysis techniques. This overview focuses mainly on the role played by Air Force System Command and Office of Aerospace Research, and the closely related activities at the Department of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency. The omission of other agencies from this review reflects the limitations of this presentation, not the significance of their contributions.

Lambert, J.; Kissell, K.

315

33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing...

2010-07-01

316

33 CFR 334.640 - Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing range...ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.640 Gulf of Mexico south of Apalachee Bay, Fla.; Air Force rocket firing...

2011-07-01

317

Measuring Student Attitudes Toward the Air Force Traffic Safety Course. Final Report for Period February 1977--December 1978.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A questionnaire survey was developed to measure the attitudes of students toward the Air Force Traffic Safety Course. Mandatory for virtually all personnel entering the Air Force, this course was taught in a standardized multimedia format at more than 140 locations . It was a 10-hour course of instruction covering environmental hazards, vehicle…

DeLeo, Philip J.; Slaughter, Sharon L.

318

The vulnerability of commercial aircraft avionics to carbon fibers  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Avionics components commonly used in commercial aircraft were tested for vulnerability to failure when operated in an environment with a high density of graphite fibers. The components were subjected to a series of exposures to graphite fibers of different lengths. Lengths used for the tests were (in order) 1 mm, 3 mm, and 10 mm. The test procedure included subjecting the equipment to characteristic noise and shock environments. Most of the equipment was invulnerable or did not fail until extremely high average exposures were reached. The single exception was an air traffic control transponder produced in the early 1960's. It had the largest case open area through which fibers could enter and it had no coated boards.

Meyers, J. A.; Salmirs, S.

1980-01-01

319

SMART: The Future of Spaceflight Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A novel avionics approach is necessary to meet the future needs of low cost space and lunar missions that require low mass and low power electronics. The current state of the art for avionics systems are centralized electronic units that perform the required spacecraft functions. These electronic units are usually custom-designed for each application and the approach compels avionics designers to have in-depth system knowledge before design can commence. The overall design, development, test and evaluation (DDT&E) cycle for this conventional approach requires long delivery times for space flight electronics and is very expensive. The Small Multi-purpose Advanced Reconfigurable Technology (SMART) concept is currently being developed to overcome the limitations of traditional avionics design. The SMART concept is based upon two multi-functional modules that can be reconfigured to drive and sense a variety of mechanical and electrical components. The SMART units are key to a distributed avionics architecture whereby the modules are located close to or right at the desired application point. The drive module, SMART-D, receives commands from the main computer and controls the spacecraft mechanisms and devices with localized feedback. The sensor module, SMART-S, is used to sense the environmental sensors and offload local limit checking from the main computer. There are numerous benefits that are realized by implementing the SMART system. Localized sensor signal conditioning electronics reduces signal loss and overall wiring mass. Localized drive electronics increase control bandwidth and minimize time lags for critical functions. These benefits in-turn reduce the main processor overhead functions. Since SMART units are standard flight qualified units, DDT&E is reduced and system design can commence much earlier in the design cycle. Increased production scale lowers individual piece part cost and using standard modules also reduces non-recurring costs. The benefit list continues, but the overall message is already evident: the SMART concept is an evolution in spacecraft avionics. SMART devices have the potential to change the design paradigm for future satellites, spacecraft and even commercial applications.

Alhorn, Dean C.; Howard, David E.

2010-01-01

320

Natural and forced air temperature variability in the Labrador region of Canada during the past century  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Evaluation of Labrador air temperatures over the past century (1881-2011) shows multi-scale climate variability and strong linkages with ocean-atmospheric modes of variability and external forcings. The Arctic Oscillation, Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, and El Nino Southern Oscillation are shown to be the dominant seasonal and interannual drivers of regional air temperature variability for most of the past century. Several global climate models show disagreement with observations on the rate of recent warming which suggests that models are currently unable to reproduce regional climate variability in Labrador air temperature. Using a combination of empirical statistical modeling and global climate models, we show that 33 % of the variability in annual Labrador air temperatures over the period 1881-2011 can be explained by natural factors alone; however, the inclusion of anthropogenic forcing increases the explained variance to 65 %. Rapid warming over the past 17 years is shown to be linked to both natural and anthropogenic factors with several anomalously warm years being primarily linked to recent anomalies in the Arctic Oscillation and North Atlantic sea surface temperatures. Evidence is also presented that both empirical statistical models and global climate models underestimate the regional air temperature response to ocean salinity anomalies and volcanic eruptions. These results provide important insight into the predictability of future regional climate impacts for the Labrador region.

Way, Robert G.; Viau, Andre E.

2014-08-01

321

Piloted Ignition of Polypropylene/Glass Composites in a Forced Air Flow  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Forced Ignition and Spread Test (FIST) is being used to study the flammability characteristics of combustible materials in forced convective flows. The FIST methodology is based on the ASTM E-1321, Lateral Ignition and Flame Spread Test (LIFT) which is used to determine the ignition and flame spread characteristics of materials, and to produce 'Flammability Diagrams' of materials. The LIFT apparatus, however, relies on natural convection to bring air to the combustion zone and the fuel vapor to the pilot flame, and thus cannot describe conditions where the oxidizer flow velocity may change. The FIST on the other hand, by relying on a forced flow as the dominant transport mechanism, can be used to examine variable oxidizer flow characteristics, such as velocity, oxygen concentration, and turbulence intensity, and consequently has a wider applicability. Particularly important is its ability to determine the flammability characteristics of materials used in spacecraft since in the absence of gravity the only flow present is that forced by the HVAC of the space facility. In this paper, we report work on the use of the FIST approach on the piloted ignition of a blended polypropylene fiberglass (PP/GL) composite material exposed to an external radiant flux in a forced convective flow of air. The effect of glass concentration under varying external radiant fluxes is examined and compared qualitatively with theoretical predictions of the ignition process. The results are used to infer the effect of glass content on the fire safety characteristics of composites.

Fernandez-Pello, A. C.; Rich, D.; Lautenberger, C.; Stefanovich, A.; Metha, S.; Torero, J.; Yuan, Z.; Ross, H.

2003-01-01

322

Evaluation of the TCE catalytic oxidation unit at Wurtsmith Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect

Remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater is frequently performed by air stripping, a process that transfers the contaminants from the water phase to the air phase by contacting the phases countercurrently through a packed-bed column. Air stripping has proven to be effective and economic for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater; in many cases, however, the states require the use of an emissions control device, such as a catalytic oxidation unit or a catalytic incinerator, in conjunction with the air stripping unit. Incineration is an attractive choice for emissions control since the contaminants are destroyed on site. Wurtsmith Air Force Base is the site of an air-stripping-with-emissions-control system to remove VOCs, chiefly trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater. A fluidized-bed catalytic oxidation unit treats the air stream to destroy the organic contaminants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of this unit and its catalyst for destroying halogenated organics with respect to catalyst bed temperature and operating time. The objectives included identification of any products of incomplete combustion formed and determination of the utility costs for the unit. Samples were collected over a period of {approximately}19 months with volatile organic sampling trains according to EPA Method 30. Samples were taken at catalyst bed temperatures of 315, 370, 425, and 480{degree}C. The results indicate that the incinerator was destroying the TCE with >97% efficiency when operated at 370{degree}C or greater. 6 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

Hylton, T.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Marchand, E.G. (Air Force Engineering and Services Center, Tyndall AFB, FL (USA))

1991-01-01

323

Advanced avionics concepts: Autonomous spacecraft control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A large increase in space operations activities is expected because of Space Station Freedom (SSF) and long range Lunar base missions and Mars exploration. Space operations will also increase as a result of space commercialization (especially the increase in satellite networks). It is anticipated that the level of satellite servicing operations will grow tenfold from the current level within the next 20 years. This growth can be sustained only if the cost effectiveness of space operations is improved. Cost effectiveness is operational efficiency with proper effectiveness. A concept is presented of advanced avionics, autonomous spacecraft control, that will enable the desired growth, as well as maintain the cost effectiveness (operational efficiency) in satellite servicing operations. The concept of advanced avionics that allows autonomous spacecraft control is described along with a brief description of each component. Some of the benefits of autonomous operations are also described. A technology utilization breakdown is provided in terms of applications.

1990-01-01

324

Integration of Passive Components for Spacecraft Avionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The NASA roadmap outlining future deep space missions to Europa and other outer planetary destinations calls for continued reductions in the mass and volume of the spacecraft avionics. Spacecraft power electronics, including the power switches and converters, remain difficult to miniaturize due to the need for large numbers of discrete passive components such as resistors, capacitors, inductors and transformers. As part of the System-on-a-chip program at the Center for Integrated Space Microsystems and at the University of Arkansas, we are working to develop integrated or embedded passive components geared specifically for use in power management and distribution (PMAD) in future avionics over the next five to ten years. This will not only enable a scaling down of the power subsystems, but will make possible new architectures such as "distributed" PMAD. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

Brandon, E. J.; Wesseling, E.; White, V.; Lieneweg, U.; Mojarradi, M.; Ulrich, R.; Wasef, M.; Mantooth, A.

2001-01-01

325

Space Application Requirements for Organic Avionics  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently evaluating polymer based components for application in launch vehicle and propulsion system avionics systems. Organic polymers offer great advantages over inorganic corollaries. Unlike inorganics with crystalline structures defining their sensing characteristics, organic polymers can be engineered to provide varying degrees of sensitivity for various parameters including electro-optic response, second harmonic generation, and piezoelectric response. While great advantages in performance can be achieved with organic polymers, survivability in the operational environment is a key aspect for their practical application. The space environment in particular offers challenges that must be considered in the application of polymer based devices. These challenges include: long term thermal stability for long duration missions, extreme thermal cycling, space radiation tolerance, vacuum operation, low power operation, high operational reliability. Requirements for application of polymer based devices in space avionics systems will be presented and discussed in light of current polymer materials.

Watson, Michael D.; Minow, Joseph; Altstatt, Richard; Wertz, George; Semmel, Charles; Edwards, David; Ashley, Paul R.

2004-01-01

326

Prognostics for Electronics Components of Avionics Systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Electronics components have and increasingly critical role in avionics systems and for the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research filed as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management. This paper reports on a prognostics application for electronics components of avionics systems, in particular, its application to the Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). The remaining useful life prediction for the IGBT is based on the particle filter framework, leveraging data from an accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. The accelerated aging test provided thermal-electrical overstress by applying thermal cycling to the device. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of the steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Bhaskar; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

2009-01-01

327

New Technologies for Space Avionics, 1993  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The report reviews a 1993 effort that investigated issues associated with the development of requirements, with the practice of concurrent engineering and with rapid prototyping, in the development of a next-generation Reaction Jet Drive Controller. This report details lessons learned, the current status of the prototype, and suggestions for future work. The report concludes with a discussion of the vision of future avionics architectures based on the principles associated with open architectures and integrated vehicle health management.

Aibel, David W.; Harris, David R.; Bartlett, Dave; Black, Steve; Campagna, Dave; Fernald, Nancy; Garbos, Ray

1993-01-01

328

Power, Avionics and Software Communication Network Architecture  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This document describes the communication architecture for the Power, Avionics and Software (PAS) 2.0 subsystem for the Advanced Extravehicular Mobile Unit (AEMU). The following systems are described in detail: Caution Warn- ing and Control System, Informatics, Storage, Video, Audio, Communication, and Monitoring Test and Validation. This document also provides some background as well as the purpose and goals of the PAS project at Glenn Research Center (GRC).

Ivancic, William D.; Sands, Obed S.; Bakula, Casey J.; Oldham, Daniel R.; Wright, Ted; Bradish, Martin A.; Klebau, Joseph M.

2014-01-01

329

Space transfer vehicle avionics advanced development needs  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The assessment of preliminary transportation program options for the exploration initiative is underway. The exploration initiative for the Moon and Mars is outlined by mission phases. A typical lunar/Mars outpost technology/advanced development schedule is provided. An aggressive and focused technology development program is needed as early as possible to successfully support these new initiatives. The avionics advanced development needs, plans, laboratory facilities, and benefits from an early start are described.

Huffaker, C. F.

1990-01-01

330

STS-2: SAIL non-avionics subsystems math model requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Simulation of the STS-2 Shuttle nonavionics subsystems in the shuttle avionics integration laboratory (SAIL) is necessary for verification of the integrated shuttle avionics system. The math model (simulation) requirements for each of the nonavionics subsystems that interfaces with the Shuttle avionics system is documented and a single source document for controlling approved changes (by the SAIL change control panel) to the math models is provided.

Bennett, W. P.; Herold, R. W.

1980-01-01

331

An Introduction to Intelligent Processing Programs Developed by the Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Air Force has numerous on-going manufacturing and integration development programs (machine tools, composites, metals, assembly, and electronics) which are instrumental in improving productivity in the aerospace industry, but more importantly, have identified strategies and technologies required for the integration of advanced processing equipment. An introduction to four current Air Force Manufacturing Technology Directorate (ManTech) manufacturing areas is provided. Research is being carried out in the following areas: (1) machining initiatives for aerospace subcontractors which provide for advanced technology and innovative manufacturing strategies to increase the capabilities of small shops; (2) innovative approaches to advance machine tool products and manufacturing processes; (3) innovative approaches to advance sensors for process control in machine tools; and (4) efforts currently underway to develop, with the support of industry, the Next Generation Workstation/Machine Controller (Low-End Controller Task).

Sampson, Paul G.; Sny, Linda C.

1992-01-01

332

Airborne mass spectrometers: four decades of atmospheric and space research at the Air Force research laboratory.  

PubMed

Mass spectrometry is a versatile research tool that has proved to be extremely useful for exploring the fundamental nature of the earth's atmosphere and ionosphere and in helping to solve operational problems facing the Air Force and the Department of Defense. In the past 40 years, our research group at the Air Force Research Laboratory has flown quadrupole mass spectrometers of many designs on nearly 100 sounding rockets, nine satellites, three Space Shuttles and many missions of high-altitude research aircraft and balloons. We have also used our instruments in ground-based investigations of rocket and jet engine exhaust, combustion chemistry and microwave breakdown chemistry. This paper is a review of the instrumentation and techniques needed for space research, a summary of the results from many of the experiments, and an introduction to the broad field of atmospheric and space mass spectrometry in general. PMID:10548806

Viggiano, A A; Hunton, D E

1999-11-01

333

Radar Scan Strategies for the Patrick Air Force Base Weather Surveillance Radar, Model-74C, Replacement  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) is replacing the Weather Surveillance Radar, Model 74C (WSR-74C) at Patrick Air Force Base (PAFB), with a Doppler, dual polarization radar, the Radtec 43/250. A new scan strategy is needed for the Radtec 43/250, to provide high vertical resolution data over the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) launch pads, while taking advantage of the new radar's advanced capabilities for detecting severe weather phenomena associated with convection within the 45 WS area of responsibility. The Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed several scan strategies customized for the operational needs of the 45 WS. The AMU also developed a plan for evaluating the scan strategies in the period prior to operational acceptance, currently scheduled for November 2008.

Short, David

2008-01-01

334

Baseline meteorological soundings for parametric environmental investigations at Kennedy Space Center and Vandenberg Air Force Base  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Meteorological soundings representative of the atmospheric environment at the Kennedy Space Center, Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Base, California, are presented. Synthetic meteorological soundings at Kennedy Space Center, including fall, spring, and a sea breeze, and at Vandenberg Air Force Base (sea breeze with low and high level inversion and stationary upper level troughs) are shown. Soundings of frontal passages are listed. The Titan launch soundings at Kennedy Space Center present a wide range of meteorological conditions, both seasonal and time of day variations. The meteorological data input of altitude, wind speed, wind direction, temperature, and pressure may be used as meteorological inputs for the NASA/MSFC Multilayer Diffusion Model or other models to obtain quantitative estimates of effluent concentrations associated with the potential emission of major combustion products in the lower atmosphere to simulate actual launches of space vehicles. The Titan launch soundings are also of value in terms of rocket effluent measurements for analysis purposes.

Susko, M.; Stephens, J. B.

1976-01-01

335

Space tug avionics definition study. Volume 3: Avionics baseline configuration definition  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The baseline avionics systems for the space tug is comprised of a central digital computer that integrates the functions of all of the tug's subsystems by means of a redundant digital data bus. The major subsystems of the avionics system are: data management; communications; guidance, navigation, and control; rendezvous and docking; electrical power; and instrumentation. The baseline avionics system for the space tug resulting from system and subsystem trade studies is defined. Tug interfaces with the spacecraft, orbiter and the ground, and the baseline philosophy and configuration for onboard checkout of the tug are included. Baseline configurations, functional and operational features, component details and characteristics, and the supporting software are included in the subsystem descriptions.

1975-01-01

336

Study objectives: Will commercial avionics do the job? Improvements needed?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Improvements in commercial avionics are covered in a viewgraph format. Topics include the following: computer architecture, user requirements, Boeing 777 aircraft, cost effectiveness, and implemention.

Nasr, Hatem

1992-01-01

337

Rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) functional description  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A functional design of a rotorcraft digital advanced avionics system (RODAAS) to transfer the technology developed for general aviation in the Demonstration Advanced Avionics System (DAAS) program to rotorcraft operation was undertaken. The objective was to develop an integrated avionics system design that enhances rotorcraft single pilot IFR operations without increasing the required pilot training/experience by exploiting advanced technology in computers, busing, displays and integrated systems design. A key element of the avionics system is the functionally distributed architecture that has the potential for high reliability with low weight, power and cost. A functional description of the RODAAS hardware and software functions is presented.

Peterson, E. M.; Bailey, J.; Mcmanus, T. J.

1985-01-01

338

Effects of Contaminants on Reproductive Success of Aquatic Birds Nesting at Edwards Air Force Base, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contamination by organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls, metals, and trace elements at Edwards Air Force\\u000a Base (EAFB), located in the Mojave Desert, could adversely affect nesting aquatic birds, especially at the sewage lagoons\\u000a that comprise Piute Ponds. Estimates of avian reproduction, in conjunction with analyses of eggs and avian foods for contaminant\\u000a residues, may indicate the potential for negative effects

R. L. Hothem; J. J. Crayon; M. A. Law

2006-01-01

339

STS-27 Atlantis, OV-104, lands at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A cloud of dust, formed by the touchdown of the main landing gear (MLG) and nose landing gear (NLG) on the Mojave Desert sands, trails behind Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, as it slows to a stop on Runway 17 dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB), California. This aft view of OV-104's landing shows the space shuttle main engines, wings, and tail section with vertical tail rudder / speed brake engaged. Mountains appear in the distance.

1988-01-01

340

Air Force hierarchy of models: a look inside the great pyramid  

Microsoft Academic Search

The widely-used Air Force hierarchy of models and simulations is generally depicted as a four-level pyramid; ranging from Engineering\\/Component Level up to Theater\\/Campaign Level. While it does present a concise picture of the scope of military models and simulations, it gives the impression that there is a smooth and natural transition from one level to the next. That is not

Dawn A. Trevisani; Alex F. Sisti

2000-01-01

341

Basic materials research programs at the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) annually sponsors approximately 5000 research scientists at 1000 universities and laboratories, generating about 10,000 Ph.D. graduates per decade, all expected to publish their basic research findings in peer-reviewed journals. After a brief introduction of the nature of AFOSR's support to basic research in the U.S. and international scientific communities, work it supports

Herbert C. Carlson; K. C. Goretta

2006-01-01

342

Exploration and Resource Assessment at Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho Using an Integrated Team Approach  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Air Force is facing a number of challenges as it moves into the future, one of the biggest being how to provide safe and secure energy to support base operations. A team of scientists and engineers met at Mountain Home Air Force Base near Boise, Idaho, to discuss the possibility of exploring for geothermal resources under the base. The team identified that there was a reasonable potential for geothermal resources based on data from an existing well. In addition, a regional gravity map helped identify several possible locations for drilling a new well. The team identified several possible sources of funding for this well—the most logical being to use U.S. Department of Energy funds to drill the upper half of the well and U.S. Air Force funds to drill the bottom half of the well. The well was designed as a slimhole well in accordance with State of Idaho Department of Water Resources rules and regulations. Drilling operations commenced at the Mountain Home site in July of 2011 and were completed in January of 2012. Temperatures increased gradually, especially below a depth of 2000 ft. Temperatures increased more rapidly below a depth of 5500 ft. The bottom of the well is at 5976 ft, where a temperature of about 140°C was recorded. The well flowed artesian from a depth below 5600 ft, until it was plugged off with drilling mud. Core samples were collected from the well and are being analyzed to help understand permeability at depth. Additional tests using a televiewer system will be run to evaluate orientation and directions at fractures, especially in the production zone. A final report on the well exploitation will be forthcoming later this year. The Air Force will use it to evaluate the geothermal resource potential for future private development options at Mountain Home AFB.

Joseph C. Armstrong; Robert P. Breckenridge; Dennis L. Nielson; John W. Shervais; Thomas R. Wood

2012-10-01

343

Air Force Research Laboratory Investments in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has been helping students to become more literate in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), empowering students to become innovators, inventors, self-reliant, and logical thinkers. As technologically proficient problem-solvers, they will be able to compete as skilled “knowledge workers” in the twenty-first century. The laboratory hopes these efforts will help foster development of a

Ricardo Negron; Casey A. DeRaad; Michael T. Huggins; Joe Sciabica

2011-01-01

344

Advanced cathode and anode research at the Air Force Research Laboratory  

Microsoft Academic Search

High power microwave (HPM) tubes require currents and voltages generally in excess of 1 kA and 100 kV. Traditionally such systems have operated in poor vacuum (>10-6 torr) and on a single shot basis. Current work at the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) has been directed toward high vacuum and high repetition rate systems, necessitating a complete revision of standard

D. Shiffler; M. Ruebush; M. LaCour; K. Golby; K. Cartwright; M. Haworth

2002-01-01

345

Overview of the Air Force Research Laboratory laser applications group active imaging programs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Air Force Research Laboratory laser applications group, also known as 'Scorp Works' has been developing user specific, active illumination systems for the past 8 years. A survey of some of these programs will be presented. Programs to be included are the covet adjustable laser illuminator, the Coast Guard search and rescue laser systems, a camera automated tracking system, and a 1.5 ?m covert camera and illuminator.

Cooley, William T.; Gurney, Matthew L.; Dodd, Patrick R.; Griffy, Barton W.; Kelly, John M.; Pressnall, Tim A.

1999-07-01

346

Sonic booms produced by US Air Force and US Navy aircraft: Measured data  

Microsoft Academic Search

A sonic measurement program was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base. Sonic boom signatures, produced by F-4, F-14, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-111, SR-71, and T-38 aircraft, were obtained under the flight track and at various lateral sites which were located up to 18 miles off-track. Thirteen monitors developed by Det 1 AL\\/BBE were used to collect full sonic boom waveforms,

R. A. Lee; J. M. Downing

1991-01-01

347

Suicide in the United States Air Force: Risk factors communicated before and at death  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundOver the last decade, suicide rates in the U.S. military have steadily increased, resulting in a call for suicide-related research with military populations. The present project aimed to describe and evaluate the communications (i.e., verbally and in suicide notes) of 13 suicide risk factors in the suicide death investigation files of 98 active duty U.S. Air Force (USAF) members.

Daniel W. Cox; Marjan Ghahramanlou-Holloway; Farrah N. Greene; Jennifer L. Bakalar; Christina L. Schendel; M. Elicia Nademin; David A. Jobes; David R. Englert; Michael Kindt

2011-01-01

348

Ground-water-monitoring evaluation, Hughes Aircraft, US Air Force Plant No. 44. Tucson, Arizona  

Microsoft Academic Search

This report summarizes the results of EPA investigations conducted during April 1987 at the Hughes Aircraft\\/Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona to determine compliance with the regulatory requirements of ground-water monitoring, and for the hazardous and solid-waste amendments of RCRA, and the corresponding State regulations. Based on the results of these investigations, a number of requisite actions were identified

M. G. Filippini; D. Zuroski

1988-01-01

349

Geothermal exploration program, Hill Air Force Base, Davis and Weber Counties, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Results obtained from a program designed to locate a low- or moderate-temperature geothermal resource that might exist beneath Hill Air Force Base (AFB), Ogden, Utah are discussed. A phased exploration program was conducted at Hill AFB. Published geological, geochemical, and geophysical reports on the area were examined, regional exploration was conducted, and two thermal gradient holes were drilled. This program demonstrated that thermal waters are not present in the shallow subsurface at this site. (MHR)

Glenn, W.E.; Chapman, D.S.; Foley, D.; Capuano, R.M.; Cole, D.; Sibbett, B.; Ward, S.H.

1980-03-01

350

ASCAN Helms participates in T-38 training at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

1990 Group 13 Astronaut Candidate (ASCAN) Susan J. Helms participates in T-38 training at Vance Air Force Base (VAFB), Enid, Oklahoma. Helms, wearing helmet with oxygen mask, familiarizes herself with procedures to follow in preparation for ejection from a jet aircraft. Helms, along with the other 1990 Astronaut Class members, took part in ground egress and parasail training exercises at VAFB from 07-29-90 through 07-31-90.

1990-01-01

351

Ground-water conditions at Beale Air Force Base and vicinity, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Ground-water conditions were studied in a 168-square-mile area between the Sierra Nevada and the Feather River in Yuba County, Calif. The area is in the eastern part of the Sacramento Valley and includes most of Beale Air Force Base. Source, occurrence, movement, and chemical quality of the ground water were evaluated. Ground water occurs in sedimentary and volcanic rocks of Tertiary and Quaternary age. The base of the freshwater is in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks of Oligocene and Eocene age, that contain water of high dissolved-solids concentration. The ground water occurs under unconfined and partly confined conditions. At Beale Air Force Base it is at times partly confined. Recharge is principally from the rivers. Pumpage in the study area was estimated to be 129,000 acre-feet in 1975. In the 1960's, water levels in most parts of the study area declined less rapidly than in earlier years or became fairly stable. In the 1970's, water levels at Beale Air Force Base declined only slightly. Spacing of wells on the base and rates of pumping are such that excessive pumping interference is avoided. Water quality at the base and throughout the study area is generally good. Dissolved-solids concentrations are 700 to 900 milligrams per liter in the undifferentiated sedimentary rocks beneath the base well field. (USGS)

Page, R.W.

1980-01-01

352

Innovative pollution prevention program at Air Force owned Raytheon operated facility incorporating Russian technology  

SciTech Connect

Air Force Plant 44 in Tucson, Arizona is owned by the Air Force and operated by Raytheon Missile Systems Company. A joint Air Force/Raytheon Pollution Prevention Team operates at AFP 44 with the ultimate goal to minimize or eliminate the use of hazardous substances. The team works together to uncover new technologies and methods that will replace chemicals used in the plant's missile manufacturing facilities. The program maximizes pollution prevention by first eliminating hazardous material use, then chemical recycling, next hazardous waste reduction and finally wastewater treatment and recycling. From fiscal years 1994 through 1997, nine pollution prevention projects have been implemented, totaling $2.6 million, with a payback averaging less than two years. A unique wastewater treatment method has been demonstrated as part of this program. This is electroflotation, a Russian technology which removes dispersed particles from liquid with gas bubbles obtained during water electrolysis. A unit was built in the US which successfully removed organic emulsions from wastewater. Operational units are planned for the removal of waste from waterfall paint booths. The pollution prevention joint team continues to be very active with two projects underway in FY 98 and two more funded for FY 99.

Stallings, J.H.; Cepeda-Calderon, S.

1999-07-01

353

NATO Air Force crew Individual Protective Equipment present and potential future  

SciTech Connect

Present NATO countries Air Force Individual Protective Equipment (IPE) for ground crew is identical to Army IPE. Recent studies have shown that the Air Forces face unacceptable performance degradation in chemical warfare environments and that the IPE is over designed for the expected chemical challenge. The situation is illustrated by means of a few examples. Chemical protective overgarments and undercoveralls have now evolved to an extended storage life of over ten years and a high resistance to wear and tear. Potential chemical challenge to NATO air bases is such that a small fraction of personnel need to replace the suit in a few hours, whereas for the remaining very large fraction, a light chemical protection would be sufficient. Air permeable gloves have been developed that will protect the aircrew and ground crew to a sufficient extent and still allow for the required dexterity. Finally, developments are on the way to replace the slippery overboots with an integrated chemical defense combat boot or comfortable NBC socks. These developments are illustrated by means of some examples, and some test data is provided.

Medema, J.; Wittgen, P.P.M.M.

1988-05-01

354

Source evaluation report phase 2 investigation: Limited field investigation. Final report: United States Air Force Environmental Restoration Program, Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the limited field investigation work done to address issues and answer unresolved questions regarding a collection of potential contaminant sources at Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), near Fairbanks, Alaska. These sources were listed in the Eielson AFB Federal Facility Agreement supporting the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of the base. The limited field investigation began in 1993 to resolve all remaining technical issues and provide the data and analysis required to evaluate the environmental hazard associated with these sites. The objective of the limited field investigation was to allow the remedial project managers to sort each site into one of three categories: requiring remedial investigation/feasibility study, requiring interim removal action, or requiring no further remedial action.

Not Available

1994-10-01

355

Results of implementing a disciplined avionic development process: advanced design for quality avionic systems (ADQAS)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Producers and integrators of military avionic systems have long had to deal with implementing highly integrated and complex systems. The commercial sector is beginning to face these same issues and has realized that routine development and test approaches are inadequate. For example, the FAA is about to publish Aerospace Recommended Practice (ARP) 4754 which describes a new approach to certifying

P. B. Hugge; J. D. Lang

1995-01-01

356

78 FR 63459 - Names of Members of the Performance Review Board for the Department of the Air Force  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Economics 12. Mr. Hale, Director, Ground Enterprise Directorate 13. Mr. Peterson, Chief Financial Officer, US Special Operations Command Additionally, all career status Air Force Tier 3 SES members not included in the above list are...

2013-10-24

357

Application of discrete event simulation techniques for prioritization of U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing Projects  

E-print Network

This study, through the use of discrete event simulation and modeling, explores various prioritization disciplines for U.S. Air Force Military Family Housing maintenance, repair, and renovation projects. Actual data from the Military Family Housing...

Krukenberg, Harry J.

1996-01-01

358

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) Federal Energy Management Program Technical Assistance Project 224 Altus Air Force Base Solar Technologies  

SciTech Connect

The principal goal of this project was to evaluate altus Air Force Base for building integrated silicon or thin film module photovoltaic opportunities. This report documents PNNL's efforts and documents study conclusions.

Russo, Bryan J.

2010-09-30

359

75 FR 33587 - Local Redevelopment Authority and Available Surplus Buildings and Land at Air Force Research Labs...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...telephone (916) 643-6420, ext 100, or Ms. Debra Bahr, Realty Specialist, Air Force Real Property Agency, 2261 Hughes Ave, Ste. 121, Lackland AFB, TX 78236, telephone (210) 395-9487. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: This surplus property is...

2010-06-14

360

Scaling Star-Coupler-Based Optical Networks for Avionics Applications  

E-print Network

Scaling Star-Coupler-Based Optical Networks for Avionics Applications Qi Li, Sebastien Rumley of an optical broadcast- and-select network based on a passive star coupler is ex- plored for avionics capable of receiving signals from all other clients connected to the star coupler. We propose a connecting

Bergman, Keren

361

Building a Predictable Avionics Platform In Ada: A Case Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

In an effort to promote the use of Ada in embedded system development, a realistic avionics application model whose hard real-time properties are fully predictable has been generated. This was done starting with a rate monotonic analysis of a set of typical fully synchronized periodic and aperiodic avionics tasks drawn from an idealized attack aircraft mission computer. The authors describe

C. Douglass Locke; David R. Vogel; T. J. Mesler

1991-01-01

362

Avionics GPB Control System Analysis  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Gravity Probe B is a Satellite being developed by Lockheed Martin under NASA contract through MSFC and managed by Stanford University. The goal of the satellite experiment is to test the accuracy of drift predictions made using Einstein s General Theory of Relativity. The drift in the direction of the spin axes of 4 highly precise quartz spherical gyroscopes induced by motion in the earth s gravitational field will be measured over a year s duration with the known, non-relativistic effects removed. The expected angles of drift for a one year period are approximately 6.6 arcsec for drift in the orbit plane called geodetic drift and 0.033 arcsec of drift normal to the orbit plane called frame dragging. The aerodynamic drag force on the GPB Satellite is compensated by a translation control system. It is pointed at a guide star and maintained in spin at a rate to be selected in the range 0.1 - 1 rpm. The purpose of our task is to update the TREETOPS GPB spacecraft simulation and to assist MSFC in assessing the affect of Helium slosh dynamics on spacecraft pointing performance.

2003-01-01

363

Department of Energy/US Air Force Memorandum of Agreement Program  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the Department of Energy/United States Air Force Memorandum of Agreement (DOE/USAF MOA) Program which was formed as a result of the DOE and the US Air Force combining forces to reduce waste generation in areas common to both agencies. This program will develop pollution prevention technologies such as material substitution and advanced manufacturing techniques to reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous waste (see Figures 1). Joint Agency development of solutions to shared problems, including substitution of chlorinated solvents and metal coating/manufacturing process development, leverages DOE funds. The Program will cover all phases involved in industrial processes. It will expedite future selection and implementation of the best technologies to show immediate and long-term effectiveness for DOE and USAF sites. The Program provides for technical performance comparisons, under actual field conditions, of different available technologies. The comparisons will be based on effectiveness, with respect to the technology itself, risk reduction and general acceptability. The goal is to develop and transfer environmentally compliant manufacturing and repair technologies.

Copeland, A.E.

1992-08-01

364

Department of Energy/US Air Force Memorandum of Agreement Program  

SciTech Connect

This document discusses the Department of Energy/United States Air Force Memorandum of Agreement (DOE/USAF MOA) Program which was formed as a result of the DOE and the US Air Force combining forces to reduce waste generation in areas common to both agencies. This program will develop pollution prevention technologies such as material substitution and advanced manufacturing techniques to reduce or eliminate the generation of hazardous waste (see Figures 1). Joint Agency development of solutions to shared problems, including substitution of chlorinated solvents and metal coating/manufacturing process development, leverages DOE funds. The Program will cover all phases involved in industrial processes. It will expedite future selection and implementation of the best technologies to show immediate and long-term effectiveness for DOE and USAF sites. The Program provides for technical performance comparisons, under actual field conditions, of different available technologies. The comparisons will be based on effectiveness, with respect to the technology itself, risk reduction and general acceptability. The goal is to develop and transfer environmentally compliant manufacturing and repair technologies.

Copeland, A.E.

1992-01-01

365

Walk-through survey report: HVLV (high velocity low volume) control technology for aircraft bonded wing and radome maintenance at Air Force Logistics Command, McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, California  

Microsoft Academic Search

A walk through survey was conducted at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center, McClellan Air Force Base, California, on June 13, 1983, to evaluate the use of High Velocity Low Volume (HVLV) technology in the aircraft-maintenance industry. The HVLV system consisted of 65 ceiling drops in the bonded honeycomb shop where grinding and sanding operations created glass fiber and resin dusts.

Hollett

1983-01-01

366

Remedial action plan: United States Air Force Plant Number 44, Tucson, Arizona. Final report, 1981-1986  

Microsoft Academic Search

The remedial action plan for Air Force Plant No. 44, Tuscon, Ariz., is a complete report of field-investigative activities into past waste-disposal practices at the plant as part of a four-phased Installation Restoration Program by the United States Air Force to identify environmental concerns caused by past waste-disposal practices. The report contains all four phases of the investigation including a

1986-01-01

367

Development of energy harvester system for avionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper deals with an energy harvesting system for avionics; it is an energy source for a unit which is used for wireless monitoring or autonomous control of a small aircraft engine. This paper is focused on development process of energy harvesting system from mechanical vibrations in the engine area. The used energy harvesting system consists of an electro-magnetic energy harvester, power management and energy storage element. The energy harvesting system with commercial power management circuits have to be tested and verified measured results are used for an optimal redesign of the electro-magnetic harvester. This developmental step is necessary for the development of the optimal vibration energy harvesting system.

Hadas, Z.; Vetiska, V.; Ancik, Z.; Ondrusek, C.; Singule, V.

2013-05-01

368

Micro-Scale Avionics Thermal Management  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Trends in the thermal management of avionics and commercial ground-based microelectronics are converging, and facing the same dilemma: a shortfall in technology to meet near-term maximum junction temperature and package power projections. Micro-scale devices hold the key to significant advances in thermal management, particularly micro-refrigerators/coolers that can drive cooling temperatures below ambient. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) Stirling cooler is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this challenge with predicted efficiencies that are an order of magnitude better than current and future thermoelectric coolers.

Moran, Matthew E.

2001-01-01

369

Evaluation of the TCE catalytic oxidation unit at Wurtsmith Air Force Base  

SciTech Connect

Wurtsmith Air Force Base is the site of an air-stripping-with-emissions-control system to remove volatile organic compounds (VOCs), chiefly trichloroethylene (TCE), from groundwater. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a fluidized-bed catalytic oxidation unit for destroying halogenated organics with respect to catalyst bed temperature and operating time. The objectives included identification of any products of incomplete combustion formed and determination of the utility costs for the unit. Samples were collected over a period of {approximately} 19 months with volatile organic sampling trains according to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Method 30. Samples were taken at catalyst bed temperatures of 315, 370, 425, and 480 C. The results indicate that the incinerator was destroying the TCE with >97% efficiency when operated at {ge}370 C. A conservative cost estimate for utilities was determined to be $0.36/1,000 gal of water treated.

Hylton, T.D. (Oak Ridge National Lab., Tennessee (United States))

1992-02-01

370

United States Air Force Academy get-away-special flexible beam experiment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Department of Astronautics at the United States Air Force Academy is currently planning to fly an experiment in a NASA Get-Away-Special (GAS) canister. The experiment was named the flex beam experiment. The primary technical objective of the flex beam experiment is to measure the damping of a thin beam in the vacuum and zero G environment of space. By measuring the damping in space, it is hoped to determine the amount of damping the beam normally experiences due to the gravitational forces present on Earth. This will allow validation of models which predict the dynamics of thin beams in the space environment. The experiment will also allow the Academy to develop and improve its ability to perform experiments within the confines of a NASA GAS canister. Several experiments, of limited technical difficulty, were flown by the Academy. More complex experiments are currently planned and it is hoped to learn techniques with each space shuttle flight.

Bubb, Keith W.; Lamberson, Steven E.; Lash, Thomas A.

1989-01-01

371

F-16 Class A mishaps in the U.S. Air Force, 1975-93.  

PubMed

All USAF F-16 fighter Class A (major) aircraft mishaps from 1975-93 were analyzed, using records from the U.S. Air Force Safety Agency (AFSA). There were 190 Class A mishaps involving 204 F-16's and 217 aircrew during this 19-yr period. The overall Class A rate was 5.09 per 100,000 flight hours, more than double the overall USAF rate. The mishaps are categorized by year, month, time of day and model of aircraft in relation to mishap causes as determined and reported by AFSA. Formation position, phase of flight and primary cause of the mishap indicate that maneuvering, cruise and low-level phases account for the majority of the mishaps (71%), with air-to-air engagements associated with a higher proportion of pilot error (71%) than was air-to-ground (49%). Engine failure was the number one cause of mishaps (35%), and collision with the ground the next most frequent (24%). Pilot error was determined as causative in 55% of all the mishaps. Pilot error was often associated with other non-pilot related causes. Channelized attention, loss of situational awareness, and spatial disorientation accounted for approximately 30% of the total pilot error causes found. Pilot demographics, flight hour/sortie profiles, and aircrew injuries are also listed. Fatalities occurred in 27% of the mishaps, with 97% of those involving pilot errors. PMID:8853836

Knapp, C J; Johnson, R

1996-08-01

372

Validation and Verification of Operational Land Analysis Activities at the Air Force Weather Agency  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The NASA developed Land Information System (LIS) is the Air Force Weather Agency's (AFWA) operational Land Data Assimilation System (LDAS) combining real time precipitation observations and analyses, global forecast model data, vegetation, terrain, and soil parameters with the community Noah land surface model, along with other hydrology module options, to generate profile analyses of global soil moisture, soil temperature, and other important land surface characteristics. (1) A range of satellite data products and surface observations used to generate the land analysis products (2) Global, 1/4 deg spatial resolution (3) Model analysis generated at 3 hours

Shaw, Michael; Kumar, Sujay V.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Cetola, Jeffrey

2011-01-01

373

Analysis of the US Air Force Defense Meteorological Satellite Program Imagery for Global Lightning  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The U. S. Air Force operates the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), a system of near-polar orbiting satellites designed for use in operational weather forecasting and other applications. DMSP satellites carry a suite of sensors that provide images of the earth and profiles of the atmosphere. The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado has been involved with the archival of DMSP data and its use for several research projects since 1979. This report summarizes the portion of this involvement funded by NASA.

Scharfen, Gregory R.

1999-01-01

374

Hybrid sounding rocket development at the United States Air Force Academy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) has developed a LOx-HTPB (Liquid Oxygen-Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene) powered sounding rocket. USAFA has proven the use of hybrid rockets as a forgiving instrument to teach the fundamentals of aerospace system engineering at the undergraduate level. A rocket motor has been designed which will deliver 1000 lbs. of thrust for 1O-15 seconds and power the vehicle to approximately 20,000 ft. The rocket will be recovered via parachute and system performance will be recorded with an onboard data acquisition system. The main subsystems have been tested successfully and a launch is expected this summer.

Lydon, M. C.; Simmons, R. J.

1993-06-01

375

Geology, hydrology, and water supply of Edwards Air Force Base, Kern County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Edwards Air Force Base occupies the northern part of Antelope Valley, California. As a result of large-scale and increasing agricultural pumping in the valley, the net draft has exceeded the perennial supply since about 1930 and was about 170,000 acre-feet in 1951--at least three times the estimated yield. As a result, there has been a continuing depletion of ground water stored in all the unconsolidated deposits, including the principal aquifers contained in the younger and older alluvium.

Dutcher, Lee Carlton; Warts, G.F., Jr.

1963-01-01

376

Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI. Summary report. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a summary of the Air Force CALS Test Network (AFCTN) Test Report Transfer of Air Force Technical Procurement Bid Set Data to Small Businesses, Using CALS and EDI (AFCTN Test Report 94-034, UCRL-ID-118619). It represents a synthesis of the results, conclusions, and recommendations, as well as a more concise presentation of the issues and strategies as viewed from AFCTN`s perspective. This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s {open_quote}Blue Ribbon{close_quote} contractors, located throughout the United States. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote.

NONE

1995-01-10

377

Flight elements: Advanced avionics systems architectures  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Space transportation objectives are associated with transporting material from Earth to orbit, interplanetary travel, and planetary landing. The objectives considered herein are associated with Earth to orbit transportation. Many good avionics architectural features will support all phases of space transportation, but interplanetary transportation poses significantly different problems such as long mission time with high reliability, unattended operation, and many different opportunities such as long nonoperational flight segments that can be used for equipment fault diagnosis and repair. Fault tolerance can be used to permit continued operation with faulty units, not only during launch but also, and perhaps with more impact, during prelaunch activities. Avionics systems are entering a phase of development where the traditional approaches to satisfactory systems based on engineering judgement and thorough testing will alone no longer be adequate to assure that the required system performance can be obtained. A deeper understanding will be required to make the effects of obscure design decisions clear at a level where their impact can be properly judged.

1990-01-01

378

Observed and SST-forced multidecadal variability in global land surface air temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of multidecadal variability (MDV) in global land surface air temperature (SAT) are analyzed based on observations. The role of sea surface temperature (SST) variations in generating MDV in land SAT is assessed using atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by observed SST. MDV in land SAT exhibits regional differences, with amplitude larger than 0.3 °C mainly over North America, East Asia, Northern Eurasia, Northern Africa and Greenland for the study period of 1902-2004. MDV can account for more than 30 % of long-term temperature variation during the last century in most regions, especially more than 50 % in parts of the above-mentioned regions. The SST-forced simulations reproduce the observed feature of zonal mean MDV in land SAT, though with weaker amplitude especially at the northern high-latitudes. Two types of MDV in land SAT, one of 60-year-timescale, mainly observed in the northern mid-high-latitude lands, and another of 20-30-year-timescale, mainly observed in the low-latitude lands, are also well reproduced. The SST-forced MDV accounts for more than 40 % amplitude of observed MDV in most regions. Except for some sporadically distributed regions in central Eurasia, South America and Western Australia, the SST-forced multidecadal variations are well in-phase with observations. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation signals are found dominant in MDV of both the observed and SST-forced land SAT, suggesting important roles of these oceanic oscillations in generating MDV in global land SAT.

Gao, L. H.; Yan, Z. W.; Quan, X. W.

2014-03-01

379

Observed and SST-forced multidecadal variability in global land surface air temperature  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The characteristics of multidecadal variability (MDV) in global land surface air temperature (SAT) are analyzed based on observations. The role of sea surface temperature (SST) variations in generating MDV in land SAT is assessed using atmospheric general circulation model simulations forced by observed SST. MDV in land SAT exhibits regional differences, with amplitude larger than 0.3 °C mainly over North America, East Asia, Northern Eurasia, Northern Africa and Greenland for the study period of 1902-2004. MDV can account for more than 30 % of long-term temperature variation during the last century in most regions, especially more than 50 % in parts of the above-mentioned regions. The SST-forced simulations reproduce the observed feature of zonal mean MDV in land SAT, though with weaker amplitude especially at the northern high-latitudes. Two types of MDV in land SAT, one of 60-year-timescale, mainly observed in the northern mid-high-latitude lands, and another of 20-30-year-timescale, mainly observed in the low-latitude lands, are also well reproduced. The SST-forced MDV accounts for more than 40 % amplitude of observed MDV in most regions. Except for some sporadically distributed regions in central Eurasia, South America and Western Australia, the SST-forced multidecadal variations are well in-phase with observations. The Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation and Pacific Decadal Oscillation signals are found dominant in MDV of both the observed and SST-forced land SAT, suggesting important roles of these oceanic oscillations in generating MDV in global land SAT.

Gao, L. H.; Yan, Z. W.; Quan, X. W.

2015-01-01

380

Automation&Characterization of US Air Force Bench Top Wind Tunnels - Summary Report  

SciTech Connect

The United States Air Force Precision Measurement Equipment Laboratories (PMEL) calibrate over 1,000 anemometer probes per year. To facilitate a more efficient calibration process for probe-style anemometers, the Air Force Metrology and Calibration Program underwent an effort to modernize the existing PMEL bench top wind tunnels. Through a joint effort with the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the performance of PMEL wind tunnels was improved. The improvement consisted of new high accuracy sensors, automatic data acquisition, and a software-driven calibration process. As part of the wind tunnel upgrades, an uncertainty analysis was completed, laser Doppler velocimeter profiling was conducted to characterize the velocities at probe locations in the wind tunnel, and pitot tube calibrations of the wind tunnel were verified. The bench top wind tunnel accuracy and repeatability has been measured for nine prototype wind tunnel systems and valuable field experience has been gained with these wind tunnels at the PMELs. This report describes the requirements for the wind tunnel improvements along with actual implementation strategies and details. Lessons-learned from the automation, the velocity profiling, and the software-driven calibration process will also be discussed.

Hardy, J.E.

2006-03-23

381

Sonic booms produced by US Air Force and US Navy aircraft: Measured data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A sonic measurement program was conducted at Edwards Air Force Base. Sonic boom signatures, produced by F-4, F-14, F-15, F-16, F-18, F-111, SR-71, and T-38 aircraft, were obtained under the flight track and at various lateral sites which were located up to 18 miles off-track. Thirteen monitors developed by Det 1 AL/BBE were used to collect full sonic boom waveforms, and nine modified dosimeters were used to collect supplemental peak overpressures and the C-weighted Sound Exposure Levels (CSEL) for 43 near steady supersonic flights of the above United States Air Force and United States Navy aircraft. This report describes the measured database (BOOMFILE) that contains sonic boom signatures and overpressures, aircraft tracking, and local weather data. These measured data highlight the major influences on sonic boom propagation and generation. The data from this study show that a constant offset of 26 from the peak overpressure expressed in dB gives a good estimate of the CSEL of a sonic boom.

Lee, R. A.; Downing, J. M.

1991-01-01

382

Future Directions of Supersonic Combustion Research: Air Force/NASA Workshop on Supersonic Combustion  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research, the Air Force Wright Laboratory Aero Propulsion and Power Directorate, and the NASA Langley Research Center held a joint supersonic combustion workshop on 14-16 May 1996. The intent of this meeting was to: (1) examine the current state-of-the-art in hydrocarbon and/or hydrogen fueled scramjet research; (2) define the future direction and needs of basic research in support of scramjet technology; and (3) when appropriate, help transition basic research findings to solve the needs of developmental engineering programs in the area of supersonic combustion and fuels. A series of topical sessions were planned. Opening presentations were designed to focus and encourage group discussion and scientific exchange. The last half-day of the workshop was set aside for group discussion of the issues that were raised during the meeting for defining future research opportunities and directions. The following text attempts to summarize the discussions that took place at the workshop.

Tishkoff, Julian M.; Drummond, J. Philip; Edwards, Tim; Nejad, Abdollah S.

1997-01-01

383

Fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation survey, Norton Air Force Base, California  

SciTech Connect

The fall 1994 wildlife and vegetation surveys were completed October 3-7, 1994, at Norton Air Force Base (AFB), California. Two biologists from CDM Federal Programs, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regional biologist and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) lead biologist conducted the surveys. A habitat assessment of three Installation Restoration Project (IRP) sites at Norton Air Force Base was also completed during the fall survey period. The IRP sites include: Landfill No. 2 (Site 2); the Industrial Wastewater Treatment Plant (IWTP) area; and Former Fire Training Area No. 1 (Site 5). The assessments were designed to qualitatively characterize the sites of concern, identify potential ecological receptors, and provide information for Remedial Design/Remedial Action activities. A Reference Area (Santa Ana River Wash) and the base urban areas were also characterized. The reference area assessment was performed to provide a baseline for comparison with the IRP site habitats. The fall 1994 survey is the second of up to four surveys that may be completed. In order to develop a complete understanding of all plant and animal species using the base, these surveys were planned to be conducted over four seasons. Species composition can vary widely during the course of a year in Southern California, and therefore, seasonal surveys will provide the most complete and reliable data to address changes in habitat structure and wildlife use of the site. Subsequent surveys will focus on seasonal wildlife observations and a spring vegetation survey.

Not Available

1994-12-15

384

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption by the station. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Cape Canaveral AFS. It is A companion report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profiles to be used to improve the current energy system on the station. The characteristics of electricity, diesel fuel, No. 2 fuel oil, and motor vehicle gasoline (MOGAS) are analyzed for on-base facilities. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Cape Canaveral AFS facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985--1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the North, South, and Titan Substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-12-01

385

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to assess energy use at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). The information obtained from this assessment will be used in identifying energy resource opportunities to reduce overall energy consumption on the base. The primary focus of this report is to assess the current baseline energy consumption at Patrick AFB. It is a comparison report to Volume 1, the Executive Summary, and Volume 3, the Resource Assessment. This assessment requires that information be obtained and characterized for buildings, utilities, energy sources, energy uses, and load profile information to be used to improve the characterization of energy use on the base. The characteristics of electricity, natural gas, and No. 2 fuel oil are analyzed for on-base facilities and housing. The assessment examines basic regional information used to determine energy-use intensity (EUI) values for Patrick AFB facilities by building, fuel type, and energy end use. It also provides a summary of electricity consumption from Florida Power and Light Company (FPL) metered data for 1985-1991. Load profile information obtained from FPL data is presented for the north and south substations for the four seasons of the year, including weekdays and weekends.

Wahlstrom, R.R.; King, D.A.; Parker, S.A.; Sandusky, W.F.

1993-08-01

386

Patrick Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost effective energy projects at Patrick Air Force Base (AFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Patrick AFB which is located south of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume.2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance, and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value and value index of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Parker, S.A.; King, D.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Elliott, D.B.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-12-01

387

Resonant multi-frequency method for Kelvin probe force microscopy in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The multi-frequency method, recently introduced in atomic force microscopy (AFM), has shown remarkable enhancement of sensitivity and resolution of microscopy with a variety of heterogeneous materials. Under ambient conditions, Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) is commonly carried out using only the first flexural eigenmode of the micro-cantilever probe. Here we report a resonant multi-frequency method for KPFM in air. To implement this method, the first eigenmode of the cantilever probe is used for topography imaging, whereas the second one is used to measure the local contact potential difference in the two-pass mode with the tip lifted. By introducing an additional feedback controller, a multi-frequency KPFM (MF-KPFM) is developed upon a commercial AFM. The performance of MF-KPFM, including the feedback controller, sensitivity and noise, lift height of the cantilever and lateral resolution, is evaluated and optimized. The capabilities of MF-KPFM are demonstrated by characterizing a charge pattern on a polymer electret. The results show that the lateral resolution of KPFM in air can be improved by the resonant multi-frequency method.

Ding, X. D.; Li, C.; Liang, Z. W.; Lin, G. C.

2012-10-01

388

Griffiss Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Electric resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Air Combat Command (ACC) has tasked the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Griffiss Air Force Base (AFB). FEMP, with support from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), is designing this model program for federal customers served by the Niagara Mohawk Power Company. The program with Griffiss AFB will (1) identify and evaluate all cost-effective electric energy projects; (2) develop a schedule for project acquisition considering project type, size, timing, capital requirements, as well as energy and dollar savings; and (3) secure 100% of the financing required to implement electric energy efficiency projects from Niagara Mohawk and have them procure the necessary contractors to perform detailed audits and install the technologies. This report provides the results of the electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at one of Niagara Mohawk`s primary federal facilities, the ACC Griffiss AFB facility located near Rome, New York. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in seven common energy end-use categories. A narrative description of each ERO provides information on the initial cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. The evaluation methodology and technical and cost assumptions are also described for each ERO. Summary tables present the operational performance of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and the results of the life-cycle cost analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Armstrong, P.R.; Shankle, S.A.; Elliott, D.B.; Stucky, D.J.; Keller, J.M.; Wahlstrom, R.R.; Dagle, J.E.; Gu, A.Y.

1993-09-01

389

The Prevalence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in the Chinese Air Force Population  

PubMed Central

Background. Functional gastrointestinal disorders (FGIDs) are common in the general population worldwide. However, there is paucity of large sale surveys for prevalence of FGID in the military personnel. Methods. It is a cross-sectional study, using Rome III criteria for the diagnosis of FGID among the Chinese Air Force (CAF) workers. Results. Of 4633 registered male subjects, there were 818 (16.4%) air crew and 4170 (83.6%) ground personnel. FGIDs were identified in 1088 (23.48%) of cases. It was more prevalent in the ground personnel than air crew (24.02% versus 20.33%; P = 0.022). Based on Rome III criteria, the commonest disease category was functional gastroduodenal disorder (37.4%), whereas functional nausea and vomiting disorder (FNV) was the most frequent overall diagnosis. Functional dyspepsia (FD) with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) was the leading FGIDs' overlap (3.9%). Conclusion. FGIDs in CAF population are rather underestimated. This necessitates preventive strategies according to job characteristics. PMID:23653637

Wu, Wenming; Guo, Xu; Yang, Yunsheng; Peng, Lihua; Mao, Gaoping; Qurratulain, Hyder; Wang, Weifeng; Sun, Gang

2013-01-01

390

Determination of charge on asphaltene nanoaggregates in air using electrostatic force microscopy.  

PubMed

In this paper, we provide measurement of charge of asphaltene nanoaggregates in air using electrostatic force microscopy. We obtain the average surface charge density of the nanoaggregates as 43.7 nC/cm(2). Among the different aspects of asphaltene, one of the least known is its charge and the effect of solvent and compositional variability (of asphaltene) in dictating this charge. For aqueous systems, asphaltene charge demonstrates a strong dependence on the pH and the salt concentration, indicating that a possible ionization of the surface groups leads to this charging. On the contrary, for asphaltene in nonpolar media (e.g., toluene and heptane), it is believed that asphaltene native charge is central in dictating this charging. This native charge is the solvent-independent charge or the asphaltene charge in air. Our measurements, therefore, provide the first direct quantification (i.e., a quantification of charge not from the measurement of the asphaltene mobilities, which in turn requires specification of the nonuniform asphaltene size distribution) of this asphaltene native charge by conducting the measurements in air. Similar measurements in a solvent may introduce a solvent-dependent value, thereby forbidding not only the exact quantification of this native charge but also the understanding of the specific role of the solvent. This measurement, therefore, will provide a useful starting point to quantify the mechanism of asphaltene charging in nonpolar solvents with important ramifications in deciphering the role of asphaltene in transport and handling of crude and heavy oils. PMID:25517259

Gaikwad, Ravi; Hande, Aharnish; Das, Siddhartha; Mitra, Sushanta K; Thundat, Thomas

2015-01-20

391

Perspective on One Decade of Laser Propulsion Research at Air Force Research Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Air Force Laser Propulsion Program spanned nearly 10-years and included about 35-weeks of experimental research with the Pulsed Laser Vulnerability Test System of the High Energy Laser Systems Test Facility at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico, WSMR/HELSTF/PLVTS. PLVTS is a pulsed CO2 laser that produces up to 10 kW of power in {approx}10 cm{sup 2} spot at wavelength of 10.6 microns. The laser is capable of a pulse repetition rate up to 25 Hz, with pulse durations of about 20 microseconds. During the program basic research was conducted on the production of propulsion thrust from laser energy through heating of air and ablation of various candidate rocket propellant fuels. Flight tests with an ablation fuel (Delrin) and air were accomplished with a model Laser Lightcraft vehicle that was optimized for propulsion by the PLVTS at its maximum power output, 10 kW at 25 Hz, 400 J/pulse. Altitudes exceeding 200-feet were achieved with ablation fuels. The most recent contributions to the technology included development of a mini-thruster standard for testing of chemically enhanced fuels and theoretical calculations on the performance of formulations containing ammonium nitrate and Delrin. Results of these calculations will also be reported here.

Larson, C. William [Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Air Force Research Laboratory, Edwards AFB, CA 93524-7680 (United States)

2008-04-28

392

Analysis of Air Force Systems Command's industrial-surge preparedness planning. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect

As U.S. foreign policy calls for a decrease in Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces in Europe, the U.S. needs to increase its conventional capability in order to maintain vigilant deterrence against the Warsaw Pact forces. The objective of this study was to analyze Air Force Systems Command's industrial-surge preparedness planning and policies and how they are implemented at five major product divisions. This research documents findings and concerns about AFSC's surge preparedness planning and policies, outside influences and relationships, and recommendations for future industrial-base initiatives. Interviews disclosed that industrial surge preparedness planning is a low-priority responsibility. It is not sufficiently funded and rarely addressed at program reviews or milestone decisions. Furthermore, the using commands do not usually offer their surge requirements, but expect AFSC to determine the user's surge requirements for them. A survey indicated that for many programs, surge was not a requirement. However, tactical systems had the greatest share of surge requirements. The survey also indicated that program offices are seldom questioned about surge considerations from their chain of command or their users. Finally, the survey showed that many of the program and project managers have had little to no exposure to surge-preparedness planning through their formal education.

Hunigan, K.A.

1987-09-01

393

Industry perspectives on Plug-& -Play Spacecraft Avionics  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This paper describes the methodologies and findings from an industry survey of awareness and utility of Spacecraft Plug-& -Play Avionics (SPA). The survey was conducted via interviews, in-person and teleconference, with spacecraft prime contractors and suppliers. It focuses primarily on AFRL's SPA technology development activities but also explores the broader applicability and utility of Plug-& -Play (PnP) architectures for spacecraft. Interviews include large and small suppliers as well as large and small spacecraft prime contractors. Through these “ product marketing” interviews, awareness and attitudes can be assessed, key technical and market barriers can be identified, and opportunities for improvement can be uncovered. Although this effort focuses on a high-level assessment, similar processes can be used to develop business cases and economic models which may be necessary to support investment decisions.

Franck, R.; Graven, P.; Liptak, L.

394

Avionics electromagnetic interference immunity and environment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Aircraft electromagnetic spectrum and radio frequency (RF) field strengths are charted, profiling the higher levels of electromagnetic voltages encountered by the commercial aircraft wiring. Selected military, urban, and rural electromagnetic field levels are plotted and provide a comparison of radiation amplitudes. Low frequency magnetic fields and electric fields from 400 H(Z) power systems are charted versus frequency and wire separation to indicate induced voltages on adjacent or neighboring circuits. Induced EMI levels and attenuation characteristics of electric, magnetic, RF fields, and transients are plotted and graphed for common types of wire circuits. The significance of wire circuit returns and shielding is emphasized to highlight the techniques that help block the paths of electromagnetic interference and maintain avionic interface signal quality.

Clarke, C. A.

1986-01-01

395

Automated safety and training avionics for general aviation aircraft  

E-print Network

and Training Avionics (ASTRA). ASTRA research is focused on integrating low-cost, yet sophisticated, computing technology into general aviation aircraft. The system architecture includes a Flight Mode Interpreter (FMI), which provides real-time identification...

Trang, Jeffrey Alan

2012-06-07

396

Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This standard establishes the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA includes a generic functional model, processing structural model, and an architecture interface model. This standard defines the requirements for applying these models to the development of spacecraft core avionics systems. The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture models to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software processing system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical services and interfaces. It establishes the requirement for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interfaces points. The generic core avionics functions and processing structural models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

1994-01-01

397

Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) reference model technical guide  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This report presents a full description of the Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA). The SGOAA consists of a generic system architecture for the entities in spacecraft avionics, a generic processing architecture, and a six class model of interfaces in a hardware/software system. The purpose of the SGOAA is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of specific avionics hardware/software systems. The SGOAA defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

1993-01-01

398

Overview of Avionics and Electrical Ground Support Equipment  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presents an overview of the Crew Module Avionics and the associated Electrical Ground Support Equipment for the Pad Abort 1 flight test of the Orion Program. A limited selection of the technical challenges and solutions are highlighted.

Clarke, Sean C.

2011-01-01

399

The adequacy of corrective lenses worn by United States Air Force aviators for annual flight medical examinations.  

PubMed

Aviators presenting for annual flight medical examinations at the 379th Strategic Hospital at Wurtsmith Air Force Base were studied to determine the prevalence of substandard visual acuity. The prevalence of the use of outdated (superseded) corrective lenses was also studied. We conducted 342 examinations on different aviators and 92 (26.9%) of these aviators were found to require corrective lenses. There were 23 (6.7%) aviators who were found to have inadequate visual acuity and 14 of these (4.1%) were found to be wearing superseded lenses. The visual screening method prescribed by the United States Air Force did not identify four of the aviators who wore superseded lenses. Three aviators were found to be wearing lenses obtained from civil sources. The study suggests that improvements could be made in U.S. Air Force visual screening and care. PMID:1741722

Mapes, P B

1991-11-01

400

Supplemental site inspection for Air Force Plant 59, Johnson City, New York, Volume 3: Appendices F-Q  

SciTech Connect

This summary describes a Supplemental Site Inspection (SSI) conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) at Air Force Plant 59 (AFP 59) in Johnson City, New York. All required data pertaining to this project were entered by ANL into the Air Force-wide Installation Restoration Program Information System (IRPIMS) computer format and submitted to an appropriate authority. The work was sponsored by the United States Air Force as part of its Installation Restoration Program (IRP). Previous studies had revealed the presence of contaminants at the site and identified several potential contaminant sources. Argonne`s study was conducted to answer questions raised by earlier investigations. This volume consists of appendices F-Q, which contain the analytical data from the site characterization.

Nashold, B.; Rosenblatt, D.; Hau, J. [and others

1995-08-01

401

A review of United States Air Force aeromedical evacuation of acute myocardial infarction patients in Europe.  

PubMed

United States Air Force regulations currently do not recommend the routine movement of recently stabilized patients diagnosed with acute myocardial infarctions. However, U.S. Department of Defense and embassy physicians throughout Europe continually request aeromedical movement of these patients. Therefore, a year-long prospective case review of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patient movement within the military aeromedical system in Europe was undertaken to evaluate the need for and safety of transporting these patients. This case review, combined with the literature, suggests that recently stabilized AMI patients, with appropriate pre-flight preparation and in-flight care, can tolerate exposure to the stresses of flight and can be safely airlifted. PMID:7501195

Connor, S B; Lyons, T J

1995-10-01

402

Electrical discharge in a nanometer-sized air/water gap observed by atomic force microscopy.  

PubMed

We report a method to initiate and investigate electrical discharges of ambient air/water molecules in a nanometer-sized gap. Our methodology is based on a typical atomic force microscopy (AFM) setup, in which a cylinder discharge gap of < or =5 nm could be configured between the AFM probe and substrate. We observed highly localized stochastic nanoexplosions in which the discharge probability is dominated by the electric field, material-specific surface reactions, and humidity. AFM results, coupled with the boundary element method (BEM), finite element method (FEM), and method of characteristics (MOC) simulations, further revealed the generation of transient shock waves in the nanoscale discharge. The propagation of shock fronts significantly facilitates the radial expansion of the ionized particles, leading to the formation of microscale patterns on selected substrates. Our findings provide an initial understanding of nanoscale discharge and could be relevant to a few applications including nano/microstructuring, microelectronics, and plasma-assisted depositions. PMID:16262421

Xie, Xian Ning; Chung, Hong Jing; Sow, Chorng Haur; Adamiak, Kazimierz; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen

2005-11-01

403

Lateral spread of sonic boom measurements from US Air Force boomfile flight tests  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A series of sonic boom flight tests were conducted by the US Air Force at Edwards AFB in 1987 with current supersonic DOD aircraft. These tests involved 43 flights by various aircraft at different Mach number and altitude combinations. The measured peak overpressures to predicted values as a function of lateral distance are compared. Some of the flights are combined into five groups because of the varying profiles and the limited number of sonic booms obtained during this study. The peak overpressures and the lateral distances are normalized with respect to the Carlson method predicted centerline overpressures and lateral cutoff distances, respectively, to facilitate comparisons between sonic boom data from similar flight profiles. It is demonstrated that the data agrees with sonic boom theory and previous studies and adds to the existing sonic boom database by including sonic boom signatures, tracking, and weather data in a digital format.

Downing, J. Micah

1992-10-01

404

Development of residential-conservation-survey methodology for the US Air Force. Interim report. Task two  

SciTech Connect

A US Air Force (USAF) Residential Energy Conservation Methodology was developed to compare USAF needs and available data to the procedures of the Residential Conservation Service (RCS) program as developed for general use by utility companies serving civilian customers. Attention was given to the data implications related to group housing, climatic data requirements, life-cycle cost analysis, energy saving modifications beyond those covered by RCS, and methods for utilizing existing energy consumption data in approaching the USAF survey program. Detailed information and summaries are given on the five subtasks of the program. Energy conservation alternatives are listed and the basic analysis techniques to be used in evaluating their thermal performane are described. (MCW)

Abrams, D. W.; Hartman, T. L.; Lau, A. S.

1981-11-13

405

The psychologist and the bombardier: the Army Air Forces' aircrew classification program in WWII.  

PubMed

During World War II, psychologists in the Army Air Forces were given an unprecedented opportunity to showcase their discipline by developing examinations to test the aptitude of aviation cadets as pilots, navigators, or bombardiers. These psychologists enjoyed success in classifying pilots and navigators, but became quickly frustrated by their results for bombardiers. The trouble lay not in their choice of tests but in their performance measures for bombardiering, a difficulty that came to be known as 'the problem of the criterion.' This episode in the history of military mental testing exemplifies the challenges faced by psychologists at the moment they were poised to gain the support of the armed services, and highlights how these new hazards shaped postwar military psychology. PMID:24360722

Holmes, Marcia E

2014-03-01

406

Hot, cold, and annual reference atmospheres for Edwards Air Force Base, California (1975 version)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Reference atmospheres pertaining to summer (hot), winter (cold), and mean annual conditions for Edwards Air Force Base, California, are presented from surface to 90 km altitude (700 km for the annual model). Computed values of pressure, kinetic temperature, virtual temperature, and density and relative differences percentage departure from the Edwards reference atmospheres, 1975 (ERA-75) of the atmospheric parameters versus altitude are tabulated in 250 m increments. Hydrostatic and gas law equations were used in conjunction with radiosonde and rocketsonde thermodynamic data in determining the vertical structure of these atmospheric models. The thermodynamic parameters were all subjected to a fifth degree least-squares curve-fit procedure, and the resulting coefficients were incorporated into Univac 1108 computer subroutines so that any quantity may be recomputed at any desired altitude using these subroutines.

Johnson, D. L.

1975-01-01

407

Avionics Architectures for Exploration: Wireless Technologies and Human Spaceflight  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors describe ongoing efforts by the Avionics Architectures for Exploration (AAE) project chartered by NASA's Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Program to evaluate new avionics architectures and technologies, provide objective comparisons of them, and mature selected technologies for flight and for use by other AES projects. The AAE project team includes members from most NASA centers and from industry. This paper provides an overview of recent AAE efforts, with particular emphasis on the wireless technologies being evaluated under AES to support human spaceflight.

Goforth, Montgomery B.; Ratliff, James E.; Barton, Richard J.; Wagner, Raymond S.; Lansdowne, Chatwin

2014-01-01

408

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 2, Baseline detail  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program, to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is a model program PNL is designing for federal customers served by the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG and E). The primary goal of the VAFB project is to identify all electric energy efficiency opportunities, and to negotiate with PG and E to acquire those resources through a customized demand-side management program for its federal clients. That customized program should have three major characteristics: (1) 100% up-front financing; (2) substantial utility cost-sharing; and (3) utility implementation through energy service companies under contract to the utility. A similar arrangement will be pursued with Southern California Gas for non-electric resource opportunities if that is deemed desirable by the site and if the gas utility seems open to such an approach. This report documents the assessment of baseline energy use at VAFB located near Lompoc, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 3, Resource Assessment. This analysis examines the characteristics of electric, natural gas, fuel oil, and propane use for fiscal year 1991. It records energy-use intensities for the facilities at VAFB by building type and energy end use. It also breaks down building energy consumption by fuel type, energy end use, and building type. A more complete energy consumption reconciliation is presented that includes the accounting of all energy use among buildings, utilities, and applicable losses.

Halverson, M.A.; Richman, E.E.; Dagle, J.E.; Hickman, B.J.; Daellenbach, K.K.; Sullivan, G.P.

1993-06-01

409

Ground-water data, 1969-77, Vandenberg Air Force Base area, Santa Barbara County, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The water supply for Vandenberg Air Force Base is obtained from wells in the Lompoc Plain, San Antonio Valley, and Lompoc Terrace groundwater basins. Metered pumpage during the period 1969-77 from the Lompoc Plain decreased from a high of 3,670 acre-feet in 1969 to a low of 2,441 acre-feet in 1977, while pumpage from the San Antonio Valley increased from a low of 1 ,020 acre-feet in 1969 to a high of 1,829 acre-feet in 1977. Pumpage from the Lompoc Terrace has remained relatively constant and was 187 acre-feet in 1977. In the Barka Slough area of the San Antonio Valley, water levels in four shallow wells declined during 1976 and 1977. Water levels in observation wells in the two aquifers of the Lompoc Terrace ground-water basin fluctuated during the period, but show no long term trends. Chemical analyses or field determinations of temperature and specific conductance were made of 219 water samples collected from 53 wells. In the Lompoc Plain the dissolved-solids concentration in all water samples was more than 625 milligrams per liter, and in most was more than 1,000 milligrams per liter. The manganese concentration in analyzed samples equaled or exceeded the recommended limit of 50 micrograms per liter for public water supplies. Dissolved-solids concentrations increased with time in water samples from two wells east of the Air Force Base in San Antonio Valley. In the base well-field area, concentrations of dissolved solids ranged from 290 to 566 milligrams per liter. Eight analyses show manganese at or above the recommended limit of 50 milligrams per liter. In the Lompoc Terrace area dissolved-solids concentrations ranged from 470 to 824 milligrams per liter. Five new supply wells, nine observation wells, and two exploratory/observation wells were drilled on the base during the period 1972-77. (USGS)

Lamb, Charles E.

1980-01-01

410

Vandenberg Air Force Base integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The US Air Force Space Command (SPACECOM) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), as the lead laboratory supporting the US Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Vandenberg Air Force Base (VAFB). This is part of a model program that PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at the SPACECOM VAFB facility located approximately 50 miles northwest of Santa Barbara, California. It is a companion report to Volume 1, Executive Summary, and Volume 2, Baseline Detail. The results of the analysis of EROs are presented in ten common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). In addition, a case study of process loads at Space Launch Complex-4 (SLC-4) is included. A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings; impacts on operation and maintenance (O and M); and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. A description of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions is also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost-effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis indicating the net present value (NPV) and value index (VI) of each ERO. Finally, an appendix includes a summary of an economic analysis case study of the South Vandenberg Power Plant (SVPP) operating scenarios.

Daellenbach, K.K.; Dagle, J.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Elliott, D.B.; Halverson, M.A.; Hickman, B.J.; Parker, G.B.; Richman, E.E.; Shankle, S.A.

1993-06-01

411

Cape Canaveral Air Force Station integrated resource assessment. Volume 3, Resource assessment  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Air Force (USAF) has tasked the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) in support of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), to identify, evaluate, and assist in acquiring all cost-effective energy projects at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (AFS). Projects considered can be either in the form of energy management or energy conservation. The overall efforts of this task are based on a model program PNL is designing to support energy-use decisions in the federal sector. This report provides the results of the fossil fuel and electric energy resource opportunity (ERO) assessments performed by PNL at Cape Canaveral AFS, which is located approximately 10 miles north of Cocoa Beach, Florida. It is a companion report to Volume 1: Executive Summary and Volume 2: Baseline Detail. The results of the analyses of EROs are presented in 11 common energy end-use categories (e.g., boilers and furnaces, service hot water, and building lighting). A narrative description of each ERO is provided, including information on the installed cost, energy and dollar savings, impacts on operations and maintenance (O&M), and, when applicable, a discussion of energy supply and demand, energy security, and environmental issues. Descriptions of the evaluation methodologies and technical and cost assumptions are also provided for each ERO. Summary tables present the cost- effectiveness of energy end-use equipment before and after the implementation of each ERO and present the results of the life-cycle cost (LCC) analysis, indicating the net present value (NPV) and savings-to-investment ratio (SIR) of each ERO.

Sandusky, W.F.; Eichman, C.J.; King, D.A.; McMordie, K.L.; Parker, S.A.; Shankle, S.A.; Wahlstrom, R.R.

1994-03-01

412

Effects of a Circulating-water Garment and Forced-air Warming on Body Heat Content and Core Temperature  

PubMed Central

Background: Forced-air warming is sometimes unable to maintain perioperative normothermia. We therefore compared heat transfer, regional heat distribution, and core rewarming of forced-air warming with a novel circulating-water garment. Methods: Nine volunteers were each evaluated on two randomly ordered study days. They were anesthetized and cooled to a core temperature near 34°C. The volunteers were subsequently warmed for 2.5 hours with either a circulating-water garment or forced-air cover. Overall, heat balance was determined from the difference between cutaneous heat loss (thermal flux transducers) and metabolic heat production (oxygen consumption). Average arm and leg (peripheral) tissue temperatures were determined from 18 intramuscular needle thermocouples, 15 skin thermal flux transducers, and “deep” arm and foot thermometers. Results: Heat production (? 60 kcal/h) and loss (?45 kcal/h) were similar with each treatment before warming. The increase in heat transfer across anterior portions of the skin surface was similar with each warming system (?65 kcal/h). Forced-air warming had no effect on posterior heat transfer whereas circulating-water transferred 21 ± 9 kcal/h through the posterior skin surface after a half hour of warming. Over 2.5 h, circulating-water thus increased body heat content 56% more than forced air. Core temperatures thus increased faster than with circulating water than forced air, especially during the first hour, with the result that core temperature was 1.1 ± 0.7°C greater after 2.5 h (P < 0.001). Peripheral tissue heat content increased twice as much as core heat content with each device, but the core-to-peripheral tissue temperature gradient remained positive throughout the study. Conclusions: The circulating-water system transferred more heat than forced air, with the difference resulting largely from posterior heating. Circulating water rewarmed patients 0.4°C/h faster than forced air. A substantial peripheral-to-core tissue-temperature gradient with each device indicated that peripheral tissues insulated the core, thus slowing heat transfer. PMID:15114200

Taguchi, Akiko; Ratnaraj, Jebadurai; Kabon, Barbara; Sharma, Neeru; Lenhardt, Rainer; Sessler, Daniel I.

2005-01-01

413

NASA/Air Force/Environmental Protection Agency Interagency Depainting Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Many popular and widely used paint stripping products have traditionally contained methylene chloride as their main active ingredient. However, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has critically curved the allowable use of methylene chloride under the National Emission Standard for Hazardous Air Pollutants regulating Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities . Compliance with this rule was mandatory by September 1998 for affected facilities. An effort is underway to identify and evaluate alternative depainting technologies emphasizing those believed both effective and environmentally benign. On behalf of the EPA and in cooperation with the United States Air Force, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is conducting a technical assessment of several alternative technologies ( i.e. : chemical stripping, two CO2 blasting processes, CO2 xenon lamp coating removal, CO2 Laser stripping, plastic media blasting, sodium bicarbonate wet stripping, high pressure water stripping, and wheat starch blasting). These depainting processes represent five removal method categories, namely abrasive, impact, cryogenic, thermal, and/or molecular bonding dissociation. This paper discusses the test plan and parameters for this interagency study. Several thicknesses of clad and non-clad aluminum substrates were used to prepare test specimens. Each depainting process has been assigned a specimen lot, all of which have completed three to five stripping cycles. Numerous metallurgical evaluations are underway to assess the impact of these alternative depainting processes upon the structural integrity of the substrate.

Clark-Ingram, Marceia

1998-01-01

414

Spacecraft environmental interactions: A joint Air Force and NASA research and technology program  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A joint Air Force/NASA comprehensive research and technology program on spacecraft environmental interactions to develop technology to control interactions between large spacecraft systems and the charged-particle environment of space is described. This technology will support NASA/Department of Defense operations of the shuttle/IUS, shuttle/Centaur, and the force application and surveillance and detection missions, planning for transatmospheric vehicles and the NASA space station, and the AFSC military space system technology model. The program consists of combined contractual and in-house efforts aimed at understanding spacecraft environmental interaction phenomena and relating results of ground-based tests to space conditions. A concerted effort is being made to identify project-related environmental interactions of concern. The basic properties of materials are being investigated to develop or modify the materials as needed. A group simulation investigation is evaluating basic plasma interaction phenomena to provide inputs to the analytical modeling investigation. Systems performance is being evaluated by both groundbased tests and analysis.

Pike, C. P.; Purvis, C. K.; Hudson, W. R.

1985-01-01

415

Numerical investigation of the effect of inlet flow distortions on forced draught air-cooled heat exchanger performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Forced draught air-cooled heat exchangers (ACHEs) are often arranged into banks consisting of multiple rows of fan-heat exchanger combinations. Fans on the outer edge of the banks are subject to severe cross-flow conditions as the air is swept past en route to fans located deeper within the banks. The cross-flow conditions give rise to increased inlet flow losses. The current

C. J. Meyer

2005-01-01

416

Forced-air warming: a source of airborne contamination in the operating room?  

PubMed Central

Forced-air-warming (FAW) is an effective and widely used means for maintaining surgical normothermia, but FAW also has the potential to generate and mobilize airborne contamination in the operating room. We measured the emission of viable and non-viable forms of airborne contamination from an arbitrary selection of FAW blowers (n=25) in the operating room. A laser particle counter measured particulate concentrations of the air near the intake filter and in the distal hose airstream. Filtration efficiency was calculated as the reduction in particulate concentration in the distal hose airstream relative to that of the intake. Microbial colonization of the FAW blower's internal hose surfaces was assessed by culturing the microorganisms recovered through swabbing (n=17) and rinsing (n=9) techniques. Particle counting revealed that 24% of FAW blowers were emitting significant levels of internally generated airborne contamination in the 0.5 to 5.0 µm size range, evidenced by a steep decrease in FAW blower filtration efficiency for particles 0.5 to 5.0 µm in size. The particle size-range-specific reduction in efficiency could not be explained by the filtration properties of the intake filter. Instead, the reduction was found to be caused by size-range-specific particle generation within the FAW blowers. Microorganisms were detected on the internal air path surfaces of 94% of FAW blowers. The design of FAW blowers was found to be questionable for preventing the build-up of internal contamination and the emission of airborne contamination into the operating room. Although we did not evaluate the link between FAW and surgical site infection rates, a significant percentage of FAW blowers with positive microbial cultures were emitting internally generated airborne contamination within the size range of free floating bacteria and fungi (<4 µm) that could, conceivably, settle onto the surgical site. PMID:21808690

Albrecht, Mark; Gauthier, Robert; Leaper, David

2009-01-01

417

Forced-air warming: a source of airborne contamination in the operating room?  

PubMed

Forced-air-warming (FAW) is an effective and widely used means for maintaining surgical normothermia, but FAW also has the potential to generate and mobilize airborne contamination in the operating room.We measured the emission of viable and non-viable forms of airborne contamination from an arbitrary selection of FAW blowers (n=25) in the operating room. A laser particle counter measured particulate concentrations of the air near the intake filter and in the distal hose airstream. Filtration efficiency was calculated as the reduction in particulate concentration in the distal hose airstream relative to that of the intake. Microbial colonization of the FAW blower's internal hose surfaces was assessed by culturing the microorganisms recovered through swabbing (n=17) and rinsing (n=9) techniques.Particle counting revealed that 24% of FAW blowers were emitting significant levels of internally generated airborne contamination in the 0.5 to 5.0 µm size range, evidenced by a steep decrease in FAW blower filtration efficiency for particles 0.5 to 5.0 µm in size. The particle size-range-specific reduction in efficiency could not be explained by the filtration properties of the intake filter. Instead, the reduction was found to be caused by size-range-specific particle generation within the FAW blowers. Microorganisms were detected on the internal air path surfaces of 94% of FAW blowers.The design of FAW blowers was found to be questionable for preventing the build-up of internal contamination and the emission of airborne contamination into the operating room. Although we did not evaluate the link between FAW and surgical site infection rates, a significant percentage of FAW blowers with positive microbial cultures were emitting internally generated airborne contamination within the size range of free floating bacteria and fungi (<4 µm) that could, conceivably, settle onto the surgical site. PMID:21808690

Albrecht, Mark; Gauthier, Robert; Leaper, David

2009-10-10

418

Avionics System Architecture for the NASA Orion Vehicle  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

It has been 30 years since the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) last developed a crewed spacecraft capable of launch, on-orbit operations, and landing. During that time, aerospace avionics technologies have greatly advanced in capability, and these technologies have enabled integrated avionics architectures for aerospace applications. The inception of NASA s Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) spacecraft offers the opportunity to leverage the latest integrated avionics technologies into crewed space vehicle architecture. The outstanding question is to what extent to implement these advances in avionics while still meeting the unique crewed spaceflight requirements for safety, reliability and maintainability. Historically, aircraft and spacecraft have very similar avionics requirements. Both aircraft and spacecraft must have high reliability. They also must have as much computing power as possible and provide low latency between user control and effecter response while minimizing weight, volume, and power. However, there are several key differences between aircraft and spacecraft avionics. Typically, the overall spacecraft operational time is much shorter than aircraft operation time, but the typical mission time (and hence, the time between preventive maintenance) is longer for a spacecraft than an aircraft. Also, the radiation environment is typically more severe for spacecraft than aircraft. A "loss of mission" scenario (i.e. - the mission is not a success, but there are no casualties) arguably has a greater impact on a multi-million dollar spaceflight mission than a typical commercial flight. Such differences need to be weighted when determining if an aircraft-like integrated modular avionics (IMA) system is suitable for a crewed spacecraft. This paper will explore the preliminary design process of the Orion vehicle avionics system by first identifying the Orion driving requirements and the difference between Orion requirements and those of other previous crewed spacecraft avionics systems. Common systems engineering methods will be used to evaluate the value propositions, or the factors that weight most heavily in design consideration, of Orion and other aerospace systems. Then, the current Orion avionics architecture will be presented and evaluated.

Baggerman, Clint; McCabe, Mary; Verma, Dinesh

2009-01-01

419

Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI: Test report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s ``Blue Ribbon`` contractors, located throughout the US. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote. Lessons learned from the test are being fed back to the CALS and EDI standards organizations, and to future implementors of CALS-EDI based acquisition or contracting systems, which require the transfer of technical information, such as engineering data, manufacturing process data, quality test data, and other product or process data, in the form of a CALS or other digital datafile.

NONE

1994-08-15

420

Ground-water hydrology and water quality of the southern high plains aquifer, Melrose Air Force Range, Cannon Air Force Base, Curry and Roosevelt Counties, New Mexico, 2002-03  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. Geological Survey characterized the ground-water hydrology and water quality at Melrose Air Force Range in east-central New Mexico. The purpose of the study was to provide baseline data to Cannon Air Force Base resource managers to make informed decisions concerning actions that may affect the ground-water system. Five periods of water-level measurements and four periods of water-quality sample collection were completed at Melrose Air Force Range during 2002 and 2003. The water-level measurements and water-quality samples were collected from a 29-well monitoring network that included wells in the Impact Area and leased lands of Melrose Air Force Range managed by Cannon Air Force Base personnel. The purpose of this report is to provide a broad overview of ground-water flow and ground-water quality in the Southern High Plains aquifer in the Ogallala Formation at Melrose Air Force Range. Results of the ground-water characterization of the Southern High Plains aquifer indicated a local flow system in the unconfined aquifer flowing northeastward from a topographic high, the Mesa (located in the southwestern part of the Range), toward a regional flow system in the unconfined aquifer that flows southeastward through the Portales Valley. Ground water was less than 55 years old across the Range; ground water was younger (less than 25 years) near the Mesa and ephemeral channels and older (25 years to 55 years) in the Portales Valley. Results of water-quality analysis indicated three areas of different water types: near the Mesa and ephemeral channels, in the Impact Area of the Range, and in the Portales Valley. Within the Southern High Plains aquifer, a sodium/chloride-dominated ground water was found in the center of the Impact Area of the Range with water-quality characteristics similar to ground water from the underlying Chinle Formation. This sodium/chloride-dominated ground water of the unconfined aquifer in the Impact Area indicates a likely connection with the deeper water-producing zone. No pesticides, explosives, volatile organic compounds, semivolatile organic compounds, organic halogens, or perchlorate were found in water samples from the Southern High Plains aquifer at the Range.

Langman, Jeff B.; Gebhardt, Fredrick E.; Falk, Sarah E.

2004-01-01

421

Air  

MedlinePLUS

... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

422

Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Form N: Development and Standardization. Final Report for Period March 1974 - March 1978.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The construction and norming of Form N of the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) is described. The new form serves the same purpose as its predecessor and possesses basically the same characteristics. References are made to the research which provided the basis for most of the changes. Other changes were made because of the admission of…

Gould, R. Bruce

423

Smart Warriors: A Rationale for Educating Air Force Academy Cadets in the History of Science, Technology, and Warfare.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Identifies enhancing the judgments of cadets through education at a military institution like the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) as a crucial pedagogical issue facing instructors of History of Science and Technology (HST). Discusses the experience of helping cadets to meet such challenges in learning HST in the context of professional…

Astore, William J.

2003-01-01

424

Smart Warriors: A Rationale for Educating Air Force Academy Cadets in the History of Science, Technology, and Warfare  

Microsoft Academic Search

A crucial pedagogical issue facing instructors of History of Science and Technology (HST) at a military institution like the United States Air Force Academy (USAFA) is enhancing the judgment of cadets through education so that they can make informed and intelligent decisions as officers. Fundamental understanding of relationships between HST and warfare provides much needed context for making decisions in

William J. Astore

2003-01-01

425

Decision support model for municipal solid waste recycling at United States Air Force Installations. Master`s thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The United States Air Force requires each installation to operate a municipal solid waste recycling program. Two inherently conflicting objectives, waste material diversion and financial result, have been established for the program. Reducing landfill disposal is the primary objective, but the incentive for profit is strong because each installation can retain profits from the program. Installations can be divided into

1996-01-01

426

Description and Results of the Air Force Research and Development Program for the Improvement of Maintenance Efficiency.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An overview of the Air Force's Research and Development Program for the Improvement of Maintenance Efficiency is provided. First described are the steps found in any detailed task analysis, a process which results in the complete specification of each task involved in an overall maintenance effort. The factors influencing maintenance effectiveness…

Foley, John P., Jr.

427

Instructor's Index to U.S. Navy and Air Force Materials for Teaching Basic Electricity. Final Report, No. 29.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this index is to identify U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force transparencies, films, and manuals which can be used by schools and colleges to teach basic electricity. Materials are classified according to 39 major categories including Electron Theory, Batteries and Battery Connections, D.C. Series Circuits, Network Theorems,…

Stoller, Alan

428

Laminar Forced Convection Heat Transfer from Isothermal Bodies with Unity Aspect Ratio in Co-Axial Air Flow  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article a semi—analytical approach is employed to obtain dimensionless heat transfer correlations for forced convection over three geometries sphere, cone and cylinder with unity aspect ratio in laminar axial air flow. The comparison of the present results for sphere with the previous works shows a very good agreement. For example, the average difference between the results of the

YASER HADAD; KHOSROW JAFARPUR

2011-01-01

429

The local environment resulting from a massive nuclear attack on Whiteman Air Force Base. Final technical report  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study examines the potential blast and fallout damage that would be sustained by the 15 counties surrounding the Whiteman Air Force Base in Missouri following a nuclear attack against the associated Minuteman missile silos. The study also provides recommendations concerning the shelters that would be required to protect the population of these 15 counties from blast effects and heavy

C. W. Hulburt; C. A. Yutko; R. J. Sullivan

1980-01-01

430

AFHRL/FT [Air Force Human Resources Laboratory/Flight Training] Capabilities in Undergraduate Pilot Training Simulation Research: Executive Summary.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The document presents a summary description of the Air Force Human Resource Laboratory's Flying Training Division (AFHRL/FT) research capabilities for undergraduate pilot training. One of the research devices investigated is the Advanced Simulator for Undergraduate Pilot Training (ASUPT). The equipment includes the ASUPT, the instrumented T-37…

Matheny, W. G.; And Others

431

The Learning-Focused Transformation of Biology and Physics Core Courses at the U.S. Air Force Academy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An institution-wide focus on deep learning has made significant changes in the biology and physics core course curriculum at the U.S. Air Force Academy. The biology course director has reworked course objectives to reflect the learning-focused approach to teaching, while the physics curriculum has adopted new learning outcomes and ways to…

Sagendorf, Kenneth; Noyd, Robert K.; Morris, D. Brent

2009-01-01

432

The Impact of the NSA Cyber Defense Exercise on the Curriculum at the Air Force Institute of Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes how the curriculum and course format at the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) has evolved based on our experience with the highly-successful Cyber Defense Exercise (CDX) sponsored by the National Security Agency (NSA). Using industry-standard hardware and software, AFIT graduate students designed, built, and operated a robust network infrastructure that survived scans, denial of service attacks,

Barry E. Mullins; Timothy H. Lacey; Robert F. Mills; Joseph M. Trechter; Samuel D. Bass

2007-01-01

433

DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND MONITORING OF THE PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIER IN AREA 5 AT DOVER AIR FORCE BASE  

EPA Science Inventory

The primary objective of this project was to test the performance of two different reactive media in the same aquifer. To satisfy this objective, Battelle designed, constructed, and monitored a pilot-scale permeable reactive barrier (PRB) in Area 5 at Dover Air Force Base, DE. Th...

434

An Improved Calibration Method for Hydrazine Monitors for the United States Air Force  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of Phase 1 of the ''Air Force Hydrazine Detector Characterization and Calibration Project''. A method for calibrating model MDA 7100 hydrazine detectors in the United States Air Force (AF) inventory has been developed. The calibration system consists of a Kintek 491 reference gas generation system, a humidifier/mixer system which combines the dry reference hydrazine gas with humidified diluent or carrier gas to generate the required humidified reference for calibrations, and a gas sampling interface. The Kintek reference gas generation system itself is periodically calibrated using an ORNL-constructed coulometric titration system to verify the hydrazine concentration of the sample atmosphere in the interface module. The Kintek reference gas is then used to calibrate the hydrazine monitors. Thus, coulometric titration is only used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek reference gas generation system, and is not required for hydrazine monitor calibrations. One advantage of using coulometric titration for verifying the concentration of the reference gas is that it is a primary standard (if used for simple solutions), thereby guaranteeing, in principle, that measurements will be traceable to SI units (i.e., to the mole). The effect of humidity of the reference gas was characterized by using the results of concentrations determined by coulometric titration to develop a humidity correction graph for the Kintek 491 reference gas generation system. Using this calibration method, calibration uncertainty has been reduced by 50% compared to the current method used to calibrate hydrazine monitors in the Air Force inventory and calibration time has also been reduced by more than 20%. Significant findings from studies documented in this report are the following: (1) The Kintek 491 reference gas generation system (generator, humidifier and interface module) can be used to calibrate hydrazine detectors. (2) The Kintek system output concentration is less than the calculated output of the generator alone but can be calibrated as a system by using coulometric titration of gas samples collected with impingers. (3) The calibrated Kintek system output concentration is reproducible even after having been disassembled and moved and reassembled. (4) The uncertainty of the reference gas concentration generated by the Kintek system is less than half the uncertainty of the Zellweger Analytics' (ZA) reference gas concentration and can be easily lowered to one third or less of the ZA method by using lower-uncertainty flow rate or total flow measuring instruments. (5) The largest sources of uncertainty in the current ORNL calibration system are the permeation rate of the permeation tubes and the flow rate of the impinger sampling pump used to collect gas samples for calibrating the Kintek system. Upgrading the measurement equipment, as stated in (4), can reduce both of these. (6) The coulometric titration technique can be used to periodically assess the performance of the Kintek system and determine a suitable recalibration interval. (7) The Kintek system has been used to calibrate two MDA 7100s and an Interscan 4187 in less than one workday. The system can be upgraded (e.g., by automating it) to provide more calibrations per day. (8) The humidity of both the reference gas and the environment of the Chemcassette affect the MDA 7100 hydrazine detector's readings. However, ORNL believes that the environmental effect is less significant than the effect of the reference gas humidity. (9) The ORNL calibration method based on the Kintek 491 M-B gas standard can correct for the effect of the humidity of the reference gas to produce the same calibration as that of ZA's. Zellweger Analytics calibrations are typically performed at 45%-55% relative humidity. (10) Tests using the Interscan 4187 showed that the instrument was not accurate in its lower (0-100 ppb) range. Subsequent discussions with Kennedy Space Center (KSC) personnel also indicated that the Interscan units were not reproducible when new sensors were

Korsah, K

2003-07-07

435

Future space transportation system architecture avionics requirements  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA began a multi-center study in January 1993 to examine options for providing the most cost effective space transportation system in the future. The key advanced avionics requirements for these vehicle concepts are envisioned to provide significantly improved operational efficiency and effectiveness. It is very desirable to have adaptive guidance, navigation, and control approaches that will allow launch and return in almost any weather condition. The vehicles must be able to accommodate atmospheric density variations and winds without software changes. The flight operations must become much more autonomous in all flight regimes like an aircraft, and preflight checkout should make use of the onboard systems. When the vehicle returns to the launch site, subsystem health must be known and maintenance tasks scheduled accordingly. Ground testing of most subsystems must be eliminated. Also, the health monitoring system must be designed to enhance the ability to abort the mission significantly and save the crew and the vehicle. The displays and controls must be much less complex than current systems and must significantly reduce pilot work load. It is important to have low power, light weight displays and controls. Rendezvous and docking and all flight phases must have autopilot capability to reduce pilot work load for routine operations and in abort situations. The vehicles must have the demonstrated ability to return to the launch site. Abort from all mission phases can put additional demands on the communications system.

Stone, Howard; Engelund, Walt

1993-01-01

436

Sub-pico-Newton shear-force feedback system in air and liquid for scanning probe microscopy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Scanning near-field optical microscopy requires a performant sensor to measure the tip-to-sample distance. In this article, we report on a shear force detection scheme for scanning near-field optical microscopy applications. It is based on an all fiber low-coherence interferometer. This setup makes possible the measurements of the tip oscillation amplitude of less than 50 pm both in air and aqueous environment with a precision of 160 fm/Hz1/2, thus demonstrating the ability to perform topographic measurements both in air and in liquids with a resolution better than 1 nm in tip-sample distance. Stable feedback in air and fluids is obtained with tip-sample interaction forces below 1 pN.

Giaccari, Philippe; Sqalli, Omar; Limberger, Hans G.

2004-09-01

437

78 FR 68687 - Final Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class (JAR...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Final Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class (JAR-VLA) Regulations; Aquila...airworthiness design criteria for the inclusion of advance avionics with integrated electronic displays for the Aquila...

2013-11-15

438

78 FR 54791 - Proposed Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

...Proposed Additional Airworthiness Design Standards: Advanced Avionics Under the Special Class (JAR-VLA) Regulations; Aquila...issuance of the design criteria for the inclusion of advance avionics with intergrated electronic displays for the Aquila...

2013-09-06

439

Avionic architecture requirements for Space Exploration Initiative systems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The authors discuss NASA's Strategic Avionics Technology Working Group (SATWG) and the results of the first study commissioned by the SATWG, the Space Avionics Requirements Study (SARS). The goal of the SARS task was to show that an open avionics architecture, using modular, standardized components, could be applied across the wide range of systems that comprise the Space Exploration Initiative. The study addressed systems ranging from expendable launch vehicles and the space station to surface systems such as Mars or lunar rovers and habitats. Top-level avionics requirements were derived from characterizations of each of the systems considered. Then a set of avionics subsystems were identified, along with estimates of the numbers and types of modules needed to meet the requirements. Applicability of these results across the infrastructure was then illustrated. In addition to these tasks, critical technologies were identified, characterized, and assessed in terms of their criticality and impact on the program. Design, development, test, and evaluation methods were addressed to identify potential areas of improvement.

Herbella, C. G.; Brown, D. C.

1991-01-01

440

An Analysis of the Relationship Between Readability of Air Force Procedural Manuals and Discrepancies Involving Non-Compliance with the Procedures.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Readability of Air Force logistics procedural manuals is generally too high for their readers. The readers, from different Air Force Specialties (AFS), are faced with a readability/reading ability gap when using the procedural manuals. This 'gap' was found to correlate directly with the frequency of discrepancies actually found over a two-year…

Johnson, Keith H.; And Others

441

33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...2010-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force... § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...The waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of a circular area 5...

2010-07-01

442

33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico within a circle one nautical mile in...

2010-07-01

443

33 CFR 334.730 - Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...Waters of Santa Rosa Sound and Gulf of Mexico within a circle one nautical mile in...

2011-07-01

444

33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force Proving Ground Command...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...2011-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force... § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Air Force...The waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of a circular area 5...

2011-07-01

445

Pavements Maintenance and Construction Equipment Operator Career Ladders: United States Air Force Job Inventory. AFSCs 55130/31, 55150/51, 55170/71, and 55191.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U. S. Air Force job inventory for the pavements maintenance and construction equipment operator career ladders is divided into 26 categories, each of which is broken down into a duty-task list. Space is provided for Air Force personnel filling out the inventory to check whether each task is at present part of their duties. The 26 categories…

Air Force Personnel and Training Research Center, Lackland AFB, TX.

446

Exposure to Prescription Drugs Labeled for Risk of Adverse Effects of Suicidal Behavior or Ideation among 100 Air Force Personnel Who Died by Suicide, 2006-2009  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Prescription drugs for many indications are labeled with warnings for potential risk of suicidal ideation or behavior. Exposures to prescription drugs labeled for adverse effects of suicidal behavior or ideation among 100 Air Force personnel who died by suicide between 2006 and 2009 are described. Air Force registry data were linked to…

Lavigne, Jill E.; McCarthy, Michael; Chapman, Richard; Petrilla, Allison; Knox, Kerry L.

2012-01-01

447

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

...Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2011-07-01

448

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2013-07-01

449

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2012-07-01

450

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2014-07-01

451

33 CFR 334.630 - Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms firing range and aircraft jettison, U...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.; small-arms...DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.630 Tampa Bay south of MacDill Air Force Base, Fla.;...

2010-07-01

452

On-site fuel cell energy systems: the U. S. Air Force field test demonstration plan. Final report, 30 March30 September 1980  

Microsoft Academic Search

The large scale application of fuel cell energy systems, electrochemical energy conversion devices, to facility operations, could result in significant benefits to the public and to the U.S. Air Force. This report summarizes the advantages and potential applications of fuel cells on an Air Force base, highlights the pertinent operational characteristics of a fuel cell, identifies the ongoing governmental and

Aimone

1980-01-01

453

China and the Dispatch of the Soviet Air Force: The Formation of the Chinese–Soviet–Korean Alliance in the Early Stage of the Korean War  

Microsoft Academic Search

China's entry into the Korean War, together with the involvement of the Soviet Air Force, constituted not only the base of Chinese and Soviet joint assistance to North Korea but also the formation of the Sino-Soviet–North Korean triangular alliance. Recently declassified Russian Defense Ministry archives show that Stalin wavered on dispatching the Soviet Air Force for fear of a direct

Zhihua Shen

2010-01-01

454

33 CFR 334.275 - North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley, Va.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

...North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...Southwest Branch of the Back River at latitude 37°03?50?...

2012-07-01

455

33 CFR 334.275 - North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley, Va.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

...North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...Southwest Branch of the Back River at latitude 37°03?50?...

2014-07-01

456

33 CFR 334.275 - North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley, Va.; restricted area.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...North and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...and Southwest Branch, Back River, Hampton, U.S. Air Force Base, Langley...Southwest Branch of the Back River at latitude 37°03?50?...

2013-07-01

457

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

Not Available

1991-10-01

458

Severe Weather Tool using 1500 UTC Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Soundings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

People and property at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) are at risk when severe weather occurs. Strong winds, hail and tornadoes can injure individuals and cause costly damage to structures if not properly protected. NASA's Launch Services Program and Ground Systems Development and Operations Program and other KSC programs use the daily and weekly severe weather forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) to determine if they need to limit an activity such as working on gantries, or protect property such as a vehicle on a pad. The 45 WS requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a warm season (May-September) severe weather tool for use in the Meteorological Interactive Data Display System (MIDDS) based on the late morning, 1500 UTC (1100 local time), CCAFS (XMR) sounding. The 45 WS frequently makes decisions to issue a severe weather watch and other severe weather warning support products to NASA and the 45th Space Wing in the late morning, after the 1500 UTC sounding. The results of this work indicate that certain stability indices based on the late morning XMR soundings can depict differences between days with reported severe weather and days with no reported severe weather. The AMU determined a frequency of reported severe weather for the stability indices and implemented an operational tool in MIDDS.

Bauman, William H., III

2013-01-01

459

Body mass penalties in the physical fitness tests of the Army, Air Force, and Navy.  

PubMed

Recent research has empirically documented a consistent penalty against heavier service members for events identical or similar to those in the physical fitness tests of the Army, Air Force, and Navy. These penalties, which are not related to body fatness, are based on biological scaling models and have a physiological basis. Using hypothetical cases, we quantified the penalties for men, with body mass of 60 vs. 90 kg, and women, 45 vs. 75 kg, to be 15% to 20% for the fitness tests of these three services. Such penalties alone can adversely affect awards and promotions for heavier service members. To deal equitably with these penalties in a practical manner, we offer two recommendations, i.e., (1) implementation of revised fitness tests with balanced events, in which the penalties of one event for heavier service members are balanced by an equal and opposite bias against lighter service members, or (2) development of correction factors that can be multiplied by raw scores to yield adjusted scores free of body mass bias. PMID:16933817

Vanderburgh, Paul M; Crowder, Todd A

2006-08-01

460

Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: groundwater biogeochemistry.  

PubMed

Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/ aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally atteuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. PMID:12143993

Witt, Michael E; Klecka, Gary M; Lutz, Edward J; Ei, Tom A; Grosso, Nancy R; Chapelle, Francis H

2002-07-01

461

Natural attenuation of chlorinated solvents at Area 6, Dover Air Force Base: Groundwater biogeochemistry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) has recently emerged as a viable groundwater remediation technology in the United States. Area 6 at Dover Air Force Base (Dover, DE) was chosen as a test site to examine the potential for MNA of tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) in groundwater and aquifer sediments. A "lines of evidence" approach was used to document the occurrence of natural attenuation. Chlorinated hydrocarbon and biogeochemical data were used to develop a site-specific conceptual model where both anaerobic and aerobic biological processes are responsible for the destruction of PCE, TCE, and daughter metabolites. An examination of groundwater biogeochemical data showed a region of depleted dissolved oxygen with elevated dissolved methane and hydrogen concentrations. Reductive dechlorination likely dominated in the anaerobic portion of the aquifer where PCE and TCE levels were observed to decrease with a simultaneous increase in cis-1,2-dichloroethene (cis-DCE), vinyl chloride (VC), ethene, and dissolved chloride. Near the anaerobic/aerobic interface, concentrations of cis-DCE and VC decreased to below detection limits, presumably due to aerobic biotransformation processes. Therefore, the contaminant and daughter product plumes present at the site appear to have been naturally attenuated by a combination of active anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation processes. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Witt, M.E.; Klecka, G.M.; Lutz, E.J.; Ei, T.A.; Grosso, N.R.; Chapelle, F.H.

2002-01-01

462

Occurrence and impact of zoonoses in pet dogs and cats at US Air Force bases.  

PubMed

A descriptive epidemiologic study was conducted to quantitate the occurrence of zoonoses in pet animals (almost exclusively dogs and cats) at 30 Air Force bases in nine regions of the United States during 1980 and 1981. Reviews of reported cases of pet-associated zoonoses in humans at these bases were included. Occurrence of a zoonotic disease in dogs and cats was expressed as a ratio of reported cases per 100 rabies vaccinations (cs/Crv). Overall, the four zoonoses reported most frequently from these pets were hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms, and fleas. Annual ratios revealed geographic variations: for example, hookworms in dogs and cats in the southeast ranged from 12.3 to 9.4 cs/Crv; in the northern Great Plains, hookworms ranged from 0.9 to 0.4 cs/Crv. Dermatomycoses in the southeast ranged from 1.3 to 1.1 cs/Crv, and in Alaska from 0.3 to 0.2 cs/Crv. Quarterly zoonoses occurrence revealed seasonal variations in several regions. Reports of zoonoses in people from these bases indicated that five less frequent zoonoses in dogs and cats (Microsporum canis dermatomycosis, fleas, Sarcoptes scabiei var canis, Gram-positive bacterial infections, and rabies) presented greater acute threats to humans than did the four most frequent zoonoses reported from their pets. PMID:6496816

Warner, R D

1984-11-01

463

Occurrence and impact of zoonoses in pet dogs and cats at US Air Force bases.  

PubMed Central

A descriptive epidemiologic study was conducted to quantitate the occurrence of zoonoses in pet animals (almost exclusively dogs and cats) at 30 Air Force bases in nine regions of the United States during 1980 and 1981. Reviews of reported cases of pet-associated zoonoses in humans at these bases were included. Occurrence of a zoonotic disease in dogs and cats was expressed as a ratio of reported cases per 100 rabies vaccinations (cs/Crv). Overall, the four zoonoses reported most frequently from these pets were hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms, and fleas. Annual ratios revealed geographic variations: for example, hookworms in dogs and cats in the southeast ranged from 12.3 to 9.4 cs/Crv; in the northern Great Plains, hookworms ranged from 0.9 to 0.4 cs/Crv. Dermatomycoses in the southeast ranged from 1.3 to 1.1 cs/Crv, and in Alaska from 0.3 to 0.2 cs/Crv. Quarterly zoonoses occurrence revealed seasonal variations in several regions. Reports of zoonoses in people from these bases indicated that five less frequent zoonoses in dogs and cats (Microsporum canis dermatomycosis, fleas, Sarcoptes scabiei var canis, Gram-positive bacterial infections, and rabies) presented greater acute threats to humans than did the four most frequent zoonoses reported from their pets. PMID:6496816

Warner, R D

1984-01-01

464

The emergence of extended field ECI technology in the Air Force  

SciTech Connect

Extended-field shaped-coil technology is a promising solution to the increasingly demanding Air Force ECI requirements. As part of the engine overhaul process, eddy current inspection has long played a role in determining if fracture critical hardware remains flight worthy. With gas turbine engines today pushing the limits of many of their components` material properties, eddy current has become even more important to hardware life determination. One example is the inspection requirements for the F100-PW-220 1st and 3rd stage fan disk broach slots. The required zone of inspection has tripled in size as compared to earlier engine models. Concurrently, maximum time limits for overhaul inspections are being imposed. The conventional, indexed style, depot inspection takes approximately 14 hours to complete one full set of disk broaches. This inspection time was deemed too lengthy. Therefore an extended-field, shaped-coil design was pursued, prototyped and demonstrated. This new method reduces the same depot inspection times to approximately 2.5 hours.

Henderson, J.; Lyders, D. [United Technologies Pratt and Whitney, West Palm Beach, FL (United States); Price, L.S.; Nuxoll, G.; Gehlen, M. [UniWest Corp., Pasco, WA (United States); Braun, T.J.; Keppler, E.E. [Systems Research Labs., Inc., Dayton, OH (United States); Stone, R.; Arispe, B. [Kelly Air Force Base, Kelly AFB, TX (United States)

1995-12-31

465

Attenuated geophysical signatures associated with ongoing remediation efforts at Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Oscoda, Michigan  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Previous geophysical investigations (1996, 1997, 2003, and 2004) conducted at the decommissioned Wurtsmith Air Force Base former Fire Training Cell (FT-02) showed a clearly defined high conductivity anomaly associated with hydrocarbon contaminants in the vadose zone and ground water near the source area. The source of the geophysical anomalies was attributed to biogeochemical modifications of the contaminated zone resulting from intrinsic bioremediation. During these previous surveys, ground penetrating radar (GPR) data showed a zone of attenuated GPR reflections extending from the vadose zone to below the water table. Self potential data (SP) data defined a positive anomaly coincident with the hydrochemically defined plume, while electrical resistivity data showed anomalously high conductivity within the zone of impact. In 2007, another integrated geophysical study of the site was conducted. GPR, SP, electrical resistivity, and induced polarization surveys were conducted with expectations of achieving similar results as the past surveys. However, preliminary assessment of the data shows a marked decrease in electrical conductivity and SP response over the plume. GPR data still showed the attenuated signals, but the zone of attenuation was only observed below the water table. We attribute the attenuation of the observed geophysical anomalies to ongoing soil vapor extraction initiated in 2003. Significant removal of the contaminant mass by the vapor extraction system has altered the subsurface biogeochemical conditions and these changes were documented by the 2007 geophysical and geochemical data. The results of this study show that the attenuation of the contaminant plume is detectable with geophysical methods.

Che-Alota, V.; Atekwana, E. A.; Sauck, W. A.; Nolan, J. T.; Slater, L. D.

2007-12-01

466

Statistical Short-Range Guidance for Peak Wind Speed Forecasts at Edwards Air Force Base, CA  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The peak winds near the surface are an important forecast element for space shuttle landings. As defined in the Flight Rules (FR), there are peak wind thresholds that cannot be exceeded in order to ensure the safety of the shuttle during landing operations. The National Weather Service Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) is responsible for weather forecasts for all shuttle landings, and is required to issue surface average and 10-minute peak wind speed forecasts. They indicate peak winds are a challenging parameter to forecast. To alleviate the difficulty in making such wind forecasts, the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) developed a PC-based graphical user interface (GUI) for displaying peak wind climatology and probabilities of exceeding peak wind thresholds for the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC; Lambert 2003). However, the shuttle occasionally may land at Edwards Air Force Base (EAFB) in southern California when weather conditions at KSC in Florida are not acceptable, so SMG forecasters requested a similar tool be developed for EAFB.

Dreher, Joseph G.; Crawford, Winifred; Lafosse, Richard; Hoeth, Brian; Burns, Kerry

2009-01-01

467

Air force research laboratory's technology programs addressing deployable space optical systems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The US Air Force Research Lab (AFRL) has integrated several technology development efforts together to form a cohesive approach for enabling deployable optical systems in the future. Aperture size dominates the cost/architecture trades for space based laser systems for missile defense and tactical imaging system pursuing broad area coverage with local access. Larger apertures allow both systems to consider higher orbits, offering greater fields of regard. However, large monolithic apertures quickly run into launch vehicle faring volumetric and throw mass constraints. Several technologies may enable space deployable of optical segments to form a large primary mirror at a reduced mass, circumventing the launch vehicle constraints. However, to produce an optically phased wavefront, a combination of technologies, deployment mechanisms, lightweight structures and mirrors, mirror mount isolators and actuators, adaptive optics, and processing techniques, must be applied in concert. While this paper concentrates on the hardware development activities under the UltraLITE program, namely the Precision Deployable Optical Structure ground demonstration and the brassboard Deployable Space Telescope, it will also briefly cover and provide references to related technology programs on-going at the AFRL.

Bell, Kevin D.; Powers, Michael K.; Griffin, Steven F.; Huybrechts, Steven

1998-08-01

468

Type II altitude decompression sickness (DCS): U.S. Air Force experience with 133 cases.  

PubMed

Type II altitude-related decompression sickness (DCS), due to its wide spectrum of symptoms, is often difficult to diagnose. This difficulty sometimes leads unnecessarily to the permanent grounding of an experienced aviator. So that this condition could be better understood, a total of 133 cases of Type II altitude DCS (on file at the United States Air Force Hyperbaric Medicine Division, School of Aerospace Medicine, Brooks AFB, TX) were reviewed. Most cases (94.7%) followed altitude chamber training. The most common manifestation was joint pain (43.6%), associated with headache (42.1%), visual disturbances (30.1%), and limb paresthesia (27.8%). The next most common symptoms were, in order of decreasing frequency: mental confusion (24.8%), limb numbness (16.5%), and extreme fatigue (10.5%). Spinal cord involvement, chokes, and unconsciousness were rare (6.9%, 6%, and 1.5%, respectively). Hyperbaric oxygen treatment produced fully successful results in 97.7% of the cases. Only 2.3% of the cases resulted in residual deficit; no deaths occurred. A thorough knowledge of the differential diagnosis and predisposing factors is essential to narrow the margins of error in the diagnosis and prevention of decompression sickness in the operational or training environment. A recommendation for favorable consideration of waiver action for those aviators who suffered Type II DCS is presented. These recommendations are based on a unique classification of the severity of symptoms. PMID:2653301

Wirjosemito, S A; Touhey, J E; Workman, W T

1989-03-01

469

Soil erosion and causative factors at Vandenberg Air Force Base, California  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Areas of significant soil erosion and unvegetated road cuts were identified and mapped for Vandenberg Air Force Base. One hundred forty-two eroded areas (most greater than 1.2 ha) and 51 road cuts were identified from recent color infrared aerial photography and ground truthed to determine the severity and causes of erosion. Comparison of the present eroded condition of soils (as shown in the 1986 photography) with that in historical aerial photography indicates that most erosion on the base took place prior to 1928. However, at several sites accelerated rates of erosion and sedimentation may be occurring as soils and parent materials are eroded vertically. The most conspicuous erosion is in the northern part of the base, where severe gully, sheet, and mass movement erosion have occurred in soils and in various sedimentary rocks. Past cultivation practices, compounded by highly erodible soils prone to subsurface piping, are probably the main causes. Improper range management practices following cultivation may have also increased runoff and erosion. Aerial photography from 1986 shows that no appreciable headward erosion or gully sidewall collapse have occurred in this area since 1928.

Butterworth, Joel B.

1988-01-01

470

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

Not Available

1991-10-01

471

Studying technology intrusion in linear communities: The case of Air Force low-altitude training routes  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents techniques for examining communities at risk within the analytical framework of linear communities, a concept developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) researchers for cases in which technologies affect long, narrow geographic areas. Linear communities are defined solely by their proximity to these technological intrusions rather than by political boundaries. The research methods discussed in this paper were used in a recent ORNL study undertaken to define and analyze impacts resulting from US Air Force training flights conducted in designated low-altitude airspaces. First, four issues had to be addressed: (1) defining community boundaries; (2) designing an effective strategy for selecting case study sites within time, personnel, and budgetary constraints; (3) choosing a representative sample of respondents within each case study site; and (4) describing and analyzing the impacts of linear technologies on linear communities. Then, ORNL addressed the problem of community boundary definition by limiting data collection to the area within flight corridors. A representative sample of case study sites was selected from a population of 600 routes using a stratified sampling process. Respondents were chosen within each case study corridor by creating a sampling frame consisting of road segments, drawing a proportional, random sample of road segments from this, and selecting individual structures from each segment with a random number table. Finally, the problem of analyzing impacts on linear communities was solved by aggregating survey responses by route.

Schweitzer, M.; Wolfe, A.K. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Energy Division); Braid, R.B. (Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States))

1993-01-01

472

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

Not Available

1992-03-01

473

[Hypobaric chamber as a test of the aircrew of Russain Air Forces].  

PubMed

Authors research clinical medical importance of hypobaric ascends to an attitude of 5000 meters for 20 minutes for detection of latent forms of diseases and assessment of professional health and ascends to an attitude of 5000 and 6000 meters for 5 minutes when performing psychophysiological training for high altitude flying. According to test of 1326 pilots of Russian Air Forces, including pilots with different diseases, hypobaric ascends showed high diagnostic effectiveness for the professional health assessment. By using of both methods it was revealed that frequency of detection of decreased tolerance to hypoxia is the same (in average in 2,7 and 3,1% of total number of patients). By ascends in 38 patients (2,9%) was revealed decreased tolerance to hypoxia of medium level. It indicated about low functional state and space capacity of pilots. It was proved that hypobaric ascends of 5000 and 6000 meters for 5 minutes could be considered as an effective method of checkup of aircrew for the aviation physical examination. PMID:25051790

Shishov, A A; Olenev, N I; Shishkin, A N; Filatov, V N

2014-04-01

474

Prostate cancer incidence in Air Force aviators compared with non-aviators  

PubMed Central

Introduction Several studies investigating whether prostate cancer incidence is elevated in aviators both in the civilian and military sectors have yielded inconsistent findings. Most investigations have compared aviators to the general population. Instead, our study compared prostate cancer incidence rates among officer aviator and non-aviators in the United States Air Force to reduce confounding by socioeconomic status and frequency of medical exams. Methods This retrospective analysis ascertained prostate cancer cases using the Automated Cancer Tumor Registry of the Department of Defense linked to personnel records from the USAF Personnel Center to identify aviators and non-aviators. Survival analysis using the Cox Proportional Hazards model allowed comparison of prostate cancer incidence rates in USAF aviators and non-aviators. Results After adjustment for age and race, the hazards ratio for prostate cancer incidence comparing aviators with non-aviators was 1.15 (95 % confidence interval, 0.85-1.44). Neither prostate cancer incidence nor time to diagnosis differed significantly between the two groups. Conclusion Our study compared prostate cancer rates in aviators with a reference group of non-aviators similar in socio-economic level and frequency of exams. When compared to this internal reference group the risk of prostate cancer in USAF officer aviators appeared similar with no significant excess. PMID:22097644

Rogers, David; Boyd, Douglas D.; Fox, Erin E.; Cooper, Sharon; Goldhagen, Marc; Shen, Yu; del Junco, Deborah J.

2011-01-01

475

An analysis of trichloroethylene movement in groundwater at castle Air Force Base, California  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A trichloroethylene (TCE) plume has been identified in the groundwater under a U.S. Air Force Base in the Central Valley of California. An areal, two-dimensional numerical solute transport model indicates that the movement of TCE due to advection, dispersion, and linear sorption is simulated over a 25-year historic period. The model is used in several ways: (1) to estimate the extent of the plume; (2) to confirm the likely sources of contamination as suggested by a soil organic vapor survey of the site; and (3) to make predictions about future movement of the plume. Despite the noisy and incomplete data set, the model reproduces the general trends in contamination at a number of observation wells. The analysis indicates that soil organic vapor monitoring is an effective tool for identifying contaminant source locations. Leaky sewer pipes and underground tanks are the indicated pathways for TCE to have entered the groundwater system. The chemical mass balance indicates that a total of about 100 gallons of TCE - a relatively small amount of organic solvent - has created the observed groundwater plume. ?? 1989.

Avon, L.; Bredehoeft, J.D.

1989-01-01

476

Evaluation of ground-water flow by particle tracking, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) began a Basewide Monitoring Program (BMP) in 1992. The purpose of the BMP was to establish a long-term ground-water and surface- water sampling network in order to (1) characterize current ground-water and surface-water quality; (2) describe water-quality changes as water enters, flows across, and exits Base boundaries; (3) conduct statistical analyses of water quality; and (4) estimate the effect of WPAFB on regional water quality. As part of the BMP, the USGS conducted ground-water particle-tracking analyses based on a ground-water-flow model produced during a previous USGS study. This report briefly describes the previous USGS study, the inherent assumptions of particle-tracking analyses, and information on the regional ground-water-flow field as inferred from particle pathlines. Pathlines for particles placed at the Base boundary and particles placed within identified Installation Restoration Program sites are described.

Cunningham, W.L.; Sheets, R.A.; Schalk, C.W.

1994-01-01

477

Fiber laser beam combining and power scaling progress: Air Force Research Laboratory Laser Division  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Numerous achievements have been made recently by researchers in the areas of fiber laser beam combining and power scaling. Industry has demonstrated multi-kW power from a single fiber amplifier, and a US national laboratory has coherently combined eight fiber amplifiers totaling 4 kW. This paper will survey the recent literature and then focus on fiber laser results from the Laser Division, Directed Energy Directorate of the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL). Progress has been made in the power scaling of narrow-linewidth fiber amplifiers, and we are transitioning lessons learned from PCF power scaling into monolithic architectures. SBS suppression has been achieved using a variety of techniques to lower the Brillioun gain, including acoustically tailored fiber, laser gain competition resulting from multitone seeding and inducing a longitudinal thermal gradient. We recently demonstrated a 32-channel coherent beam combination result using AFRL's phaselocking technique and are focused on exploring the limitations of this technique including linewidth broadening, kW-induced phase nonlinearities and auto-tuning methods for large channel counts. Additionally, we have recently refurbished our High Energy Laser Joint Technology Office-sponsored 16-amplifier fiber testbed to meet strict PER, spatial drift, power stability and beam quality requirements.

Wagner, T. J.

2012-02-01

478

Gold nanoparticle coated silicon tips for Kelvin probe force microscopy in air  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The tip apex dimensions and geometry of the conductive probe remain the major limitation to the resolution of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM). One of the possible strategies to improve the spatial resolution of surface potential images consists in the development of thinner and more durable conductive tips. In an effort to improve the lateral resolution of topography and surface potential maps, we have evaluated high aspect ratio conductive tips created by depositing gold nanoparticles on standard silicon tips. Besides the already known general topographic resolution enhancement offered by these modified tips, an improvement of surface potential lateral resolution and signal-to-noise ratio is reported here for a variety of samples as compared to other regular conductive probes. We have also observed that the modified conductive tips have a significant auto-regeneration capability, which stems from a certain level of mobility of the nanoparticle coating. This property makes the modified tips highly resistant to degradation during scanning, thus increasing their durability. As demonstrated by the heterogeneous set of structures measured in the present study performed in air, the nanoparticle coated tips are suitable for KPFM analysis. In particular, surface potential difference determination on graphene deposited on silicon, gold sputtered on a salt surface, large and mildly rough areas of ZnO films and small DNA molecules on insulating mica have been achieved with enhanced resolution.

Hormeńo, Silvia; Penedo, Marcos; Manzano, Cristina V.; Luna, Mónica

2013-10-01

479

Effects of trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene on wild rodents at Edwards Air Force Base, California, USA  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Effects of inhalation of volatilized trichloroethylene (TCE) or perchloroethylene (PCE) were assessed based on the health and population size of wild, burrowing mammals at Edwards Air Force Base (CA, USA). Organic soil-vapor concentrations were measured at three sites with aquifer contamination of TCE or PCE of 5.5 to 77 mg/L and at two uncontaminated reference sites. Population estimates of kangaroo rats (Dipodomys merriami and D. panamintinus) as well as hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice (Peromyscus maniculatus) were compared between contaminated and uncontaminated populations. Maximum soil-gas concentrations associated with groundwater contamination were less than 1.5 ??l/L of TCE and 0.07 ??l/L of PCE. Population estimates of kangaroo rats were similar at contaminated and reference sites. Hematology, blood chemistry, and histopathology of kangaroo rats and deer mice indicated no evidence of health effects caused by exposure. Trichloroethylene or PCE in groundwater and in related soil gas did not appear to reduce the size of small mammal populations or impair the health of individuals.

Spring, S.E.; Miles, A.K.; Anderson, M.J.

2004-01-01

480

(Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)  

SciTech Connect

This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

Not Available

1992-04-01

481

Measuring Forces and Spatiotemporal Evolution of Thin Water Films between an Air Bubble and Solid Surfaces of Different Hydrophobicity.  

PubMed

A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and reflection interference contrast microscopy (RICM) was used to measure simultaneously the interaction force and the spatiotemporal evolution of the thin water film between a bubble in water and mica surfaces with varying degrees of hydrophobicity. Stable films, supported by the repulsive van der Waals-Casimir-Lifshitz force were always observed between air bubble and hydrophilic mica surfaces (water contact angle, ?w < 5°) whereas bubble attachment occurred on hydrophobized mica surfaces. A theoretical model, based on the Reynolds lubrication theory and the augmented Young-Laplace equation including the effects of disjoining pressure, provided excellent agreement with experiment results, indicating the essential physics involved in the interaction between air bubble and solid surfaces can be elucidated. A hydrophobic interaction free energy per unit area of the form: WH(h) = -?(1 - cos ?w)exp(-h/DH) can be used to quantify the attraction between bubble and hydrophobized solid substrate at separation, h, with ? being the surface tension of water. For surfaces with water contact angle in the range 45° < ?w < 90°, the decay length DH varied between 0.8 and 1.0 nm. This study quantified the hydrophobic interaction in asymmetric system between air bubble and hydrophobic surfaces, and provided a feasible method for synchronous measurements of the interaction forces with sub-nN resolution and the drainage dynamics of thin films down to nm thickness. PMID:25514470

Shi, Chen; Cui, Xin; Xie, Lei; Liu, Qingxia; Chan, Derek Y C; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Zeng, Hongbo

2015-01-27

482

HLLV avionics requirements study and electronic filing system database development  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This final report provides a summary of achievements and activities performed under Contract NAS8-39215. The contract's objective was to explore a new way of delivering, storing, accessing, and archiving study products and information and to define top level system requirements for Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) avionics that incorporate Vehicle Health Management (VHM). This report includes technical objectives, methods, assumptions, recommendations, sample data, and issues as specified by DPD No. 772, DR-3. The report is organized into two major subsections, one specific to each of the two tasks defined in the Statement of Work: the Index Database Task and the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. The Index Database Task resulted in the selection and modification of a commercial database software tool to contain the data developed during the HLLV Avionics Requirements Task. All summary information is addressed within each task's section.

1994-01-01

483

Investigation of an advanced fault tolerant integrated avionics system  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Presented is an advanced, fault-tolerant multiprocessor avionics architecture as could be employed in an advanced rotorcraft such as LHX. The processor structure is designed to interface with existing digital avionics systems and concepts including the Army Digital Avionics System (ADAS) cockpit/display system, navaid and communications suites, integrated sensing suite, and the Advanced Digital Optical Control System (ADOCS). The report defines mission, maintenance and safety-of-flight reliability goals as might be expected for an operational LHX aircraft. Based on use of a modular, compact (16-bit) microprocessor card family, results of a preliminary study examining simplex, dual and standby-sparing architectures is presented. Given the stated constraints, it is shown that the dual architecture is best suited to meet reliability goals with minimum hardware and software overhead. The report presents hardware and software design considerations for realizing the architecture including redundancy management requirements and techniques as well as verification and validation needs and methods.

Dunn, W. R.; Cottrell, D.; Flanders, J.; Javornik, A.; Rusovick, M.

1986-01-01

484

Space Transportation Avionics Technology Symposium. Volume 2: Conference Proceedings  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The focus of the symposium was to examine existing and planned avionics technology processes and products and to recommend necessary changes for strengthening priorities and program emphases. Innovative changes in avionics technology development and design processes are needed to support the increasingly complex, multi-vehicle, integrated, autonomous space-based systems. Key technology advances make such a major initiative viable at this time: digital processing capabilities, integrated on-board test/checkout methods, easily reconfigurable laboratories, and software design and production techniques.

1990-01-01

485

Space Generic Open Avionics Architecture (SGOAA) standard specification  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The purpose of this standard is to provide an umbrella set of requirements for applying the generic architecture interface model to the design of a specific avionics hardware/software system. This standard defines a generic set of system interface points to facilitate identification of critical interfaces and establishes the requirements for applying appropriate low level detailed implementation standards to those interface points. The generic core avionics system and processing architecture models provided herein are robustly tailorable to specific system applications and provide a platform upon which the interface model is to be applied.

Wray, Richard B.; Stovall, John R.

1993-01-01

486

Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems for Space and Lunar Exploration  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA's newly named Advanced Avionics and Processor Systems (AAPS) project, formerly known as the Radiation Hardened Electronics for Space Environments (RHESE) project, endeavors to mature and develop the avionic and processor technologies required to fulfill NASA's goals for future space and lunar exploration. Over the past year, multiple advancements have been made within each of the individual AAPS technology development tasks that will facilitate the success of the Constellation program elements. This paper provides a brief review of the project's recent technology advancements, discusses their application to Constellation projects, and addresses the project's plans for the coming year.

Keys, Andrew S.; Adams, James H.; Ray, Robert E.; Johnson, Michael A.; Cressler, John D.

2009-01-01

487

Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) Avionics Flight Computing Architecture Study  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A NASA multi-Center study team was assembled from LaRC, MSFC, KSC, JSC and WFF to examine potential flight computing architectures for a Heavy Lift Vehicle (HLV) to better understand avionics drivers. The study examined Design Reference Missions (DRMs) and vehicle requirements that could impact the vehicles avionics. The study considered multiple self-checking and voting architectural variants and examined reliability, fault-tolerance, mass, power, and redundancy management impacts. Furthermore, a goal of the study was to develop the skills and tools needed to rapidly assess additional architectures should requirements or assumptions change.

Hodson, Robert F.; Chen, Yuan; Morgan, Dwayne R.; Butler, A. Marc; Sdhuh, Joseph M.; Petelle, Jennifer K.; Gwaltney, David A.; Coe, Lisa D.; Koelbl, Terry G.; Nguyen, Hai D.

2011-01-01

488

Space Tug avionics definition study. Volume 1: Executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

A top down approach was used to identify, compile, and develop avionics functional requirements for all flight and ground operational phases. Such requirements as safety mission critical functions and criteria, minimum redundancy levels, software memory sizing, power for tug and payload, data transfer between payload, tug, shuttle, and ground were established. Those functional requirements that related to avionics support of a particular function were compiled together under that support function heading. This unique approach provided both organizational efficiency and traceability back to the applicable operational phase and event. Each functional requirement was then allocated to the appropriate subsystems and its particular characteristics were quantified.

1975-01-01

489

Forecasting Cool Season Daily Peak Winds at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The expected peak wind speed for the day is an important element in the daily 24-Hour and Weekly Planning Forecasts issued by the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) for planning operations at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS). The morning outlook for peak speeds also begins the warning decision process for gusts ^ 35 kt, ^ 50 kt, and ^ 60 kt from the surface to 300 ft. The 45 WS forecasters have indicated that peak wind speeds are a challenging parameter to forecast during the cool season (October-April). The 45 WS requested that the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool to help them forecast the speed and timing of the daily peak and average wind, from the surface to 300 ft on KSC/CCAFS during the cool season. The tool must only use data available by 1200 UTC to support the issue time of the Planning Forecasts. Based on observations from the KSC/CCAFS wind tower network, surface observations from the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF), and CCAFS upper-air soundings from the cool season months of October 2002 to February 2007, the AMU created multiple linear regression equations to predict the timing and speed of the daily peak wind speed, as well as the background average wind speed. Several possible predictors were evaluated, including persistence, the temperature inversion depth, strength, and wind speed at the top of the inversion, wind gust factor (ratio of peak wind speed to average wind speed), synoptic weather pattern, occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft, 4000 ft, or 5000 ft. Six synoptic patterns were identified: 1) surface high near or over FL, 2) surface high north or east of FL, 3) surface high south or west of FL, 4) surface front approaching FL, 5) surface front across central FL, and 6) surface front across south FL. The following six predictors were selected: 1) inversion depth, 2) inversion strength, 3) wind gust factor, 4) synoptic weather pattern, 5) occurrence of precipitation at the SLF, and 6) strongest wind in the lowest 3000 ft. The forecast tool was developed as a graphical user interface with Microsoft Excel to help the forecaster enter the variables, and run the appropriate regression equations. Based on the forecaster's input and regression equations, a forecast of the day's peak and average wind is generated and displayed. The application also outputs the probability that the peak wind speed will be ^ 35 kt, 50 kt, and 60 kt.

Barrett, Joe, III; Short, David; Roeder, William

2008-01-01

490

Dermal exposure to jet fuel (JP-8) in US Air Force personnel.  

PubMed

Limited research has been conducted on dermal exposure and risk assessment, owing to the lack of reliable measurement techniques and data for quantitative risk assessment. We investigated the magnitude of dermal exposure to jet propulsion fuel 8 (JP-8), using naphthalene as a surrogate, on the US Air Force fuel-cell maintenance workers. Dermal exposure of 124 workers routinely working with JP-8 was measured using a non-invasive tape-strip technique coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. The contribution of job-related factors to dermal exposure was determined using multiple linear regression analyses. Average whole body dermal exposure to naphthalene (as a marker for JP-8) was 7.61 +/- 2.27 ln(ng m(-2)). Significant difference (P < 0.0001) between the high-exposure group [8.34 +/- 2.23 ln(ng m(-2))] and medium- and low-exposure groups [6.18 +/- 1.35 ln(ng m(-2)) and 5.84 +/- 1.34 ln(ng m(-2)), respectively] was observed reflecting the actual exposure scenarios. Skin irritation, use of booties, working inside the fuel tank and the duration of JP-8 exposure were significant factors explaining the whole body dermal exposure. This study clearly demonstrates the efficiency and suitability of the tape-strip technique for the assessment of dermal exposure to JP-8 and that naphthalene can serve as a useful marker of exposure and uptake of JP-8 and its components. It also showed that the skin provides a significant route for JP-8 exposure and that actions to reduce exposure are required. Studies to investigate the relative contribution of dermal uptake of JP-8 on total body dose and the toxicokinetics of dermal exposure to JP-8 are underway. PMID:16006502

Chao, Yi-Chun E; Gibson, Roger L; Nylander-French, Leena A

2005-10-01

491

Geologic investigation :an update of subsurface geology on Kirtland Air Force Base, New Mexico.  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this investigation was to generate a revised geologic model of Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) incorporating the geological and geophysical data produced since the Site-Wide Hydrogeologic Characterization Project (SWHC) of 1994 and 1995. Although this report has certain stand-alone characteristics, it is intended to complement the previous work and to serve as a status report as of late 2002. In the eastern portion of KAFB (Lurance Canyon and the Hubbell bench), of primary interest is the elevation to which bedrock is buried under a thin cap of alluvium. Elevation maps of the bedrock top reveal the paleodrainage that allows for the interpretation of the area's erosional history. The western portion of KAFB consists of the eastern part of the Albuquerque basin where bedrock is deeply buried under Santa Fe Group alluvium. In this area, the configuration of the down-to-the-west, basin-bounding Sandia and West Sandia faults is of primary interest. New geological and geophysical data and the reinterpretation of old data help to redefine the location and magnitude of these elements. Additional interests in this area are the internal stratigraphy and structure of the Santa Fe Group. Recent data collected from new monitoring wells in the area have led to a geologic characterization of the perched Tijeras Arroyo Groundwater system and have refined the known limits of the Ancestral Rio Grande fluvial sediments within the Santa Fe Group. Both the reinterpretation of the existing data and a review of the regional geology have shown that a segment of the boundary between the eastern and western portions of KAFB is a complicated early Tertiary (Laramide) wrench-fault system, the Tijeras/Explosive Ordnance Disposal Area/Hubbell Spring system. A portion of this fault zone is occupied by a coeval ''pull-apart'' basin filled with early Tertiary conglomerates, whose exposures form the ''Travertine Hills''.

Van Hart, Dirk (GRAM, Inc.)

2003-06-01

492

Baseline biological risk assessment for aquatic populations occurring near Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Eielson Air Force Base (AFB), Alaska was listed as a Superfund site in November 1989 with 64 potential source areas of contamination. As part of a sitewide remedial investigation, baseline risk assessments were conducted in 1993 and 1994 to evaluate hazards posed to biological receptors and to human health. Fish tissue, aquatic invertebrates, aquatic vegetation, sediment, and surface water data were collected from several on-site and off-site surface water bodies. An initial screening risk assessment indicated that several surface water sites along two major tributary creeks flowing through the base had unacceptable risks to both aquatic receptors and to human health because of DDTs. Other contaminants of concern (i.e., PCBs and PAHs) were below screening risk levels for aquatic organisms, but contributed to an unacceptable risk to human health. Additional samples was taken in 1994 to characterize the site-wide distribution of PAHs, DDTs, and PCBs in aquatic biota and sediments. Concentrations of PAHs were invertebrates > aquatic vegetation > fish, but concentrations were sufficiently low that they posed no significant risk to biological receptors. Pesticides were detected in all fish tissue samples. Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were also detected in most fish from Garrison Slough. The pattern of PCB concentrations in Arctic grayling (Thymallus arcticus) was related to their proximity to a sediment source in lower Garrison Slough. Ingestion of PCB-contaminated fish is the primary human-health risk driver for surface water bodies on Eielson AFB, resulting in carcinogenic risks > 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} for future recreational land-use at some sites. Principal considerations affecting uncertainty in the risk assessment process included spatial and temporal variability in media contaminant concentrations and inconsistencies between modelled and measured body burdens.

Dauble, D.; Brandt, C.; Lewis, R.; Smith, R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-12-31

493

Field Measurements of Heating Efficiency of Electric Forced-Air Furnaces in Six Manufactured Homes.  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of field measurements of heating efficiency for six manufactured homes in the Pacific Northwest heated with electric forced-air systems. This is the first in a series of regional and national efforts to measure in detail the heating efficiency of manufactured homes. Only six homes were included in this study because of budgetary constraints; therefore this is not a representative sample. These investigations do provide some useful information on the heating efficiency of these homes. Useful comparisons can be drawn between these study homes and site-built heating efficiencies measured with a similar protocol. The protocol used to test these homes is very similar to another Ecotope protocol used in the study conducted in 1992 and 1993 for the Bonneville Power Administration to test the heating efficiency of 24 homes. This protocol combined real-time power measurements of furnace energy usage with energy usage during co-heat periods. Accessory data such as house and duct tightness measurements and tracer gas measurements were used to describe these homes and their heating system efficiency. Ensuring that manufactured housing is constructed in an energy and resource efficient manner is of increasing concern to manufactured home builders and consumers. No comparable work has been done to measure the heating system efficiency of MCS manufactured homes, although some co-heat tests have been performed on manufactured homes heated with natural gas to validate HUD thermal standards. It is expected that later in 1994 more research of this kind will be conducted, and perhaps a less costly and less time-consuming method for testing efficiencies will be develops.

Davis, Bob; Palmiter, Larry S.; Siegel, Jeff

1994-07-26

494

Evaluation of the TCE catalytic oxidation unit at Wurtsmith Air Force Base  

Microsoft Academic Search

Remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater is frequently performed by air stripping, a process that transfers the contaminants from the water phase to the air phase by contacting the phases countercurrently through a packed-bed column. Air stripping has proven to be effective and economic for removing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from groundwater; in many cases, however, the states require the use of

T. D. Hylton; E. G. Marchand

1991-01-01

495

SR-71B - in Flight with F-18 Chase Aircraft - View from Air Force Tanker  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

NASA 831, an SR-71B operated by the Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, cruises over the Mojave Desert with an F/A-18 Hornet flying safety chase. They were photographed on a 1996 mission from an Air Force refueling tanker The F/A-18 Hornet is used primarily as a safety chase and support aircraft at Dryden. As support aircraft, the F-18s are used for safety chase, pilot proficiency and aerial photography. Two SR-71 aircraft have been used by NASA as testbeds for high-speed and high-altitude aeronautical research. The aircraft, an SR-71A and an SR-71B pilot trainer aircraft, have been based here at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California. They were transferred to NASA after the U.S. Air Force program was cancelled. As research platforms, the aircraft can cruise at Mach 3 for more than one hour. For thermal experiments, this can produce heat soak temperatures of over 600 degrees Fahrenheit (F). This operating environment makes these aircraft excellent platforms to carry out research and experiments in a variety of areas -- aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, thermal protection materials, high-speed and high-temperature instrumentation, atmospheric studies, and sonic boom characterization. The SR-71 was used in a program to study ways of reducing sonic booms or over pressures that are heard on the ground, much like sharp thunderclaps, when an aircraft exceeds the speed of sound. Data from this Sonic Boom Mitigation Study could eventually lead to aircraft designs that would reduce the 'peak' overpressures of sonic booms and minimize the startling affect they produce on the ground. One of the first major experiments to be flown in the NASA SR-71 program was a laser air data collection system. It used laser light instead of air pressure to produce airspeed and attitude reference data, such as angle of attack and sideslip, which are normally obtained with small tubes and vanes extending into the airstream. One of Dryden's SR-71s was used for the Linear Aerospike Rocket Engine, or LASRE Experiment. Another earlier project consisted of a series of flights using the SR-71 as a science camera platform for NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. An upward-looking ultraviolet video camera placed in the SR-71's nosebay studied a variety of celestial objects in wavelengths that are blocked to ground-based astronomers. Earlier in its history, Dryden had a decade of past experience at sustained speeds above Mach 3. Two YF-12A aircraft and an SR-71 designated as a YF-12C were flown at the center between December 1969 and November 1979 in a joint NASA/USAF program to learn more about the capabilities and limitations of high-speed, high-altitude flight. The YF-12As were prototypes of a planned interceptor aircraft based on a design that later evolved into the SR-71 reconnaissance aircraft. Dave Lux was the NASA SR-71 project manger for much of the decade of the 1990s, followed by Steve Schmidt. Developed for the USAF as reconnaissance aircraft more than 30 years ago, SR-71s are still the world's fastest and highest-flying production aircraft. The aircraft can fly at speeds of more than 2,200 miles per hour (Mach 3+, or more than three times the speed of sound) and at altitudes of over 85,000 feet. The Lockheed Skunk Works (now Lockheed Martin) built the original SR-71 aircraft. Each aircraft is 107.4 feet long, has a wingspan of 55.6 feet, and is 18.5 feet high (from the ground to the top of the rudders, when parked). Gross takeoff weight is about 140,000 pounds, including a possible fuel weight of 80,280 pounds. The airframes are built almost entirely of titanium and titanium alloys to withstand heat generated by sustained Mach 3 flight. Aerodynamic control surfaces consist of all-moving vertical tail surfaces, ailerons on the outer wings, and elevators on the trailing edges between the engine exhaust nozzles. The two SR-71s at Dryden have been assigned the following NASA tail numbers: NASA 844 (A model), military serial 61-7980 and NASA 831 (B model), military serial 61-7956. From 1990

1996-01-01

496

An inverse analytical technique applied to solute-transport observations at Otis Air Force Base, Cape Cod, Massachusetts  

E-print Network

in the groundwater and nearby ponds in the vicinity of the secondary sewage treatment facility at Otis Air Force Base. Of these contaminants, chloride, boron, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, and detergents are present in substantial concentrations. The U. S.... Geological Survey used a two-dimensional, numerical model to characterize the presence and movement of boron and the detergents in the groundwater. Their preliminary simulated concentration distributions did not capture the full length of the boron...

Ala, Natalyn Kraemer

1990-01-01

497

Air Force ground-water contamination cleanup: an evaluation of the pump-and-treat method. Master's thesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This thesis is an attempt to determine the effectiveness of the Air Force's use of pump-and-treat technology to remediate groundwater contamination. The study is divided into four major sections: (1) literature survey of ground-water contamination problems and remediation technology; (2) identification of bases where pump-and-treat technology has been employed; (3) collection of quantitative data from bases for analysis; (4) analysis

Ammons

1988-01-01

498

78 FR 63169 - Meetings of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force; Cancellation of October 1...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

On Thursday, September 12, 2013 (78 FR 56219-56220), the Department of Defense published a notice announcing an October 1, 2013 meeting of the National Commission on the Structure of the Air Force in Bossier City, Louisiana. On Thursday, September 26, 2013 (78 FR 59343- 59344), the Department of Defense published a notice announcing an October 4, 2013 meeting of the National Commission on the......

2013-10-23

499

Aircraft accident report: NASA 712, Convair 990, N712NA, March Air Force Base, California, July 17, 1985, executive summary  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On July 17, l985, NASA 712, a Convair 990 aircraft, was destroyed by fire during an aborted takeoff at March Air Force Base in California. Material ejected from a blowout in the tires of the right main landing gear penetrated the right-wing fuel tank. The leaking fuel ignited. Fire engulfed the right wing and fuselage as the aircraft stopped its forward motion. The crew of four and the 15 scientists and technicians aboard escaped without serious injury.

Batthauer, Byron E.; Mccarthy, G. T.; Hannah, Michael; Hogan, Robert J.; Marlow, Frank J.; Reynard, William D.; Stoklosa, Janis H.; Yager, Thomas J.

1986-01-01

500

Evaluating and managing Cold War era historic properties : the cultural significance of U.S. Air Force defensive radar systems.  

SciTech Connect

Aircraft and later missile radar early warning stations played an important role in the Cold War. They are associated with important technological, social, political, and military themes of the Cold War and are worthy of preservation. The scope and scale of these systems make physical preservation impractical, but the U.S. Air Force program of historical evaluation and documentation of these systems will provide valuable information to future generations studying this historic period.

Whorton, M.

1999-01-20

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