Science.gov

Sample records for air inleakage test

  1. Control room envelope unfiltered air inleakage test protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Lagus, P.L.; Grot, R.A.

    1997-08-01

    In 1983, the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) recommended that the US NRC develop a control room HVAC performance testing protocol. To date no such protocol has been forthcoming. Beginning in mid-1994, an effort was funded by NRC under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grant to develop several simplified test protocols based on the principles of tracer gas testing in order to measure the total unfiltered inleakage entering a CRE during emergency mode operation of the control room ventilation system. These would allow accurate assessment of unfiltered air inleakage as required in SRP 6.4. The continuing lack of a standard protocol is unfortunate since one of the significant parameters required to calculate operator dose is the amount of unfiltered air inleakage into the control room. Often it is assumed that, if the Control Room Envelope (CRE) is maintained at +1/8 in. w.g. differential pressure relative to the surroundings, no significant unfiltered inleakage can occur it is further assumed that inleakage due to door openings is the only source of unfiltered air. 23 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. MULTI - TRACER CONTROL ROOM AIR INLEAKAGE PROTOCOL AND SIMULATED PRIMARY AND EXTENDED MULTI - ZONE RESULTS.

    SciTech Connect

    DIETZ,R.N.

    2002-01-01

    The perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be applied simultaneously to the wide range in zonal flowrates (from tens of cfms in some Control Rooms to almost 1,000,000 cfm in Turbine Buildings), to achieve the necessary uniform tagging for subsequent determination of the desired air inleakage and outleakage from all zones surrounding a plant's Control Room (CR). New types of PFT sources (Mega sources) were devised and tested to handle the unusually large flowrates in a number of HVAC zones in power stations. A review of the plans of a particular nuclear power plant and subsequent simulations of the tagging and sampling results confirm that the technology can provide the necessary concentration measurement data to allow the important ventilation pathways involving the Control Room and its air flow communications with all adjacent zones to be quantitatively determined with minimal uncertainty. Depending on need, a simple single or 3-zone scheme (involving the Control Room alone or along with the Aux. Bldg. and Turbine Bldg.) or a more complex test involving up to 7 zones simultaneously can be accommodated with the current revisions to the technology; to test all the possible flow pathways, several different combinations of up to 7 zones would need to be run. The potential exists that for an appropriate investment, in about 2 years, it would be possible to completely evaluate an entire power plant in a single extended multizone test with up to 12 to 13 separate HVAC zones. With multiple samplers in the Control Room near each of the contiguous zones, not only will the prevalent inleakage or outleakage zones be documented, but the particular location of the pathway's room of ingress can be identified. The suggested protocol is to perform a 3-zone test involving the Control Room, Aux. Bldg., and Turbine Bldg. to (1) verify CR total inleakage and (2) proportion that inleakage to distinguish that from the other 2 major buildings and any remaining untagged locations

  3. Reduction of air in-leakage and flue gas by-passing in the penthouse of Duke Power-Marshall Unit No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, R.; Rush, T.

    1995-12-31

    After a year of operation, the penthouse was inspected and found to be {open_quotes}lightly dusted{close_quotes} with barely sufficient accumulation to show footprints. This is contrasted with previous five foot deep ash dunes. The savings in maintenance repairs are estimated at $65,000 for vacuuming that was not required, and $80,000 in maintenance personnel weld repairs. The history of repairs was such that vacuuming and weld repair costs were predictable, and before the IOSMEMBRANE{reg_sign} installation, always expected as recurring maintenance costs. The heat rate improvement of reducing air in-leakage is well known, and significant. The principal quantified savings are in reduced maintenance costs, more expedient repairs (reduced cool down time for repairs in the penthouse), and safety. The heat rate improvements, though not quantified yet, are expected to be significant. The success of the ISOMEMBRANE{reg_sign} on Unit No. 4 has resulted in similar plans for Unit No. 3 and other units in the Duke Power system.

  4. CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE

    SciTech Connect

    MAY TH

    2008-04-16

    The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

  5. Air gun test evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Carleton, J.J. II; Fox, L.; Rudy, C.R.

    1992-01-15

    A mechanical shock testing apparatus is used for testing the response of components subject to large accelerations in hostile environments. The test acceleration is provided by the impact of a bullet against a plate on which the component to be tested is mounted. This report describes a series of experiments that were performed to determine the dependence of the air gun test apparatus performance on incremental changes in the hardware configurations, changes in the pressure used to drive the bullet, and different accelerometers. The effect of variation of these experimental factors on the measured acceleration was determined using a Taguchi screening experimental design. Experimental settings were determined that can be used to operate the tester with a measured output within acceleration specifications.

  6. Air emissions testing

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, L.D.

    1993-01-01

    The article presents a brief overview of air emission sampling methods and analysis procedures related to stationary sources such as incinerators, power plants, and industrial boilers. It is intended primarily for the laboratory chemist or manager who is familiar with samples and methods associated with water or waste sources, but not with those associated with air and stack gas emissions.

  7. Testing for Air Pollution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Artice

    Three experiments are presented in this Science Study Aid to provide the teacher with some fundamental air pollution activities. The first experiment involved particulates, the second deals with microorganisms, and the third looks at gases in the atmosphere. Each activity outlines introductory information, objectives, materials required, procedure…

  8. Advanced air revitalization system testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Hallick, T. M.; Schubert, F. H.

    1983-01-01

    A previously developed experimental air revitalization system was tested cyclically and parametrically. One-button startup without manual interventions; extension by 1350 hours of tests with the system; capability for varying process air carbon dioxide partial pressure and humidity and coolant source for simulation of realistic space vehicle interfaces; dynamic system performance response on the interaction of the electrochemical depolarized carbon dioxide concentrator, the Sabatier carbon dioxide reduction subsystem, and the static feed water electrolysis oxygen generation subsystem, the carbon dioxide concentrator module with unitized core technology for the liquid cooled cell; and a preliminary design for a regenerative air revitalization system for the space station are discussed.

  9. Testing Air-Filtering Systems

    PubMed Central

    Songer, Joseph R.; Sullivan, James F.; Hurd, James W.

    1963-01-01

    A procedure was developed for evaluating high-efficiency filters mounted in exhaust ducts at the National Animal Disease Laboratory. An aerosol of the test organism, Escherichia coli B T3 bacteriophage, was generated in a chamber attached to a ceiling exhaust register in concentrations of at least 1000 viable organisms per ft3 of air. Samples were collected from both the pre- and postfilter areas, and the number of organisms per ft3 of air was determined. The efficiency of the filter was calculated from these figures. A total of 269 high-efficiency filters were tested. Of these, 249 had efficiencies of 98% or greater. The remaining 20, with efficiencies of less than 98%, were repaired and retested. No filter was accepted with an efficiency of less than 98%. Images Fig. 2 PMID:14063779

  10. 10. "TEST STAND 15, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. "TEST STAND 1-5, AIR FORCE FLIGHT TEST CENTER." ca. 1958. Test Area 1-115. Original is a color print, showing Test Stand 1-5 from below, also showing the superstructure of TS1-4 at left. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Leuhman Ridge near Highways 58 & 395, Boron, Kern County, CA

  11. Flight testing air-to-air missiles for flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutschinski, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    The philosophy of the design of air-to-air missiles and hence of flight testing them for flutter differs from that of manned aircraft. Primary emphasis is put on analytical and laboratory evaluation of missile susceptibility to aeroelastic and aero-servo-elastic instabilities and uses flight testing for confirmation of the absence of such instabilities. Flight testing for flutter is accomplished by using specially instrumented programmed missiles, air or ground launched with a booster to reach the extreme flight conditions of tactical use, or by using guided missiles with telemetered performance data. The instrumentation and testing techniques are discussed along with the success of recent flight tests.

  12. Testing the Patriot air defense weapon system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, W. L.; McClay, L. F.

    1983-11-01

    A summary of the overall test program of the Patriot air defense weapon system is presented, including preparations for system integration tests and surveillance tests, with particular emphasis placed on the guidance flight test program. The major components of the system are described, and subsystem tests consisting of static and dynamic plume tests, static propulsion tests, dynamic propulsion test firings, and control system test firings are discussed. A series of system-level preflight guidance tests which consisted of a captive carry flight test program and other tests is considered. Tests on more sophisticated missions such as ECM, jamming, and combinations of ECM and chaff are addressed. Test data collection techniques are covered.

  13. United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornung, Steven D.; Beeson, Harold D.

    2000-01-01

    The Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), as part of the Air Force Material Command, requested that NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) conduct testing and analyses in support of the United States Air Force Wipe Solvent Development Project. The purpose of the wipe solvent project is to develop an alternative to be used by Air Force flight line and maintenance personnel for the wipe cleaning of oxygen equipment. This report provides material compatibility, liquid oxygen (LOX) mechanical impact, autogenous ignition temperature (AIT), and gauge cleaning test data for some of the currently available solvents that may be used to replace CFC-113 and methyl chloroform. It provides data from previous WSTF test programs sponsored by the Naval Sea Systems Command, the Kennedy Space Center, and other NASA programs for the purpose of assisting WP AFB in identifying the best alternative solvents for validation testing.

  14. TESTS OF INDOOR AIR QUALITY SINKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Experiments were conducted in a room-size test chamber to determine the sink effects of selected materials on indoor air concentrations of p-dichlorobenzene (PDCB). hese effects might alter pollutant behavior from that predicted using similar indoor air quality models, by reducin...

  15. Tests on air propellers in yaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F; Lesley, E P

    1923-01-01

    This report contains the results of tests to determine the thrust (pull) and torque characteristics of air propellers in movement relative to the air in a line oblique to the line of the shaft, and specifically when such angle of obliquity is large, as in the case of helicopter flight with the propeller serving for both sustentation and traction.

  16. Breathing air trailer acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1994-09-14

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) will document compliance with the requirements of WHC-S-0251 Rev. 0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment being tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a Design and Fabrication procurement activity for use in the core sampling program. The ATP was written by the Seller and will be performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing the test at the Seller`s location. This test procedure is to verify that the American Bristol Industries, Inc., Model 5014-0001 low pressure Mobile Breathing Air Trailer, meets or exceeds the requirements of the Westinghouse Hanford specification.

  17. Breathing air trailer acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Kostelnik, A.J.

    1996-02-12

    This Acceptance Test Report documents compliance with the requirements of specification WHC-S-0251, Rev.0 and ECNs 613530 and 606113. The equipment was tested according to WHC-SD-WM-ATP-104. The equipment tested is a Breathing Air Supply Trailer purchased as a design and fabrication procurement activity. The ATP was written by the Seller and was performed by the Seller with representatives of the Westinghouse Hanford Company witnessing portions of the test at the Seller`s location.

  18. ASTM Validates Air Pollution Test Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) has validated six basic methods for measuring pollutants in ambient air as the first part of its Project Threshold. Aim of the project is to establish nationwide consistency in measuring pollutants; determining precision, accuracy and reproducibility of 35 standard measuring methods. (BL)

  19. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  20. Optical Air Flow Measurements for Flight Tests and Flight Testing Optical Air Flow Meters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jentink, Henk W.; Bogue, Rodney K.

    2005-01-01

    Optical air flow measurements can support the testing of aircraft and can be instrumental to in-flight investigations of the atmosphere or atmospheric phenomena. Furthermore, optical air flow meters potentially contribute as avionics systems to flight safety and as air data systems. The qualification of these instruments for the flight environment is where we encounter the systems in flight testing. An overview is presented of different optical air flow measurement techniques applied in flight and what can be achieved with the techniques for flight test purposes is reviewed. All in-flight optical airflow velocity measurements use light scattering. Light is scattered on both air molecules and aerosols entrained in the air. Basic principles of making optical measurements in flight, some basic optical concepts, electronic concepts, optoelectronic interfaces, and some atmospheric processes associated with natural aerosols are reviewed. Safety aspects in applying the technique are shortly addressed. The different applications of the technique are listed and some typical examples are presented. Recently NASA acquired new data on mountain rotors, mountain induced turbulence, with the ACLAIM system. Rotor position was identified using the lidar system and the potentially hazardous air flow profile was monitored by the ACLAIM system.

  1. Advanced air revitalization system modeling and testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dall-Baumann, Liese; Jeng, Frank; Christian, Steve; Edeer, Marybeth; Lin, Chin

    1990-01-01

    To support manned lunar and Martian exploration, an extensive evaluation of air revitalization subsystems (ARS) is being conducted. The major operations under study include carbon dioxide removal and reduction; oxygen and nitrogen production, storage, and distribution; humidity and temperature control; and trace contaminant control. A comprehensive analysis program based on a generalized block flow model was developed to facilitate the evaluation of various processes and their interaction. ASPEN PLUS was used in modelling carbon dioxide removal and reduction. Several life support test stands were developed to test new and existing technologies for their potential applicability in space. The goal was to identify processes which use compact, lightweight equipment and maximize the recovery of oxygen and water. The carbon dioxide removal test stands include solid amine/vacuum desorption (SAVD), regenerative silver oxide chemisorption, and electrochemical carbon dioxide concentration (EDC). Membrane-based carbon dioxide removal and humidity control, catalytic reduction of carbon dioxide, and catalytic oxidation of trace contaminants were also investigated.

  2. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  3. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated document from the... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person...

  4. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated document from the... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person...

  5. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated document from the... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person...

  6. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated document from the... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person...

  7. 49 CFR 232.305 - Single car air brake tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51. You may obtain a copy of the incorporated document from the... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Single car air brake tests. 232.305 Section 232... car air brake tests. (a) Single car air brake tests shall be performed by a qualified person...

  8. Condenser performance test and back-pressure improvement: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Piskorowski, J.; Beckett, G.; Bell, R.

    1988-04-01

    This document describes condenser performance test and analyses experiences. The testing was performed by Indianapolis Power and Light Company (IPL) on the Petersburg Unit 3 condenser. The initial testing revealed a performance deficiency. Modifications were made to the condenser, air in-leakage was reduced and the vacuum pumps were brought back to their original design capacity. Testing was reperformed after these activities and although a significant performance improvement was achieved deficiencies were still evident. Heat Exchanger Systems, Inc. (HES) was retained as consultants during this testing program. The Central Electricity Generating Board's (CEGB) Central Electricity Research Laboratory (CERL) acting as a subcontractor to HES were retained to perform an analysis of the Petersburg Unit 3 condenser using their EPOC computer code. The results of this analysis are also contained in this document. 3 refs., 48 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Acceptance Test Report for 241-U compressed air system

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-10-20

    This Acceptance Test Report (ATR) documents the results of acceptance testing of a newly upgraded compressed air system at 241-U Farm. The system was installed and the test successfully performed under work package 2W-92-01027.

  10. Air Pollution Tests Using the "DEMA"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilt, L. M.

    1970-01-01

    Describes the making and calibrating of a DEMA (DEvice for Measuring Air) from readily available, inexpensive materials. Procedures for measuring atmospheric particulates, acids, and carbon monoxide are described. (PR)

  11. Interpretation of prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shapiro, Allen M.; Greene, Earl A.

    1995-01-01

    An air-pressurized slug test consists of applying a constant pressure to the column of air in a well, monitoring the declining water level, and then releasing the air pressure and monitoring the recovering water level. Such tests offer a means of estimating formation transmissivity and storativity without extensive downhole equipment and the associated safety risks. This paper analyzes data from prematurely terminated tests. A solution to the boundary-value problem for the declining and recovering water level during an air-pressurized slug test is developed for an arbitrary time-dependent air pressure applied to the well. Type curves are generated to estimate formation transmissivity and storativity from the recovering water level associated with prematurely, terminated tests. The application of the type curves is illustrated in a series of actual tests.

  12. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF AIR CLEANING PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discuses the application of the Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program for products that clean ventilation air to the problem of protecting buildings from chemical and biological attack. This program is funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency und...

  13. MSFC hot air collectors. Phase 1: Test report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Losey, R.

    1977-01-01

    A development test program of 3 hot air flat plate solar collectors is described in detail. The pressure drop versus flow rate performance characteristics for these collectors, mounted in series, was determined under 14 different test conditions each of which was characterized by a unique combination of inlet air temperature and air flow rate. Characteristics of inlet, exit and transfer ducts of these collectors were also determined during this testing. The test results indicate that significant pressure drop occurs at air flow rates greater than 150 standard cubic feet per minute and this drop is not heavily dependent upon inlet air temperature; and inlet, exit and transfer duct characteristics differ sufficiently to suggest that system performance may be enhanced through careful design of each type of duct individually.

  14. Radiant heat test of Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP).

    SciTech Connect

    Gronewald, Patrick James; Oneto, Robert; Mould, John; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-08-01

    A conceptual design for a plutonium air transport package capable of surviving a 'worst case' airplane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A full-scale prototype, designated as the Perforated Metal Air Transport Package (PMATP) was thermally tested in the SNL Radiant Heat Test Facility. This testing, conducted on an undamaged package, simulated a regulation one-hour aviation fuel pool fire test. Finite element thermal predictions compared well with the test results. The package performed as designed, with peak containment package temperatures less than 80 C after exposure to a one-hour test in a 1000 C environment.

  15. Computer Simulation for Air-coupled Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamawaki, H.

    2014-06-01

    Air-coupled ultrasound is used as non-contact ultrasonic testing method. For wider application of air-coupled ultrasonic technique, it is required to know situation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid. Transmittance of the ultrasonic waves from air to solids is extremely small with 10-5 however it was revealed that, by using computer simulation methods based on the two-stage elastic wave equation in which two independent variables of stress and particle velocity are used, visualization calculation of ultrasonic propagation between air and solid was possible. In this report, the calculation of air-coupled ultrasound using the new Improved-FDM for computer simulation of ultrasonic propagation in solids is shown. Waveforms obtained by 1-dimensional calculation are discussed for principle and performance of the calculation. Visualization of ultrasonic incidence to cylindrical steel pipe is demonstrated as an example to show availability for ultrasonic testing.

  16. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, A.; Bergey, D.

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  17. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    Rudd, Armin; Bergey, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  18. PERFORMANCE TESTING OF THE TETRADYNE HIGH SPEED AIR JET SKIMMER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency evaluated the performance of the prototype Tetradyne High Speed Air Jet Skimmer at their OHMSETT test facility at Leonardo, New Jersey. The skimmer depends on an air-jet impacting the water surface at an angle and deflecting rapidly moving...

  19. Evaluation of unsaturated zone air permeability through pneumatic tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baehr, Arthur L.; Hult, Marc F.

    1991-01-01

    Predicting the steady state distribution of air pressure in the unsaturated zone resulting from a pneumatic test provides a method for determining air-phase permeability. This technique is analogous to the inverse problem of well hydraulics; however, air flow is more complicated than ground water flow because of air compressibility, the Klinkenberg effect, variations in air density and viscosity that result from temperature fluctuations in the unsaturated zone and the possibility of inducing water movement during the pneumatic test. An analysis of these complicating factors reveals that, when induced water movement can be neglected, a linear version of the airflow equation can provide an appropriate approximation for the purpose of determining air-phase permeability. Two analytical solutions for steady state, two-dimensional, axisymmetric airflow to a single well partially screened in the unsaturated zone are developed. One solution applies where there is a stratum of relatively low air permeability, separating the stratum in which the well is completed, from the atmosphere. The other solution applies where there is no separating stratum between the domain and atmosphere. In both situations the water table forms the lower horizontal boundary. Applications of both solutions to determine air permeability from data collected during pneumatic tests are presented.

  20. DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS

    SciTech Connect

    Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

    2012-09-20

    Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected

  1. IMPROVED TEST METHODS FOR ELECTRONIC AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objective of this project was to develop a fractional filtration efficiency test protocol for residential electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) that avoids the limitations of the ASHRAE 52.2 method. Specifically, the objectives were to a) determine the change in efficiency that ...

  2. Laboratory Performance Testing of Residential Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.; Booten, C.; Christensen, D.; Tomerlin, J.

    2013-03-01

    Window air conditioners are the dominant cooling product for residences, in terms of annual unit sales. They are inexpensive, portable and can be installed by the owner. For this reason, they are an attractive solution for supplemental cooling, for retrofitting air conditioning into a home which lacks ductwork, and for renters. Window air conditioners for sale in the United States are required to meet very modest minimum efficiency standards. Four window air conditioners' performance were tested in the Advanced HVAC Systems Laboratory on NREL's campus in Golden, CO. In order to separate and study the refrigerant system's performance, the unit's internal leakage pathways, the unit's fanforced ventilation, and the leakage around the unit resulting from installation in a window, a series of tests were devised that focused on each aspect of the unit's performance. These tests were designed to develop a detailed performance map to determine whole-house performance in different climates. Even though the test regimen deviated thoroughly from the industry-standard ratings test, the results permit simple calculation of an estimated rating for both capacity and efficiency that would result from a standard ratings test. Using this calculation method, it was found that the three new air conditioners' measured performance was consistent with their ratings. This method also permits calculation of equivalent SEER for the test articles. Performance datasets were developed across a broad range of indoor and outdoor operating conditions, and used them to generate performance maps.

  3. HESTIA Phase I Test Results: The Air Revitalization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Sarah E.; Hansen, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    In any human spaceflight mission, a number of Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) technologies work together to provide the conditions astronauts need to live healthily, productively, and comfortably in space. In a long-duration mission, many of these ECLSS technologies may use materials supplied by In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU), introducing more interactions between systems. The Human Exploration Spacecraft Test-bed for Integration & Advancement (HESTIA) Project aims to create a test-bed to evaluate ECLSS and ISRU technologies and how they interact in a high-fidelity, closed-loop, human-rated analog habitat. Air purity and conditioning are essential components within any ECLSS and for HESTIA's first test they were achieved with the Air Revitalization System (ARS) described below. The ARS provided four essential functions to the test-bed chamber: cooling the air, removing humidity from the air, removing trace contaminants, and scrubbing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the air. In this case, the oxygen supply function was provided by ISRU. In the current configuration, the ARS is a collection of different subsystems. A fan circulates the air, while a condensing heat exchanger (CHX) pulls humidity out of the air. A Trace Contaminant Removal System (TCRS) filters the air of potentially harmful contaminants. Lastly, a Reactive Plastic Lithium Hydroxide (RP-LiOH) unit removes CO2 from the breathing air. During the HESTIA Phase I test in September 2015, the ARS and its individual components each functioned as expected, although further analysis is underway. During the Phase I testing and in prior bench-top tests, the energy balance of heat removed by the CHX was not equal to the cooling it received. This indicated possible instrument error and therefore recalibration of the instruments and follow-up testing is planned in 2016 to address the issue. The ARS was tested in conjunction with two other systems: the Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) and the

  4. Fabrication of VB2/air cells for electrochemical testing.

    PubMed

    Stuart, Jessica; Lopez, Ruben; Lau, Jason; Li, Xuguang; Waje, Mahesh; Mullings, Matthew; Rhodes, Christopher; Licht, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    A technique to investigate the properties and performance of new multi-electron metal/air battery systems is proposed and presented. A method for synthesizing nanoscopic VB2 is presented as well as step-by-step procedure for applying a zirconium oxide coating to the VB2 particles for stabilization upon discharge. The process for disassembling existing zinc/air cells is shown, in addition construction of the new working electrode to replace the conventional zinc/air cell anode with a the nanoscopic VB2 anode. Finally, discharge of the completed VB2/air battery is reported. We show that using the zinc/air cell as a test bed is useful to provide a consistent configuration to study the performance of the high-energy high capacity nanoscopic VB2 anode. PMID:23962835

  5. Fabrication of VB2/Air Cells for Electrochemical Testing

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Jessica; Lopez, Ruben; Lau, Jason; Li, Xuguang; Waje, Mahesh; Mullings, Matthew; Rhodes, Christopher; Licht, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    A technique to investigate the properties and performance of new multi-electron metal/air battery systems is proposed and presented. A method for synthesizing nanoscopic VB2 is presented as well as step-by-step procedure for applying a zirconium oxide coating to the VB2 particles for stabilization upon discharge. The process for disassembling existing zinc/air cells is shown, in addition construction of the new working electrode to replace the conventional zinc/air cell anode with a the nanoscopic VB2 anode. Finally, discharge of the completed VB2/air battery is reported. We show that using the zinc/air cell as a test bed is useful to provide a consistent configuration to study the performance of the high-energy high capacity nanoscopic VB2 anode. PMID:23962835

  6. Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    Presented is information useful to applicants who are preparing for the Airline Transport Pilot-Airplane (Air Carrier) Written Test. The guide describes the basic aeronautical knowledge and associated requirements for certification, as well as information on source material, instructions for taking the official test, and questions that are…

  7. Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Form O: Development and Standardization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Deborah L.; And Others

    This report presents the rationale, development, and standardization of the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) Form O. The test is used to select individuals for officer commissioning programs, and candidates for pilot and navigator training. Form O contains 380 items organized in 16 subtests. All items are administered in a single test…

  8. Report of the Building 9207 air bag test

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, T.E.; Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.

    1992-12-01

    As part of a major testing program now underway at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (MMES), a full-scale air bag test was conducted in Building 9207. The test program, supported and managed by the Center for Natural Phenomena Engineering (CNPE), is intended to determine the stiffness and strength of unreinforced hollow clay tile walls (HCTVS) in order to more accurately analyze and predict the response of buildings containing these type of walls, especially when subjected to seismic and high wind loadings. The air bag test was a very large undertaking that started more than a year before the test was actually performed. Preparation for the test included the following activities: (1) preparation of the wall and the adjacent building areas; (2) design and field fabrication of test supporting structures; (3) procurement of equipment and instrumentation; (4) development of supporting test procedures and checklists; (5) installation of over seventy linear variable differential transformers (LVDTs) and strain gages; (6) development of computer programs for use in the data acquisition systems; (7) extensive review into the existing engineering literature; (8) discussions with researchers with prior experience performing air bag tests; (9) coordination with the building operators; (10) plant safety reviews; and (11) dry runs of the test itself.

  9. The Air Force modular automatic test equipment (mate) maintenance concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stout, J.; Persans, D.; Caporale, J.

    The Air Force has developed the Modular Automatic Test Equipment (MATE) system as a disciplined approach to the definition, acquisition, and support of automatic test equipment. The system is expressed in a series of guides regarding the hardware, computer program, human factors, and documentation required to implement the considered approach. The present investigation is concerned with the facet of the guidelines which addresses the MATE maintenance concepts. Attention is given to maintenance problems in the field, a MATE system maintenance concept overview, maintenance-oriented tests, integrated diagnostics, the MATE system operational/confidence test scenario, and a MATE system optional self-test.

  10. Development and test of the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, Paul G.; Bates, Jerry C.; Miller, Christopher R.; Chahine, Moustafa T.; O'Callaghan, Fred; Aumann, Hartmut H.; Karnik, Avinash R.

    1999-12-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) has been developed for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program for a scheduled launch on the EOS PM-1 spacecraft in December 2000. AIRS, working in concert with complementary microwave instrumentation on EOS PM-1 is designed to provide both new and more accurate data about the atmosphere, land and oceans for application to NASA climate studies and NOAA and DOD weather prediction. Among the important parameters to be derived from AIRS observations are atmospheric temperature profiles with an average accuracy of 1 K in 1 kilometer (km) layers in the troposphere, humidity profiles to 10% accuracy and surface temperatures with an average accuracy of 0.5 K. The AIRS measurement technique is based on passive IR remote sensing using a precisely calibrated, high spectral resolution grating spectrometer operating in the 3.7 - 15.4 micrometer region. The instrument concept uses a passively cooled multi- aperture echelle array spectrometer approach in combination with advanced state of the art focal plane and cryogenic refrigerator technology to achieve unparalleled performance capability in a practical long life configuration. The AIRS instrument, which has been under development since 1991, has been fully integrated and has completed successfully a comprehensive performance verification program. Performance verification included thermal vacuum testing, environmental qualification and a full range of spatial, spectral and radiometric calibrations, which have demonstrated outstanding spectrometric performance. This paper provides a brief overview of the AIRS mission and instrument design along with key results from the test program.

  11. Test results of lithium pool-air reaction suppression systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1987-02-01

    Engineered reaction suppression systems were demonstrated to be effective in suppressing lithium pool-air reactions for lithium quantities up to 100 kg. Lithium pool-air reaction suppression system tests were conducted to evaluate suppression system effectiveness for potential use in fusion facilities in mitigating consequences of postulated lithium spills. Small-scale perforated and sacrificial cover plate suppression systems with delayed inert gas purging proved effective in controlling the lithium-air interaction for lithium quantities near 15 kg at initial temperatures up to 450/sup 0/C. A large-scale suppression system with a sacrificial cover, a diverter plate, an inert gas atmosphere, and remotely retrievable catch pans proved effective in controlling lithium pool-air interaction for a 100-kg lithium discharge at an initial temperature of 550/sup 0/C. This suppression system limited the maximum pool temperature to about 600/sup 0/C less than that expected for a similar lithium pool-air reaction without a suppression system. Lithium aerosol release from this large-scale suppression system was a factor of about 10,000 less than that expected for a lithium pool-air reaction with no suppression system. Remote retrieval techniques for lithium cleanup, such as (1) in-place lithium siphoning and overhead crane dismantling, and (2) lithium catch pan removal by use of an overhead crane, were demonstrated as part of this large-scale test.

  12. Validity of cycle test in air compared to underwater cycling.

    PubMed

    Almeling, M; Schega, L; Witten, F; Lirk, P; Wulf, K

    2006-01-01

    According to international guidelines, fitness to dive is generally assessed using a bicycle stress test (BST) in air. To date, there is no study explicitly addressing the question whether the results of a BST in air really predict performance status under water. Therefore, the aim of the present study was twofold: first, to design an experimental setting allowing the examination of physical performance status under water, and second, to examine whether there is an association of response to exercise in air compared to exercise under water using self contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA). We constructed and evaluated a measurement technique for a bicycle ergometry and for gas analysis under water. Part of the work was the development of a new valve system which allowed to collect the exhaled air in total and to transport it to the spirometer next to the pool. Twenty-eight healthy male divers underwent a BST. Compared to a given workload in air, gross capacity decreased significantly by about 50% underwater. High performance in air was associated with a high performance underwater. The examinations were carried out without any complications. In conclusion, our experimental setting allowed the safe and reliable examination of physical performance status under water. First results indicate that the results of a BST in air correlate well with the cardio-circulatory performance status underwater. A subsequent study with a larger sample size will enable us to more precisely model this correlation. PMID:16602256

  13. Theoretical and numerical analysis of the corneal air puff test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simonini, Irene; Angelillo, Maurizio; Pandolfi, Anna

    2016-08-01

    Ocular analyzers are used in the current clinical practice to estimate, by means of a rapid air jet, the intraocular pressure and other eye's parameters. In this study, we model the biomechanical response of the human cornea to the dynamic test with two approaches. In the first approach, the corneal system undergoing the air puff test is regarded as a harmonic oscillator. In the second approach, we use patient-specific geometries and the finite element method to simulate the dynamic test on surgically treated corneas. In spite of the different levels of approximation, the qualitative response of the two models is very similar, and the most meaningful results of both models are not significantly affected by the inclusion of viscosity of the corneal material in the dynamic analysis. Finite element calculations reproduce the observed snap-through of the corneal shell, including two applanate configurations, and compare well with in vivo images provided by ocular analyzers, suggesting that the mechanical response of the cornea to the air puff test is actually driven only by the elasticity of the stromal tissue. These observations agree with the dynamic characteristics of the test, since the frequency of the air puff impulse is several orders of magnitude larger than the reciprocal of any reasonable relaxation time for the material, downplaying the role of viscosity during the fast snap-through phase.

  14. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Train brake tests conducted using yard air. 232... Train brake tests conducted using yard air. (a) When a train air brake system is tested from a yard air... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The...

  15. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Train brake tests conducted using yard air. 232... Train brake tests conducted using yard air. (a) When a train air brake system is tested from a yard air... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The...

  16. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Train brake tests conducted using yard air. 232... Train brake tests conducted using yard air. (a) When a train air brake system is tested from a yard air... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The...

  17. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Train brake tests conducted using yard air. 232... Train brake tests conducted using yard air. (a) When a train air brake system is tested from a yard air... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The...

  18. 49 CFR 232.217 - Train brake tests conducted using yard air.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Train brake tests conducted using yard air. 232... Train brake tests conducted using yard air. (a) When a train air brake system is tested from a yard air... reduction of brake pipe air pressure at the same, or slower, rate as an engineer's brake valve. (b) The...

  19. Planes, Politics and Oral Proficiency: Testing International Air Traffic Controllers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moder, Carol Lynn; Halleck, Gene B.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates the variation in oral proficiency demonstrated by 14 Air Traffic Controllers across two types of testing tasks: work-related radio telephony-based tasks and non-specific English tasks on aviation topics. Their performance was compared statistically in terms of level ratings on the International Civil Aviation Organization…

  20. FIELD TEST OF AIR SPARGING COUPLED WITH SOIL VAPOR EXTRACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A controlled field study was designed and conducted to assess the performance of air sparging for remediation of petroleum fuel and solvent contamination in a shallow (3-m deep) groundwater aquifer. Sparging was performed in an insolation test cell (5 m by 3 m by 8-m deep). A soi...

  1. Modeling Airborne Beryllium Concentrations From Open Air Dynamic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, N. M.

    2003-12-01

    A heightened awareness of airborne beryllium contamination from industrial activities was reestablished during the late 1980's and early 1990's when it became recognized that Chronic Beryllium Disease (CBD) had not been eradicated, and that the Occupational Health and Safety Administration standards for occupational air exposure to beryllium may not be sufficiently protective. This was in response to the observed CBD increase in multiple industrial settings where beryllium was manufactured and/or machined, thus producing beryllium particulates which are then available for redistribution by airborne transport. Sampling and modeling design activities were expanded at Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico to evaluate potential airborne beryllium exposure to workers who might be exposed during dynamic testing activities associated with nuclear weapons Stockpile Stewardship. Herein is presented the results of multiple types of collected air measurements that were designed to characterize the production and dispersion of beryllium used in components whose performance is evaluated during high explosive detonation at open air firing sites. Data from fallout, high volume air, medium volume air, adhesive film, particle size impactor, and fine-particulate counting techniques will be presented, integrated, and applied in dispersion modeling to assess potential onsite and offsite personal exposures resulting from dynamic testing activities involving beryllium.

  2. Test Report for Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATO) Prototype.

    SciTech Connect

    Bobbe, Jeffery G.; Pierce, Jim Dwight

    2003-06-01

    A prototype design for a plutonium air transport package capable of carrying 7.6 kg of plutonium oxide and surviving a ''worst-case'' plane crash has been developed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for the Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). A series of impact tests were conducted on half-scale models of this design for side, end, and comer orientations at speeds close to 282 m/s onto a target designed to simulate weathered sandstone. These tests were designed to evaluate the performance of the overpack concept and impact-limiting materials in critical impact orientations. The impact tests of the Perforated Metal Air Transportable Package (PMATP) prototypes were performed at SNL's 10,000-ft rocket sled track. This report describes test facilities calibration and environmental testing methods of the PMATP under specific test conditions. The tests were conducted according to the test plan and procedures that were written by the authors and approved by SNL management and quality assurance personnel. The result of these tests was that the half-scale PMATP survived the ''worst-case'' airplane crash conditions, and indicated that a full-scale PMATP, utilizing this overpack concept and these impact-limiting materials, would also survive these crash conditions.

  3. Testing of a refuelable zinc/air bus battery

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.F.; Fleming, D.; Koopman, R.; Hargrove, D.; Maimoni, A.; Peterman, K.

    1995-02-22

    We report tests of a refuelable zinc/air battery of modular, bipolar-cell design, intended for fleet electric busses and vans. The stack consists of twelve 250-cm{sup 2} cells built of two units: (1) a copper-clad glass-reinforced epoxy board supporting anode and cathode current collectors, and (2) polymer frame providing for air- and electrolyte distribution and zinc fuel storage. The stack was refueled in 4 min. by a hydraulic transfer of zinc particles entrained in solution flow.

  4. F-1 Engine Test Firing at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    This photograph depicts the Rocketdyne static firing of the F-1 engine at the towering 76-meter Test Stand 1-C in Area 1-125 of the Edwards Air Force Base in California. The Saturn V S-IC (first) stage utilized five F-1 engines for its thrust. Each engine provided 1,500,000 pounds, for a combined thrust of 7,500,000 pounds with liquid oxygen and kerosene as its propellants.

  5. Development of a Test Facility for Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Sao-Dung; Lin, Amy; Campbell, Melissa; Smith, Frederick; Curley, Su

    2007-01-01

    Development of new air revitalization system (ARS) technology can initially be performed in a subscale laboratory environment, but in order to advance the maturity level, the technology must be tested in an end-to-end integrated environment. The Air Revitalization Technology Evaluation Facility (ARTEF) at the NASA Johnson Space Center serves as a ground test bed for evaluating emerging ARS technologies in an environment representative of spacecraft atmospheres. At the center of the ARTEF is a hypobaric chamber which serves as a sealed atmospheric chamber for closed loop testing. A Human Metabolic Simulator (HMS) was custom-built to simulate the consumption of oxygen, and production of carbon dioxide, moisture and heat of up to eight persons. A multitude of gas analyzers and dew point sensors are used to monitor the chamber atmosphere upstream and downstream of a test article. A robust vacuum system is needed to simulate the vacuum of space. A reliable data acquisition and control system is required to connect all the subsystems together. This paper presents the capabilities of the integrated test facility and some of the issues encountered during the integration.

  6. STANDARDS CONTROLLING AIR EMISSIONS FOR THE SOIL DESICCATION PILOT TEST

    SciTech Connect

    BENECKE MW

    2010-09-08

    This air emissions document supports implementation of the Treatability Test Plan for Soil Desiccation as outlined in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau (DOE/RL-2007-56). Treatability testing supports evaluation of remedial technologies for technetium-99 (Tc-99) contamination in the vadose zone at sites such as the BC Cribs and Trenches. Soil desiccation has been selected as the first technology for testing because it has been recommended as a promising technology in previous Hanford Site technology evaluations and because testing of soil desiccation will provide useful information to enhance evaluation of other technologies, in particular gas-phase remediation technologies. A soil desiccation pilot test (SDPT) will evaluate the desiccation process (e.g., how the targeted interval is dried) and the long-term performance for mitigation of contaminant transport. The SDPT will dry out a moist zone contaminated by Tc-99 and nitrate that has been detected at Well 299-E13-62 (Borehole C5923). This air emissions document applies to the activities to be completed to conduct the SDPT in the 200-BC-1 operable unit located in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. Well 299-E13-62 is planned to be used as an injection well. This well is located between and approximately equidistant from cribs 216-B-16, 216-B-17, 216-B-18. and 216-B-19. Nitrogen gas will be pumped at approximately 300 ft{sup 3}/min into the 299-EI3-62 injection well, located approximately 12 m (39 ft) away from extraction well 299-EI3-65. The soil gas extraction rate will be approximately 150 ft{sup 3}/min. The SDPT will be conducted continuously over a period of approximately six months. The purpose of the test is to evaluate soil desiccation as a potential remedy for protecting groundwater. A conceptual depiction is provided in Figure 1. The soil desiccation process will physically dry, or evaporate, some of the water from the moist zone of interest. As such, it is

  7. Core testing of zinc/air refuelable battery modules

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J. F., LLNL

    1998-08-20

    We are developing a refuelable zinc/air battery (6-cells) for evaluation under the five USABC `core` test protocols. In the first half of the two year project ($1OOK, FY1997), an advanced refuelable design was developed, fabricated and tested at power levels up to 415 W. Performance matched or exceeded that of earlier multicell systems. A computer program was developed for automated data acquisition and drive cycle simulation. Small mockup cells (80 cm 2) were constructed for rapid testing of components. In the follow-on effort (FY1998, $1OOK) we will make minor advances in system design and fabrication efficiency, and seek to improve cathode performance and life, before delivery of two final units for test at DOE laboratory.

  8. Hazardous air pollutant testing at the LGTI coal gasification plant

    SciTech Connect

    Wetherold, R.G.; Williams, W.A.; Maxwell, D.P.; Mann, R.M.

    1995-06-01

    A comprehensive hazardous air pollutant test program was conducted in November 1994 at the Louisiana Gasification Technology, Inc. (LGTI), plant in Plaquemine, Louisiana. This program was sponsored by DOE/PETC, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Destec Energy. In May of 1995, additional testing of the hot syngas stream was conducted at the LGTI facility under this same program. DOE/METC provided additional technical support for the hot gas testing effort. In this paper, the sampling and analytical methods used during the November and May test program are summarized. The hot gas testing is described in greater detail. In particular, the hot gas sampling probe and probe insertion/withdrawal system are discussed. The sampling probe was designed to collect particulate and extract gas samples at process temperature and pressure. The design of the probe system is described, and the operating procedures are summarized. The operation of the probe during the testing is discussed, and photographs of the testing are provided. In addition to the summaries and descriptions of the test methodologies, selected preliminary emissions results of the November sampling are included in the paper.

  9. Ground-based air-sampling measurements near the Nevada Test Site after atmospheric nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Cederwall, R T; Ricker, Y E; Cederwall, P L; Homan, D N; Anspaugh, L R

    1990-11-01

    Historical air-sampling data measured within 320 km (200 mi) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have been reviewed for periods following atmospheric nuclear tests, primarily in the 1950s. These data come mostly from high-volume air samplers, with some from cascade-impactor samplers. Measurements considered here are for beta radiation from gross fission products. The resulting air-quality data base is comprised of almost 13,000 samples from 42 sampling locations downwind of the NTS. In order to compile an accurate air-quality data base for use in estimating exposure via inhalation, raw data values were sought where possible, and the required calculations were performed on a computer with state-of-the-art algorithms. The data-processing procedures consisted of (1) entry and error checking of historical data; (2) determination of appropriate background values, air-sampling volumes, and net air concentrations; and (3) calculation of integrated air concentration (C) for each sample (considering fallout arrival times). Comparing C values for collocated high-volume and cascade-impactor samplers during the Upshot-Knothole series showed similar lognormal distributions, but with a geometric mean C for cascade impactors about half that for the high-volume air samplers. Overall, the uncertainty in C values is about a factor of three. In the past, it has been assumed that C could be related to ground deposition by a constant having units of velocity. In our data bases, simultaneous measurements of air concentration and ground deposition at the same locations were not related by a constant; indeed, there was a great amount of scatter. This suggests that the relationship between C and ground deposition in this situation is too complex to be treated adequately by simple approaches. PMID:2211113

  10. Ground-based air-sampling measurements near the Nevada Test Site after atmospheric nuclear tests

    SciTech Connect

    Cederwall, R.T.; Ricker, Y.E.; Cederwall, P.L.; Homan, D.N.; Anspaugh, L.R. )

    1990-11-01

    Historical air-sampling data measured within 320 km (200 mi) of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) have been reviewed for periods following atmospheric nuclear tests, primarily in the 1950s. These data come mostly from high-volume air samplers, with some from cascade-impactor samplers. Measurements considered here are for beta radiation from gross fission products. The resulting air-quality data base is comprised of almost 13,000 samples from 42 sampling locations downwind of the NTS. In order to compile an accurate air-quality data base for use in estimating exposure via inhalation, raw data values were sought where possible, and the required calculations were performed on a computer with state-of-the-art algorithms. The data-processing procedures consisted of (1) entry and error checking of historical data; (2) determination of appropriate background values, air-sampling volumes, and net air concentrations; and (3) calculation of integrated air concentration (C) for each sample (considering fallout arrival times). Comparing C values for collocated high-volume and cascade-impactor samplers during the Upshot-Knothole series showed similar lognormal distributions, but with a geometric mean C for cascade impactors about half that for the high-volume air samplers. Overall, the uncertainty in C values is about a factor of three. In the past, it has been assumed that C could be related to ground deposition by a constant having units of velocity. In our data bases, simultaneous measurements of air concentration and ground deposition at the same locations were not related by a constant; indeed, there was a great amount of scatter. This suggests that the relationship between C and ground deposition in this situation is too complex to be treated adequately by simple approaches.

  11. Spring- And Air-Suspension Mechanism For Testing Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.

    1994-01-01

    Spring-and air-suspension mechanism supports weight of one end of test structure, yet allows that end to move almost completely unhindered as though it were weightless and not attached to suspension. Mechanisms of this type called "zero-spring-rate mechanisms" (ZSRM's) because they support structure in manner of spring suspension exhibiting approximately zero stiffness (zero spring rate) within some range of motion about nominal equilibrium or central support position. This suspension mechanism does not include overhead cables, which necessitate large amounts of overhead clearance and overhead support structures: suspension mechanism more compact (much smaller than structure) and supports structure from below.

  12. VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID/AIR INTERFACECORROSION TESTS

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.; Hoffman, E.

    2009-11-09

    The phenomena of vapor space corrosion and liquid/air interface corrosion of carbon steel in simulated liquid waste environments have been investigated. Initial experiments have explored the hypothesis that vapor space corrosion may be accelerated by the formation of a corrosive electrolyte on the tank wall by a process of evaporation of relatively warmer waste and condensation of the vapor on the relatively cooler tank wall. Results from initial testing do not support the hypothesis of electrolyte transport by evaporation and condensation. The analysis of the condensate collected by a steel specimen suspended over a 40 C simulated waste solution showed no measurable concentrations of the constituents of the simulated solution and a decrease in pH from 14 in the simulant to 5.3 in the condensate. Liquid/air interface corrosion was studied as a galvanic corrosion system, where steel at the interface undergoes accelerated corrosion while steel in contact with bulk waste is protected. The zero-resistance-ammeter technique was used to measure the current flow between steel specimens immersed in solutions simulating (1) the high-pH bulk liquid waste and (2) the expected low-pH meniscus liquid at the liquid/air interface. Open-circuit potential measurements of the steel specimens were not significantly different in the two solutions, with the result that (1) no consistent galvanic current flow occurred and (2) both the meniscus specimen and bulk specimen were subject to pitting corrosion.

  13. LIQUID AIR INTERFACE CORROSION TESTING FOR FY2010

    SciTech Connect

    Zapp, P.

    2010-12-16

    An experimental study was undertaken to investigate the corrosivity to carbon steel of the liquid-air interface of dilute simulated radioactive waste solutions. Open-circuit potentials were measured on ASTM A537 carbon steel specimens located slightly above, at, and below the liquid-air interface of simulated waste solutions. The 0.12-inch-diameter specimens used in the study were sized to respond to the assumed distinctive chemical environment of the liquid-air interface, where localized corrosion in poorly inhibited solutions may frequently be observed. The practical inhibition of such localized corrosion in liquid radioactive waste storage tanks is based on empirical testing and a model of a liquid-air interface environment that is made more corrosive than the underlying bulk liquid due to chemical changes brought about by absorbed atmospheric carbon dioxide. The chemical changes were assumed to create a more corrosive open-circuit potential in carbon in contact with the liquid-air interface. Arrays of 4 small specimens spaced about 0.3 in. apart were partially immersed so that one specimen contacted the top of the meniscus of the test solution. Two specimens contacted the bulk liquid below the meniscus and one specimen was positioned in the vapor space above the meniscus. Measurements were carried out for up to 16 hours to ensure steady-state had been obtained. The results showed that there was no significant difference in open-circuit potentials between the meniscus-contact specimens and the bulk-liquid-contact specimens. With the measurement technique employed, no difference was detected between the electrochemical conditions of the meniscus versus the bulk liquid. Stable open-circuit potentials were measured on the specimen located in the vapor space above the meniscus, showing that there existed an electrochemical connection through a thin film of solution extending up from the meniscus. This observation supports the Hobbs-Wallace model of the development

  14. The Yucca Mountain Project prototype air-coring test, U12g tunnel, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, J.M.; Newsom, J.C.

    1994-12-01

    The Prototype Air-Coring Test was conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) G-Tunnel facility to evaluate standard coring techniques, modified slightly for air circulation, for use in testing at a prospective nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Air-coring technology allows sampling of subsurface lithology with minimal perturbation to ambient characteristic such as that required for exploratory holes near aquifers, environmental applications, and site characterization work. Two horizontal holes were cored, one 50 ft long and the other 150 ft long, in densely welded fractured tuff to simulate the difficult drilling conditions anticipated at Yucca Mountain. Drilling data from seven holes on three other prototype tests in nonwelded tuff were also collected for comparison. The test was used to establish preliminary standards of performance for drilling and dust collection equipment and to assess procedural efficiencies. The Longyear-38 drill achieved 97% recovery for HQ-size core (-2.5 in.), and the Atlas Copco dust collector (DCT-90) captured 1500 lb of fugitive dust in a mine environment with only minor modifications. Average hole production rates were 6-8 ft per 6-h shift in welded tuff and almost 20 ft per shift on deeper holes in nonwelded tuff. Lexan liners were successfully used to encapsulate core samples during the coring process and protect core properties effectively. The Prototype Air-Coring Test demonstrated that horizontal air coring in fractured welded tuff (to at least 150 ft) can be safely accomplished by proper selection, integration, and minor modification of standard drilling equipment, using appropriate procedures and engineering controls. The test also indicated that rig logistics, equipment, and methods need improvement before attempting a large-scale dry drilling program at Yucca Mountain.

  15. Remote sensing and sensor testing via hot air balloons

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, S.M.; Kroutil, R.T.; Traynor, C.A.

    1996-11-01

    Tethered and free-flying manned hot air balloons have been demonstrated as platforms for various remote sensing asks and sensor testing and atmospheric measurements. These platforms are inexpensive to operate, do not cause atmospheric disturbances as do higher speed platforms, and are extremely stable and free of vibrations inherent in aircraft structures. The equipment operated and tested on the balloons in connection with this project includes a prototype multispectral imaging spectrometer, high resolution CCD cameras, mid- and far-infrared cameras, a radiometer, FTIR spectrometers, video recording equipment and portable power generators carried beneath the balloon providing power to the equipment The experiments conducted on and from the balloon include chemical effluents characterization, atmospheric propagation through slant paths, obscurants imaging and scene reflectance. 7 refs.

  16. 30 CFR 75.152 - Tests of air flow; qualified person.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of air flow; qualified person. 75.152....152 Tests of air flow; qualified person. A person is a qualified person within the meaning of the provisions of Subpart D—Ventilation of this part requiring that tests of air flow be made by a...

  17. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's air brake system shall receive the calibration, maintenance, and testing as prescribed in this section....

  18. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's air brake system shall receive the calibration, maintenance, and testing as prescribed in this section....

  19. 49 CFR 229.29 - Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and... Inspections and Tests § 229.29 Air brake system calibration, maintenance, and testing. (a) A locomotive's air brake system shall receive the calibration, maintenance, and testing as prescribed in this section....

  20. 78 FR 17185 - U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... Department of the Air Force U.S. Air Force Space Command Notice of Test AGENCY: U.S. Air Force Space Command... inform users of an upcoming event related to the GPS satellite constellation. U.S. Air Force Space... process L2C or L5 CNAV. U.S. Air Force Space Command ] expects to conduct one to two CNAV tests per...

  1. Air

    MedlinePlus

    ... do to protect yourself from dirty air . Indoor air pollution and outdoor air pollution Air can be polluted indoors and it can ... this chart to see what things cause indoor air pollution and what things cause outdoor air pollution! Indoor ...

  2. Air Conditioning Stall Phenomenon Testing, Model Development, and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Irminger, Philip; Rizy, D Tom; Li, Huijuan; Smith, Travis; Rice, C Keith; Li, Fangxing; Adhikari, Sarina

    2012-01-01

    Electric distribution systems are experiencing power quality issues of extended reduced voltage due to fault-induced delayed voltage recovery (FIDVR). FIDVR occurs in part because modern air conditioner (A/C) and heat pump compressor motors are much more susceptible to stalling during a voltage sag or dip such as a sub-transmission fault. They are more susceptible than older A/C compressor motors due to the low inertia of these newer and more energy efficient motors. There is a concern that these local reduced voltage events on the distribution system will become more frequent and prevalent and will combine over larger areas and challenge transmission system voltage and ultimately power grid reliability. The Distributed Energy Communications and Controls (DECC) Laboratory at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been employed to (1) test, (2) characterize and (3) model the A/C stall phenomenon.

  3. 40 CFR 86.162-03 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... alternative air conditioning test simulations. (a) Upon petition from a manufacturer or upon the Agency's own initiative, the Administrator will approve a simulation of the environmental cell for air conditioning test... the tailpipe emissions, air conditioning compressor load, and fuel economy. (2) For any...

  4. 49 CFR 232.307 - Modification of the single car air brake test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Modification of the single car air brake test... Requirements § 232.307 Modification of the single car air brake test procedures. (a) Request. The AAR or other authorized representative of the railroad industry may seek modification of the single car air brake...

  5. 49 CFR 232.307 - Modification of the single car air brake test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Modification of the single car air brake test... Requirements § 232.307 Modification of the single car air brake test procedures. (a) Request. The AAR or other authorized representative of the railroad industry may seek modification of the single car air brake...

  6. Parameter estimation of an air-bearing suspended test table

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Zhenxian; Lin, Yurong; Liu, Yang; Chen, Xinglin; Chen, Fang

    2015-02-01

    A parameter estimation approach is proposed for parameter determination of a 3-axis air-bearing suspended test table. The table is to provide a balanced and frictionless environment for spacecraft ground test. To balance the suspension, the mechanical parameters of the table, including its angular inertias and centroid deviation from its rotating center, have to be determined first. Then sliding masses on the table can be adjusted by stepper motors to relocate the centroid of the table to its rotating center. Using the angular momentum theorem and the coriolis theorem, dynamic equations are derived describing the rotation of the table under the influence of gravity imbalance torque and activating torques. To generate the actuating torques, use of momentum wheels is proposed, whose virtue is that no active control is required to the momentum wheels, which merely have to spin at constant rates, thus avoiding the singularity problem and the difficulty of precisely adjusting the output torques, issues associated with control moment gyros. The gyroscopic torques generated by the momentum wheels, as they are forced by the table to precess, are sufficient to activate the table for parameter estimation. Then least-square estimation is be employed to calculate the desired parameters. The effectiveness of the method is validated by simulation.

  7. Field Test of Room-to-Room Uniformity of Ventilation Air Distribution in Two New Houses

    SciTech Connect

    Hendron, Robert; Anderson, Ren; Barley, Dennis; Rudd, Armin; Townsend, Aaron; Hancock, Ed

    2006-12-01

    This report describes a field test to characterize the uniformity of room-to-room ventilation air distribution under various operating conditions by examining multi-zone tracer gas decay curves and calculating local age-of-air.

  8. Combination Of Thermography And Pressure Tests To Combat Air Leakage Problems In Building Enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spruin, W. G.

    1987-05-01

    Uncontrolled air leakage in a building enclosure is the main component of space heating and cooling costs. In Atlantic Canada, Public Works Canada has combined thermography and pressure testing to identify design and construction problems in new construction and to identify specific areas of air leakage in existing housing stock. A study case shows how thermography and pressure testing has been utilized to locate and compare specific areas of air leakage in a residence before and after air sealing. The study provides both quantitative and qualitative evidence of how air sealing increases the air tightness in building enclosures.

  9. Operational test report for 241-AW tank inlet air control stations

    SciTech Connect

    Minteer, D.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-03

    This document reports the results of operational testing on tank inlet air control stations in 241-AW tank farm. An air control station was installed on each of the six AW tanks. Operational testing consisted of a simple functional test of each station`s air flow controller, aerosol testing of each station`s HEPA filter, and final ventilation system balancing (i.e., tank airflows and vacuum level) using the air control stations. The test was successful and the units were subsequently placed into operation.

  10. Air pollution control system testing at the DOE offgas components test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Speed, D.; VanPelt, W.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-06-01

    In 1997, the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS) plans to begin operation of the Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes. The Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) leads an extensive technical support program designed to obtain incinerator and air pollution control equipment performance data to support facility start-up and operation. A key component of this technical support program includes the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a pilot-scale offgas system test bed. The primary goal for this test facility is to demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the planned CIF Air Pollution Control System (APCS). To accomplish this task, the OCTF has been equipped with a 1/10 scale CIF offgas system equipment components and instrumentation. In addition, the OCTF design maximizes the flexibility of APCS operation and facility instrumentation and sampling capabilities permit accurate characterization of all process streams throughout the facility. This allows APCS equipment performance to be evaluated in an integrated system under a wide range of possible operating conditions. This paper summarizes the use of this DOE test facility to successfully demonstrate APCS operability and maintainability, evaluate and optimize equipment and instrument performance, and provide direct CIF start-up support. These types of facilities are needed to permit resolution of technical issues associated with design and operation of systems that treat and dispose combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive waste throughout and DOE complex.

  11. Technology Solutions Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    SciTech Connect

    A. Rudd and D. Bergey

    2015-08-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs.

  12. Test/QA Plan (TQAP) for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the semi-continuous ambient air monitoring technology (or MARGA) test and quality assurance plan is to specify procedures for a verification test applicable to commercial semi-continuous ambient air monitoring technologies. The purpose of the verification test is ...

  13. Energy use test facility: CAC-DOE solar air heater test report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    The solar air heater testing demonstrated an attractive application for residential space heating, especially appealing to the do-it-yourself market. Simple improvements in construction, such as caulking of the glazing, could increase collector performance at little cost. The operating cost of the fan was insignificant, being less than $0.05/week. Tested in its as-shipped configuration at 96.1 cfm (3 cfm/ft (2)), the useful energy delivered averaged 20,000 Btu/day for six days in December. The electrical consumption of the fan was approximately 1 kWh. Doubling the flowrate did not increase collector performance appreciably. A TRNSYS computer simulation model for this solar air heater design was validated by comparing the measured test data on Jaunary 4, 1981 with calculated values. TRNSYS predicted that measured collector outlet temperatures within +- 1.20F and the energy delivered within +- 3%. The excellent agreement was obtained by adjusting the collector loss coefficient to an unrealistically low value; therefore, a parametric study is recommended to determine the model sensitivity to varying different parameters. A first-order collector efficiency curve was derived from the TRNSYS simulations which compared well with the curve defined by the clear-day measured data.

  14. VERIFICATION TESTING OF AIR POLLUTION CONTROL TECHNOLOGY QUALITY MANAGEMENT PLAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document is the basis for quality assurance for the Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center (APCT Center) operated under the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It describes the policies, organizational structure, responsibilities, procedures, and qualit...

  15. Laboratory testing during critical care transport: point-of-care testing in air ambulances.

    PubMed

    Di Serio, Francesca; Petronelli, Maria Antonia; Sammartino, Eugenio

    2010-07-01

    Air and ground transport are used for prehospital transport of patients in acute life-threatening situations, and increasingly, critically ill patients undergo interhospital transportation. Results from clinical studies suggest that critical tests performed during the transport of critically ill patients presents a potential opportunity to improve patient care. Our project was to identify, according to the recommendations published at this time, a model of point-of-care testing (POCT) (arterial blood gases analysis and glucose, sodium, potassium, ionized calcium, hematocrit/hemoglobin measurements) in air ambulances. In order to identify the key internal and external factors that are important to achieving our objective, an analysis of the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats (SWOT analysis) was incorporated into our planning model prior to starting the project. To allow the entire POCT process (pre-, intra-, and post-analytic steps) to be under the control of the reference laboratory, an experimental model of information technology was applied. Real-time results during transport of critically ill patients must be considered to be an integral part of the patient care process and excellent channels of communication are needed between the intensive care units, emergency medical services and laboratories. With technological and computer advances, POCT during critical care transport will certainly increase in the future: this will be a challenge from a laboratory and clinical context. PMID:20406127

  16. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... to simulate the impact of an ambient heat load on the power requirements of the vehicle's air... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating... be shown that all of the ambient test condition performance requirements are satisfied. (d)...

  17. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... to simulate the impact of an ambient heat load on the power requirements of the vehicle's air... elements that are discussed are ambient air temperature and humidity, minimum test cell size, solar heating... be shown that all of the ambient test condition performance requirements are satisfied. (d)...

  18. 40 CFR 86.162-03 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conditioning test simulations. 86.162-03 Section 86.162-03 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... alternative air conditioning test simulations. (a) Upon petition from a manufacturer or upon the Agency's own initiative, the Administrator will approve a simulation of the environmental cell for air conditioning...

  19. Building America Top Innovations 2014 Profile: HVAC Cabinet Air Leakage Test Method

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This 2014 Top Innovation profile describes Building America-funded research by teams and national laboratories that resulted in the development of an ASHRAE standard and a standardized testing method for testing the air leakage of HVAC air handlers and furnace cabinets and has spurred equipment manufacturers to tighten the cabinets they use for residential HVAC systems.

  20. 40 CFR 86.162-03 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... initiative, the Administrator will approve a simulation of the environmental cell for air conditioning test... environmental cell test data for the range of vehicles to be covered by the simulation including items such as the tailpipe emissions, air conditioning compressor load, and fuel economy. (2) For any...

  1. Functional performance testing of the universal super absorbing air filters FSU 70 „Air by Corneliu”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raţiu, S.; Birtok-Băneasă, C.; Alexa, V.; Kiss, I.

    2015-06-01

    This paper presents the experimental methodology to carry out functional performance tests for an air filter with a particular design of its housing, generically named Universal super absorbing FSU 70 „Air by Corneliu”. The tests were carried out in the Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory, within the specialization "Road automotives" belonging to the Faculty of Engineering Hunedoara, component of “Politehnica” University of Timisoara. We present some comparative values of various operating parameters of the engine fitted, in the first measuring session, with the original filter, and then with the studied filter.

  2. Thermal Gradient Behavior of TBCs Subjected to a Laser Gradient Test Rig: Simulating an Air-to-Air Combat Flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Rogerio S.; Marple, Basil R.; Marcoux, P.

    2016-01-01

    A computer-controlled laser test rig (using a CO2 laser) offers an interesting alternative to traditional flame-based thermal gradient rigs in evaluating thermal barrier coatings (TBCs). The temperature gradient between the top and back surfaces of a TBC system can be controlled based on the laser power and a forced air back-face cooling system, enabling the temperature history of complete aircraft missions to be simulated. An air plasma spray-deposited TBC was tested and, based on experimental data available in the literature, the temperature gradients across the TBC system (ZrO2-Y2O3 YSZ top coat/CoNiCrAlY bond coat/Inconel 625 substrate) and their respective frequencies during air-to-air combat missions of fighter jets were replicated. The missions included (i) idle/taxi on the runway, (ii) take-off and climbing, (iii) cruise trajectory to rendezvous zone, (iv) air-to-air combat maneuvering, (v) cruise trajectory back to runway, and (vi) idle/taxi after landing. The results show that the TBC thermal gradient experimental data in turbine engines can be replicated in the laser gradient rig, leading to an important tool to better engineer TBCs.

  3. Comparison of Tests on Air Propellers in Flight with Wind Tunnel Model Tests on Similar Forms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durand, W F; Lesley, E P

    1926-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the performance, characteristics, and coefficients of full-sized air propellers in flight and to compare these results with those derived from wind-tunnel tests on reduced scale models of similar geometrical form. The full-scale equipment comprised five propellers in combination with a VE-7 airplane and Wright E-4 engine. This part of the work was carried out at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, between May 1 and August 24, 1924, and was under the immediate charge of Mr. Lesley. The model or wind-tunnel part of the investigation was carried out at the Aerodynamic Laboratory of Stanford University and was under the immediate charge of Doctor Durand. A comparison of the curves for full-scale results with those derived from the model tests shows that while the efficiencies realized in flight are close to those derived from model tests, both thrust developed and power absorbed in flight are from 6 to 10 per cent greater than would be expected from the results of model tests.

  4. Environmental Technology Verification: Supplement to Test/QA Plan for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners; Bioaerosol Inactivation Efficiency by HVAC In-Duct Ultraviolet Light Air Cleaners

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollution Control Technology Verification Center has selected general ventilation air cleaners as a technology area. The Generic Verification Protocol for Biological and Aerosol Testing of General Ventilation Air Cleaners is on the Environmental Technology Verification we...

  5. Relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test Scores and Success in Air Weapons Controller Training. Interim Report for the Period November 1982-February 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finegold, Lawrence S.; Rogers, Deborah

    This project investigated the relationship between Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) composite scores and student performance in Air Force air weapons controller training. The purpose of this study was to examine the feasibility of using AFOQT scores as one selection criteria for entry to the air weapons controller field. An analysis of…

  6. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, Curtis; Modera, Mark

    2012-05-01

    This report presents a process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  7. A new guide for commissioning air handling systems: Using a model functional test

    SciTech Connect

    Haasl, Tudi; Sellers, David; Friedman, Hannah; Piette, Mary Ann; Bourassa, Norman; Gillespie, Ken

    2002-05-01

    Functional tests are a set of detailed instructions for building commissioning that demand extensive HVAC system knowledge to write and perform. Understanding the energy use implications and theory behind the test procedures, estimating the costs and benefits of doing a particular test, implementing the tests correctly, and resolving problems require years of field experience. As part of a large research project now underway, a practical guide is being developed that communicates this knowledge. This paper presents the components and intended use of the Functional Testing Guide and Model Functional Test for Air Handling Systems. A series of model functional tests, starting at the outdoor air intake section and proceeding through the air handling unit, distribution system, and terminal equipment and ending at the exhaust air discharge point, are provided for many commonly installed air handling system configurations. The model functional tests contain advice for tailoring the test procedures to specific system configurations, desirable and undesirable testing outcomes, a calculation appendix, references to other resources, and examples of completed test forms. The guide is an educational resource, with background information that clarifies the principles behind testing configurations and results. The functional tests have been selected from an extensive commissioning test protocol library compiled by Pacific Gas and Electric in 2001. The guide also includes a design guideline for the selection of control and monitoring points and a design intent documentation form.

  8. Laboratory Testing of Aerosol for Enclosure Air Sealing

    SciTech Connect

    Harrington, C.; Modera, M.

    2012-05-01

    Space conditioning energy use can be significantly reduced by addressing uncontrolled infiltration and exfiltration through the envelope of a building. A process for improving the air tightness of a building envelope by sealing shell leaks with an aerosol sealing technology is presented. Both retrofit and new construction applications are possible through applying this process either in attics and crawlspaces or during rough-in stage.

  9. DEVELOPING A FRAMEWORK FOR TESTING INDOOR AIR PRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the development of a framework for testing products used indoors for appropriate environmental attributes, as part of EPA's Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) program. Test protocols are being established for products that fit into three categories: ...

  10. Compressed-air energy storage: Pittsfield aquifer field test

    SciTech Connect

    Bui, H.V.; Herzog, R.A.; Jacewicz, D.M.; Lange, G.R.; Scarpace, E.R.; Thomas, H.H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report documents the results of a comprehensive investigation into the practical feasibility for Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) in Porous Media. Natural gas porous media storage technology developed from seventy years of experience by the natural gas storage industry is applied to the investigation of CAES in porous media. A major objective of this investigation is the geologic characterization, deliverability prediction, and operations analysis of the Pittsfield CAES aquifer experiment, conducted in Pike County, Illinois during 1981--85 under EPRI/DOE sponsorship. Emphasis has been placed on applying accepted petroleum engineering concepts to the study of deliverability and on the characterization and quantification of oxygen losses which reportedly occurred at Pittsfield. Other objectives are to apply the natural gas underground storage technology and approach to a general study of CAES feasibility in porous media reservoirs, with emphasis on the practical risks and constraints of air storage in aquifer and depleted natural gas reservoirs, the effects of water on CAES operation, corrosion effects, and a review of air dehydration options.

  11. Building America Case Study: Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts, Tyler, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    2015-08-01

    ?Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy.

  12. The Air Force Officer Qualifying Test: Validity, Fairness, and Bias. Technical Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardison, Chaitra M.; Sims, Carra S.; Wong, Eunice C.

    2010-01-01

    The Air Force has long recognized the importance of selecting the most qualified officers possible. For more than 60 years, it has relied on the Air Force Officer Qualifying Test (AFOQT) as one measure of those qualifications. A variety of concerns have been raised about whether the AFOQT is biased, too expensive, or even valid for predicting…

  13. Criterion-Referenced Test (CRT) Items for Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Diane, Ed.

    These criterion-referenced test (CRT) items for air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration are keyed to the Missouri Air Conditioning, Heating, and Refrigeration Competency Profile. The items are designed to work with both the Vocational Instructional Management System and Vocational Administrative Management System. For word processing and…

  14. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86.161-00 Section 86.161-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations...

  15. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86.161-00 Section 86.161-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations...

  16. 40 CFR 86.161-00 - Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air conditioning environmental test facility ambient requirements. 86.161-00 Section 86.161-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations...

  17. 40 CFR 86.167-17 - AC17 Air Conditioning Emissions Test Procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false AC17 Air Conditioning Emissions Test Procedure. 86.167-17 Section 86.167-17 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later...

  18. 78 FR 44189 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ..., 2000 (65 FR 19477). Robert C. Lauby, Deputy Associate Administrator for Regulatory and Legislative... Federal Railroad Administration Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In... the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) per 49 CFR 232.307 to modify the single car air brake...

  19. 40 CFR 86.165-12 - Air conditioning idle test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air conditioning idle test procedure. 86.165-12 Section 86.165-12 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year...

  20. Pegasus Air-Launched Space Booster Flight Test Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elias, Antonio L.; Knutson, Martin A.

    1995-01-01

    Pegasus is a satellite-launching space rocket dropped from a B52 carrier aircraft instead of launching vertically from a ground pad. Its three-year, privately-funded accelerated development was carried out under a demanding design-to-nonrecurring cost methodology, which imposed unique requirements on its flight test program, such as the decision not to drop an inert model from the carrier aircraft; the number and type of captive and free-flight tests; the extent of envelope exploration; and the decision to combine test and operational orbital flights. The authors believe that Pegasus may be the first vehicle where constraints in the number and type of flight tests to be carried out actually influenced the design of the vehicle. During the period November 1989 to February of 1990 a total of three captive flight tests were conducted, starting with a flutter clearing flight and culminating in a complete drop rehearsal. Starting on April 5, 1990, two combination test/operational flights were conducted. A unique aspect of the program was the degree of involvement of flight test personnel in the early design of the vehicle and, conversely, of the design team in flight testing and early flight operations. Various lessons learned as a result of this process are discussed throughout this paper.

  1. Compressed-air energy storage field test using the aquifer at Pittsfield, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    Istvan, J.A.; Pereira, J.C.; Roark, P.; Bakhtiari, H. )

    1990-02-01

    This report describes the design, construction, and operation of a field experiment to examine feasibility of full-scale compressed air energy storage (CAES) within aquifer reservoirs. A summary of data obtained and the conclusions from the field experiment are presented. Two injection/withdrawal wells, two instrument wells, and four logging/sampling wells were drilled and cored. Air was injected in the St. Peter Sandstone to create an air bubble which was cycled with ambient and elevated temperature air in the injection withdrawal pattern contemplated for CAES installations. At its peak content of 111.75 {times} 10{sup 6} scf, the air bubble was 30 ft thick at the I/W well area and reached 18 ft in thickness at a distance of 686 ft from the I/W well. Three post-test core wells were drilled and cored. The caprock, reservoir, and formation water were sampled and analyzed prior to and after exposure to compressed air and associated water. Samples of stored air were collected and analyzed. Items of interest were degree of liquid entrance into flowing well, effects in aquifer of increased air temperature, and changes in oxygen content of air. Prior to plugging and abandoning the well field, an additional well was drilled and cored, outside the air bubble. This work is part of the continuing research by EPRI to investigate the geochemical oxidation process. Reservoir engineering and utilization of geologic media for storing air has many complexities, but it has useable experience from successful natural gas storage. The design, construction, and testing at Pittsfield demonstrates that orientation toward useage of an aquifer air storage facility can be performed successfully. The disappearance of oxygen needs attention for seasonal storage of air but should not dampen enthusiasm for weekly or daily storage cycles.

  2. TESTING INDOOR AIR PRODUCTS: ONE APPROACH TO DEVELOPING WIDELY ACCEPTED PROTOCOLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes an approach to developing widely acce ted products for testing indoor air products. [NOTE: Research Triangle Institute (RTI) is a partner in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) Environmental Technology Verification (ETV) Program with responsibil...

  3. Testing an Algae-Based Air-Regeneration System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nienow, James

    1998-01-01

    The potential of an air-regeneration system based on the growth of unicellular algae on the surface of porous ceramic tubes was evaluated. The system is fairly robust with respect to environmental conditions and is capable of maintaining algal cultures for up to 365 days. Under standard conditions (50-66 micro mol/sq mm s (PPF), 450 micro mol mol of CO2), mature tubes can remove CO2 at a rate of up to 90 micro mol/sq m min. Under these conditions, approximately 200 square meters of area would be required for each member of the crew. However, the rate of uptake increases with both photon flux and CO2 concentration in accordance with Michaelis-Menton dynamics. An extrapolation to conditions of saturating light and carbon dioxide indicates that the area required can be reduced by a factor of at least 2.5.

  4. Test/QA Plan for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems - Second Round

    EPA Science Inventory

    Test/QA Plan for Verification of Semi-Continuous Ambient Air Monitoring Systems - Second Round. Changes reflect performance of second round of testing at new location and with various changes to personnel. Additional changes reflect general improvements to the Version 1 test/QA...

  5. 40 CFR 1066.845 - AC17 air conditioning efficiency test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... voluntary procedure for measuring the net impact of air conditioner operation on CO2 emissions. See 40 CFR... tests according to 40 CFR 86.132-00(a) through (g). If the vehicle has been tested within the last 36... solar heating is disabled for certain test intervals as described in this section. (d) Interior...

  6. Air Force NiH2 IPV storage testing

    SciTech Connect

    Smellie, S.; Hill, C.A.

    1996-02-01

    USAF Phillips Laboratory Nickel Hydrogen IPV storage test, performed at the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC) at Crane Indiana, is discussed. The storage tests is just one component of the USAF Phillips Laboratory Nickel Hydrogen IPV Test Program. The plan was to store cells for a defined period and cycle matching cells to determine the effect on cycle life. The storage period was completed in April 95 and the cycling cells have achieved five years of real time LEO cycling. The two main objectives of the storage test are: to investigate various methods on NiH2 cells by using two different manufacturers and two different storage methods or conditions, and to determine the effect of storage method on cycle performance and cycle life by using matching cells cycling at 25% depth of discharge. The comparisons between individual cycle performance as well as cycle life are also reported. During the test the following variables has been considered: constant potential, cell current, open circuit voltage, and temperature. The results of the test are also discussed using charts and tables.

  7. Beta test of models-3 with Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model

    SciTech Connect

    LeDuc, S.

    1997-12-31

    The Models-3 framework for advanced air quality modeling, developed by the Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development (EPA/ORD), was provided to a limited number of beta test sites during the summer of 1997. Tutorial datasets and the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model were also provided. Valuable feedback on framework installation, performance, functionality, intuitiveness, user friendliness resulted from the beta test. This information will be used to guide framework improvements preparatory to public release in June 1998.

  8. Operability test procedure for 241-U compressed air system and heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, R.D.

    1994-08-31

    The 241-U-701 compressed air system supplies instrument quality compressed air to Tank Farm 241-U. The supply piping to the 241-U Tank Farm is not included in the modification. Modifications to the 241-U-701 compressed air system include installation of a 15 HP Reciprocating Air Compressor, Ingersoll-Rand Model 10T3NLM-E15; an air dryer, Hankinson, Model DH-45; and miscellaneous system equipment and piping (valves, filters, etc.) to meet the design. A newly installed heat pump allows the compressor to operate within an enclosed relatively dust free atmosphere and keeps the compressor room within a standard acceptable temperature range, which makes possible efficient compressor operation, reduces maintenance, and maximizes compressor operating life. This document is an Operability Test Procedure (OTP) which will further verify (in addition to the Acceptance Test Procedure) that the 241-U-701 compressed air system and heat pump operate within their intended design parameters. The activities defined in this OTP will be performed to ensure the performance of the new compressed air system will be adequate, reliable and efficient. Completion of this OTP and sign off of the OTP Acceptance of Test Results is necessary for turnover of the compressed air system from Engineering to Operations.

  9. Wide Bandwidth Air-Coupled Ultrasonic Testing of Food Containers in Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, T. H.; Hutchins, D. A.; Billson, D. R.

    2003-03-01

    Air-coupled NDE has been used to perform measurements on food containers. This relies on the broad bandwidth available from polymer-filmed capacitive transducers, combined with pulse compression techniques. The first experiments involve liquids within cylindrical polymer containers. It will be demonstrated that transmission through the drinks bottles can be used to measure liquid level, either from monitoring the through-transmitted signal directly, or by observation of a reflection from the liquid surface. This can be achieved without contact to the container. By scanning the transducers around the container, it is also possible to collect tomographic data. It will be demonstrated that this can be used to reconstruct air-coupled cross-sectional images of such containers, so that contaminants can be located. It is also shown that the temperature of a liquid can be estimated successfully, using time-of-flight measurements. The result is a powerful method for the NDE of such materials, which could be applied to production-line situations.

  10. Rehabilitation of the Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand at Edwards Air Force Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Daniel S.; Ray, Ronald J.; Phillips, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Since initial use in 1958 for the X-15 rocket-powered research airplane, the Rocket Engine Test Facility has proven essential for testing and servicing rocket-powered vehicles at Edwards Air Force Base. For almost two decades, several successful flight-test programs utilized the capability of this facility. The Department of Defense has recently demonstrated a renewed interest in propulsion technology development with the establishment of the National Aerospace Initiative. More recently, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration is undergoing a transformation to realign the organization, focusing on the Vision for Space Exploration. These initiatives provide a clear indication that a very capable ground-test stand at Edwards Air Force Base will be beneficial to support the testing of future access-to-space vehicles. To meet the demand of full integration testing of rocket-powered vehicles, the NASA Dryden Flight Research Center, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Air Force Research Laboratory have combined their resources in an effort to restore and upgrade the original X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility to become the new Rocket Vehicle Integration Test Stand. This report describes the history of the X-15 Rocket Engine Test Facility, discusses the current status of the facility, and summarizes recent efforts to rehabilitate the facility to support potential access-to-space flight-test programs. A summary of the capabilities of the facility is presented and other important issues are discussed.

  11. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  12. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  13. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  14. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Testing § 3280.406 Air chamber test method for certification and... wrapped until preconditioning is initiated. (2) Panels selected for testing in the air chamber shall not be taken from the top or bottom of the stack. (b) Testing. Testing must be conducted in...

  15. Analysis of incinerator performance and metal emissions from recent trial and test burns

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, T.C.; Lee, H.T.; Kuo, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    Recent trial- and test-burn data from five rotary kiln incinerator facilities were analyzed for combustion performance and metal emissions. The incinerator facilities examined included: DuPont`s Gulf Coast Regional Waste Incinerator in Orange, Texas; Chemical Waste Management`s Incinerator in Port Arthur, Texas; Rollins Environmental Service`s Incinerator in Deer Park, Texas; Martin Marietta`s TSCA Incinerator in Oak Ridge, Tennessee; and EPA`s Incineration Research Facility in Jefferson, Arkansas. The analysis involved the use of a PC-based computer program capable of performing material and energy balance calculations and predicting equilibrium compositions based on the minimization of system free energy. For each analysis, the feed data of waste and fuel and the corresponding operating parameters associated with incinerator and/or afterburner operation were input to the program and the program simulated the combustion performance under equilibrium conditions. In the analysis, the field-recorded performance data were compared with the simulated equilibrium results and the incinerator performance, including the quality of the field data, the combustion efficiency, the percent excess air, the heat loss, and the amount of air inleakage, was evaluated. In addition, the field-obtained metal data were analyzed for emission rate and metal balance. 13 refs., 4 figs., 16 tabs.

  16. Development and Characterization Testing of an Air Pulsation Valve for a Pulse Detonation Engine Supersonic Parametric Inlet Test Section

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tornabene, Robert

    2005-01-01

    In pulse detonation engines, the potential exists for gas pulses from the combustor to travel upstream and adversely affect the inlet performance of the engine. In order to determine the effect of these high frequency pulses on the inlet performance, an air pulsation valve was developed to provide air pulses downstream of a supersonic parametric inlet test section. The purpose of this report is to document the design and characterization tests that were performed on a pulsation valve that was tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center 1x1 Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) test facility. The high air flow pulsation valve design philosophy and analyses performed are discussed and characterization test results are presented. The pulsation valve model was devised based on the concept of using a free spinning ball valve driven from a variable speed electric motor to generate air flow pulses at preset frequencies. In order to deliver the proper flow rate, the flow port was contoured to maximize flow rate and minimize pressure drop. To obtain sharp pressure spikes the valve flow port was designed to be as narrow as possible to minimize port dwell time.

  17. 40 CFR 86.162-03 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... initiative, the Administrator will approve a simulation of the environmental cell for air conditioning test... approvals will be granted, the Administrator will consider data showing how well the simulation matches environmental cell test data for the range of vehicles to be covered by the simulation including items such...

  18. 40 CFR 86.162-03 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... initiative, the Administrator will approve a simulation of the environmental cell for air conditioning test... approvals will be granted, the Administrator will consider data showing how well the simulation matches environmental cell test data for the range of vehicles to be covered by the simulation including items such...

  19. Predictive Validity of Conventional and Adaptive Tests in an Air Force Training Environment. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sympson, James B.; And Others

    Conventional Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery-7 (ASVAB) Arithmetic Reasoning and Word Knowledge tests, were compared with computer-administered adaptive tests as predictors of performance in an Air Force Jet Engine Mechanic training course (n=495). Results supported earlier research in showing somewhat longer examinee response times for…

  20. 77 FR 38857 - Design, Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ...The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC or the Commission) is issuing for public comment draft regulatory guide (DG), DG-1280, ``Design, Inspection, and Testing Criteria for Air Filtration and Adsorption Units of Normal Atmosphere Cleanup Systems in Light-Water- Cooled Nuclear Power Plants.'' This guide describes a method for design, inspection, and testing of normal atmosphere cleanup......

  1. Calibration of the Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, B. W., Jr.; Runckel, J. F.; Igoe, W. B.

    1974-01-01

    The Langley 16-foot transonic tunnel with test section air removal (plenum suction) was calibrated to a Mach number of 1.3. The results of the calibration, including the effects of slot shape modifications, test section wall divergence, and water vapor condensation, are presented. A complete description of the wind tunnel and its auxiliary equipment is included.

  2. 76 FR 18105 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Central Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... voltage transformer used when testing coil-only residential central air conditioners and heat pumps, 75 FR... heat pumps, as required by 42 U.S.C. 6295(gg)(2)(A). 75 FR 31238-39. These proposals included testing... (parameter P2). 75 FR 31238-39. P1 and P2 are both expressed in units of watts. Since heat pumps are...

  3. Private and Commercial Pilot: Ligher-Than-Air Airship. Flight Test Guide. (Part 61 Revised).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The flight test guide assists the applicant and his instructor in preparing for the flight test for the Private or Commercial Pilot Certificate with a Lighter-Than-Air Category and Airship Class Rating under Part 61 (revised) of Federal Aviation Regulations. It contains information and guidance concerning pilot operations, procedures, and…

  4. EVALUATION OF A TEST METHOD FOR MEASURING INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM DRY-PROCESS PHOTOCOPIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A large chamber test method for measuring indoor air emissions from office equipment was developed, evaluated, and revised based on the initial testing of four dry-process photocopiers. Because all chambers may not necessarily produce similar results (e.g., due to differences in ...

  5. Desktop Application Program to Simulate Cargo-Air-Drop Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuthbert, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The DSS Application is a computer program comprising a Windows version of the UNIX-based Decelerator System Simulation (DSS) coupled with an Excel front end. The DSS is an executable code that simulates the dynamics of airdropped cargo from first motion in an aircraft through landing. The bare DSS is difficult to use; the front end makes it easy to use. All inputs to the DSS, control of execution of the DSS, and postprocessing and plotting of outputs are handled in the front end. The front end is graphics-intensive. The Excel software provides the graphical elements without need for additional programming. Categories of input parameters are divided into separate tabbed windows. Pop-up comments describe each parameter. An error-checking software component evaluates combinations of parameters and alerts the user if an error results. Case files can be created from inputs, making it possible to build cases from previous ones. Simulation output is plotted in 16 charts displayed on a separate worksheet, enabling plotting of multiple DSS cases with flight-test data. Variables assigned to each plot can be changed. Selected input parameters can be edited from the plot sheet for quick sensitivity studies.

  6. Results and code prediction comparisons of lithium-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) Fusion Safety Support Studies include evaluation of potential safety and environmental concerns associated with the use of liquid lithium as a breeder and coolant for fusion reactors. Potential mechanisms for volatilization and transport of radioactive metallic species associated with breeder materials are of particular interest. Liquid lithium pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior tests were conducted with lithium masses up to 100 kg within the 850-m/sup 3/ containment vessel in the Containment Systems Test Facility. Lithium-air reaction rates, aerosol generation rates, aerosol behavior and characterization, as well as containment atmosphere temperature and pressure responses were determined. Pool-air reaction and aerosol behavior test results were compared with computer code calculations for reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol behavior. The volatility of potentially radioactive metallic species from a lithium pool-air reaction was measured. The response of various aerosol detectors to the aerosol generated was determined. Liquid lithium spray tests in air and in nitrogen atmospheres were conducted with lithium temperatures of about 427/sup 0/ and 650/sup 0/C. Lithium reaction rates, containment atmosphere response, and aerosol generation and characterization were determined for these spray tests.

  7. Simultaneous inversion of air-injection tests in fractured unsaturated tuff at Yucca Mountain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, K.; Tsang, Y. W.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    1999-08-01

    Air-injection tests are being used to characterize the flow characteristics of the fractured volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. As the air component flows mainly in the heterogeneous fracture system, air-injection tests can be used to determine the hydrological properties and parameters of the fracture networks. In situ air-injection tests have been carried out in 30 boreholes drilled in a fractured rock block of 13 × 21.5 × 18 m3 in the underground facility at Yucca Mountain. These in situ field tests consist of a constant rate flow injection in one of the boreholes, while the pressure response is monitored in all 30 boreholes of the rock block. This paper presents a simultaneous inversion for 21 air-injection tests in 21 separate boreholes using TOUGH2, a three-dimensional numerical code for multiphase, multicomponent transport [Pruess, 1991; Pruess et al., 1996]. Spatially variable fracture permeability is used as an adjustable parameter to fit the measured pressure responses. For most of the pneumatic experiments the calculated pressure changes match the measured data well. Estimated permeabilities range over 5 orders of magnitude, from 10-15 to 8 × 10-11 m2, indicating large spatial variability in permeability of the heterogeneous fracture system.

  8. Air/ground wind shear information integration: Flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinton, David A.

    1992-01-01

    An element of the NASA/FAA wind shear program is the integration of ground-based microburst information on the flight deck, to support airborne wind shear alerting and microburst avoidance. NASA conducted a wind shear flight test program in the summer of 1991 during which airborne processing of Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) data was used to derive microburst alerts. High level microburst products were extracted from TDWR, transmitted to a NASA Boeing 737 in flight via data link, and processed to estimate the wind shear hazard level (F-factor) that would be experienced by the aircraft in the core of each microburst. The microburst location and F-factor were used to derive a situation display and alerts. The situation display was successfully used to maneuver the aircraft for microburst penetrations, during which in situ 'truth' measurements were made. A total of 19 penetrations were made of TDWR-reported microburst locations, resulting in 18 airborne microburst alerts from the TDWR data and two microburst alerts from the airborne in situ measurements. The primary factors affecting alerting performance were spatial offset of the flight path from the region of strongest shear, differences in TDWR measurement altitude and airplane penetration altitude, and variations in microburst outflow profiles. Predicted and measured F-factors agreed well in penetrations near microburst cores. Although improvements in airborne and ground processing of the TDWR measurement would be required to support an airborne executive-level alerting protocol, the feasibility of airborne utilization of TDWR data link data has been demonstrated.

  9. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  10. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  11. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  12. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  13. 33 CFR 334.340 - Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. 334.340 Section 334.340 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.340 Chesapeake Bay off Plumtree Island, Hampton, Va.; Air Force precision test area. (a) The... Command, Langley Air Force Base, Va., shall be responsible for publicizing in advance through the...

  14. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and...

  15. An inventory of aeronautical ground research facilities. Volume 2: Air breathing engine test facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pirrello, C. J.; Hardin, R. D.; Heckart, M. V.; Brown, K. R.

    1971-01-01

    The inventory covers free jet and direct connect altitude cells, sea level static thrust stands, sea level test cells with ram air, and propulsion wind tunnels. Free jet altitude cells and propulsion wind tunnels are used for evaluation of complete inlet-engine-exhaust nozzle propulsion systems under simulated flight conditions. These facilities are similar in principal of operation and differ primarily in test section concept. The propulsion wind tunnel provides a closed test section and restrains the flow around the test specimen while the free jet is allowed to expand freely. A chamber of large diameter about the free jet is provided in which desired operating pressure levels may be maintained. Sea level test cells with ram air provide controlled, conditioned air directly to the engine face for performance evaluation at low altitude flight conditions. Direct connect altitude cells provide a means of performance evaluation at simulated conditions of Mach number and altitude with air supplied to the flight altitude conditions. Sea level static thrust stands simply provide an instrumented engine mounting for measuring thrust at zero airspeed. While all of these facilities are used for integrated engine testing, a few provide engine component test capability.

  16. Second Line of Defense, Port of Buenos Aires and Exolgan Container Terminal Operational Testing and Evaluation Plan, Buenos Aires, Argentina

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, Bryan W.

    2012-08-23

    The Office of the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Megaports project team for Argentina will conduct operational testing and evaluation (OT&E) at Exolgan Container Terminal at the Port of Dock Sud from July 16-20, 2012; and at the Port of Buenos Aires from September 3-7, 2012. SLD is installing radiation detection equipment to screen export, import, and transshipment containers at these locations. The purpose of OT&E is to validate and baseline an operable system that meets the SLD mission and to ensure the system continues to perform as expected in an operational environment with Argentina Customs effectively adjudicating alarms.

  17. Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Borst, R.R.; Wood, B.D.

    1985-05-01

    The performance of a prototype 3 ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

  18. A heating season comparison test of two solar air heating systems

    SciTech Connect

    Thacher, E.F.; Wen, C.

    1987-06-01

    An outdoor, comparison performance test of two solar air-heating systems was performed between December 1, 1985 and May 17, 1986, near Potsdam, in northern New York. Each system was installed in a small test cell and operated in the direct heating mode. An identical third test cell served as a control. Infiltration air was blown into the cells at 0.5 air changes per hour (ACH). The solar fractions obtained were low, ranging from 0.116 to0.213, with the north cell's fraction somewhat lower than the south cell's. The average solar fraction of both cells in each control range increased as the temperature control range widened. Simulation of the experiment in Albany, Buffalo, Potsdam, and Syracusae using TRNSYS gave solar fractions of similar magnitudes and the same trend. An economic analysis comparing the solar systems to five different conventional energy sources showed no payback during the 20-year term of the analysis.

  19. Dynamic performance testing of prototype 3 ton air-cooled carrier absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borst, R. R.; Wood, B. D.

    1985-05-01

    The performance of a prototype three ton cooling capacity air-cooled lithium bromide/water absorption chiller was tested using an absorption chiller test facility which was modified to expand its testing capabilities to include air-cooled chillers in addition to water-cooled chillers. Temperatures of the three externally supplied fluid loops: hot water, chilled water, and cooling air, were varied in order to determine the effects this would have on the two principal measures of chiller performance: cooling capacity and thermal coefficient of performance (COP). A number of interrelated factors were identified as contributing to less than expected performance. For comparison, experimental correlations of other investigators for this and other similar absorption chillers are presented. These have been plotted as both contour and three-dimensional performance maps in order to more clearly show the functional dependence of the chiller performance on the fluid loop temperatures.

  20. Novel Air Stimulation MR-Device for Intraoral Quantitative Sensory Cold Testing

    PubMed Central

    Brönnimann, Ben; Meier, Michael L.; Hou, Mei-Yin; Parkinson, Charles; Ettlin, Dominik A.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of neuroimaging in dental research provides exciting opportunities for relating excitation of trigeminal neurons to human somatosensory perceptions. Cold air sensitivity is one of the most frequent causes of dental discomfort or pain. Up to date, devices capable of delivering controlled cold air in an MR-environment are unavailable for quantitative sensory testing. This study therefore aimed at constructing and evaluating a novel MR-compatible, computer-controlled cold air stimulation apparatus (CASA) that produces graded air puffs. CASA consisted of a multi-injector air jet delivery system (AJS), a cold exchanger, a cooling agent, and a stimulus application construction. Its feasibility was tested by performing an fMRI stimulation experiment on a single subject experiencing dentine cold sensitivity. The novel device delivered repetitive, stable air stimuli ranging from room temperature (24.5°C ± 2°C) to −35°C, at flow rates between 5 and 17 liters per minute (l/min). These cold air puffs evoked perceptions similar to natural stimuli. Single-subject fMRI-analysis yielded brain activations typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, insular and cingulate cortices, somatosensory, cerebellar, and frontal brain regions. Thus, the novel CASA allowed for controlled, repetitive quantitative sensory testing by using air stimuli at graded temperatures (room temperature down to −35°C) while simultaneously recording brain responses. No MR-compatible stimulation device currently exists that is capable of providing non-contact natural-like stimuli at a wide temperature range to tissues in spatially restricted areas such as the mouth. The physical characteristics of this novel device thus holds promise for advancing the field of trigeminal and spinal somatosensory research, namely with respect to comparing therapeutic interventions for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:27445771

  1. Novel Air Stimulation MR-Device for Intraoral Quantitative Sensory Cold Testing.

    PubMed

    Brönnimann, Ben; Meier, Michael L; Hou, Mei-Yin; Parkinson, Charles; Ettlin, Dominik A

    2016-01-01

    The advent of neuroimaging in dental research provides exciting opportunities for relating excitation of trigeminal neurons to human somatosensory perceptions. Cold air sensitivity is one of the most frequent causes of dental discomfort or pain. Up to date, devices capable of delivering controlled cold air in an MR-environment are unavailable for quantitative sensory testing. This study therefore aimed at constructing and evaluating a novel MR-compatible, computer-controlled cold air stimulation apparatus (CASA) that produces graded air puffs. CASA consisted of a multi-injector air jet delivery system (AJS), a cold exchanger, a cooling agent, and a stimulus application construction. Its feasibility was tested by performing an fMRI stimulation experiment on a single subject experiencing dentine cold sensitivity. The novel device delivered repetitive, stable air stimuli ranging from room temperature (24.5°C ± 2°C) to -35°C, at flow rates between 5 and 17 liters per minute (l/min). These cold air puffs evoked perceptions similar to natural stimuli. Single-subject fMRI-analysis yielded brain activations typically associated with acute pain processing including thalamus, insular and cingulate cortices, somatosensory, cerebellar, and frontal brain regions. Thus, the novel CASA allowed for controlled, repetitive quantitative sensory testing by using air stimuli at graded temperatures (room temperature down to -35°C) while simultaneously recording brain responses. No MR-compatible stimulation device currently exists that is capable of providing non-contact natural-like stimuli at a wide temperature range to tissues in spatially restricted areas such as the mouth. The physical characteristics of this novel device thus holds promise for advancing the field of trigeminal and spinal somatosensory research, namely with respect to comparing therapeutic interventions for dentine hypersensitivity. PMID:27445771

  2. Interim results from UO/sub 2/ fuel oxidation tests in air

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, T.K.; Gilbert, E.R.; Thornhill, C.K.; White, G.D.; Piepel, G.F.; Griffin, C.W.j

    1987-08-01

    An experimental program is being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to extend the characterization of spent fuel oxidation in air. To characterize oxidation behavior of irradiated UO/sub 2/, fuel oxidation tests were performed on declad light-water reactor spent fuel and nonirradited UO/sub 2/ pellets in the temperature range of 135 to 250/sup 0/C. These tests were designed to determine the important independent variables that might affect spent fuel oxidation behavior. The data from this program, when combined with the test results from other programs, will be used to develop recommended spent fuel dry-storage temperature limits in air. This report describes interim test results. The initial PNL investigations of nonirradiated and spent fuels identified the important testing variables as temperature, fuel burnup, radiolysis of the air, fuel microstructure, and moisture in the air. Based on these initial results, a more extensive statistically designed test matrix was developed to study the effects of temperature, burnup, and moisture on the oxidation behavior of spent fuel. Oxidation tests were initiated using both boiling-water reactor and pressurized-water reactor fuels from several different reactors with burnups from 8 to 34 GWd/MTU. A 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field was applied to the test ovens to simulate dry storage cask conditions. Nonirradiated fuel was included as a control. This report describes experimental results from the initial tests on both the spent and nonirradiated fuels and results to date on the tests in a 10/sup 5/ R/h gamma field. 33 refs., 51 figs., 6 tabs.

  3. Development of a remotely controlled testing platform with low-drag air-ventilated hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveev, Konstantin I.; Perry, Nicholaus I.; Mattson, Alexander W.; Chaney, Christopher S.

    2015-03-01

    This paper addresses the development and testing of a remotely controlled boat platform with an innovative air-ventilated hull. The application of air cavities on the underside of ship hulls is a promising means for reducing hydrodynamic drag and pollutant emissions and increasing marine transportation efficiency. Despite this concept's potential, design optimization and high-performance operation of novel air-cavity ships remain a challenging problem. Hull construction and sensor instrumentation of the model-scale air-cavity boat is described in the paper. The modular structure of the hull allows for easy modifications, and an electric propulsion unit enables self-propelled operation. The boat is controlled remotely via a radio transmission system. Results of initial tests are reported, including thrust, speed, and airflow rate in several loading conditions. The constructed platform can be used for optimizing air-cavity systems and testing other innovative hull designs. This system can be also developed into a high-performance unmanned boat.

  4. Development of a Smart Release Algorithm for Mid-Air Separation of Parachute Test Articles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, James W.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) project is currently developing an autonomous method to separate a capsule-shaped parachute test vehicle from an air-drop platform for use in the test program to develop and validate the parachute system for the Orion spacecraft. The CPAS project seeks to perform air-drop tests of an Orion-like boilerplate capsule. Delivery of the boilerplate capsule to the test condition has proven to be a critical and complicated task. In the current concept, the boilerplate vehicle is extracted from an aircraft on top of a Type V pallet and then separated from the pallet in mid-air. The attitude of the vehicles at separation is critical to avoiding re-contact and successfully deploying the boilerplate into a heatshield-down orientation. Neither the pallet nor the boilerplate has an active control system. However, the attitude of the mated vehicle as a function of time is somewhat predictable. CPAS engineers have designed an avionics system to monitor the attitude of the mated vehicle as it is extracted from the aircraft and command a release when the desired conditions are met. The algorithm includes contingency capabilities designed to release the test vehicle before undesirable orientations occur. The algorithm was verified with simulation and ground testing. The pre-flight development and testing is discussed and limitations of ground testing are noted. The CPAS project performed a series of three drop tests as a proof-of-concept of the release technique. These tests helped to refine the attitude instrumentation and software algorithm to be used on future tests. The drop tests are described in detail and the evolution of the release system with each test is described.

  5. Voice-coil-actuated air valve for use in compressor forced-response testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattern, Duane; Owen, A. Karl

    1995-05-01

    A 0-450 Hertz bandwidth, voice coil actuated, proportional sleeve valve is designed to modulate air mass flow by controlling the throat area of a choked flow. The valve was designed to deliver a mass flow of 0.072 kg/s with a maximum valve throat area of 41 mm2, a 689 kPA pressure difference across the valve, and 20 degree(s)C, air supply. The valve was developed with inexpensive, off-the-shelf components for use in ground-based forced response testing of compression systems. The design and operation of the valve are discussed and experimental test data of a prototype valve and air injector are compared to a mathematical model. Implementation of a set of eight of these valves in the compression system of a jet engine is discussed.

  6. ASME N511-19XX, Standard for periodic in-service testing of nuclear air treatment, heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    A draft version of the Standard is presented in this document. The Standard covers the requirements for periodic in-service testing of nuclear safety-related air treatment, heating, ventilating, and air conditioning systems in nuclear facilities. The Standard provides a basis for the development of test programs and does not include acceptance criteria, except in cases where the results of one test influence the performance of other tests. The Standard covers general inspection and test requirements, reference values, inspection and test requirements, generic tests, acceptance criteria, in-service test requirements, testing following an abnormal incident, corrective action requirements, and quality assurance. Mandatory appendices provide a visual inspection checklist and four test procedures. Non-mandatory appendices provide additional information and guidance on mounting frame pressure leak test procedure, corrective action, challenge gas substitute selection criteria, and test program development. 8 refs., 10 tabs.

  7. HIV Testing Practices among Men Who Have Sex with Men in Buenos Aires, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Balán, Iván C.; Dolezal, Curtis; Pando, María A.; Marone, Rubén; Barreda, Victoria; Ávila, María Mercedes

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore HIV-testing practices among MSM in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in light of current international health guidelines that recommend frequent HIV testing for MSM who engage in high-risk behavior. Participants, who were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), were 500 mostly young, non-gay-identified MSM of low socioeconomic status, high levels of unemployment, living mainly in the less affluent areas surrounding Buenos Aires, and lacking health insurance. They provided blood samples for HIV testing and responded to a Computer Assisted Self Interview. Fifty-two percent had never been tested for HIV, and 20% had been tested only once; 17% were found to be HIV infected, of whom almost half were unaware of their status. Main reasons for never having tested previously were: not feeling at risk, fear of finding out results, and not knowing where to get tested. Among those previously tested, men had been tested a median of 2 times with their most recent test having occurred a median of 2.7 years prior to study enrollment. Of those who had not tested positive before entering the study, only 41% returned for their results. HIV testing was infrequent and insufficient for early detection of infection, entry into treatment, and protection of sexual partners. This was particularly the case among non-gay-identified MSM. Testing campaigns should aim to help MSM become aware of their risk behavior, decrease fear of testing by explaining available treatment resources and decreasing the stigma associated with HIV, and by publicizing information about free and confidential testing locations. Rapid HIV testing should be made available to eliminate the need for a return visit and make results immediately available to individuals who are tested. PMID:23659314

  8. HIV testing practices among men who have sex with men in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carballo-Diéguez, Alex; Balán, Iván C; Dolezal, Curtis; Pando, María A; Marone, Rubén; Barreda, Victoria; Avila, María Mercedes

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the study was to explore HIV-testing practices among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in light of current international health guidelines that recommend frequent HIV testing for MSM who engage in high-risk behavior. Participants, who were recruited using respondent-driven sampling (RDS), were 500 mostly young, nongay-identified MSM of low socioeconomic status, high levels of unemployment, living mainly in the less-affluent areas surrounding Buenos Aires, and lacking health insurance. They provided blood samples for HIV testing and responded to a Computer Assisted Self Interview. Fifty-two percent had never been tested for HIV, and 20% had been tested only once; 17% were found to be HIV infected, of whom almost half were unaware of their status. Main reasons for never having tested previously were: not feeling at risk, fear of finding out results, and not knowing where to get tested. Among those previously tested, men had been tested a median of 2 times with their most recent test having occurred a median of 2.7 years prior to study enrollment. Of those who had not tested positive before entering the study, only 41% returned for their results. HIV testing was infrequent and insufficient for early detection of infection, entry into treatment, and protection of sexual partners. This was particularly the case among nongay-identified MSM. Testing campaigns should aim to help MSM become aware of their risk behavior, decrease fear of testing by explaining available treatment resources and decreasing the stigma associated with HIV, and by publicizing information about free and confidential testing locations. Rapid HIV testing should be made available to eliminate the need for a return visit and make results immediately available to individuals who are tested. PMID:23659314

  9. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  10. Trends in positive drug tests, United States Air Force, fiscal years 1997-1999.

    PubMed

    Grayson, J Kevin; Gibson, Roger L; Shanklin, Shari L; Neuhauser, Katerina M; McGhee, Charles

    2004-07-01

    We investigated the relationship between various demographic factors and the risk of testing positive for marijuana or cocaine use in the U.S. Air Force in fiscal years 1997 through 1999. Overall test positive rates for marijuana and cocaine were very low, at 0.24 and 0.07% of all tests, respectively. However, monthly test positive rates increased significantly during the study period while the number of tests conducted decreased by more than 50%. Gender, race/ethnicity, service component, military rank, education level, and assignment location each predicted the likelihood of testing positive for marijuana or cocaine use. These findings were consistent with annual surveys of self-reported drug use conducted in military and civilian populations in the United States. We conclude that overall testing percentages should be re-evaluated in light of these findings, but we do not recommend oversampling from population subgroups that demonstrated a higher likelihood of testing positive. PMID:15291178

  11. TESTING TRUCK-MOUNTED VACUUM AND AIR CONVEYOR SYSTEMS FOR OIL SPILL RECOVERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two different vacuum truck designs were evaluated for oil recovery performance at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Oil and Hazardous Materials Simulated Environmental Test Tank (OHMSETT) facility in September 1980. These were a Vactor Model 2045 air conveyor design made...

  12. 76 FR 34801 - Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Petition for Modification of Single Car Air Brake Test Procedures In accordance with Part 232 of Title 49 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), this document provides the public notice that by a document...

  13. 49 CFR 232.307 - Modification of the single car air brake test procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Modification of the single car air brake test procedures. 232.307 Section 232.307 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION BRAKE SYSTEM SAFETY STANDARDS FOR FREIGHT AND OTHER NON-PASSENGER TRAINS...

  14. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  15. Design of a test facility for gas-fired desiccant-based air conditioning systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh-Azar, A.A.; Steele, W.G.; Hodge, B.K.

    1996-12-31

    The design of a facility for testing desiccant-based air conditioning systems is presented. The determination of the performance parameters of desiccant systems is discussed including moisture removal capacity, latent and total cooling capacities, and efficiency indexes. The appropriate procedures and key measurements for determining these parameters are identified using uncertainty analysis.

  16. 76 FR 20536 - Protocol Gas Verification Program and Minimum Competency Requirements for Air Emission Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Part 75 RIN 2060-AQ06 Protocol Gas Verification Program and Minimum Competency Requirements for Air Emission Testing Correction In rule document 2011-6216 appearing on pages 17288-17325 in...

  17. 7 CFR 28.603 - Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedures for air flow tests of micronaire reading... micronaire reading. In determining in terms of micronaire readings, the fiber fineness and maturity, in... cotton in terms of micronaire reading on the curvilinear scale adopted in September 1950 by...

  18. DEVELOPMENT OF HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANT EMISSION FACTORS FROM STATE SOURCE TEST PROGRAMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study in which emission factors were evolved from test data obtained from several Air Quality Management Districts in California and from state environmental agencies in Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, and Texas. The emission factors were developed...

  19. Test Protocol for Room-to-Room Distribution of Outside Air by Residential Ventilation Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barley, C. D.; Anderson, R.; Hendron, B.; Hancock, E.

    2007-12-01

    This test and analysis protocol has been developed as a practical approach for measuring outside air distribution in homes. It has been used successfully in field tests and has led to significant insights on ventilation design issues. Performance advantages of more sophisticated ventilation systems over simpler, less-costly designs have been verified, and specific problems, such as airflow short-circuiting, have been identified.

  20. 76 FR 65616 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Residential Central Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-24

    ...The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE or the Department) proposed amendments to the DOE test procedure for residential central air conditioners and heat pumps in a June 2010 notice of proposed rulemaking (June 2010 NOPR) and in an April 2011 supplemental notice of proposed rulemaking (April 2011 SNOPR). The amendments proposed in this subsequent SNOPR would change the off-mode laboratory test......

  1. Acceptability testing of radioluminescent lights for VFR-night air taxi operations

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, G.A.

    1985-01-01

    Tritium-powered radioluminescent (RL) lights have been under development for remote, austere, and tactical airfield lighting applications. The State of Alaska has requested FAA approval for use of the technology as a safe alternative lighting system to meet the airfield lighting needs of air taxi operations and general aviation in the state. The tests described in this report were performed by PNL for the DOE Defense Byproducts Production and Utilization Program. These tests are a step toward gaining the required approvals.

  2. Extravehicular Activity/Air Traffic Control (EVA/ATC) test report. [communication links to the astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomaro, D. J.

    1982-01-01

    During extravehicular activity (EVA), communications between the EVA astronaut and the space shuttle orbiter are maintained by means of transceiver installed in the environmental support system backpack. Onboard the orbiter, a transceiver line replaceable unit and its associated equipment performs the task of providing a communications link to the astronaut in the extravehicular activity/air traffic control (EVA/ATC) mode. Results of the acceptance tests that performed on the system designed and fabricated for EVA/ATC testing are discussed.

  3. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type... shall not exceed 25 mm. (1 inch) of water-column height when the air flow into the...

  4. Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster decelerator subsystem - Air drop test vehicle/B-52 design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runkle, R. E.; Drobnik, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    The air drop development test program for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Recovery System required the design of a large drop test vehicle that would meet all the stringent requirements placed on it by structural loads, safety considerations, flight recovery system interfaces, and sequence. The drop test vehicle had to have the capability to test the drogue and the three main parachutes both separately and in the total flight deployment sequence and still be low-cost to fit in a low-budget development program. The design to test large ribbon parachutes to loads of 300,000 pounds required the detailed investigation and integration of several parameters such as carrier aircraft mechanical interface, drop test vehicle ground transportability, impact point ground penetration, salvageability, drop test vehicle intelligence, flight design hardware interfaces, and packaging fidelity.

  5. A SOLAS challenge: How can we test test feedback loops involving air-sea exchange?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebert, B. J.

    2004-12-01

    It is now well accepted that the Earth System links biological and physical processes in the water, on land, and in the air, creating countless feedback loops and dependencies that are at best difficult to quantify. One example of interest to SOLAS scientists is the suspension and long-range transport of dust from Asia, which may or may not interact with acidic air pollutants, that may increase the biological availability of iron, thereby increasing primary productivity in parts of the Pacific. This could increase DMS emissions and modify the radiative impact of Pacific clouds, affecting the climate and the hydrological system that limits the amount of dust lofted each year. Air-sea exchange is central to many such feedbacks: Variations in productivity in upwelling waters off Peru probably change DMS emissions and modify the stratocumulus clouds that blanket that region, thereby feeding back to productivity. The disparate time and space scales of the controlling processes make it difficult to observationally constrain such systems without the use of multi-year time-series and intensive multiplatform process studies. Unfortunately, much of the infrastructure for funding Earth science is poorly suited for supporting multidisciplinary research. For example, NSF's program managers are organized into disciplines and sub-disciplines, and rely on disciplinary reviewer communities that are protective of their slices of the funding pie. It is easy to find authors of strong, innovative, cross-disciplinary (yet unsuccessful) proposals who say they'll never try it again, because there is so little institutional support for interfacial research. Facility issues also complicate multidisciplinary projects, since there are usually several allocating groups that don't want to commit their ships, airplanes, or towers until the other groups have done so. The result is that there are very few examples of major interdisciplinary projects, even though IGBP core programs have articulated

  6. The calibration and flight test performance of the space shuttle orbiter air data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, A. S.; Mena, A. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle air data system (ADS) is used by the guidance, navigation and control system (GN&C) to guide the vehicle to a safe landing. In addition, postflight aerodynamic analysis requires a precise knowledge of flight conditions. Since the orbiter is essentially an unpowered vehicle, the conventional methods of obtaining the ADS calibration were not available; therefore, the calibration was derived using a unique and extensive wind tunnel test program. This test program included subsonic tests with a 0.36-scale orbiter model, transonic and supersonic tests with a smaller 0.2-scale model, and numerous ADS probe-alone tests. The wind tunnel calibration was further refined with subsonic results from the approach and landing test (ALT) program, thus producing the ADS calibration for the orbital flight test (OFT) program. The calibration of the Space Shuttle ADS and its performance during flight are discussed in this paper. A brief description of the system is followed by a discussion of the calibration methodology, and then by a review of the wind tunnel and flight test programs. Finally, the flight results are presented, including an evaluation of the system performance for on-board systems use and a description of the calibration refinements developed to provide the best possible air data for postflight analysis work.

  7. Initial testing of two DEMI (Driesbach Electromotive Inc. ) Model 4E zinc-air rechargeable cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hardin, J.E.; Martin, M.E.

    1989-10-23

    The purpose of this document is to report the results of INEL laboratory testing of two DEMI 4E Aerobic Power Battery Cells (collectively designated Pack 46 in INEL records). The 4E Aerobic Power Battery is a secondary battery developed privately by Driesbach Electromotive Inc. (DEMI). The battery employs zinc as the anode and a bifunctional air cathode. This testing was performed as the first phase of a cooperative agreement between INEL and DEMI leading to the construction and testing of electric vehicle-size cells, to be followed eventually by a battery pack. 3 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. MODE IDENTIFICATION OF AN ARCH DAM BY A DYNAMIC AIR-GUN TEST.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, Hsi-Ping; Fedock, Joseph J.; Fletcher, Jon B.

    1986-01-01

    Thirteen natural frequencies of a concrete arch dam (Monticello Dam near Sacramento, California) have been identified by using a dynamic testing method which employs an air gun firing in the reservoir as the excitation source. These vibrations modes are determined from the peak responses in the Fourier amplitude spectra of the free-vibration data recorded at three crest locations using three-component geophones. Comparisons of the first five natural frequencies with results obtained by forced vibration tests using rotating mass shakers show good agreement. The next eight higher-frequency modes, not previously identified, are determined from data of the present tests.

  9. Long life VA testing of welded steel specimens in air and in seawater with cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect

    Slind, T.

    1994-12-31

    Small scale welded T-joints made of 30 mm thick plate have been tested in air and in seawater with cathodic protection using a wide band offshore load spectrum (WASH). The seawater tests were carried out with a mean loading frequency of 0.25 Hz and a water temperature of 7 C. Identical SN curves are obtained for the two environments for fatigue lives up to 5 million cycles. The variable amplitude tests give average Palmgren-Miner sums below 1.0. A comparison of results obtained with a narrow band load spectrum shows no clear effect of the band width.

  10. Air Force Ni-H2 cell test program: State of Charge test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Bruce; Smellie, Douglas

    1995-01-01

    Nickel-Hydrogen cells are being cycled under a LEO (low earth orbit) test regime to examine the benefits of operating the cells at lower States of Charge (SOC) than typically used. A group of four cells are cycled using a voltage limiting charge regime that limits the State of Charge that the cells are allowed to reach. The test cells are then compared to identical cells being cycled at or near 100% State of Charge using a constant current charge regime.

  11. Plasma test on industrial diamond powder in hydrogen and air for fracture strength study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chary, Rohit Asuri Sudharshana

    Diamonds are the most precious material all over the world. Ever since their discovery, the desire for natural diamonds has been great; recently, the demand has steeply increased, leading to scarcity. For example, in 2010, diamonds worth $50 billion were marketed. This increased demand has led to discovering alternative sources to replace diamonds. The diamond, being the hardest material on earth, could be replaced with no other material except another diamond. Thus, the industrial or synthetic diamond was invented. Because of extreme hardness is one of diamond's properties, diamonds are used in cutting operations. The fracture strength of diamond is one of the crucial factors that determine its life time as a cutting tool. Glow discharge is one of the techniques used for plasma formation. The glow discharge process is conducted in a vacuum chamber by ionizing gas atoms. Ions penetrate into the atomic structure, ejecting a secondary electron. The objective of this study is to determine the change in fracture strength of industrial diamond powder before and after plasma treatment. This study focuses mainly on the change in crystal defects and crushing strength (CS) of industrial diamond powder after the penetration of hydrogen gas, air and hydrogen-air mixture ions into the sample powder. For this study, an industrial diamond powder sample of 100 carats weight, along with its average fracture strength value was received from Engis Corporation, Illinois. The sample was divided into parts, each weighing 10-12 carats. At the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), a plasma test was conducted on six sample parts for a total of 16 hours on each part. The three gas types mentioned above were used during plasma tests, with the pressure in vacuum chamber between 200 mTorr and 2 Torr. The plasma test on four sample parts was in the presence of hydrogen-air mixture. The first sample had chamber pressures between 200 mTorr and 400 mTorr. The remaining three samples had chamber

  12. [Correlation between results of the residency admission test and of pediatric certification test in Buenos Aires, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Juan Pablo; Hamui, Magali; Paganini, Agustina; Torres, Fernando A; Ossorio, María Fabiana; Eiguchi, Kumiko; Ferrero, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    In the city of Buenos Aires (CABA), pediatric residents enter the residency program after taking a unified admission test. After completion of the program and passing a final test, the Universidad de Buenos Aires (UBA) provides a professional certification. The objective of this study is to determine if the results obtained in the residency admission test (RAT) and those of the professional certification test (PCT) correlated. This is a cross-sectional study, that included all subjects who passed the pediatrics RAT in CABA in 2004-2009, and that attended the pediatric PCT of the UBA. The score for each subject in both tests was obtained and the corresponding correlation was calculated. Results were divided in quintiles, and the proportion of subjects who improved their position in the PCT with respect to the RAT was calculated. Data from 303 subjects was obtained. The RAT showed a median of 45.0 (over 60 maximum) (IC-range: 43.0-48.7), and the PCT showed a median of 6 points (over 10 max.)(IC-range: 6-8). A significative correlation between results in RAT and PCT was observed (r = 0.37, p < 0.001). Based on their position in the RAT, 43.8% of subjects improved their position in the PCT, without differences between residents attending pediatric and general hospitals (45.6 vs. 31.5%; p = 0.1). In the case of pediatric residents, results of the residency admission test correlate with those obtained in the professional certification test. PMID:27295703

  13. Validation of a Dumbbell Body Sway Test in Olympic Air Pistol Shooting

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Daniel; Zakynthinaki, Maria S.; Cordente, Carlos A.; Monroy Antón, Antonio; López Jiménez, David

    2014-01-01

    We present and validate a test able to provide reliable body sway measurements in air pistol shooting, without the use of a gun. 46 senior male pistol shooters who participated in Spanish air pistol championships participated in the study. Body sway data of two static bipodal balance tests have been compared: during the first test, shooting was simulated by use of a dumbbell, while during the second test the shooters own pistol was used. Both tests were performed the day previous to the competition, during the official training time and at the training stands to simulate competition conditions. The participantś performance was determined as the total score of 60 shots at competition. Apart from the commonly used variables that refer to movements of the shooters centre of pressure (COP), such as COP displacements on the X and Y axes, maximum and average COP velocities and total COP area, the present analysis also included variables that provide information regarding the axes of the COP ellipse (length and angle in respect to X). A strong statistically significant correlation between the two tests was found (with an interclass correlation varying between 0.59 and 0.92). A statistically significant inverse linear correlation was also found between performance and COP movements. The study concludes that dumbbell tests are perfectly valid for measuring body sway by simulating pistol shooting. PMID:24756067

  14. Validation of a dumbbell body sway test in olympic air pistol shooting.

    PubMed

    Mon, Daniel; Zakynthinaki, Maria S; Cordente, Carlos A; Monroy Antón, Antonio; López Jiménez, David

    2014-01-01

    We present and validate a test able to provide reliable body sway measurements in air pistol shooting, without the use of a gun. 46 senior male pistol shooters who participated in Spanish air pistol championships participated in the study. Body sway data of two static bipodal balance tests have been compared: during the first test, shooting was simulated by use of a dumbbell, while during the second test the shooters own pistol was used. Both tests were performed the day previous to the competition, during the official training time and at the training stands to simulate competition conditions. The participantś performance was determined as the total score of 60 shots at competition. Apart from the commonly used variables that refer to movements of the shooters centre of pressure (COP), such as COP displacements on the X and Y axes, maximum and average COP velocities and total COP area, the present analysis also included variables that provide information regarding the axes of the COP ellipse (length and angle in respect to X). A strong statistically significant correlation between the two tests was found (with an interclass correlation varying between 0.59 and 0.92). A statistically significant inverse linear correlation was also found between performance and COP movements. The study concludes that dumbbell tests are perfectly valid for measuring body sway by simulating pistol shooting. PMID:24756067

  15. Evaluation of malodor for automobile air conditioner evaporator by using laboratory-scale test cooling bench.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Kim, Sun Hwa; Jung, Young Rim; Kim, Man Goo

    2008-09-12

    As one of the measures to improve the environment in an automobile, malodor caused by the automobile air-conditioning system evaporator was evaluated and analyzed using laboratory-scale test cooling bench. The odor was simulated with an evaporator test cooling bench equipped with an airflow controller, air temperature and relative humidity controller. To simulate the same odor characteristics that occur from automobiles, one previously used automobile air conditioner evaporator associated with unpleasant odors was selected. The odor was evaluated by trained panels and collected with aluminum polyester bags. Collected samples were analyzed by thermal desorption into a cryotrap and subsequent gas chromatographic separation, followed by simultaneous olfactometry, flame ionization detector and identified by atomic emission detection and mass spectrometry. Compounds such as alcohols, aldehydes, and organic acids were identified as responsible odor-active compounds. Gas chromatography/flame ionization detection/olfactometry combined sensory method with instrumental analysis was very effective as an odor evaluation method in an automobile air-conditioning system evaporator. PMID:18701113

  16. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The...

  17. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The...

  18. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The...

  19. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH... test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. (a) The...

  20. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency...

  1. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency...

  2. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency...

  3. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency...

  4. 10 CFR 431.76 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial warm air furnaces. 431.76 Section 431.76 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial Warm Air Furnaces Test Procedures § 431.76 Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency...

  5. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  6. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  7. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  8. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  9. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  10. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  11. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  12. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  13. A comparison of measured and predicted test flow in an expansion tube with air and oxygen test gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaggard, K. V.; Goad, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Simultaneous time-resolved measurements of temperature, density, pitot pressure, and wall pressure in both air and O2 test gases were obtained in the Langley pilot model expansion tube. These tests show nonequilibrium chemical and vibrational relaxation significantly affect the test-flow condition. The use of an electromagnetic device to preopen the secondary diaphragm before the arrival of the primary shock wave resulted in an improvement in the agreement between the measured pitot pressure and the value inferred from measured density and interface velocity. Boundary-layer splitter plates used to reduce the wall boundary layer show that this disagreement in the measured and inferred pitot pressures is not a result of boundary-layer effects.

  14. Turbo test rig with hydroinertia air bearings for a palmtop gas turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shuji; Isomura, Kousuke; Togo, Shin-ichi; Esashi, Masayoshi

    2004-11-01

    This paper describes a turbo test rig to test the compressor of a palmtop gas turbine generator at low temperature (<100 °C). Impellers are 10 mm in diameter and have three-dimensional blades machined using a five-axis NC milling machine. Hydroinertia bearings are employed in both radial and axial directions. The performance of the compressor was measured at 50% (435 000 rpm) and 60% (530 000 rpm) of the rated rotational speed (870 000 rpm) by driving a turbine using compressed air at room temperature. The measured pressure ratio is lower than the predicted value. This could be mainly because impeller tip clearance was larger than the designed value. The measured adiabatic efficiency is unrealistically high due to heat dissipation from compressed air. During acceleration toward the rated rotational speed, a shaft crashed to the bearing at 566 000 rpm due to whirl. At that time, the whirl ratio was 8.

  15. A Flight Control System Architecture for the NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murch, Austin M.

    2008-01-01

    A flight control system architecture for the NASA AirSTAR infrastructure has been designed to address the challenges associated with safe and efficient flight testing of research control laws in adverse flight conditions. The AirSTAR flight control system provides a flexible framework that enables NASA Aviation Safety Program research objectives, and includes the ability to rapidly integrate and test research control laws, emulate component or sensor failures, inject automated control surface perturbations, and provide a baseline control law for comparison to research control laws and to increase operational efficiency. The current baseline control law uses an angle of attack command augmentation system for the pitch axis and simple stability augmentation for the roll and yaw axes.

  16. Indoor test for thermal performance evaluation of the Solaron (air) solar collector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The test procedure used and the results obtained from an evaluation test program, conducted to obtain thermal performance data on a Solaron double glazed air solar collector under simulated conditions in a solar simulator are described. A time constant test and incident angle modifier test were also conducted to determine the transient effect and the incident angle effect on the collector. These results and the results of the collector load test are also discussed. The Solaron collector absorber plate is made of 24-gage steel, the coating is baked-on black paint, the cover consists of two sheets of 1/8-inch low-iron tempered glass, and the insulation is one thickness of 3 5/8-inch fiberglass batting.

  17. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xenofos, George; Forbes, John; Farrow, John; Williams, Robert; Tyler, Tom; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2003-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a fill-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrUmentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors. The test rig provided steady and unsteady pressure data necessary to validate the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The rig also helped characterize the turbine blade loading conditions. Test and CFD analysis results are to be presented in another JANNAF paper.

  18. Comparison of aerodynamic data measured in air and Freon-12 wind-tunnel test mediums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental investigation was carried out to measure two dimensional static aerodynamic characteristics of a 65 sub l-213 airfoil in air and Freon-12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) test mediums at corresponding test conditions. The purpose of the tests was to compare measurements in the two test mediums and to evaluate reported methods of converting Freon-12 data to equivalent air values. The test article was a two dimensional wing instrumented to measure chordwise surface pressure distributions. The parameters considered were Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.0, angles of attack of zero deg and 1 deg, and Reynolds numbers based on model chord from 2,000,000 to 21,000,000. The agreement between data measured in the two test mediums is further improved by application of the transonic or area ratio similarity laws. Where flow conditions are characterized by surface shocks or stall, the effects of flow separation may not be identically reflected in the Freon-12 data, even when converted in accordance with existing similarity laws.

  19. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-01-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  20. Compliance testing of Consumat Silver Reclamation Incinerator Number 4, Offutt Air Force Base, Nebraska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, P.T.

    1989-07-01

    At the request of HQ SAC/SGPB compliance testing Consumeat Silver Reclamation Incinerator No. 4 (particulate emissions) was accomplished 26-28 Jan 89. Visible emissions were evaluated by the Nebraska Department of Environmental Control on-site observer. Results indicate the incinerator met the standard for visible emissions. The survey was to determine compliance with the emission standards as defined under Nebraska Air Pollution Control Rules and Regulations. Results indicate the incinerator met particulate standards.

  1. Phase 2: HGM air flow tests in support of HEX vane investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, G. B., Jr.; Steele, L. L.; Eisenhart, D. W.

    1993-07-01

    Following the start of SSME certification testing for the Pratt and Whitney Alternate Turbopump Development (ATD) High Pressure Oxidizer Turbopump (HPOTP), cracking of the leading edge of the inner HEX vane was experienced. The HEX vane, at the inlet of the oxidizer bowl in the Hot Gas Manifold (HGM), accepts the HPOTP turbine discharge flow and turns it toward the Gaseous Oxidizer Heat Exchanger (GOX HEX) coil. The cracking consistently initiated over a specific circumferential region of the hex vane, with other circumferential locations appearing with increased run time. Since cracking had not to date been seen with the baseline HPOTP, a fluid-structural interaction involving the ATD HPOTP turbine exit flowfield and the HEX inner vane was suspected. As part of NASA contract NAS8-36801, Pratt and Whitney conducted air flow tests of the ATD HPOTP turbine turnaround duct flowpath in the MSFC Phase 2 HGM air flow model. These tests included HEX vane strain gages and additional fluctuating pressure gages in the turnaround duct and HEX vane flowpath area. Three-dimensional flow probe measurements at two stations downstream of the turbine simulator exit plane were also made. Modifications to the HPOTP turbine simulator investigated the effects on turbine exit flow profile and velocity components, with the objective of reproducing flow conditions calculated for the actual ATD HPOTP hardware. Testing was done at the MSFC SSME Dynamic Fluid Air Flow (Dual-Leg) Facility, at air supply pressures between 50 and 250 psia. Combinations of turbine exit Mach number and pressure level were run to investigate the effect of flow regime. Information presented includes: (1) Descriptions of turbine simulator modifications to produce the desired flow environment; (2) Types and locations for instrumentation added to the flow model for improved diagnostic capability; (3) Evaluation of the effect of changes to the turbine simulator flowpath on the turbine exit flow environment; and (4

  2. Flight test of multi-pulses vertical laser propulsion in air breathing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Ming; Wu, Jie; Wang, Guangyu

    2013-05-01

    The air breathing vertical laser propulsion experiment refers to that in the air breathing mode the light craft under the irradiation of incident laser of vertical direction will turn pulse laser energy into the vertical propulsion thrust of the light craft and continue along the fixed rail upward propulsion flight. It is an important experiment to test the minimum single pulse energy, the optimization degree of light craft structure, and the characteristics of turning the laser energy into the thrust. The experiment is to be conducted dozens of meters in height away the ground generally. The article gives a detailed explanation of the whole process of the air breathing vertical propulsion test, including vertical propulsion light craft design, the connections design, the connections performance test, the frictional resistance detection and the whole process of movement performance test. A vertical propulsion tower was used to conduct the single pulse experiment and multi-pulse performance was predicted with a multiple-pulse thrust measuring system. The impulse coupling coefficient was estimated from fight height. Finally, through the experiments of air breathing vertical laser propulsion, the relation of the movement time and flight height was obtained. In the curve, the mean acceleration of the light craft can arrive to 6m/s2 in the first 20 pulses and the propulsion height can reach 3.5m in 1.12s. After 0.65s, the acceleration of the light craft decreased significantly. The results of the article lay the good foundation for the laser propulsion launch system verification.

  3. Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples

    SciTech Connect

    Metzger, R.L.; Jessop, B.H.; McDowell, B.L.

    1996-02-01

    A solubility testing method for several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS{reg_sign}) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of U{sub 3}O{sub 8}. Profiles developed for U{sub 3}O{sub 8} samples show good agreement with in vitro and in vivo tests performed by other investigators on samples from the same uranium mills.

  4. Experimental results of the QUENCH-16 bundle test on air ingress

    SciTech Connect

    Stuckert, J.; Steinbrueck, M.

    2012-07-01

    The out-of-pile bundle experiment QUENCH-16 on air ingress was conducted in the electrically heated 21-rod QUENCH facility at KIT in July 2011. It was performed in the frame of the EC supported LACOMECO program. The test scenario included the oxidation of the Zircaloy-4 claddings in air following a limited pre-oxidation in steam, and involved a long period of oxygen starvation to promote interaction with the nitrogen. The primary aim was to examine the influence of the formed oxide layer structure on bundle coolability and hydrogen release during the terminal flooding phase. QUENCH-16 was thus a companion test to the earlier air ingress experiment, QUENCH-10, which was performed with strongly pre-oxidized bundle. Unlike QUENCH-10, significant temperature escalation and intensive hydrogen release were observed during the reflood phase. Post-test investigations of bundle cross sections reveal residual nitride traces at various elevations. The external part of the oxide scale is of porous structure due to re-oxidation of nitrides during reflood. Relative thick internal oxide scales underneath this porous layer and residual nitrides were formed during reflood. At lower bundle elevations frozen partially oxidized melt was detected, relocated from upper elevations. (authors)

  5. The influence of intraocular pressure and air jet pressure on corneal contactless tonometry tests.

    PubMed

    Simonini, Irene; Pandolfi, Anna

    2016-05-01

    The air puff is a dynamic contactless tonometer test used in ophthalmology clinical practice to assess the biomechanical properties of the human cornea and the intraocular pressure due to the filling fluids of the eye. The test is controversial, since the dynamic response of the cornea is governed by the interaction of several factors which cannot be discerned within a single measurement. In this study we describe a numerical model of the air puff tests, and perform a parametric analysis on the major action parameters (jet pressure and intraocular pressure) to assess their relevance on the mechanical response of a patient-specific cornea. The particular cornea considered here has been treated with laser reprofiling to correct myopia, and the parametric study has been conducted on both the preoperative and postoperative geometries. The material properties of the cornea have been obtained by means of an identification procedure that compares the static biomechanical response of preoperative and postoperative corneas under the physiological IOP. The parametric study on the intraocular pressure suggests that the displacement of the cornea׳s apex can be a reliable indicator for tonometry, and the one on the air jet pressure predicts the outcomes of two or more distinct measurements on the same cornea, which can be used in inverse procedures to estimate the material properties of the tissue. PMID:26282384

  6. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Robert Grossman; Ronald Warren

    2008-06-01

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was operated as the nation's site for nuclear weapons testing. The release of man-made radionuclides from the NTS as a result of testing activities has been monitored since the first decade of atmospheric testing. After 1962, when nuclear tests were conducted only underground, the radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS was greatly reduced. After the 1992 moratorium on nuclear testing, radiation monitoring on the NTS focused on detecting airborne radionuclides which come from historically contaminated soils resuspended into the air (e.g., by winds) and tritium-contaminated soil moisture emitted to the air from soils through evapotranspiration. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This is the dose limit established for someone living off of the NTS from radionuclides emitted to air from the NTS. This limit does not include the radiation doses that members of the public may receive through the intake of radioactive particles unrelated to NTS activities, such as those that come from naturally occurring elements in the environment (e.g., naturally occurring radionuclides in soil or radon gas from the earth or natural building materials), or from other man-made sources (e.g., medical treatments). The NTS demonstrates compliance using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole

  7. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability.

  8. Preliminary results from dynamic model tests of an air cushion landing system.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leland, T. J. W.; Thompson, W. C.; Vohinger, D. S.

    1973-01-01

    Experimental study of the behavior of an air cushion landing system on 1:10 and 1:4-scale dynamic models of the CC-115 aircraft over a range of initial impact, on a smooth hard surface of fiberglass-coated plywood, on calm water, and on rough water with waves 5 ft high and 100 ft crest-to-crest wide. The performance was satisfactory with the 1:10 scale model on hard surfaces and calm water and was less certain, requiring more tests, on rough water, while substantial pitching oscillations were observed in tests on the 1:4 scale model.

  9. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies.

    PubMed

    Arunkumar, R; Hogancamp, Kristina U; Parsons, Michael S; Rogers, Donna M; Norton, Olin P; Nagel, Brian A; Alderman, Steven L; Waggoner, Charles A

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30 x 30 x 29 cm(3) nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5 to 12 standard m(3)/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150 degrees C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7 standard m(3)/min, high mass concentrations (approximately 25 mg/m(3)) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160 nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions. PMID

  10. High-efficiency particulate air filter test stand and aerosol generator for particle loading studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arunkumar, R.; Hogancamp, Kristina U.; Parsons, Michael S.; Rogers, Donna M.; Norton, Olin P.; Nagel, Brian A.; Alderman, Steven L.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2007-08-01

    This manuscript describes the design, characterization, and operational range of a test stand and high-output aerosol generator developed to evaluate the performance of 30×30×29cm3 nuclear grade high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters under variable, highly controlled conditions. The test stand system is operable at volumetric flow rates ranging from 1.5to12standardm3/min. Relative humidity levels are controllable from 5%-90% and the temperature of the aerosol stream is variable from ambient to 150°C. Test aerosols are produced through spray drying source material solutions that are introduced into a heated stainless steel evaporation chamber through an air-atomizing nozzle. Regulation of the particle size distribution of the aerosol challenge is achieved by varying source solution concentrations and through the use of a postgeneration cyclone. The aerosol generation system is unique in that it facilitates the testing of standard HEPA filters at and beyond rated media velocities by consistently providing, into a nominal flow of 7standardm3/min, high mass concentrations (˜25mg/m3) of dry aerosol streams having count mean diameters centered near the most penetrating particle size for HEPA filters (120-160nm). Aerosol streams that have been generated and characterized include those derived from various concentrations of KCl, NaCl, and sucrose solutions. Additionally, a water insoluble aerosol stream in which the solid component is predominantly iron (III) has been produced. Multiple ports are available on the test stand for making simultaneous aerosol measurements upstream and downstream of the test filter. Types of filter performance related studies that can be performed using this test stand system include filter lifetime studies, filtering efficiency testing, media velocity testing, evaluations under high mass loading and high humidity conditions, and determination of the downstream particle size distributions.

  11. Revision of testing criteria for air cleaning unit of renovated APR-1000 and APR-1400 NPPS.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung-Young

    2011-07-01

    Designing Air Cleaning Units (ACU) of an Engineered Safety Feature and normal atmosphere clean-up system at the renovated APR-1000 and APR-1400 NPP, and fuel cycle facilities in Korea, is required to meet the standards of ASME AG-1 (1997), ASME N509/N510 (1989) and KEPIC-MH (2001) to enhance the removal efficiency of aerosols and particulates from the effluents. The revised ACU testing criteria are allowed to use alternative challenge agents of the dioctyl phthalate and Refrigerant-11 for in situ testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and adsorption banks. The operability testing time of engineered safety feature (ESF) trains was changed from 10 h to 15 min. The activated carbon in adsorption banks should undergo laboratory tests at a temperature of 30 °C and relative humidity 95 %. The removal criteria of methyl iodide should be over 99.5 % for ESF and 99 % for normal systems. This paper provides the background of the changed criteria for designing and testing of the ACU system in nuclear facilities. PMID:21502294

  12. Design of a two dimensional planer pressurized air labyrinth seal test rig

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konicki, Joseph S.

    1993-12-01

    A two-dimensional planer labyrinth seal test rig was designed to operate with air supplied at 45 psig and temperatures up to 150 F. The rig operates with a manually specified test section pressure up to 30 psig yielding Mach numbers to 0.9 and gap Reynolds numbers to 100,000. The air flow rate through the seal will be controlled by setting inlet pressure and adjusting an outlet control valve. The test section measurements are 18 inches wide by 1.5 inches depth by 6 inches in length and provides for 10:1 large scale geometry seals to be used to facilitate measurements. Design maximum seal gap size is 0.15 inches. The test section has a glass viewing port to allow flow field measurement by non-intrusive means such as Laser Doppler Velocimeter (LDV) with seals containing up to 5 sealing knives. Measurements of pressure, temperature and flow fields can also be simultaneously measured by probes inserted in the seal itself, or mounted on the removable/replaceable top plate. Inlet flow is conditioned through the use of a dump diffuser incorporating screens, honeycombs, expansion and contraction portions. The inlet flow to the test section can be modified from uniform to various non-uniform conditions by employing profile generators such as screens and winglets. A detailed mechanical design has been conducted including stress analysis and seal flow rate predictions.

  13. Evaluation of ozone generation and indoor organic compounds removal by air cleaners based on chamber tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Kuo-Pin; Lee, Grace Whei-May; Hsieh, Ching-Pei; Lin, Chi-Chi

    2011-01-01

    Ozone can cause many health problems, including exacerbation of asthma, throat irritation, cough, chest ache, shortness of breath, and respiratory infections. Air cleaners are one of the sources of indoor ozone, and thus the evaluation of ozone generated by air cleaners is desired significant issue. Most evaluation methods proposed are based on chamber tests. However, the adsorption and desorption of ozone on the wall of test chamber and the deposition of ozone resulted from the surface reaction can influence the evaluation results. In this study, we developed a mass balance model that took the adsorption, desorption and deposition of ozone into consideration to evaluate the effective ozone emission rates of six selected air cleaners. The experiments were conducted in a stainless steel chamber with a volume of 11.3 m 3 at 25 °C and 60% relative humidity. The adsorption, desorption and deposition rate constants of ozone obtained by fitting the model to the experimental data were k a = 0.149 ± 0.052 m h -1, k d = 0.013 ± 0.007 h -1, and k r = 0.050 ± 0.020 h -1, respectively. The effective ozone emission rates of Air Cleaners No. 1, 2, and 3 ranged between 13,400-24,500 μg h -1, 7190-10,400 μg h -1, and 4880-6560 μg h -1, respectively, which were more stable than those of No.4, 5, and 6. The effective ozone emission rates of Air Cleaners No. 4, 5, and 6 increased with the time of operation which might be relevant to the decrease of ozone removal by the "aging" filter installed in these cleaners. The removal of toluene and formaldehyde by these six air cleaners were also evaluated and the clean air delivery rates (CADRs) of these two pollutants ranged from non-detectable to 0.42 ± 0.08 m 3 h -1, and from non-detectable to 0.75 ± 0.07 m 3 h -1, respectively. The CADRs showed an insignificant relationship with the effective ozone emission rates. Thus, the removal of toluene and formaldehyde might be resulted from the adsorption on the filters and the

  14. Proposal for a Vehicle Level Test Procedure to Measure Air Conditioning Fuel Use

    SciTech Connect

    Rugh, J. P.

    2010-04-01

    The air-conditioning (A/C) compressor load significantly impacts the fuel economy of conventional vehicles and the fuel use/range of plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV). A National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) vehicle performance analysis shows the operation of the air conditioner reduces the charge depletion range of a 40-mile range PHEV from 18% to 30% in a worst case hot environment. Designing for air conditioning electrical loads impacts PHEV and electric vehicle (EV) energy storage system size and cost. While automobile manufacturers have climate control procedures to assess A/C performance, and the U.S. EPA has the SCO3 drive cycle to measure indirect A/C emissions, there is no automotive industry consensus on a vehicle level A/C fuel use test procedure. With increasing attention on A/C fuel use due to increased regulatory activities and the development of PHEVs and EVs, a test procedure is needed to accurately assess the impact of climate control loads. A vehicle thermal soak period is recommended, with solar lamps that meet the SCO3 requirements or an alternative heating method such as portable electric heaters. After soaking, the vehicle is operated over repeated drive cycles or at a constant speed until steady-state cabin air temperature is attained. With this method, the cooldown and steady-state A/C fuel use are measured. This method can be run at either different ambient temperatures to provide data for the GREEN-MAC-LCCP model temperature bins or at a single representative ambient temperature. Vehicles with automatic climate systems are allowed to control as designed, while vehicles with manual climate systems are adjusted to approximate expected climate control settings. An A/C off test is also run for all drive profiles. This procedure measures approximate real-world A/C fuel use and assess the impact of thermal load reduction strategies.

  15. Treatability test of a stacked-tray air stripper for VOC in water

    SciTech Connect

    Pico, T., LLNL

    1998-04-01

    A common strategy for hydraulic containment and mass removal at VOC contaminated sites is `pump and treat (P&T)`. In P&T operations, contaminated ground water is pumped from wells, treated above ground, and discharged. Many P&T remediation systems at VOC sites rely on air stripping technology because VOCs are easily transferred to the vapor phase. In stacked-tray air strippers, contaminated water is aerated while it flows down through a series of trays. System operations at LLNL are strictly regulated by the California and federal Environmental Protection Agencies (Cal/EPA and EPA), the Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD), the California Regional Water Quality Control Board (RWQCB) and the Department of Toxic Substances Control (DTSC). These agencies set discharge limits, require performance monitoring, and assess penalties for non-compliance. National laboratories are also subject to scrutiny by the public and other government agencies. This extensive oversight makes it necessary to accurately predict field treatment performance at new extraction locations to ensure compliance with all requirements prior to facility activation. This paper presents treatability test results for a stacked- tray air stripper conducted at LLNL and compares them to the vendor`s modeling software results.

  16. Air-breathing aerospace plane development essential: Hypersonic propulsion flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1994-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric accelerators for low earth-to-orbit and return transportation. The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. It is proposed that near full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computational-design technology so that it can be used for designing this system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  17. Hypersonic propulsion flight tests as essential to air-breathing aerospace plane development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, U.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersonic air-breathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can fundamentally change transatmospheric acclerators for transportation from low Earth orbits (LEOs). The value and limitations of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. Near-full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing a prototype hypersonic propulsion system and for developing computation-design technology that can be used in designing that system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests. A road map for achieving these objectives is also presented.

  18. Testing cleanable/reuseable HEPA prefilters for mixed waste incinerator air pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, D.B.; Wong, A.; Walker, B.W.; Paul, J.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility (CIF) at the US DOE Savannah River Site is undergoing preoperational testing. The CIF is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes from site operations and clean-up activities. The technologies selected for use in the air pollution control system (APCS) were based on reviews of existing incinerators, air pollution control experience, and recommendations from consultants. This approach resulted in a facility design using experience from other operating hazardous/radioactive incinerators. In order to study the CIF APCS prior to operation, a 1/10 scale pilot facility, the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), was constructed and has been in operation since late 1994. Its mission is to demonstrate the design integrity of the CIF APCS and optimize equipment/instrument performance of the full scale production facility. Operation of the pilot facility has provided long-term performance data of integrated systems and critical facility components. This has reduced facility startup problems and helped ensure compliance with facility performance requirements. Technical support programs assist in assuring all stakeholders the CIF can properly treat combustible hazardous, mixed, and low-level radioactive wastes. High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters are used to remove hazardous and radioactive particulates from the exhaust gas strewn before being released into the atmosphere. The HEPA filter change-out frequency has been a potential issue and was the first technical issue to be studied at the OCTF. Tests were conducted to evaluate the performance of HEPA filters under different operating conditions. These tests included evaluating the impact on HEPA life of scrubber operating parameters and the type of HEPA prefilter used. This pilot-scale testing demonstrated satisfactory HEPA filter life when using cleanable metal prefilters and high flows of steam and water in the offgas scrubber. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Impact of air traffic emissions on airport air quality. Multi-scale modeling, test bed and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramaroson, R.; Vuillot, F.; Durand, Y.; Courbet, B.; Janin, F.; Copalle, A.; Guin, C.; Paux, E.; Vannier, F.; Talbaut, M.; Weill, M.

    2004-12-01

    Air traffic emissions are playing a significant role in airport air quality. Engine emissions contribute to the ozone and PM formation. There is an emergence of a need to develop advanced numerical tools and airport emission databases for air pollution studies. Field monitoring at airports necessary to support model assessment is still limited in time and space. The French ONERA AIRPUR project has focused on three objectives: emission inventories; dispersion models; field measurements. Results are presented and discussed in this paper. The ground spatial distribution of LTO emissions using realistic aircraft trajectories, aircraft-engine classification by ICAO, fuel flow methodology and diurnal variations of fleet number, is presented and discussed. Exhaust species time evolution is simulated using a chemical-dispersion model. Results show high emissions of NOx during LTO, and a maximum of CO and Hydrocarbons during taxi. Depending on seasons, the NOx lifetime is varying differently; lower concentration is calculated far away from LTO emissions. Longer-lived pollutants such as ozone are formed downstream and require the use of advanced dispersion models. For this reason, two interactive models coupling the micro and the regional scales are developed and used in this work. A 3D CFD model (CEDRE) simulates the flow characteristics around buildings and the dispersion of emissions. CEDRE boundary conditions are provided by the 3D nested dispersion model MEDIUM/MM5, which includes a surface boundary layer chemistry and calculates the concentration of pollutants from the local to the airport vicinities. The CFD results show a tracer accumulation calculated downstream beside terminals, consistent with observations at some mega-airports. Sensibility studies are conducted to highlight the impact of emissions on ozone formation with MEDIUM. Results show that longer-lived species are produced downstream, their concentration depending on NOx, aromatics and VOC released by

  20. Experience with a prototype of the Test Ban Treaty monitoring system for air-borne radioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Measday, David F.; Ho, Ernest C. Y.

    2004-01-01

    Monitoring of air-borne radioactivity has been tested on behalf of the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organization. A prototype system was installed at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC in April 1996 and has been operating successfully since then. The air is drawn through a glass-fibre filter for a period of 24 h. A cooling period eliminates products of 222Rn in the uranium series. A germanium detector then counts the γ-rays. Several anthropogenic nuclides such as 123I and 99mTc have been observed from local medical facilities. In addition many natural nuclides have been detected and the most abundant are the products of thoron viz 220Rn, which is in the thorium series. The 239 keV γ-ray from 212Pb has been studied to investigate the reason for significant fluctuations in its intensity. It was found that rain, wind, low temperature and maritime air all decrease the observed activity. A model was created which mimics the variation reasonably well.

  1. Design of an air ejector for boundary-layer bleed of an acoustically treated turbofan engine inlet during ground testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stakolich, E. G.

    1978-01-01

    An air ejector was designed and built to remove the boundary-layer air from the inlet a turbofan engine during an acoustic ground test program. This report describes; (1) how the ejector was sized; (2) how the ejector performed; and (3) the performance of a scale model ejector built and tested to verify the design. With proper acoustic insulation, the ejector was effective in reducing boundary layer thickness in the inlet of the turbofan engine while obtaining the desired acoustic test conditions.

  2. Solubility testing of actinides on breathing-zone and area air samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, Robert Lawrence

    The solubility of inhaled radionuclides in the human lung is an important characteristic of the compounds needed to perform internal dosimetry assessments for exposed workers. A solubility testing method for uranium and several common actinides has been developed with sufficient sensitivity to allow profiles to be determined from routine breathing zone and area air samples in the workplace. Air samples are covered with a clean filter to form a filter-sample-filter sandwich which is immersed in an extracellular lung serum simulant solution. The sample is moved to a fresh beaker of the lung fluid simulant each day for one week, and then weekly until the end of the 28 day test period. The soak solutions are wet ashed with nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide to destroy the organic components of the lung simulant solution prior to extraction of the nuclides of interest directly into an extractive scintillator for subsequent counting on a Photon-Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALSsp°ler ) spectrometer. Solvent extraction methods utilizing the extractive scintillators have been developed for the isotopes of uranium, plutonium, and curium. The procedures normally produce an isotopic recovery greater than 95% and have been used to develop solubility profiles from air samples with 40 pCi or less of Usb3Osb8. This makes it possible to characterize solubility profiles in every section of operating facilities where airborne nuclides are found using common breathing zone air samples. The new method was evaluated by analyzing uranium compounds from two uranium mills whose product had been previously analyzed by in vitro solubility testing in the laboratory and in vivo solubility testing in rodents. The new technique compared well with the in vivo rodent solubility profiles. The method was then used to evaluate the solubility profiles in all process sections of an operating in situ uranium plant using breathing zone and area air samples collected during routine

  3. Cloud Observation and Modeling Test Bed for Air Force Weather Applications: Overview and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nobis, T. E.

    2012-12-01

    Air Force Weather (AFW) has documented requirements for real-time cloud analysis and short range cloud forecasts to support DoD missions around the world. To meet these needs, AFW utilizes the Cloud Depiction and Forecast System (CDFS) II system to develop a hourly cloud analysis and short range forecast. The system creates cloud masks from 16 different satellite sources and optimally merges them to create the analysis. This analysis then forms the initialization field for a short range 'advective' based cloud forecast. Northrop Grumman Corp. has recently delivered a CDFS II based Cloud Model Test Bed. This system offers the ability to test several aspects of the CDFS II system including: the effect of adding and subtracting sources of cloud imagery, the effect of changing source and skill of required external data sources, and the impact of changing the cloud information merge process among the various sources. In addition, the test bed offers a capability to generate a robust cloud modeling baseline against which to measure progress of a next generation Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) based advanced data assimilation system. Finally, the test bed allows the development and testing of new cloud modeling validation techniques (and sources) to provide greater confidence in results generated from the test bed. This presentation will provide a basic overview of the CDFS II system and of the newly developed Test Bed and will include results from the first series of experiments conducted using the Test Bed.

  4. COPD and air travel: does hypoxia-altitude simulation testing predict in-flight respiratory symptoms?

    PubMed

    Edvardsen, Anne; Ryg, Morten; Akerø, Aina; Christensen, Carl Christian; Skjønsberg, Ole H

    2013-11-01

    The reduced pressure in an aircraft cabin may cause significant hypoxaemia and respiratory symptoms in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The current study evaluated whether there is a relationship between hypoxaemia obtained during hypoxia-altitude simulation testing (HAST), simulating an altitude of 2438 m, and the reporting of respiratory symptoms during air travel. 82 patients with moderate to very severe COPD answered an air travel questionnaire. Arterial oxygen tensions during HAST (PaO2HAST) in subjects with and without in-flight respiratory symptoms were compared. The same questionnaire was answered within 1 year after the HAST. Mean ± sd PaO2HAST was 6.3 ± 0.6 kPa and 62 (76%) of the patients had PaO2HAST <6.6 kPa. 38 (46%) patients had experienced respiratory symptoms during air travel. There was no difference in PaO2HAST in those with and those without in-flight respiratory symptoms (6.3 ± 0.7 kPa versus 6.3 ± 0.6 kPa, respectively; p=0.926). 54 (66%) patients travelled by air after the HAST, and patients equipped with supplemental oxygen (n = 23, 43%) reported less respiratory symptoms when flying with than those without such treatment (four (17%) versus 11 (48%) patients; p=0.039). In conclusion, no difference in PaO2HAST was found between COPD patients with and without respiratory symptoms during air travel. PMID:23258777

  5. Performance tests of air source heat pumps under frosting conditions. Quality of results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahlen, P.

    This report focuses on the analysis of uncertainties in research regarding air-source heat pumps. The principles recommended by the Western European Calibration Conference (WECC) are applied and the generated information is condensed in the form of uncertainty budgets. The ensuring discussion, and the Measurement Assurance Program that was applied during the research work are also relevant to general testing of cooling coils, e.g. for air source heat pumps. The general conclusion of the analysis is that the method of determining frost mass by continuous weighing and frost density by inference from pressure drop considerations, which is presented in the report, has the potential to produce results with an accuracy on a par with the best previously used techniques to investigate frosting and defrosting phenomena. Furthermore, the methodology has the distinct advantage of yielding online measuring possibilities and being much less time consuming than traditional techniques.

  6. Measuring Air-Water Interfacial Area via the Interfacial Partitioning Tracer Test Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouni, A.; Zhong, H.; Mainhagu, J.; Araujo, J. B.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are one method available for measuring air-water interfacial area (Aa-w). Two variations of the aqueous IPTT method are compared. One involves the standard approach comprising tracer injection under steady unsaturated-flow conditions with a uniform water-saturation distribution within the column. The other involves tracer injection under steady saturated-flowconditions in the presence of trapped residual air. Sodium dodecylbezenesulfonate (SDBS) and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA) were used as the partitioning andnonreactive tracers, respectively. A sandy soil with a median grain diameter of 0.234 mm was used as the porous medium. Initial water saturation, Sw,was approximately 80%. Water saturation was monitored gravimetrically during the experiments. The results of the experiments will be assessed and compared to those of prior studies.

  7. Acceleration of degradation by highly accelerated stress test and air-included highly accelerated stress test in crystalline silicon photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Soh; Tanahashi, Tadanori; Doi, Takuya; Masuda, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    We examined the effects of hyper-hygrothermal stresses with or without air on the degradation of crystalline silicon (c-Si) photovoltaic (PV) modules, to shorten the required duration of a conventional hygrothermal-stress test [i.e., the “damp heat (DH) stress test”, which is conducted at 85 °C/85% relative humidity for 1,000 h]. Interestingly, the encapsulant within a PV module becomes discolored under the air-included hygrothermal conditions achieved using DH stress test equipment and an air-included highly accelerated stress test (air-HAST) apparatus, but not under the air-excluded hygrothermal conditions realized using a highly accelerated stress test (HAST) machine. In contrast, the reduction in the output power of the PV module is accelerated irrespective of air inclusion in hyper-hygrothermal test atmosphere. From these findings, we conclude that the required duration of the DH stress test will at least be significantly shortened using air-HAST, but not HAST.

  8. Multiple Sensitivity Testing for Regional Air Quality Model in summer 2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Y.; Lee, P.; Pan, L.; Tong, D.; Kim, H. C.; Huang, M.; Wang, J.; McQueen, J.; Lu, C. H.; Artz, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NOAA Air Resources laboratory leads to improve the performance of the U.S. Air Quality Forecasting Capability (NAQFC). It is operational in NOAA National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) which focuses on predicting surface ozone and PM2.5. In order to improve its performance, we tested several approaches, including NOAA Environmental Modeling System Global Aerosol Component (NGAC) simulation derived ozone and aerosol lateral boundary conditions (LBC), bi-direction NH3 emission and HMS(Hazard Mapping System)-BlueSky emission with the latest U.S. EPA Community Multi-scale Air Quality model (CMAQ) version and the U.S EPA National Emission Inventory (NEI)-2011 anthropogenic emissions. The operational NAQFC uses static profiles for its lateral boundary condition (LBC), which does not impose severe issue for near-surface air quality prediction. However, its degraded performance for the upper layer (e.g. above 3km) is evident when comparing with aircraft measured ozone. NCEP's Global Forecast System (GFS) has tracer O3 prediction treated as 3-D prognostic variable (Moorthi and Iredell, 1998) after being initialized with Solar Backscatter Ultra Violet-2 (SBUV-2) satellite data. We applied that ozone LBC to the CMAQ's upper layers and yield more reasonable O3 prediction than that with static LBC comparing with the aircraft data in Discover-AQ Colorado campaign. NGAC's aerosol LBC also improved the PM2.5 prediction with more realistic background aerosols. The bi-direction NH3 emission used in CMAQ also help reduce the NH3 and nitrate under-prediction issue. During summer 2014, strong wildfires occurred in northwestern USA, and we used the US Forest Service's BlueSky fire emission with HMS fire counts to drive CMAQ and tested the difference of day-1 and day-2 fire emission estimation. Other related issues were also discussed.

  9. Heave-pitch-roll analysis and testing of air cushion landing systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boghani, A. B.; Captain, K. M.; Wormley, D. N.

    1978-01-01

    The analytical tools (analysis and computer simulation) needed to explain and predict the dynamic operation of air cushion landing systems (ACLS) is described. The following tasks were performed: the development of improved analytical models for the fan and the trunk; formulation of a heave pitch roll analysis for the complete ACLS; development of a general purpose computer simulation to evaluate landing and taxi performance of an ACLS equipped aircraft; and the verification and refinement of the analysis by comparison with test data obtained through lab testing of a prototype cushion. Demonstration of simulation capabilities through typical landing and taxi simulation of an ACLS aircraft are given. Initial results show that fan dynamics have a major effect on system performance. Comparison with lab test data (zero forward speed) indicates that the analysis can predict most of the key static and dynamic parameters (pressure, deflection, acceleration, etc.) within a margin of a 10 to 25 percent.

  10. Flight tests with a data link used for air traffic control information exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies showed that air traffic control (ATC) message exchange with a data link offers the potential benefits of increased airspace system safety and efficiency. To accomplish these benefits, data link can be used to reduce communication errors and relieve overloaded ATC voice radio frequencies, which hamper efficient message exchange during peak traffic periods. Flight tests with commercial airline pilots as test subjects were conducted in the NASA Transport Systems Research Vehicle Boeing 737 airplane to contrast flight operations that used current voice communications with flight operations that used data link to transmit both strategic and tactical ATC clearances during a typical commercial airflight from takeoff to landing. The results of these tests that used data link as the primary communication source with ATC showed flight crew acceptance, a perceived reduction in crew work load, and a reduction in crew communication errors.

  11. High-speed impact test of an air-transportable plutonium nitrate shipping container

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshimura, H.R.; Pope, R.B.; Leisher, W.B.; Joseph, B.J.

    1980-04-01

    To obtain information on package response for comparison with other test environments, a high-speed impact test was performed on a modified Federal Republic of Germany 18B plutonium nitrate air-transportable container. The container, modified with reinforcing rings for improved crush resistance around the inner tube assembly, was impacted at a velocity of 137 m/s onto an unyielding surface. Substantial crushing of the foam overpack and extensive deformation of the container cavity occurred, causing release of the liquid surrogate contents from the titanium shipping container. The container damage resulting from the high-speed pulldown test was more severe than that from a 185-m free fall onto a semirigid surface by a similar container or the crush environment produced by a 9-m drop of a 2-Mg block onto the container resting on an unyielding surface.

  12. A Semi-automated Commissioning Tool for VAV Air Handling Units:Functional Test Analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Haves, Philip; Kim, Moosung; Najafi, Massieh; Xu, Peng

    2007-01-01

    A software tool that automates the analysis of functional tests for air-handling units is described. The tool compares the performance observed during manual tests with the performance predicted by simple models of the components under test that are configured using design and of information catalog data. Significant differences between observed and expected performance indicate the presence faults. Fault diagnosis is performed by analyzing the variation of these differences with operating points using expert rules and fuzzy inferencing. The tool has a convenient user interface to facilitate manual entry of measurements made during a test. A graphical display compares the measured and expected performance, highlighting significant differences that indicate the presence of faults. The tool is designed to be used by commissioning providers conducting functional tests as part of either new building commissioning or retrocommissioning as well as by building owners and operators conducting routine tests to check the performance of their HVAC systems. This paper describes the input data requirements of the tool, the software structure, and the graphical interface and summarizes the development and testing process used.

  13. Investigation of water accumulation in an offgas test facility HEPA housing

    SciTech Connect

    Speed, D.L.; Burns, D.B.; Van Pelt, W.B.; Burns, H.H.

    1997-06-01

    The Consolidated Incineration Facility, at the Department of Energy`s Savannah River Site, is designed to treat solid and liquid RCRA hazardous and mixed wastes generated by site operations and clean-up activities. During CIF`s pretrial burn campaigns in 1995, an appreciable amount of water was recovered from the HEPA housings. Questions were immediately raised as to the source of the water, and the degree of wetness of the filters during operation. There are two primary issues involved: Water could reduce the life expectancy and performance of the HEPA filters, housing, and associated ducting, and wet HEPAs also present radiological concerns for personnel during filter change-out. A similar phenomenon was noted at the Offgas Components Test Facility (OCTF), a 1/10 scale pilot of CIF`s air pollution control system. Tests at OCTF indicated the water`s most likely origin to be vapor condensing out from the flue gas stream due to excessive air in-leakage at housing door seals, ducting flanges, and actual holes in the ducting. The rate of accumulation bears no statistical correlation to such process parameters as steam flow, reheater outlet temperature and offgas velocity in the duct. Test results also indicated that the HEPA filter media is moistened by the initial process flow while the facility is being brought on line. However, even when the HEPA filters were manually drenched prior to startup, they became completely dry within four hours of the time steam was introduced to the reheater. Finally, no demonstrable relationship was found between the degree of filter media wetness and filter dP.

  14. High-speed Tests of a Ducted Body with Various Air-outlet Openings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, John V.; Baals, Donald D.

    1942-01-01

    Test of a ducted body with Internal flow were made in the 8-foot high-speed wind tunnel for the purpose of studying the effects on external drag and an critical speed of the addition of efficient inlet and outlet openings to a basic streamline shape. Drag tests of a 13.6- inch-diameter streamline body of fineness ratio 6.14 were made at Mach numbers ranging from 0.20 to 0.75. The model was centrally mounted on a 9-percent-thick airfoil and was designed to have an efficient airfoil-body juncture and a high critical speed. An air inlet at the nose and various outlets at the tail were added: drag and internal-flow data were obtained over the given speed range. The critical speed of the ducted bodies was found to be as high as that of the streamline body. The external - drag with air flow through the body did not exceed the drag of the basic streamline shape. No appreciable variation in the efficiency of the diffuser section of the internal duct occurred throughout the Mach number range of the tests.

  15. Sampling of air streams and incorporation of samples in the Microtox{trademark} toxicity testing system

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinheinz, G.T.; St. John, W.P.

    1997-10-01

    A study was conducted to develop a rapid and reliable method for the collection and incorporation of biofiltration air samples containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into the Microtox toxicity testing system. To date, no method exists for this type of assay. A constant stream of VOCs was generated by air stripping compounds from a complex mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons (PHCs). Samples were collected on coconut charcoal ORBO tubes and the VOCs extracted with methylene chloride. The compounds extracted were then solvent exchanged into dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) under gaseous nitrogen. The resulting DMSO extract was directly incorporated into the Microtox toxicity testing system. In order to determine the efficiency of the solvent exchange, the VOCs in the DMSO extract were then extracted into hexane and subsequently analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) with a flame ionization detector (FID). It was determined that all but the most volatile VOCs could be effectively transferred from the ORBO tubes to DMSO for Microtox testing. Potential trace amounts of residual methylene chloride in the DMSO extracts showed no adverse effects in the Microtox system when compared to control samples.

  16. Collaborative Testing of Methods to Measure Air Pollutants, II. The Non-Dispersive Infrared Method for Carbon Monoxide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKee, Herbert C.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    The Methods Standardization Branch of the Environmental Protection Agency, National Environmental Research Center, has undertaken a program to standardize methods used in measuring air pollutants covered by the national primary and secondary air quality standards. This paper presents the results of a collective test of the method specified for…

  17. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  18. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  19. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  20. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  1. 42 CFR 84.1143 - Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter tests; performance requirements; general. 84.1143 Section 84.1143 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1143 Dust, fume, and mist air-purifying filter...

  2. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... conditioners at 10 CFR 430.32(b). 1. Definitions. 1.1“Active mode” means a mode in which the room air... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  3. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... conditioners at 10 CFR 430.32(b). 1. Definitions. 1.1“Active mode” means a mode in which the room air... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  4. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... conditioners at 10 CFR 430.32(b). 1. Definitions. 1.1 “Active mode” means a mode in which the room air... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY...

  5. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  6. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  7. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  8. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE... C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. (a) Inhalation resistance shall...

  9. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-Conditioning Electricity Savings from Standard Energy Conservation Measures, Radiant Barriers, and High-Efficiency Window Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.

    1992-01-01

    A field test involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMs) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The average measured pre-weatherization air-conditioning electricity consumption was 1664 kWh/year ($119/year). Ten percent of the houses used less than 250 kWh/year, while another 10% used more than 3000 kWh/year. An average reduction in air-conditioning electricity consumption of 535 kWh/year ($38/year and 28% of pre-weatherization consumption) was obtained from replacement of one low-efficiency window air conditioner (EER less than 7.0) per house with a high-efficiency unit (EER greater than 9.0). For approximately the same cost, savings tripled to 1503 kWh/year ($107/year and 41% of pre-weatherization consumption) in those houses with initial air-conditioning electricity consumption greater than 2750 kWh/year. For these houses, replacement of a low-efficiency air conditioner with a high-efficiency unit was cost effective using the incremental cost of installing a new unit now rather than later; the average installation cost for these houses under a weatherization program was estimated to be $786. The

  10. Design and cold-air test of single-stage uncooled turbine with high work output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffitt, T. P.; Szanca, E. M.; Whitney, W. J.; Behning, F. P.

    1980-01-01

    A solid version of a 50.8 cm single stage core turbine designed for high temperature was tested in cold air over a range of speed and pressure ratio. Design equivalent specific work was 76.84 J/g at an engine turbine tip speed of 579.1 m/sec. At design speed and pressure ratio, the total efficiency of the turbine was 88.6 percent, which is 0.6 point lower than the design value of 89.2 percent. The corresponding mass flow was 4.0 percent greater than design.

  11. Flight Tests of the DELICAT Airborne LIDAR System for Remote Clear Air Turbulence Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrancken, Patrick; Wirth, Martin; Ehret, Gerhard; Witschas, Benjamin; Veerman, Henk; Tump, Robert; Barny, Hervé; Rondeau, Philippe; Dolfi-Bouteyre, Agnès; Lombard, Laurent

    2016-06-01

    An important aeronautics application of lidar is the airborne remote detection of Clear Air Turbulence which cannot be performed with onboard radar. We report on a DLR-developed lidar system for the remote detection of such turbulent areas in the flight path of an aircraft. The lidar, consisting of a high-power UV laser transmitter and a direct detection system, was installed on a Dutch research aircraft. Flight tests executed in 2013 demonstrated the performance of the lidar system to detect local subtle variations in the molecular backscatter coefficient indicating the turbulence some 10 to 15 km ahead.

  12. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Unz, Ronald J.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m3/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  13. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Paxton K; Parsons, Michael S; Unz, Ronald J; Waggoner, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m(3)/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome. PMID:22667655

  14. Air Traffic Management Technology Demostration: 1 Research and Procedural Testing of Routes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Sara R.; Kibler, Jennifer L.; Hubbs, Clay E.; Smail, James W.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Air Traffic Management Technology Demonstration-1 (ATD-1) will operationally demonstrate the feasibility of efficient arrival operations combining ground-based and airborne NASA technologies. The ATD-1 integrated system consists of the Traffic Management Advisor with Terminal Metering which generates precise time-based schedules to the runway and merge points; Controller Managed Spacing decision support tools which provide controllers with speed advisories and other information needed to meet the schedule; and Flight deck-based Interval Management avionics and procedures which allow flight crews to adjust their speed to achieve precise relative spacing. Initial studies identified air-ground challenges related to the integration of these three scheduling and spacing technologies, and NASA's airborne spacing algorithm was modified to address some of these challenges. The Research and Procedural Testing of Routes human-in-the-loop experiment was then conducted to assess the performance of the new spacing algorithm. The results of this experiment indicate that the algorithm performed as designed, and the pilot participants found the airborne spacing concept, air-ground procedures, and crew interface to be acceptable. However, the researchers concluded that the data revealed issues with the frequency of speed changes and speed reversals.

  15. Evaluation of Burning Test Rate Method for Flammable Solids to Increase air-Cargo Safety.

    PubMed

    Lukežič, Marjan; Marinšek, Marjan; Faganeli, Jadran

    2010-03-01

    This paper deals with a standard classification procedure for readily combustible solids and their assignment to the relevant packing groups according to international air-cargo legislation and regulations. The current International Air Transport Association and United Nations Orange Book regulations were used on chemically similar substances: hexamethylenetetramine and Dancook ignition briquettes, which are both assigned into the same Packing Group III. To critically evaluate the degree of hazard both chemicals present, a standard burning test rate as well as thermogravimetry, differential scanning calorimetry and evolved gas analysis measurements were performed. It was shown that relatively small changes in the chemical composition of the material may have essential influence on the package group determination. Taking into account all the facts collected in the experimental work, it was concluded that ignition briquettes will undergo spontaneous combustion if exposed to elevated temperatures and, from this point of view, represent higher risk than hexamethylenetetramine during air transportation. Therefore, ignition briquettes should be classified into Packing Group II. PMID:24061664

  16. The Oklahoma Field Test: Air-conditioning electricity savings from standard energy conservation measures, radiant barriers, and high-efficiency window air conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Ternes, M.P.; Levins, W.P.

    1992-08-01

    A field test Involving 104 houses was performed in Tulsa, Oklahoma, to measure the air-conditioning electricity consumption of low-income houses equipped with window air conditioners, the reduction in this electricity consumption attributed to the installation of energy conservation measures (ECMS) as typically installed under the Oklahoma Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP), and the reduction achieved by the replacement of low-efficiency window air conditioners with high-efficiency units and the installation of attic radiant barriers. Air-conditioning electricity consumption and indoor temperature were monitored weekly during the pre-weatherization period (June to September 1988) and post-weatherization period (May to September 1989). House energy consumption models and regression analyses were used to normalize the air-conditioning electricity savings to average outdoor temperature conditions and the pre-weatherization indoor temperature of each house. The following conclusions were drawn from the study: (1) programs directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption should be targeted at clients with high consumption to improve cost effectiveness; (2) replacing low-efficiency air conditioners with high-efficiency units should be considered an option in a weatherization program directed at reducing air-conditioning electricity consumption; (3) ECMs currently being installed under the Oklahoma WAP (chosen based on effectiveness at reducing space-heating energy consumption) should continue to be justified based on their space-heating energy savings potential only; and (4) attic radiant barriers should not be included in the Oklahoma WAP if alternatives with verified savings are available or until further testing demonstrates energy savings or other benefits in this typo of housing.

  17. Study of the test method for prediction of air conditioning equipment seasonal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, S.B.

    1980-05-01

    The test procedure, Method of Testing, Rating and Estimating the Seasonal Performance of Central Air-Conditioners and Heat Pumps Operating in the Cooling Mode, has been analyzed. The analysis of the test procedure incorporated two main functions: (1) to determine the validity of the test procedure; and (2) to determine if there are other alternate methods of obtaining the same results with less testing burden. Data were collected from industry and analyzed for any significant trends. Certain conclusions are drawn about the energy efficiency ratios, degradation coefficients and seasonal energy efficiency ratios. An error analysis was performed on the test procedure to determine the approximate amount of error when using this procedure. A semi-empirical model assuming a first order system response was developed to determine the factors that affect the part-load and cooling-load factors. The corresponding transient characteristics are then determined in terms of a single time constant. A thermostat demand cycle is used to determine the relationship between on-time and cycle-time. Recommendations are made regarding an alternate method being used to determine the seasonal energy efficiency ratio.

  18. Liquid-Air Interface Corrosion Testing Simulating The Environment Of Hanford Double Shell Tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Gray, J. R.; Garcia-Diaz, B. L.; Murphy, T. H.; Hicks, K. R.

    2014-01-30

    Coupon tests on A537 carbon steel materials were conducted to evaluate the Liquid-Air Interface (LAI) corrosion susceptibility in a series of solutions designed to simulate conditions in the radioactive waste tanks located at the Hanford Nuclear Facility. The new stress corrosion cracking requirements and the impact of ammonia on LAI corrosion were the primary focus. The minimum R value (i.e., molar ratio of nitrite to nitrate) of 0.15 specified by the new stress corrosion cracking requirements was found to be insufficient to prevent pitting corrosion at the LAI. The pH of the test solutions was 10, which was actually less than the required pH 11 defined by the new requirements. These tests examined the effect of the variation of the pH due to hydroxide depletion at the liquid air interface. The pits from the current testing ranged from 0.001 to 0.008 inch in solutions with nitrate concentrations of 0.4 M and 2.0 M. The pitting and general attack that occurred progressed over the four-months. No significant pitting was observed, however, for a solution with a nitrate concentration of 4.5 M. The pitting depths observed in these partial immersion tests in unevaporated condensates ranged from 0.001 to 0.005 inch after 4 months. The deeper pits were in simulants with low R values. Simulants with R values of approximately 0.6 to 0.8 appeared to significantly reduce the degree of attack. Although, the ammonia did not completely eliminate attack at the LAI, the amount of corrosion in an extremely corrosive solution was significantly reduced. Only light general attack (< 1 mil) occurred on the coupon in the vicinity of the LAI. The concentration of ammonia (i.e., 50 ppm or 500 ppm) did not have a strong effect.

  19. Full scale field test of the in situ air stripping process at the Savannah River integrated demonstration test site

    SciTech Connect

    Looney, B.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Eddy, C.A.

    1991-06-29

    Under sponsorship from the US Department of Energy, technical personnel from the Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) and other DOE laboratories, universities and private industry have completed a full scale demonstration of environmental remediation using horizontal wells. This demonstration was performed as Phase I of an Integrated Demonstration Project designed to evaluate innovative remediation technologies for environmental restoration of sites contaminated with organic contaminants. The demonstration utilized two directionally drilled horizontal wells to deliver gases and extract contaminants from the subsurface. The resulting in situ air stripping process was designed to remediate soils and sediments above and below the water table as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The 139 day long test successfully removed volatile chlorinated solvents from the subsurface using the two horizontal wells. One well, approximately 300 ft (90m) long and 165 ft (50m) deep drilled below a contaminant plume in the groundwater, was used to inject air and strip the contaminants from the groundwater. A second horizontal well, approximately 175 ft (53m) long and 75 ft (23m) deep in the vadose zone, was used to extract residual contamination in the vadose zone along with the material purged from the groundwater. Pretest and posttest characterization data and monitoring data during the demonstration were collected to aid in interpretation of the test and to provide the information needed for future environmental restoration that employ directionally drilled wells as extraction or delivery systems. Contaminant concentration data and microbiological monitoring data are summarized in this report; the characterization data and geophysical monitoring data are documented in a series of related project reports.

  20. Hypoxia Stress Test Reveals Exaggerated Cardiovascular Effects in Hypertensive Rats after Exposure to the Air Pollutant Acrolein

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to air pollution increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially in susceptible populations with cardiovascular disease. Stress tests are useful in assessing cardiovascular risk and manifesting latent effects of exposure. The goal of this study w...

  1. Early Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) experience with Peripheral Vision Horizon Displays (PVHD)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schofield, B. L.

    1984-01-01

    Three separate Air Force Flight Test Center (AFFTC) tests were conducted in 1980 and 1981 on two models of the peripheral vision horizon displays (PVHD) (Malcolm Horizon). A fixed base simulator test was conducted with twenty test pilot subjects using the Flight Simulator Demonstration Model which incorporated a Helium Neon laser as the light bar medium. Two separate flight tests were conducted by the Test Pilot School classes 80A and 80B in a Twin Otter commuter aircraft using the Stage A Model PVHD. The Xenon lighted A Model was tested in its original configuration by class 80A. Class 80B used a modified configuration which incorporated an AFFTC designed and manufactured hood. With the hood, the PVHD projected a thinner, distinct light bar. Only a few general remarks concerning the tests and unrestricted, overall conclusions reached by the author are presented. The conclusions of all three AFFTC evaluations of the PVHD concept were that it has not yet been adequately evaluated. There seems to be a significant learning curve associated with the PVHD and the project pilots for Test Pilot School Class 80B only got a good start on the learning curve. A lengthy learning curve for the PVHD should be anticipated in view of the training period required for the attitude display indicator (ADI). This does seem to point out that the PVHD, in its present form, is simply not as compelling as the natural horizon. It can also be concluded that any attempt at a valid evaluation of the PVHD concept can be done only under instrument meteorological conditions (IMC) or validly simulated IMC conditions. The knee in the learning curve, however, may be reached without full IMC, although it may take much longer to reach.

  2. Wing-Nacelle-Propeller Tests - Comparative Tests of Liquid-Cooled and Air-Cooled Engine Nacelles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Donald H.

    1934-01-01

    This report gives the results of measurements of the lift, drag, and propeller characteristics of several wing and nacelle combinations with a tractor propeller. The nacelles were so located that the propeller was about 31% of the wing chord directly ahead of the leading edge of the wing, a position which earlier tests (NASA Report No. 415) had shown to be efficient. The nacelles were scale models of an NACA cowled nacelle for a radial air-cooled engine, a circular nacelle with the V-type engine located inside and the radiator for the cooling liquid located inside and the radiator for the type, and a nacelle shape simulating the housing which would be used for an extension shaft if the engine were located entirely within the wing. The propeller used in all cases was a 4-foot model of Navy No. 4412 adjustable metal propeller. The results of the tests indicate that, at the angles of attack corresponding to high speeds of flight, there is no marked advantage of one type of nacelle over the others as far as low drag is concerned, since the drag added by any of the nacelles in the particular location ahead of the wing is very small. The completely cowled nacelle for a radial air-cooled engine appears to have the highest drag, the liquid-cooled engine appears to have the highest drag, the liquid-cooled engine nacelle with external radiator slightly less drag. The liquid-cooled engine nacelle with radiator in the cowling hood has about half the drag of the cowled radial air-cooled engine nacelle. The extension-shaft housing shows practically no increase in drag over that of the wing alone. A large part of the drag of the liquid-cooled engine nacelle appears to be due to the external radiator. The maximum propulsive efficiency for a given propeller pitch setting is about 2% higher for the liquid-cooled engine nacelle with the radiator in the cowling hood than that for the other cowling arrangements.

  3. Nevada Test Site National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants Calendar Year 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Warren and Robert F. Grossman

    2009-06-30

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is operated by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office. From 1951 through 1992, the NTS was the continental testing location for U.S. nuclear weapons. The release of radionuclides from NTS activities has been monitored since the initiation of atmospheric testing. Limitation to under-ground detonations after 1962 greatly reduced radiation exposure to the public surrounding the NTS. After nuclear testing ended in 1992, NTS radiation monitoring focused on detecting airborne radionuclides from historically contaminated soils. These radionuclides are derived from re-suspension of soil (primarily by winds) and emission of tritium-contaminated soil moisture through evapotranspiration. Low amounts of tritium were also emitted to air at the North Las Vegas Facility (NLVF), an NTS support complex in the city of North Las Vegas. To protect the public from harmful levels of man-made radiation, the Clean Air Act, National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) (Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations [CFR] Part 61 Subpart H) (CFR, 2008a) limits the release of radioactivity from a U.S. Department of Energy facility (e.g., the NTS) to 10 millirem per year (mrem/yr) effective dose equivalent to any member of the public. This limit does not include radiation not related to NTS activities. Unrelated doses could come from naturally occurring radioactive elements or from other man-made sources such as medical treatments. The NTS demonstrates compliance with the NESHAP limit by using environmental measurements of radionuclide air concentrations at critical receptor locations. This method was approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for use on the NTS in 2001 and has been the sole method used since 2005. Six locations on the NTS have been established to act as critical receptor locations to demonstrate compliance with the NESHAP limit. These locations are actually pseudo

  4. Flight tests using data link for air traffic control and weather information exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, Charles E.; Scanlon, Charles H.

    1990-01-01

    Message exchange for air traffic control (ATC) purposes via data link offers the potential benefits of increasing the airspace system safety and efficiency. This is accomplished by reducing communication errors and relieving the overloaded ATC radio frequencies, which hamper efficient message exchanges during peak traffic periods in many busy terminal areas. However, the many uses and advantages of data link create additional questions concerning the interface among the human-users and the cockpit and ground systems. A flight test was conducted in the NASA Langley B-737 airplane to contrast flight operations using current voice communications with the use of data link for transmitting both strategic and tactical ATC clearances during a typical commercial airline flight from takeoff to landing. Commercial airplane pilots were used as test subjects.

  5. Field test of an air-to-ground communication link using a bare optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juarez, Juan C.; Dwivedi, Anurag; Sova, Raymond M.; Sluz, Joseph E.; Young, David W.

    2007-04-01

    Results of a field demonstration of an air-to-ground communication link using an airborne bare optical fiber are presented. The demonstration was conducted by the Johns Hopkins University, Applied Physics Laboratory at the TCOM, L.P. Test Facility in Elizabeth City, NC in May 2006 using a 38 m, tethered aerostat raised to an altitude of 2100 ft. A bare, single mode optical fiber attached between the aerostat and its mooring station was evaluated as an optical link for several hours. Wavelength Division Multiplexed channels operating in the 1550 nm band with data rates of 1 and 10 Gbps were tested to achieve error free data transfers. A separate, continuous wave channel was also multiplexed for performance monitoring. BER vs. link power measurements and eye diagrams will be analyzed for data transfer performance over the airborne bare optical fiber.

  6. Numerical analyses of a rocket engine turbine and comparison with air test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Ken; Chan, Daniel C.; Hudson, Susan T.; Gaddis, Stephen W.

    1992-01-01

    The study presents cold air test data on the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump turbine recently collected at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Overall performance data, static pressures on the first- and second-stage nozzles, and static pressures along with the gas path at the hub and tip are gathered and compared with various (1D, quasi-3D, and 3D viscous) analysis procedures. The results of each level of analysis are compared to test data to demonstrate the range of applicability for each step in the design process of a turbine. One-dimensional performance prediction, quasi-3D loading prediction, 3D wall pressure distribution prediction, and 3D viscous wall pressure distribution prediction are illustrated.

  7. Compressed air demand-type firefighter's breathing system, volume 1. [design analysis and performance tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. L.

    1975-01-01

    The commercial availability of lightweight high pressure compressed air vessels has resulted in a lightweight firefighter's breathing apparatus. The improved apparatus, and details of its design and development are described. The apparatus includes a compact harness assembly, a backplate mounted pressure reducer assembly, a lightweight bubble-type facemask with a mask mounted demand breathing regulator. Incorporated in the breathing regulator is exhalation valve, a purge valve and a whistle-type low pressure warning that sounds only during inhalation. The pressure reducer assembly includes two pressure reducers, an automatic transfer valve and a signaling device for the low pressure warning. Twenty systems were fabricated, tested, refined through an alternating development and test sequence, and extensively examined in a field evaluation program. Photographs of the apparatus are included.

  8. Numerical analyses of a rocket engine turbine and comparison with air test data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Ken; Chan, Daniel C.; Hudson, Susan T.; Gaddis, Stephen W.

    1992-06-01

    The study presents cold air test data on the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Turbopump turbine recently collected at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Overall performance data, static pressures on the first- and second-stage nozzles, and static pressures along with the gas path at the hub and tip are gathered and compared with various (1D, quasi-3D, and 3D viscous) analysis procedures. The results of each level of analysis are compared to test data to demonstrate the range of applicability for each step in the design process of a turbine. One-dimensional performance prediction, quasi-3D loading prediction, 3D wall pressure distribution prediction, and 3D viscous wall pressure distribution prediction are illustrated.

  9. Lateral spread of sonic boom measurements from US Air Force boomfile flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Downing, J. Micah

    1992-01-01

    A series of sonic boom flight tests were conducted by the US Air Force at Edwards AFB in 1987 with current supersonic DOD aircraft. These tests involved 43 flights by various aircraft at different Mach number and altitude combinations. The measured peak overpressures to predicted values as a function of lateral distance are compared. Some of the flights are combined into five groups because of the varying profiles and the limited number of sonic booms obtained during this study. The peak overpressures and the lateral distances are normalized with respect to the Carlson method predicted centerline overpressures and lateral cutoff distances, respectively, to facilitate comparisons between sonic boom data from similar flight profiles. It is demonstrated that the data agrees with sonic boom theory and previous studies and adds to the existing sonic boom database by including sonic boom signatures, tracking, and weather data in a digital format.

  10. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Shepherd, Seth D.

    2004-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  11. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.; Deyo, Charles R.; Longbottom, Jeff A.; White, Jason C.

    2005-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  12. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Grauvogel, Nathanael L.; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2006-05-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares, and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combine the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  13. Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Hank D., II; Blair, Tommy L.; Ensor, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator (AFEWES) Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, point-source flares and lamp- and LASER-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include missile seeker hardware mounted on a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. This paper will focus on recent developments and upgrades to the AFEWES IR capability. In particular, current developments in IR scene generation/projection and efforts to optically combining the IR image produced by a resistive array with existing foreground lamp sources.

  14. Air Force use of civil airworthiness criteria for testing and acceptance of military derivative transport aircraft

    SciTech Connect

    Marx, R.I.; Chapman, D.M.; Langley, M.J.; Fouts, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    A review of commercial aircraft programs and the use of FAA certification criteria in the acquisition of off-the-shelf transport aircraft by the USAF to fulfill its airlift requirements is presented. In addition, major differences between military and commercial test programs and acquisition are cited to illustrate the principal benefits to the Air Force of this method. Significantly reduced acquisition time, and reduced ground and flight testing and development costs are shown as benefits of this process. The unique aspects of certification of military derivatives, recent initiatives to codify the processes, and the impacts on changes required in the manner in which the USAF currently contracts for aircraft are discussed. 20 refs.

  15. Testing of Large Diameter Fresnel Optics for Space Based Observations of Extensive Air Showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H.; Christl, Mark J.; Young, Roy M.

    2011-01-01

    The JEM-EUSO mission will detect extensive air showers produced by extreme energy cosmic rays. It operates from the ISS looking down on Earth's night time atmosphere to detect the nitrogen fluorescence and Cherenkov produce by the charged particles in the EAS. The JEM-EUSO science objectives require a large field of view, sensitivity to energies below 50 EeV, and must fit within available ISS resources. The JEM-EUSO optic module uses three large diameter, thin plastic lenses with Fresnel surfaces to meet the instrument requirements. A bread-board model of the optic has been manufactured and has undergone preliminary tests. We report the results of optical performance tests and evaluate the present capability to manufacture these optical elements.

  16. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing of metal adhesively bonded joints using cellular polypropylene transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaal, Mate; Bartusch, Jürgen; Dohse, Elmar; Kreutzbruck, Marc; Amos, Jay

    2014-02-01

    Adhesively bonded aluminum components have been widely used in the aerospace industry for weight-efficient and damage-tolerant structures. Automated squirter jet immersion ultrasonic testing is a common inspection technique to assure the bond integrity of large, contoured assemblies. However, squirter jet inspection presents several limitations in scanning speed, related to water splash noise over protruding stiffeners and splash interference crosstalk in multi-channel inspection systems. Air-coupled ultrasonic testing has been evaluated as an alternative, possibly offering the benefits of increased throughput by enabling higher speeds, and eliminating the contamination concerns and maintenance issues of water couplant systems. Adhesive joints of multi-layer aluminum plates with artificial disbonds were inspected with novel air-coupled ultrasonic probes based on cellular polypropylene. Disbonds of various sizes were engineered in several multi-layer configurations and at various depths. Results were compared with squirter jet immersion and conventional piezoelectric transducer designs in terms of scan contrast, resolution and inspection time.

  17. Small-scale materials blast testing using gram-range explosives and air-shock loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargather, Michael; Settles, Gary

    2006-11-01

    Many material properties are unknown under the high strain rates of shock wave impulse from an explosion in air. Actual blast testing is required for this, but full-scale explosive tests are expensive and dangerous, and yield limited data. Here we explore the possibility that gram-range explosive charges can be used for such testing in an ordinary laboratory setting. The explosion is characterized by high-speed digital shadowgraphy and piezoelectric pressure records of shock speed and overpressure duration. These data yield an explosive impulse describing the strength of shock loading at various standoff distances from a material sample (typically 25cm diameter). Simultaneously, twin high-speed digital cameras and surface tracking software provide material displacement and strain rate data during the test. In principle, these data and the measured shock loading provide a means to find dynamic material properties by an inverse computational approach. A scaling analysis also relates the gram-range blast test to a large-scale blast from the same or a different explosive.

  18. Test Data of Flow Field of Shuttle SRM Nozzle Joint with Bond Defects, Using Unheated Air

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hair, Leroy M.; McAnally, James V.; Hengel, John E.

    1989-01-01

    The nozzle-to-case joint on the Shuttle SRM (as redesigned after the Challenger accident) features an adhesive sealant filling and bonding the joint, with a wiper O-ring to prevent the adhesive from reaching and disabling the closure O-ring. Flawless implementation of that joint design would ensure that hot, corrosive propellant combustion gases never reach the closure O-ring. However, understanding the flow field related to bonding defects is prudent. A comprehensive test program was conducted to quantify such flow fields and associated heating environments. A two-dimensional, full-scale model represented 65 inches of the nozzle joint, using unheated air as the test medium, in a blowdown mode. Geometry variations modeled RSRM assembly tolerances, and two types of bonding defects: pullaways and blowholes. A range of the magnitude of each type defect was tested. Also a range of operational parameters was tested, representative of the RSRM flow environment, including duplication of RSRM Mach and Reynolds numbers. Extensive instrumentation was provided to quantify pressures, heat rates, and velocities. The resulting data established that larger geometric defects cause larger pressure and larger heating, at the closure O-ring region. Velocity trends were not so straight-forward. Variations in assembly tolerances did not generally affect flow fields or heating. Operational parameters affected flow fields and heating as might be expected, increasing density or velocity increased heating. Complete details of this test effort are presented.

  19. Temperature and strain rate effects in high strength high conductivity copper alloys tested in air

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, D.J.

    1998-03-01

    The tensile properties of the three candidate alloys GlidCop{trademark} Al25, CuCrZr, and CuNiBe are known to be sensitive to the testing conditions such as strain rate and test temperature. This study was conducted on GlidCop Al25 (2 conditions) and Hycon 3HP (3 conditions) to ascertain the effect of test temperature and strain rate when tested in open air. The results show that the yield strength and elongation of the GlidCop Al25 alloys exhibit a strain rate dependence that increases with temperature. Both the GlidCop and the Hycon 3 HP exhibited an increase in strength as the strain rate increased, but the GlidCop alloys proved to be the most strain rate sensitive. The GlidCop failed in a ductile manner irrespective of the test conditions, however, their strength and uniform elongation decreased with increasing test temperature and the uniform elongation also decreased dramatically at the lower strain rates. The Hycon 3 HP alloys proved to be extremely sensitive to test temperature, rapidly losing their strength and ductility when the temperature increased above 250 C. As the test temperature increased and the strain rate decreased the fracture mode shifted from a ductile transgranular failure to a ductile intergranular failure with very localized ductility. This latter observation is based on the presence of dimples on the grain facets, indicating that some ductile deformation occurred near the grain boundaries. The material failed without any reduction in area at 450 C and 3.9 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} s{sup {minus}1}, and in several cases failed prematurely.

  20. Application of SOS umu-test for the detection of genotoxic volatile chemicals and air pollutants

    SciTech Connect

    Ong, T.M.; Stewart, J.; Wen, Y.F.; Whong, W.Z.

    1987-01-01

    The SOS umu-test has been used for the detection of DNA-damaging agents. In this system the plasmid pSK1002 carrying a fused gene umuC-lacZ was introduced into Salmonella typhimurium TA1535. The SOS function induced by genotoxic agents is detected by a colorimetric measurement of beta-galactosidase activity encoded by the lacZ gene, which is regulated by the Umu operon. This system was used with modifications to study the SOS function inducibility of volatile chemicals (propylene oxide, methyl bromide, and ethylene dibromide) and air pollutants (diesel emission, welding fumes, and cigarette smoke). Tester cells were exposed directly to the test material. The enzyme activity of the treated cells was measured according to the established procedure. Results of the study showed that all chemicals and pollutants tested induced SOS function in a dose-related manner. These results indicate that the SOS umu-test is potentially useful for the in situ detection of genotoxic agents in occupational settings.

  1. Advanced fuel hydrocarbon remediation national test location - in situ air sparging system (revised)

    SciTech Connect

    Health, J.; Lory, E.

    1997-03-01

    Air sparging is the process of injecting clean air directly into an aquifer for remediation of contaminated groundwater. For removing contaminants, air sparging relies on two basic mechanisms working either alone or in tandem: biodegradation and volatilization. The objective of air sparging is to force air through contaminated aquifer materials to provide oxygen for bioremediation and/or to strip contaminants out of the aquifer.

  2. Development and testing of meteorology and air dispersion models for Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. D.; Brown, M. J.; Cruz, X.; Sosa, G.; Streit, G.

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Instituto Mexicano del Petróleo are completing a joint study of options for improving air quality in Mexico City. We have modified a three-dimensional, prognostic, higher-order turbulence model for atmospheric circulation (HOTMAC) and a Monte Carlo dispersion and transport model (RAPTAD) to treat domains that include an urbanized area. We used the meteorological model to drive models which describe the photochemistry and air transport and dispersion. The photochemistry modeling is described in a separate paper. We tested the model against routine measurements and those of a major field program. During the field program, measurements included: (1) lidar measurements of aerosol transport and dispersion, (2) aircraft measurements of winds, turbulence, and chemical species aloft, (3) aircraft measurements of skin temperatures, and (4) Tethersonde measurements of winds and ozone. We modified the meteorological model to include provisions for time-varying synoptic-scale winds, adjustments for local wind effects, and detailed surface-coverage descriptions. We developed a new method to define mixing-layer heights based on model outputs. The meteorology and dispersion models were able to provide reasonable representations of the measurements and to define the sources of some of the major uncertainties in the model-measurement comparisons.

  3. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2001-08-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator Infrared Countermeasures (IRCM) lab currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares, and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9' X 3' cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and in the foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for proper spatial and intensity characteristics. All relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  4. Use of parabolic reflector to amplify in-air signals generated during impact-echo testing.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaowei; Zhu, Jinying; Tsai, Yi-Te; Haberman, Michael R

    2011-10-01

    The impact-echo method is a commonly used nondestructive testing technique for elastic plates in civil engineering. The impact-echo mode corresponds to the frequency at zero group velocity of S(1) Lamb mode. Recent development of the air-coupled impact-echo (ACIE) method introduces the possibility for rapid scanning of large structures and increases the practicality of in situ measurements. However, sensors used in ACIE are susceptible to ambient noise, which complicates in situ ACIE measurements. This letter presents the results of ACIE measurements taken using a parabolic reflector together with standard measurement microphones to increase the signal to noise ratio for ACIE measurements. The signal gain and effects of sensor location with respect to impact location are discussed. PMID:21974487

  5. Slow fatigue testing of titanium grade 29 in air and seawater

    SciTech Connect

    Atteraas, L.; Hersvik, G.; Solbakken, H.

    1999-07-01

    ASTM Grade 29 titanium has been fatigue tested in air and seawater at 110 C at a low frequency. The possible influence of seawater is completely masked by the fact that all the specimens of welded titanium, and most of the parent metal samples, had internal fracture initiations. Compared to the parent metal, the welded pipe specimens (5G orbital TIG) had a significantly lower fatigue life at the relatively high cyclic stress levels employed ({sigma}{sub max} = 0.85 {sigma}{sub y}). This is attributed to the presence of pores. Fractographic studies of failed weld metal specimens indicate that the fracture initiation takes place in the material immediately surrounding a pore, with an abrupt crack formation, marking the beginning of the crack growth phase. The duration of the crack initiation phase shows large variations, whereas the growth phase duration varies little.

  6. Photodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in passive air samplers: Field testing different deployment chambers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartkow, M.E.; Kennedy, K.E.; Huckins, J.N.; Holling, N.; Komarova, T.; Muller, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were loaded with deuterated anthracene and pyrene as performance reference compounds (PRCs) and deployed at a test site in four different chambers (open and closed box chamber, bowl chamber and cage chamber) for 29 days. The losses of PRCs and the uptake of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the ambient air were quantified. UV-B levels measured in each deployment chamber indicated that SPMDs would be exposed to the most UV-B in the cage chamber and open box chamber. Significantly less PAHs were quantified in SPMDs deployed in the cage chamber and open box chamber compared to samplers from the other two chambers, suggesting that photodegradation of PAHs had occurred. The loss of PRCs confirmed these results but also showed that photodegradation was occurring in the closed box chamber. The bowl chamber appears to provide the best protection from the influence of direct photodegradation. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. ENVIRONMENTAL REACTIVITY OF SOLID STATE HYDRIDE MATERIALS: MODELING AND TESTING FOR AIR AND WATER EXPOSURE

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, D.; James, C.; Cortes-Concepcion, J.; Tamburello, D.; Brinkman, K.; Gray, J.

    2010-05-18

    To make commercially acceptable condensed phase hydrogen storage systems, it is important to understand quantitatively the risks involved in using these materials. A rigorous set of environmental reactivity tests have been developed based on modified testing procedures codified by the United Nations for the transportation of dangerous goods. Potential hydrogen storage material, 2LiBH4{center_dot}MgH2 and NH3BH3, have been tested using these modified procedures to evaluate the relative risks of these materials coming in contact with the environment in hypothetical accident scenarios. It is apparent that an ignition event will only occur if both a flammable concentration of hydrogen and sufficient thermal energy were available to ignite the hydrogen gas mixture. In order to predict hydride behavior for hypothesized accident scenarios, an idealized finite element model was developed for dispersed hydride from a breached system. Empirical thermodynamic calculations based on precise calorimetric experiments were performed in order to quantify the energy and hydrogen release rates and to quantify the reaction products resulting from water and air exposure. Both thermal and compositional predictions were made with identification of potential ignition event scenarios.

  8. Air jet erosion test on plasma sprayed surface by varying erodent impingement pressure and impingement angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Ajit; Behera, Asit; Mishra, S. C.; Pani, S.; Parida, P.

    2015-02-01

    Fly-ash premixed with quartz and illmenite powder in different weight proportions are thermal sprayed on mild steel and copper substrates at various input power levels of the plasma torch ranging from 11 kW to 21 kW DC. The erosion test has done using Air Jet erosion test Reg (As per ASTM G76) with silica erodent typically 150-250 pm in size. Multiple tests were performed at increasing the time duration from 60 sec to 180 sec with increasing pressure (from 1 bar to 2.5 bar) and angle (60° & 90°). This study reveals that the impact velocity and impact angle are two most significant parameters among various factors influencing the wear rate of these coatings. The mechanisms and microstructural changes that arise during erosion wear are studied by using SEM. It is found that, when erodent are impacting the fresh un-eroded surface, material removal occurs by the continuous evolution of craters on the surface. Upper layer splats are removed out after 60 sec and second layer splat erosion starts. Based on these observations Physical models are developed. Some graphs plotted between mass loss-rate versus time period/impact Pressure/impact Angle gives good correlation with surface features observed.

  9. Dynamic stability test results on an 0.024 scale B-1 air vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beeman, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    Dynamic longitudinal and lateral-directional stability characteristics of the B-1 air vehicle were investigated in three wind tunnels at the Langley Research Center. The main rotary derivatives were obtained for an angle of attack range of -3 degrees to +16 degrees for a Mach number range of 0.2 to 2.16. Damping in roll data could not be obtained at the supersonic Mach numbers. The Langley 7 x 10 foot high speed tunnel, the 8 foot transonic pressure tunnel, and the 4 foot Unitary Plan wind tunnel were the test sites. An 0.024 scale light-weight model was used on a forced oscillation type balance. Test Reynolds number varied from 474,000/ft to 1,550,000/ft. through the Mach number range tested. The results showed that the dynamic stability characteristics of the model in pitch and roll were generally satisfactory up to an angle attack of about +6 degrees. In the wing sweep range from 15 to 25 degrees the positive damping levels in roll deteriorated rapidly above +2 degrees angle of attack. This reduction in roll damping is believed to be due to the onset of separation over the wing as stall is approached.

  10. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform...

  11. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test;...

  12. Space Station Freedom seal leakage rate analysis and testing summary: Air leaks in ambient versus vacuum exit conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodriguez, P. I.; Markovitch, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report is intended to reveal the apparent relationship of air seal leakage rates between 2 atmospheres (atm) to 1 atm and 1 atm to vacuum conditions. Gas dynamics analysis is provided as well as data summarizing the MSFC test report, 'Space Station Freedom (S.S. Freedom) Seal Flaw Study With Delta Pressure Leak Rate Comparison Test Report'.

  13. 10 CFR Appendix F to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Room Air Conditioners F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. F Appendix F to Subpart B of Part 430—Uniform...

  14. Comparison of EPA (Environmental Protection Agency) test house data with predictions of an indoor-air-quality model

    SciTech Connect

    Sparks, L.E.; Jackson, M.D.; Tichenor, B.A.

    1988-07-01

    An easy-to-use indoor-air-quality (IAQ) model is described. It is multi-compartmented and based on a well-mixed mixing model. Sources and sinks are allowed in each compartment. A menu-driven fill-in-the-form user interface controls program flow and is used to obtain data from the user. On-screen graphical output is provided. The model estimates the effects of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), air cleaning, room-to-room air movement, and natural ventilation on pollutant concentrations. Experiments conducted in the EPA test house using moth crystal cakes for model verification are described. The agreement between small chamber emission factors, model predictions, and test house data is very good. Predicted weight loss of the moth crystal cakes was within 5% of the measured weight loss. Predicted room concentrations of p-dichlorobenzene are within 20% of the measured values. Future directions for model development and experimental studies are discussed.

  15. Evaluation of sampling methods for toxicological testing of indoor air particulate matter.

    PubMed

    Tirkkonen, Jenni; Täubel, Martin; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Leppänen, Hanna; Lindsley, William G; Chen, Bean T; Hyvärinen, Anne; Huttunen, Kati

    2016-09-01

    There is a need for toxicity tests capable of recognizing indoor environments with compromised air quality, especially in the context of moisture damage. One of the key issues is sampling, which should both provide meaningful material for analyses and fulfill requirements imposed by practitioners using toxicity tests for health risk assessment. We aimed to evaluate different existing methods of sampling indoor particulate matter (PM) to develop a suitable sampling strategy for a toxicological assay. During three sampling campaigns in moisture-damaged and non-damaged school buildings, we evaluated one passive and three active sampling methods: the Settled Dust Box (SDB), the Button Aerosol Sampler, the Harvard Impactor and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Bioaerosol Cyclone Sampler. Mouse RAW264.7 macrophages were exposed to particle suspensions and cell metabolic activity (CMA), production of nitric oxide (NO) and tumor necrosis factor (TNFα) were determined after 24 h of exposure. The repeatability of the toxicological analyses was very good for all tested sampler types. Variability within the schools was found to be high especially between different classrooms in the moisture-damaged school. Passively collected settled dust and PM collected actively with the NIOSH Sampler (Stage 1) caused a clear response in exposed cells. The results suggested the higher relative immunotoxicological activity of dust from the moisture-damaged school. The NIOSH Sampler is a promising candidate for the collection of size-fractionated PM to be used in toxicity testing. The applicability of such sampling strategy in grading moisture damage severity in buildings needs to be developed further in a larger cohort of buildings. PMID:27569522

  16. Transfer of Air Force technical procurement bid set data to small businesses, using CALS and EDI: Test report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-08-15

    This report documents a test transfer of three Air Force technical procurement bid sets to one large and twelve small businesses, using the Department of Defense (DoD) Continuous Acquisition and Life-cycle Support (CALS) and ANSI ASC X12 Electronic Data Interchange (EDI) standards. The main goal of the test was to evaluate the effectiveness of using CALS technical data within the context of the DoD`s EDI-based standard approach to electronic commerce in procurement, with particular emphasis on receipt and use of the data by small contractors. Air Force procurement data was provided by the Sacramento Air Logistics Center at McClellan Air Force Base; the manufacturing participants were selected from among McClellan`s ``Blue Ribbon`` contractors, located throughout the US. The test was sponsored by the Air Force CALS Test Network, headquartered at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The test successfully demonstrated the technical feasibility of including CALS MIL-R-28002 (Raster) engineering data in an EDI Specification/Technical Information transaction set (ANSI ASC X12 841) when issuing electronic requests for quotation to small businesses. In many cases, the data was complete enough for the contractor participant to feel comfortable generating a quote. Lessons learned from the test are being fed back to the CALS and EDI standards organizations, and to future implementors of CALS-EDI based acquisition or contracting systems, which require the transfer of technical information, such as engineering data, manufacturing process data, quality test data, and other product or process data, in the form of a CALS or other digital datafile.

  17. A flight test design for studying airborne applications of air to ground duplex data link communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1988-01-01

    The Automatic En Route Air Traffic Control (AERA) and the Advanced Automated System (AAS) of the NAS plan, call for utilization of data links for such items as computer generated flight clearances, enroute minimum safe altitude warnings, sector probes, out of conformance check, automated flight services, and flow management of advisories. A major technical challenge remaining is the integration, flight testing, and validation of data link equipment and procedures in the aircraft cockpit. The flight test organizational chart, was designed to have the airplane side of data link experiments implemented in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) experimental Boeing 737 airplane. This design would enable investigations into implementation of data link equipment and pilot interface, operations, and procedures. The illustrated ground system consists of a work station with links to a national weather database and a data link transceiver system. The data link transceiver system could be a Mode-S transponder, ACARS, AVSAT, or another type of radio system such as the military type HF data link. The airborne system was designed so that a data link transceiver, workstation, and touch panel could be interfaced with an input output processor to the aircraft system bus and thus have communications access to other digital airplane systems.

  18. A flight test design for studying airborne applications of air to ground duplex data link communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scanlon, Charles H.

    1988-09-01

    The Automatic En Route Air Traffic Control (AERA) and the Advanced Automated System (AAS) of the NAS plan, call for utilization of data links for such items as computer generated flight clearances, enroute minimum safe altitude warnings, sector probes, out of conformance check, automated flight services, and flow management of advisories. A major technical challenge remaining is the integration, flight testing, and validation of data link equipment and procedures in the aircraft cockpit. The flight test organizational chart, was designed to have the airplane side of data link experiments implemented in the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) experimental Boeing 737 airplane. This design would enable investigations into implementation of data link equipment and pilot interface, operations, and procedures. The illustrated ground system consists of a work station with links to a national weather database and a data link transceiver system. The data link transceiver system could be a Mode-S transponder, ACARS, AVSAT, or another type of radio system such as the military type HF data link. The airborne system was designed so that a data link transceiver, workstation, and touch panel could be interfaced with an input output processor to the aircraft system bus and thus have communications access to other digital airplane systems.

  19. Experimental results and modeling tests of an adsorptive air-conditioning unit

    SciTech Connect

    Guilleminot, J.J.; Poyelle, F.; Meunier, F.

    1998-10-01

    Experimental tests have been performed on a zeolite-water adsorptive system suitable for air conditioning and consisting of two adsorbers filled with a consolidated composite made of zeolite mixed with a highly conductive matrix. This paper describes the experimental results of such a heat pump unit operating with a heat and mass recovery cycle. An important enhancement of the specific cooling power (SCP) has been achieved. At evaporating temperature T = 4 C, mass transfer resistance controls the process and limits the expected COP. Tests carried out at higher evaporating pressure make it possible to achieve the predicted COP and SCP. A predictive model developed and validated elsewhere in order to describe the temperature evolution of components and the heat and mass transfer in the adsorbers explains the mass transfer resistance in the adsorbent. Last, a new highly conductive adsorbent composite with good mass transfer properties is developed. The model is used to predict the performances of this new material. Very good SCP and COP can be achieved.

  20. Development and Testing of an Air Fluorescence Imaging System for the Detection of Radiological Contamination

    SciTech Connect

    Inrig, Elizabeth; Koslowsky, Vern; Andrews, Bob; Dick, Michael; Forget, Patrick; Ing, Harry; Hugron, Roger; Wong, Larry

    2011-12-13

    Detection of radionuclides emitting short-range radiation, such as {alpha} and low-energy {beta} particles, has always presented a challenge, particularly when such radionuclides are dispersed over a wide area. In this situation, conventional detection methods require the area of interest to be surveyed using a fragile probe at very close range--a slow, error-prone, and potentially dangerous process that may take many hours for a single room. The instrument under development uses a novel approach by imaging radiation-induced fluorescence in the air surrounding a contaminated area, rather than detecting the radiation directly. A robust and portable system has been designed and built that will allow contaminated areas to be rapidly detected and delineated. The detector incorporates position-sensitive photo-multiplier tubes, UV filters, a fast electronic shutter and an aspherical phase mask that significantly increases the depth-of-field. Preliminary tests have been conducted using sealed {sup 241}Am sources of varying activities and surface areas. The details of the instrument design will be described and the results of recent testing will be presented.

  1. Air Force electronic warfare evaluation simulator (AFEWES) infrared test and evaluation capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepherd, Seth D.

    2002-07-01

    The Air Force Electronic Warfare Evaluation Simulator IR Countermeasures test facility currently has the ability to simulate a complete IRCM test environment, including IR missiles in flight, aircraft in flight, and various IR countermeasures including maneuvers, LASERs, flares and lamp-based jammer systems. The simulations of IR missiles in flight include real missile seeker hardware mounted in a six degree-of-freedom flight simulation table. The simulations of aircraft signatures and IR countermeasures are accomplished by using up to eight xenon arc lamps, located in 9 inch X 3 inch cylindrical housings, in the presentation foreground. A mirror system keeps the high intensity IR sources in the missile field of view. Range closure is simulated in the background by zooming in on the scene and int eh foreground by separating and controlling the irises of the arc lamp sources for property spatial and intensity characteristics. Al relative motion and range closure is controlled by missile flyout software and aircraft flight-profile software models.

  2. A New Foil Air Bearing Test Rig for Use to 700 C and 70,000 rpm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Chris

    1997-01-01

    A new test rig has been developed for evaluating foil air bearings at high temperatures and speeds. These bearings are self acting hydrodynamic air bearings which have been successfully applied to a variety of turbomachinery operating up to 650 C. This unique test rig is capable of measuring bearing torque during start-up, shut-down and high speed operation. Load capacity and general performance characteristics, such as durability, can be measured at temperatures to 700 C and speeds to 70,000 rpm. This paper describes the new test rig and demonstrates its capabilities through the preliminary characterization of several bearings. The bearing performance data from this facility can be used to develop advanced turbomachinery incorporating high temperature oil-free air bearing technology.

  3. SMA actuated vertical deploy air dam: part 2 operation and test performance of prototype unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, Alan L.; Johnson, Nancy L.; Brown, Jeffrey

    2013-03-01

    Airflow over/under/around a vehicle can affect many important aspects of vehicle performance including vehicle drag (fuel economy) and cooling/heat exchange for the vehicle powertrain and A/C systems. Devices in current use to control airflow, with the exception of a few active spoilers, are of fixed geometry, orientation, and stiffness. Such devices can thus not be relocated, reoriented, etc. as driving conditions change and thus vehicle airflow cannot be adjusted to better suit the changed driving condition. Additionally, under-vehicle airflow control devices also reduce ground clearance presenting a challenge to designers to provide the needed control of airflow while maintaining sufficient ground clearance. The collaborative study, whose second part is documented in this paper, was successful in developing an SMA actuator based approach to reversibly deploying an air dam through vertical translation of its structure. Beyond feasibility, vehicle mounted prototype fully functional units demonstrated that this approach would add little weight to the existing stationary system, and could potentially perform well in the harsh under vehicle environment due to a lack of exposed bearings and pivots. This demonstration showed that actuation speed, force, and cyclic stability all could meet the application requirements. The solution, a dual point balanced actuation approach based on shape memory alloy wires, uses straight linear actuation to produce a reversible height change of 50 mm. On vehicle wind tunnel and onroad tests verified the potential for a reversibly deployable air dam to meet the otherwise conflicting goals of large ground clearance for off-road performance and optimum lower ground clearance for optimum fuel economy benefits.

  4. Environmental assessment for the depleted uranium testing program at the Nevada Test Site by the United States Army Ballistics Research Laboratory. [Open-Air Tests and X-Tunnel Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-11-24

    This proposed action provides the Department of Energy (DOE) authorization to the US Army to conduct a testing program using Depleted Uranium (DU) in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory (BRL) would be the managing agency for the program. The proposed action site would utilize existing facilities, and human activity would be confined to areas identified as having no tortoise activity. Two classifications of tests would be conducted under the testing program: (1) open-air tests, and (2) X-Tunnel tests. A series of investigative tests would be conducted to obtain information on DU use under the conditions of each classification. The open-air tests would include DU ammunition hazard classification and combat systems activity tests. Upon completion of each test or series of tests, the area would be decontaminated to meet requirements of DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. All contaminated materials would be decontaminated or disposed of as radioactive waste in an approved low-level Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) by personnel trained specifically for this purpose.

  5. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2012 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Miller, Julianne J

    2013-07-01

    In 1963, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), predecessor to the US Department of Energy (DOE), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range (NAFR)). Operation Roller Coaster consisted of four tests in which chemical explosions were detonated in the presence of nuclear devices to assess the dispersal of radionuclides and evaluate the effectiveness of storage structures to contain the ejected radionuclides. These tests resulted in dispersal of plutonium over the ground surface downwind of the test ground zero. Three tests, Clean Slate 1, 2, and 3, were conducted on the TTR in Cactus Flat; the fourth, Double Tracks, was conducted in Stonewall Flat on the NTTR. DOE is working to clean up and close all four sites. Substantial cleaned up has been accomplished at Double Tracks and Clean Slate 1. Cleanup of Clean Slate 2 and 3 is on the DOE planning horizon for some time in the next several years. The Desert Research Institute installed two monitoring stations, number 400 at the Sandia National Laboratories Range Operations Center and number 401 at Clean Slate 3, in 2008 and a third monitoring station, number 402 at Clean Slate 1, in 2011 to measure radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions. The primary objectives of the data collection and analysis effort are to (1) monitor the concentration of radiological parameters in dust particles suspended in air, (2) determine whether winds are re-distributing radionuclides or contaminated soil material, (3) evaluate the controlling meteorological conditions if wind transport is occurring, and (4) measure ancillary radiological, meteorological, and environmental parameters that might provide insight to the above assessments. The following observations are based on data collected during CY2012. The mean annual concentration of gross alpha and gross beta is highest at Station 400 and lowest at Station

  6. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring. CY2014 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Nikoloch, George; Shadel, Craig; Chapman, Jenny; Mizell, Steve A.; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J.

    2015-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during ongoing monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2014 monitoring are: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2014 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations; (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. Differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely the result of differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  7. Tonopah Test Range Air Monitoring: CY2013 Meteorological, Radiological, and Airborne Particulate Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Mizell, Steve A; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; McCurdy, Greg; Etyemezian, Vicken; Miller, Julianne J

    2014-10-01

    In 1963, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly the Atomic Energy Commission [AEC]), implemented Operation Roller Coaster on the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) and an adjacent area of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) (formerly the Nellis Air Force Range). This test resulted in radionuclide-contaminated soils at Clean Slate I, II, and III. This report documents observations made during on-going monitoring of radiological, meteorological, and dust conditions at stations installed adjacent to Clean Slate I and Clean Slate III and at the TTR Range Operations Control center. The primary objective of the monitoring effort is to determine if winds blowing across the Clean Slate sites are transporting particles of radionuclide-contaminated soils beyond both the physical and administrative boundaries of the sites. Results for the calendar year (CY) 2013 monitoring include: (1) the gross alpha and gross beta values from the monitoring stations are approximately equivalent to the highest values observed during the CY2012 reporting at the surrounding Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) stations (this was the latest documented data available at the time of this writing); (2) only naturally occurring radionuclides were identified in the gamma spectral analyses; (3) the ambient gamma radiation measurements indicate that the average annual gamma exposure is similar at all three monitoring stations and periodic intervals of increased gamma values appear to be associated with storm fronts passing through the area; and (4) the concentrations of both resuspended dust and saltated sand particles generally increase with increasing wind speed. However, differences in the observed dust concentrations are likely due to differences in the soil characteristics immediately adjacent to the monitoring stations. Neither the resuspended particulate radiological analyses nor the ambient gamma radiation measurements suggest wind transport of radionuclide-contaminated soils.

  8. Contamination mechanisms of air basin with tritium in venues of underground nuclear explosions at the former Semipalatinsk test site.

    PubMed

    Lyakhova, O N; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V; Tur, Y S

    2012-11-01

    During the period of testing from 1945 to 1962 at the territory of Semipalatinsk test site (STS) within the Degelen Mountains in tunnels, 209 underground nuclear explosions were produced. Many of the tunnels have seasonal water seepage in the form of streams, through which tritium migrates from the underground nuclear explosion (UNE) venues towards the surface. The issue of tritium contamination occupies a special place in the radioactive contamination of the environment. In this paper we assess the level and distribution of tritium in the atmospheric air of ecosystems with water seepage at tunnels № 176 and № 177, located on "Degelen" site. There has been presented general nature of tritium distribution in the atmosphere relative to surface of a watercourse which has been contaminated with tritium. The basic mechanisms were studied for tritium distribution in the air of studied ecosystems, namely, the distribution of tritium in the systems: water-atmosphere, tunnel air-atmosphere, soil water-atmosphere, vegetation-atmosphere. An analytical calculation of tritium concentration in the atmosphere by the concentration of tritium in water has been performed. There has experimentally obtained the dependence for predictive assessment of tritium concentrations in air as a function of tritium concentration in one of the inlet sources such as water, tunnel air, soil water, vegetation, etc.. The paper also describes the general nature of tritium distribution in the air in the area "Degelen". PMID:22672895

  9. Operational dead air space testing of the chemically protected DEPloyable MEDical Systems (cp DEPMEDS). Final report, Aug-Oct 91

    SciTech Connect

    Seitzinger, A.; Richardson, T.

    1992-07-01

    This report documents the results and findings of dead air space tests on the chemically protected deployable medical systems (DEPMEDS) conducted at Fort Indiantown Gap, PA. The DEPMEDS are composed of various size overpressurized chemically protected shelters connected by viaducts. Designed by the U.S. Army Natick Research, Development and Engineering Center (NATICK), the shelters provide a clean air conditioned atmosphere to treat wounded personnel in a chemical warfare environment. NATICK requested the U.S. Army Chemical Research, Development and Engineering Center's support to identify any dead air spaces, because these spaces would be a potential chemical agent vapor accumulation location, and threaten the collective protection of the shelters. Initially, a smoke generator was utilized to observe the air flow patterns within the DEPMEDS, and suspect dead air space locations were identified. However, subsequent dissemination of sulfur hexafluoride into the ventilation system of the shelter indicated that no dead air spaces were present. This report includes a few suggestions to improve the air circulation of the DEPMEDS, namely elimination of the interior shelter liners and using doors between the viaducts connecting the various shelters. Sulfur, Ventilation kinetics, Shelters, Collective protection, Hexafluoride, Chemical agent simulants.

  10. Development and testing of a portable wind sensitive directional air sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deyo, J.; Toma, J.; King, R. B.

    1975-01-01

    A portable wind sensitive directional air sampler was developed as part of an air pollution source identification system. The system is designed to identify sources of air pollution based on the directional collection of field air samples and their analysis for TSP and trace element characteristics. Sources can be identified by analyzing the data on the basis of pattern recognition concepts. The unit, designated Air Scout, receives wind direction signals from an associated wind vane. Air samples are collected on filter slides using a standard high volume air sampler drawing air through a porting arrangement which tracks the wind direction and permits collection of discrete samples. A preset timer controls the length of time each filter is in the sampling position. At the conclusion of the sampling period a new filter is automatically moved into sampling position displacing the previous filter to a storage compartment. Thus the Air Scout may be set up at a field location, loaded with up to 12 filter slides, and left to acquire air samples automatically, according to the wind, at any timer interval desired from 1 to 30 hours.

  11. Composition surveys of test gas produced by a hydrogen-oxygen-air burner. [for supersonic ramjet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggers, J. M.

    1974-01-01

    As a result of the need for a uniform hot gas test stream for fuel injector development for hydrogen fueled supersonic combustion ramjet engines, an experimental study of injector configuration effect on exit flow uniformity of a hydrogen fueled oxygen replenished, combustion burner was made. Measurements used to investigate the burner nozzle exit profiles were pitot and gas sample measurements. Gas composition and associated temperature profiles were reduced to an acceptable level by burner injector modifications. The effect of the injector modifications was to redistribute the hydrogen fuel, increase the air pressure drop, promote premixing of the oxygen and air, and establish a uniform flow pattern where the oxygen-air mixture comes into contact with the hydrogen fuel. The most sensitive phenomenon which affected the composition profiles was the uniformity of the air distribution supplied to the combustion chamber.

  12. Field validation of sound mitigation models and air pollutant emission testing in support of missile motor disposal activities.

    PubMed

    McFarland, Michael J; Palmer, Glenn R; Kordich, Micheal M; Pollet, Dean A; Jensen, James A; Lindsay, Mitchell H

    2005-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense approved activities conducted at the Utah Test and Training Range (UTTR) include both operational readiness test firing of intercontinental ballistic missile motors as well as the destruction of obsolete or otherwise unusable intercontinental ballistic missile motors through open burn/open detonation (OB/ OD). Within the Utah Division of Air Quality, these activities have been identified as having the potential to generate unacceptable noise levels, as well as significant amounts of hazardous air pollutants. Hill Air Force Base, UT, has completed a series of field tests at the UTTR in which sound-monitoring surveillance of OB/OD activities was conducted to validate the Sound Intensity Prediction System (SIPS) model. Using results generated by the SIPS model to support the decision to detonate, the UTTR successfully disposed of missile motors having an aggregate net explosive weight (NEW) of 56,500 lbs without generating adverse noise levels within populated areas. These results suggest that, under appropriate conditions, missile motors of even larger NEW may be detonated without exceeding regulatory noise limits. In conjunction with collecting noise monitoring data, air quality data was collected to support the development of air emission factors for both static missile motor firings and OB/OD activities. Through the installation of 15 ground-based air samplers, the generation of combustion fixed gases, hazardous air pollutants, and chlorides were monitored during the 56,500-lb NEW detonation event. Comparison of field measurements to predictions generated from the U.S. Navy's energetic combustion pollutant formation model, POLU4WN, indicated that, as the detonation fireball expanded from ground zero, organic compounds as well as carbon monoxide continued to oxidize as the hot gases reacted with ambient air. Hazardous air pollutant analysis of air samplers confirmed the presence of chloromethane, benzene, toluene, 1,2-propadiene, and

  13. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  14. Studies with the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method - Effect of air flow and effect of fabric dye

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Lopez, M. T.

    1976-01-01

    One sample each of commercial polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams were evaluated using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method. Air flow rates of 0, 0.16, 16, and 48 ml/sec were used to determine the effect of air flow on relative toxicity. Time to first sign of incapacitation and time to death were substantially reduced with both polyurethane and polychloroprene flexible foams by the introduction of 16 to 48 ml/sec air flow. The relative toxicity rankings of these materials were not altered by changes in air flow. Under these test conditions, the polyurethane foam consistently appeared more toxic than the polychloroprene foam. Samples of six different colors from the same fabric were evaluated separately, using the USF/NASA toxicity screening test method, to determine the effect of fabric dye, if any. The material was an upholstery fabric, consisting of 46 percent cotton, 33 percent wool, and 21 percent nylon. There appeared to be no significant effect of fabric dye on relative toxicity, for this material under these test conditions.

  15. 42 CFR 84.156 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, demand class; minimum requirements. 84.156 Section 84.156 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  16. 42 CFR 84.157 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, pressure-demand class; minimum requirements. 84.157 Section 84.157 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY...

  17. 76 FR 45011 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Proposed Emission Standards and Test...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... comment includes information claimed to be Confidential Business Information (CBI) or other information... Procedures for Aircraft;'' Final Rule, 38 FR 19088, July 17, 1973. \\12\\ U.S. EPA, ``Control of Air Pollution from Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures;'' Final Rule, 62 FR...

  18. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  19. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  20. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  1. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  2. 42 CFR 84.159 - Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests for gases and vapors; supplied-air respirators; general performance requirements. 84.159 Section 84.159 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE...

  3. 24 CFR 3280.406 - Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Air chamber test method for certification and qualification of formaldehyde emission levels. 3280.406 Section 3280.406 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING...

  4. VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS FROM LATEX PAINT-PART 2. TEST HOUSE STUDIES AND INDOOR AIR QUALITY (IAQ) MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Emission models developed using small chamber data were combined with an Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) model to analyze the impact of volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from latex paint on indoor environments. Test house experiments were conducted to verify the IAQ model's pred...

  5. 77 FR 65823 - Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY 40 CFR Parts 87 RIN 2060-AO70 Control of Air Pollution From Aircraft and Aircraft Engines; Emission Standards and Test Procedures Correction In rule document 2012-13828 appearing on pages...

  6. Environmental assessment, aircraft chemical warfare survivability test program, Naval Air Warfare Center, Aircraft Division, Patuxent River, Maryland

    SciTech Connect

    1992-02-01

    The proposed project, the Aircraft Chemical Warfare Survivability Test Program at Patuxent River Naval Air Station, involves the testing and development of aircraft systems and operating procedures for use in an environment contaminated with chemical/biological warfare agents. The tests will be performed in accordance with a directive from the chief of Naval Operations to obtain and maintain the capability to operate in a chemically-contaminated environment. These tests will be performed under outdoor, warm-weather conditions on a dredge disposal area and adjacent runways to simulate the conditions under which a real-life threat would be encountered.

  7. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for...

  8. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for...

  9. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for...

  10. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for...

  11. 42 CFR 84.254 - Powered air-purifying respirators; requirements and tests.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... air-purifying respirators prescribed in subpart L of this part are applicable to vinyl chloride... use with powered air-purifying respirators for entry into and escape from vinyl chloride atmospheres... of 25 ppm vinyl chloride monomer at a total flow rate of 115 liters per minute for...

  12. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the intake air. Where: Ps = dry atmospheric pressure (kPa) Ta = intake air temperature (°C) (ii) The...) The parameter for the laboratory atmospheric factor, fa, shall be: 0.98≤fa≤1.02; (A) The equation...

  13. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the intake air. Where: Ps = dry atmospheric pressure (kPa) Ta = intake air temperature (°C) (ii) The...) The parameter for the laboratory atmospheric factor, fa, shall be: 0.98≤fa≤1.02; (A) The equation...

  14. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the intake air. Where: Ps = dry atmospheric pressure (kPa) Ta = intake air temperature (°C) (ii) The...) The parameter for the laboratory atmospheric factor, fa, shall be: 0.98≤fa≤1.02; (A) The equation...

  15. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the intake air. Where: Ps = dry atmospheric pressure (kPa) Ta = intake air temperature (°C) (ii) The...) The parameter for the laboratory atmospheric factor, fa, shall be: 0.98≤fa≤1.02; (A) The equation...

  16. 30 CFR 7.87 - Test to determine the maximum fuel-air ratio.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the intake air. Where: Ps = dry atmospheric pressure (kPa) Ta = intake air temperature (°C) (ii) The...) The parameter for the laboratory atmospheric factor, fa, shall be: 0.98≤fa≤1.02; (A) The equation...

  17. 76 FR 19913 - Compliance Testing Procedures: Correction Factor for Room Air Conditioners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... contained in the petition. (75 FR 72739, Nov. 26, 2010). In addition to a comment from AHAM reiterating... that as atmospheric pressure drops, so does the air density and, therefore, the mass of air in a room. As atmospheric pressure drops, the efficiency of a unit would also drop because there would be...

  18. Testing Selected Behaviors to Reduce Indoor Air Pollution Exposure in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, B. R.; Mathee, A.; Krieger, L.; Shafritz, L.; Favin, M.; Sherburne, L.

    2004-01-01

    Indoor air pollution is responsible for the deaths and illness of millions of young children in developing countries. This study investigated the acceptability (willingness to try) and feasibility (ability to perform) of four indoor air pollution reduction behaviors (improve stove maintenance practices, child location practices, ventilation…

  19. 40 CFR 86.165-12 - Air conditioning idle test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle.... If engine stalling occurs during cycle operation, follow the provisions of § 86.136-90 to restart the... be controlled to an average of 50 ± 5 grains of water/pound of dry air. (2) Ambient air...

  20. 40 CFR 86.165-12 - Air conditioning idle test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle.... If engine stalling occurs during cycle operation, follow the provisions of § 86.136-90 to restart the... be controlled to an average of 40-60 grains of water/pound of dry air. (2) Ambient air...

  1. 40 CFR 86.165-12 - Air conditioning idle test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle.... If engine stalling occurs during cycle operation, follow the provisions of § 86.136-90 to restart the... be controlled to an average of 40-60 grains of water/pound of dry air. (2) Ambient air...

  2. 40 CFR 86.165-12 - Air conditioning idle test procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles and New Light-Duty Trucks and New Otto-Cycle.... If engine stalling occurs during cycle operation, follow the provisions of § 86.136-90 to restart the... be controlled to an average of 50 ± 5 grains of water/pound of dry air. (2) Ambient air...

  3. Mapping Water Vapor Bands using AIRS Measurements for NPOESS/NPP VIIRS Pre-launch End-to-End Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, J. J.; Hao, X.; Hauss, B.; Wang, C.; Xiong, J.

    2005-12-01

    NPOESS/NPP pre-launch end to end testing is very important for establishing the long-term high quality Environmental Data Records (EDRs). In our early studies, we have developed spatial and spectral mapping technology and demonstrated the AIRS-MODIS-VIIRS band mapping approaches successfully. In this paper, we will focus on VIIRS water vapor band mapping for proxy dataset generating based on our recently established proxy database which includes the AIRS simulated MODIS, AIRS simulated VIIRS and aggregated MODIS radiances/ brightness temperatures. We demonstrate the efficacy of this approach by presenting results of the cross-comparison of water vapor band measurements from AIRS, MODIS and simulated VIIRS. We also investigate the dependence of the quality of water vapor band mapping as a function of the surface emissivity spectrum, phenomenology, and atmospheric conditions. The same approach can be used to map CrIS to VIIRS for post-launch calibration and validation. It is also valuable to keep the continuity between MODIS and VIIRS water vapor measurements. This approach can provide increased confidence in evaluating EDR retrieval algorithms performances. It also can be used to map 6.75 μm band using AIRS or CrIS measurements for water vapor algorithm testing.

  4. TESTING VAPOR SPACE AND LIQUID-AIR INTERFACE CORROSION IN SIMULATED ENVIRONMENTS OF HANFORD DOUBLE-SHELLED TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, E.

    2013-05-30

    Electrochemical coupon testing were performed on 6 Hanford tank solution simulants and corresponding condensate simulants to evaluate the susceptibility of vapor space and liquid/air interface corrosion. Additionally, partial-immersion coupon testing were performed on the 6 tank solution simulants to compliment the accelerated electrochemical testing. Overall, the testing suggests that the SY-102 high nitrate solution is the most aggressive of the six solution simulants evaluated. Alternatively, the most passive solution, based on both electrochemical testing and coupon testing, was AY-102 solution. The presence of ammonium nitrate in the simulants at the lowest concentration tested (0.001 M) had no significant effect. At higher concentrations (0.5 M), ammonium nitrate appears to deter localized corrosion, suggesting a beneficial effect of the presence of the ammonium ion. The results of this research suggest that there is a threshold concentration of ammonium ions leading to inhibition of corrosion, thereby suggesting the need for further experimentation to identify the threshold.

  5. Use Of The Operational Air Quality Monitor (AQM) For In-Flight Water Testing Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macatangay, Ariel

    2014-01-01

    A primary requirement for manned spaceflight is Environmental Health which ensures air and water contaminants, acoustic profiles, microbial flora, and radiation exposures within the cabin are maintained to levels needed for crew health and for vehicle system functionality. The reliance on ground analyses of returned samples is a limitation in the current environmental monitoring strategy that will prevent future Exploration missions beyond low-Earth orbit. This proposal attempts to address this shortcoming by advancing in-flight analyses of water and air. Ground analysis of in-flight, air and water samples typically employ vapor-phase analysis by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify and quantify organic compounds present in the samples. We envision the use of newly-developed direct ionization approaches as the most viable avenue leading towards an integrated analytical platform for the monitoring of water, air, and, potentially bio-samples in the cabin environment. Development of an in-flight instrument capable of analyzing air and water samples would be the logical next step to meeting the environmental monitoring needs of Exploration missions. Currently, the Air Quality Monitor (AQM) on-board ISS provides this specific information for a number of target compounds in the air. However, there is a significant subset of common target compounds between air and water. Naturally, the following question arises, "Can the AQM be used for both air and water quality monitoring?" Previous directorate-level IR&D funding led to the development of a water sample introduction method for mass spectrometry using electrothermal vaporization (ETV). This project will focus on the integration of the ETV with a ground-based AQM. The capabilities of this integrated platform will be evaluated using a subset of toxicologically important compounds.

  6. Air- coupled ultrasonic testing of CFRP rods by means of guided waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kažys, Rymantas; Raišutis, Renaldas; Žukauskas, Egidijus; Mažeika, Liudas; Vladišauskas, Alfonsas

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important parts of the gliders is a lightweight longeron reinforcement made of carbon fibre reinforced plastics (CFRP) rods. These small diameter (a few millimetres) rods during manufacturing are glued together in epoxy filled matrix in order to build the arbitrary spar profile. However, the defects presenting in the rods such as brake of fibres, lack of bonding, reduction of density affect essentially the strength of the construction and are very complicated in repairing. Therefore, appropriate non-destructive testing techniques of carbon fibber rods should be applied before gluing them together. The objective of the presented work was development of NDT technique of CFRP rods used for aerospace applications, which is based on air- coupled excitation/reception of guided waves. The regularities of ultrasonic guided waves propagating in both circular and rectangular cross-section CFRP rods immersed into water were investigated and it was shown that the guided waves propagating along sample of the rod create leaky waves which are radiated into a surrounding medium. The ultrasonic receiver scanned over the rod enables to pick-up the leaky waves and to determine the non-uniformities of propagation caused by the defects. Theoretical investigations were carried out by means of numerical simulations based on a 2D and 3D finite differences method. By modelling and experimental investigations it was demonstrated that presence of any type of the defect disturbs the leaky wave and enables to detect them. So, the spatial position of defects can be determined also. It was shown that such important defects as a disbond of the plies essentially reduce or even completely suppress the leaky wave, so they can be detected quit easily.

  7. Development of hazardous air pollutant emission factors from state source test programs (April 1998). Final report, May 1992--September 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.L.; Blackley, C.; Battiste, J.; Gilbert, J.; Mesich, K.

    1998-04-01

    The report gives results of a study in which emission factors were developed from test data obtained from several Air Quality Management Districts in California and from state environmental agencies in Louisiana, Maryland, New Jersey, and Texas. The emission factors were developed for 9 of 23 relatively important source categories which lacked good quality emission factors. Over 100 test reports were screened for completeness: 69 of them contained sufficient information for emission factor development. From the 69 complete reports, 983 individual hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emission factors were developed and entered into EPA`s Factor Information Retrieval (FIRE) system emission factor database. The number, data quality, and range of emission factors developed--for each source classification code and source category tested--are also included in the report.

  8. Analytic and experimental evaluation of flowing air test conditions for selected metallics in a shuttle TPS application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, J. W.; Tong, H.; Clark, K. J.; Suchsland, K. E.; Neuner, G. J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed experimental and analytical evaluation was performed to define the response of TD nickel chromium alloy (20 percent chromium) and coated columbium (R512E on CB-752 and VH-109 on WC129Y) to shuttle orbiter reentry heating. Flight conditions important to the response of these thermal protection system (TPS) materials were calculated, and test conditions appropriate to simulation of these flight conditions in flowing air ground test facilities were defined. The response characteristics of these metallics were then evaluated for the flight and representative ground test conditions by analytical techniques employing appropriate thermochemical and thermal response computer codes and by experimental techniques employing an arc heater flowing air test facility and flat face stagnation point and wedge test models. These results were analyzed to define the ground test requirements to obtain valid TPS response characteristics for application to flight. For both material types in the range of conditions appropriate to the shuttle application, the surface thermochemical response resulted in a small rate of change of mass and a negligible energy contribution. The thermal response in terms of surface temperature was controlled by the net heat flux to the surface; this net flux was influenced significantly by the surface catalycity and surface emissivity. The surface catalycity must be accounted for in defining simulation test conditions so that proper heat flux levels to, and therefore surface temperatures of, the test samples are achieved.

  9. 77 FR 59023 - Preoperational Testing of Instrument and Control Air Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... System (ADAMS): You may access publicly available documents online in the NRC Library at http://www.nrc... air systems (ICAS) in a commercial nuclear power plant. Successful demonstration of the operability...

  10. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  11. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  12. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  13. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles §...

  14. 40 CFR 86.1832-01 - Optional equipment and air conditioning for test vehicles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... VEHICLES AND ENGINES General Compliance Provisions for Control of Air Pollution From New and In-Use Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks, and Complete Otto-Cycle Heavy-Duty Vehicles § 86.1832-01...

  15. ANALYSIS OF MEASUREMENT UNCERTAINTIES IN THE NULLING TEST FOR AIR LEAKAGE FROM RESIDENTIAL DUCTS.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2001-04-01

    An analysis of measurement uncertainties in a recently proposed method of measuring air leakage in residential duct systems has been carried out. The uncertainties in supply and return leakage rates are expressed in terms of the value of the envelope leakage flow coefficient and the uncertainties in measured pressures and air flow rates. Results of the analysis are compared with data published by two research groups.

  16. Field testing soybeans for residual effects of air pollution and seed size on crop yield

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, R.K.; Rose, L.P. Jr.; Leffel, R.C.

    1980-01-01

    Mean seed weights (g/100 seeds) for four soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.), cultivars grown in 1973 and 1974 in cylindrical open-top field chambers that provided carbon-filtered air were significantly greater (17.2) than from plants grown in nonfiltered air in chambers (15.1), or in conventional plots without chambers (15.7). Using this seed, as experiment was designed to answer three questions: (i) does air quality influence seed yields from subsequent plants; (ii) do seed size differences, possibly induced by air pollutants, influence subsequent seed yields; (iii) is there a yield advantage from planting large seed vs an original lot of seed. This experiment was designed as a split-split plot with six replications. The whole plot treatments were the four cultivars; the split-plot treatments consisted of the nine factorial combinations of three seed sizes and three environments. The split-split plot treatment was a comparison between the specified seed size and an original lot of the seed from which the specific seed size was obtained. Six seeds per 30 cm of row were planted and evaluated in a field experiment near Queenstown, Maryland, in 1975. We found no residual air quality effects on subsequent seed yields. Differences in seed size observed for different air qualities did not significantly affect yields. In general, there was no significant yield advantage for plants grown from a selected seed size as compared with the original lot seed.

  17. Results from Geothermal Logging, Air and Core-Water Chemistry Sampling, Air Injection Testing and Tracer Testing in the Northern Ghost Dance Fault, YUCCA Mountain, Nevada, November 1996 to August 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Lecain, G.D.; Anna, L.O.; Fahy, M.F.

    1998-08-01

    Geothermal logging, air and core-water chemistry sampling, air-injection testing, and tracer testing were done in the northern Ghost Dance Fault at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, from November 1996 to August 1998. The study was done by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy. The fault-testing drill room and test boreholes were located in the crystal-poor, middle nonlithophysal zone of the Topopah Spring Tuff, a tuff deposit of Miocene age. The drill room is located off the Yucca Mountain underground Exploratory Studies Facility at about 230 meters below ground surface. Borehole geothermal logging identified a temperature decrease of 0.1 degree Celsius near the Ghost Dance Fault. The temperature decrease could indicate movement of cooler air or water, or both, down the fault, or it may be due to drilling-induced evaporative or adiabatic cooling. In-situ pneumatic pressure monitoring indicated that barometric pressure changes were transmitted from the ground surface to depth through the Ghost Dance Fault. Values of carbon dioxide and delta carbon-13 from gas samples indicated that air from the underground drill room had penetrated the tuff, supporting the concept of a well-developed fracture system. Uncorrected carbon-14-age estimates from gas samples ranged from 2,400 to 4,500 years. Tritium levels in borehole core water indicated that the fault may have been a conduit for the transport of water from the ground surface to depth during the last 100 years.

  18. Design Report for the ½ Scale Air-Cooled RCCS Tests in the Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF)

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, D. D.; Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Bremer, N.; Aeschlimann, R. W.

    2014-06-01

    The Natural convection Shutdown heat removal Test Facility (NSTF) is a large scale thermal hydraulics test facility that has been built at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The facility was constructed in order to carry out highly instrumented experiments that can be used to validate the performance of passive safety systems for advanced reactor designs. The facility has principally been designed for testing of Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) concepts that rely on natural convection cooling for either air or water-based systems. Standing 25-m in height, the facility is able to supply up to 220 kW at 21 kW/m2 to accurately simulate the heat fluxes at the walls of a reactor pressure vessel. A suite of nearly 400 data acquisition channels, including a sophisticated fiber optic system for high density temperature measurements, guides test operations and provides data to support scaling analysis and modeling efforts. Measurements of system mass flow rate, air and surface temperatures, heat flux, humidity, and pressure differentials, among others; are part of this total generated data set. The following report provides an introduction to the top level-objectives of the program related to passively safe decay heat removal, a detailed description of the engineering specifications, design features, and dimensions of the test facility at Argonne. Specifications of the sensors and their placement on the test facility will be provided, along with a complete channel listing of the data acquisition system.

  19. Flight Test of an L(sub 1) Adaptive Controller on the NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Xargay, Enric; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of a flight test of the L-1 adaptive control architecture designed to directly compensate for significant uncertain cross-coupling in nonlinear systems. The flight test was conducted on the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model that is an integral part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. The results presented are for piloted tasks performed during the flight test.

  20. Integrated Testing of a 4-Bed Molecular Sieve, Air-Cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor, and Sabatier Engineering Development Unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knox, James C.; Miller, Lee; Campbell, Melissa; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2006-01-01

    Accumulation and subsequent compression of carbon dioxide that is removed from the space cabin are two important processes involved in a closed-loop air revitalization scheme of the International Space Station (ISS). The 4-Bed Molecular Sieve (4BMS) of ISS currently operates in an open loop mode without a compressor. The Sabatier Engineering Development Unit (EDU) processes waste CO2 to provide water to the crew. This paper reports the integrated 4BMS, air-cooled Temperature Swing Adsorption Compressor (TSAC), and Sabatier EDU testing. The TSAC prototype was developed at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). The 4BMS was modified to a functionally flight-like condition at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Testing was conducted at MSFC. The paper provides details of the TSAC operation at various CO2 loadings and corresponding performance of the 4BMS and Sabatier.

  1. Combatting urban air pollution through Natural Gas Vehicle (NGV) analysis, testing, and demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    1995-03-01

    Deteriorating urban air quality ranks as a top concern worldwide, since air pollution adversely affects both public health and the environment. The outlook for improving air quality in the world`s megacities need not be bleak, however, The use of natural gas as a transportation fuel can measurably reduce urban pollution levels, mitigating chronic threats to health and the environment. Besides being clean burning, natural gas vehicles (NGVs) are economical to operate and maintain. The current cost of natural gas is lower than that of gasoline. Natural gas also reduces the vehicle`s engine wear and noise level, extends engine life, and decreases engine maintenance. Today, about 700,000 NGVs operate worldwide, the majority of them converted from gasoline or diesel fuel. This article discusses the economic, regulatory and technological issues of concern to the NGV industry.

  2. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    In the history of manned spaceflight, environmental monitoring has relied heavily on archival sampling. For short missions, this type of sample collection was sufficient; returned samples provided a snapshot of the presence of chemical and biological contaminants in the spacecraft air and water. However, with the construction of the International Space Station (ISS) and the subsequent extension of mission durations, soon to be up to one year, the need for enhanced, real-time environmental monitoring became more pressing. The past several years have seen the implementation of several real-time monitors aboard the ISS, complemented with reduced archival sampling. The station air is currently monitored for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using gas chromatography-differential mobility spectrometry (Air Quality Monitor [AQM]). The water on ISS is analyzed to measure total organic carbon and biocide concentrations using the Total Organic Carbon Analyzer (TOCA) and the Colorimetric Water Quality Monitoring Kit (CWQMK), respectively. The current air and water monitors provide important data, but the number and size of the different instruments makes them impractical for future exploration missions. It is apparent that there is still a need for improvements in environmental monitoring capabilities. One such improvement could be realized by modifying a single instrument to analyze both air and water. As the AQM currently provides quantitative, compound-specific information for target compounds present in air samples, and many of the compounds are also targets for water quality monitoring, this instrument provides a logical starting point to evaluate the feasibility of this approach. In this presentation, we will discuss our recent studies aimed at determining an appropriate method for introducing VOCs from water samples into the gas phase and our current work, in which an electro-thermal vaporization unit has been interfaced with the AQM to analyze target analytes at the

  3. Performance testing of the NIOSH charcoal tube technique for the determination of air concentrations of organic vapors.

    PubMed

    Saalwaechter, A T; McCammon, C S; Roper, P; Carlberg, K S

    1977-09-01

    The use of the charcoal tube-gas chromatographic method to evaluate workplace air contamination has proliferated greatly in the las 10 years. This report documents early efforts by NIOSH researchers to evaluate several sampling and analytical parameters and their effect on the reliability of the technique. The effects of humidity, sample stability, sample migration and variations in the desorption efficiency are presented. A protocol is suggested for basic testing of the method for new substances. PMID:906963

  4. New insights into the electrode mechanism of lithium sulfur batteries via air-free post-test analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Dietz Rago, Nancy L; Bloom, Ira D; Shaw, Leon L

    2016-08-01

    Effects of the volume expansion and shrinkage of Li2S cathodes on electrochemical cycle life are investigated via post-test analysis without exposure to air. The engineered electrodes that confine volume changes within micro-reactors have significantly longer life than the electrodes without the micro-reactor structure, providing the first unambiguous evidence of the importance of confining volume changes for improved battery performance. PMID:27430393

  5. Hover and wind-tunnel testing of shrouded rotors for improved micro air vehicle design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pereira, Jason L.

    The shrouded-rotor configuration has emerged as the most popular choice for rotary-wing Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs), because of the inherent safety of the design and the potential for significant performance improvements. However, traditional design philosophies based on experience with large-scale ducted propellers may not apply to the low-Reynolds-number (˜20,000) regime in which MAVs operate. An experimental investigation of the effects of varying the shroud profile shape on the performance of MAV-scale shrouded rotors has therefore been conducted. Hover tests were performed on seventeen models with a nominal rotor diameter of 16 cm (6.3 in) and various values of diffuser expansion angle, diffuser length, inlet lip radius and blade tip clearance, at various rotor collective angles. Compared to the baseline open rotor, the shrouded rotors showed increases in thrust by up to 94%, at the same power consumption, or reductions in power by up to 62% at the same thrust. These improvements surpass those predicted by momentum theory, due to the additional effect of the shrouds in reducing the non-ideal power losses of the rotor. Increasing the lip radius and decreasing the blade tip clearance caused performance to improve, while optimal values of diffuser angle and length were found to be 10 and 50% of the shroud throat diameter, respectively. With the exception of the lip radius, the effects of changing any of the shrouded-rotor parameters on performance became more pronounced as the values of the other parameters were changed to degrade performance. Measurements were also made of the wake velocity profiles and the shroud surface pressure distributions. The uniformity of the wake was improved by the presence of the shrouds and by decreasing the blade tip clearance, resulting in lower induced power losses. For high net shroud thrust, a favorable pressure distribution over the inlet was seen to be more important than in the diffuser. Strong suction pressures were observed

  6. A novel test cage with an air ventilation system as an alternative to conventional cages for the efficacy testing of mosquito repellents.

    PubMed

    Obermayr, U; Rose, A; Geier, M

    2010-11-01

    We have developed a novel test cage and improved method for the evaluation of mosquito repellents. The method is compatible with the United States Environmental Protection Agency, 2000 draft OPPTS 810.3700 Product Performance Test Guidelines for Testing of Insect Repellents. The Biogents cages (BG-cages) require fewer test mosquitoes than conventional cages and are more comfortable for the human volunteers. The novel cage allows a section of treated forearm from a volunteer to be exposed to mosquito probing through a window. This design minimizes residual contamination of cage surfaces with repellent. In addition, an air ventilation system supplies conditioned air to the cages after each single test, to flush out and prevent any accumulation of test substances. During biting activity tests, the untreated skin surface does not receive bites because of a screen placed 150 mm above the skin. Compared with the OPPTS 810.3700 method, the BG-cage is smaller (27 liters, compared with 56 liters) and contains 30 rather than hundreds of blood-hungry female mosquitoes. We compared the performance of a proprietary repellent formulation containing 20% KBR3023 with four volunteers on Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae) in BG- and conventional cages. Repellent protection time was shorter in tests conducted with conventional cages. The average 95% protection time was 4.5 +/- 0.4 h in conventional cages and 7.5 +/- 0.6 h in the novel BG-cages. The protection times measured in BG-cages were more similar to the protection times determined with these repellents in field tests. PMID:21175061

  7. Field test of two high-pressure, direct-contact downhole steam generators. Volume I. Air/diesel system

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, B.W.

    1983-05-01

    As a part of the Project DEEP STEAM to develop technology to more efficiently utilize steam for the recovery of heavy oil from deep reservoirs, a field test of a downhole steam generator (DSG) was performed. The DSG burned No. 2 diesel fuel in air and was a direct-contact, high pressure device which mixed the steam with the combustion products and injected the resulting mixture directly into the oil reservoir. The objectives of the test program included demonstration of long-term operation of a DSG, development of operational methods, assessment of the effects of the steam/combustion gases on the reservoir and comparison of this air/diesel DSG with an adjacent oxygen/diesel direct contact generator. Downhole operation of the air/diesel DSG was started in June 1981 and was terminated in late February 1982. During this period two units were placed downhole with the first operating for about 20 days. It was removed, the support systems were slightly modified, and the second one was operated for 106 days. During this latter interval the generator operated for 70% of the time with surface air compressor problems the primary source of the down time. Thermal contact, as evidenced by a temperature increase in the production well casing gases, and an oil production increase were measured in one of the four wells in the air/diesel pattern. Reservoir scrubbing of carbon monoxide was observed, but no conclusive data on scrubbing of SO/sub x/ and NO/sub x/ were obtained. Corrosion of the DSG combustor walls and some other parts of the downhole package were noted. Metallurgical studies have been completed and recommendations made for other materials that are expected to better withstand the downhole combustion environment. 39 figures, 8 tables.

  8. 76 FR 17287 - Protocol Gas Verification Program and Minimum Competency Requirements for Air Emission Testing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ..., the Acid Rain Program, and the Clean Air Interstate Rule. EPA is amending its Protocol Gas... sections of the Acid Rain Program continuous emission monitoring system regulations by adding and..., 2008, revisions to 40 CFR part 75, the Acid Rain Program continuous emission monitoring...

  9. Test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with KASCADE air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörandel, J. R.; Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Łuczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G.; Ulrich, H.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.; KASCADE-Grande Collaboration

    2009-12-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  10. A test of the hadronic interaction model EPOS with air shower data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apel, W. D.; Arteaga, J. C.; Badea, F.; Bekk, K.; Bertaina, M.; Blümer, J.; Bozdog, H.; Brancus, I. M.; Brüggemann, M.; Buchholz, P.; Cantoni, E.; Chiavassa, A.; Cossavella, F.; Daumiller, K.; de Souza, V.; Di Pierro, F.; Doll, P.; Engel, R.; Engler, J.; Finger, M.; Fuhrmann, D.; Ghia, P. L.; Gils, H. J.; Glasstetter, R.; Grupen, C.; Haungs, A.; Heck, D.; Hörandel, J. R.; Huege, T.; Isar, P. G.; Kampert, K.-H.; Kang, D.; Kickelbick, D.; Klages, H. O.; Kolotaev, Y.; Luczak, P.; Mathes, H. J.; Mayer, H. J.; Milke, J.; Mitrica, B.; Morello, C.; Navarra, G.; Nehls, S.; Oehlschläger, J.; Ostapchenko, S.; Over, S.; Petcu, M.; Pierog, T.; Rebel, H.; Roth, M.; Schieler, H.; Schröder, F.; Sima, O.; Stümpert, M.; Toma, G.; Trinchero, G. C.; Ulrich, H.; van Buren, J.; Walkowiak, W.; Weindl, A.; Wochele, J.; Wommer, M.; Zabierowski, J.

    2009-03-01

    Predictions of the hadronic interaction model EPOS 1.61 as implemented in the air shower simulation program CORSIKA are compared to observations with the KASCADE experiment. The investigations reveal that the predictions of EPOS are not compatible with KASCADE measurements. The discrepancies seen are most likely due to use of a set of inelastic hadronic cross sections that are too high.

  11. In-place HEPA (high efficiency, particulate air) filter testing at Hanford: Operating experiences, calibrations, and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Flores, D.S.; Decelis, D.G.

    1989-10-01

    High Efficiency, Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters provide a minimum of 99.97% removal efficiency for particles greater than or equal to .3 microns in diameter. Each HEPA filter installation at Hanford is, at specified intervals, functionally tested for leaks. The test procedure involves a dioctylphthalate (DOP) smoke generator and a calibrated airborne particle detector. The DOP generator produces smoke of a known quantitative particle size distribution upstream of the filter. The airborne particle detector is first placed upstream, and then downstream of the filter to determine percent penetration. The smoke generator is characterized using a calibrated laser spectrometer, and the particle detector is calibrated using a calibrated picoammeter. 2 refs., 4 figs.

  12. Field testing passive air samplers for current use pesticides in a tropical environment.

    PubMed

    Gouin, Todd; Wania, Frank; Ruepert, Clemens; Castillo, Luisa E

    2008-09-01

    Air was sampled for one year in the central valley of Costa Rica using an active high-volume sampler as well as passive samplers (PAS) based on polyurethane foam (PUF) disks and XAD-resin filled mesh cylinders. Extracts were analyzed for pesticides that are either banned or currently used in Costa Rican agriculture. Sampling rates for PUF-based passive air samplers, determined from the loss of depuration compounds spiked on the disks prior to deployment averaged 5.9 +/- 0.9 m3 x d(-1) and were higher during the windier dry season than during the rainy season. Sampling rates for the XAD-based passive sampler were determined from the slopes of linear relationships that were observed between the amount of pesticide sequestered in the resin and the length of deployment, which varied from 4 months to 1 year. Those sampling rates increased with decreasing molecular size of a pesticide, and their average of 2.1 +/- 1.5 m3 x d(-1) is higher than rates previously reported for temperate and polar sampling sites. Even though the trends of the sampling rate with molecular size and temperature are consistent with the hypothesis that molecular diffusion controls uptake in passive samplers, the trends are much more pronounced than a direct proportionality between sampling rate and molecular diffusivity would suggest. Air concentrations derived by the three sampling methods are within a factor of 2 of each other, suggesting that properly calibrated PAS can be effective tools for monitoring levels of pesticides in the tropical atmosphere. In particular, HiVol samplers, PUF-disk samplers, and XAD-based passive samplers are suitable for obtaining information on air concentration variability on the time scale of days, seasons and years, respectively. This study represents the first calibration study for the uptake of current use pesticides by passive air samplers. PMID:18800540

  13. A review of acceptance testing of the Los Alamos/Canberra Alpha Sentry Continuous Air Monitor (CAM)

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, J.C.

    1998-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) undertook the design and development of a new generation of alpha continuous air monitor (CAM) instrumentation that would incorporate advanced technologies in the design of the sampling inlet, multi-channel analyzer (MCA) electronics, solid state alpha detectors, radon background interference suppression, background interference compensation and based on spectral analysis, and microcomputer based data communication, processing, storage, and retrieval. The ANSI air monitoring instrument standards (Performance Specifications for Health Physics Instrumentation -- Occupational Airborne Radioactivity Monitoring Instrumentation, N42.17B) specify performance criteria and testing procedures for instruments and instrument systems designed to continuously sample and quantify airborne radioactivity in the workplace. Although the intent of the standard is to provide performance testing criteria for type testing, it is appropriate to evaluate the performance of a new instrument such as the Alpha Sentry against certain of these criteria for purposes of an acceptance test based on stated specifications and the Los Alamos CAM Requirements document. This report provides an overview of the results of these tests, as they pertain to instruments designed to detect alpha-emitting radionuclides in particulate form.

  14. Development and Testing of a Temperature-swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide in Closed-loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulloth, Lila M.; Rosen, Micha; Affleck, David; LeVan, M. Douglas; Wang, Yuan

    2005-01-01

    The air revitalization system of the International Space Station (ISS) operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby dosing the air-loop. We have developed a temperature-swing adsorption compressor (TSAC) that is energy efficient, quiet, and has no rapidly moving parts for performing these tasks. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low- pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. This paper discusses the design and testing of a TSAC for carbon dioxide that has application in the ISS and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop.

  15. Air oxidation behavior of fuel for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hironobu; Hayashi, Kimio; Fukuda, Kousaku

    1992-08-01

    The oxidation behavior of the HTTR fuel was studied with respect to the scenario of an air ingress accident which had been assessed in the HTTR safety analysis. The coated fuel particles were heated under a sufficient air flow in the temperature range of 900-1400 C for maximum duration of 600 h (at 1300 C). Failure fractions of the SiC coating layer after the heat treatments remained within the fraction at the fuel production. And the failure behavior of the SiC layer did not depend on such heating conditions as the temperature and the duration in the present experiment. It was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction, and laser Raman spectroscopy that a thin oxide film was formed on the SiC layer by the heat treatments.

  16. A Multilevel Test of Constrained Choices Theory: The Case of Tobacco Clean Air Restrictions.

    PubMed

    Vuolo, Mike; Kadowaki, Joy; Kelly, Brian C

    2016-09-01

    According to Bird and Rieker's sociology of constrained choices, decisions and priorities concerning health are shaped by the contexts-including policy, community, and work/family-in which they are formulated. While each level received attention in the original and subsequent research, we contend their constrained choices theory provides a powerful multilevel framework for modeling health outcomes. We apply this framework to tobacco clean air restrictions, combining a comprehensive database of tobacco policies with the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 from ages 19 to 31. Using multilevel panel models, we find that clean air policies lower the odds of past 30 day smoking and dependence while controlling for other policy-, city-, and individual-level constraints. We also find unique between- and within-person effects, as well as gender effects, for the constraint levied by smoking bans. We argue for the theory's broad applicability beyond commonly cited findings regarding gender and biological influences. PMID:27601410

  17. The system integration and verification testing of an orbital maneuvering vehicle for an air bearing floor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, N. L., Jr.; Martin, M. F.; Paulukaitis, K. R.; Haslam, J. W., Jr.; Henderson, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    The teleoperator and Robotics Evaluation Facility (TOREF) is composed of a 4,000 square foot precision air bearing floor, the Teleoperator Motion Base, the Target Motion and Support Simulator, the mock-ups of the Hubble Space Telescope, Multi-mission Modular Spacecraft, and the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle (OMV). The TOREF and its general capabilities to support the OMV and other remote system simulations; the facility operating procedures and requirements; and the results of generic OMV investigations are summarized.

  18. Operational test report for the 241-A-701 air compressor upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Meeuwsen, W.E.

    1997-06-30

    A description and safety class designation of the accumulator and 701-A compressor system is contained in VTHC-SD-@-DA-137, Safety Classification (of the 241-A-70) Compressed Air System and shown on drawings H-2-62895, Sheet 2 and H-14-20308, Sheet 3. The design basis for the 241-A-702 Ventilation System Accumulator is contained in @-C-SD-@-DB-016, 241-A-702 Ventilation System Accumulator Design Basis.

  19. AIR AND ENERGY ENGINEERING RESEARCH LABORATORY (AEERL) PROCEDURES MANUAL: LEVEL 1 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT TERRESTRIAL ECOLOGICAL TESTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The manual provides detailed procedures for EPA/AEERL's Level 1 terrestrial bioassays. (Some test methods designated for AEERL's Level 1 environmental assessment biological testing program are sufficiently new that little or no published literature is available describing specifi...

  20. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... coefficient calculation. 3.9 Test procedures for Frost Accumulation heating mode tests (the H2, H22, H2V, and... during cyclic tests and frost accumulation tests, if needed, to produce stabilized room air temperatures... system (see Definition 1.42), the manufacturer must specify the frosting interval to be used during...

  1. Development and testing of an air quality model for Mexico City

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.D.; Streit, G.; Cruz, X.; Ruiz, M.; Sosa, G.; Russell, A.G.; McNair, L.A.

    1992-03-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory and Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo have embarked on a joint study of options for improving air quality in Mexico City. The intent is to develop a modeling system which can address the behavior of pollutants in the region so that option for improving Mexico City air quality can be properly evaluated. In February of 1991, the project conducted a field program which yielded a variety of data which is being used to evaluate and improve the models. Normally the worst air quality for both primary and photochemical pollutants occurs in the winter Mexico City. During the field program, measurements included: (1) lidar measurements of aerosol transport and dispersion, (2) aircraft measurements of winds, turbulence, and chemical species aloft, (3) aircraft measurements of earth surface skin temperatures, and (4) tethersonde measurements of wind, temperature and ozone vertical profiles. A three-dimensional, prognostic, higher order turbulence meteorological model (HOTMAC) was modified to include an urban canopy and urban heat sources. HOTMAC is used to drive an Monte-Carlo kernel dispersion code (RAPTAD). HOTMAC also provides winds and mixing heights for the CIT photochemical model which was developed by investigators at the California Institute of Technology and Carnegie Mellon University.

  2. Development of Micro Air Reconnaissance Vehicle as a Test Bed for Advanced Sensors and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shams, Qamar A.; Vranas, Thomas L.; Fox, Robert L.; Kuhn, Theodore R.; Ingham, John; Logan, Michael J.; Barnes, Kevin N.; Guenther, Benjamin F.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a Micro/Mini Air Reconnaissance Vehicle for advanced sensors and electronics at NASA Langley Research Center over the last year. This vehicle is expected to have a total weight of less than four pounds, a design velocity of 40 mph, an endurance of 15-20 minutes, and a maximum range of 5km. The vehicle has wings that are simple to detach yet retain the correct alignment. The upper fuselage surface has a quick release hatch used to access the interior and also to mount the varying propulsion systems. The sensor suite developed for this vehicle consists of a Pitot-static measurement system for determining air speed, an absolute pressure measurement for determining altitude, magnetic direction measurement, and three orthogonal gyros to determine body angular rates. Swarming GPS-guidance and in-flight maneuvering is discussed, as well as design and installation of some other advance sensors like MEMS microphones, infrared cameras, GPS, humidity sensors, and an ultrasonic sonar sensor. Also low cost, small size, high performance control and navigation system for the Micro Air Vehicle is discussed. At the end, laboratory characterization of different sensors, motors, propellers, and batteries will be discussed.

  3. Air detoxification with nanosize TiO2 aerosol tested on mice.

    PubMed

    Besov, A S; Krivova, N A; Vorontsov, A V; Zaeva, O B; Kozlov, D V; Vorozhtsov, A B; Parmon, V N; Sakovich, G V; Komarov, V F; Smirniotis, P G; Eisenreich, N

    2010-01-15

    A method for fast air purification using high concentration aerosol of TiO(2) nanoparticles is evaluated in a model chemical catastrophe involving toxic vapors of diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP). Mice are used as human model in a closed 100 dm(3) chamber. Exposure of mice to 37 ppm of DFP vapor for 15 min resulted in acute poisoning. Spraying TiO(2) aerosol in 2 min after the start of exposure to DFP vapors resulted in quick removal of DFP vapors from the chamber's air. Animals did not show signs of poisoning after the decontamination experiment and exposure to TiO(2) aerosol alone. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidant activity (AOA) of mice blood plasma were measured for animals exposed to sound of aerosol generator, DFP vapors, TiO(2) aerosol and DFP vapors+TiO(2) aerosol. Reduced ROS and increased AOA were found for mice exposure to sound, DFP and TiO(2) aerosol. Exposure to DFP and decontamination with TiO(2) nanoparticles resulted in decreased AOA in 48 h following the exposure. The results suggest that application of TiO(2) aerosol is a powerful method of air purification from toxic hydrolysable compounds with moderate health aftermaths and requires further study and optimization. PMID:19765900

  4. Radiation Detection Field Test at the Federal Express (FedEx) Air Cargo Facility at Denver International Airport (DIA)

    SciTech Connect

    Weirup, D; Waters, A; Hall, H; Dougan, A; Trombino, D; Mattesich, G; Hull, E; Bahowick, S; Loshak, A; Gruidl, J

    2004-02-11

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recently conducted a field-test of radiation detection and identification equipment at the air cargo facility of Federal Express (FedEx) located at Denver International Airport (DIA) over a period of two weeks. Comprehensive background measurements were performed and were analyzed, and a trial strategy for detection and identification of parcels displaying radioactivity was implemented to aid in future development of a comprehensive protection plan. The purpose of this project was threefold: {sm_bullet} Quantify background radiation environments at an air cargo facility. {sm_bullet} Quantify and identify ''nuisance'' alarms. {sm_bullet} Evaluate the performance of various isotope identifiers deployed in an operational environment (in this case, the operational environment included the biggest blizzard in over 90 years!).

  5. X-33 (Rev-F) Aeroheating Results of Test 6770 in NASA Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Horvath, Thomas J.; Kowalkowski, Matthew K.; Liechty, Derek S.

    1999-01-01

    Aeroheating characteristics of the X-33 Rev-F configuration have been experimentally examined in the Langley 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel (Test 6770). Global surface heat transfer distributions, surface streamline patterns, and shock shapes were measured on a 0.013-scale model at Mach 6 in air. Parametric variations include angles-of-attack of 20-deg, 30-deg, and 40-deg; Reynolds numbers based on model length of 0.9 to 4.9 million; and body-flap deflections of 10-deg and 20-deg. The effects of discrete roughness elements on boundary layer transition, which included trip height, size, and location, both on and off the windward centerline, were investigated. This document is intended to serve as a quick release of preliminary data to the X-33 program; analysis is limited to observations of the experimental trends in order to expedite dissemination.

  6. Hydrogen oxidation mechanism with applications to (1) the chaperon efficiency of carbon dioxide and (2) vitiated air testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brabbs, Theodore A.; Lezberg, Erwin A.; Bittker, David A.; Robertson, Thomas F.

    1987-01-01

    Ignition delay times for the hydrogen/oxygen/carbon dioxide/argon system were obtained behind reflected shock waves. A detailed kinetic mechanism modeled the experimental hydrogen/oxygen data, Skinner and Ringrose's high-pressure data, and Slack and Grillo's hydrogen/air data. A carbon dioxide chaperon efficiency of 7.0 +/- 0.2 was determined. The reaction pathway H2O yields H2O2 yields OH yields H was required to model the high-pressure data. It is suggested that some of the lowest temperature data points (1.0 and 0.5 atm) for Slack and Grillo's hydrogen/air experiments are in error. It was found that the technique of simplifying a detailed kinetic mechanism for a limited range of experimental data may render the model useless for other test conditions.

  7. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  8. Field-scale tests for determining mixing patterns associated with coarse-bubble air diffuser configurations, Egan Quarry, Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hornewer, N.J.; Johnson, G.P.; Robertson, D.M.; Hondzo, Miki

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District did field-scale tests in August-September 1996 to determine mixing patterns associated with different configurations of coarse-bubble air diffusers. The tests were done in an approximately 13-meter deep quarry near Chicago, Ill. Three-dimensional velocity, water-temperature, dissolved oxygen concentration, and specific-conductivity profiles were collected from locations between approximately 2 to 30 meters from the diffusers for two sets of five test configurations; one set for stratified and one set for destratified conditions in the quarry. The data-collection methods and instrumentation used to characterize mixing patterns and interactions of coarse-bubble diffusers were successful. An extensive data set was collected and is available to calibrate and verify aeration and stratification models, and to characterize basic features of bubble-plume interaction.

  9. Air STAR Beyond Visual Range UAS Description and Preliminary Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Kevin; Cox, David E.; Foster, John V.; Riddick, Stephen E.; Laughter, Sean A.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research Unmanned Aerial System project's capabilities were expanded by updating the system design and concept of operations. The new remotely piloted airplane system design was flight tested to assess integrity and operational readiness of the design to perform flight research. The purpose of the system design is to improve aviation safety by providing a capability to validate, in high-risk conditions, technologies to prevent airplane loss of control. Two principal design requirements were to provide a high degree of reliability and that the new design provide a significant increase in test volume (relative to operations using the previous design). The motivation for increased test volume is to improve test efficiency and allow new test capabilities that were not possible with the previous design and concept of operations. Three successful test flights were conducted from runway 4-22 at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center's Wallops Flight Facility.

  10. Aerothermal test results from the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched space booster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noffz, Gregory K.; Curry, Robert E.; Haering, Edward A., Jr.; Kolodziej, Paul

    1991-01-01

    A survey of temperature measurements at speeds through Mach 8.0 on the first flight of the Pegasus air-launched booster system is discussed. In addition, heating rates were derived from the temperature data obtained on the fuselage in the vicinity of the wing shock interaction. Sensors were distributed on the wing surfaces, leading edge, and on the wing-body fairing or fillet. Side-by-side evaluations were obtained for a variety of sensor installations. Details of the trajectory reconstruction through first-stage separation are provided. Given here are indepth descriptions of the sensor installations, temperature measurements, and derived heating rates along with interpretations of the results.

  11. Performance Evaluation of the Operational Air Quality Monitor for Water Testing Aboard the International Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, William T.; Limero, Thomas F.; Gazda, Daniel B.; Minton, John M.; Macatangay, Ariel V.; Dwivedi, Prabha; Fernandez, Facundo M.

    2014-01-01

    Real-time environmental monitoring on ISS is necessary to provide data in a timely fashion and to help ensure astronaut health. Current real-time water TOC monitoring provides high-quality trending information, but compound-specific data is needed. The combination of ETV with the AQM showed that compounds of interest could be liberated from water and analyzed in the same manner as air sampling. Calibration of the AQM using water samples allowed for the quantitative analysis of ISS archival samples. Some calibration issues remain, but the excellent accuracy of DMSD indicates that ETV holds promise for as a sample introduction method for water analysis in spaceflight.

  12. Test and evaluation of the Argonne BPAC10 Series air chamber calorimeter designed for 20 minute measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.; Jung, E.A. ); Cremers, T. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper is the final report on DOE-OSS Task ANLE88002 Fast Air Chamber Calorimetry.'' The task objective was to design, construct, and test an isothermal air chamber calorimeter for plutonium assay of bulk samples that would meet the following requirements for sample power measurement: average sample measurement time less than 20 minutes. Measurement of samples with power output up to 10 W. Precision of better than 1% RSD for sample power greater than 1 W. Precision better than 0.010 watt SD, for sample power less than 1 W. This report gives a description of the calorimeter hardware and software and discusses the test results. The instrument operating procedure, included as an appendix, gives examples of typical input/output and explains the menu driven software. Sample measurement time of less than 20 minutes was attained by pre-equilibration of the samples in low cost precision preheaters and by prediction of equilibrium measurements. Tests at the TA55 Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, on typical samples, indicates that the instrument meets all the measurement requirements.

  13. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2. 86.162-00 Section 86.162-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  14. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2. 86.162-00 Section 86.162-00 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND...

  15. SO 2 sorption characteristics of air sampling filter media using a new laboratory test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batterman, Stuart; Osak, Igor; Gelman, Charles

    A significant factor in the selection of filter media used for air sampling is the formation of artifacts due to the sorption of sulfur and nitrogen oxides on the filter. These artifacts can erroneously increase measured particulate concentrations. A technique is developed to measure the uptake of SO 2 and other gases and vapors on air sampling filter media. The static chamber technique features in-chamber measurements of SO 2 concentrations using FTIR spectrometry. The filter uptake, partition coefficient, and diffusion coefficient are estimated from the loss of gaseous SO 2 in the chamber. The technique provides rapid and precise results over a wide range of filter characteristics and avoids problems related to the extraction of target analytes from the filter. A total of 12 types of filters are evaluated, including glass fiber, Teflon-coated glass fiber, nylon, quartz fiber, Teflon, Supor, Nylasorb, and acrylic copolymer membranes. Results indicate that Teflon, quartz and acrylic copolymer filters have minimal sorption of SO 2 while quartz fiber, Supor and Nylasorb filters have high to moderate uptake of SO 2.

  16. INDOOR AIR EMISSIONS FROM OFFICE EQUIPMENT: TEST METHOD DEVELOPMENT AND POLLUTION PREVENTION OPPORTUNITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes the development and evaluation of a large chamber test method for measuring emissions from dry-process photocopiers. The test method was developed in two phases. Phase 1 was a single-laboratory evaluation at Research Triangle Institute (RTI) using four, mid-r...

  17. Flight Test of Composite Model Reference Adaptive Control (CMRAC) Augmentation Using NASA AirSTAR Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Gadient, ROss; Lavretsky, Eugene

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents flight test results of a robust linear baseline controller with and without composite adaptive control augmentation. The flight testing was conducted using the NASA Generic Transport Model as part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at NASA Langley Research Center.

  18. 75 FR 72739 - Compliance Testing Procedures: Correction Factor for Room Air Conditioners

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-26

    ... public record evidence justifying this requested action. See, 75 FR 42579, 42581 (July 22, 2010... Rulemaking (SNOPR) to amend the test procedure. See 75 FR 37594, 37635 (June 29, 2010). DOE states: ``Section... final rule and without prior notice. 75 FR 42579 (July 22, 2010) Here, test procedure revocation is...

  19. Start-stop testing of two self-acting air-lubricated spiral groove thrust bearing coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunfee, J. D.; Shapiro, W.

    1974-01-01

    Start-stop tests were conducted on air-lubricated spiral-groove thrust bearings. Application of a matrix-bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) coating over a porous chrome oxide coating resulted in significantly lower friction, compared to bearings coated with chrome oxide only. The MoS2 coated bearing sustained 15,000 start-stop cycles at a maximum of 3600 rpm. Each cycle was 15 seconds on, 30 seconds off. The chrome oxide coated bearing failed by local welding after 2030 cycles. Both types of coatings exhibited early failures under higher thrust loads when operating films were insufficient to sustain the load without overheating.

  20. A regression-based method for mapping traffic-related air pollution: application and testing in four contrasting urban environments.

    PubMed

    Briggs, D J; de Hoogh, C; Gulliver, J; Wills, J; Elliott, P; Kingham, S; Smallbone, K

    2000-05-15

    Accurate, high-resolution maps of traffic-related air pollution are needed both as a basis for assessing exposures as part of epidemiological studies, and to inform urban air-quality policy and traffic management. This paper assesses the use of a GIS-based, regression mapping technique to model spatial patterns of traffic-related air pollution. The model--developed using data from 80 passive sampler sites in Huddersfield, as part of the SAVIAH (Small Area Variations in Air Quality and Health) project--uses data on traffic flows and land cover in the 300-m buffer zone around each site, and altitude of the site, as predictors of NO2 concentrations. It was tested here by application in four urban areas in the UK: Huddersfield (for the year following that used for initial model development), Sheffield, Northampton, and part of London. In each case, a GIS was built in ArcInfo, integrating relevant data on road traffic, urban land use and topography. Monitoring of NO2 was undertaken using replicate passive samplers (in London, data were obtained from surveys carried out as part of the London network). In Huddersfield, Sheffield and Northampton, the model was first calibrated by comparing modelled results with monitored NO2 concentrations at 10 randomly selected sites; the calibrated model was then validated against data from a further 10-28 sites. In London, where data for only 11 sites were available, validation was not undertaken. Results showed that the model performed well in all cases. After local calibration, the model gave estimates of mean annual NO2 concentrations within a factor of 1.5 of the actual mean (approx. 70-90%) of the time and within a factor of 2 between 70 and 100% of the time. r2 values between modelled and observed concentrations are in the range of 0.58-0.76. These results are comparable to those achieved by more sophisticated dispersion models. The model also has several advantages over dispersion modelling. It is able, for example, to provide

  1. Air Force nickel hydrogen cell low earth orbit life test - Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Carole A.; Matsumoto, James M.; Poston, Talmadge M.; Prater, Alonzo; Brown, Harry; Hall, Steve; House, Shaun

    A program status evaluation is presented for the USAF Ni-H2 LEO service life test scheme. A total of 142 such cells are currently being tested under simulated LEO conditions; as of 1992, over 28,000 operational cycles had been accumulated for the longest-running of these test packs. Performance superior to that obtainable for conventional NiCd batteries has been demonstrated by the data thus far gathered, and a data base for different cell sizes and manufacturers has been generated.

  2. Model test on underground coal gasification (UCG) with low-pressure fire seepage push-through. Part I: Test conditions and air fire seepage

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.H.

    2008-07-01

    The technology of a pushing-through gallery with oxygen-enriched fire-seepage combustion was studied during shaft-free UCG in this article, and the main experiment parameters were probed. The test results were analyzed in depth. The patterns of variation and development were pointed out for the fire source moving speed, temperature field, leakage rate, the expanding diameter for the gasification gallery, and blasting pressure. Test results showed that, with the increase in the wind-blasting volume, the moving velocity for the fire source speeded up, and the average temperature for the gallery continuously rose. Under the condition of oxygen-enriched air blasting, when O{sub 2} contents stood at 90%, the moving speed for the fire source was 4-5 times that of air blasting. In the push-through process, the average leakage rate for the blasting was 82.23%, with the average discharge volume of 3.43 m{sup 3}/h and average gallery diameter of 7.87 cm. With the proceeding of firepower seepage, the extent of dropping for the leakage rate increased rapidly, and the drop rate for the blasting pressure gradually heightened.

  3. Mechanical testing of ultra-high temperature ceramics at 1500°C in air - Development of an experimental facility and test method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winder, Sheena L.

    2015-10-01

    With a melting point in excess of 3000°C and a high density, ultra-high temperature ceramics (UHTCs) are a candidate material for hypersonic flight vehicles, atmospheric re-entry vehicles, and rocket propulsion systems. When ceramics are under consideration as a structural material, creep is an important design criterion and a life-limiting condition. However, the characterization of mechanical behavior at temperatures in excess of 1300°C has many challenges to overcome. Of utmost importance is the selection of materials for test fixtures. Materials selected must maintain their structural integrity, not cause chemical degradation of the test material, and not interfere with the acquisition of data at required temperatures in extreme environments over long durations. In this work, the thermo-chemical compatibility of hafnium diboride (HfB 2) UHTC with other high temperature materials was investigated. The findings enabled the development and construction of a mechanical testing facility capable of reaching 1700°C in air. Platinum foil proved unstable in the presence of HfB2 at 1500°C, while yttrium aluminum garnet and alumina were demonstrated to successfully perform as test fixture materials inside the test chamber. The results of this research represent a significant contribution towards the use of UHTCs in extreme environments associated with hypersonic flight and atmospheric re-entry.

  4. Test and evaluation of shale derived jet fuel by the United States Air Force

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, C.L.

    1985-01-01

    In June 1980, the United States Congress passed the Energy Security Act which provided for the formation of the United States Synthetic Fuels Corporation and amended the Defense Production Act of 1950 to provide for synthetic fuels for the Department of Defense (DOD). A subsequent law, P.L., 96-304, appropriated up to $20 billion for financial incentives to foster a national synthetic fuel industry. The initial synthetic fuel project funded under the Energy Security Act is the Unocal Parachute Creek Project in Colorado with an expected shale oil production of 10,000 bbls/day. The Defense Fuel Supply Center (DFSC) contracted with Gary Energy Refining Company, Fruita, Colorado to provide approximately 5,000 bbls/day of shale JP-4 for the United States Air Force (USAF) using crude from the Parachute Creek Project, with initial deliveries to begin in 1985.

  5. Air-breathing aerospace plane development essential: Hypersonic propulsion flight tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, Unmeel B.

    1995-01-01

    Hypersonic airbreathing propulsion utilizing scramjets can change transatmospheric accelerators for low earth-to-orbit and return transportation. The value and limitation of ground tests, of flight tests, and of computations are presented, and scramjet development requirements are discussed. It is proposed that near full-scale hypersonic propulsion flight tests are essential for developing computational design technology so that it can be used for designing this system. In order to determine how these objectives should be achieved, some lessons learned from past programs are presented. A conceptual two-stage-to-orbit (TSTO) prototype/experimental aerospace plane is recommended as a means of providing access-to-space and for conducting flight tests.

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION--GENERIC VERIFICATION PROTOCOL FOR BIOLOGICAL AND AEROSOL TESTING OF GENERAL VENTILATION AIR CLEANERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Under EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program, Research Triangle Institute (RTI) will operate the Air Pollution Control Technology Center to verify the filtration efficiency and bioaerosol inactivation efficiency of heating, ventilation and air conditioning air cleane...

  7. A ground test measurement system for the shuttle entry air data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutte, P. C.

    1983-01-01

    The Ground Test Measurement System (GTMS) for determining vacuum decay leak rate within the orifice tubing assembly of SEADS is described. The system can also monitor the absolute pressure in the tubing assembly under certain conditions. The GTMS determines leak rate by measuring vacuum-pressure decay which can be converted into leakage flow rate. Results of performance testing and operation of the GTMS are given.

  8. Microbial Growth and Air Pollutants in the Corrosion of Carbonate Rocks: Results from Laboratory and Outdoor Experimental Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moroni, B.; Poli, G.; Pitzurra, L.

    2003-04-01

    Microorganisms and atmospheric pollution are primary causes of deterioration of materials exposed to open air. Due to the variety of chemical-mineralogical compositions and textures, stone represents a variegated substrate that interacts with environmental fluids and particulate, and is a selective environment for biological proliferation. Carbonate rocks, in particular, are highly exposed to environmental decay and extremely susceptible to acid attack caused by atmospheric pollutants and metabolic acid production. The aim of this work is to study the combined effect of microbial contamination and atmospheric pollutants in the weathering of carbonate rocks by means of laboratory and outdoor exposure tests. Laboratory experiments performed on carbonate rocks allowed evaluation of the influence of the gas mixture in the chemical modifications of the lithic substrate, and formulation of a kinetic model of sulphation. The obtained results suggest that nucleation alternates with growth as leading processes in the development of sulphation. In particular, nucleation of the reaction products is the leading process in the initial period of sulphation, which is characterized by a marked slowdown of the reaction progress, whereas growth of the products is the leading process in the subsequent period of resumption of sulphation. In situ experiments performed by exposing limestone specimens at two air monitoring stations in Perugia with different degrees of urban air pollution showed high levels of fungal colonization at early times and the presence of weathering products (i.e. gypsum) in the longer term. Results point to a combined effect of microbial colonization and atmospheric pollutants in promoting the weathering of stone through acid attack within the film of water present on the surface of the exposed material, and through the oxidation of metal sulphide particulate pollutant to sulphate. Laboratory tests assaying the extent of fungal colonization and/or chemical

  9. A dual-surfactant approach for the interfacial partitioning tracer test measurement of air-water interfacial area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Ouni, A.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Interfacial partitioning tracer tests (IPTT) are one method available for measuring air-water interfacial area (A_ia). The method has been shown to provide uncertain measurements that are influenced by surfactant-enhanced drainage. The purpose of this work is to test a revised method that minimizes formation of interfacial-tension gradients in order to prevent surfactant-induced drainage. The method employs a dual-surfactant injection under steady unsaturated-flow conditions. Sodium dodecylbezene sulfonate (SDBS) and pentafluorobenzoic acid (PFBA) were used as the partitioning and nonreactive tracers, respectively. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) was used as the surfactant in the background solution. Three types of porous media were used for the study: a sandy soil, a well-sorted sand, and glass beads. Water saturation was monitored gravimetrically during the experiments. The results obtained with the revised method are compared to those obtained with the standard IPTT method.

  10. Application of wavelet filtering and Barker-coded pulse compression hybrid method to air-coupled ultrasonic testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhenggan; Ma, Baoquan; Jiang, Jingtao; Yu, Guang; Liu, Kui; Zhang, Dongmei; Liu, Weiping

    2014-10-01

    Air-coupled ultrasonic testing (ACUT) technique has been viewed as a viable solution in defect detection of advanced composites used in aerospace and aviation industries. However, the giant mismatch of acoustic impedance in air-solid interface makes the transmission efficiency of ultrasound low, and leads to poor signal-to-noise (SNR) ratio of received signal. The utilisation of signal-processing techniques in non-destructive testing is highly appreciated. This paper presents a wavelet filtering and phase-coded pulse compression hybrid method to improve the SNR and output power of received signal. The wavelet transform is utilised to filter insignificant components from noisy ultrasonic signal, and pulse compression process is used to improve the power of correlated signal based on cross-correction algorithm. For the purpose of reasonable parameter selection, different families of wavelets (Daubechies, Symlet and Coiflet) and decomposition level in discrete wavelet transform are analysed, different Barker codes (5-13 bits) are also analysed to acquire higher main-to-side lobe ratio. The performance of the hybrid method was verified in a honeycomb composite sample. Experimental results demonstrated that the proposed method is very efficient in improving the SNR and signal strength. The applicability of the proposed method seems to be a very promising tool to evaluate the integrity of high ultrasound attenuation composite materials using the ACUT.

  11. Evaluation of dust-related health hazards associated with air coring at G-Tunnel, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Skaggs, B.J.; Ortiz, L.W.; Burton, D.J.; Isom, B.L.; Vigil, E.A.

    1991-03-01

    The Yucca Mountain Project was established to evaluate the potential for storing high-level radioactive wastes in geologic formations. Hydrologists recommended that drilling or coring in support of characterization tests be performed dry. Dry drilling, or air coring, presents a concern about health protection for the drilling personnel. The rock generally has a high silica content, and natural zeolites are abundant. Some zeolites are fibrous, leading to concerns that inhalation may result in asbestos-like lung diseases. An industrial hygiene study (IH) was conducted as part of an air coring technical feasibility test. The IH study found the potential for exposures to airborne silica and nuisance dusts to be within regulatory requirements and determined the commercial dust control equipment monitored to be effective when used in conjunction with a good area ventilation system and sound IH practices. Fibrous zeolites were not detected. Recommendations for the Yucca Mountain studies are (1) dust collection and control equipment equivalent or superior to that monitored must be used for any dry drilling activity and must be used with good general dilution ventilation and local exhaust ventilation provided on major emission sources; (2) good industrial hygiene work practices must be implemented, including monitoring any area where zeolitic fibers are suspect; and (3) a study should be conducted to determine the biological effects of the fibrous zeolite, mordenite. 25 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Project Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle Aeroheating: LaRC 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel Test 6931

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, Brian R.

    2009-01-01

    An investigation of the aeroheating environment of the Project Orion Crew Entry Vehicle has been performed in the Langley Research Center 20-Inch Mach 6 Air Tunnel. Data were measured on a approx.3.5% scale model (0.1778-m/7-inch diameter) of the vehicle using coaxial thermocouples at free stream Reynolds numbers of 2.0 10(exp 6)/ft to 7.30 10(exp 6)/ft and computational predictions were generated for all test conditions. The primary goals of this test were to obtain convective heating data for use in assessing the accuracy of the computational technique and to validate test methodology and heating data from a test of the same wind tunnel model in the Arnold Engineering Development Center Tunnel 9. Secondary goals were to determine the extent of transitional/turbulent data which could be produced on a CEV model in this facility, either with or without boundary-layer trips, and to demonstrate continuous pitch-sweep operation in this tunnel for heat transfer testing.

  13. Field test of the Electric Fuel{trademark} zinc-air refuelable battery system for electric vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, J.R.; Koretz, B.; Harats, Y.

    1996-12-31

    The Electric Fuel Limited (EFL) zinc-air refuelable battery system will be tested over the next two years in a number of electric vehicle demonstration projects, the largest of which is an $18-million, 64-vehicle, two-year test sponsored chiefly by Deutsche Post AG (the German Post Corporation). The German field test is the largest-ever EV fleet test of a single advanced-battery technology. It also represents a marked departure from other EV test and demonstration programs, in that it is being sponsored not by government or electric utility interests, but by large fleet operators committed to shifting significant proportions of their vehicles to electric over the next 5--10 years. The Electric Fuel battery has specific energy of 200 Wh/kg, an achievement that allows electric vehicles to go as far on a charge as conventionally fueled vehicles go on a tank of gasoline. Fast, convenient refueling eliminates the need for lengthy electrical recharging, and clean, centralized zinc regeneration plants ensure the most efficient and environment-friendly use of energy resources.

  14. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description, Capabilities, and Analytical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, William T.; Daniels, Jeffrey; Nikolich, George; Shadel, Craig; Giles, Ken; Karr, Lynn; Kluesner, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Activity. DRI has operated these stations since that time. A third station was deployed in the period May to September 2011. The TTR is located within the northwest corner of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (280 mi2). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from Soils Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  15. Air Monitoring Network at Tonopah Test Range: Network Description and Capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Tappen; George Nikolich; Ken Giles; David Shafer; Tammy Kluesner

    2010-05-18

    During the period April to June 2008, at the behest of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO); the Desert Research Institute (DRI) constructed and deployed two portable environmental monitoring stations at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR) as part of the Environmental Restoration Project Soils Sub-Project. The TTR is located within the boundaries of the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR) near the northern edge, and covers an area of approximately 725.20 km2 (179,200 acres). The primary objective of the monitoring stations is to evaluate whether and under what conditions there is wind transport of radiological contaminants from one of the three Soil Sub-Project Corrective Action Units (CAUs) associated with Operation Roller Coaster on TTR. Operation Roller Coaster was a series of tests, conducted in 1963, designed to examine the stability and dispersal of plutonium in storage and transportation accidents. These tests did not result in any nuclear explosive yield. However, the tests did result in the dispersal of plutonium and contamination of surface soils in the surrounding area.

  16. Experimental tests and predictive model of an adsorptive air conditioning unit

    SciTech Connect

    Poyelle, F.; Guilleminot, J.J.; Meunier, F.

    1999-01-01

    An adsorption air conditioning unit has been built operating with a heat nd mass recovery cycle and a zeolite-water pair. A new consolidated adsorbent composite with good heat transfer properties has been developed and implemented in the adsorber. At an evaporating temperature of 4 C, the experimental specific cooling power (SCP) of 97 W/kg achieved represents a real improvement in comparison with those measured with a packed bed technology. At this evaporating pressure, the mass transfer resistance controls the process. Therefore, at higher evaporating temperature a COP of 0.68 and a SCP of 135 W/kg were experimentally achieved. A new model has been developed to take into account the mass transfer limitations. The model has been validated and can predict the average pressure inside the adsorber and the components temperature of the unit. A new high conductive material with enhanced mass transfer properties has been developed. The predictive model shows that a SCP of 600 W/kg and a COP of 0.74 could be achieved with this new material.

  17. 75 FR 31223 - Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Residential Central Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... method for crediting heat pumps that provide a demand defrost capability. 53 FR 8304. The next revision... FR 76700. DOE modified the test procedure on March 14, 1988, to expand coverage to variable- speed... October 11, 2005, and became effective on April 10, 2006. 70 FR 59122. The October 2005 final...

  18. DESIGN, FABRICATION AND TESTING OF THE AIR-JET OIL BOOM

    EPA Science Inventory

    This novel boom has the capability to divert oil slicks under wave and current conditions that normally preclude the development of conventional booms. Tests at the EPA's OHMSETT facility have demonstrated that this boom can divert oil slicks at 3 knots with 85 percent efficiency...

  19. COMPENSATING FOR WALL EFFECTS IN IAQ (INDOOR AIR QUALITY) CHAMBER TESTS BY MATHEMATICAL MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents mechanistic mathematical models that account for two phenomena: interior surfaces of a state-of-the-art emissions test chamber acting as a transient sink for organic emissions; the effect of increasing chamber concentration on the emission rate of the source. A...

  20. China Energy Efficiency Round Robin Testing Results for Room Air Conditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; Zheng, Nina; Pierrot, Andre

    2010-06-07

    of all countries energy strategies. As we all know, a very large amount of total energy consumption is due to energy consuming products and equipment, which account for about 50% of China's total energy consumption. However, the current average energy utilization efficiency of this sector is only about 60%, 10 percent lower than the international advanced level. Therefore, China's energy consuming products and equipment sector holds great energy-saving potential. On the other hand, the energy supplied to these products is mainly from fossil fuel combustion, a major source of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Therefore, improving the energy efficiency and augmenting the market share of market-dominant energy consuming products is of significant importance to achieving China's energy saving and emission reduction target and is an effective means to deal with energy and environmental constraints and climate change issues. Main energy consuming products generally include widely-used home appliances, industrial equipment, office equipment, transportation vehicles, etc. China is one of the major manufacturers and exporters of energy end-using products such as air-conditioners, refrigerators, televisions, etc. Their overall energy efficiency is comparatively low and the products are poorly designed, leading to great energy-saving potential. For example, electricity consumption of air conditioners accounts for about 20% of China's total electricity consumption and 40% of the summer electricity peak load in large and medium cities. However, less than 5% of units sold in the domestic market in 2009 reached the standard's highly efficient level of grade 2 above. The electricity consumption of electric motors and their related drive systems accounts for about 60% of China's total electricity consumption; however, less than 2% of the domestic market share consists of energy-efficient electric motor products. Promoting the energy efficiency and market shares of main energy

  1. High altitude AM0 testing of PV concentrator lens elements. [Air Mass Zero

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, M. F.; Brinker, D. J.; Boyer, E. O.; Mcknight, R. C.; Ranaudo, R. J.

    1990-01-01

    Recently, the NASA Lewis Research Center modified its Lear High Altitude Test Facility to fly two prototype ENTECH minidome Fresnel lens photovoltaic concentrator elements. The tests were highly successful, and the results verified the ability of the Lear High Altitude Facility to measure the optical performance of individual concentrator lens elements and concentrator/cell combinations at near AM0 insolation conditions. The two concentrator lenses flown achieved optical efficiencies, based on a gallium arsenide concentrator cell response, of 89.8 percent and 90.0 percent. The flights demonstrated the ability of the aircraft to maintain the pointing accuracy required to obtain useful data. With proper alignment of the collimating tube and the pilot's sunsight, this facility could easily maintain a pointing accuracy of + or - 0.5 deg for a sufficiently long time to obtain accurate, reproducible results.

  2. Development, solar test, and evaluation of a high-temperature air receiver for point-focusing parabolic dish applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanseth, E. J.

    1981-01-01

    A high temperature solar receiver was fabricated and tested in excess of 1370 C on an 11-meter-diameter test bed concentrator at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Parabolic Dish Test Site, Edwards, California. The 60-kilowatt thermal receiver design utilizes state-of-the-art silicon carbide honeycomb matrix panels to receive and transfer the solar energy and mullite elements for thermal buffer storage. Solar tests were conducted with indicated air exit temperatures ranging from 885 C (1625 F) to 1427 C (2600 F), mass flow rates of 75 to 105 g/sec (0.16 to 0.23 lbm/sec), and pressures up to 265 kPa absolute (38.4 psia). Estimates of efficiency are 59.7% at 1120 C (2048 F) to 80.6% at 885 C (1625 F) when aperture spillage losses are considered separately. Results are presented which demonstrate the feasibility of this innovative receiver concept for point-focusing parabolic dish applications over a wide temperature range.

  3. Effects of biodiesel on emissions of regulated air pollutants and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons under engine durability testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hsi-Hsien; Chien, Shu-Mei; Lo, Mei-Yu; Lan, John Chi-Wei; Lu, Wen-Chang; Ku, Yong-Yuan

    An 80,000-km durability test was performed on two engines using diesel and biodiesel (methyl ester of waste cooking oil) as fuel in order to examine emissions resulting from the use of biodiesel. The test biodiesel (B20) was blended with 80% diesel and 20% methyl ester derived from waste cooking oil. Emissions of regulated air pollutants, including CO, HC, NO x, particulate matter (PM) and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were measured at 20,000-km intervals. The identical-model engines were installed on a standard dynamometer equipped with a dilution tunnel used to measure the pollutants. To simulate real-world driving conditions, emission measurements were made in accordance with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) FTP transient cycle guidelines. At 0 km of the durability test, HC, CO and PM emission levels were lower for the B20 engine than those for diesel. After running for 20,000 km and longer, they were higher. However, the deterioration coefficients for these regulated air pollutants were not statistically higher than 1.0, implying that the emission factors do not increase significantly after 80,000 km of driving. Total (gaseous+particulate phase) PAH emission levels for both B20 and diesel decreased as the driving mileage accumulated. However, for the engine using B20 fuel, particulate PAH emissions increased as engine mileage increased. The average total PAH emission factors were 1097 and 1437 μg bhp h -1 for B20 and diesel, respectively. For B20, the benzo[ a]pyrene equivalence emission factors were 0.77, 0.24, 0.20, 7.48, 5.43 and 14.1 μg bhp h -1 for 2-, 3-, 4-, 5-, 6-ringed and total PAHs. Results show that B20 use can reduce both PAH emission and its corresponding carcinogenic potency.

  4. AIRSLUG: A fortran program for the computation of type curves to estimate transmissivity and storativity from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Greene, E.A.; Shapiro, A.M.

    1998-01-01

    The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.The Fortran code AIRSLUG can be used to generate the type curves needed to analyze the recovery data from prematurely terminated air-pressurized slug tests. These type curves, when used with a graphical software package, enable the engineer or scientist to analyze field tests to estimate transmissivity and storativity. Prematurely terminating the slug test can significantly reduce the overall time needed to conduct the test, especially at low-permeability sites, thus saving time and money.

  5. Testing of a PC-based regional air quality modeling system

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, K.T.; Cuq, F.

    1998-12-31

    Current regional modeling practice requires the use of a mesoscale model such as CSUMM or MM5 to generate the windfields and other meteorological inputs, and a photochemical grid model such as UAM or SAQM-AERO to predict ozone and PM concentrations. These models require extensive resources and are frequently operational on supercomputers and Unix workstations. Costs for running them on these computers are prohibitive, especially the analysis of different control strategies that may require dozens of model simulations. This paper describes the development and adaptation of regional models for running on inexpensive Pentium PCs. Benchmark tests using actual episodes are also compared against Cray supercomputers and Unix workstations.

  6. L(sub 1) Adaptive Control Design for NASA AirSTAR Flight Test Vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Irene M.; Cao, Chengyu; Hovakimyan, Naira; Zou, Xiaotian

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present a new L(sub 1) adaptive control architecture that directly compensates for matched as well as unmatched system uncertainty. To evaluate the L(sub 1) adaptive controller, we take advantage of the flexible research environment with rapid prototyping and testing of control laws in the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research system at the NASA Langley Research Center. We apply the L(sub 1) adaptive control laws to the subscale turbine powered Generic Transport Model. The presented results are from a full nonlinear simulation of the Generic Transport Model and some preliminary pilot evaluations of the L(sub 1) adaptive control law.

  7. Implementation and testing of a simple data assimilation algorithm in the regional air pollution forecast model, DEOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydendall, J.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.

    2009-08-01

    A simple data assimilation algorithm based on statistical interpolation has been developed and coupled to a long-range chemistry transport model, the Danish Eulerian Operational Model (DEOM), applied for air pollution forecasting at the National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Denmark. In this paper, the algorithm and the results from experiments designed to find the optimal setup of the algorithm are described. The algorithm has been developed and optimized via eight different experiments where the results from different model setups have been tested against measurements from the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) network covering a half-year period, April-September 1999. The best performing setup of the data assimilation algorithm for surface ozone concentrations has been found, including the combination of determining the covariances using the Hollingsworth method, varying the correlation length according to the number of adjacent observation stations and applying the assimilation routine at three successive hours during the morning. Improvements in the correlation coefficient in the range of 0.1 to 0.21 between the results from the reference and the optimal configuration of the data assimilation algorithm, were found. The data assimilation algorithm will in the future be used in the operational THOR integrated air pollution forecast system, which includes the DEOM.

  8. Implementation and testing of a simple data assimilation algorithm in the regional air pollution forecast model, DEOM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frydendall, J.; Brandt, J.; Christensen, J. H.

    2009-03-01

    A simple data assimilation algorithm based on statistical interpolation has been developed and coupled to a long-range chemistry transport model, the Danish Eulerian Operational Model (DEOM), applied for air pollution forecasting at the National Environmental Research Institute (NERI), Denmark. In this paper, the algorithm and the results from experiments designed to find the optimal setup of the algorithm are described. The algorithm has been developed and optimized via eight different experiments where the results from different model setups have been tested against measurements from the EMEP (European Monitoring and Evaluation Programme) network covering a half-year period, April-September 1999. The best performing setup of the data assimilation algorithm for surface ozone concentrations has been found, including the combination of determining the covariances using the Hollingsworth method, varying the correlation length according to the number of adjacent observation stations and applying the assimilation routine at three successive hours during the morning. Improvements in the correlation coefficient in the range of 0.1 to 0.21 between the results from the reference and the optimal configuration of the data assimilation algorithm, were found. The data assimilation algorithm will in the future be used in the operational THOR integrated air pollution forecast system, which includes the DEOM.

  9. Nonpoint-pollution discharge permit testing and control strategies at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Vogelsang, K.G.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze systematically a nonpoint storm water monitoring program at Naval Air Station Whidbey Island, Washington, to determine if more relevant data can be obtained at lower cost by revising the sampling location, frequency, or pollutants of interest. Current remedial investigations of contaminants in sediments, station hazardous material use information and station management plans provided the bulk of the data. Review of watersheds indicated that potential contamination by 26 compounds may be present in the storm runoff. Testing to identify the presence of these compounds is required to renew an existing National Pollution Discharge Elimination System permit for the air station. It was also found that the frequency of sampling could be reduced from 52 events per year to about 30 with no significant loss of statistical accuracy, thereby reducing the recurring cost of the sampling program. Also discussed are management practices and structural improvements that are technically feasible for controlling the two most significant pollutants, oil and grease and suspended solids. Best Management Practices are recommended to prevent or clean the spill of aviation fuel at the spill location. Use of synthetic oil-sorbent booms is recommended in lieu of the existing baffle treatment system.

  10. Prioritizing testing of organic compounds detected as gas phase air pollutants: structure-activity study for human contact allergens.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R; Macina, O T; Graham, C; Rosenkranz, H S; Cass, G R; Karol, M H

    1997-01-01

    Organic compounds that are used or generated anthropogenically in large quantities in cities can be identified through their presence in the urban atmosphere and in air pollutant source emissions. Compounds identified by this method were screened to evaluate their potential to act as contact allergens. The CASE and MULTICASE computer programs, which are based on the detection of structure-activity relationships (SAR), were used to evaluate this potential. These relationships first are determined by comparing chemical structures to biological activity within a learning set comprised of 458 compounds, each of which had been tested experimentally in human trials for its sensitization potential. Using the information contained in this learning set, CASE and MULTICASE predicted the activity of 238 compounds found in the atmosphere for their ability to act as contact allergens. The analysis finds that 21 of 238 compounds are predicted to be active contact allergens (probability >0.5), with potencies ranging from mild to very strong. The compounds come from chemical classes that include chlorinated aromatics and chlorinated hydrocarbons, N-containing compounds, phenols, alkenes, and an S-containing compound. Using the measured airborne concentrations or emission rates of these compounds as an indication of the extent of their use, together with their predicted potencies, provides an efficient method to prioritize the experimental assessment of contact sensitization of untested organic compounds that can be detected as air pollutants. Images Figure 1. PMID:9300925

  11. Water cooling system for an air-breathing hypersonic test vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petley, Dennis H.; Dziedzic, William M.

    1993-01-01

    This study provides concepts for hypersonic experimental scramjet test vehicles which have low cost and low risk. Cryogenic hydrogen is used as the fuel and coolant. Secondary water cooling systems were designed. Three concepts are shown: an all hydrogen cooling system, a secondary open loop water cooled system, and a secondary closed loop water cooled system. The open loop concept uses high pressure helium (15,000 psi) to drive water through the cooling system while maintaining the pressure in the water tank. The water flows through the turbine side of the turbopump to pump hydrogen fuel. The water is then allowed to vent. In the closed loop concept high pressure, room temperature, compressed liquid water is circulated. In flight water pressure is limited to 6000 psi by venting some of the water. Water is circulated through cooling channels via an ejector which uses high pressure gas to drive a water jet. The cooling systems are presented along with finite difference steady-state and transient analysis results. The results from this study indicate that water used as a secondary coolant can be designed to increase experimental test time, produce minimum venting of fluid and reduce overall development cost.

  12. Steam Methane Reformation Testing for Air-Independent Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mwara, Kamwana N.

    2015-01-01

    Recently, NASA has been looking into utilizing landers that can be propelled by LOX-CH (sub 4), to be used for long duration missions. Using landers that utilize such propellants, also provides the opportunity to use solid oxide fuel cells as a power option, especially since they are able to process methane into a reactant through fuel reformation. One type of reformation, called steam methane reformation, is a process to reform methane into a hydrogen-rich product by reacting methane and steam (fuel cell exhaust) over a catalyst. A steam methane reformation system could potentially use the fuel cell's own exhaust to create a reactant stream that is hydrogen-rich, and requires less internal reforming of the incoming methane. Also, steam reformation may hold some advantages over other types of reforming, such as partial oxidation (PROX) reformation. Steam reformation does not require oxygen, while up to 25 percent can be lost in PROX reformation due to unusable CO (sub 2) reformation. NASA's Johnson Space Center has conducted various phases of steam methane reformation testing, as a viable solution for in-space reformation. This has included using two different types of catalysts, developing a custom reformer, and optimizing the test system to find the optimal performance parameters and operating conditions.

  13. Testing an advanced satellite technique for dust detection as a decision support system for the air quality assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falconieri, Alfredo; Filizzola, Carolina; Femiano, Rossella; Marchese, Francesco; Sannazzaro, Filomena; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio; Di Muro, Ersilia; Divietri, Mariella; Crisci, Anna Maria; Lovallo, Michele; Mangiamele, Lucia; Vaccaro, Maria Pia; Palma, Achille

    2014-05-01

    In order to correctly apply the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE), local Authorities are often requested to discriminate the possible origin (natural/anthropic) of anomalous concentration of pollutants in the air (art.20 Directive 2008/50/CE). In this framework, it's been focused on PM10 and PM2,5 concentrations and sources. In fact, depending on their origin, appropriate counter-measures can be taken devoted to prevent their production (e.g. by traffic restriction) or simply to reduce their impact on citizen health (e.g. information campaigns). In this context suitable satellite techniques can be used in order to identify natural sources (particularly Saharan dust, but also volcanic ash or forest fire smoke) that can be responsible of over-threshold concentration of PM10/2,5 in populated areas. In the framework of the NIBS (Networking and Internationalization of Basilicata Space Technologies) project, funded by the Basilicata Region within the ERDF 2007-2013 program, the School of Engineering of University of Basilicata, the Institute of Methodologies for Environmental Analysis of National Research Council (IMAA-CNR) and the Regional Agency for the Protection of the Environment of Basilicata Region (ARPAB) have started a collaboration devoted to assess the potential of the use of advanced satellite techniques for Saharan dust events identification to support ARPAB activities related to the application of the European directive for air quality (2008/50/CE) in Basilicata region. In such a joint activity, the Robust Satellite Technique (RST) approach has been assessed and tested as a decision support system for monitoring and evaluating air quality at local and regional level. In particular, RST-DUST products, derived by processing high temporal resolution data provided by SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager) sensor on board Meteosat Second Generation platforms, have been analysed together with PM10 measurements performed by the ground

  14. Launch vehicle effluent measurements during the May 12, 1977, Titan 3 launch at Air Force Eastern Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, G. L.; Bendura, R. J.; Woods, D. C.

    1979-01-01

    Airborne effluent measurements and cloud physical behavior for the May 21, 1977, Titan 3 launch from the Air Force Eastern Test Range, Fla. are presented. The monitoring program included airborne effluent measurements in situ in the launch cloud, visible and infrared photography of cloud growth and physical behavior, and limited surface collection of rain samples. Airborne effluent measurements included concentrations of HCl, NO, NOx, and aerosols as a function of time in the exhaust cloud. For the first time in situ particulate mass concentration and aerosol number density were measured as a function of time and size in the size range of 0.05 to 25 micro meters diameter. Measurement results were similar to those of earlier launch monitorings. Maximum HCl and NOx concentrations ranged from 10 ppm and 500 ppb, respectively, several minutes after launch to about 1 ppm and 100 ppb at 45 minutes after launch.

  15. Can citizen science produce good science? Testing the OPAL Air Survey methodology, using lichens as indicators of nitrogenous pollution.

    PubMed

    Tregidgo, Daniel J; West, Sarah E; Ashmore, Mike R

    2013-11-01

    Citizen science is having increasing influence on environmental monitoring as its advantages are becoming recognised. However methodologies are often simplified to make them accessible to citizen scientists. We tested whether a recent citizen science survey (the OPAL Air Survey) could detect trends in lichen community composition over transects away from roads. We hypothesised that the abundance of nitrophilic lichens would decrease with distance from the road, while that of nitrophobic lichens would increase. The hypothesised changes were detected along strong pollution gradients, but not where the road source was relatively weak, or background pollution relatively high. We conclude that the simplified OPAL methodology can detect large contrasts in nitrogenous pollution, but it may not be able to detect more subtle changes in pollution exposure. Similar studies are needed in conjunction with the ever-growing body of citizen science work to ensure that the limitations of these methods are fully understood. PMID:23631940

  16. Testing usability and trainability of indirect touch interaction: perspective for the next generation of air traffic control systems.

    PubMed

    Causse, Mickaël; Alonso, Roland; Vachon, François; Parise, Robert; Orliaguet, Jean-Pierre; Tremblay, Sébastien; Terrier, Patrice

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether indirect touch device can be used to interact with graphical objects displayed on another screen in an air traffic control (ATC) context. The introduction of such a device likely requires an adaptation of the sensory-motor system. The operator has to simultaneously perform movements on the horizontal plane while assessing them on the vertical plane. Thirty-six right-handed participants performed movement training with either constant or variable practice and with or without visual feedback of the displacement of their actions. Participants then performed a test phase without visual feedback. Performance improved in both practice conditions, but accuracy was higher with visual feedback. During the test phase, movement time was longer for those who had practiced with feedback, suggesting an element of dependency. However, this 'cost' of feedback did not extend to movement accuracy. Finally, participants who had received variable training performed better in the test phase, but accuracy was still unsatisfactory. We conclude that continuous visual feedback on the stylus position is necessary if tablets are to be introduced in ATC. PMID:25050968

  17. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  18. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  19. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  20. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  1. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  2. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  3. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  4. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  5. 42 CFR 84.163 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C supplied-air respirators, demand and pressure-demand classes; test requirements. 84.163 Section 84.163 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL...

  6. 42 CFR 84.162 - Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Man test for gases and vapors; Type C respirators, continuous-flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirators; test requirements. 84.162 Section 84.162 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES...

  7. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps M Appendix M to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. M Appendix M to Subpart B...

  8. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps M Appendix M to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. M Appendix M to Subpart B...

  9. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps M Appendix M to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. M Appendix M to Subpart B...

  10. 10 CFR Appendix M to Subpart B of... - Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Uniform Test Method for Measuring the Energy Consumption of Central Air Conditioners and Heat Pumps M Appendix M to Subpart B of Part 430 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CONSERVATION PROGRAM FOR CONSUMER PRODUCTS Test Procedures Pt. 430, Subpt. B, App. M Appendix M to Subpart B...

  11. Testing flow-through air samplers for use in near-field vapour drift studies by measuring pyrimethanil in air after spraying.

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Trudyanne S; Hageman, Kimberly J; Hewitt, Andrew J

    2014-03-01

    Pesticide volatilisation and subsequent vapour drift reduce a pesticide's efficiency and contribute to environmental contamination. High-volume air samplers (HVSs) are often used to measure pesticide concentrations in air but these samplers are expensive to purchase and require network electricity, limiting the number and type of sites where they can be deployed. The flow-through sampler (FTS) presents an opportunity to overcome these limitations. The FTS is a wind-driven passive sampler that has been developed to quantify organic contaminants in remote ecosystems. FTSs differ from other passive samplers in that they turn into the wind and use the wind to draw air through the sampling media. The main objective of this work was to evaluate the FTS in a near-field pesticide vapour drift study by comparing the concentrations of pyrimethanil in air measured using one HVS and three FTSs placed in the same location. Pyrimethanil was sprayed onto a vineyard as part of normal pest management procedures. Air samples were collected every eight hours for 48 h. The volume of air sampled by the FTSs was calculated using the measured relationship between ambient wind speed and the wind speed inside the sampler as determined with a separate wind tunnel study. The FTSs sampled 1.7 to 40.6 m(3) of air during each 8 h sampling period, depending on wind speed, whereas the mean volume sampled by the HVS was 128.7 m(3). Mean pyrimethanil concentrations ranged from 0.4 to 3.2 μg m(-3) of air. Inter-sampler reproducibility, as represented by percent relative standard deviation, for the three FTSs was ∼20%. The largest difference in FTS-derived versus HVS-derived pyrimethanil concentrations occurred during the lowest wind-speed period. During this period, it is likely that the FTS predominately acted like a traditional diffusion-based passive sampler. As indicated by both types of sampler, pyrimethanil concentrations in air changed by a factor of ∼2 during the two days after spaying

  12. Genotoxicity of Air Borne Particulates Assessed by Comet and the Salmonella Mutagenicity Test in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    ElAssouli, Sufian M.; AlQahtani, Mohamed H.; Milaat, Waleed

    2007-01-01

    Fine airborne respirable particulates less than 10 micrometer (PM10) are considered one of the top environmental public health concerns, since they contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) which are among the major carcinogenic compounds found in urban air. The objective of this study is to assess the genotoxicity of the ambient PM10 collected at 11 urban sites in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The PM10 extractable organic matter (EOM) was examined for its genotoxicity by the single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) comet assay and the Salmonella mutagenicity (Ames) test. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to quantify 16 PAH compounds in four sites. Samples from oil refinery and heavy diesel vehicles traffic sites showed significant DNA damage causing comet in 20–44% of the cells with tail moments ranging from 0.5–2.0 compared to samples from petrol driven cars and residential area, with comet in less than 2% of the cells and tail moments of < 0.02.In the Ames test, polluted sites showed indirect mutagenic response and caused 20–56 rev/ m3, mean while residential and reference sites caused 2–15 rev /m3. The genotoxicity of the EOM in both tests directly correlated with the amount of organic particulate and the PAHs concentrations in the air samples. The PAHs concentrations ranged between 0.83 ng/m3 in industrial and heavy diesel vehicles traffic sites to 0.18 ng /m3 in the residential area. Benzo(ghi)pyrene was the major PAH components and at one site it represented 65.4 % of the total PAHs. Samples of the oil refinery site were more genotoxic in the SCGE assay than samples from the heavy diesel vehicles traffic site, despite the fact that both sites contain almost similar amount of PAHs. The opposite was true for the mutagenicity in the Ames test. This could be due to the nature of the EOM in both sites. These findings confirm the genotoxic potency of the PM10 organic extracts to which urban populations are exposed. PMID:17911660

  13. Copper contamination effects on hydrogen-air combustion under SCRAMJET (supersonic combustion ramjet) testing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, S.L.; Lottes, S.A.; Berry, G.F.

    1990-01-01

    Two forms of copper catalytic reactions (homogeneous and heterogeneous) in hydrogen flames were found in a literature survey. Hydrogen atoms in flames recombine into hydrogen molecules through catalytic reactions, and these reactions which affect the timing of the combustion process. Simulations of hydrogen flames with copper contamination were conducted by using a modified general chemical kinetics program (GCKP). Results show that reaction times of hydrogen flames are shortened by copper catalytic reactions, but ignition times are relatively insensitive to the reactions. The reduction of reaction time depends on the copper concentration, copper phase, particle size (if copper is in the condensed phase), and initial temperature and pressure. The higher the copper concentration of the smaller the particle, the larger the reduction in reaction time. For a supersonic hydrogen flame (Mach number = 4.4) contaminated with 200 ppm of gaseous copper species, the calculated reaction times are reduced by about 9%. Similar reductions in reaction time are also computed for heterogeneous copper contamination. Under scramjet testing conditions, the change of combustion timing appears to be tolerable (less than 5%) if the Mach number is lower than 3 or the copper contamination is less than 100 ppm. The higher rate the Mach number, the longer the reaction time and the larger the copper catalytic effects. 7 tabs., 8 figs., 34 refs.

  14. Post-test evaluation of the geology, geochemistry, microbiology, and hydrology of the in situ air stripping demonstration site at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Eddy Dilek, C.A.; Looney, B.B.; Hazen, T.C.; Nichols, R.L.; Fliermans, C.B.; Parker, W.H.; Dougherty, J.M.; Kaback, D.S.; Simmons, J.L.

    1993-07-01

    A full-scale demonstration of the use of horizontal wells for in situ air stripping for environment restoration was completed as part of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Program. The demonstration of in situ air stripping was the first in a series of demonstrations of innovative remediation technologies for the cleanup of sites contaminated with volatile organic contaminants. The in situ air stripping system consisted of two directionally drilled wells that delivered gases to and extract contamination from the subsurface. The demonstration was designed to remediate soils and sediments in the unsaturated and saturated zones as well as groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds. The demonstration successfully removed significant quantities of solvent from the subsurface. The field site and horizontal wells were subsequently used for an in situ bioremediation demonstration during which methane was added to the injected air. The field conditions documented herein represent the baseline status of the site for evaluating the in situ bioremediation as well as the post-test conditions for the in situ air stripping demonstration. Characterization activities focused on documenting the nature and distribution of contamination in the subsurface. The post-test characterization activities discussed herein include results from the analysis of sediment samples, three-dimensional images of the pretest and post-test data, contaminant inventories estimated from pretest and post-test models, a detailed lithologic cross sections of the site, results of aquifer testing, and measurements of geotechnical parameters of undisturbed core sediments.

  15. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... power requirements to roadload dynamometer requirements. AC2 simulates, in standard test cell ambient...)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar heat...)(5)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar...

  16. 40 CFR 86.162-00 - Approval of alternative air conditioning test simulations and descriptions of AC1 and AC2.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... power requirements to roadload dynamometer requirements. AC2 simulates, in standard test cell ambient...)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar heat...)(5)(i) (A) and (B) are replaced with 76 °F and 50 grains of water/pound of dry air and the solar...

  17. Application of nonparametric regression and statistical testing to identify the impact of oil and natural gas development on local air quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hanqi; Small, Mitchell J.; Pekney, Natalie J.

    2015-10-01

    The objective of the current work was to develop a statistical method and associated tool to evaluate the impact of oil and natural gas exploration and production activities on local air quality. Nonparametric regression of pollutant concentrations on wind direction was combined with bootstrap hypothesis testing to provide statistical inference regarding the existence of a local/regional air quality impact. The block bootstrap method was employed to address the effect of autocorrelation on test significance. The method was applied to short-term air monitoring data collected at three sites within Pennsylvania's Allegheny National Forest. All of the measured pollutant concentrations were well below the National Ambient Air Quality Standards, so the usual criteria and methods for data analysis were not sufficient. Using advanced directional analysis methods, test results were first applied to verify the existence of a regional impact at a background site. Next the impact of an oil field on local NOx and SO2 concentrations at a second monitoring site was identified after removal of the regional effect. Analysis of a third site also revealed air quality impacts from nearby areas with a high density of oil and gas wells. All results and conclusions were quantified in terms of statistical significance level for the associated inferences. The proposed method can be used to formulate hypotheses and verify conclusions regarding oil and gas well impacts on air quality and support better-informed decisions for their management and regulation.

  18. Relationship between Air Traffic Selection and Training (AT-SAT)) Battery Test Scores and Composite Scores in the Initial en Route Air Traffic Control Qualification Training Course at the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ronald Scott

    2012-01-01

    Scope and Method of Study: This study focused on the development and use of the AT-SAT test battery and the Initial En Route Qualification training course for the selection, training, and evaluation of air traffic controller candidates. The Pearson product moment correlation coefficient was used to measure the linear relationship between the…

  19. Performance Testing of a Magnetically Suspended Double Gimbal Control Moment Gyro Based on the Single Axis Air Bearing Table

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10−3°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs. PMID:23012536

  20. Biologic surveys for the Sandia National Laboratories, Coyote Canyon Test Complex, Kirtland Air Force Base, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, R.M.; Knight, P.J.

    1994-05-25

    This report provides results of a comprehensive biologic survey performed in Coyote Canyon Test Complex (CCTC), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), Bernalillo County, New Mexico, which was conducted during the spring and summer of 1992 and 1993. CCTC is sited on land owned by the Department of Energy (DOE) and Kirtland Air Force Base and managed by SNL. The survey covered 3,760 acres of land, most of which is rarely disturbed by CCTC operations. Absence of grazing by livestock and possibly native ungulates, and relative to the general condition of private range lands throughout New Mexico, and relative to other grazing lands in central New Mexico. Widely dispersed, low intensity use by SNL as well as prohibition of grazing has probably contributed to abundance of special status species such as grama grass cactus within the CCTC area. This report evaluates threatened and endangered species found in the area, as well as comprehensive assessment of biologic habitats. Included are analyses of potential impacts and mitigative measures designed to reduce or eliminate potential impacts. Included is a summary of CCTC program and testing activities.

  1. Performance testing of a magnetically suspended double gimbal control moment gyro based on the single axis air bearing table.

    PubMed

    Cui, Peiling; Zhang, Huijuan; Yan, Ning; Fang, Jiancheng

    2012-01-01

    Integrating the advantage of magnetic bearings with a double gimble control moment gyroscope (DGCMG), a magnetically suspended DGCMG (MSDGCMG) is an ideal actuator in high-precision, long life, and rapid maneuver attitude control systems. The work presented here mainly focuses on performance testing of a MSDGCMG independently developed by Beihang University, based on the single axis air bearing table. In this paper, taking into sufficient consideration to the moving-gimbal effects and the response bandwidth limit of the gimbal, a special MSDGCMG steering law is proposed subject to the limits of gimbal angle rate and angle acceleration. Finally, multiple experiments are carried out, with different MSDGCMG angular momenta as well as different desired attitude angles. The experimental results indicate that the MSDGCMG has a good gimbal angle rate and output torque tracking capabilities, and that the attitude stability with MSDGCMG as actuator is superior to 10(-3)°/s. The MSDGCMG performance testing in this paper, carried out under moving-base condition, will offer a technique base for the future research and application of MSDGCMGs. PMID:23012536

  2. Real-air data reduction procedures based on flow parameters measured in the test section of supersonic and hypersonic facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G., III; Wilder, S. E.

    1972-01-01

    Data-reduction procedures for determining free stream and post-normal shock kinetic and thermodynamic quantities are derived. These procedures are applicable to imperfect real air flows in thermochemical equilibrium for temperatures to 15 000 K and a range of pressures from 0.25 N/sq m to 1 GN/sq m. Although derived primarily to meet the immediate needs of the 6-inch expansion tube, these procedures are applicable to any supersonic or hypersonic test facility where combinations of three of the following flow parameters are measured in the test section: (1) Stagnation pressure behind normal shock; (2) freestream static pressure; (3) stagnation point heat transfer rate; (4) free stream velocity; (5) stagnation density behind normal shock; and (6) free stream density. Limitations of the nine procedures and uncertainties in calculated flow quantities corresponding to uncertainties in measured input data are discussed. A listing of the computer program is presented, along with a description of the inputs required and a sample of the data printout.

  3. Experimental Evaluation of Indoor Air Distribution in High-Performance Residential Buildings: Part I. General Descriptions and Qualification Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Jalalzadeh, A. A.; Hancock, E.; Powell, D.

    2007-12-01

    The main objective of this project is to experimentally characterize an air distribution system in heating mode during a period of recovery from setback. The specific air distribution system under evaluation incorporates a high sidewall supply-air register/diffuser and a near-floor wall return air grille directly below. With this arrangement, the highest temperature difference between the supply air and the room can occur during the recovery period and create a favorable condition for stratification. The experimental approach will provide realistic input data and results for verification of computational fluid dynamics modeling.

  4. Development of a 12-Thrust Chamber Kerosene /Oxygen Primary Rocket Sub-System for an Early (1964) Air-Augmented Rocket Ground-Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pryor, D.; Hyde, E. H.; Escher, W. J. D.

    1999-01-01

    Airbreathing/Rocket combined-cycle, and specifically rocket-based combined- cycle (RBCC), propulsion systems, typically employ an internal engine flow-path installed primary rocket subsystem. To achieve acceptably short mixing lengths in effecting the "air augmentation" process, a large rocket-exhaust/air interfacial mixing surface is needed. This leads, in some engine design concepts, to a "cluster" of small rocket units, suitably arrayed in the flowpath. To support an early (1964) subscale ground-test of a specific RBCC concept, such a 12-rocket cluster was developed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The small primary rockets used in the cluster assembly were modified versions of an existing small kerosene/oxygen water-cooled rocket engine unit routinely tested at MSFC. Following individual thrust-chamber tests and overall subsystem qualification testing, the cluster assembly was installed at the U. S. Air Force's Arnold Engineering Development Center (AEDC) for RBCC systems testing. (The results of the special air-augmented rocket testing are not covered here.) While this project was eventually successfully completed, a number of hardware integration problems were met, leading to catastrophic thrust chamber failures. The principal "lessons learned" in conducting this early primary rocket subsystem experimental effort are documented here as a basic knowledge-base contribution for the benefit of today's RBCC research and development community.

  5. Estimation of the heterogeneity of fracture permeability by simultaneous modeling of multiple air-injection tests in partially saturated fractured tuff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, Y. W.; Huang, K.; Bodvarsson, G. S.

    Air-injection tests were used to investigate the flow characteristics of the fractured volcanic tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the potential site for a high-level nuclear waste repository. Because the tuff matrix pores are saturated over 90% with water and the matrix permeability is on the order of microdarcies, the air component of flow is mainly in the fractures. Air-injection tests can therefore help to determine the flow characteristics and heterogeneity structure of the densely fractured welded tuff. The tests were carried out in the Exploratory Studies Facility, an 8 km long underground tunnel at the Yucca Mountain site, in twelve 40 m long boreholes, forming three clusters within a cubic rock volume of approximately 40 meters on each edge. Each borehole in the test block was packed off (or isolated) into four sections (or zones) by inflatable packers. The in situ field tests consisted of constant-rate air injection into one of the isolated borehole zones while the pressure response was monitored in all the isolated zones. The pressure data showed an almost universal response in all monitored zones to injection into any borehole-zone, indicating that the fractures are well connected for airflow. Air-injection tests were performed in succession for all isolated zones. A simultaneous inversion was performed for the pressure response of all the monitoring zones for all the injection tests in the test block. TOUGH2, a 3D numerical code for multiphase, multicomponent transport, was used for this purpose. Spatially variable fracture permeability was used as an adjustable parameter to fit the simulated pressure responses to those measured, assuming fixed fracture porosity. For most of the pneumatic experiments, the calculated pressure changes matched the data well, and the estimated permeability ranged over four orders of magnitude, from 10-15 m2 to 10-11 m2.

  6. [The 75th anniversary of science research and development testing centre of air medicine and military ergonomics SSRDTI of military medicine of Ministry of Defense of the RF].

    PubMed

    Bukhtiiarov, I V; Khomenko, M N; Zhdan'ko, I M

    2010-01-01

    The article presents main stages of forming Science research and development testing centre of air medicine and military ergonomics, results of researches of three main directions: medical-technical (ergonomic) supply of creation, testing and exploitation of air techniques and armament; participating in organization of combat training activity for the purposes of saving professional health, securing of combativity and professional reliability of aircraft pilots; scientific grounding of improvement of medical supply of aviation (improvement of medical control for dynamics of state of health, physiological and psychological resources of organism in course of combat training, creation of automatized diagnostic complexes and etc.). PMID:20536040

  7. Correlation of the Characteristics of Single-Cylinder and Flight Engines in Tests of High-Performance Fuels in an Air-Cooled Engine I : Cooling Characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert W.; Richard, Paul H.; Brown, Kenneth D.

    1945-01-01

    Variable charge-air flow, cooling-air pressure drop, and fuel-air ration investigations were conducted to determine the cooling characteristics of a full-scale air-cooled single cylinder on a CUE setup. The data are compared with similar data that were available for the same model multicylinder engine tested in flight in a four-engine airplane. The cylinder-head cooling correlations were the same for both the single-cylinder and the flight engine. The cooling correlations for the barrels differed slightly in that the barrel of the single-cylinder engine runs cooler than the barrel of te flight engine for the same head temperatures and engine conditions.

  8. Prototype development and test results of a continuous ambient air monitoring system for hydrazine at the 10 ppb level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meneghelli, Barry; Parrish, Clyde; Barile, Ron; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    A Hydrazine Vapor Area Monitor (HVAM) system is currently being field tested as a detector for the presence of hydrazine in ambient air. The MDA/Polymetron Hydrazine Analyzer has been incorporated within the HVAM system as the core detector. This analyzer is a three-electrode liquid analyzer typically used in boiler feed water applications. The HVAM system incorporates a dual-phase sample collection/transport method which simultaneously pulls ambient air samples containing hydrazine and a very dilute sulfuric acid solution (0.0001 M) down a length of 1/4 inch outside diameter (OD) tubing from a remote site to the analyzer. The hydrazine-laden dilute acid stream is separated from the air and the pH is adjusted by addition of a dilute caustic solution to a pH greater than 10.2 prior to analysis. Both the dilute acid and caustic used by the HVAM are continuously generated during system operation on an "as needed" basis by mixing a metered amount of concentrated acid/base with dilution water. All of the waste water generated by the analyzer is purified for reuse by Barnstead ion-exchange cartridges so that the entire system minimizes the generation of waste materials. The pumping of all liquid streams and mixing of the caustic solution and dilution water with the incoming sample are done by a single pump motor fitted with the appropriate mix of peristaltic pump heads. The signal to noise (S/N) ratio of the analyzer has been enhanced by adding a stirrer in the MDA liquid cell to provide mixing normally generated by the high liquid flow rate designed by the manufacturer. An onboard microprocessor continuously monitors liquid levels, sample vacuum, and liquid leak sensors, as well as handles communications and other system functions (such as shut down should system malfunctions or errors occur). The overall system response of the HVAM can be automatically checked at regular intervals by measuring the analyzer response to a metered amount of calibration standard injected

  9. Prototype development and test results of a continuous ambient air monitoring system for hydrazine at the 10 ppb level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meneghelli, Barry; Parrish, Clyde; Barile, Ron; Lueck, Dale E.

    1995-01-01

    A Hydrazine Vapor Area Monitor (HVAM) system is currently being field tested as a detector for the presence of hydrazine in ambient air. The MDA/Polymetron Hydrazine Analyzer has been incorporated within the HVAM system as the core detector. This analyzer is a three-electrode liquid analyzer typically used in boiler feed water applications. The HVAM system incorporates a dual-phase sample collection/transport method which simultaneously pulls ambient air samples containing hydrazine and a very dilute sulfuric acid solution (0.0001 M) down a length of 1/4 inch outside diameter (OD) tubing from a remote site to the analyzer. The hydrazine-laden dilute acid stream is separated from the air and the pH is adjusted by addition of a dilute caustic solution to a pH greater than 10.2 prior to analysis. Both the dilute acid and caustic used by the HVAM are continuously generated during system operation on an "as needed" basis by mixing a metered amount of concentrated acid/base with dilution water. All of the waste water generated by the analyzer is purified for reuse by Barnstead ion-exchange cartridges so that the entire system minimizes the generation of waste materials. The pumping of all liquid streams and mixing of the caustic solution and dilution water with the incoming sample are done by a single pump motor fitted with the appropriate mix of peristaltic pump heads. The signal to noise (S/N) ratio of the analyzer has been enhanced by adding a stirrer in the MDA liquid cell to provide mixing normally generated by the high liquid flow rate designed by the manufacturer. An onboard microprocessor continuously monitors liquid levels, sample vacuum, and liquid leak sensors, as well as handles communications and other system functions (such as shut down should system malfunctions or errors occur). The overall system response of the HVAM can be automatically checked at regular intervals by measuring the analyzer response to a metered amount of calibration standard injected

  10. Regulatory fire test requirements for plutonium air transport packages : JP-4 or JP-5 vs. JP-8 aviation fuel.

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Victor G.; Lopez, Carlos; Nicolette, Vernon F.

    2010-10-01

    For certification, packages used for the transportation of plutonium by air must survive the hypothetical thermal environment specified in 10CFR71.74(a)(5). This regulation specifies that 'the package must be exposed to luminous flames from a pool fire of JP-4 or JP-5 aviation fuel for a period of at least 60 minutes.' This regulation was developed when jet propellant (JP) 4 and 5 were the standard jet fuels. However, JP-4 and JP-5 currently are of limited availability in the United States of America. JP-4 is very hard to obtain as it is not used much anymore. JP-5 may be easier to get than JP-4, but only through a military supplier. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that readily-available JP-8 fuel is a possible substitute for the aforementioned certification test. Comparisons between the properties of the three fuels are given. Results from computer simulations that compared large JP-4 to JP-8 pool fires using Sandia's VULCAN fire model are shown and discussed. Additionally, the Container Analysis Fire (CAFE) code was used to compare the thermal response of a large calorimeter exposed to engulfing fires fueled by these three jet propellants. The paper then recommends JP-8 as an alternate fuel that complies with the thermal environment implied in 10CFR71.74.

  11. Portable device for use in starting air-start-units for aircraft and having cable lead testing capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosier, W. R.; Volk, G. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A portable device for starting aircraft engines and the like is disclosed. The device includes a lead testing and motor starting circuit characterized by: (1) a direct current voltage source, (2) a pair of terminal plugs connected with the circuit (each being characterized by a first, second, and third terminal) (3) a pair of manually operable switches for connecting the first terminal of each plug of the pair to the positive side of the voltage source, (4) a circuit lead connecting to the second terminal of each plug the negative side of said source, (5) a pair of electrical cables adapted to connect said first and second terminals of each plug to an air-start unit, and means for connecting each cable of the pair of cables between the first terminal of one plug and the third terminal of the other plug of the pair, and (6) a second pair of manually operable switches for selectivity connecting the third terminal of each plug of the pair to the negative side of the voltage source.

  12. A comparative assessment of cigarette smoke aerosols using an in vitro air-liquid interface cytotoxicity test.

    PubMed

    Thorne, David; Dalrymple, Annette; Dillon, Deborah; Duke, Martin; Meredith, Clive

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the evaluation of a modified air-liquid interface BALB/c 3T3 cytotoxicity method for the assessment of smoke aerosols in vitro. The functionality and applicability of this modified protocol was assessed by comparing the cytotoxicity profiles from eight different cigarettes. Three reference cigarettes, 1R5F, 3R4F and CORESTA Monitor 7 were used to put the data into perspective and five bespoke experimental products were manufactured, ensuring a balanced and controlled study. Manufactured cigarettes were matched for key variables such as nicotine delivery, puff number, pressure drop, ventilation, carbon monoxide, nicotine free dry particulate matter and blend, but significantly modified for vapor phase delivery, via the addition of two different types and quantities of adsorptive carbon. Specifically manufacturing products ensures comparisons can be made in a consistent manner and allows the research to ask targeted questions, without confounding product variables. The results demonstrate vapor-phase associated cytotoxic effects and clear differences between the products tested and their cytotoxic profiles. This study has further characterized the in vitro vapor phase biological response relationship and confirmed that the biological response is directly proportional to the amount of available vapor phase toxicants in cigarette smoke, when using a Vitrocell® VC 10 exposure system. This study further supports and strengthens the use of aerosol based exposure options for the appropriate analysis of cigarette smoke induced responses in vitro and may be especially beneficial when comparing aerosols generated from alternative tobacco aerosol products. PMID:26339773

  13. Radionuclide transport from soil to air, native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle on the Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, R.O.; Shinn, J.H.; Essington, E.H.; Tamura, T.; Romney, E.M.; Moor, K.S.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1988-12-01

    Between 1970 and 1986 the Nevada Applied Ecology Group (NAEG), U.S. Department of Energy, conducted environmental radionuclide studies at weapons-testing sites on or adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. In this paper, NAEG studies conducted at two nuclear (fission) sites (NS201, NS219) and two nonnuclear (nonfission) sites (Area 13 (Project 57) and Clean Slate 2) are reviewed, synthesized and compared regarding (1) soil particle-size distribution and physical-chemical characteristics of 239 + 240Pu-bearing radioactive particles, (2) 239 + 240Pu resuspension rates and (3) transuranic and fission-product radionuclide transfers from soil to native vegetation, kangaroo rats and grazing cattle. The data indicate that transuranic radionuclides were transferred more readily on the average from soil to air, the external surfaces of native vegetation and to tissues of kangaroo rats at Area 13 than at NS201 or NS219. The 239 + 240Pu resuspension factor for undisturbed soil at Area 13 was three to four orders-of-magnitude larger than at NS201 and NS219, the geometric mean (GM) vegetation-over-soil 239 + 240Pu concentration ratio was from ten to 100 times larger than at NS201, and the GM GI-over-soil, carcass-over-soil and pelt-over-soil 239 + 240Pu ratios for kangaroo rats were about ten times larger than at NS201. These results are consistent with the finding that Area 13, compared with NS201 or NS219, has a higher percentage of radioactivity associated with smaller soil particles and a larger percentage of resuspendable and respirable soil. However, the resuspension factor increased by a factor of 27 at NS201 when the surface soil was disturbed, and by a factor of 12 at NS219 following a wildfire.

  14. Analyses and estimates of hydraulic conductivity from slug tests in alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Natalie A.; Braun, Christopher L.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the collection, analyses, and distribution of hydraulic-conductivity data obtained from slug tests completed in the alluvial aquifer underlying Air Force Plant 4 and Naval Air Station-Joint Reserve Base Carswell Field, Fort Worth, Texas, during October 2002 and August 2003 and summarizes previously available hydraulic-conductivity data. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force, completed 30 slug tests in October 2002 and August 2003 to obtain estimates of horizontal hydraulic conductivity to use as initial values in a ground-water-flow model for the site. The tests were done by placing a polyvinyl-chloride slug of known volume beneath the water level in selected wells, removing the slug, and measuring the resulting water-level recovery over time. The water levels were measured with a pressure transducer and recorded with a data logger. Hydraulic-conductivity values were estimated from an analytical relation between the instantaneous displacement of water in a well bore and the resulting rate of head change. Although nearly two-thirds of the tested wells recovered 90 percent of their slug-induced head change in less than 2 minutes, 90-percent recovery times ranged from 3 seconds to 35 minutes. The estimates of hydraulic conductivity range from 0.2 to 200 feet per day. Eighty-three percent of the estimates are between 1 and 100 feet per day.

  15. Long-Duration Testing of a Temperature-Swing Adsorption Compressor for Carbon Dioxide for Closed-Loop Air Revitalization Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, Micha; Mulloth, Lila; Varghese, Mini

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the results of long-duration testing of a temperature-swing adsorption compressor that has application in the International Space Station (ISS) and future spacecraft for closing the air revitalization loop. The air revitalization system of the ISS operates in an open loop mode and relies on the resupply of oxygen and other consumables from Earth for the life support of astronauts. A compressor is required for delivering the carbon dioxide from a removal assembly to a reduction unit to recover oxygen and thereby closing the air-loop. The TSAC is a solid-state compressor that has the capability to remove CO2 from a low-pressure source, and subsequently store, compress, and deliver at a higher pressure as required by a processor. The TSAC is an ideal interface device for CO2 removal and reduction units in the air revitalization loop of a spacecraft for oxygen recovery. The TSAC was developed and its operation was successfully verified in integration tests with the flight-like Carbon Dioxide Removal Assembly (CDRA) at Marshall Space Flight Center prior to the long-duration tests. Long-duration tests reveal the impacts of repeated thermal cycling on the compressor components and the adsorbent material.

  16. THE DISTRIBUTION OF CHLORPYRIFOS FOLLOWING A CRACK AND CREVICE TYPE APPLICATION IN THE U.S. EPA INDOOR AIR QUALITY TEST HOUSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    A study was conducted in the U.S. EPA Indoor Air Quality Test House to determine the spatial and temporal distribution of chlorpyrifos following a professional crack and crevice application in the kitchen. Following the application, measurements were made in the kitchen, den a...

  17. FURTHER REFINEMENTS AND TESTING OF APEX3.0: EPA'S POPULATION EXPOSURE MODEL FOR CRITERIA AND AIR TOXIC INHALATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Air Pollutants Exposure Model (APEX(3.0)) is a PC-based model that was derived from the probabilistic NAAQS Exposure Model for carbon monoxide (pNEM/CO). APEX will be one of the tools used to estimate human population exposure for criteria and air toxic pollutants as part ...

  18. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF A WHOLE-AIR SAMPLER FOR MEASUREMENT OF PERSONAL EXPOSURE TO VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A small and relatively lightweight (3.35 kg) whole-air (canister) sampler that can be worn to monitor personal exposures to volatile organic compounds was developed and evaluated. The prototype personal whole air sampler (PWAS) consists of a 1-L canister, a mass flow controller, ...

  19. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial... energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. (a) Scope. This section contains...

  20. 10 CFR 431.96 - Uniform test method for the measurement of energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. 431.96 Section 431.96 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR CERTAIN COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Commercial... energy efficiency of commercial air conditioners and heat pumps. (a) Scope. This section contains...