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Sample records for air reveals large-scale

  1. Large-scale impact of anthropogenic mercury during the 1970s revealed by polar firn air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, X.; Ferrari, C. P.; Dommergue, A.; Albert, M. R.; Battle, M. O.; Severinghaus, J. P.; Arnaud, L.; Barnola, J.; Cairns, W.; Barbante, C.; Boutron, C.

    2009-12-01

    Mercury (Hg) is an extremely toxic pollutant, and its biogeochemical cycle has been perturbed by anthropogenic emissions during recent centuries. In the atmosphere, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM; Hg°) is the predominant form of mercury (up to 95%). GEM concentrations measured in the interstitial air of the firn (unconsolidated snow) at Summit (central Greenland) enabled reconstruction of the atmospheric history of this species in mid- to high-northern latitudes back to the twentieth century. GEM concentrations increased rapidly after World War II from ~1.5 ng m-3 reaching a maximum of ~3 ng m-3 around 1970 and decreased until stabilizing at ~1.7 ng m-3 around 1995. This reconstruction reproduces real-time measurements available from the Arctic since 1995 and exhibits the same general trend observed in Europe since 1990. Anthropogenic emissions caused a two-fold rise in boreal atmospheric GEM concentrations before the 1970s, which likely contributed to higher deposition of mercury in both industrialized and remotes areas. Once deposited, this toxin becomes available for methylation and, subsequently, the contamination of ecosystems. Implementation of air pollution regulations, however, enabled a large-scale decline in atmospheric mercury levels during the 1980s. Our results suggest that potential increases in emissions in the coming decades could have a similar large-scale impact on atmospheric Hg levels.

  2. Polar firn air reveals large-scale impact of anthropogenic mercury emissions during the 1970s

    PubMed Central

    Faïn, Xavier; Ferrari, Christophe P.; Dommergue, Aurélien; Albert, Mary R.; Battle, Mark; Severinghaus, Jeff; Arnaud, Laurent; Barnola, Jean-Marc; Cairns, Warren; Barbante, Carlo; Boutron, Claude

    2009-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) is an extremely toxic pollutant, and its biogeochemical cycle has been perturbed by anthropogenic emissions during recent centuries. In the atmosphere, gaseous elemental mercury (GEM; Hg°) is the predominant form of mercury (up to 95%). Here we report the evolution of atmospheric levels of GEM in mid- to high-northern latitudes inferred from the interstitial air of firn (perennial snowpack) at Summit, Greenland. GEM concentrations increased rapidly after World War II from ≈1.5 ng m−3 reaching a maximum of ≈3 ng m−3 around 1970 and decreased until stabilizing at ≈1.7 ng m−3 around 1995. This reconstruction reproduces real-time measurements available from the Arctic since 1995 and exhibits the same general trend observed in Europe since 1990. Anthropogenic emissions caused a two-fold rise in boreal atmospheric GEM concentrations before the 1970s, which likely contributed to higher deposition of mercury in both industrialized and remotes areas. Once deposited, this toxin becomes available for methylation and, subsequently, the contamination of ecosystems. Implementation of air pollution regulations, however, enabled a large-scale decline in atmospheric mercury levels during the 1980s. The results shown here suggest that potential increases in emissions in the coming decades could have a similar large-scale impact on atmospheric Hg levels. PMID:19805267

  3. DESIGN OF LARGE-SCALE AIR MONITORING NETWORKS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The potential effects of air pollution on human health have received much attention in recent years. In the U.S. and other countries, there are extensive large-scale monitoring networks designed to collect data to inform the public of exposure risks to air pollution. A major crit...

  4. Landsat 7 Reveals Large-scale Fractal Motion of Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    get carried along within the vortices, but these are soon mixed into the surrounding clouds. Landsat is unique in its ability to image both the small-scale eddies that mix clear and cloudy air, down to the 30 meter pixel size of Landsat, but also having a wide enough field-of-view, 180 km, to reveal the connection of the turbulence to large-scale flows such as the subtropical oceanic gyres. Landsat 7, with its new onboard digital recorder, has extended this capability away from the few Landsat ground stations to remote areas such as Alejandro Island, and thus is gradually providing a global dynamic picture of evolving human-scale phenomena. (For more details on von Karman vortices, refer to http://climate.gsfc.nasa.gov/cahalan) Image and caption courtesy Bob Cahalan, NASA GSFC

  5. Large scale air monitoring: lichen vs. air particulate matter analysis.

    PubMed

    Rossbach, M; Jayasekera, R; Kniewald, G; Thang, N H

    1999-07-15

    Biological indicator organisms have been widely used for monitoring and banking purposes for many years. Although the complexity of the interactions between organisms and their environment is generally not easily comprehensible, environmental quality assessment using the bioindicator approach offers some convincing advantages compared to direct analysis of soil, water, or air. Measurement of air particulates is restricted to experienced laboratories with access to expensive sampling equipment. Additionally, the amount of material collected generally is just enough for one determination per sampling and no multidimensional characterization might be possible. Further, fluctuations in air masses have a pronounced effect on the results from air filter sampling. Combining the integrating property of bioindicators with the world wide availability and particular matrix characteristics of air particulate matter as a prerequisite for global monitoring of air pollution is discussed. A new approach for sampling urban dust using large volume filtering devices installed in air conditioners of large hotel buildings is assessed. A first experiment was initiated to collect air particulates (300-500 g each) from a number of hotels during a period of 3-4 months by successive vacuum cleaning of used inlet filters from high volume air conditioning installations reflecting average concentrations per 3 months in different large cities. This approach is expected to be upgraded and applied for global monitoring. Highly positive correlated elements were found in lichens such as K/S, Zn/P, the rare earth elements (REE) and a significant negative correlation between Hg and Cu was observed in these samples. The ratio of concentrations of elements in dust and Usnea spp. is highest for Cz, Zn and Fe (400-200) and lowest for elements such as Ca, Rb, and Sr (20-10). PMID:10474261

  6. Cloud-based large-scale air traffic flow optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yi

    The ever-increasing traffic demand makes the efficient use of airspace an imperative mission, and this paper presents an effort in response to this call. Firstly, a new aggregate model, called Link Transmission Model (LTM), is proposed, which models the nationwide traffic as a network of flight routes identified by origin-destination pairs. The traversal time of a flight route is assumed to be the mode of distribution of historical flight records, and the mode is estimated by using Kernel Density Estimation. As this simplification abstracts away physical trajectory details, the complexity of modeling is drastically decreased, resulting in efficient traffic forecasting. The predicative capability of LTM is validated against recorded traffic data. Secondly, a nationwide traffic flow optimization problem with airport and en route capacity constraints is formulated based on LTM. The optimization problem aims at alleviating traffic congestions with minimal global delays. This problem is intractable due to millions of variables. A dual decomposition method is applied to decompose the large-scale problem such that the subproblems are solvable. However, the whole problem is still computational expensive to solve since each subproblem is an smaller integer programming problem that pursues integer solutions. Solving an integer programing problem is known to be far more time-consuming than solving its linear relaxation. In addition, sequential execution on a standalone computer leads to linear runtime increase when the problem size increases. To address the computational efficiency problem, a parallel computing framework is designed which accommodates concurrent executions via multithreading programming. The multithreaded version is compared with its monolithic version to show decreased runtime. Finally, an open-source cloud computing framework, Hadoop MapReduce, is employed for better scalability and reliability. This framework is an "off-the-shelf" parallel computing model

  7. Satellite measurements of large-scale air pollution - Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Fraser, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    A technique for deriving large-scale pollution parameters from NIR and visible satellite remote-sensing images obtained over land or water is described and demonstrated on AVHRR images. The method is based on comparison of the upward radiances on clear and hazy days and permits simultaneous determination of aerosol optical thickness with error Delta tau(a) = 0.08-0.15, particle size with error + or - 100-200 nm, and single-scattering albedo with error + or - 0.03 (for albedos near 1), all assuming accurate and stable satellite calibration and stable surface reflectance between the clear and hazy days. In the analysis of AVHRR images of smoke from a forest fire, good agreement was obtained between satellite and ground-based (sun-photometer) measurements of aerosol optical thickness, but the satellite particle sizes were systematically greater than those measured from the ground. The AVHRR single-scattering albedo agreed well with a Landsat albedo for the same smoke.

  8. Changes in large-scale air circulation and connection with climate variables in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Barbu, Nicu

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper is the analysis of the relationship between climate variables (seasonal mean air temperature - T2m, and seasonal amount of precipitation - PP) and large-scale air circulation. In order to achieve this, the air circulation types were derived from GrossWetterTypen (GWT) and WetterLagenKlassifikation (WLK) Catalogues developed within COST733 framework. Daily air circulation types are divided into 18 groups according to the GWT Catalogue and in 40 groups according to the WLK Catalogue and for each type winter (DJF) and summer (JJA) occurrence frequency were calculated. To this end the Pearson correlation coefficient between climate variables and circulation type's frequency were computed. The results reveals that in wintertime the GWT circulation types captures better than WLK circulation types the T2m variability in time that for summer the WLK circulation types captures better than GWT circulation types. This is due to the seasonal variability of the horizontal extension of air masses. We found that the T2m is positive correlated to anticyclonic circulation types and negative correlated with cyclonic types and the PP is correlated to the cyclonic circulation and negative correlated to anticyclonic ones. Additionally, the trend significance of the climate variables as well as air circulation types have been analysed with the non-parametric Mann-Kendall test. The changes of the trends were detected by employing the non-parametric Pettit test. From the trend analysis we can state that some of the anticyclonic circulation types presents upward tendency and some of the cyclonic circulation presents downward tendency. This is an important results because explain the upward trend of the T2m and the downward trend of the PP.

  9. Effects of Large-Scale Solar Installations on Dust Mobilization and Air Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pratt, J. T.; Singh, D.; Diffenbaugh, N. S.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale solar projects are increasingly being developed worldwide and many of these installations are located in arid, desert regions. To examine the effects of these projects on regional dust mobilization and air quality, we analyze aerosol product data from NASA's Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR) at annual and seasonal time intervals near fifteen photovoltaic and solar thermal stations ranging from 5-200 MW (12-4,942 acres) in size. The stations are distributed over eight different countries and were chosen based on size, location and installation date; most of the installations are large-scale, took place in desert climates and were installed between 2006 and 2010. We also consider air quality measurements of particulate matter between 2.5 and 10 micrometers (PM10) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) monitoring sites near and downwind from the project installations in the U.S. We use monthly wind data from the NOAA's National Center for Atmospheric Prediction (NCEP) Global Reanalysis to select the stations downwind from the installations, and then perform statistical analysis on the data to identify any significant changes in these quantities. We find that fourteen of the fifteen regions have lower aerosol product after the start of the installations as well as all six PM10 monitoring stations showing lower particulate matter measurements after construction commenced. Results fail to show any statistically significant differences in aerosol optical index or PM10 measurements before and after the large-scale solar installations. However, many of the large installations are very recent, and there is insufficient data to fully understand the long-term effects on air quality. More data and higher resolution analysis is necessary to better understand the relationship between large-scale solar, dust and air quality.

  10. Overlapping communities reveal rich structure in large-scale brain networks during rest and task conditions.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mahshid; McMenamin, Brenton W; Simon, Jonathan Z; Pessoa, Luiz

    2016-07-15

    Large-scale analysis of functional MRI data has revealed that brain regions can be grouped into stable "networks" or communities. In many instances, the communities are characterized as relatively disjoint. Although recent work indicates that brain regions may participate in multiple communities (for example, hub regions), the extent of community overlap is poorly understood. To address these issues, here we investigated large-scale brain networks based on "rest" and task human functional MRI data by employing a mixed-membership Bayesian model that allows each brain region to belong to all communities simultaneously with varying membership strengths. The approach allowed us to 1) compare the structure of disjoint and overlapping communities; 2) determine the relationship between functional diversity (how diverse is a region's functional activation repertoire) and membership diversity (how diverse is a region's affiliation to communities); 3) characterize overlapping community structure; 4) characterize the degree of non-modularity in brain networks; 5) study the distribution of "bridges", including bottleneck and hub bridges. Our findings revealed the existence of dense community overlap that was not limited to "special" hubs. Furthermore, the findings revealed important differences between community organization during rest and during specific task states. Overall, we suggest that dense overlapping communities are well suited to capture the flexible and task dependent mapping between brain regions and their functions. PMID:27129758

  11. Drought Variability in Eastern Part of Romania and its Connection with Large-Scale Air Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Nicu; Stefan, Sabina; Georgescu, Florinela

    2014-05-01

    Drought is a phenomenon that appears due to precipitation deficit and it is intensified by strong winds, high temperatures, low relative humidity and high insolation; in fact, all these factors lead to increasing of evapotranspiration processes that contribute to soil water deficit. The Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI) take into account all this factors listed above. The temporal variability of the drought in Eastern part of Romania for 50 years, during the period 1961-2010, is investigated. This study is focused on the drought variability related to large scale air circulation. The gridded dataset with spatial resolution of 0.5º lat/lon of SPEI, (https://digital.csic.es/handle/10261/72264) were used to analyze drought periods in connection with large scale air circulation determinate from the two catalogues (GWT - GrossWetter-Typen and WLK - WetterLargenKlassifikation) defined in COST733Action. The GWT catalogue uses at input dataset the sea level pressure and the WLK catalogue uses as input dataset the geopotential field at 925 hPa and 500 hPa, wind at 700 hPa and total water content for entire atmospheric column. In this study we use the GWT catalogue with 18 circulation types and the WLK catalogue with 40 circulation types. The analysis for Barlad Hydrological Basin indicated that the negative values (that means water deficit - drought period) of SPEI are associated with prevailing anticyclonic regime and positive values (that means water excess - rainy period) of SPEI are associated with prevailing cyclonic regime as was expected. In last decade was observed an increase of dry period associated with an increase of anticyclonic activity over Romania. Using GWT18 catalogue the drought are associated with the north-eastern anticyclonic circulation type (NE-A). According to the WLK40 catalogue, the dominant circulation type associated with the drought is north-west-anticyclonic-dry anticyclonic (NW-AAD) type. keywords: drought, SPEI

  12. A Feasibility Study on Operating Large Scale Compressed Air Energy Storage in Porous Formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Pfeiffer, W. T.; Li, D.; Bauer, S.

    2015-12-01

    Compressed air energy storage (CAES) in porous formations has been considered as one promising option of large scale energy storage for decades. This study, hereby, aims at analyzing the feasibility of operating large scale CAES in porous formations and evaluating the performance of underground porous gas reservoirs. To address these issues quantitatively, a hypothetic CAES scenario with a typical anticline structure in northern Germany was numerically simulated. Because of the rapid growth in photovoltaics, the period of extraction in a daily cycle was set to the early morning and the late afternoon in order to bypass the massive solar energy production around noon. The gas turbine scenario was defined referring to the specifications of the Huntorf CAES power plant. The numerical simulations involved two stages, i.e. initial fill and cyclic operation, and both were carried out using the Eclipse E300 simulator (Schlumberger). Pressure loss in the gas wells was post analyzed using an analytical solution. The exergy concept was applied to evaluate the potential energy amount stored in the specific porous formation. The simulation results show that porous formations prove to be a feasible solution of large scale CAES. The initial fill with shut-in periods determines the spatial distribution of the gas phase and helps to achieve higher gas saturation around the wells, and thus higher deliverability. The performance evaluation shows that the overall exergy flow of stored compressed air is also determined by the permeability, which directly affects the deliverability of the gas reservoir and thus the number of wells required.

  13. Meteorological and photochemical modeling of large-scale albedo changes in the South Coast Air Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Tran, K.T.; Mirabella, V.A.

    1998-12-31

    The effectiveness of large-scale surface albedo changes as an ozone control strategy is investigated. These albedo changes are part of the Cool Communities strategy that calls for the use of lighter colored roofing and paving materials as well as an increase in tree planting. The advanced mesoscale model MM5 was used to analyze the associated effects on ambient temperature, mixing depth and winds. The MM5 model was modified to accept surface properties derived from a satellite-based land use database. Preprocessors were also developed to allow a research-oriented model such as MM5 to be user friendly and amenable to practical, routine air quality modeling applications. Changes in ozone air quality are analyzed with the Urban Airshed Model (UAM). Results of the MM5/UAM simulations of the SCAQS August 26--28, 1987 ozone episode are presented and compared to those obtained with the CSUMM/UAM models.

  14. Relationship between the large-scale air circulation and frequency of very warm days in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, Sabina; Barbu, Nicu; Baciu, Madalina

    2015-04-01

    In this work is investigated the relationship between the large-scale air circulation and frequency of very warm days (frequency of days with maximum temperature greater or equal to 90th percentile - FrTmax90). This analysis is conducted for summer and winter over the period 1962-2010. Daily temperature data recorded at 85 Romanian meteorological stations with complete observations over the study period were used to calculate the FrTmax90 for summer and winter. Daily air circulation types computed by using two objective catalogues, namely GWT (GrossWetter-Typen) and WLK (WetterLargenKlassifikation) from COST733Action were used to calculate the air circulation frequency for summer and winter. NCEP/NCAR gridded reanalysis data sets were used. For the GWT catalogue the sea level pressure data sets were used to classify the air circulation in the 18 types. In the case of the WLK catalogue the geopotential height at 925 and 500 hPa, zonal and meridional components of wind vector at 700 hPa and precipitable water content for the entire atmospheric column were used to classify the air circulation in the 40 types. For winter were obtained 4 clusters and for summer 8 clusters of FrTmax90 by using a clusterization method. These clusters present homogeneity related to the FrTmax90. The Pearson correlation coefficient (R) is calculated between the FrTmax90 and the air circulation types. The results show that correlation coefficients are greatest in winter than in summer for the GWT catalogue compared to the WLK catalogue. The greatest correlation coefficients was obtained during winter for southwestern-anticyclones (SW[A]) circulation type for all the 4 clusters according to the GWT catalogue. The northwestern-anticyclones-wet (NW-AAW) circulation type presents the greatest correlation coefficient only for the cluster 3 according to the WLK catalogue. We can note that these results depend on the both large-scale air circulation and orography (the Carpathians).

  15. The application of liquid air energy storage for large scale long duration solutions to grid balancing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brett, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew

    2014-12-01

    Liquid Air Energy Storage (LAES) provides large scale, long duration energy storage at the point of demand in the 5 MW/20 MWh to 100 MW/1,000 MWh range. LAES combines mature components from the industrial gas and electricity industries assembled in a novel process and is one of the few storage technologies that can be delivered at large scale, with no geographical constraints. The system uses no exotic materials or scarce resources and all major components have a proven lifetime of 25+ years. The system can also integrate low grade waste heat to increase power output. Founded in 2005, Highview Power Storage, is a UK based developer of LAES. The company has taken the concept from academic analysis, through laboratory testing, and in 2011 commissioned the world's first fully integrated system at pilot plant scale (300 kW/2.5 MWh) hosted at SSE's (Scottish & Southern Energy) 80 MW Biomass Plant in Greater London which was partly funded by a Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) grant. Highview is now working with commercial customers to deploy multi MW commercial reference plants in the UK and abroad.

  16. Changes in seasonal mean maximum air temperature in Romania and their connection with large-scale circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomozeiu, Rodica; Busuioc, Aristita; Stefan, Sabina

    2002-08-01

    This paper investigates the temporal and spatial variability of the seasonal mean of maximum air temperature in Romania and its links with the large-scale atmospheric circulation. The Romanian data sets are represented by time series at 14 stations. The large-scale parameters are represented by the observed sea-level pressure (SLP) and geopotential height at 500 hPa (Z500). The period analysed was 1922-98 for winter and 1960-98 for all seasons. Before analysis, the original temperature data were tested to detect for inhomogeneity using the standard normal homogeneity test. Empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) were used to analyse the spatial and temporal variability of the local and large-scale parameters and to eliminate noise from the original data set. The time series associated with the first EOF pattern of the SLP and mean maximum temperature in Romania were analysed from trend and shifts point of view using the Pettitt and Mann-Kendall tests respectively. The covariance map computed using the Z500 and the seasonal mean of maximum temperature in Romania were used as additional methods to identify the large-scale circulation patterns influencing the local variability.Significant increasing trends were found for winter and summer mean maximum temperature in Romania, with upward shifts around 1947 and 1985 respectively. During autumn, a decreasing trend with a downward shift around 1969 was detected. These changes seem to be real, since they are connected to similar changes in the large-scale circulation. So, the intensification of the southwesterly circulation over Europe since 1933 overlapped with the enhancement of westerly circulation after the 1940s could be the reason for the change in winter mean maximum temperature. The slight weakening of the southwesterly circulation during autumn could be one of the reasons for the decrease in the regime of the mean maximum temperature for autumn seasons. Additionally, the covariance map technique reveals the

  17. ACTIVE LONGITUDES REVEALED BY LARGE-SCALE AND LONG-LIVED CORONAL STREAMERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing

    2011-07-10

    We use time-series ultraviolet full sun images to construct limb-synoptic maps of the Sun. On these maps, large-scale, long-lived coronal streamers appear as repetitive sinusoid-like arcs projected over the polar regions. They are caused by high altitude plasma produced from sunspot-rich regions at latitudes generally far from the poles. The non-uniform longitudinal distribution of these streamers reveals four longitudinal zones at the surface of the Sun from which sunspots erupt preferentially over the 5 year observing interval (2006 January to 2011 April). Spots in these zones (or clusters) have individual lifetimes short compared to the lifetimes of the coronal features which they sustain, and they erupt at different times. The four sunspot clusters contain >75% of all numbered sunspots in this period. They occupy two distinct longitudinal zones separated by {approx}180{sup 0} and each spanning {approx}100{sup 0} in longitude. The rotation rates of the spot clusters are {approx}5% faster than the rates at both the surface and the bottom of the convection zone. While no convincing theoretical framework exists to interpret the sunspot clusters in the longitude-time space, their persistent and nonuniform distribution indicates long-lived, azimuthal structures beneath the surface, and are compatible with the existence of previously reported active longitudes on the Sun.

  18. Large-scale structural transitions in supercoiled DNA revealed by coarse-grained simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krajina, Brad; Spakowitz, Andrew

    Topological constraints, such as DNA supercoiling, play an integral role in genomic regulation and organization in living systems. However, physical understanding of the principles that underlie DNA structure and organization at biologically-relevant length-scales remains a formidable challenge. We develop a coarse-grained simulation approach for predicting equilibrium conformations of supercoiled DNA. With this approach, we study the conformational transitions that arise due to supercoiling across the full range of supercoiling densities that are commonly explored by living systems. Simulations of ring DNA molecules with lengths up to the scale of topological domains in the E. coli chromosome (~10 kilobases) reveal large-scale structural transitions elicited by supercoiling, resulting in 3 supercoiling conformational regimes: chiral coils, extended plectonemes, and branched hyper-supercoils. These results capture the non-monotonic relationship of size versus degree of supercoiling observed in experimental sedimentation studies of supercoiled DNA, and our results provide a physical explanation of the structural transitions underlying this behavior.

  19. Relationship between climate extremes in Romania and their connection to large-scale air circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbu, Nicu; Ştefan, Sabina

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the connection between climate extremes (temperature and precipitation) in Romania and large-scale air circulation. Daily observational data of maximum air temperature and amount of precipitation for the period 1961-2010 were used to compute two seasonal indices associated with temperature and precipitation, quantifying their frequency, as follows: frequency of very warm days (FTmax90 ≥ 90th percentile), frequency of very wet days (FPp90; daily precipitation amount ≥ 90th percentile). Seasonally frequency of circulation types were calculated from daily circulation types determined by using two objective catalogues (GWT - GrossWetter-Typen and WLK - WetterLargenKlassifikation) from the COST733Action. Daily reanalysis data sets (sea level pressure, geopotential height at 925 and 500 hPa, u and v components of wind vector at 700 hPa and precipitable water content for the entire atmospheric column) build up by NCEP/NCAR, with 2.5°/2.5° lat/lon spatial resolution, were used to determine the circulation types. In order to select the optimal domain size related to the FTmax90 and the FPp90, the explained variance (EV) has been used. The EV determines the relation between the variance among circulation types and the total variance of the variable under consideration. This method quantifies the discriminatory power of a classification. The relationships between climate extremes in Romania and large-scale air circulation were investigated by using multiple linear regression model (MLRM), the predictands are FTmax90 and FPp90 and the circulation types were used as predictors. In order to select the independent predictors to build the MLRM the collinearity and multicollinearity analysis were performed. The study period is dividend in two periods: the period 1961-2000 is used to train the MLRM and the period 2001-2010 is used to validate the MLRM. The analytical relationship obtained by using MLRM can be used for future projection

  20. Large-scale air traffic surveillance using an IMM estimator with assignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hui; Kirubarajan, Thiagalingam; Li, Yicong; Bar-Shalom, Yaakov

    1997-10-01

    In this paper we present the development and implementation of a multisensor-multitarget tracking algorithm for large scale air traffic surveillance based on the IMM state estimator combined with a 2-dimensional assignment for data association. The algorithm can be used to track a large umber of targets from measurements obtained with a large number of radars. The use of the algorithm is illustrated on measurements obtained from 5 FAA radars, which are asynchronous, heterogeneous and geographically distributed over a large area. Both secondary radar data (beacon returns from cooperative targets) as well as primary radar data (skin returns from non-cooperative targets) are used. The target IDs from the beacon returns are not used in the data association. The surveillance region includes about 800 targets that exhibit different types of motion. The performance of the IMM estimator is compared with that of the Kalman filter. A number of performance measures that can be used on real data without knowledge of the ground truth are presented for this purpose. It is shown that the IMM estimator performs better than the Kalman filter. The advantage of fusing multisensor data is quantified. It is also shown that the computational requirements in the multisensor case are lower than in single sensor case.

  1. Large-Scale Mitochondrial DNA Analysis of the Domestic Goat Reveals Six Haplogroups with High Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Naderi, Saeid; Rezaei, Hamid-Reza; Taberlet, Pierre; Zundel, Stéphanie; Rafat, Seyed-Abbas; Naghash, Hamid-Reza; El-Barody, Mohamed A. A.; Ertugrul, Okan; Pompanon, François

    2007-01-01

    Background From the beginning of domestication, the transportation of domestic animals resulted in genetic and demographic processes that explain their present distribution and genetic structure. Thus studying the present genetic diversity helps to better understand the history of domestic species. Methodology/Principal Findings The genetic diversity of domestic goats has been characterized with 2430 individuals from all over the old world, including 946 new individuals from regions poorly studied until now (mainly the Fertile Crescent). These individuals represented 1540 haplotypes for the HVI segment of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region. This large-scale study allowed the establishment of a clear nomenclature of the goat maternal haplogroups. Only five of the six previously defined groups of haplotypes were divergent enough to be considered as different haplogroups. Moreover a new mitochondrial group has been localized around the Fertile Crescent. All groups showed very high haplotype diversity. Most of this diversity was distributed among groups and within geographic regions. The weak geographic structure may result from the worldwide distribution of the dominant A haplogroup (more than 90% of the individuals). The large-scale distribution of other haplogroups (except one), may be related to human migration. The recent fragmentation of local goat populations into discrete breeds is not detectable with mitochondrial markers. The estimation of demographic parameters from mismatch analyses showed that all groups had a recent demographic expansion corresponding roughly to the period when domestication took place. But even with a large data set it remains difficult to give relative dates of expansion for different haplogroups because of large confidence intervals. Conclusions/Significance We propose standard criteria for the definition of the different haplogroups based on the result of mismatch analysis and on the use of sequences of reference. Such a

  2. scMRI Reveals Large-Scale Brain Network Abnormalities in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Zielinski, Brandon A.; Anderson, Jeffrey S.; Froehlich, Alyson L.; Prigge, Molly B. D.; Nielsen, Jared A.; Cooperrider, Jason R.; Cariello, Annahir N.; Fletcher, P. Thomas; Alexander, Andrew L.; Lange, Nicholas; Bigler, Erin D.; Lainhart, Janet E.

    2012-01-01

    Autism is a complex neurological condition characterized by childhood onset of dysfunction in multiple cognitive domains including socio-emotional function, speech and language, and processing of internally versus externally directed stimuli. Although gross brain anatomic differences in autism are well established, recent studies investigating regional differences in brain structure and function have yielded divergent and seemingly contradictory results. How regional abnormalities relate to the autistic phenotype remains unclear. We hypothesized that autism exhibits distinct perturbations in network-level brain architecture, and that cognitive dysfunction may be reflected by abnormal network structure. Network-level anatomic abnormalities in autism have not been previously described. We used structural covariance MRI to investigate network-level differences in gray matter structure within two large-scale networks strongly implicated in autism, the salience network and the default mode network, in autistic subjects and age-, gender-, and IQ-matched controls. We report specific perturbations in brain network architecture in the salience and default-mode networks consistent with clinical manifestations of autism. Extent and distribution of the salience network, involved in social-emotional regulation of environmental stimuli, is restricted in autism. In contrast, posterior elements of the default mode network have increased spatial distribution, suggesting a ‘posteriorization’ of this network. These findings are consistent with a network-based model of autism, and suggest a unifying interpretation of previous work. Moreover, we provide evidence of specific abnormalities in brain network architecture underlying autism that are quantifiable using standard clinical MRI. PMID:23185305

  3. Organization of the pronephric kidney revealed by large-scale gene expression mapping

    PubMed Central

    Raciti, Daniela; Reggiani, Luca; Geffers, Lars; Jiang, Qiuhong; Bacchion, Francesca; Subrizi, Astrid E; Clements, Dave; Tindal, Christopher; Davidson, Duncan R; Kaissling, Brigitte; Brändli, André W

    2008-01-01

    Background The pronephros, the simplest form of a vertebrate excretory organ, has recently become an important model of vertebrate kidney organogenesis. Here, we elucidated the nephron organization of the Xenopus pronephros and determined the similarities in segmentation with the metanephros, the adult kidney of mammals. Results We performed large-scale gene expression mapping of terminal differentiation markers to identify gene expression patterns that define distinct domains of the pronephric kidney. We analyzed the expression of over 240 genes, which included members of the solute carrier, claudin, and aquaporin gene families, as well as selected ion channels. The obtained expression patterns were deposited in the searchable European Renal Genome Project Xenopus Gene Expression Database. We found that 112 genes exhibited highly regionalized expression patterns that were adequate to define the segmental organization of the pronephric nephron. Eight functionally distinct domains were discovered that shared significant analogies in gene expression with the mammalian metanephric nephron. We therefore propose a new nomenclature, which is in line with the mammalian one. The Xenopus pronephric nephron is composed of four basic domains: proximal tubule, intermediate tubule, distal tubule, and connecting tubule. Each tubule may be further subdivided into distinct segments. Finally, we also provide compelling evidence that the expression of key genes underlying inherited renal diseases in humans has been evolutionarily conserved down to the level of the pronephric kidney. Conclusion The present study validates the Xenopus pronephros as a genuine model that may be used to elucidate the molecular basis of nephron segmentation and human renal disease. PMID:18492243

  4. A large-scale screen reveals genes that mediate electrotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Runchi; Zhao, Siwei; Jiang, Xupin; Sun, Yaohui; Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Jing; Borleis, Jane; Willard, Stacey; Tang, Ming; Cai, Huaqing; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Huang, Yuesheng; Jiang, Jianxin; Huang, Zunxi; Mogilner, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Devreotes, Peter N; Zhao, Min

    2015-05-26

    Directional cell migration in an electric field, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis or electrotaxis, occurs in many types of cells, and may play an important role in wound healing and development. Small extracellular electric fields can guide the migration of amoeboid cells, and we established a large-scale screening approach to search for mutants with electrotaxis phenotypes from a collection of 563 Dictyostelium discoideum strains with morphological defects. We identified 28 strains that were defective in electrotaxis and 10 strains with a slightly higher directional response. Using plasmid rescue followed by gene disruption, we identified some of the mutated genes, including some previously implicated in chemotaxis. Among these, we studied PiaA, which encodes a critical component of TORC2, a kinase protein complex that transduces changes in motility by activating the kinase PKB (also known as Akt). Furthermore, we found that electrotaxis was decreased in mutants lacking gefA, rasC, rip3, lst8, or pkbR1, genes that encode other components of the TORC2-PKB pathway. Thus, we have developed a high-throughput screening technique that will be a useful tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of electrotaxis. PMID:26012633

  5. Large-scale phylogenetic analyses reveal the causes of high tropical amphibian diversity

    PubMed Central

    Pyron, R. Alexander; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    Many groups show higher species richness in tropical regions but the underlying causes remain unclear. Despite many competing hypotheses to explain latitudinal diversity gradients, only three processes can directly change species richness across regions: speciation, extinction and dispersal. These processes can be addressed most powerfully using large-scale phylogenetic approaches, but most previous studies have focused on small groups and recent time scales, or did not separate speciation and extinction rates. We investigate the origins of high tropical diversity in amphibians, applying new phylogenetic comparative methods to a tree of 2871 species. Our results show that high tropical diversity is explained by higher speciation in the tropics, higher extinction in temperate regions and limited dispersal out of the tropics compared with colonization of the tropics from temperate regions. These patterns are strongly associated with climate-related variables such as temperature, precipitation and ecosystem energy. Results from models of diversity dependence in speciation rate suggest that temperate clades may have lower carrying capacities and may be more saturated (closer to carrying capacity) than tropical clades. Furthermore, we estimate strikingly low tropical extinction rates over geological time scales, in stark contrast to the dramatic losses of diversity occurring in tropical regions presently. PMID:24026818

  6. A large scale screen reveals genes that mediate electrotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum**

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Runchi; Zhao, Siwei; Jiang, Xupin; Sun, Yaohui; Zhao, Sanjun; Gao, Jing; Borleis, Jane; Willard, Stacey; Tang, Ming; Cai, Huaqing; Kamimura, Yoichiro; Huang, Yuesheng; Jiang, Jianxin; Huang, Zunxi; Mogilner, Alex; Pan, Tingrui; Devreotes, Peter N; Zhao, Min

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell migration in an electric field, a phenomenon called galvanotaxis or electrotaxis, occurs in many types of cells, and may play an important role in wound healing and development. Small extracellular electric fields can guide the migration of amoeboid cells, and here, we established a large-scale screening approach to search for mutants with electrotaxis phenotypes from a collection of 563 Dictyostelium discoideum strains with morphological defects. We identified 28 strains that were defective in electrotaxis and 10 strains with a slightly higher directional response. Using plasmid rescue followed by gene disruption, we identified some of the mutated genes, including some previously implicated in chemotaxis. Amongst these we studied PiaA, which encodes a critical component of TORC2, a kinase protein complex that transduces changes in motility by activating the kinase PKB (also known as Akt). Furthermore, we found that electrotaxis was decreased in mutants lacking gefA, rasC, rip3, lst8 or pkbR1, genes that encode other components of the TORC2-PKB pathway. Thus, we have developed a high-throughput screening technique that will be a useful tool to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of electrotaxis. PMID:26012633

  7. Systematic Phenotyping of a Large-Scale Candida glabrata Deletion Collection Reveals Novel Antifungal Tolerance Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Ekkehard; Istel, Fabian; Tscherner, Michael; Brunke, Sascha; Ames, Lauren; Firon, Arnaud; Green, Brian; Cabral, Vitor; Marcet-Houben, Marina; Jacobsen, Ilse D.; Quintin, Jessica; Seider, Katja; Frohner, Ingrid; Glaser, Walter; Jungwirth, Helmut; Bachellier-Bassi, Sophie; Chauvel, Murielle; Zeidler, Ute; Ferrandon, Dominique; Gabaldón, Toni; Hube, Bernhard; d'Enfert, Christophe; Rupp, Steffen; Cormack, Brendan; Haynes, Ken; Kuchler, Karl

    2014-01-01

    The opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida glabrata is a frequent cause of candidiasis, causing infections ranging from superficial to life-threatening disseminated disease. The inherent tolerance of C. glabrata to azole drugs makes this pathogen a serious clinical threat. To identify novel genes implicated in antifungal drug tolerance, we have constructed a large-scale C. glabrata deletion library consisting of 619 unique, individually bar-coded mutant strains, each lacking one specific gene, all together representing almost 12% of the genome. Functional analysis of this library in a series of phenotypic and fitness assays identified numerous genes required for growth of C. glabrata under normal or specific stress conditions, as well as a number of novel genes involved in tolerance to clinically important antifungal drugs such as azoles and echinocandins. We identified 38 deletion strains displaying strongly increased susceptibility to caspofungin, 28 of which encoding proteins that have not previously been linked to echinocandin tolerance. Our results demonstrate the potential of the C. glabrata mutant collection as a valuable resource in functional genomics studies of this important fungal pathogen of humans, and to facilitate the identification of putative novel antifungal drug target and virulence genes. PMID:24945925

  8. Large-scale gene discovery in human airway epithelia reveals novel transcripts.

    PubMed

    Scheetz, Todd E; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Coco, Justin; Eyestone, Mari de Fatima; Bonaldo, Maria; Kucaba, Tamara; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McCray, Paul B

    2004-03-12

    The airway epithelium represents an important barrier between the host and the environment. It is a first site of contact with pathogens, particulates, and other stimuli, and has evolved the means to dynamically respond to these challenges. In an effort to define the transcript profile of airway epithelia, we created and sequenced cDNA libraries from cystic fibrosis (CF) and non-CF epithelia and from human lung tissue. Sequencing of these libraries produced approximately 53,000 3'-expressed sequence tags (3'-ESTs). From these, a nonredundant UniGene set of more than 19,000 sequences was generated. Despite the relatively small contribution of airway epithelia to the total mass of the lung, focused gene discovery in this tissue yielded novel results. The ESTs included several thousand transcripts (6,416) not previously identified from cDNA sequences as expressed in the lung. Among the abundant transcripts were several genes involved in host defense. Most importantly, the set also included 879 3'-ESTs that appear to be novel sequences not previously represented in the National Center for Biotechnology Information UniGene collection. This UniGene set should be useful for studies of pulmonary diseases involving the airway epithelium including cystic fibrosis, respiratory infections and asthma. It also provides a reagent for large-scale expression profiling. PMID:14701920

  9. Large-scale Models Reveal the Two-component Mechanics of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive explanation of striated muscle mechanics and contraction on the basis of filament rotations. Helical proteins, particularly the coiled-coils of tropomyosin, myosin and α-actinin, shorten their H-bonds cooperatively and produce torque and filament rotations when the Coulombic net-charge repulsion of their highly charged side-chains is diminished by interaction with ions. The classical “two-component model” of active muscle differentiated a “contractile component” which stretches the “series elastic component” during force production. The contractile components are the helically shaped thin filaments of muscle that shorten the sarcomeres by clockwise drilling into the myosin cross-bridges with torque decrease (= force-deficit). Muscle stretch means drawing out the thin filament helices off the cross-bridges under passive counterclockwise rotation with torque increase (= stretch activation). Since each thin filament is anchored by four elastic α-actinin Z-filaments (provided with force-regulating sites for Ca2+ binding), the thin filament rotations change the torsional twist of the four Z-filaments as the “series elastic components”. Large scale models simulate the changes of structure and force in the Z-band by the different Z-filament twisting stages A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Stage D corresponds to the isometric state. The basic phenomena of muscle physiology, i. e. latency relaxation, Fenn-effect, the force-velocity relation, the length-tension relation, unexplained energy, shortening heat, the Huxley-Simmons phases, etc. are explained and interpreted with the help of the model experiments. PMID:19330099

  10. Diversity and relationships of cocirculating modern human rotaviruses revealed using large-scale comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Sarah M; McKell, Allison O; Rippinger, Christine M; McAllen, John K; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F; Payne, Daniel C; Edwards, Kathryn M; Chappell, James D; Patton, John T

    2012-09-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  11. Diversity and Relationships of Cocirculating Modern Human Rotaviruses Revealed Using Large-Scale Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    McKell, Allison O.; Rippinger, Christine M.; McAllen, John K.; Akopov, Asmik; Kirkness, Ewen F.; Payne, Daniel C.; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Chappell, James D.; Patton, John T.

    2012-01-01

    Group A rotaviruses (RVs) are 11-segmented, double-stranded RNA viruses and are primary causes of gastroenteritis in young children. Despite their medical relevance, the genetic diversity of modern human RVs is poorly understood, and the impact of vaccine use on circulating strains remains unknown. In this study, we report the complete genome sequence analysis of 58 RVs isolated from children with severe diarrhea and/or vomiting at Vanderbilt University Medical Center (VUMC) in Nashville, TN, during the years spanning community vaccine implementation (2005 to 2009). The RVs analyzed include 36 G1P[8], 18 G3P[8], and 4 G12P[8] Wa-like genogroup 1 strains with VP6-VP1-VP2-VP3-NSP1-NSP2-NSP3-NSP4-NSP5/6 genotype constellations of I1-R1-C1-M1-A1-N1-T1-E1-H1. By constructing phylogenetic trees, we identified 2 to 5 subgenotype alleles for each gene. The results show evidence of intragenogroup gene reassortment among the cocirculating strains. However, several isolates from different seasons maintained identical allele constellations, consistent with the notion that certain RV clades persisted in the community. By comparing the genes of VUMC RVs to those of other archival and contemporary RV strains for which sequences are available, we defined phylogenetic lineages and verified that the diversity of the strains analyzed in this study reflects that seen in other regions of the world. Importantly, the VP4 and VP7 proteins encoded by VUMC RVs and other contemporary strains show amino acid changes in or near neutralization domains, which might reflect antigenic drift of the virus. Thus, this large-scale, comparative genomic study of modern human RVs provides significant insight into how this pathogen evolves during its spread in the community. PMID:22696651

  12. Large-scale transport of a CO-enhanced air mass from Europe to the Middle East

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connors, V. S.; Miles, T.; Reichle, H. G., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    On November 14, 1981, the shuttle-borne Measurement of Air Pollution from Satellites (MAPS) experiment observed a carbon monoxide (CO) enhanced air mass in the middle troposphere over the Middle East. The primary source of this polluted air was estimated by constructing adiabatic isentropic trajectories backwards from the MAPS measurement location over a 36 h period. The isentropic diagnostics indicate that CO-enhanced air was transported southeastward over the Mediterranean from an organized synoptic-scale weather regime, albeit of moderate intensity, influencing central Europe on November 12. Examination of the evolving synoptic scale vertical velocity and precipitation patterns during this period, in conjuction with Meteosat visible, infrared, and water vapor imagery, suggests that the presence of this disturbed weather system over Europe may have created upward transport of CO-enhanced air between the boundary-layer and midtropospheric levels, and subsequent entrainment in the large-scale northwesterly jet stream flow over Europe and the Mediterranean.

  13. LARGE-SCALE PREDICTIONS OF MOBILE SOURCE CONTRIBUTIONS TO CONCENTRATIONS OF TOXIC AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation shows concentrations and deposition of toxic air pollutants predicted by a 3-D air quality model, the Community Multi Scale Air Quality (CMAQ) modeling system. Contributions from both on-road and non-road mobile sources are analyzed.

  14. Important aspects of Eastern Mediterranean large-scale variability revealed from data of three fixed observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensi, Manuel; Velaoras, Dimitris; Cardin, Vanessa; Perivoliotis, Leonidas; Pethiakis, George

    2015-04-01

    Long-term variations of temperature and salinity observed in the Adriatic and Aegean Seas seem to be regulated by larger-scale circulation modes of the Eastern Mediterranean (EMed) Sea, such as the recently discovered feedback mechanisms, namely the BiOS (Bimodal Oscillating System) and the internal thermohaline pump theories. These theories are the results of interpretation of many years' observations, highlighting possible interactions between two key regions of the EMed. Although repeated oceanographic cruises carried out in the past or planned for the future are a very useful tool for understanding the interaction between the two basins (e.g. alternating dense water formation, salt ingressions), recent long time-series of high frequency (up to 1h) sampling have added valuable information to the interpretation of internal mechanisms for both areas (i.e. mesoscale eddies, evolution of fast internal processes, etc.). During the last 10 years, three deep observatories were deployed and maintained in the Adriatic, Ionian, and Aegean Seas: they are respectively, the E2-M3A, the Pylos, and the E1-M3A. All are part of the largest European network of Fixed Point Open Ocean Observatories (FixO3, http://www.fixo3.eu/). Herein, from the analysis of temperature and salinity, and potential density time series collected at the three sites from the surface down to the intermediate and deep layers, we will discuss the almost perfect anti-correlated behavior between the Adriatic and the Aegean Seas. Our data, collected almost continuously since 2006, reveal that these observatories well represent the thermohaline variability of their own areas. Interestingly, temperature and salinity in the intermediate layer suddenly increased in the South Adriatic from the end of 2011, exactly when they started decreasing in the Aegean Sea. Moreover, Pylos data used together with additional ones (e.g. Absolute dynamic topography, temperature and salinity data from other platforms) collected

  15. Is synaesthesia one condition or many? A large-scale analysis reveals subgroups.

    PubMed

    Novich, Scott; Cheng, Sherry; Eagleman, David M

    2011-09-01

    Synaesthesia is a broadly defined neural phenomenon in which stimulation of a sense or concept triggers a second perception not normally associated with the stimulus. For example, letters or numbers may trigger a colour experience, sounds may trigger a taste sensation, or tastes may trigger a feeling of touch. Dozens of forms of synaesthesia have been reported, but the relationship between the different forms has not been studied: is someone with a particular form of synaesthesia likely to possess other types? If so, which ones? As an inroad to illuminating underlying mechanisms, we here examine which different synaesthesia types tend to co-occur. We analyzed reports of the forms of synaesthesia experienced by 19,133 participants who completed the Synaesthesia Battery (Eagleman, Kagan, Nelson, Sagaram, & Sarma, 2007), using correlation analysis, exploratory factor analysis (EFA), confirmatory factor analysis (CFA), and multidimensional scaling (MDS). Our analyses converged on the finding of five distinct groupings of synaesthesia forms. We label these coloured sequence synaesthesias (CSSs), coloured music synaesthesias, non-visual sequela synaesthesias, spatial sequence synaesthesia (SSS), and coloured sensation synaesthesias. Collectively, our findings reveal that synaesthesia is an umbrella term that encompasses several distinct groups with independent probabilities of expression, and this may in turn suggest distinct underlying mechanisms and the possibility of different genetic bases. PMID:21923794

  16. Acoustic telemetry reveals large-scale migration patterns of walleye in Lake Huron

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayden, Todd A.; Holbrook, Christopher; Fielder, David G.; Vandergoot, Christopher S.; Bergstedt, Roger A.; Dettmers, John M.; Krueger, Charles C.; Cooke, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Fish migration in large freshwater lacustrine systems such as the Laurentian Great Lakes is not well understood. The walleye (Sander vitreus) is an economically and ecologically important native fish species throughout the Great Lakes. In Lake Huron walleye has recently undergone a population expansion as a result of recovery of the primary stock, stemming from changing food web dynamics. During 2011 and 2012, we used acoustic telemetry to document the timing and spatial scale of walleye migration in Lake Huron and Saginaw Bay. Spawning walleye (n = 199) collected from a tributary of Saginaw Bay were implanted with acoustic tags and their migrations were documented using acoustic receivers (n = 140) deployed throughout U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron. Three migration pathways were described using multistate mark-recapture models. Models were evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion. Fish sex did not influence migratory behavior but did affect migration rate and walleye were detected on all acoustic receiver lines. Most (95%) tagged fish migrated downstream from the riverine tagging and release location to Saginaw Bay, and 37% of these fish emigrated from Saginaw Bay into Lake Huron. Remarkably, 8% of walleye that emigrated from Saginaw Bay were detected at the acoustic receiver line located farthest from the release location more than 350 km away. Most (64%) walleye returned to the Saginaw River in 2012, presumably for spawning. Our findings reveal that fish from this stock use virtually the entirety of U.S. nearshore waters of Lake Huron.

  17. Large Scale RNAi Reveals the Requirement of Nuclear Envelope Breakdown for Nuclear Import of Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Snijder, Berend; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Kühbacher, Andreas; Becker, Miriam; Day, Patricia M.; Schiller, John T.; Kann, Michael; Pelkmans, Lucas; Helenius, Ari; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-01-01

    A two-step, high-throughput RNAi silencing screen was used to identify host cell factors required during human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection. Analysis of validated hits implicated a cluster of mitotic genes and revealed a previously undetermined mechanism for import of the viral DNA (vDNA) into the nucleus. In interphase cells, viruses were endocytosed, routed to the perinuclear area, and uncoated, but the vDNA failed to be imported into the nucleus. Upon nuclear envelope perforation in interphase cells HPV16 infection occured. During mitosis, the vDNA and L2 associated with host cell chromatin on the metaphase plate. Hence, we propose that HPV16 requires nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis for access of the vDNA to the nucleoplasm. The results accentuate the value of genes found by RNAi screens for investigation of viral infections. The list of cell functions required during HPV16 infection will, moreover, provide a resource for future virus-host cell interaction studies. PMID:24874089

  18. Large scale RNAi reveals the requirement of nuclear envelope breakdown for nuclear import of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Inci; Weber, Susanne; Snijder, Berend; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Kühbacher, Andreas; Becker, Miriam; Day, Patricia M; Schiller, John T; Kann, Michael; Pelkmans, Lucas; Helenius, Ari; Schelhaas, Mario

    2014-05-01

    A two-step, high-throughput RNAi silencing screen was used to identify host cell factors required during human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) infection. Analysis of validated hits implicated a cluster of mitotic genes and revealed a previously undetermined mechanism for import of the viral DNA (vDNA) into the nucleus. In interphase cells, viruses were endocytosed, routed to the perinuclear area, and uncoated, but the vDNA failed to be imported into the nucleus. Upon nuclear envelope perforation in interphase cells HPV16 infection occured. During mitosis, the vDNA and L2 associated with host cell chromatin on the metaphase plate. Hence, we propose that HPV16 requires nuclear envelope breakdown during mitosis for access of the vDNA to the nucleoplasm. The results accentuate the value of genes found by RNAi screens for investigation of viral infections. The list of cell functions required during HPV16 infection will, moreover, provide a resource for future virus-host cell interaction studies. PMID:24874089

  19. Global dynamic topography observations reveal limited influence of large-scale mantle flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoggard, M. J.; White, N.; Al-Attar, D.

    2016-06-01

    Convective circulation of the Earth's mantle maintains some fraction of surface topography that varies with space and time. Most predictive models show that this dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-2 km, dominated by wavelengths of 104 km. Here, we test these models against our comprehensive observational database of 2,120 spot measurements of dynamic topography that were determined by analysing oceanic seismic surveys. These accurate measurements have typical peak amplitudes of +/-1 km and wavelengths of approximately 103 km, and are combined with limited continental constraints to generate a global spherical harmonic model, the robustness of which has been carefully tested and benchmarked. Our power spectral analysis reveals significant discrepancies between observed and predicted dynamic topography. At longer wavelengths (such as 104 km), observed dynamic topography has peak amplitudes of about +/-500 m. At shorter wavelengths (such as 103 km), significant dynamic topography is still observed. We show that these discrepancies can be explained if short-wavelength dynamic topography is generated by temperature-driven density anomalies within a sub-plate asthenospheric channel. Stratigraphic observations from adjacent continental margins show that these dynamic topographic signals evolve quickly with time. More rapid temporal and spatial changes in vertical displacement of the Earth's surface have direct consequences for fields as diverse as mantle flow, oceanic circulation and long-term climate change.

  20. The Dynamics of Sea Straits Reveals Large-Scale Modes of Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubino, Angelo; Androsov, Alexey; Zanchettin, Davide; Voltzinger, Naum

    2016-04-01

    Using a very high resolution 3D numerical model we investigate the tidal dynamics in the Strait of Messina. We show that different stratifications at the southern boundaries, consistent with observed stratifications in the Ionian approaches to the Strait, yield different mean sea level heights. On this basis we search for long-term variations in sea level heights measured in the tidal stations of Catania, Messina and Marseille, and associate them with the concomitant phase of dominant modes of interannual-to-decadal climate variability in the Euro-Mediterranean sector. We focus on the atmospheric North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and on the Adriatic-Ionian Bimodal Oscillating System (BiOS) to illustrate the grand variability in sea level teleconnections during the last four decades. In particular, observations reveal a strong imprint of both NAO and BiOS on all sea level records in the 21st century, when NAO and BiOS are inversely correlated. In the 1990s, a well known period of persistent positive NAO anomalies, the NAO imprint on sea level becomes weaker compared to the most recent period, although it remains clear on decadal trends, while the BiOS shows very weak positive variability. In the 1970s and early 1980s, when the NAO was on a neutral phase with weak variability, the NAO imprint on sea levels is weakest, and sea levels in Marseille and Sicily anticorrelate with each other, in contrast to the positive correlations found during the later periods. Based on these observational evidence, we discuss how our modeling results provide a basis to understand the local dynamics that contributed to determine such observed decadal variability.

  1. Measuring air-sea gas exchange velocities in a large scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2014-06-01

    In this study we present gas exchange measurements conducted in a large scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.8 to 15 m s-1 conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of three) was observed for N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant affected CH3OH, the high solubility tracer only weakly.

  2. EFFECTS OF OXYGEN AND AIR MIXING ON VOID FRACTIONS IN A LARGE SCALE SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Leishear, R; Hector Guerrero, H; Michael Restivo, M

    2008-09-11

    Oxygen and air mixing with spargers was performed in a 30 foot tall by 30 inch diameter column, to investigate mass transfer as air sparged up through the column and removed saturated oxygen from solution. The mixing techniques required to support this research are the focus of this paper. The fluids tested included water, water with an antifoam agent (AFA), and a high, solids content, Bingham plastic, nuclear waste simulant with AFA, referred to as AZ01 simulant, which is non-radioactive. Mixing of fluids in the column was performed using a recirculation system and an air sparger. The re-circulation system consisted of the column, a re-circulating pump, and associated piping. The air sparger was fabricated from a two inch diameter pipe concentrically installed in the column and open near the bottom of the column. The column contents were slowly re-circulated while fluids were mixed with the air sparger. Samples were rheologically tested to ensure effective mixing, as required. Once the fluids were adequately mixed, oxygen was homogeneously added through the re-circulation loop using a sintered metal oxygen sparger followed by a static mixer. Then the air sparger was re-actuated to remove oxygen from solution as air bubbled up through solution. To monitor mixing effectiveness several variables were monitored, which included flow rates, oxygen concentration, differential pressures along the column height, fluid levels, and void fractions, which are defined as the percent of dissolved gas divided by the total volume of gas and liquid. Research showed that mixing was uniform for water and water with AFA, but mixing for the AZ101 fluid was far more complex. Although mixing of AZ101 was uniform throughout most of the column, gas entrapment and settling of solids significantly affected test results. The detailed test results presented here provide some insight into the complexities of mixing and void fractions for different fluids and how the mixing process itself

  3. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D. B.; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A.; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A.; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  4. Metaproteomics reveals major microbial players and their biodegradation functions in a large-scale aerobic composting plant

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongming; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Song, Caihong; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-01-01

    Composting is an appropriate management alternative for municipal solid waste; however, our knowledge about the microbial regulation of this process is still scare. We employed metaproteomics to elucidate the main biodegradation pathways in municipal solid waste composting system across the main phases in a large-scale composting plant. The investigation of microbial succession revealed that Bacillales, Actinobacteria and Saccharomyces increased significantly with respect to abundance in composting process. The key microbiologic population for cellulose degradation in different composting stages was different. Fungi were found to be the main producers of cellulase in earlier phase. However, the cellulolytic fungal communities were gradually replaced by a purely bacterial one in active phase, which did not support the concept that the thermophilic fungi are active through the thermophilic phase. The effective decomposition of cellulose required the synergy between bacteria and fungi in the curing phase. PMID:25989417

  5. Metaproteomics reveals major microbial players and their biodegradation functions in a large-scale aerobic composting plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dongming; Li, Mingxiao; Xi, Beidou; Zhao, Yue; Wei, Zimin; Song, Caihong; Zhu, Chaowei

    2015-11-01

    Composting is an appropriate management alternative for municipal solid waste; however, our knowledge about the microbial regulation of this process is still scare. We employed metaproteomics to elucidate the main biodegradation pathways in municipal solid waste composting system across the main phases in a large-scale composting plant. The investigation of microbial succession revealed that Bacillales, Actinobacteria and Saccharomyces increased significantly with respect to abundance in composting process. The key microbiologic population for cellulose degradation in different composting stages was different. Fungi were found to be the main producers of cellulase in earlier phase. However, the cellulolytic fungal communities were gradually replaced by a purely bacterial one in active phase, which did not support the concept that the thermophilic fungi are active through the thermophilic phase. The effective decomposition of cellulose required the synergy between bacteria and fungi in the curing phase. PMID:25989417

  6. The iBeetle large-scale RNAi screen reveals gene functions for insect development and physiology.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Engel, Christian; Schultheis, Dorothea; Schwirz, Jonas; Ströhlein, Nadi; Troelenberg, Nicole; Majumdar, Upalparna; Dao, Van Anh; Grossmann, Daniela; Richter, Tobias; Tech, Maike; Dönitz, Jürgen; Gerischer, Lizzy; Theis, Mirko; Schild, Inga; Trauner, Jochen; Koniszewski, Nikolaus D B; Küster, Elke; Kittelmann, Sebastian; Hu, Yonggang; Lehmann, Sabrina; Siemanowski, Janna; Ulrich, Julia; Panfilio, Kristen A; Schröder, Reinhard; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Stanke, Mario; Buchhholz, Frank; Frasch, Manfred; Roth, Siegfried; Wimmer, Ernst A; Schoppmeier, Michael; Klingler, Martin; Bucher, Gregor

    2015-01-01

    Genetic screens are powerful tools to identify the genes required for a given biological process. However, for technical reasons, comprehensive screens have been restricted to very few model organisms. Therefore, although deep sequencing is revealing the genes of ever more insect species, the functional studies predominantly focus on candidate genes previously identified in Drosophila, which is biasing research towards conserved gene functions. RNAi screens in other organisms promise to reduce this bias. Here we present the results of the iBeetle screen, a large-scale, unbiased RNAi screen in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, which identifies gene functions in embryonic and postembryonic development, physiology and cell biology. The utility of Tribolium as a screening platform is demonstrated by the identification of genes involved in insect epithelial adhesion. This work transcends the restrictions of the candidate gene approach and opens fields of research not accessible in Drosophila. PMID:26215380

  7. Reconstruction of air-shower parameters for large-scale radio detectors using the lateral distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostunin, D.; Bezyazeekov, P. A.; Hiller, R.; Schröder, F. G.; Lenok, V.; Levinson, E.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate features of the lateral distribution function (LDF) of the radio signal emitted by cosmic ray air-showers with primary energies Epr > 0.1 EeV and its connection to air-shower parameters such as energy and shower maximum using CoREAS simulations made for the configuration of the Tunka-Rex antenna array. Taking into account all significant contributions to the total radio emission, such as by the geomagnetic effect, the charge excess, and the atmospheric refraction we parameterize the radio LDF. This parameterization is two-dimensional and has several free parameters. The large number of free parameters is not suitable for experiments of sparse arrays operating at low SNR (signal-to-noise ratios). Thus, exploiting symmetries, we decrease the number of free parameters based on the shower geometry and reduce the LDF to a simple one-dimensional function. The remaining parameters can be fit with a small number of points, i.e. as few as the signal from three antennas above detection threshold. Finally, we present a method for the reconstruction of air-shower parameters, in particular, energy and Xmax (shower maximum), which can be reached with a theoretical accuracy of better than 15% and 30 g/cm2, respectively.

  8. Large scale Tesla coil guided discharges initiated by femtosecond laser filamentation in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arantchouk, L.; Point, G.; Brelet, Y.; Prade, B.; Carbonnel, J.; André, Y.-B.; Mysyrowicz, A.; Houard, A.

    2014-07-01

    The guiding of meter scale electric discharges produced in air by a Tesla coil is realized in laboratory using a focused terawatt laser pulse undergoing filamentation. The influence of the focus position, the laser arrival time, or the gap length is studied to determine the best conditions for efficient laser guiding. Discharge parameters such as delay, jitter, and resistance are characterized. An increase of the discharge length by a factor 5 has been achieved with the laser filaments, corresponding to a mean breakdown field of 2 kV/cm for a 1.8 m gap length. Consecutive guided discharges at a repetition rate of 10 Hz are also reported.

  9. Systems Perturbation Analysis of a Large-Scale Signal Transduction Model Reveals Potentially Influential Candidates for Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Allen, Laura; Hochfelder, Colleen; Majumder, Mahbubul; Helikar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation in signal transduction pathways can lead to a variety of complex disorders, including cancer. Computational approaches such as network analysis are important tools to understand system dynamics as well as to identify critical components that could be further explored as therapeutic targets. Here, we performed perturbation analysis of a large-scale signal transduction model in extracellular environments that stimulate cell death, growth, motility, and quiescence. Each of the model's components was perturbed under both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations. Using 1,300 simulations under both types of perturbations across various extracellular conditions, we identified the most and least influential components based on the magnitude of their influence on the rest of the system. Based on the premise that the most influential components might serve as better drug targets, we characterized them for biological functions, housekeeping genes, essential genes, and druggable proteins. The most influential components under all environmental conditions were enriched with several biological processes. The inositol pathway was found as most influential under inactivating perturbations, whereas the kinase and small lung cancer pathways were identified as the most influential under activating perturbations. The most influential components were enriched with essential genes and druggable proteins. Moreover, known cancer drug targets were also classified in influential components based on the affected components in the network. Additionally, the systemic perturbation analysis of the model revealed a network motif of most influential components which affect each other. Furthermore, our analysis predicted novel combinations of cancer drug targets with various effects on other most influential components. We found that the combinatorial perturbation consisting of PI3K inactivation and overactivation of IP3R1 can lead to increased activity levels of apoptosis

  10. Systems Perturbation Analysis of a Large-Scale Signal Transduction Model Reveals Potentially Influential Candidates for Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Puniya, Bhanwar Lal; Allen, Laura; Hochfelder, Colleen; Majumder, Mahbubul; Helikar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation in signal transduction pathways can lead to a variety of complex disorders, including cancer. Computational approaches such as network analysis are important tools to understand system dynamics as well as to identify critical components that could be further explored as therapeutic targets. Here, we performed perturbation analysis of a large-scale signal transduction model in extracellular environments that stimulate cell death, growth, motility, and quiescence. Each of the model’s components was perturbed under both loss-of-function and gain-of-function mutations. Using 1,300 simulations under both types of perturbations across various extracellular conditions, we identified the most and least influential components based on the magnitude of their influence on the rest of the system. Based on the premise that the most influential components might serve as better drug targets, we characterized them for biological functions, housekeeping genes, essential genes, and druggable proteins. The most influential components under all environmental conditions were enriched with several biological processes. The inositol pathway was found as most influential under inactivating perturbations, whereas the kinase and small lung cancer pathways were identified as the most influential under activating perturbations. The most influential components were enriched with essential genes and druggable proteins. Moreover, known cancer drug targets were also classified in influential components based on the affected components in the network. Additionally, the systemic perturbation analysis of the model revealed a network motif of most influential components which affect each other. Furthermore, our analysis predicted novel combinations of cancer drug targets with various effects on other most influential components. We found that the combinatorial perturbation consisting of PI3K inactivation and overactivation of IP3R1 can lead to increased activity levels of apoptosis

  11. Sensitivity study of a large-scale air pollution model by using high-performance computations and Monte Carlo algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostromsky, Tz.; Dimov, I.; Georgieva, R.; Marinov, P.; Zlatev, Z.

    2013-10-01

    In this paper we present some new results of our work on sensitivity analysis of a large-scale air pollution model, more specificly the Danish Eulerian Model (DEM). The main purpose of this study is to analyse the sensitivity of ozone concentrations with respect to the rates of some chemical reactions. The current sensitivity study considers the rates of six important chemical reactions and is done for the areas of several European cities with different geographical locations, climate, industrialization and population density. One of the most widely used variance-based techniques for sensitivity analysis, such as Sobol estimates and their modifications, have been used in this study. A vast number of numerical experiments with a specially adapted for the purpose version of the Danish Eulerian Model (SA-DEM) were carried out to compute global Sobol sensitivity measures. SA-DEM was implemented and run on two powerful cluster supercomputers: IBM Blue Gene/P, the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Bulgaria and IBM MareNostrum III, the most powerful parallel supercomputer in Spain. The refined (480 × 480) mesh version of the model was used in the experiments on MareNostrum III, which is a challenging computational problem even on such a powerful machine. Some optimizations of the code with respect to the parallel efficiency and the memory use were performed. Tables with performance results of a number of numerical experiments on IBM BlueGene/P and on IBM MareNostrum III are presented and analysed.

  12. Regional and large-scale influences on seasonal to interdecadal variability in Caribbean surface air temperature in CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Jung-Hee; Hayhoe, Katharine

    2015-07-01

    We evaluate the ability of global climate models participating in phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5) to reproduce observed seasonality and interannual variability of temperature over the Caribbean, and compare these with simulations from atmosphere-only (AMIP5) and previous-generation CMIP3 models. Compared to station and gridded observations, nearly every CMIP5, CMIP3 and AMIP5 simulation tends to reproduce the primary inter-regional features of the Caribbean annual temperature cycle. In most coupled model simulations, however, boreal summer temperature lags observations by about 1 month, with a similar lag in the simulated annual cycle of sea surface temperature (SST), and a systematic cold bias in both climatological annual mean air temperature and SST. There is some improvement from CMIP3 to CMIP5 but the bias is still marked compared to AMIP5 and observations, implying that biases in the annual temperature cycle may originate in the ocean component of the coupled models. This also suggests a tendency for models to over-emphasize the influence of SSTs on near-surface temperature, a bias that may be exacerbated by model tendency to over-estimate ocean mixed layer depth as well. In contrast, we find that both coupled and atmosphere-only models tend to reasonably simulate the response of observed temperature to global temperature, to regional and large-scale variability across the Caribbean region and the Gulf of Mexico, and even to more remote Atlantic and Pacific influences. These findings contribute to building confidence in the ability of coupled models to simulate the effect of global-scale change on the Caribbean.

  13. Captured metagenomics: large-scale targeting of genes based on ‘sequence capture’ reveals functional diversity in soils

    PubMed Central

    Manoharan, Lokeshwaran; Kushwaha, Sandeep K.; Hedlund, Katarina; Ahrén, Dag

    2015-01-01

    Microbial enzyme diversity is a key to understand many ecosystem processes. Whole metagenome sequencing (WMG) obtains information on functional genes, but it is costly and inefficient due to large amount of sequencing that is required. In this study, we have applied a captured metagenomics technique for functional genes in soil microorganisms, as an alternative to WMG. Large-scale targeting of functional genes, coding for enzymes related to organic matter degradation, was applied to two agricultural soil communities through captured metagenomics. Captured metagenomics uses custom-designed, hybridization-based oligonucleotide probes that enrich functional genes of interest in metagenomic libraries where only probe-bound DNA fragments are sequenced. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with targeted genes while maintaining their target diversity and their taxonomic distribution correlated well with the traditional ribosomal sequencing. The captured metagenomes were highly enriched with genes related to organic matter degradation; at least five times more than similar, publicly available soil WMG projects. This target enrichment technique also preserves the functional representation of the soils, thereby facilitating comparative metagenomics projects. Here, we present the first study that applies the captured metagenomics approach in large scale, and this novel method allows deep investigations of central ecosystem processes by studying functional gene abundances. PMID:26490729

  14. Genome resequencing in Populus: Revealing large-scale genome variation and implications on specialized-trait genomics

    SciTech Connect

    Muchero, Wellington; Labbe, Jessy L; Priya, Ranjan; DiFazio, Steven P; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2014-01-01

    To date, Populus ranks among a few plant species with a complete genome sequence and other highly developed genomic resources. With the first genome sequence among all tree species, Populus has been adopted as a suitable model organism for genomic studies in trees. However, far from being just a model species, Populus is a key renewable economic resource that plays a significant role in providing raw materials for the biofuel and pulp and paper industries. Therefore, aside from leading frontiers of basic tree molecular biology and ecological research, Populus leads frontiers in addressing global economic challenges related to fuel and fiber production. The latter fact suggests that research aimed at improving quality and quantity of Populus as a raw material will likely drive the pursuit of more targeted and deeper research in order to unlock the economic potential tied in molecular biology processes that drive this tree species. Advances in genome sequence-driven technologies, such as resequencing individual genotypes, which in turn facilitates large scale SNP discovery and identification of large scale polymorphisms are key determinants of future success in these initiatives. In this treatise we discuss implications of genome sequence-enable technologies on Populus genomic and genetic studies of complex and specialized-traits.

  15. Large-Scale Disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gad-El-Hak, Mohamed

    "Extreme" events - including climatic events, such as hurricanes, tornadoes, and drought - can cause massive disruption to society, including large death tolls and property damage in the billions of dollars. Events in recent years have shown the importance of being prepared and that countries need to work together to help alleviate the resulting pain and suffering. This volume presents a review of the broad research field of large-scale disasters. It establishes a common framework for predicting, controlling and managing both manmade and natural disasters. There is a particular focus on events caused by weather and climate change. Other topics include air pollution, tsunamis, disaster modeling, the use of remote sensing and the logistics of disaster management. It will appeal to scientists, engineers, first responders and health-care professionals, in addition to graduate students and researchers who have an interest in the prediction, prevention or mitigation of large-scale disasters.

  16. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Lee Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-14

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  17. Analysis and experimental study on formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse atmospheric pressure air plasmas in repetitive pulse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lee; Liu, Lun; Liu, Yun-Long; Bin, Yu; Ge, Ya-Feng; Lin, Fo-Chang

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric air diffuse plasmas have enormous application potential in various fields of science and technology. Without dielectric barrier, generating large-scale air diffuse plasmas is always a challenging issue. This paper discusses and analyses the formation mechanism of cold homogenous plasma. It is proposed that generating stable diffuse atmospheric plasmas in open air should meet the three conditions: high transient power with low average power, excitation in low average E-field with locally high E-field region, and multiple overlapping electron avalanches. Accordingly, an experimental configuration of generating large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas is designed. Based on runaway electron theory, a low duty-ratio, high voltage repetitive nanosecond pulse generator is chosen as a discharge excitation source. Using the wire-electrodes with small curvature radius, the gaps with highly non-uniform E-field are structured. Experimental results show that the volume-scaleable, barrier-free, homogeneous air non-thermal plasmas have been obtained between the gap spacing with the copper-wire electrodes. The area of air cold plasmas has been up to hundreds of square centimeters. The proposed formation conditions of large-scale barrier-free diffuse air plasmas are proved to be reasonable and feasible.

  18. Modeling the MJO rain rates using parameterized large scale dynamics: vertical structure, radiation, and horizontal advection of dry air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, S.; Sobel, A. H.; Nie, J.

    2015-12-01

    Two Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) events were observed during October and November 2011 in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the DYNAMO field campaign. Precipitation rates and large-scale vertical motion profiles derived from the DYNAMO northern sounding array are simulated in a small-domain cloud-resolving model using parameterized large-scale dynamics. Three parameterizations of large-scale dynamics --- the conventional weak temperature gradient (WTG) approximation, vertical mode based spectral WTG (SWTG), and damped gravity wave coupling (DGW) --- are employed. The target temperature profiles and radiative heating rates are taken from a control simulation in which the large-scale vertical motion is imposed (rather than directly from observations), and the model itself is significantly modified from that used in previous work. These methodological changes lead to significant improvement in the results.Simulations using all three methods, with imposed time -dependent radiation and horizontal moisture advection, capture the time variations in precipitation associated with the two MJO events well. The three methods produce significant differences in the large-scale vertical motion profile, however. WTG produces the most top-heavy and noisy profiles, while DGW's is smoother with a peak in midlevels. SWTG produces a smooth profile, somewhere between WTG and DGW, and in better agreement with observations than either of the others. Numerical experiments without horizontal advection of moisture suggest that that process significantly reduces the precipitation and suppresses the top-heaviness of large-scale vertical motion during the MJO active phases, while experiments in which the effect of cloud on radiation are disabled indicate that cloud-radiative interaction significantly amplifies the MJO. Experiments in which interactive radiation is used produce poorer agreement with observation than those with imposed time-varying radiative heating. Our results highlight the

  19. Organization and evolution of brain lipidome revealed by large-scale analysis of human, chimpanzee, macaque, and mouse tissues.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Wei, Yuning; Yan, Zheng; Liu, Xiling; Xiong, Jieyi; Sugimoto, Masahiro; Tomita, Masaru; Pääbo, Svante; Sherwood, Chet C; Hof, Patrick R; Ely, John J; Li, Yan; Steinhauser, Dirk; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2015-02-18

    Lipids are prominent components of the nervous system. Here we performed a large-scale mass spectrometry-based analysis of the lipid composition of three brain regions as well as kidney and skeletal muscle of humans, chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, and mice. The human brain shows the most distinct lipid composition: 76% of 5,713 lipid compounds examined in our study are either enriched or depleted in the human brain. Concentration levels of lipids enriched in the brain evolve approximately four times faster among primates compared with lipids characteristic of non-neural tissues and show further acceleration of change in human neocortical regions but not in the cerebellum. Human-specific concentration changes are supported by human-specific expression changes for corresponding enzymes. These results provide the first insights into the role of lipids in human brain evolution. PMID:25661180

  20. Signal of vegetation variability found in large-scale evapotranspiration as revealed by NDVI and assimilated atmospheric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, R.; Masuda, K.; Yasunari, T.; Yatagai, A.

    2002-12-01

    The vegetation activity strongly influences the atmosphere. Especially, the transpiration from the vegetation of extensive forests plays an important role in the water and energy cycle in the climate system. It was revealed that the seasonal cycle of the evapotranspiration (ET) has close relationship to that of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) (Suzuki et al., 1998, Journal Meteorological Society of Japan, 76, 663--671). This study focused on the interannual change of the NDVI, which is derived from NOAA/AVHRR measurement, and that of the ET, which was estimated from gridded atmospheric datasets. Monthly global NDVI data were acquired from the Pathfinder AVHRR Land (PAL) data. The ET was estimated by so-called ``atmospheric water budget method, '' that is, a method for estimating the ET from the precipitation and water vapor divergence/convergence in the air column on each grid cell of the gridded atmospheric data. This study used 2.5 x 2.5 degree spatial resolution atmospheric data created by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), and gridded (2.5 x 2.5 degree) precipitation data provided by the CPC Merged analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) etc. The time series of the NDVI and ET monthly anomalies from their monthly mean was calculated for each grid cell from 1982 to 2000, and they were compared. In general, positive correlation prevails over the terrestrial area except for some deserts and tropical rain forest regions. Especially, high positive correlation coefficients were found over the high latitude Eurasia and semi-arid regions in Africa and North America. This result possibly demonstrates that the ET interannual variation contains an apparent signal due to the vegetation variability. Further results of analyses in term of the time series of the NDVI and ET in some specific regions in northern high latitudes will be introduced.

  1. A Developmental Framework for Complex Plasmodesmata Formation Revealed by Large-Scale Imaging of the Arabidopsis Leaf Epidermis[W

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgibbon, Jessica; Beck, Martina; Zhou, Ji; Faulkner, Christine; Robatzek, Silke; Oparka, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Plasmodesmata (PD) form tubular connections that function as intercellular communication channels. They are essential for transporting nutrients and for coordinating development. During cytokinesis, simple PDs are inserted into the developing cell plate, while during wall extension, more complex (branched) forms of PD are laid down. We show that complex PDs are derived from existing simple PDs in a pattern that is accelerated when leaves undergo the sink–source transition. Complex PDs are inserted initially at the three-way junctions between epidermal cells but develop most rapidly in the anisocytic complexes around stomata. For a quantitative analysis of complex PD formation, we established a high-throughput imaging platform and constructed PDQUANT, a custom algorithm that detected cell boundaries and PD numbers in different wall faces. For anticlinal walls, the number of complex PDs increased with increasing cell size, while for periclinal walls, the number of PDs decreased. Complex PD insertion was accelerated by up to threefold in response to salicylic acid treatment and challenges with mannitol. In a single 30-min run, we could derive data for up to 11k PDs from 3k epidermal cells. This facile approach opens the door to a large-scale analysis of the endogenous and exogenous factors that influence PD formation. PMID:23371949

  2. Large-scale functional network reorganization in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome revealed by modularity analysis.

    PubMed

    Scariati, Elisa; Schaer, Marie; Karahanoglu, Isik; Schneider, Maude; Richiardi, Jonas; Debbané, Martin; Van De Ville, Dimitri; Eliez, Stephan

    2016-09-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is associated with cognitive impairments and a 41% risk of developing schizophrenia. While several studies performed on patients with 22q11DS showed the presence of abnormal functional connectivity in this syndrome, how these alterations affect large-scale network organization is still unknown. Here we performed a network modularity analysis on whole-brain functional connectomes derived from the resting-state fMRI of 40 patients with 22q11DS and 41 healthy control participants, aged between 9 and 30 years old. We then split the sample at 18 years old to obtain two age subgroups and repeated the modularity analyses. We found alterations of modular communities affecting the visuo-spatial network and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) in both age groups. These results corroborate previous structural and functional studies in 22q11DS that showed early impairment of visuo-spatial processing regions. Furthermore, as ACC has been linked to the development of psychotic symptoms in 22q11DS, the early impairment of its functional connectivity provide further support that ACC alterations may provide potential biomarkers for an increased risk of schizophrenia. Finally, we found an abnormal modularity partition of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) only in adults with 22q11DS, suggesting the presence of an abnormal development of functional network communities during adolescence in 22q11DS. PMID:27371790

  3. Rank Order Coding: a Retinal Information Decoding Strategy Revealed by Large-Scale Multielectrode Array Retinal Recordings123

    PubMed Central

    Maccione, Alessandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    How a population of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) encodes the visual scene remains an open question. Going beyond individual RGC coding strategies, results in salamander suggest that the relative latencies of a RGC pair encode spatial information. Thus, a population code based on this concerted spiking could be a powerful mechanism to transmit visual information rapidly and efficiently. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mouse by recording simultaneous light-evoked responses from hundreds of RGCs, at pan-retinal level, using a new generation of large-scale, high-density multielectrode array consisting of 4096 electrodes. Interestingly, we did not find any RGCs exhibiting a clear latency tuning to the stimuli, suggesting that in mouse, individual RGC pairs may not provide sufficient information. We show that a significant amount of information is encoded synergistically in the concerted spiking of large RGC populations. Thus, the RGC population response described with relative activities, or ranks, provides more relevant information than classical independent spike count- or latency- based codes. In particular, we report for the first time that when considering the relative activities across the whole population, the wave of first stimulus-evoked spikes is an accurate indicator of stimulus content. We show that this coding strategy coexists with classical neural codes, and that it is more efficient and faster. Overall, these novel observations suggest that already at the level of the retina, concerted spiking provides a reliable and fast strategy to rapidly transmit new visual scenes. PMID:27275008

  4. Rank Order Coding: a Retinal Information Decoding Strategy Revealed by Large-Scale Multielectrode Array Retinal Recordings.

    PubMed

    Portelli, Geoffrey; Barrett, John M; Hilgen, Gerrit; Masquelier, Timothée; Maccione, Alessandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Berdondini, Luca; Kornprobst, Pierre; Sernagor, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    How a population of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) encodes the visual scene remains an open question. Going beyond individual RGC coding strategies, results in salamander suggest that the relative latencies of a RGC pair encode spatial information. Thus, a population code based on this concerted spiking could be a powerful mechanism to transmit visual information rapidly and efficiently. Here, we tested this hypothesis in mouse by recording simultaneous light-evoked responses from hundreds of RGCs, at pan-retinal level, using a new generation of large-scale, high-density multielectrode array consisting of 4096 electrodes. Interestingly, we did not find any RGCs exhibiting a clear latency tuning to the stimuli, suggesting that in mouse, individual RGC pairs may not provide sufficient information. We show that a significant amount of information is encoded synergistically in the concerted spiking of large RGC populations. Thus, the RGC population response described with relative activities, or ranks, provides more relevant information than classical independent spike count- or latency- based codes. In particular, we report for the first time that when considering the relative activities across the whole population, the wave of first stimulus-evoked spikes is an accurate indicator of stimulus content. We show that this coding strategy coexists with classical neural codes, and that it is more efficient and faster. Overall, these novel observations suggest that already at the level of the retina, concerted spiking provides a reliable and fast strategy to rapidly transmit new visual scenes. PMID:27275008

  5. Analyses of transcriptome sequences reveal multiple ancient large-scale duplication events in the ancestor of Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta).

    PubMed

    Devos, Nicolas; Szövényi, Péter; Weston, David J; Rothfels, Carl J; Johnson, Matthew G; Shaw, A Jonathan

    2016-07-01

    The goal of this research was to investigate whether there has been a whole-genome duplication (WGD) in the ancestry of Sphagnum (peatmoss) or the class Sphagnopsida, and to determine if the timing of any such duplication(s) and patterns of paralog retention could help explain the rapid radiation and current ecological dominance of peatmosses. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data were generated for nine taxa in Sphagnopsida (Bryophyta). Analyses of frequency plots for synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (Ks ) between paralogous gene pairs and reconciliation of 578 gene trees were conducted to assess evidence of large-scale or genome-wide duplication events in each transcriptome. Both Ks frequency plots and gene tree-based analyses indicate multiple duplication events in the history of the Sphagnopsida. The most recent WGD event predates divergence of Sphagnum from the two other genera of Sphagnopsida. Duplicate retention is highly variable across species, which might be best explained by local adaptation. Our analyses indicate that the last WGD could have been an important factor underlying the diversification of peatmosses and facilitated their rise to ecological dominance in peatlands. The timing of the duplication events and their significance in the evolutionary history of peat mosses are discussed. PMID:26900928

  6. Comparative Large Scale Characterization of Plant versus Mammal Proteins Reveals Similar and Idiosyncratic N-α-Acetylation Features*

    PubMed Central

    Bienvenut, Willy V.; Sumpton, David; Martinez, Aude; Lilla, Sergio; Espagne, Christelle; Meinnel, Thierry; Giglione, Carmela

    2012-01-01

    N-terminal modifications play a major role in the fate of proteins in terms of activity, stability, or subcellular compartmentalization. Such modifications remain poorly described and badly characterized in proteomic studies, and only a few comparison studies among organisms have been made available so far. Recent advances in the field now allow the enrichment and selection of N-terminal peptides in the course of proteome-wide mass spectrometry analyses. These targeted approaches unravel as a result the extent and nature of the protein N-terminal modifications. Here, we aimed at studying such modifications in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana to compare these results with those obtained from a human sample analyzed in parallel. We applied large scale analysis to compile robust conclusions on both data sets. Our data show strong convergence of the characterized modifications especially for protein N-terminal methionine excision, co-translational N-α-acetylation, or N-myristoylation between animal and plant kingdoms. Because of the convergence of both the substrates and the N-α-acetylation machinery, it was possible to identify the N-acetyltransferases involved in such modifications for a small number of model plants. Finally, a high proportion of nuclear-encoded chloroplast proteins feature post-translational N-α-acetylation of the mature protein after removal of the transit peptide. Unlike animals, plants feature in a dedicated pathway for post-translational acetylation of organelle-targeted proteins. The corresponding machinery is yet to be discovered. PMID:22223895

  7. Structural Variant Detection by Large-scale Sequencing Reveals New Evolutionary Evidence on Breed Divergence between Chinese and European Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengju; Li, Junhui; Kang, Huimin; Wang, Haifei; Fan, Ziyao; Yin, Zongjun; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Zhiquan; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we performed a genome-wide SV detection among the genomes of thirteen pigs from diverse Chinese and European originated breeds by next genetation sequencing, and constrcuted a single-nucleotide resolution map involving 56,930 putative SVs. We firstly identified a SV hotspot spanning 35 Mb region on the X chromosome specifically in the genomes of Chinese originated individuals. Further scrutinizing this region by large-scale sequencing data of extra 111 individuals, we obtained the confirmatory evidence on our initial finding. Moreover, thirty five SV-related genes within the hotspot region, being of importance for reproduction ability, rendered significant different evolution rates between Chinese and European originated breeds. The SV hotspot identified herein offers a novel evidence for assessing phylogenetic relationships, as well as likely explains the genetic difference of corresponding phenotypes and features, among Chinese and European pig breeds. Furthermore, we employed various SVs to infer genetic structure of individuls surveyed. We found SVs can clearly detect the difference of genetic background among individuals. This clues us that genome-wide SVs can capture majority of geneic variation and be applied into cladistic analyses. Characterizing whole genome SVs demonstrated that SVs are significantly enriched/depleted with various genomic features. PMID:26729041

  8. Large scale dynamics of the Michaelis complex in Bacillus stearothermophilus lactate dehydrogenase revealed by a single-tryptophan mutant study.

    PubMed

    Nie, Beining; Deng, Hua; Desamero, Ruel; Callender, Robert

    2013-03-19

    Large scale dynamics within the Michaelis complex mimic of Bacillus stearothermophilus thermophilic lactate dehydrogenase, bsLDH·NADH·oxamate, were studied with site specific resolution by laser-induced temperature jump relaxation spectroscopy with a time resolution of 20 ns. NADH emission and Trp emission from the wild type and a series of single-tryptophan bsLDH mutants, with the tryptophan positions different distances from the active site, were used as reporters of evolving structure in response to the rapid change in temperature. Several distinct dynamical events were observed on the millisecond to microsecond time scale involving motion of atoms spread over the protein, some occurring concomitantly or nearly concomitantly with structural changes at the active site. This suggests that a large portion of the protein-substrate complex moves in a rather concerted fashion to bring about catalysis. The catalytically important surface loop undergoes two distinct movements, both needed for a competent enzyme. Our results also suggest that what is called "loop motion" is not just localized to the loop and active site residues. Rather, it involves the motion of atoms spread over the protein, even some quite distal from the active site. How these results bear on the catalytic mechanism of bsLDH is discussed. PMID:23428201

  9. Targeted Sequencing Reveals Large-Scale Sequence Polymorphism in Maize Candidate Genes for Biomass Production and Composition

    PubMed Central

    Ulpinnis, Chris; Scholz, Uwe; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of maize genomic research is to identify sequence polymorphisms responsible for phenotypic variation in traits of economic importance. Large-scale detection of sequence variation is critical for linking genes, or genomic regions, to phenotypes. However, due to its size and complexity, it remains expensive to generate whole genome sequences of sufficient coverage for divergent maize lines, even with access to next generation sequencing (NGS) technology. Because methods involving reduction of genome complexity, such as genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), assess only a limited fraction of sequence variation, targeted sequencing of selected genomic loci offers an attractive alternative. We therefore designed a sequence capture assay to target 29 Mb genomic regions and surveyed a total of 4,648 genes possibly affecting biomass production in 21 diverse inbred maize lines (7 flints, 14 dents). Captured and enriched genomic DNA was sequenced using the 454 NGS platform to 19.6-fold average depth coverage, and a broad evaluation of read alignment and variant calling methods was performed to select optimal procedures for variant discovery. Sequence alignment with the B73 reference and de novo assembly identified 383,145 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 42,685 were non-synonymous alterations and 7,139 caused frameshifts. Presence/absence variation (PAV) of genes was also detected. We found that substantial sequence variation exists among genomic regions targeted in this study, which was particularly evident within coding regions. This diversification has the potential to broaden functional diversity and generate phenotypic variation that may lead to new adaptations and the modification of important agronomic traits. Further, annotated SNPs identified here will serve as useful genetic tools and as candidates in searches for phenotype-altering DNA variation. In summary, we demonstrated that sequencing of captured DNA is a powerful approach for

  10. Large scale analysis of pediatric antiviral CD8+ T cell populations reveals sustained, functional and mature responses

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Fujisawa, Tomoo; Nagasaka, Hironori; Nonoyama, Shigeaki; Sierro, Sophie; Northfield, John; Lucas, Michaela; Vargas, Anita; Klenerman, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Background Cellular immunity plays a crucial role in cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and substantial populations of CMV-specific T cells accumulate throughout life. However, although CMV infection occurs during childhood, relatively little is know about the typical quantity and quality of T cell responses in pediatric populations. Methods One thousand and thirty-six people (Male/Female = 594/442, Age: 0–19 yr.; 959 subjects, 20–29 yr.; 77 subjects) were examined for HLA typing. All of 1036 subjects were tested for HLA-A2 antigen. Of 1036 subjects, 887 were also tested for HLA-A23, 24 antigens. In addition, 50 elderly people (Male/Female = 11/39, Age: 60–92 yr.) were also tested for HLA-A2 antigen. We analyzed the CD8+ T cell responses to CMV, comparing these to responses in children and young. The frequencies, phenotype and function CD8+ T cells for two imunodominant epitopes from pp65 were measured. Results We observed consistently high frequency and phenotypically "mature" (CD27 low, CD28 low, CD45RA+) CMV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in children, including those studied in the first year of life. These CD8+ T cells retained functionality across all age groups, and showed evidence of memory "inflation" only in later adult life. Conclusion CMV consistently elicits a very strong CD8+ T cell response in infants and large pools of CMV specific CD8+ T cells are maintained throughout childhood. The presence of CMV may considerably mould the CD8+ T cell compartment over time, but the relative frequencies of CMV-specific cells do not show the evidence of a population-level increase during childhood and adulthood. This contrast with the marked expansion ("inflation") of such CD8+ T cells in older adults. This study indicates that large scale analysis of peptide specific T cell responses in infants is readily possible. The robust nature of the responses observed suggests vaccine strategies aimed at priming and boosting CD8+ T cells against major pathogens

  11. Laminar and Dorsoventral Molecular Organization of the Medial Entorhinal Cortex Revealed by Large-scale Anatomical Analysis of Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ramsden, Helen L.; Sürmeli, Gülşen; McDonagh, Steven G.; Nolan, Matthew F.

    2015-01-01

    Neural circuits in the medial entorhinal cortex (MEC) encode an animal’s position and orientation in space. Within the MEC spatial representations, including grid and directional firing fields, have a laminar and dorsoventral organization that corresponds to a similar topography of neuronal connectivity and cellular properties. Yet, in part due to the challenges of integrating anatomical data at the resolution of cortical layers and borders, we know little about the molecular components underlying this organization. To address this we develop a new computational pipeline for high-throughput analysis and comparison of in situ hybridization (ISH) images at laminar resolution. We apply this pipeline to ISH data for over 16,000 genes in the Allen Brain Atlas and validate our analysis with RNA sequencing of MEC tissue from adult mice. We find that differential gene expression delineates the borders of the MEC with neighboring brain structures and reveals its laminar and dorsoventral organization. We propose a new molecular basis for distinguishing the deep layers of the MEC and show that their similarity to corresponding layers of neocortex is greater than that of superficial layers. Our analysis identifies ion channel-, cell adhesion- and synapse-related genes as candidates for functional differentiation of MEC layers and for encoding of spatial information at different scales along the dorsoventral axis of the MEC. We also reveal laminar organization of genes related to disease pathology and suggest that a high metabolic demand predisposes layer II to neurodegenerative pathology. In principle, our computational pipeline can be applied to high-throughput analysis of many forms of neuroanatomical data. Our results support the hypothesis that differences in gene expression contribute to functional specialization of superficial layers of the MEC and dorsoventral organization of the scale of spatial representations. PMID:25615592

  12. Satellite chlorophyll fluorescence measurements reveal large-scale decoupling of photosynthesis and greenness dynamics in boreal evergreen forests.

    PubMed

    Walther, Sophia; Voigt, Maximilian; Thum, Tea; Gonsamo, Alemu; Zhang, Yongguang; Köhler, Philipp; Jung, Martin; Varlagin, Andrej; Guanter, Luis

    2016-09-01

    Mid-to-high latitude forests play an important role in the terrestrial carbon cycle, but the representation of photosynthesis in boreal forests by current modelling and observational methods is still challenging. In particular, the applicability of existing satellite-based proxies of greenness to indicate photosynthetic activity is hindered by small annual changes in green biomass of the often evergreen tree population and by the confounding effects of background materials such as snow. As an alternative, satellite measurements of sun-induced chlorophyll fluorescence (SIF) can be used as a direct proxy of photosynthetic activity. In this study, the start and end of the photosynthetically active season of the main boreal forests are analysed using spaceborne SIF measurements retrieved from the GOME-2 instrument and compared to that of green biomass, proxied by vegetation indices including the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) derived from MODIS data. We find that photosynthesis and greenness show a similar seasonality in deciduous forests. In high-latitude evergreen needleleaf forests, however, the length of the photosynthetically active period indicated by SIF is up to 6 weeks longer than the green biomass changing period proxied by EVI, with SIF showing a start-of-season of approximately 1 month earlier than EVI. On average, the photosynthetic spring recovery as signalled by SIF occurs as soon as air temperatures exceed the freezing point (2-3 °C) and when the snow on the ground has not yet completely melted. These findings are supported by model data of gross primary production and a number of other studies which evaluated in situ observations of CO2 fluxes, meteorology and the physiological state of the needles. Our results demonstrate the sensitivity of space-based SIF measurements to light-use efficiency of boreal forests and their potential for an unbiased detection of photosynthetic activity even under the challenging conditions interposed by evergreen

  13. Large-scale gene expression profiling reveals physiological response to deletion of chaperone dnaKJ in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Dongjie; Liu, Chuanpeng; Liu, Lushan; Zhu, Lingxiang; Peng, Fang; Zhou, Qiming

    2016-01-01

    Chaperone DnaK and its co-chaperone DnaJ plays various essential roles such as in assisting in the folding of nascent peptides, preventing protein aggregation and maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. Global transcriptional changes in vivo associated with deletion of dnaKJ were monitored using DNA microarray to elucidate the role of DnaKJ at the transcriptional level. Microarray profiling and bioinformatics analysis revealed that a few chaperone and protease genes, stress-related genes and genes involved in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and oxidative phosphorylation were up-regulated, whereas various transporter genes, pentose phosphate pathway and transcriptional regulation related genes were down-regulated. This study is the first to systematically analyze the alterations at the transcriptional level in vivo in deletion of dnaKJ. Fatty acid methyl esters analysis indicated that the amount of unsaturated fatty acid sharply increased and subcellular location prediction analysis showed a marked decrease in transcription of inner-membrane protein genes, which might have triggered the development of aberrant cell shape and susceptibility for some antibiotics in the ΔdnaKJ strain. PMID:27242140

  14. X-ray fluorescent microscopy reveals large-scale relocalization and extracellular translocation of cellular copper during angiogenesis.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L.; Mandava, S.; Ursos, L.; Zhang, W.; Rodi, D.; Vogt, S.; Legnini, D.; Maser, J.; Ikpatt, F.; Olopade, O. I.; Glesne, D.; Univ. of Chicago

    2007-02-13

    Although copper has been reported to influence numerous proteins known to be important for angiogenesis, the enhanced sensitivity of this developmental process to copper bioavailability has remained an enigma, because copper metalloproteins are prevalent and essential throughout all cells. Recent developments in x-ray optics at third-generation synchrotron sources have provided a resource for highly sensitive visualization and quantitation of metalloproteins in biological samples. Here, we report the application of x-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to in vitro models of angiogenesis and neurogenesis, revealing a surprisingly dramatic spatial relocalization specific to capillary formation of 80-90% of endogenous cellular copper stores from intracellular compartments to the tips of nascent endothelial cell filopodia and across the cell membrane. Although copper chelation had no effect on process formation, an almost complete ablation of network formation was observed. XFM of highly vascularized ductal carcinomas showed copper clustering in putative neoangiogenic areas. This use of XFM for the study of a dynamic developmental process not only sheds light on the copper requirement for endothelial tube formation but highlights the value of synchrotron-based facilities in biological research.

  15. Induced seismicity in large-scale mining in the kola peninsula and monitoring to reveal informative precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, N. N.; Kozyrev, A. A.; Panin, V. I.

    1996-07-01

    Large volumes of rock mass, mined-out and moved within these deposits, resulted in irreversible changes in the geodynamic regime in the upper earth's crust of the adjacent territory. These changes manifest themselves in a more frequent occurrence of such intensive dynamic phenomena as tectonic rock bursts due to fault movement adjacent to the area which is mined-out and man-made earthquakes which sharply decrease mining safety and result in great material losses. To develop the prediction techniques of such phenomena, a monitoring system is created, based on the program of the Kola Complex of geodynamic measuring stations. Most of this system is realized in the region of the Khibiny apatite mines. The system provides regional seismological monitoring, local prediction of seismicity in separate areas of a rock mass and, determination of stress and strain in rock masses, local geophysical monitoring over the state of rocks in a rock mass as well as physical and mathematical modelling of geodynamic processes in the upper earth's crust. The investigations have resulted in the distinguishing of some regularities in manifestations of induced seismicity and tectonic rock bursts and in the determination of strain precursors of intensive seismic events in the Khibiny mines. The mechanism is provided by the induced seismicity which resulted from the anthropogenic impact on the geological medium. A geodynamic monitoring complex is described, which is used to reveal the precursors of powerful seismic events in situ, and monitoring results are shown, obtained in the Kola Complex of geodynamic stations. Methods of preventing tectonic rock bursts and induced earthquakes are presented.

  16. Measuring air-sea gas-exchange velocities in a large-scale annular wind-wave tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mesarchaki, E.; Kräuter, C.; Krall, K. E.; Bopp, M.; Helleis, F.; Williams, J.; Jähne, B.

    2015-01-01

    In this study we present gas-exchange measurements conducted in a large-scale wind-wave tank. Fourteen chemical species spanning a wide range of solubility (dimensionless solubility, α = 0.4 to 5470) and diffusivity (Schmidt number in water, Scw = 594 to 1194) were examined under various turbulent (u10 = 0.73 to 13.2 m s-1) conditions. Additional experiments were performed under different surfactant modulated (two different concentration levels of Triton X-100) surface states. This paper details the complete methodology, experimental procedure and instrumentation used to derive the total transfer velocity for all examined tracers. The results presented here demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed method, and the derived gas-exchange velocities are shown to be comparable to previous investigations. The gas transfer behaviour is exemplified by contrasting two species at the two solubility extremes, namely nitrous oxide (N2O) and methanol (CH3OH). Interestingly, a strong transfer velocity reduction (up to a factor of 3) was observed for the relatively insoluble N2O under a surfactant covered water surface. In contrast, the surfactant effect for CH3OH, the high solubility tracer, was significantly weaker.

  17. Annual transition and seasonal variation of indoor air pollution levels of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol in large-scale buildings in Nagoya, Japan.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kiyoshi; Kamijima, Michihiro; Shibata, Eiji; Ohno, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Tamie

    2009-11-01

    2-Ethyl-1-hexanol (2E1H) is a possible causative chemical for sick building symptoms; however, thus far, we do not have a clear understanding of the indoor air pollution levels caused by it. In this study, first, airborne 2E1H concentrations were measured during summer and winter from 2004 to 2007 in 67 rooms of 56 large-scale buildings in Nagoya, Japan, in order to show the seasonal variation of indoor air pollution levels of 2E1H. Then, a follow-up survey was conducted in five rooms of five buildings for more than 2 years in order to establish the annual transition of their 2E1H indoor air pollution levels. 2E1H was found to be one of the predominant volatile organic compounds in the indoor air of large-scale buildings. Its geometric mean concentration was significantly higher during summer (55.4 microg/m3) than during winter (13.7 microg/m3) (p < 0.01), although there was a significant difference in the concentrations among the buildings. High 2E1H concentrations may have been caused by high emission rates of 2E1H from floors, because of the hydrolysis of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate in polyvinyl chloride flooring materials or of adhesives containing 2-ethylhexyl moieties. Follow-up observations showed little decrease in the indoor air 2E1H concentrations from one year to the next, although they did show seasonal fluctuations, with an evident increase in concentrations during summer and an evident decrease during winter. PMID:19890564

  18. Large-scale high-efficiency air stripper and recovery well network for removing volatile organic chlorocarbons from ground water

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, L F; Lorfenz, R; Muska, C F; Steele, J L

    1986-05-01

    The Savannah River Plant (SRP) produces special nuclear materials for the US Government. Since 1958, chemical wastes generated by an aluminum forming/metal finishing process used to manufacture fuel and target assemblies were discharged to a settling basin. This process waste stream contained acids, alkalis, metals, and chlorinated degreasing solvents. In 1981, these solvents, specifically trichloroethylene and tetrachloroethylene, were discovered in monitor wells near the settling basin. A monitor well network was installed to define the vertical and horizontal extent of the plume. The current inventory of total chlorocarbons in the saturated zone is approximately 360,000 pounds within the 100 ppB contour interval. During 1983, air stripping technology was evaluated to remove these solvents from the ground water. A 20-gpm ground water pilot air stripper with one recovery well was tested. Performance data from this unit were then used to design a 50-gpm production prototype air stripper. This unit demonstrated that degreaser solvent concentrations in ground water could be reduced from 120,000 ppB to less than the detection limit of 1 ppB. Data from these two units were then used to design an air stripper column that would process contaminated ground water at a rate of 400 gpm. Water is fed to this column from a network of 11 recovery wells. These wells were located in the zone of contamination, as defined by analytical and numerical modeling techniques. This system has been operational since April 1985. To date, over 65,000 pounds of chlorinated degreaser solvents have been removed from an underlying aquifer. The effects of this program on the hydraulic gradient and contamination movement are currently being evaluated. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ground water remediation program at the Savannah River Plant.

  19. Large Scale Variability of Mid-Tropospheric Carbon Dioxide as Observed by the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) on the NASA EOS Aqua Platform

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Olsen, Edward T.

    2012-01-01

    The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) is a hyperspectral infrared instrument on the EOS Aqua Spacecraft, launched on May 4, 2002. AIRS has 2378 infrared channels ranging from 3.7 microns to 15.4 microns and a 13.5 km footprint. AIRS, in conjunction with the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), produces temperature profiles with 1K/km accuracy, water vapor profiles (20%/2km), infrared cloud height and fraction, and trace gas amounts for CO2, CO, SO2, O3 and CH4 in the mid to upper troposphere. AIRS wide swath(cedilla) +/-49.5 deg , enables daily global daily coverage for over 95% of the Earth's surface. AIRS data are used for weather forecasting, validating climate model distribution and processes, and observing long-range transport of greenhouse gases. In this study, we examine the large scale and regional horizontal variability in the AIRS Mid-tropospheric Carbon Dioxide product as a function of season and associate the observed variability with known atmospheric transport processes, and sources and sinks of CO2.

  20. Large-scale recrystallization of the S-layer of Bacillus coagulans E38-66 at the air/water interface and on lipid films.

    PubMed Central

    Pum, D; Weinhandl, M; Hödl, C; Sleytr, U B

    1993-01-01

    S-layer protein isolated from Bacillus coagulans E38-66 could be recrystallized into large-scale coherent monolayers at an air/water interface and on phospholipid films spread on a Langmuir-Blodgett trough. Because of the asymmetry in the physiochemical surface properties of the S-layer protein, the subunits were associated with their more hydrophobic outer face with the air/water interface and oriented with their negatively charged inner face to the zwitterionic head groups of the dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and dipalmitoylphosphatidylethanolamine (DPPE) monolayer films. The dynamic crystal growth at both types of interfaces was first initiated at several distant nucleation points. The individual monocrystalline areas grew isotropically in all directions until the front edge of neighboring crystals was met. The recrystallized S-layer protein and the S-layer-DPPE layer could be chemically cross-linked from the subphase with glutaraldehyde. Images PMID:8478338

  1. Large scale air pollution estimation method combining land use regression and chemical transport modeling in a geostatistical framework.

    PubMed

    Akita, Yasuyuki; Baldasano, Jose M; Beelen, Rob; Cirach, Marta; de Hoogh, Kees; Hoek, Gerard; Nieuwenhuijsen, Mark; Serre, Marc L; de Nazelle, Audrey

    2014-04-15

    In recognition that intraurban exposure gradients may be as large as between-city variations, recent air pollution epidemiologic studies have become increasingly interested in capturing within-city exposure gradients. In addition, because of the rapidly accumulating health data, recent studies also need to handle large study populations distributed over large geographic domains. Even though several modeling approaches have been introduced, a consistent modeling framework capturing within-city exposure variability and applicable to large geographic domains is still missing. To address these needs, we proposed a modeling framework based on the Bayesian Maximum Entropy method that integrates monitoring data and outputs from existing air quality models based on Land Use Regression (LUR) and Chemical Transport Models (CTM). The framework was applied to estimate the yearly average NO2 concentrations over the region of Catalunya in Spain. By jointly accounting for the global scale variability in the concentration from the output of CTM and the intraurban scale variability through LUR model output, the proposed framework outperformed more conventional approaches. PMID:24621302

  2. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-15

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm{sup 3}, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  3. Generation of large-scale, barrier-free diffuse plasmas in air at atmospheric pressure using array wire electrodes and nanosecond high-voltage pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Yun; Li, Lee; Liu, Yun-Long; Liu, Lun; Liu, Minghai

    2014-10-01

    This paper introduces a method to generate large-scale diffuse plasmas by using a repetition nanosecond pulse generator and a parallel array wire-electrode configuration. We investigated barrier-free diffuse plasmas produced in the open air in parallel and cross-parallel array line-line electrode configurations. We found that, when the distance between the wire-electrode pair is small, the discharges were almost extinguished. Also, glow-like diffuse plasmas with little discharge weakening were obtained in an appropriate range of line-line distances and with a cathode-grounding cross-electrode configuration. As an example, we produced a large-scale, stable diffuse plasma with volumes as large as 18 × 15 × 15 cm3, and this discharge region can be further expanded. Additionally, using optical and electrical measurements, we showed that the electron temperature was higher than the gas temperature, which was almost the same as room temperature. Also, an array of electrode configuration with more wire electrodes had helped to prevent the transition from diffuse discharge to arc discharge. Comparing the current waveforms of configurations with 1 cell and 9 cells, we found that adding cells significantly increased the conduction current and the electrical energy delivered in the electrode gaps.

  4. Large scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolin, B. F.

    1975-01-01

    Classes of large scale dynamic systems were discussed in the context of modern control theory. Specific examples discussed were in the technical fields of aeronautics, water resources and electric power.

  5. Sound to Language: Different Cortical Processing for First and Second Languages in Elementary School Children as Revealed by a Large-Scale Study Using fNIRS

    PubMed Central

    Ojima, Shiro; Matsuba-Kurita, Hiroko; Dan, Ippeita; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Katura, Takusige; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2011-01-01

    A large-scale study of 484 elementary school children (6–10 years) performing word repetition tasks in their native language (L1-Japanese) and a second language (L2-English) was conducted using functional near-infrared spectroscopy. Three factors presumably associated with cortical activation, language (L1/L2), word frequency (high/low), and hemisphere (left/right), were investigated. L1 words elicited significantly greater brain activation than L2 words, regardless of semantic knowledge, particularly in the superior/middle temporal and inferior parietal regions (angular/supramarginal gyri). The greater L1-elicited activation in these regions suggests that they are phonological loci, reflecting processes tuned to the phonology of the native language, while phonologically unfamiliar L2 words were processed like nonword auditory stimuli. The activation was bilateral in the auditory and superior/middle temporal regions. Hemispheric asymmetry was observed in the inferior frontal region (right dominant), and in the inferior parietal region with interactions: low-frequency words elicited more right-hemispheric activation (particularly in the supramarginal gyrus), while high-frequency words elicited more left-hemispheric activation (particularly in the angular gyrus). The present results reveal the strong involvement of a bilateral language network in children’s brains depending more on right-hemispheric processing while acquiring unfamiliar/low-frequency words. A right-to-left shift in laterality should occur in the inferior parietal region, as lexical knowledge increases irrespective of language. PMID:21350046

  6. A Revised Method of Presenting Wavenumber-Frequency Power Spectrum Diagrams That Reveals the Asymmetric Nature of Tropical Large-scale Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chao, Winston C.; Yang, Bo; Fu, Xiouhua

    2007-01-01

    The popular method of presenting wavenumber-frequency power spectrum diagrams for studying tropical large-scale waves in the literature is shown to give an incomplete presentation of these waves. The so-called "convectively-coupled Kelvin (mixed Rossby-gravity) waves" are presented as existing only in the symmetric (antisymmetric) component of the diagrams. This is obviously not consistent with the published composite/regression studies of "convectively-coupled Kelvin waves," which illustrate the asymmetric nature of these waves. The cause of this inconsistency is revealed in this note and a revised method of presenting the power spectrum diagrams is proposed. When this revised method is used, "convectively-coupled Kelvin waves" do show anti-symmetric components, and "convectively-coupled mixed Rossby-gravity waves (also known as Yanai waves)" do show a hint of symmetric components. These results bolster a published proposal that these waves be called "chimeric Kelvin waves," "chimeric mixed Rossby-gravity waves," etc. This revised method of presenting power spectrum diagrams offers a more rigorous means of comparing the General Circulation Models (GCM) output with observations by calling attention to the capability of GCMs in correctly simulating the asymmetric characteristics of the equatorial waves.

  7. Large Scale Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capiluppi, Paolo

    2005-04-01

    Large Scale Computing is acquiring an important role in the field of data analysis and treatment for many Sciences and also for some Social activities. The present paper discusses the characteristics of Computing when it becomes "Large Scale" and the current state of the art for some particular application needing such a large distributed resources and organization. High Energy Particle Physics (HEP) Experiments are discussed in this respect; in particular the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) Experiments are analyzed. The Computing Models of LHC Experiments represent the current prototype implementation of Large Scale Computing and describe the level of maturity of the possible deployment solutions. Some of the most recent results on the measurements of the performances and functionalities of the LHC Experiments' testing are discussed.

  8. Large scale full-length cDNA sequencing reveals a unique genomic landscape in a lepidopteran model insect, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-09-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  9. Large Scale Full-Length cDNA Sequencing Reveals a Unique Genomic Landscape in a Lepidopteran Model Insect, Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Suetsugu, Yoshitaka; Futahashi, Ryo; Kanamori, Hiroyuki; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko; Sasanuma, Shun-ichi; Narukawa, Junko; Ajimura, Masahiro; Jouraku, Akiya; Namiki, Nobukazu; Shimomura, Michihiko; Sezutsu, Hideki; Osanai-Futahashi, Mizuko; Suzuki, Masataka G; Daimon, Takaaki; Shinoda, Tetsuro; Taniai, Kiyoko; Asaoka, Kiyoshi; Niwa, Ryusuke; Kawaoka, Shinpei; Katsuma, Susumu; Tamura, Toshiki; Noda, Hiroaki; Kasahara, Masahiro; Sugano, Sumio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Fujiwara, Haruhiko; Kataoka, Hiroshi; Arunkumar, Kallare P.; Tomar, Archana; Nagaraju, Javaregowda; Goldsmith, Marian R.; Feng, Qili; Xia, Qingyou; Yamamoto, Kimiko; Shimada, Toru; Mita, Kazuei

    2013-01-01

    The establishment of a complete genomic sequence of silkworm, the model species of Lepidoptera, laid a foundation for its functional genomics. A more complete annotation of the genome will benefit functional and comparative studies and accelerate extensive industrial applications for this insect. To realize these goals, we embarked upon a large-scale full-length cDNA collection from 21 full-length cDNA libraries derived from 14 tissues of the domesticated silkworm and performed full sequencing by primer walking for 11,104 full-length cDNAs. The large average intron size was 1904 bp, resulting from a high accumulation of transposons. Using gene models predicted by GLEAN and published mRNAs, we identified 16,823 gene loci on the silkworm genome assembly. Orthology analysis of 153 species, including 11 insects, revealed that among three Lepidoptera including Monarch and Heliconius butterflies, the 403 largest silkworm-specific genes were composed mainly of protective immunity, hormone-related, and characteristic structural proteins. Analysis of testis-/ovary-specific genes revealed distinctive features of sexual dimorphism, including depletion of ovary-specific genes on the Z chromosome in contrast to an enrichment of testis-specific genes. More than 40% of genes expressed in specific tissues mapped in tissue-specific chromosomal clusters. The newly obtained FL-cDNA sequences enabled us to annotate the genome of this lepidopteran model insect more accurately, enhancing genomic and functional studies of Lepidoptera and comparative analyses with other insect orders, and yielding new insights into the evolution and organization of lepidopteran-specific genes. PMID:23821615

  10. Self-Assembled Large-Scale Monolayer of Au Nanoparticles at the Air/Water Interface Used as a SERS Substrate.

    PubMed

    Guo, Qinghua; Xu, Minmin; Yuan, Yaxian; Gu, Renao; Yao, Jianlin

    2016-05-10

    Self-assembly of metal nanoparticles has attracted considerable attention because of its unique applications in technologies such as plasmonics, surface-enhanced optics, sensors, and catalysts. However, fabrication of ordered nanoparticle structures remains a significant challenge. Thus, developing an efficient approach for the assembly of large-scale Au nanoparticles films for theoretical studies and for various applications is highly desired. In this paper, a facial approach for fabricating a monolayer film of Au nanoparticles was developed successfully. Using the surfactant polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), a large-scale monolayer film of well-ordered, uniform-sized Au nanoparticles was fabricated at the air/water interface. The film exhibited a two-dimensional (2D) hexagonal close-packed (HCP) structure having interparticle gaps smaller than 2 nm. These gaps generated numerous uniform "hot spots" for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity. The as-prepared monolayer film could be transferred to a solid substrate for use as a suitable SERS substrate with high activity, high uniformity, and high stability. The low spot-to-spot and substrate-to-substrate variations of intensity (<10%), the large surface enhancement factor (∼10(6)), and the high stability (∼45 days) make the substrate suitable for SERS measurements. Transfer of the monolayer film onto a glassy carbon electrode produced an Au electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure suitable for electrochemical SERS measurements. The adsorption process of ionic liquids on the electrode with the monolayer film is similar to that on bulk metal electrodes. The present strategy provides an effective way for self-assembly of Au nanoparticles into well-defined nanostructures that may form optimal reproducible SERS substrates for quantitative analysis. It also provides an electrode with clean, well-defined nanostructure for electrochemical investigations. PMID:27101361

  11. Effects of sex and proficiency in second language processing as revealed by a large-scale fNIRS study of school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Sugiura, Lisa; Ojima, Shiro; Matsuba-Kurita, Hiroko; Dan, Ippeita; Tsuzuki, Daisuke; Katura, Takusige; Hagiwara, Hiroko

    2015-10-01

    Previous neuroimaging studies in adults have revealed that first and second languages (L1/L2) share similar neural substrates, and that proficiency is a major determinant of the neural organization of L2 in the lexical-semantic and syntactic domains. However, little is known about neural substrates of children in the phonological domain, or about sex differences. Here, we conducted a large-scale study (n = 484) of school-aged children using functional near-infrared spectroscopy and a word repetition task, which requires a great extent of phonological processing. We investigated cortical activation during word processing, emphasizing sex differences, to clarify similarities and differences between L1 and L2, and proficiency-related differences during early L2 learning. L1 and L2 shared similar neural substrates with decreased activation in L2 compared to L1 in the posterior superior/middle temporal and angular/supramarginal gyri for both sexes. Significant sex differences were found in cortical activation within language areas during high-frequency word but not during low-frequency word processing. During high-frequency word processing, widely distributed areas including the angular/supramarginal gyri were activated in boys, while more restricted areas, excluding the angular/supramarginal gyri were activated in girls. Significant sex differences were also found in L2 proficiency-related activation: activation significantly increased with proficiency in boys, whereas no proficiency-related differences were found in girls. Importantly, cortical sex differences emerged with proficiency. Based on previous research, the present results indicate that sex differences are acquired or enlarged during language development through different cognitive strategies between sexes, possibly reflecting their different memory functions. PMID:26147179

  12. Analysis of Active and Inactive X Chromosome Architecture Reveals the Independent Organization of 30 nm and Large-Scale Chromatin Structures

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Catherine; Sproul, Duncan; Hamilton, Charlotte; Gilbert, Nick

    2010-01-01

    Summary Using a genetic model, we present a high-resolution chromatin fiber analysis of transcriptionally active (Xa) and inactive (Xi) X chromosomes packaged into euchromatin and facultative heterochromatin. Our results show that gene promoters have an open chromatin structure that is enhanced upon transcriptional activation but the Xa and the Xi have similar overall 30 nm chromatin fiber structures. Therefore, the formation of facultative heterochromatin is dependent on factors that act at a level above the 30 nm fiber and transcription does not alter bulk chromatin fiber structures. However, large-scale chromatin structures on Xa are decondensed compared with the Xi and transcription inhibition is sufficient to promote large-scale chromatin compaction. We show a link between transcription and large-scale chromatin packaging independent of the bulk 30 nm chromatin fiber and propose that transcription, not the global compaction of 30 nm chromatin fibers, determines the cytological appearance of large-scale chromatin structures. PMID:21070966

  13. Cooking practices, air quality, and the acceptability of advanced cookstoves in Haryana, India: an exploratory study to inform large-scale interventions

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Rupak; Sambandam, Sankar; Pillarisetti, Ajay; Jack, Darby; Mukhopadhyay, Krishnendu; Balakrishnan, Kalpana; Vaswani, Mayur; Bates, Michael N.; Kinney, Patrick L.; Arora, Narendra; Smith, Kirk R.

    2012-01-01

    Background In India, approximately 66% of households rely on dung or woody biomass as fuels for cooking. These fuels are burned under inefficient conditions, leading to household air pollution (HAP) and exposure to smoke containing toxic substances. Large-scale intervention efforts need to be informed by careful piloting to address multiple methodological and sociocultural issues. This exploratory study provides preliminary data for such an exercise from Palwal District, Haryana, India. Methods Traditional cooking practices were assessed through semi-structured interviews in participating households. Philips and Oorja, two brands of commercially available advanced cookstoves with small blowers to improve combustion, were deployed in these households. Concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with a diameter <2.5 μm (PM2.5) and carbon monoxide (CO) related to traditional stove use were measured using real-time and integrated personal, microenvironmental samplers for optimizing protocols to evaluate exposure reduction. Qualitative data on acceptability of advanced stoves and objective measures of stove usage were also collected. Results Twenty-eight of the thirty-two participating households had outdoor primary cooking spaces. Twenty households had liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) but preferred traditional stoves as the cost of LPG was higher and because meals cooked on traditional stoves were perceived to taste better. Kitchen area concentrations and kitchen personal concentrations assessed during cooking events were very high, with respective mean PM2.5 concentrations of 468 and 718 µg/m3. Twenty-four hour outdoor concentrations averaged 400 µg/m3. Twenty-four hour personal CO concentrations ranged between 0.82 and 5.27 ppm. The Philips stove was used more often and for more hours than the Oorja. Conclusions The high PM and CO concentrations reinforce the need for interventions that reduce HAP exposure in the aforementioned community. Of the two stoves tested

  14. Large scale tracking algorithms.

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Ross L.; Love, Joshua Alan; Melgaard, David Kennett; Karelitz, David B.; Pitts, Todd Alan; Zollweg, Joshua David; Anderson, Dylan Z.; Nandy, Prabal; Whitlow, Gary L.; Bender, Daniel A.; Byrne, Raymond Harry

    2015-01-01

    Low signal-to-noise data processing algorithms for improved detection, tracking, discrimination and situational threat assessment are a key research challenge. As sensor technologies progress, the number of pixels will increase signi cantly. This will result in increased resolution, which could improve object discrimination, but unfortunately, will also result in a significant increase in the number of potential targets to track. Many tracking techniques, like multi-hypothesis trackers, suffer from a combinatorial explosion as the number of potential targets increase. As the resolution increases, the phenomenology applied towards detection algorithms also changes. For low resolution sensors, "blob" tracking is the norm. For higher resolution data, additional information may be employed in the detection and classfication steps. The most challenging scenarios are those where the targets cannot be fully resolved, yet must be tracked and distinguished for neighboring closely spaced objects. Tracking vehicles in an urban environment is an example of such a challenging scenario. This report evaluates several potential tracking algorithms for large-scale tracking in an urban environment.

  15. Large scale traffic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, K.; Barrett, C.L.; Rickert, M.

    1997-04-01

    Large scale microscopic (i.e. vehicle-based) traffic simulations pose high demands on computational speed in at least two application areas: (i) real-time traffic forecasting, and (ii) long-term planning applications (where repeated {open_quotes}looping{close_quotes} between the microsimulation and the simulated planning of individual person`s behavior is necessary). As a rough number, a real-time simulation of an area such as Los Angeles (ca. 1 million travellers) will need a computational speed of much higher than 1 million {open_quotes}particle{close_quotes} (= vehicle) updates per second. This paper reviews how this problem is approached in different projects and how these approaches are dependent both on the specific questions and on the prospective user community. The approaches reach from highly parallel and vectorizable, single-bit implementations on parallel supercomputers for Statistical Physics questions, via more realistic implementations on coupled workstations, to more complicated driving dynamics implemented again on parallel supercomputers. 45 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

  16. A large-scale genetic analysis reveals a strong contribution of the HLA class II region to giant cell arteritis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Carmona, F David; Mackie, Sarah L; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J; Hoffman, Gary S; Khalidi, Nader A; Koening, Curry L; Langford, Carol A; McAlear, Carol A; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G; Warrington, Kenneth J; Ytterberg, Steven R; Gregersen, Peter K; Pease, Colin T; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P C; de Bakker, Paul I W; Barrett, Jennifer H; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A; González-Gay, Miguel A; Morgan, Ann W; Martín, Javier

    2015-04-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10(-40), OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1(∗)04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10(-43)) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10(-46)), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10(-45)) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10(-6), OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10(-6), OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10(-5), OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  17. A Large-Scale Genetic Analysis Reveals a Strong Contribution of the HLA Class II Region to Giant Cell Arteritis Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Carmona, F. David; Mackie, Sarah L.; Martín, Jose-Ezequiel; Taylor, John C.; Vaglio, Augusto; Eyre, Stephen; Bossini-Castillo, Lara; Castañeda, Santos; Cid, Maria C.; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Prieto-González, Sergio; Solans, Roser; Ramentol-Sintas, Marc; González-Escribano, M. Francisca; Ortiz-Fernández, Lourdes; Morado, Inmaculada C.; Narváez, Javier; Miranda-Filloy, José A.; Martínez-Berriochoa, Agustín; Unzurrunzaga, Ainhoa; Hidalgo-Conde, Ana; Madroñero-Vuelta, Ana B.; Fernández-Nebro, Antonio; Ordóñez-Cañizares, M. Carmen; Escalante, Begoña; Marí-Alfonso, Begoña; Sopeña, Bernardo; Magro, César; Raya, Enrique; Grau, Elena; Román, José A.; de Miguel, Eugenio; López-Longo, F. Javier; Martínez, Lina; Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Benjamín; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Luis; Díaz-López, J. Bernardino; Caminal-Montero, Luis; Martínez-Zapico, Aleida; Monfort, Jordi; Tío, Laura; Sánchez-Martín, Julio; Alegre-Sancho, Juan J.; Sáez-Comet, Luis; Pérez-Conesa, Mercedes; Corbera-Bellalta, Marc; García-Villanueva, M. Jesús; Fernández-Contreras, M. Encarnación; Sanchez-Pernaute, Olga; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Ríos-Fernández, Raquel; Callejas, José L.; Fanlo-Mateo, Patricia; Martínez-Taboada, Víctor M.; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Gianfreda, Davide; Santilli, Daniele; Ramirez, Giuseppe A.; Soriano, Alessandra; Muratore, Francesco; Pazzola, Giulia; Addimanda, Olga; Wijmenga, Cisca; Witte, Torsten; Schirmer, Jan H.; Moosig, Frank; Schönau, Verena; Franke, Andre; Palm, Øyvind; Molberg, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Carette, Simon; Cuthbertson, David; Forbess, Lindsy J.; Hoffman, Gary S.; Khalidi, Nader A.; Koening, Curry L.; Langford, Carol A.; McAlear, Carol A.; Moreland, Larry; Monach, Paul A.; Pagnoux, Christian; Seo, Philip; Spiera, Robert; Sreih, Antoine G.; Warrington, Kenneth J.; Ytterberg, Steven R.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Pease, Colin T.; Gough, Andrew; Green, Michael; Hordon, Lesley; Jarrett, Stephen; Watts, Richard; Levy, Sarah; Patel, Yusuf; Kamath, Sanjeet; Dasgupta, Bhaskar; Worthington, Jane; Koeleman, Bobby P.C.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Barrett, Jennifer H.; Salvarani, Carlo; Merkel, Peter A.; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Morgan, Ann W.; Martín, Javier

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a large-scale genetic analysis on giant cell arteritis (GCA), a polygenic immune-mediated vasculitis. A case-control cohort, comprising 1,651 case subjects with GCA and 15,306 unrelated control subjects from six different countries of European ancestry, was genotyped by the Immunochip array. We also imputed HLA data with a previously validated imputation method to perform a more comprehensive analysis of this genomic region. The strongest association signals were observed in the HLA region, with rs477515 representing the highest peak (p = 4.05 × 10−40, OR = 1.73). A multivariate model including class II amino acids of HLA-DRβ1 and HLA-DQα1 and one class I amino acid of HLA-B explained most of the HLA association with GCA, consistent with previously reported associations of classical HLA alleles like HLA-DRB1∗04. An omnibus test on polymorphic amino acid positions highlighted DRβ1 13 (p = 4.08 × 10−43) and HLA-DQα1 47 (p = 4.02 × 10−46), 56, and 76 (both p = 1.84 × 10−45) as relevant positions for disease susceptibility. Outside the HLA region, the most significant loci included PTPN22 (rs2476601, p = 1.73 × 10−6, OR = 1.38), LRRC32 (rs10160518, p = 4.39 × 10−6, OR = 1.20), and REL (rs115674477, p = 1.10 × 10−5, OR = 1.63). Our study provides evidence of a strong contribution of HLA class I and II molecules to susceptibility to GCA. In the non-HLA region, we confirmed a key role for the functional PTPN22 rs2476601 variant and proposed other putative risk loci for GCA involved in Th1, Th17, and Treg cell function. PMID:25817017

  18. Large scale comparative proteomics of a chloroplast Clp protease mutant reveals folding stress, altered protein homeostasis, and feedback regulation of metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zybailov, Boris; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Rodríguez, Verenice Ramírez; Asakura, Yukari; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2009-08-01

    The clpr2-1 mutant is delayed in development due to reduction of the chloroplast ClpPR protease complex. To understand the role of Clp proteases in plastid biogenesis and homeostasis, leaf proteomes of young seedlings of clpr2-1 and wild type were compared using large scale mass spectrometry-based quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap and spectral counting with significance determined by G-tests. Virtually only chloroplast-localized proteins were significantly affected, indicating that the molecular phenotype was confined to the chloroplast. A comparative chloroplast stromal proteome analysis of fully developed plants was used to complement the data set. Chloroplast unfoldase ClpB3 was strongly up-regulated in both young and mature leaves, suggesting widespread and persistent protein folding stress. The importance of ClpB3 in the clp2-1 mutant was demonstrated by the observation that a CLPR2 and CLPB3 double mutant was seedling-lethal. The observed up-regulation of chloroplast chaperones and protein sorting components further illustrated destabilization of protein homeostasis. Delayed rRNA processing and up-regulation of a chloroplast DEAD box RNA helicase and polynucleotide phosphorylase, but no significant change in accumulation of ribosomal subunits, suggested a bottleneck in ribosome assembly or RNA metabolism. Strong up-regulation of a chloroplast translational regulator TypA/BipA GTPase suggested a specific response in plastid gene expression to the distorted homeostasis. The stromal proteases PreP1,2 were up-regulated, likely constituting compensation for reduced Clp protease activity and possibly shared substrates between the ClpP and PreP protease systems. The thylakoid photosynthetic apparatus was decreased in the seedlings, whereas several structural thylakoid-associated plastoglobular proteins were strongly up-regulated. Two thylakoid-associated reductases involved in isoprenoid and chlorophyll synthesis were up-regulated reflecting feedback from rate

  19. Large Scale Comparative Proteomics of a Chloroplast Clp Protease Mutant Reveals Folding Stress, Altered Protein Homeostasis, and Feedback Regulation of Metabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Zybailov, Boris; Friso, Giulia; Kim, Jitae; Rudella, Andrea; Rodríguez, Verenice Ramírez; Asakura, Yukari; Sun, Qi; van Wijk, Klaas J.

    2009-01-01

    The clpr2-1 mutant is delayed in development due to reduction of the chloroplast ClpPR protease complex. To understand the role of Clp proteases in plastid biogenesis and homeostasis, leaf proteomes of young seedlings of clpr2-1 and wild type were compared using large scale mass spectrometry-based quantification using an LTQ-Orbitrap and spectral counting with significance determined by G-tests. Virtually only chloroplast-localized proteins were significantly affected, indicating that the molecular phenotype was confined to the chloroplast. A comparative chloroplast stromal proteome analysis of fully developed plants was used to complement the data set. Chloroplast unfoldase ClpB3 was strongly up-regulated in both young and mature leaves, suggesting widespread and persistent protein folding stress. The importance of ClpB3 in the clp2-1 mutant was demonstrated by the observation that a CLPR2 and CLPB3 double mutant was seedling-lethal. The observed up-regulation of chloroplast chaperones and protein sorting components further illustrated destabilization of protein homeostasis. Delayed rRNA processing and up-regulation of a chloroplast DEAD box RNA helicase and polynucleotide phosphorylase, but no significant change in accumulation of ribosomal subunits, suggested a bottleneck in ribosome assembly or RNA metabolism. Strong up-regulation of a chloroplast translational regulator TypA/BipA GTPase suggested a specific response in plastid gene expression to the distorted homeostasis. The stromal proteases PreP1,2 were up-regulated, likely constituting compensation for reduced Clp protease activity and possibly shared substrates between the ClpP and PreP protease systems. The thylakoid photosynthetic apparatus was decreased in the seedlings, whereas several structural thylakoid-associated plastoglobular proteins were strongly up-regulated. Two thylakoid-associated reductases involved in isoprenoid and chlorophyll synthesis were up-regulated reflecting feedback from rate

  20. One-step synthesis of large-scale graphene film doped with gold nanoparticles at liquid-air interface for electrochemistry and Raman detection applications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Panpan; Huang, Ying; Lu, Xin; Zhang, Siyu; Li, Jingfeng; Wei, Gang; Su, Zhiqiang

    2014-07-29

    We demonstrated a facile one-step synthesis strategy for the preparation of a large-scale reduced graphene oxide multilayered film doped with gold nanoparticles (RGO/AuNP film) and applied this film as functional nanomaterials for electrochemistry and Raman detection applications. The related applications of the fabricated RGO/AuNP film in electrochemical nonenzymatic H2O2 biosensor, electrochemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection were investigated. Electrochemical data indicate that the H2O2 biosensor fabricated by RGO/AuNP film shows a wide linear range, low limitation of detection, high selectivity, and long-term stability. In addition, it was proved that the created RGO/AuNP film also exhibits excellent ORR electrochemical catalysis performance. The created RGO/AuNP film, when serving as SERS biodetection platform, presents outstanding performances in detecting 4-aminothiophenol with an enhancement factor of approximately 5.6 × 10(5) as well as 2-thiouracil sensing with a low concentration to 1 μM. It is expected that this facile strategy for fabricating large-scale graphene film doped with metallic nanoparticles will spark inspirations in preparing functional nanomaterials and further extend their applications in drug delivery, wastewater purification, and bioenergy. PMID:25015184

  1. Large-Scale Air Mass Characteristics Observed Over the Remote Tropical Pacific Ocean During March-April 1999: Results from PEM-Tropics B Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Fenn, Marta A.; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grant, William B.; Ismail, Syed; Ferrare, Richard A.; Kooi, Susan A.; Brackett, Vincent G.; Clayton, Marian B.; Avery, Melody A.

    2001-01-01

    Eighteen long-range flights over the Pacific Ocean between 38 S to 20 N and 166 E to 90 W were made by the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the NASA Pacific Exploratory Mission (PEM) Tropics B conducted from March 6 to April 18, 1999. Two lidar systems were flown on the DC-8 to remotely measure vertical profiles of ozone (O3), water vapor (H2O), aerosols, and clouds from near the surface to the upper troposphere along their flight track. In situ measurements of a wide range of gases and aerosols were made on the DC-8 for comprehensive characterization of the air and for correlation with the lidar remote measurements. The transition from northeasterly flow of Northern Hemispheric (NH) air on the northern side of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) to generally easterly flow of Southern Hemispheric (SH) air south of the ITCZ was accompanied by a significant decrease in O3, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, and aerosols and an increase in H2O. Trajectory analyses indicate that air north of the ITCZ came from Asia and/or the United States, while the air south of the ITCZ had a long residence time over the Pacific, perhaps originating over South America several weeks earlier. Air south of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) came rapidly from the west originating over Australia or Africa. This air had enhanced O3 and aerosols and an associated decrease in H2O. Average latitudinal and longitudinal distributions of O3 and H2O were constructed from the remote and in situ O3 and H2O data, and these distributions are compared with results from PEM-Tropics A conducted in August-October 1996. During PEM-Tropics B, low O3 air was found in the SH across the entire Pacific Basin at low latitudes. This was in strong contrast to the photochemically enhanced O3 levels found across the central and eastern Pacific low latitudes during PEM-Tropics A. Nine air mass types were identified for PEM-Tropics B based on their O3, aerosols, clouds, and potential vorticity characteristics. The

  2. Auxiliary tRNAs: large-scale analysis of tRNA genes reveals patterns of tRNA repertoire dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Naama; Margalit, Hanah

    2014-01-01

    Decoding of all codons can be achieved by a subset of tRNAs. In bacteria, certain tRNA species are mandatory, while others are auxiliary and are variably used. It is currently unknown how this variability has evolved and whether it provides an adaptive advantage. Here we shed light on the subset of auxiliary tRNAs, using genomic data from 319 bacteria. By reconstructing the evolution of tRNAs we show that the auxiliary tRNAs are highly dynamic, being frequently gained and lost along the phylogenetic tree, with a clear dominance of loss events for most auxiliary tRNA species. We reveal distinct co-gain and co-loss patterns for subsets of the auxiliary tRNAs, suggesting that they are subjected to the same selection forces. Controlling for phylogenetic dependencies, we find that the usage of these tRNA species is positively correlated with GC content and may derive directly from nucleotide bias or from preference of Watson–Crick codon–anticodon interactions. Our results highlight the highly dynamic nature of these tRNAs and their complicated balance with codon usage. PMID:24782525

  3. Large-scale phylogenomic analysis reveals the phylogenetic position of the problematic taxon Protocruzia and unravels the deep phylogenetic affinities of the ciliate lineages.

    PubMed

    Gentekaki, E; Kolisko, M; Boscaro, V; Bright, K J; Dini, F; Di Giuseppe, G; Gong, Y; Miceli, C; Modeo, L; Molestina, R E; Petroni, G; Pucciarelli, S; Roger, A J; Strom, S L; Lynn, D H

    2014-09-01

    The Ciliophora is one of the most studied protist lineages because of its important ecological role in the microbial loop. While there is an abundance of molecular data for many ciliate groups, it is commonly limited to the 18S ribosomal RNA locus. There is a paucity of data when it comes to availability of protein-coding genes especially for taxa that do not belong to the class Oligohymenophorea. To address this gap, we have sequenced EST libraries for 11 ciliate species. A supermatrix was constructed for phylogenomic analysis based on 158 genes and 42,158 characters and included 16 ciliates, four dinoflagellates and nine apicomplexans. This is the first multigene-based analysis focusing on the phylum Ciliophora. Our analyses reveal two robust superclades within the Intramacronucleata; one composed of the classes Spirotrichea, Armophorea and Litostomatea (SAL) and another with Colpodea and Oligohymenophorea. Furthermore, we provide corroborative evidence for removing the ambiguous taxon Protocruzia from the class Spirotrichea and placing it as incertae sedis in the phylum Ciliophora. PMID:24814356

  4. Large scale integration of drug-target information reveals poly-pharmacological drug action mechanisms in tumor cell line growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Richard A.; Gostev, Mikhail; Ilisavskii, Sergei; Willis, Anne E.; Melino, Gerry; Antonov, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding therapeutic mechanisms of drug anticancer cytotoxicity represents a key challenge in preclinical testing. Here we have performed a meta-analysis of publicly available tumor cell line growth inhibition assays (~ 70 assays from 6 independent experimental groups covering ~ 500 000 molecules) with the primary goal of understanding molecular therapeutic mechanisms of cancer cytotoxicity. To implement this we have collected currently available information on protein targets for molecules that were tested in the assays. We used a statistical methodology to identify protein targets overrepresented among molecules exhibiting cancer cytotoxicity with the particular focus of identifying overrepresented patterns consisting of several proteins (i.e. proteins “A” and “B” and “C”). Our analysis demonstrates that targeting individual proteins can result in a significant increase (up to 50-fold) of the observed odds for a molecule to be an efficient inhibitor of tumour cell line growth. However, further insight into potential molecular mechanisms reveals a multi-target mode of action: targeting a pattern of several proteins drastically increases the observed odds (up to 500-fold) for a molecule to be tumour cytotoxic. In contrast, molecules targeting only one protein but not targeting an additional set of proteins tend to be nontoxic. Our findings support a poly-pharmacology drug discovery paradigm, demonstrating that anticancer cytotoxicity is a product, in most cases, of multi-target mode of drug action PMID:24553133

  5. OMICS in Ecology: Systems Level Analyses of Halobacterium salinarum Reveal Large-scale Temperature-Mediated Changes and a Requirement of CctA for Thermotolerance

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Rueyhung Roc; Shu, Hung-Wei; Chin, See-Wen; Kao, Yuchieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Liao, Chen-Chung; Tsay, Yeou-Guang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Halobacterium salinarum is an extremely halophilic archaeon that inhabits high-salinity aqueous environments in which the temperature can range widely, both daily and seasonally. An OMICS analysis of the 37°C and 49°C proteomes and transcriptomes for revealing the biomodules affected by temperature is reported here. Analysis of those genes/proteins displaying dramatic changes provided a clue to the coordinated changes in the expression of genes within five arCOG biological clusters. When proteins that exhibited minor changes in their spectral counts and insignificant p values were also examined, the apparent influence of the elevated temperatures on conserved chaperones, metabolism, translation, and other biomodules became more obvious. For instance, increases in all eight conserved chaperones and three arginine deiminase pathway enzymes and reductions in most tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes and ribosomal proteins suggest that complex system responses occurred as the temperature changed. When the requirement for the four proteins that showed the greatest induction at 49°C was analyzed, only CctA (chaperonin subunit α), but not Hsp5, DpsA, or VNG1187G, was essential for thermotolerance. Environmental stimuli and other perturbations may induce many minor gene expression changes. Simultaneous analysis of the genes exhibiting dramatic or minor changes in expression may facilitate the detection of systems level responses. PMID:24147786

  6. Large Scale Screening of Digeneans for Neorickettsia Endosymbionts Using Real-Time PCR Reveals New Neorickettsia Genotypes, Host Associations and Geographic Records

    PubMed Central

    Greiman, Stephen E.; Tkach, Vasyl V.; Pulis, Eric; Fayton, Thomas J.; Curran, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Digeneans are endoparasitic flatworms with complex life cycles including one or two intermediate hosts (first of which is always a mollusk) and a vertebrate definitive host. Digeneans may harbor intracellular endosymbiotic bacteria belonging to the genus Neorickettsia (order Rickettsiales, family Anaplasmataceae). Some Neorickettsia are able to invade cells of the digenean's vertebrate host and are known to cause diseases of wildlife and humans. In this study we report the results of screening 771 digenean samples for Neorickettsia collected from various vertebrates in terrestrial, freshwater, brackish, and marine habitats in the United States, China and Australia. Neorickettsia were detected using a newly designed real-time PCR protocol targeting a 152 bp fragment of the heat shock protein coding gene, GroEL, and verified with nested PCR and sequencing of a 1371 bp long region of 16S rRNA. Eight isolates of Neorickettsia have been obtained. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that 7 of these isolates, provisionally named Neorickettsia sp. 1–7 (obtained from allocreadiid Crepidostomum affine, haploporids Saccocoelioides beauforti and Saccocoelioides lizae, faustulid Bacciger sprenti, deropegid Deropegus aspina, a lecithodendriid, and a pleurogenid) represent new genotypes and one (obtained from Metagonimoides oregonensis) was identical to a published sequence of Neorickettsia known as SF agent. All digenean species reported in this study represent new host records. Three of the 6 digenean families (Haploporidae, Pleurogenidae, and Faustulidae) are also reported for the first time as hosts of Neorickettsia. We have detected Neorickettsia in digeneans from China and Australia for the first time based on PCR and sequencing evidence. Our findings suggest that further surveys from broader geographic regions and wider selection of digenean taxa are likely to reveal new Neorickettsia lineages as well as new digenean host associations. PMID

  7. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-10-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms.

  8. Large-scale mitochondrial DNA analysis in Southeast Asia reveals evolutionary effects of cultural isolation in the multi-ethnic population of Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Myanmar is the largest country in mainland Southeast Asia with a population of 55 million people subdivided into more than 100 ethnic groups. Ruled by changing kingdoms and dynasties and lying on the trade route between India and China, Myanmar was influenced by numerous cultures. Since its independence from British occupation, tensions between the ruling Bamar and ethnic minorities increased. Results Our aim was to search for genetic footprints of Myanmar’s geographic, historic and sociocultural characteristics and to contribute to the picture of human colonization by describing and dating of new mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplogroups. Therefore, we sequenced the mtDNA control region of 327 unrelated donors and the complete mitochondrial genome of 44 selected individuals according to highest quality standards. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses of the entire mtDNA genomes uncovered eight new haplogroups and three unclassified basal M-lineages. The multi-ethnic population and the complex history of Myanmar were reflected in its mtDNA heterogeneity. Population genetic analyses of Burmese control region sequences combined with population data from neighboring countries revealed that the Myanmar haplogroup distribution showed a typical Southeast Asian pattern, but also Northeast Asian and Indian influences. The population structure of the extraordinarily diverse Bamar differed from that of the Karen people who displayed signs of genetic isolation. Migration analyses indicated a considerable genetic exchange with an overall positive migration balance from Myanmar to neighboring countries. Age estimates of the newly described haplogroups point to the existence of evolutionary windows where climatic and cultural changes gave rise to mitochondrial haplogroup diversification in Asia. PMID:24467713

  9. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E.; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2–6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Acα2–8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2–6Galβ1–4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2–3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  10. Association analyses of large-scale glycan microarray data reveal novel host-specific substructures in influenza A virus binding glycans.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Martin, Brigitte E; Yang, Chun-Kai; Luo, Feng; Wan, Xiu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A viruses can infect a wide variety of animal species and, occasionally, humans. Infection occurs through the binding formed by viral surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin and certain types of glycan receptors on host cell membranes. Studies have shown that the α2,3-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,3Gal) in avian, equine, and canine species; the α2,6-linked sialic acid motif (SA2,6Gal) in humans; and SA2,3Gal and SA2,6Gal in swine are responsible for the corresponding host tropisms. However, more detailed and refined substructures that determine host tropisms are still not clear. Thus, in this study, we applied association mining on a set of glycan microarray data for 211 influenza viruses from five host groups: humans, swine, canine, migratory waterfowl, and terrestrial birds. The results suggest that besides Neu5Acα2-6Galβ, human-origin viruses could bind glycans with Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Acα2-8Neu5Ac and Neu5Gcα2-6Galβ1-4GlcNAc substructures; Galβ and GlcNAcβ terminal substructures, without sialic acid branches, were associated with the binding of human-, swine-, and avian-origin viruses; sulfated Neu5Acα2-3 substructures were associated with the binding of human- and swine-origin viruses. Finally, through three-dimensional structure characterization, we revealed that the role of glycan chain shapes is more important than that of torsion angles or of overall structural similarities in virus host tropisms. PMID:26508590

  11. Recent Suicidal Ideation and Suicide Attempts in a Large-Scale Survey of the U.S. Air Force: Prevalences and Demographic Risk Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarr, Jeffery D.; Heyman, Richard E.; Slep, Amy M. Smith

    2010-01-01

    One-year prevalences of self-reported noteworthy suicidal ideation and nonfatal suicide attempts were assessed in a large sample of U.S. Air Force active duty members (N = 52,780). Participants completed the 2006 Community Assessment, which was conducted online. Over 3% of male and 5.5% of female participants reported having experienced noteworthy…

  12. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giffin, Paxton K.; Parsons, Michael S.; Unz, Ronald J.; Waggoner, Charles A.

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m3/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome.

  13. Large-scale generic test stand for testing of multiple configurations of air filters utilizing a range of particle size distributions.

    PubMed

    Giffin, Paxton K; Parsons, Michael S; Unz, Ronald J; Waggoner, Charles A

    2012-05-01

    The Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) at Mississippi State University has developed a test stand capable of lifecycle testing of high efficiency particulate air filters and other filters specified in American Society of Mechanical Engineers Code on Nuclear Air and Gas Treatment (AG-1) filters. The test stand is currently equipped to test AG-1 Section FK radial flow filters, and expansion is currently underway to increase testing capabilities for other types of AG-1 filters. The test stand is capable of producing differential pressures of 12.45 kPa (50 in. w.c.) at volumetric air flow rates up to 113.3 m(3)/min (4000 CFM). Testing is performed at elevated and ambient conditions for temperature and relative humidity. Current testing utilizes three challenge aerosols: carbon black, alumina, and Arizona road dust (A1-Ultrafine). Each aerosol has a different mass median diameter to test loading over a wide range of particles sizes. The test stand is designed to monitor and maintain relative humidity and temperature to required specifications. Instrumentation is implemented on the upstream and downstream sections of the test stand as well as on the filter housing itself. Representative data are presented herein illustrating the test stand's capabilities. Digital images of the filter pack collected during and after testing is displayed after the representative data are discussed. In conclusion, the ICET test stand with AG-1 filter testing capabilities has been developed and hurdles such as test parameter stability and design flexibility overcome. PMID:22667655

  14. A spatio-temporal screening tool for outlier detection in long term / large scale air quality observation time series and monitoring networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kracht, Oliver; Reuter, Hannes I.; Gerboles, Michel

    2013-04-01

    We present a consolidated screening tool for the detection of outliers in air quality monitoring data, which considers both attribute values and spatio-temporal relationships. Furthermore, an application example of warnings on abnormal values in time series of PM10 datasets in AirBase is presented. Spatial or temporal outliers in air quality datasets represent stations or individual measurements which differ significantly from other recordings within their spatio-temporal neighbourhood. Such abnormal values can be identified as being extreme compared to their neighbours, even though they do not necessarily require to differ significantly from the statistical distribution of the entire population. The identification of such outliers can be of interest as the basis of data quality control systems when several contributors report their measurements to the collection of larger datasets. Beyond this, it can also provide a simple solution to investigate the accuracy of station classifications. Seen from another viewpoint, it can be used as a tool to detect irregular air pollution emission events (e.g. the influence of fires, wind erosion events, or other accidental situations). The presented procedure for outlier detection was designed based on already existing literature. Specifically, we adapted the "Smooth Spatial Attribute Method" that was first developed for the identification of outlier values in networks of traffic sensors [1]. Since a free and extensible simulation platform was considered important, all codes were prototyped in the R environment which is available under the GNU General Public License [2]. Our algorithms are based on the definition of a neighbourhood for each air quality measurement, corresponding to a spatio-temporal domain limited by time (e.g., +/- 2 days) and distance (e.g., +/- 1 spherical degrees) around the location of ambient air monitoring stations. The objective of the method is that within such a given spatio-temporal domain, in which

  15. Galaxy clustering on large scales.

    PubMed

    Efstathiou, G

    1993-06-01

    I describe some recent observations of large-scale structure in the galaxy distribution. The best constraints come from two-dimensional galaxy surveys and studies of angular correlation functions. Results from galaxy redshift surveys are much less precise but are consistent with the angular correlations, provided the distortions in mapping between real-space and redshift-space are relatively weak. The galaxy two-point correlation function, rich-cluster two-point correlation function, and galaxy-cluster cross-correlation function are all well described on large scales ( greater, similar 20h-1 Mpc, where the Hubble constant, H0 = 100h km.s-1.Mpc; 1 pc = 3.09 x 10(16) m) by the power spectrum of an initially scale-invariant, adiabatic, cold-dark-matter Universe with Gamma = Omegah approximately 0.2. I discuss how this fits in with the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) satellite detection of large-scale anisotropies in the microwave background radiation and other measures of large-scale structure in the Universe. PMID:11607400

  16. Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yeaman, Andrew R. J.

    Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI), the state-of-the-art production techniques for computer chips, promises such powerful, inexpensive computing that, in the future, people will be able to communicate with computer devices in natural language or even speech. However, before full-scale VLSI implementation can occur, certain salient factors must be…

  17. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    SciTech Connect

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H/sub 2/), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H/sub 2/ with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs.

  18. Revisiting wintertime cold air intrusions at the east of the Andes: propagating features from subtropical Argentina to Peruvian Amazon and relationship with large-scale circulation patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, Jhan Carlo; Ronchail, Josyane; Lengaigne, Matthieu; Quispe, Nelson; Silva, Yamina; Bettolli, Maria Laura; Avalos, Grinia; Llacza, Alan

    2013-10-01

    This study investigates the spatial and temporal characteristics of cold surges that propagates northward along the eastern flank of the Andes from subtropical to tropical South America analysing wintertime in situ daily minimum temperature observations from Argentina, Bolivia and Peru and ERA-40 reanalysis over the 1975-2001 period. Cold surges usually last 2 or 3 days but are generally less persistent in the southern La Plata basin compared to tropical regions. On average, three to four cold surges are reported each year. Our analysis reveals that 52 % of cold episodes registered in the south of La Plata basin propagate northward to the northern Peruvian Amazon at a speed of around 20 m s-1. In comparison to cold surges that do not reach the tropical region, we demonstrate that these cold surges are characterized, before they reach the tropical region, by a higher occurrence of a specific circulation pattern associated to southern low-level winds progression toward low latitudes combined with subsidence and dry condition in the middle and low troposphere that reinforce the cold episode through a radiative effect. Finally, the relationship between cold surges and atmosphere dynamics is illustrated for the two most severe cold intrusions that reached the Peruvian and Bolivian Amazon in the last 20 years.

  19. Application of bioreactor system for large-scale production of Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus somatic embryos in an air-lift bioreactor and production of eleutherosides.

    PubMed

    Shohael, A M; Chakrabarty, D; Yu, K W; Hahn, E J; Paek, K Y

    2005-11-01

    Embryogenic callus was induced from leaf explants of Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus cultured on Murashige and Skoog (MS) basal medium supplemented with 1 mg l(-1) 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), while no plant growth regulators were needed for embryo maturation. The addition of 1 mg l(-1) 2,4-D was needed to maintain the embryogenic culture by preventing embryo maturation. Optimal embryo germination and plantlet development was achieved on MS medium with 4 mg l(-1) gibberellic acid (GA(3)). Low-strength MS medium (1/2 and 1/3 strength) was more effective than full-strength MS for the production of normal plantlets with well-developed shoots and roots. The plants were successfully transferred to soil. Embryogenic callus was used to establish a suspension culture for subsequent production of somatic embryos in bioreactor. By inoculating 10 g of embryogenic cells (fresh weight) into a 3l balloon type bubble bioreactor (BTBB) containing 2l MS medium without plant growth regulators, 121.8 g mature somatic embryos at different developmental stages were harvested and could be separated by filtration. Cotyledonary somatic embryos were germinated, and these converted into plantlets following transfer to a 3l BTBB containing 2l MS medium with 4 mg l(-1) GA3. HPLC analysis revealed that the total eleutherosides were significantly higher in leaves of field grown plants as compared to different stages of somatic embryo. However, the content of eleutheroside B was highest in germinated embryos. Germinated embryos also had higher contents of eleutheroside E and eleutheroside E1 as compared to other developmental stages. This result indicates that an efficient protocol for the mass production of E. sessiliflorus biomass can be achieved by bioreactor culture of somatic embryos and can be used as a source of medicinal raw materials. PMID:16095745

  20. Microfluidic large-scale integration.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, Todd; Maerkl, Sebastian J; Quake, Stephen R

    2002-10-18

    We developed high-density microfluidic chips that contain plumbing networks with thousands of micromechanical valves and hundreds of individually addressable chambers. These fluidic devices are analogous to electronic integrated circuits fabricated using large-scale integration. A key component of these networks is the fluidic multiplexor, which is a combinatorial array of binary valve patterns that exponentially increases the processing power of a network by allowing complex fluid manipulations with a minimal number of inputs. We used these integrated microfluidic networks to construct the microfluidic analog of a comparator array and a microfluidic memory storage device whose behavior resembles random-access memory. PMID:12351675

  1. Large scale topography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskell, R. W.; Synnott, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate the large scale topography of the Jovian satellite Io, both limb observations and stereographic techniques applied to landmarks are used. The raw data for this study consists of Voyager 1 images of Io, 800x800 arrays of picture elements each of which can take on 256 possible brightness values. In analyzing this data it was necessary to identify and locate landmarks and limb points on the raw images, remove the image distortions caused by the camera electronics and translate the corrected locations into positions relative to a reference geoid. Minimizing the uncertainty in the corrected locations is crucial to the success of this project. In the highest resolution frames, an error of a tenth of a pixel in image space location can lead to a 300 m error in true location. In the lowest resolution frames, the same error can lead to an uncertainty of several km.

  2. Challenges for Large Scale Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troyer, Matthias

    2010-03-01

    With computational approaches becoming ubiquitous the growing impact of large scale computing on research influences both theoretical and experimental work. I will review a few examples in condensed matter physics and quantum optics, including the impact of computer simulations in the search for supersolidity, thermometry in ultracold quantum gases, and the challenging search for novel phases in strongly correlated electron systems. While only a decade ago such simulations needed the fastest supercomputers, many simulations can now be performed on small workstation clusters or even a laptop: what was previously restricted to a few experts can now potentially be used by many. Only part of the gain in computational capabilities is due to Moore's law and improvement in hardware. Equally impressive is the performance gain due to new algorithms - as I will illustrate using some recently developed algorithms. At the same time modern peta-scale supercomputers offer unprecedented computational power and allow us to tackle new problems and address questions that were impossible to solve numerically only a few years ago. While there is a roadmap for future hardware developments to exascale and beyond, the main challenges are on the algorithmic and software infrastructure side. Among the problems that face the computational physicist are: the development of new algorithms that scale to thousands of cores and beyond, a software infrastructure that lifts code development to a higher level and speeds up the development of new simulation programs for large scale computing machines, tools to analyze the large volume of data obtained from such simulations, and as an emerging field provenance-aware software that aims for reproducibility of the complete computational workflow from model parameters to the final figures. Interdisciplinary collaborations and collective efforts will be required, in contrast to the cottage-industry culture currently present in many areas of computational

  3. A thiamin-bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue in the pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit induces large scale disorder-to-order transformations in the enzyme and reveals novel structural features in the covalently bound adduct.

    PubMed

    Arjunan, Palaniappa; Sax, Martin; Brunskill, Andrew; Chandrasekhar, Krishnamoorthy; Nemeria, Natalia; Zhang, Sheng; Jordan, Frank; Furey, William

    2006-06-01

    The crystal structure of the E1 component from the Escherichia coli pyruvate dehydrogenase multienzyme complex (PDHc) has been determined with phosphonolactylthiamin diphosphate (PLThDP) in its active site. PLThDP serves as a structural and electrostatic analogue of the natural intermediate alpha-lactylthiamin diphosphate (LThDP), in which the carboxylate from the natural substrate pyruvate is replaced by a phosphonate group. This represents the first example of an experimentally determined, three-dimensional structure of a thiamin diphosphate (ThDP)-dependent enzyme containing a covalently bound, pre-decarboxylation reaction intermediate analogue and should serve as a model for the corresponding intermediates in other ThDP-dependent decarboxylases. Regarding the PDHc-specific reaction, the presence of PLThDP induces large scale conformational changes in the enzyme. In conjunction with the E1-PLThDP and E1-ThDP structures, analysis of a H407A E1-PLThDP variant structure shows that an interaction between His-407 and PLThDP is essential for stabilization of two loop regions in the active site that are otherwise disordered in the absence of intermediate analogue. This ordering completes formation of the active site and creates a new ordered surface likely involved in interactions with the lipoyl domains of E2s within the PDHc complex. The tetrahedral intermediate analogue is tightly held in the active site through direct hydrogen bonds to residues His-407, Tyr-599, and His-640 and reveals a new, enzyme-induced, strain-related feature that appears to aid in the decarboxylation process. This feature is almost certainly present in all ThDP-dependent decarboxylases; thus its inclusion in our understanding of general thiamin catalysis is important. PMID:16531404

  4. Large Scale Homing in Honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Pahl, Mario; Zhu, Hong; Tautz, Jürgen; Zhang, Shaowu

    2011-01-01

    Honeybee foragers frequently fly several kilometres to and from vital resources, and communicate those locations to their nest mates by a symbolic dance language. Research has shown that they achieve this feat by memorizing landmarks and the skyline panorama, using the sun and polarized skylight as compasses and by integrating their outbound flight paths. In order to investigate the capacity of the honeybees' homing abilities, we artificially displaced foragers to novel release spots at various distances up to 13 km in the four cardinal directions. Returning bees were individually registered by a radio frequency identification (RFID) system at the hive entrance. We found that homing rate, homing speed and the maximum homing distance depend on the release direction. Bees released in the east were more likely to find their way back home, and returned faster than bees released in any other direction, due to the familiarity of global landmarks seen from the hive. Our findings suggest that such large scale homing is facilitated by global landmarks acting as beacons, and possibly the entire skyline panorama. PMID:21602920

  5. Large Scale Nanolaminate Deformable Mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Papavasiliou, A; Olivier, S; Barbee, T; Miles, R; Chang, K

    2005-11-30

    This work concerns the development of a technology that uses Nanolaminate foils to form light-weight, deformable mirrors that are scalable over a wide range of mirror sizes. While MEMS-based deformable mirrors and spatial light modulators have considerably reduced the cost and increased the capabilities of adaptive optic systems, there has not been a way to utilize the advantages of lithography and batch-fabrication to produce large-scale deformable mirrors. This technology is made scalable by using fabrication techniques and lithography that are not limited to the sizes of conventional MEMS devices. Like many MEMS devices, these mirrors use parallel plate electrostatic actuators. This technology replicates that functionality by suspending a horizontal piece of nanolaminate foil over an electrode by electroplated nickel posts. This actuator is attached, with another post, to another nanolaminate foil that acts as the mirror surface. Most MEMS devices are produced with integrated circuit lithography techniques that are capable of very small line widths, but are not scalable to large sizes. This technology is very tolerant of lithography errors and can use coarser, printed circuit board lithography techniques that can be scaled to very large sizes. These mirrors use small, lithographically defined actuators and thin nanolaminate foils allowing them to produce deformations over a large area while minimizing weight. This paper will describe a staged program to develop this technology. First-principles models were developed to determine design parameters. Three stages of fabrication will be described starting with a 3 x 3 device using conventional metal foils and epoxy to a 10-across all-metal device with nanolaminate mirror surfaces.

  6. Large-Scale Information Systems

    SciTech Connect

    D. M. Nicol; H. R. Ammerlahn; M. E. Goldsby; M. M. Johnson; D. E. Rhodes; A. S. Yoshimura

    2000-12-01

    Large enterprises are ever more dependent on their Large-Scale Information Systems (LSLS), computer systems that are distinguished architecturally by distributed components--data sources, networks, computing engines, simulations, human-in-the-loop control and remote access stations. These systems provide such capabilities as workflow, data fusion and distributed database access. The Nuclear Weapons Complex (NWC) contains many examples of LSIS components, a fact that motivates this research. However, most LSIS in use grew up from collections of separate subsystems that were not designed to be components of an integrated system. For this reason, they are often difficult to analyze and control. The problem is made more difficult by the size of a typical system, its diversity of information sources, and the institutional complexities associated with its geographic distribution across the enterprise. Moreover, there is no integrated approach for analyzing or managing such systems. Indeed, integrated development of LSIS is an active area of academic research. This work developed such an approach by simulating the various components of the LSIS and allowing the simulated components to interact with real LSIS subsystems. This research demonstrated two benefits. First, applying it to a particular LSIS provided a thorough understanding of the interfaces between the system's components. Second, it demonstrated how more rapid and detailed answers could be obtained to questions significant to the enterprise by interacting with the relevant LSIS subsystems through simulated components designed with those questions in mind. In a final, added phase of the project, investigations were made on extending this research to wireless communication networks in support of telemetry applications.

  7. Large-Scale Reform Comes of Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fullan, Michael

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the history of large-scale education reform and makes the case that large-scale or whole system reform policies and strategies are becoming increasingly evident. The review briefly addresses the pre 1997 period concluding that while the pressure for reform was mounting that there were very few examples of deliberate or…

  8. Large-scale infrared scene projectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Darin A.

    1999-07-01

    Large-scale infrared scene projectors, typically have unique opto-mechanical characteristics associated to their application. This paper outlines two large-scale zoom lens assemblies with different environmental and package constraints. Various challenges and their respective solutions are discussed and presented.

  9. Synthesis of small and large scale dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    Using a closure model for the evolution of magnetic correlations, we uncover an interesting plausible saturated state of the small-scale fluctuation dynamo (SSD) and a novel analogy between quantum mechanical tunnelling and the generation of large-scale fields. Large scale fields develop via the α-effect, but as magnetic helicity can only change on a resistive timescale, the time it takes to organize the field into large scales increases with magnetic Reynolds number. This is very similar to the results which obtain from simulations using the full MHD equations.

  10. Large-scale regions of antimatter

    SciTech Connect

    Grobov, A. V. Rubin, S. G.

    2015-07-15

    Amodified mechanism of the formation of large-scale antimatter regions is proposed. Antimatter appears owing to fluctuations of a complex scalar field that carries a baryon charge in the inflation era.

  11. Large-scale vapor transport of remotely evaporated seawater by a Rossby wave response to typhoon forcing during the Baiu/Meiyu season as revealed by the JRA-55 reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudo, Tadasuke; Kawamura, Ryuichi; Hirata, Hidetaka; Ichiyanagi, Kimpei; Tanoue, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kei

    2014-07-01

    The modulation of large-scale moisture transport from the tropics into East Asia in response to typhoon-induced heating during the mature stage of the Baiu/Meiyu season is investigated using the Japanese 55-year reanalysis (JRA-55), aided by a Rayleigh-type global isotope circulation model (ICM). We highlighted the typhoons that migrate northward along the western periphery of the North Pacific subtropical high and approach the vicinity of Japan. Anomalous anticyclonic circulations to the northeast and southeast of typhoons and cyclonic circulation to their west become evident as they migrate toward Japan, which could be interpreted as a Rossby wave response to typhoon heating. These resultant anomalous circulation patterns form moisture conveyor belt (MCB) stretching from the South Asian monsoon region to East Asia via the confluence region between the monsoon westerlies and central Pacific easterlies. The ICM results confirm that the well-defined nature of the MCB leads to penetration of the Indian Ocean, South China Sea, Philippine Sea, and Pacific Ocean water vapors into western Japan. The typhoons have the potential to accumulate large amounts of moisture from distant tropical oceans through the interaction of their Rossby wave response with the background flow. In the case of a typical typhoon, the total precipitable water around the typhoon center as it approaches Japan is maintained by the moisture supply from distant oceans rather than from the underlying ocean, which indirectly leads to the occurrence of heavy rainfall over western Japan.

  12. Global Wildfire Forecasts Using Large Scale Climate Indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Huizhong; Tao, Shu

    2016-04-01

    Using weather readings, fire early warning can provided forecast 4-6 hour in advance to minimize fire loss. The benefit would be dramatically enhanced if relatively accurate long-term projection can be also provided. Here we present a novel method for predicting global fire season severity (FSS) at least three months in advance using multiple large-scale climate indices (CIs). The predictive ability is proven effective for various geographic locations and resolution. Globally, as well as in most continents, the El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the dominant driving force controlling interannual FSS variability, whereas other CIs also play indispensable roles. We found that a moderate El Niño event is responsible for 465 (272-658 as interquartile range) Tg carbon release and an annual increase of 29,500 (24,500-34,800) deaths from inhalation exposure to air pollutants. Southeast Asia accounts for half of the deaths. Both intercorrelation and interaction of WPs and CIs are revealed, suggesting possible climate-induced modification of fire responses to weather conditions. Our models can benefit fire management in response to climate change.

  13. Climate: large-scale warming is not urban.

    PubMed

    Parker, David E

    2004-11-18

    Controversy has persisted over the influence of urban warming on reported large-scale surface-air temperature trends. Urban heat islands occur mainly at night and are reduced in windy conditions. Here we show that, globally, temperatures over land have risen as much on windy nights as on calm nights, indicating that the observed overall warming is not a consequence of urban development. PMID:15549087

  14. Survey on large scale system control methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mercadal, Mathieu

    1987-01-01

    The problem inherent to large scale systems such as power network, communication network and economic or ecological systems were studied. The increase in size and flexibility of future spacecraft has put those dynamical systems into the category of large scale systems, and tools specific to the class of large systems are being sought to design control systems that can guarantee more stability and better performance. Among several survey papers, reference was found to a thorough investigation on decentralized control methods. Especially helpful was the classification made of the different existing approaches to deal with large scale systems. A very similar classification is used, even though the papers surveyed are somehow different from the ones reviewed in other papers. Special attention is brought to the applicability of the existing methods to controlling large mechanical systems like large space structures. Some recent developments are added to this survey.

  15. Large-scale inhomogeneities and galaxy statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaeffer, R.; Silk, J.

    1984-01-01

    The density fluctuations associated with the formation of large-scale cosmic pancake-like and filamentary structures are evaluated using the Zel'dovich approximation for the evolution of nonlinear inhomogeneities in the expanding universe. It is shown that the large-scale nonlinear density fluctuations in the galaxy distribution due to pancakes modify the standard scale-invariant correlation function xi(r) at scales comparable to the coherence length of adiabatic fluctuations. The typical contribution of pancakes and filaments to the J3 integral, and more generally to the moments of galaxy counts in a volume of approximately (15-40 per h Mpc)exp 3, provides a statistical test for the existence of large scale inhomogeneities. An application to several recent three dimensional data sets shows that despite large observational uncertainties over the relevant scales characteristic features may be present that can be attributed to pancakes in most, but not all, of the various galaxy samples.

  16. Large scale features and energetics of the hybrid subtropical low `Duck' over the Tasman Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezza, Alexandre Bernardes; Garde, Luke Andrew; Veiga, José Augusto Paixão; Simmonds, Ian

    2014-01-01

    New aspects of the genesis and partial tropical transition of a rare hybrid subtropical cyclone on the eastern Australian coast are presented. The `Duck' (March 2001) attracted more recent attention due to its underlying genesis mechanisms being remarkably similar to the first South Atlantic hurricane (March 2004). Here we put this cyclone in climate perspective, showing that it belongs to a class within the 1 % lowest frequency percentile in the Southern Hemisphere as a function of its thermal evolution. A large scale analysis reveals a combined influence from an existing tropical cyclone and a persistent mid-latitude block. A Lagrangian tracer showed that the upper level air parcels arriving at the cyclone's center had been modified by the blocking. Lorenz energetics is used to identify connections with both tropical and extratropical processes, and reveal how these create the large scale environment conducive to the development of the vortex. The results reveal that the blocking exerted the most important influence, with a strong peak in barotropic generation of kinetic energy over a large area traversed by the air parcels just before genesis. A secondary peak also coincided with the first time the cyclone developed an upper level warm core, but with insufficient amplitude to allow for a full tropical transition. The applications of this technique are numerous and promising, particularly on the use of global climate models to infer changes in environmental parameters associated with severe storms.

  17. The large-scale distribution of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geller, Margaret J.

    1989-01-01

    The spatial distribution of galaxies in the universe is characterized on the basis of the six completed strips of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics redshift-survey extension. The design of the survey is briefly reviewed, and the results are presented graphically. Vast low-density voids similar to the void in Bootes are found, almost completely surrounded by thin sheets of galaxies. Also discussed are the implications of the results for the survey sampling problem, the two-point correlation function of the galaxy distribution, the possibility of detecting large-scale coherent flows, theoretical models of large-scale structure, and the identification of groups and clusters of galaxies.

  18. Large-scale assembly of colloidal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hongta

    This study reports a simple, roll-to-roll compatible coating technology for producing three-dimensional highly ordered colloidal crystal-polymer composites, colloidal crystals, and macroporous polymer membranes. A vertically beveled doctor blade is utilized to shear align silica microsphere-monomer suspensions to form large-area composites in a single step. The polymer matrix and the silica microspheres can be selectively removed to create colloidal crystals and self-standing macroporous polymer membranes. The thickness of the shear-aligned crystal is correlated with the viscosity of the colloidal suspension and the coating speed, and the correlations can be qualitatively explained by adapting the mechanisms developed for conventional doctor blade coating. Five important research topics related to the application of large-scale three-dimensional highly ordered macroporous films by doctor blade coating are covered in this study. The first topic describes the invention in large area and low cost color reflective displays. This invention is inspired by the heat pipe technology. The self-standing macroporous polymer films exhibit brilliant colors which originate from the Bragg diffractive of visible light form the three-dimensional highly ordered air cavities. The colors can be easily changed by tuning the size of the air cavities to cover the whole visible spectrum. When the air cavities are filled with a solvent which has the same refractive index as that of the polymer, the macroporous polymer films become completely transparent due to the index matching. When the solvent trapped in the cavities is evaporated by in-situ heating, the sample color changes back to brilliant color. This process is highly reversible and reproducible for thousands of cycles. The second topic reports the achievement of rapid and reversible vapor detection by using 3-D macroporous photonic crystals. Capillary condensation of a condensable vapor in the interconnected macropores leads to the

  19. Large-scale Intermittency In A Topographically Perturbed Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cava, D.; Schipa, S.; Giostra, U.

    Flow perturbation due to complex topography has been investigated. Analysed data were collected upstream and at the top of a steep ridge, Inexpressible Island, Antarc- tica. The comparison between spectra relative to wind velocity data collected upstream and at the obstacle top highlights the non-equilibrium of large eddies on the ridge. According to the rapid distortion theory, the normalised spectra at the summit of the obstacle display a spectral lag effect. Moreover, the topographic perturbation produces low-frequency secondary spectral maxima in all wind velocity components. Time se- ries of the wind velocity fluctuations and of the instantaneous momentum flux clearly reveal large-scale burst-like structures. The intermittent character of the large scale perturbation has been investigated using an Adaptive Multiresolution data filter based on the wavelet transform theory. This technique allows us to determine the occur- rence and the duration of the intermittent events. The quadrant analysis of the wavelet coefficients evidences the leading role of the sweeps (i.e. motions of high-speed air towards the surface) in transporting momentum flux at frequencies characteristics of large-scale topographic perturbation.

  20. Management of large-scale technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, A.

    1985-01-01

    Two major themes are addressed in this assessment of the management of large-scale NASA programs: (1) how a high technology agency was a decade marked by a rapid expansion of funds and manpower in the first half and almost as rapid contraction in the second; and (2) how NASA combined central planning and control with decentralized project execution.

  1. A Large Scale Computer Terminal Output Controller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tucker, Paul Thomas

    This paper describes the design and implementation of a large scale computer terminal output controller which supervises the transfer of information from a Control Data 6400 Computer to a PLATO IV data network. It discusses the cost considerations leading to the selection of educational television channels rather than telephone lines for…

  2. Large Scale Commodity Clusters for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    A. Pochinsky; W. Akers; R. Brower; J. Chen; P. Dreher; R. Edwards; S. Gottlieb; D. Holmgren; P. Mackenzie; J. Negele; D. Richards; J. Simone; W. Watson

    2002-06-01

    We describe the construction of large scale clusters for lattice QCD computing being developed under the umbrella of the U.S. DoE SciDAC initiative. We discuss the study of floating point and network performance that drove the design of the cluster, and present our plans for future multi-Terascale facilities.

  3. Evaluating Large-Scale Interactive Radio Programmes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potter, Charles; Naidoo, Gordon

    2009-01-01

    This article focuses on the challenges involved in conducting evaluations of interactive radio programmes in South Africa with large numbers of schools, teachers, and learners. It focuses on the role such large-scale evaluation has played during the South African radio learning programme's development stage, as well as during its subsequent…

  4. ARPACK: Solving large scale eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehoucq, Rich; Maschhoff, Kristi; Sorensen, Danny; Yang, Chao

    2013-11-01

    ARPACK is a collection of Fortran77 subroutines designed to solve large scale eigenvalue problems. The package is designed to compute a few eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a general n by n matrix A. It is most appropriate for large sparse or structured matrices A where structured means that a matrix-vector product w

  5. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-07-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority's large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy's Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process in included.

  6. Large-scale CFB combustion demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, P.T.; Hebb, J.L.; Aquino, R.

    1998-04-01

    The Jacksonville Electric Authority`s large-scale CFB demonstration project is described. Given the early stage of project development, the paper focuses on the project organizational structure, its role within the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program, and the projected environmental performance. A description of the CFB combustion process is included.

  7. Fractals and cosmological large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, Xiaochun; Schramm, David N.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of galaxy-galaxy and cluster-cluster correlations as well as other large-scale structure can be fit with a 'limited' fractal with dimension D of about 1.2. This is not a 'pure' fractal out to the horizon: the distribution shifts from power law to random behavior at some large scale. If the observed patterns and structures are formed through an aggregation growth process, the fractal dimension D can serve as an interesting constraint on the properties of the stochastic motion responsible for limiting the fractal structure. In particular, it is found that the observed fractal should have grown from two-dimensional sheetlike objects such as pancakes, domain walls, or string wakes. This result is generic and does not depend on the details of the growth process.

  8. Condition Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, David L.

    1999-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the research conducted for the NASA Ames Research Center under grant NAG2-1182 (Condition-Based Monitoring of Large-Scale Facilities). The information includes copies of view graphs presented at NASA Ames in the final Workshop (held during December of 1998), as well as a copy of a technical report provided to the COTR (Dr. Anne Patterson-Hine) subsequent to the workshop. The material describes the experimental design, collection of data, and analysis results associated with monitoring the health of large-scale facilities. In addition to this material, a copy of the Pennsylvania State University Applied Research Laboratory data fusion visual programming tool kit was also provided to NASA Ames researchers.

  9. Large-Scale Fusion of Gray Matter and Resting-State Functional MRI Reveals Common and Distinct Biological Markers across the Psychosis Spectrum in the B-SNIP Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zheng; Meda, Shashwath A.; Keshavan, Matcheri S.; Tamminga, Carol A.; Sweeney, John A.; Clementz, Brett A.; Schretlen, David J.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Lui, Su; Pearlson, Godfrey D.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate whether aberrant interactions between brain structure and function present similarly or differently across probands with psychotic illnesses [schizophrenia (SZ), schizoaffective disorder (SAD), and bipolar I disorder with psychosis (BP)] and whether these deficits are shared with their first-degree non-psychotic relatives. A total of 1199 subjects were assessed, including 220 SZ, 147 SAD, 180 psychotic BP, 150 first-degree relatives of SZ, 126 SAD relatives, 134 BP relatives, and 242 healthy controls (1). All subjects underwent structural MRI (sMRI) and resting-state functional MRI (rs-fMRI) scanning. Joint-independent component analysis (jICA) was used to fuse sMRI gray matter and rs-fMRI amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations data to identify the relationship between the two modalities. jICA revealed two significantly fused components. The association between functional brain alteration in a prefrontal–striatal–thalamic–cerebellar network and structural abnormalities in the default mode network was found to be common across psychotic diagnoses and correlated with cognitive function, social function, and schizo-bipolar scale scores. The fused alteration in the temporal lobe was unique to SZ and SAD. The above effects were not seen in any relative group (including those with cluster-A personality). Using a multivariate-fused approach involving two widely used imaging markers, we demonstrate both shared and distinct biological traits across the psychosis spectrum. Furthermore, our results suggest that the above traits are psychosis biomarkers rather than endophenotypes. PMID:26732139

  10. Large-scale extraction of proteins.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Teresa; Aires-Barros, Raquel

    2002-01-01

    The production of foreign proteins using selected host with the necessary posttranslational modifications is one of the key successes in modern biotechnology. This methodology allows the industrial production of proteins that otherwise are produced in small quantities. However, the separation and purification of these proteins from the fermentation media constitutes a major bottleneck for the widespread commercialization of recombinant proteins. The major production costs (50-90%) for typical biological product resides in the purification strategy. There is a need for efficient, effective, and economic large-scale bioseparation techniques, to achieve high purity and high recovery, while maintaining the biological activity of the molecule. Aqueous two-phase systems (ATPS) allow process integration as simultaneously separation and concentration of the target protein is achieved, with posterior removal and recycle of the polymer. The ease of scale-up combined with the high partition coefficients obtained allow its potential application in large-scale downstream processing of proteins produced by fermentation. The equipment and the methodology for aqueous two-phase extraction of proteins on a large scale using mixer-settlerand column contractors are described. The operation of the columns, either stagewise or differential, are summarized. A brief description of the methods used to account for mass transfer coefficients, hydrodynamics parameters of hold-up, drop size, and velocity, back mixing in the phases, and flooding performance, required for column design, is also provided. PMID:11876297

  11. Large scale processes in the solar nebula.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, A. P.

    Most proposed chondrule formation mechanisms involve processes occurring inside the solar nebula, so the large scale (roughly 1 to 10 AU) structure of the nebula is of general interest for any chrondrule-forming mechanism. Chondrules and Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) might also have been formed as a direct result of the large scale structure of the nebula, such as passage of material through high temperature regions. While recent nebula models do predict the existence of relatively hot regions, the maximum temperatures in the inner planet region may not be high enough to account for chondrule or CAI thermal processing, unless the disk mass is considerably greater than the minimum mass necessary to restore the planets to solar composition. Furthermore, it does not seem to be possible to achieve both rapid heating and rapid cooling of grain assemblages in such a large scale furnace. However, if the accretion flow onto the nebula surface is clumpy, as suggested by observations of variability in young stars, then clump-disk impacts might be energetic enough to launch shock waves which could propagate through the nebula to the midplane, thermally processing any grain aggregates they encounter, and leaving behind a trail of chondrules.

  12. Large scale meteorological influence during the Geysers 1979 field experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.

    1980-01-01

    A series of meteorological field measurements conducted during July 1979 near Cobb Mountain in Northern California reveals evidence of several scales of atmospheric circulation consistent with the climatic pattern of the area. The scales of influence are reflected in the structure of wind and temperature in vertically stratified layers at a given observation site. Large scale synoptic gradient flow dominates the wind field above about twice the height of the topographic ridge. Below that there is a mixture of effects with evidence of a diurnal sea breeze influence and a sublayer of katabatic winds. The July observations demonstrate that weak migratory circulations in the large scale synoptic meteorological pattern have a significant influence on the day-to-day gradient winds and must be accounted for in planning meteorological programs including tracer experiments.

  13. Toward Instructional Leadership: Principals' Perceptions of Large-Scale Assessment in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prytula, Michelle; Noonan, Brian; Hellsten, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a study of the perceptions that Saskatchewan school principals have regarding large-scale assessment reform and their perceptions of how assessment reform has affected their roles as principals. The findings revealed that large-scale assessments, especially provincial assessments, have affected the principal in Saskatchewan…

  14. Large-scale sodium spray fire code validation (SOFICOV) test

    SciTech Connect

    Jeppson, D.W.; Muhlestein, L.D.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, sodium, spray fire code validation test was performed in the HEDL 850-m/sup 3/ Containment System Test Facility (CSTF) as part of the Sodium Spray Fire Code Validation (SOFICOV) program. Six hundred fifty eight kilograms of sodium spray was sprayed in an air atmosphere for a period of 2400 s. The sodium spray droplet sizes and spray pattern distribution were estimated. The containment atmosphere temperature and pressure response, containment wall temperature response and sodium reaction rate with oxygen were measured. These results are compared to post-test predictions using SPRAY and NACOM computer codes.

  15. Colloquium: Large scale simulations on GPU clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernaschi, Massimo; Bisson, Mauro; Fatica, Massimiliano

    2015-06-01

    Graphics processing units (GPU) are currently used as a cost-effective platform for computer simulations and big-data processing. Large scale applications require that multiple GPUs work together but the efficiency obtained with cluster of GPUs is, at times, sub-optimal because the GPU features are not exploited at their best. We describe how it is possible to achieve an excellent efficiency for applications in statistical mechanics, particle dynamics and networks analysis by using suitable memory access patterns and mechanisms like CUDA streams, profiling tools, etc. Similar concepts and techniques may be applied also to other problems like the solution of Partial Differential Equations.

  16. Experimental Simulations of Large-Scale Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Housen, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes research on the effects of target porosity on the mechanics of impact cratering. Impact experiments conducted on a centrifuge provide direct simulations of large-scale cratering on porous asteroids. The experiments show that large craters in porous materials form mostly by compaction, with essentially no deposition of material into the ejecta blanket that is a signature of cratering in less-porous materials. The ratio of ejecta mass to crater mass is shown to decrease with increasing crater size or target porosity. These results are consistent with the observation that large closely-packed craters on asteroid Mathilde appear to have formed without degradation to earlier craters.

  17. Nonthermal Components in the Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miniati, Francesco

    2004-12-01

    I address the issue of nonthermal processes in the large scale structure of the universe. After reviewing the properties of cosmic shocks and their role as particle accelerators, I discuss the main observational results, from radio to γ-ray and describe the processes that are thought be responsible for the observed nonthermal emissions. Finally, I emphasize the important role of γ-ray astronomy for the progress in the field. Non detections at these photon energies have already allowed us important conclusions. Future observations will tell us more about the physics of the intracluster medium, shocks dissipation and CR acceleration.

  18. Large-Scale PV Integration Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Shuai; Etingov, Pavel V.; Diao, Ruisheng; Ma, Jian; Samaan, Nader A.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Guo, Xinxin; Hafen, Ryan P.; Jin, Chunlian; Kirkham, Harold; Shlatz, Eugene; Frantzis, Lisa; McClive, Timothy; Karlson, Gregory; Acharya, Dhruv; Ellis, Abraham; Stein, Joshua; Hansen, Clifford; Chadliev, Vladimir; Smart, Michael; Salgo, Richard; Sorensen, Rahn; Allen, Barbara; Idelchik, Boris

    2011-07-29

    This research effort evaluates the impact of large-scale photovoltaic (PV) and distributed generation (DG) output on NV Energy’s electric grid system in southern Nevada. It analyzes the ability of NV Energy’s generation to accommodate increasing amounts of utility-scale PV and DG, and the resulting cost of integrating variable renewable resources. The study was jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy and NV Energy, and conducted by a project team comprised of industry experts and research scientists from Navigant Consulting Inc., Sandia National Laboratories, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and NV Energy.

  19. Large-scale planar lightwave circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bidnyk, Serge; Zhang, Hua; Pearson, Matt; Balakrishnan, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    By leveraging advanced wafer processing and flip-chip bonding techniques, we have succeeded in hybrid integrating a myriad of active optical components, including photodetectors and laser diodes, with our planar lightwave circuit (PLC) platform. We have combined hybrid integration of active components with monolithic integration of other critical functions, such as diffraction gratings, on-chip mirrors, mode-converters, and thermo-optic elements. Further process development has led to the integration of polarization controlling functionality. Most recently, all these technological advancements have been combined to create large-scale planar lightwave circuits that comprise hundreds of optical elements integrated on chips less than a square inch in size.

  20. Neutrinos and large-scale structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eisenstein, Daniel J.

    2015-07-15

    I review the use of cosmological large-scale structure to measure properties of neutrinos and other relic populations of light relativistic particles. With experiments to measure the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave anisotropies and the clustering of matter at low redshift, we now have securely measured a relativistic background with density appropriate to the cosmic neutrino background. Our limits on the mass of the neutrino continue to shrink. Experiments coming in the next decade will greatly improve the available precision on searches for the energy density of novel relativistic backgrounds and the mass of neutrinos.

  1. Large scale phononic metamaterials for seismic isolation

    SciTech Connect

    Aravantinos-Zafiris, N.; Sigalas, M. M.

    2015-08-14

    In this work, we numerically examine structures that could be characterized as large scale phononic metamaterials. These novel structures could have band gaps in the frequency spectrum of seismic waves when their dimensions are chosen appropriately, thus raising the belief that they could be serious candidates for seismic isolation structures. Different and easy to fabricate structures were examined made from construction materials such as concrete and steel. The well-known finite difference time domain method is used in our calculations in order to calculate the band structures of the proposed metamaterials.

  2. Global food insecurity. Treatment of major food crops with elevated carbon dioxide or ozone under large-scale fully open-air conditions suggests recent models may have overestimated future yields

    PubMed Central

    Long, Stephen P; Ainsworth, Elizabeth A; Leakey, Andrew D.B; Morgan, Patrick B

    2005-01-01

    Predictions of yield for the globe's major grain and legume arable crops suggest that, with a moderate temperature increase, production may increase in the temperate zone, but decline in the tropics. In total, global food supply may show little change. This security comes from inclusion of the direct effect of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, [CO2], which significantly stimulates yield by decreasing photorespiration in C3 crops and transpiration in all crops. Evidence for a large response to [CO2] is largely based on studies made within chambers at small scales, which would be considered unacceptable for standard agronomic trials of new cultivars or agrochemicals. Yet, predictions of the globe's future food security are based on such inadequate information. Free-Air Concentration Enrichment (FACE) technology now allows investigation of the effects of rising [CO2] and ozone on field crops under fully open-air conditions at an agronomic scale. Experiments with rice, wheat, maize and soybean show smaller increases in yield than anticipated from studies in chambers. Experiments with increased ozone show large yield losses (20%), which are not accounted for in projections of global food security. These findings suggest that current projections of global food security are overoptimistic. The fertilization effect of CO2 is less than that used in many models, while rising ozone will cause large yield losses in the Northern Hemisphere. Unfortunately, FACE studies have been limited in geographical extent and interactive effects of CO2, ozone and temperature have yet to be studied. Without more extensive study of the effects of these changes at an agronomic scale in the open air, our ever-more sophisticated models will continue to have feet of clay. PMID:16433090

  3. Large-scale functional connectivity networks in the rodent brain.

    PubMed

    Gozzi, Alessandro; Schwarz, Adam J

    2016-02-15

    Resting-state functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (rsfMRI) of the human brain has revealed multiple large-scale neural networks within a hierarchical and complex structure of coordinated functional activity. These distributed neuroanatomical systems provide a sensitive window on brain function and its disruption in a variety of neuropathological conditions. The study of macroscale intrinsic connectivity networks in preclinical species, where genetic and environmental conditions can be controlled and manipulated with high specificity, offers the opportunity to elucidate the biological determinants of these alterations. While rsfMRI methods are now widely used in human connectivity research, these approaches have only relatively recently been back-translated into laboratory animals. Here we review recent progress in the study of functional connectivity in rodent species, emphasising the ability of this approach to resolve large-scale brain networks that recapitulate neuroanatomical features of known functional systems in the human brain. These include, but are not limited to, a distributed set of regions identified in rats and mice that may represent a putative evolutionary precursor of the human default mode network (DMN). The impact and control of potential experimental and methodological confounds are also critically discussed. Finally, we highlight the enormous potential and some initial application of connectivity mapping in transgenic models as a tool to investigate the neuropathological underpinnings of the large-scale connectional alterations associated with human neuropsychiatric and neurological conditions. We conclude by discussing the translational potential of these methods in basic and applied neuroscience. PMID:26706448

  4. Large-scale Globally Propagating Coronal Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warmuth, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    Large-scale, globally propagating wave-like disturbances have been observed in the solar chromosphere and by inference in the corona since the 1960s. However, detailed analysis of these phenomena has only been conducted since the late 1990s. This was prompted by the availability of high-cadence coronal imaging data from numerous spaced-based instruments, which routinely show spectacular globally propagating bright fronts. Coronal waves, as these perturbations are usually referred to, have now been observed in a wide range of spectral channels, yielding a wealth of information. Many findings have supported the "classical" interpretation of the disturbances: fast-mode MHD waves or shocks that are propagating in the solar corona. However, observations that seemed inconsistent with this picture have stimulated the development of alternative models in which "pseudo waves" are generated by magnetic reconfiguration in the framework of an expanding coronal mass ejection. This has resulted in a vigorous debate on the physical nature of these disturbances. This review focuses on demonstrating how the numerous observational findings of the last one and a half decades can be used to constrain our models of large-scale coronal waves, and how a coherent physical understanding of these disturbances is finally emerging.

  5. Local gravity and large-scale structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juszkiewicz, Roman; Vittorio, Nicola; Wyse, Rosemary F. G.

    1990-01-01

    The magnitude and direction of the observed dipole anisotropy of the galaxy distribution can in principle constrain the amount of large-scale power present in the spectrum of primordial density fluctuations. This paper confronts the data, provided by a recent redshift survey of galaxies detected by the IRAS satellite, with the predictions of two cosmological models with very different levels of large-scale power: the biased Cold Dark Matter dominated model (CDM) and a baryon-dominated model (BDM) with isocurvature initial conditions. Model predictions are investigated for the Local Group peculiar velocity, v(R), induced by mass inhomogeneities distributed out to a given radius, R, for R less than about 10,000 km/s. Several convergence measures for v(R) are developed, which can become powerful cosmological tests when deep enough samples become available. For the present data sets, the CDM and BDM predictions are indistinguishable at the 2 sigma level and both are consistent with observations. A promising discriminant between cosmological models is the misalignment angle between v(R) and the apex of the dipole anisotropy of the microwave background.

  6. Large-Scale Organization of Glycosylation Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Pan-Jun; Lee, Dong-Yup; Jeong, Hawoong

    2009-03-01

    Glycosylation is a highly complex process to produce a diverse repertoire of cellular glycans that are frequently attached to proteins and lipids. Glycans participate in fundamental biological processes including molecular trafficking and clearance, cell proliferation and apoptosis, developmental biology, immune response, and pathogenesis. N-linked glycans found on proteins are formed by sequential attachments of monosaccharides with the help of a relatively small number of enzymes. Many of these enzymes can accept multiple N-linked glycans as substrates, thus generating a large number of glycan intermediates and their intermingled pathways. Motivated by the quantitative methods developed in complex network research, we investigate the large-scale organization of such N-glycosylation pathways in a mammalian cell. The uncovered results give the experimentally-testable predictions for glycosylation process, and can be applied to the engineering of therapeutic glycoproteins.

  7. Large-scale databases of proper names.

    PubMed

    Conley, P; Burgess, C; Hage, D

    1999-05-01

    Few tools for research in proper names have been available--specifically, there is no large-scale corpus of proper names. Two corpora of proper names were constructed, one based on U.S. phone book listings, the other derived from a database of Usenet text. Name frequencies from both corpora were compared with human subjects' reaction times (RTs) to the proper names in a naming task. Regression analysis showed that the Usenet frequencies contributed to predictions of human RT, whereas phone book frequencies did not. In addition, semantic neighborhood density measures derived from the HAL corpus were compared with the subjects' RTs and found to be a better predictor of RT than was frequency in either corpus. These new corpora are freely available on line for download. Potentials for these corpora range from using the names as stimuli in experiments to using the corpus data in software applications. PMID:10495803

  8. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities.

    PubMed

    Raab, C; Kurths, J

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor. PMID:11461376

  9. The challenge of large-scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, S. A.

    1996-03-01

    The tasks that I have assumed for myself in this presentation include three separate parts. The first, appropriate to the particular setting of this meeting, is to review the basic work of the founding of this field; the appropriateness comes from the fact that W. G. Tifft made immense contributions that are not often realized by the astronomical community. The second task is to outline the general tone of the observational evidence for large scale structures. (Here, in particular, I cannot claim to be complete. I beg forgiveness from any workers who are left out by my oversight for lack of space and time.) The third task is to point out some of the major aspects of the field that may represent the clues by which some brilliant sleuth will ultimately figure out how galaxies formed.

  10. Engineering management of large scale systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanders, Serita; Gill, Tepper L.; Paul, Arthur S.

    1989-01-01

    The organization of high technology and engineering problem solving, has given rise to an emerging concept. Reasoning principles for integrating traditional engineering problem solving with system theory, management sciences, behavioral decision theory, and planning and design approaches can be incorporated into a methodological approach to solving problems with a long range perspective. Long range planning has a great potential to improve productivity by using a systematic and organized approach. Thus, efficiency and cost effectiveness are the driving forces in promoting the organization of engineering problems. Aspects of systems engineering that provide an understanding of management of large scale systems are broadly covered here. Due to the focus and application of research, other significant factors (e.g., human behavior, decision making, etc.) are not emphasized but are considered.

  11. Large scale cryogenic fluid systems testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center's Cryogenic Fluid Systems Branch (CFSB) within the Space Propulsion Technology Division (SPTD) has the ultimate goal of enabling the long term storage and in-space fueling/resupply operations for spacecraft and reusable vehicles in support of space exploration. Using analytical modeling, ground based testing, and on-orbit experimentation, the CFSB is studying three primary categories of fluid technology: storage, supply, and transfer. The CFSB is also investigating fluid handling, advanced instrumentation, and tank structures and materials. Ground based testing of large-scale systems is done using liquid hydrogen as a test fluid at the Cryogenic Propellant Tank Facility (K-site) at Lewis' Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio. A general overview of tests involving liquid transfer, thermal control, pressure control, and pressurization is given.

  12. Batteries for Large Scale Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L.

    2011-07-15

    In recent years, with the deployment of renewable energy sources, advances in electrified transportation, and development in smart grids, the markets for large-scale stationary energy storage have grown rapidly. Electrochemical energy storage methods are strong candidate solutions due to their high energy density, flexibility, and scalability. This review provides an overview of mature and emerging technologies for secondary and redox flow batteries. New developments in the chemistry of secondary and flow batteries as well as regenerative fuel cells are also considered. Advantages and disadvantages of current and prospective electrochemical energy storage options are discussed. The most promising technologies in the short term are high-temperature sodium batteries with β”-alumina electrolyte, lithium-ion batteries, and flow batteries. Regenerative fuel cells and lithium metal batteries with high energy density require further research to become practical.

  13. Large scale water lens for solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Mondol, A S; Vogel, B; Bastian, G

    2015-06-01

    Properties of large scale water lenses for solar concentration were investigated. These lenses were built from readily available materials, normal tap water and hyper-elastic linear low density polyethylene foil. Exposed to sunlight, the focal lengths and light intensities in the focal spot were measured and calculated. Their optical properties were modeled with a raytracing software based on the lens shape. We have achieved a good match of experimental and theoretical data by considering wavelength dependent concentration factor, absorption and focal length. The change in light concentration as a function of water volume was examined via the resulting load on the foil and the corresponding change of shape. The latter was extracted from images and modeled by a finite element simulation. PMID:26072893

  14. Large Scale Quantum Simulations of Nuclear Pasta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fattoyev, Farrukh J.; Horowitz, Charles J.; Schuetrumpf, Bastian

    2016-03-01

    Complex and exotic nuclear geometries collectively referred to as ``nuclear pasta'' are expected to naturally exist in the crust of neutron stars and in supernovae matter. Using a set of self-consistent microscopic nuclear energy density functionals we present the first results of large scale quantum simulations of pasta phases at baryon densities 0 . 03 < ρ < 0 . 10 fm-3, proton fractions 0 . 05

  15. Large-scale simulations of reionization

    SciTech Connect

    Kohler, Katharina; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Hamilton, Andrew J.S.; /JILA, Boulder

    2005-11-01

    We use cosmological simulations to explore the large-scale effects of reionization. Since reionization is a process that involves a large dynamic range--from galaxies to rare bright quasars--we need to be able to cover a significant volume of the universe in our simulation without losing the important small scale effects from galaxies. Here we have taken an approach that uses clumping factors derived from small scale simulations to approximate the radiative transfer on the sub-cell scales. Using this technique, we can cover a simulation size up to 1280h{sup -1} Mpc with 10h{sup -1} Mpc cells. This allows us to construct synthetic spectra of quasars similar to observed spectra of SDSS quasars at high redshifts and compare them to the observational data. These spectra can then be analyzed for HII region sizes, the presence of the Gunn-Peterson trough, and the Lyman-{alpha} forest.

  16. The XMM Large Scale Structure Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Marguerite

    2005-10-01

    We propose to complete, by an additional 5 deg2, the XMM-LSS Survey region overlying the Spitzer/SWIRE field. This field already has CFHTLS and Integral coverage, and will encompass about 10 deg2. The resulting multi-wavelength medium-depth survey, which complements XMM and Chandra deep surveys, will provide a unique view of large-scale structure over a wide range of redshift, and will show active galaxies in the full range of environments. The complete coverage by optical and IR surveys provides high-quality photometric redshifts, so that cosmological results can quickly be extracted. In the spirit of a Legacy survey, we will make the raw X-ray data immediately public. Multi-band catalogues and images will also be made available on short time scales.

  17. Grid sensitivity capability for large scale structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagendra, Gopal K.; Wallerstein, David V.

    1989-01-01

    The considerations and the resultant approach used to implement design sensitivity capability for grids into a large scale, general purpose finite element system (MSC/NASTRAN) are presented. The design variables are grid perturbations with a rather general linking capability. Moreover, shape and sizing variables may be linked together. The design is general enough to facilitate geometric modeling techniques for generating design variable linking schemes in an easy and straightforward manner. Test cases have been run and validated by comparison with the overall finite difference method. The linking of a design sensitivity capability for shape variables in MSC/NASTRAN with an optimizer would give designers a powerful, automated tool to carry out practical optimization design of real life, complicated structures.

  18. Large-Scale Astrophysical Visualization on Smartphones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becciani, U.; Massimino, P.; Costa, A.; Gheller, C.; Grillo, A.; Krokos, M.; Petta, C.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays digital sky surveys and long-duration, high-resolution numerical simulations using high performance computing and grid systems produce multidimensional astrophysical datasets in the order of several Petabytes. Sharing visualizations of such datasets within communities and collaborating research groups is of paramount importance for disseminating results and advancing astrophysical research. Moreover educational and public outreach programs can benefit greatly from novel ways of presenting these datasets by promoting understanding of complex astrophysical processes, e.g., formation of stars and galaxies. We have previously developed VisIVO Server, a grid-enabled platform for high-performance large-scale astrophysical visualization. This article reviews the latest developments on VisIVO Web, a custom designed web portal wrapped around VisIVO Server, then introduces VisIVO Smartphone, a gateway connecting VisIVO Web and data repositories for mobile astrophysical visualization. We discuss current work and summarize future developments.

  19. Estimation of large-scale dimension densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raab, Corinna; Kurths, Jürgen

    2001-07-01

    We propose a technique to calculate large-scale dimension densities in both higher-dimensional spatio-temporal systems and low-dimensional systems from only a few data points, where known methods usually have an unsatisfactory scaling behavior. This is mainly due to boundary and finite-size effects. With our rather simple method, we normalize boundary effects and get a significant correction of the dimension estimate. This straightforward approach is based on rather general assumptions. So even weak coherent structures obtained from small spatial couplings can be detected with this method, which is impossible by using the Lyapunov-dimension density. We demonstrate the efficiency of our technique for coupled logistic maps, coupled tent maps, the Lorenz attractor, and the Roessler attractor.

  20. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R

    1998-10-01

    A study has been carried out to determine the feasibility of using commercial database management systems (DBMSs) to support large-scale computational science. Conventional wisdom in the past has been that DBMSs are too slow for such data. Several events over the past few years have muddied the clarity of this mindset: 1. 2. 3. 4. Several commercial DBMS systems have demonstrated storage and ad-hoc quer access to Terabyte data sets. Several large-scale science teams, such as EOSDIS [NAS91], high energy physics [MM97] and human genome [Kin93] have adopted (or make frequent use of) commercial DBMS systems as the central part of their data management scheme. Several major DBMS vendors have introduced their first object-relational products (ORDBMSs), which have the potential to support large, array-oriented data. In some cases, performance is a moot issue. This is true in particular if the performance of legacy applications is not reduced while new, albeit slow, capabilities are added to the system. The basic assessment is still that DBMSs do not scale to large computational data. However, many of the reasons have changed, and there is an expiration date attached to that prognosis. This document expands on this conclusion, identifies the advantages and disadvantages of various commercial approaches, and describes the studies carried out in exploring this area. The document is meant to be brief, technical and informative, rather than a motivational pitch. The conclusions within are very likely to become outdated within the next 5-7 years, as market forces will have a significant impact on the state of the art in scientific data management over the next decade.

  1. Supporting large-scale computational science

    SciTech Connect

    Musick, R., LLNL

    1998-02-19

    Business needs have driven the development of commercial database systems since their inception. As a result, there has been a strong focus on supporting many users, minimizing the potential corruption or loss of data, and maximizing performance metrics like transactions per second, or TPC-C and TPC-D results. It turns out that these optimizations have little to do with the needs of the scientific community, and in particular have little impact on improving the management and use of large-scale high-dimensional data. At the same time, there is an unanswered need in the scientific community for many of the benefits offered by a robust DBMS. For example, tying an ad-hoc query language such as SQL together with a visualization toolkit would be a powerful enhancement to current capabilities. Unfortunately, there has been little emphasis or discussion in the VLDB community on this mismatch over the last decade. The goal of the paper is to identify the specific issues that need to be resolved before large-scale scientific applications can make use of DBMS products. This topic is addressed in the context of an evaluation of commercial DBMS technology applied to the exploration of data generated by the Department of Energy`s Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI). The paper describes the data being generated for ASCI as well as current capabilities for interacting with and exploring this data. The attraction of applying standard DBMS technology to this domain is discussed, as well as the technical and business issues that currently make this an infeasible solution.

  2. Large-scale sequential quadratic programming algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Eldersveld, S.K.

    1992-09-01

    The problem addressed is the general nonlinear programming problem: finding a local minimizer for a nonlinear function subject to a mixture of nonlinear equality and inequality constraints. The methods studied are in the class of sequential quadratic programming (SQP) algorithms, which have previously proved successful for problems of moderate size. Our goal is to devise an SQP algorithm that is applicable to large-scale optimization problems, using sparse data structures and storing less curvature information but maintaining the property of superlinear convergence. The main features are: 1. The use of a quasi-Newton approximation to the reduced Hessian of the Lagrangian function. Only an estimate of the reduced Hessian matrix is required by our algorithm. The impact of not having available the full Hessian approximation is studied and alternative estimates are constructed. 2. The use of a transformation matrix Q. This allows the QP gradient to be computed easily when only the reduced Hessian approximation is maintained. 3. The use of a reduced-gradient form of the basis for the null space of the working set. This choice of basis is more practical than an orthogonal null-space basis for large-scale problems. The continuity condition for this choice is proven. 4. The use of incomplete solutions of quadratic programming subproblems. Certain iterates generated by an active-set method for the QP subproblem are used in place of the QP minimizer to define the search direction for the nonlinear problem. An implementation of the new algorithm has been obtained by modifying the code MINOS. Results and comparisons with MINOS and NPSOL are given for the new algorithm on a set of 92 test problems.

  3. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-08-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  4. Introducing Large-Scale Innovation in Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotiriou, Sofoklis; Riviou, Katherina; Cherouvis, Stephanos; Chelioti, Eleni; Bogner, Franz X.

    2016-02-01

    Education reform initiatives tend to promise higher effectiveness in classrooms especially when emphasis is given to e-learning and digital resources. Practical changes in classroom realities or school organization, however, are lacking. A major European initiative entitled Open Discovery Space (ODS) examined the challenge of modernizing school education via a large-scale implementation of an open-scale methodology in using technology-supported innovation. The present paper describes this innovation scheme which involved schools and teachers all over Europe, embedded technology-enhanced learning into wider school environments and provided training to teachers. Our implementation scheme consisted of three phases: (1) stimulating interest, (2) incorporating the innovation into school settings and (3) accelerating the implementation of the innovation. The scheme's impact was monitored for a school year using five indicators: leadership and vision building, ICT in the curriculum, development of ICT culture, professional development support, and school resources and infrastructure. Based on about 400 schools, our study produced four results: (1) The growth in digital maturity was substantial, even for previously high scoring schools. This was even more important for indicators such as vision and leadership" and "professional development." (2) The evolution of networking is presented graphically, showing the gradual growth of connections achieved. (3) These communities became core nodes, involving numerous teachers in sharing educational content and experiences: One out of three registered users (36 %) has shared his/her educational resources in at least one community. (4) Satisfaction scores ranged from 76 % (offer of useful support through teacher academies) to 87 % (good environment to exchange best practices). Initiatives such as ODS add substantial value to schools on a large scale.

  5. Large-Scale Hybrid Motor Testing. Chapter 10

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Story, George

    2006-01-01

    Hybrid rocket motors can be successfully demonstrated at a small scale virtually anywhere. There have been many suitcase sized portable test stands assembled for demonstration of hybrids. They show the safety of hybrid rockets to the audiences. These small show motors and small laboratory scale motors can give comparative burn rate data for development of different fuel/oxidizer combinations, however questions that are always asked when hybrids are mentioned for large scale applications are - how do they scale and has it been shown in a large motor? To answer those questions, large scale motor testing is required to verify the hybrid motor at its true size. The necessity to conduct large-scale hybrid rocket motor tests to validate the burn rate from the small motors to application size has been documented in several place^'^^.^. Comparison of small scale hybrid data to that of larger scale data indicates that the fuel burn rate goes down with increasing port size, even with the same oxidizer flux. This trend holds for conventional hybrid motors with forward oxidizer injection and HTPB based fuels. While the reason this is occurring would make a great paper or study or thesis, it is not thoroughly understood at this time. Potential causes include the fact that since hybrid combustion is boundary layer driven, the larger port sizes reduce the interaction (radiation, mixing and heat transfer) from the core region of the port. This chapter focuses on some of the large, prototype sized testing of hybrid motors. The largest motors tested have been AMROC s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Edwards Air Force Base and the Hybrid Propulsion Demonstration Program s 250K-lbf thrust motor at Stennis Space Center. Numerous smaller tests were performed to support the burn rate, stability and scaling concepts that went into the development of those large motors.

  6. Cooling biogeophysical effect of large-scale tropical deforestation in three Earth System models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brovkin, Victor; Pugh, Thomas; Robertson, Eddy; Bathiany, Sebastian; Arneth, Almut; Jones, Chris

    2015-04-01

    Vegetation cover in the tropics is limited by moisture availability. Since transpiration from forests is much greater than from grasslands, the sensitivity of precipitation in the Amazon to large-scale deforestation has long been seen as a critical parameter of climate-vegetation interactions. Most Amazon deforestation experiments to date have been performed with interactive land-atmosphere models but prescribed sea surface temperatures (SSTs). They reveal a strong reduction in evapotranspiration and precipitation, and an increase in global air surface temperature due to reduced latent heat flux. We performed large-scale tropical deforestation experiments with three Earth system models (ESMs) including interactive ocean models, which participated in the FP7 project EMBRACE. In response to tropical deforestation, all models simulate a significant reduction in tropical precipitation, similar to the experiments with prescribed SSTs. However, all three models suggest that the response of global temperature to the deforestation is a cooling or no change, differing from the result of a global warming in prescribed SSTs runs. Presumably, changes in the hydrological cycle and in the water vapor feedback due to deforestation operate in the direction of a global cooling. In addition, one of the models simulates a local cooling over the deforested tropical region. This is opposite to the local warming in the other models. This suggests that the balance between warming due to latent heat flux decrease and cooling due to albedo increase is rather subtle and model-dependent. Last but not least, we suggest using large-scale deforestation as a standard biogeophysical experiment for model intercomparison, for example, within the CMIP6 framework.

  7. Gravity and large-scale nonlocal bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Kwan Chuen; Scoccimarro, Román; Sheth, Ravi K.

    2012-04-01

    For Gaussian primordial fluctuations the relationship between galaxy and matter overdensities, bias, is most often assumed to be local at the time of observation in the large-scale limit. This hypothesis is however unstable under time evolution, we provide proofs under several (increasingly more realistic) sets of assumptions. In the simplest toy model galaxies are created locally and linearly biased at a single formation time, and subsequently move with the dark matter (no velocity bias) conserving their comoving number density (no merging). We show that, after this formation time, the bias becomes unavoidably nonlocal and nonlinear at large scales. We identify the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields in which the galaxy overdensity can be expanded, showing that they can be constructed out of the invariants of the deformation tensor (Galileons), the main signature of which is a quadrupole field in second-order perturbation theory. In addition, we show that this result persists if we include an arbitrary evolution of the comoving number density of tracers. We then include velocity bias, and show that new contributions appear; these are related to the breaking of Galilean invariance of the bias relation, a dipole field being the signature at second order. We test these predictions by studying the dependence of halo overdensities in cells of fixed dark matter density: measurements in simulations show that departures from the mean bias relation are strongly correlated with the nonlocal gravitationally induced fields identified by our formalism, suggesting that the halo distribution at the present time is indeed more closely related to the mass distribution at an earlier rather than present time. However, the nonlocality seen in the simulations is not fully captured by assuming local bias in Lagrangian space. The effects on nonlocal bias seen in the simulations are most important for the most biased halos, as expected from our predictions. Accounting for these

  8. Large-Scale Statistics for Cu Electromigration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauschildt, M.; Gall, M.; Hernandez, R.

    2009-06-01

    Even after the successful introduction of Cu-based metallization, the electromigration failure risk has remained one of the important reliability concerns for advanced process technologies. The observation of strong bimodality for the electron up-flow direction in dual-inlaid Cu interconnects has added complexity, but is now widely accepted. The failure voids can occur both within the via ("early" mode) or within the trench ("late" mode). More recently, bimodality has been reported also in down-flow electromigration, leading to very short lifetimes due to small, slit-shaped voids under vias. For a more thorough investigation of these early failure phenomena, specific test structures were designed based on the Wheatstone Bridge technique. The use of these structures enabled an increase of the tested sample size close to 675000, allowing a direct analysis of electromigration failure mechanisms at the single-digit ppm regime. Results indicate that down-flow electromigration exhibits bimodality at very small percentage levels, not readily identifiable with standard testing methods. The activation energy for the down-flow early failure mechanism was determined to be 0.83±0.02 eV. Within the small error bounds of this large-scale statistical experiment, this value is deemed to be significantly lower than the usually reported activation energy of 0.90 eV for electromigration-induced diffusion along Cu/SiCN interfaces. Due to the advantages of the Wheatstone Bridge technique, we were also able to expand the experimental temperature range down to 150° C, coming quite close to typical operating conditions up to 125° C. As a result of the lowered activation energy, we conclude that the down-flow early failure mode may control the chip lifetime at operating conditions. The slit-like character of the early failure void morphology also raises concerns about the validity of the Blech-effect for this mechanism. A very small amount of Cu depletion may cause failure even before a

  9. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, L. W.; Wesche, K.; Trachte, K.; Reudenbach, C.; Bendix, J.

    2016-04-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important “water tower” that provides water for nearly 40% of the world’s population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding.

  10. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures

    PubMed Central

    Lehnert, L. W.; Wesche, K.; Trachte, K.; Reudenbach, C.; Bendix, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important “water tower” that provides water for nearly 40% of the world’s population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding. PMID:27073126

  11. Climate variability rather than overstocking causes recent large scale cover changes of Tibetan pastures.

    PubMed

    Lehnert, L W; Wesche, K; Trachte, K; Reudenbach, C; Bendix, J

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP) is a globally important "water tower" that provides water for nearly 40% of the world's population. This supply function is claimed to be threatened by pasture degradation on the TP and the associated loss of water regulation functions. However, neither potential large scale degradation changes nor their drivers are known. Here, we analyse trends in a high-resolution dataset of grassland cover to determine the interactions among vegetation dynamics, climate change and human impacts on the TP. The results reveal that vegetation changes have regionally different triggers: While the vegetation cover has increased since the year 2000 in the north-eastern part of the TP due to an increase in precipitation, it has declined in the central and western parts of the TP due to rising air temperature and declining precipitation. Increasing livestock numbers as a result of land use changes exacerbated the negative trends but were not their exclusive driver. Thus, we conclude that climate variability instead of overgrazing has been the primary cause for large scale vegetation cover changes on the TP since the new millennium. Since areas of positive and negative changes are almost equal in extent, pasture degradation is not generally proceeding. PMID:27073126

  12. Development of large-scale functional brain networks in children.

    PubMed

    Supekar, Kaustubh; Musen, Mark; Menon, Vinod

    2009-07-01

    The ontogeny of large-scale functional organization of the human brain is not well understood. Here we use network analysis of intrinsic functional connectivity to characterize the organization of brain networks in 23 children (ages 7-9 y) and 22 young-adults (ages 19-22 y). Comparison of network properties, including path-length, clustering-coefficient, hierarchy, and regional connectivity, revealed that although children and young-adults' brains have similar "small-world" organization at the global level, they differ significantly in hierarchical organization and interregional connectivity. We found that subcortical areas were more strongly connected with primary sensory, association, and paralimbic areas in children, whereas young-adults showed stronger cortico-cortical connectivity between paralimbic, limbic, and association areas. Further, combined analysis of functional connectivity with wiring distance measures derived from white-matter fiber tracking revealed that the development of large-scale brain networks is characterized by weakening of short-range functional connectivity and strengthening of long-range functional connectivity. Importantly, our findings show that the dynamic process of over-connectivity followed by pruning, which rewires connectivity at the neuronal level, also operates at the systems level, helping to reconfigure and rebalance subcortical and paralimbic connectivity in the developing brain. Our study demonstrates the usefulness of network analysis of brain connectivity to elucidate key principles underlying functional brain maturation, paving the way for novel studies of disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism. PMID:19621066

  13. Large Scale Computer Simulation of Erthocyte Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Cameron; Revalee, Joel; Laradji, Mohamed

    2007-11-01

    The cell membrane is crucial to the life of the cell. Apart from partitioning the inner and outer environment of the cell, they also act as a support of complex and specialized molecular machinery, important for both the mechanical integrity of the cell, and its multitude of physiological functions. Due to its relative simplicity, the red blood cell has been a favorite experimental prototype for investigations of the structural and functional properties of the cell membrane. The erythrocyte membrane is a composite quasi two-dimensional structure composed essentially of a self-assembled fluid lipid bilayer and a polymerized protein meshwork, referred to as the cytoskeleton or membrane skeleton. In the case of the erythrocyte, the polymer meshwork is mainly composed of spectrin, anchored to the bilayer through specialized proteins. Using a coarse-grained model, recently developed by us, of self-assembled lipid membranes with implicit solvent and using soft-core potentials, we simulated large scale red-blood-cells bilayers with dimensions ˜ 10-1 μm^2, with explicit cytoskeleton. Our aim is to investigate the renormalization of the elastic properties of the bilayer due to the underlying spectrin meshwork.

  14. Large-scale carbon fiber tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A realistic release of carbon fibers was established by burning a minimum of 45 kg of carbon fiber composite aircraft structural components in each of five large scale, outdoor aviation jet fuel fire tests. This release was quantified by several independent assessments with various instruments developed specifically for these tests. The most likely values for the mass of single carbon fibers released ranged from 0.2 percent of the initial mass of carbon fiber for the source tests (zero wind velocity) to a maximum of 0.6 percent of the initial carbon fiber mass for dissemination tests (5 to 6 m/s wind velocity). Mean fiber lengths for fibers greater than 1 mm in length ranged from 2.5 to 3.5 mm. Mean diameters ranged from 3.6 to 5.3 micrometers which was indicative of significant oxidation. Footprints of downwind dissemination of the fire released fibers were measured to 19.1 km from the fire.

  15. Curvature constraints from large scale structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Dio, Enea; Montanari, Francesco; Raccanelli, Alvise; Durrer, Ruth; Kamionkowski, Marc; Lesgourgues, Julien

    2016-06-01

    We modified the CLASS code in order to include relativistic galaxy number counts in spatially curved geometries; we present the formalism and study the effect of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature. The new version of the code is now publicly available. Using a Fisher matrix analysis, we investigate how measurements of the spatial curvature parameter ΩK with future galaxy surveys are affected by relativistic effects, which influence observations of the large scale galaxy distribution. These effects include contributions from cosmic magnification, Doppler terms and terms involving the gravitational potential. As an application, we consider angle and redshift dependent power spectra, which are especially well suited for model independent cosmological constraints. We compute our results for a representative deep, wide and spectroscopic survey, and our results show the impact of relativistic corrections on spatial curvature parameter estimation. We show that constraints on the curvature parameter may be strongly biased if, in particular, cosmic magnification is not included in the analysis. Other relativistic effects turn out to be subdominant in the studied configuration. We analyze how the shift in the estimated best-fit value for the curvature and other cosmological parameters depends on the magnification bias parameter, and find that significant biases are to be expected if this term is not properly considered in the analysis.

  16. Large scale digital atlases in neuroscience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawrylycz, M.; Feng, D.; Lau, C.; Kuan, C.; Miller, J.; Dang, C.; Ng, L.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging in neuroscience has revolutionized our current understanding of brain structure, architecture and increasingly its function. Many characteristics of morphology, cell type, and neuronal circuitry have been elucidated through methods of neuroimaging. Combining this data in a meaningful, standardized, and accessible manner is the scope and goal of the digital brain atlas. Digital brain atlases are used today in neuroscience to characterize the spatial organization of neuronal structures, for planning and guidance during neurosurgery, and as a reference for interpreting other data modalities such as gene expression and connectivity data. The field of digital atlases is extensive and in addition to atlases of the human includes high quality brain atlases of the mouse, rat, rhesus macaque, and other model organisms. Using techniques based on histology, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging as well as gene expression data, modern digital atlases use probabilistic and multimodal techniques, as well as sophisticated visualization software to form an integrated product. Toward this goal, brain atlases form a common coordinate framework for summarizing, accessing, and organizing this knowledge and will undoubtedly remain a key technology in neuroscience in the future. Since the development of its flagship project of a genome wide image-based atlas of the mouse brain, the Allen Institute for Brain Science has used imaging as a primary data modality for many of its large scale atlas projects. We present an overview of Allen Institute digital atlases in neuroscience, with a focus on the challenges and opportunities for image processing and computation.

  17. Food appropriation through large scale land acquisitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulli, Maria Cristina; D'Odorico, Paolo

    2014-05-01

    The increasing demand for agricultural products and the uncertainty of international food markets has recently drawn the attention of governments and agribusiness firms toward investments in productive agricultural land, mostly in the developing world. The targeted countries are typically located in regions that have remained only marginally utilized because of lack of modern technology. It is expected that in the long run large scale land acquisitions (LSLAs) for commercial farming will bring the technology required to close the existing crops yield gaps. While the extent of the acquired land and the associated appropriation of freshwater resources have been investigated in detail, the amount of food this land can produce and the number of people it could feed still need to be quantified. Here we use a unique dataset of land deals to provide a global quantitative assessment of the rates of crop and food appropriation potentially associated with LSLAs. We show how up to 300-550 million people could be fed by crops grown in the acquired land, should these investments in agriculture improve crop production and close the yield gap. In contrast, about 190-370 million people could be supported by this land without closing of the yield gap. These numbers raise some concern because the food produced in the acquired land is typically exported to other regions, while the target countries exhibit high levels of malnourishment. Conversely, if used for domestic consumption, the crops harvested in the acquired land could ensure food security to the local populations.

  18. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  19. Large-scale wind turbine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spera, David A.

    1988-05-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to show how structural technology was applied in the design of modern wind turbines, which were recently brought to an advanced stage of development as sources of renewable power. Wind turbine structures present many difficult problems because they are relatively slender and flexible; subject to vibration and aeroelastic instabilities; acted upon by loads which are often nondeterministic; operated continuously with little maintenance in all weather; and dominated by life-cycle cost considerations. Progress in horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWT) development was paced by progress in the understanding of structural loads, modeling of structural dynamic response, and designing of innovative structural response. During the past 15 years a series of large HAWTs was developed. This has culminated in the recent completion of the world's largest operating wind turbine, the 3.2 MW Mod-5B power plane installed on the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Some of the applications of structures technology to wind turbine will be illustrated by referring to the Mod-5B design. First, a video overview will be presented to provide familiarization with the Mod-5B project and the important components of the wind turbine system. Next, the structural requirements for large-scale wind turbines will be discussed, emphasizing the difficult fatigue-life requirements. Finally, the procedures used to design the structure will be presented, including the use of the fracture mechanics approach for determining allowable fatigue stresses.

  20. Large-scale isentropic mixing properties of the Antarctic polar vortex from analyzed winds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Kenneth P.

    1993-01-01

    Winds derived from analyzed geopotential height fields are used to study quasi-horizontal mixing by the large-scale flow in the lower stratosphere during austral spring. This is the period when the Antarctic ozone hole appears and disappears. Trajectories are computed for large ensembles of particles initially inside and outside the main polar vortex. Mixing and transport are diagnosed through estimates of finite time Lyapunov exponents and Lagrangian dispersion statistics of the tracer trajectories. At 450 K and above prior to the vortex breakdown: Lyapunov exponents are a factor of 2 smaller inside the vortex than outside; diffusion coefficients are an order of magnitude smaller inside than outside the vortex; and the trajectories reveal little exchange of air across the vortex boundary. At lower levels (425 and 400 K) mixing is greater, and there is substantial exchange of air across the vortex boundary. In some years there are large wave events that expel small amounts of vortex air into the mid-latitudes. At the end of the spring season during the vortex breakdown there is rapid mixing of air across the vortex boundary, which is evident in the mixing diagnostics and the tracer trajectories.

  1. Creation of the dam for the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP by large-scale blasting: analysis of planning experience and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect

    Shuifer, M. I.; Argal, E. S.

    2012-05-15

    Results of complex instrument observations and video taping during large-scale blasts detonated for creation of the dam at the No. 2 Kambaratinskaya HPP on the Naryn River in the Kyrgyz Republic are analyzed. Tests of the energy effectiveness of the explosives are evaluated, characteristics of LSB manifestations in seismic and air waves are revealed, and the shaping and movement of the rock mass are examined. A methodological analysis of the planning and production of the LSB is given.

  2. An informal paper on large-scale dynamic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Large scale systems are defined as systems requiring more than one decision maker to control the system. Decentralized control and decomposition are discussed for large scale dynamic systems. Information and many-person decision problems are analyzed.

  3. Hierarchical features of large-scale cortical connectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Sporns, O.

    2005-12-01

    The analysis of complex networks has revealed patterns of organization in a variety of natural and artificial systems, including neuronal networks of the brain at multiple scales. In this paper, we describe a novel analysis of the large-scale connectivity between regions of the mammalian cerebral cortex, utilizing a set of hierarchical measurements proposed recently. We examine previously identified functional clusters of brain regions in macaque visual cortex and cat cortex and find significant differences between such clusters in terms of several hierarchical measures, revealing differences in how these clusters are embedded in the overall cortical architecture. For example, the ventral cluster of visual cortex maintains structurally more segregated, less divergent connections than the dorsal cluster, which may point to functionally different roles of their constituent brain regions.

  4. Sensitivity technologies for large scale simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Collis, Samuel Scott; Bartlett, Roscoe Ainsworth; Smith, Thomas Michael; Heinkenschloss, Matthias; Wilcox, Lucas C.; Hill, Judith C.; Ghattas, Omar; Berggren, Martin Olof; Akcelik, Volkan; Ober, Curtis Curry; van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf; Keiter, Eric Richard

    2005-01-01

    Sensitivity analysis is critically important to numerous analysis algorithms, including large scale optimization, uncertainty quantification,reduced order modeling, and error estimation. Our research focused on developing tools, algorithms and standard interfaces to facilitate the implementation of sensitivity type analysis into existing code and equally important, the work was focused on ways to increase the visibility of sensitivity analysis. We attempt to accomplish the first objective through the development of hybrid automatic differentiation tools, standard linear algebra interfaces for numerical algorithms, time domain decomposition algorithms and two level Newton methods. We attempt to accomplish the second goal by presenting the results of several case studies in which direct sensitivities and adjoint methods have been effectively applied, in addition to an investigation of h-p adaptivity using adjoint based a posteriori error estimation. A mathematical overview is provided of direct sensitivities and adjoint methods for both steady state and transient simulations. Two case studies are presented to demonstrate the utility of these methods. A direct sensitivity method is implemented to solve a source inversion problem for steady state internal flows subject to convection diffusion. Real time performance is achieved using novel decomposition into offline and online calculations. Adjoint methods are used to reconstruct initial conditions of a contamination event in an external flow. We demonstrate an adjoint based transient solution. In addition, we investigated time domain decomposition algorithms in an attempt to improve the efficiency of transient simulations. Because derivative calculations are at the root of sensitivity calculations, we have developed hybrid automatic differentiation methods and implemented this approach for shape optimization for gas dynamics using the Euler equations. The hybrid automatic differentiation method was applied to a first

  5. International space station. Large scale integration approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Brad

    The International Space Station is the most complex large scale integration program in development today. The approach developed for specification, subsystem development, and verification lay a firm basis on which future programs of this nature can be based. International Space Station is composed of many critical items, hardware and software, built by numerous International Partners, NASA Institutions, and U.S. Contractors and is launched over a period of five years. Each launch creates a unique configuration that must be safe, survivable, operable, and support ongoing assembly (assemblable) to arrive at the assembly complete configuration in 2003. The approaches to integrating each of the modules into a viable spacecraft and continue the assembly is a challenge in itself. Added to this challenge are the severe schedule constraints and lack of an "Iron Bird", which prevents assembly and checkout of each on-orbit configuration prior to launch. This paper will focus on the following areas: 1) Specification development process explaining how the requirements and specifications were derived using a modular concept driven by launch vehicle capability. Each module is composed of components of subsystems versus completed subsystems. 2) Approach to stage (each stage consists of the launched module added to the current on-orbit spacecraft) specifications. Specifically, how each launched module and stage ensures support of the current and future elements of the assembly. 3) Verification approach, due to the schedule constraints, is primarily analysis supported by testing. Specifically, how are the interfaces ensured to mate and function on-orbit when they cannot be mated before launch. 4) Lessons learned. Where can we improve this complex system design and integration task?

  6. Large Scale Flame Spread Environmental Characterization Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayman, Lauren K.; Olson, Sandra L.; Gokoghi, Suleyman A.; Brooker, John E.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Kacher, Henry F.

    2013-01-01

    Under the Advanced Exploration Systems (AES) Spacecraft Fire Safety Demonstration Project (SFSDP), as a risk mitigation activity in support of the development of a large-scale fire demonstration experiment in microgravity, flame-spread tests were conducted in normal gravity on thin, cellulose-based fuels in a sealed chamber. The primary objective of the tests was to measure pressure rise in a chamber as sample material, burning direction (upward/downward), total heat release, heat release rate, and heat loss mechanisms were varied between tests. A Design of Experiments (DOE) method was imposed to produce an array of tests from a fixed set of constraints and a coupled response model was developed. Supplementary tests were run without experimental design to additionally vary select parameters such as initial chamber pressure. The starting chamber pressure for each test was set below atmospheric to prevent chamber overpressure. Bottom ignition, or upward propagating burns, produced rapid acceleratory turbulent flame spread. Pressure rise in the chamber increases as the amount of fuel burned increases mainly because of the larger amount of heat generation and, to a much smaller extent, due to the increase in gaseous number of moles. Top ignition, or downward propagating burns, produced a steady flame spread with a very small flat flame across the burning edge. Steady-state pressure is achieved during downward flame spread as the pressure rises and plateaus. This indicates that the heat generation by the flame matches the heat loss to surroundings during the longer, slower downward burns. One heat loss mechanism included mounting a heat exchanger directly above the burning sample in the path of the plume to act as a heat sink and more efficiently dissipate the heat due to the combustion event. This proved an effective means for chamber overpressure mitigation for those tests producing the most total heat release and thusly was determined to be a feasible mitigation

  7. Synchronization of coupled large-scale Boolean networks

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Fangfei

    2014-03-15

    This paper investigates the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of two large-scale Boolean networks. First, the aggregation algorithm towards large-scale Boolean network is reviewed. Second, the aggregation algorithm is applied to study the complete synchronization and partial synchronization of large-scale Boolean networks. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the efficiency of the proposed results.

  8. Why large-scale seasonal streamflow forecasts are feasible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Candogan Yossef, N.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal forecasts of precipitation and temperature, using either statistical or dynamic prediction, have been around for almost 2 decades. The skill of these forecasts differ both in space and time, with highest skill in areas heavily influenced by SST anomalies such as El Nino or areas where land surface properties have a major impact on e.g. Monsoon strength, such as the vegetation cover of the Sahel region or the snow cover of the Tibetan plateau. However, the skill of seasonal forecasts is limited in most regions, with anomaly correlation coefficients varying between 0.2 and 0.5 for 1-3 month precipitation totals. This raises the question whether seasonal hydrological forecasting is feasible. Here, we make the case that it is. Using the example of statistical forecasts of NAO-strength and related precipitation anomalies over Europe, we show that the skill of large-scale streamflow forecasts is generally much higher than the precipitation forecasts itself, provided that the initial state of the system is accurately estimated. In the latter case, even the precipitation climatology can produce skillful results. This is due to the inertia of the hydrological system rooted in the storage of soil moisture, groundwater and snow pack, as corroborated by a recent study using snow observations for seasonal streamflow forecasting in the Western US. These examples seem to suggest that for accurate seasonal hydrological forecasting, correct state estimation is more important than accurate seasonal meteorological forecasts. However, large-scale estimation of hydrological states is difficult and validation of large-scale hydrological models often reveals large biases in e.g. streamflow estimates. Fortunately, as shown with a validation study of the global model PCR-GLOBWB, these biases are of less importance when seasonal forecasts are evaluated in terms of their ability to reproduce anomalous flows and extreme events, i.e. by anomaly correlations or categorical quantile

  9. Large-scale network-level processes during entrainment.

    PubMed

    Lithari, Chrysa; Sánchez-García, Carolina; Ruhnau, Philipp; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-03-15

    Visual rhythmic stimulation evokes a robust power increase exactly at the stimulation frequency, the so-called steady-state response (SSR). Localization of visual SSRs normally shows a very focal modulation of power in visual cortex and led to the treatment and interpretation of SSRs as a local phenomenon. Given the brain network dynamics, we hypothesized that SSRs have additional large-scale effects on the brain functional network that can be revealed by means of graph theory. We used rhythmic visual stimulation at a range of frequencies (4-30 Hz), recorded MEG and investigated source level connectivity across the whole brain. Using graph theoretical measures we observed a frequency-unspecific reduction of global density in the alpha band "disconnecting" visual cortex from the rest of the network. Also, a frequency-specific increase of connectivity between occipital cortex and precuneus was found at the stimulation frequency that exhibited the highest resonance (30 Hz). In conclusion, we showed that SSRs dynamically re-organized the brain functional network. These large-scale effects should be taken into account not only when attempting to explain the nature of SSRs, but also when used in various experimental designs. PMID:26835557

  10. Large-scale network-level processes during entrainment

    PubMed Central

    Lithari, Chrysa; Sánchez-García, Carolina; Ruhnau, Philipp; Weisz, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Visual rhythmic stimulation evokes a robust power increase exactly at the stimulation frequency, the so-called steady-state response (SSR). Localization of visual SSRs normally shows a very focal modulation of power in visual cortex and led to the treatment and interpretation of SSRs as a local phenomenon. Given the brain network dynamics, we hypothesized that SSRs have additional large-scale effects on the brain functional network that can be revealed by means of graph theory. We used rhythmic visual stimulation at a range of frequencies (4–30 Hz), recorded MEG and investigated source level connectivity across the whole brain. Using graph theoretical measures we observed a frequency-unspecific reduction of global density in the alpha band “disconnecting” visual cortex from the rest of the network. Also, a frequency-specific increase of connectivity between occipital cortex and precuneus was found at the stimulation frequency that exhibited the highest resonance (30 Hz). In conclusion, we showed that SSRs dynamically re-organized the brain functional network. These large-scale effects should be taken into account not only when attempting to explain the nature of SSRs, but also when used in various experimental designs. PMID:26835557

  11. Very large-scale motions in a turbulent pipe flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae Hwa; Jang, Seong Jae; Sung, Hyung Jin

    2011-11-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent pipe flow with ReD=35000 was performed to investigate the spatially coherent structures associated with very large-scale motions. The corresponding friction Reynolds number, based on pipe radius R, is R+=934, and the computational domain length is 30 R. The computed mean flow statistics agree well with previous DNS data at ReD=44000 and 24000. Inspection of the instantaneous fields and two-point correlation of the streamwise velocity fluctuations showed that the very long meandering motions exceeding 25R exist in logarithmic and wake regions, and the streamwise length scale is almost linearly increased up to y/R ~0.3, while the structures in the turbulent boundary layer only reach up to the edge of the log-layer. Time-resolved instantaneous fields revealed that the hairpin packet-like structures grow with continuous stretching along the streamwise direction and create the very large-scale structures with meandering in the spanwise direction, consistent with the previous conceptual model of Kim & Adrian (1999). This work was supported by the Creative Research Initiatives of NRF/MEST of Korea (No. 2011-0000423).

  12. Large-Scale Spacecraft Fire Safety Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Ferkul, Paul V.; Olson, Sandra; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T'ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grunde

    2014-01-01

    An international collaborative program is underway to address open issues in spacecraft fire safety. Because of limited access to long-term low-gravity conditions and the small volume generally allotted for these experiments, there have been relatively few experiments that directly study spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample sizes and environment conditions typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. The major constraint has been the size of the sample, with prior experiments limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. This lack of experimental data forces spacecraft designers to base their designs and safety precautions on 1-g understanding of flame spread, fire detection, and suppression. However, low-gravity combustion research has demonstrated substantial differences in flame behavior in low-gravity. This, combined with the differences caused by the confined spacecraft environment, necessitates practical scale spacecraft fire safety research to mitigate risks for future space missions. To address this issue, a large-scale spacecraft fire experiment is under development by NASA and an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status, and concept of this collaborative international project (Saffire). The project plan is to conduct fire safety experiments on three sequential flights of an unmanned ISS re-supply spacecraft (the Orbital Cygnus vehicle) after they have completed their delivery of cargo to the ISS and have begun their return journeys to earth. On two flights (Saffire-1 and Saffire-3), the experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter-scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. On one of the flights (Saffire-2), 9 smaller (5 x 30 cm) samples will be tested to evaluate NASAs material flammability screening tests

  13. Safety aspects of large-scale combustion of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Edeskuty, F.J.; Haugh, J.J.; Thompson, R.T.

    1986-01-01

    Recent hydrogen-safety investigations have studied the possible large-scale effects from phenomena such as the accumulation of combustible hydrogen-air mixtures in large, confined volumes. Of particular interest are safe methods for the disposal of the hydrogen and the pressures which can arise from its confined combustion. Consequently, tests of the confined combustion of hydrogen-air mixtures were conducted in a 2100 m/sup 3/ volume. These tests show that continuous combustion, as the hydrogen is generated, is a safe method for its disposal. It also has been seen that, for hydrogen concentrations up to 13 vol %, it is possible to predict maximum pressures that can occur upon ignition of premixed hydrogen-air atmospheres. In addition information has been obtained concerning the survivability of the equipment that is needed to recover from an accident involving hydrogen combustion. An accident that involved the inadvertent mixing of hydrogen and oxygen gases in a tube trailer gave evidence that under the proper conditions hydrogen combustion can transit to a detonation. If detonation occurs the pressures which can be experienced are much higher although short in duration.

  14. Large-scale climatic control on European precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavers, David; Prudhomme, Christel; Hannah, David

    2010-05-01

    Atlantic air. The Balkans' precipitation shows a linkage with the Siberian High pressure system. With the onset of spring and summer the correlation patterns shift in location and the winter correlation dipole breaks down. In summer, fewer significant correlations between the MSLP (large-scale climate) and precipitation are found across Europe. This results in smaller scale correlation patterns and possibly suggests that warm-season precipitation is predominantly generated by local or regional scale convective systems. These convective systems are not likely to be captured by large-scale atmospheric patterns of MSLP. In conclusion this research shows: 1) the detailed change in large-scale climatic control on precipitation across Europe, and 2) the geographic regions with strongest correlation between precipitation and MSLP shift from month-to-month, highlighting the dynamic nature of precipitation generating weather systems throughout the year. This study also shows that the utility of an in-situ index to describe precipitation occurrence, such as the NAO, is likely to be limited because the seasonal movements of the large-scale climate patterns are not captured.

  15. Large-scale Stratospheric Transport Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plumb, R. Alan

    2003-01-01

    The PI has undertaken a theoretical analysis of the existence and nature of compact tracer-tracer relationships of the kind observed in the stratosphere, augmented with three-dimensional model simulations of stratospheric tracers (the latter being an extension of modeling work the group did during the SOLVE experiment). This work achieves a rigorous theoretical basis for the existence and shape of these relationships, as well as a quantitative theory of their width and evolution, in terms of the joint tracer-tracer PDF distribution. A paper on this work is almost complete and will soon be submitted to Rev. Geophys. We have analyzed lower stratospheric water in simulations with an isentropic-coordinate version of the MATCH transport model which we recently helped to develop. The three-dimensional structure of lower stratospheric water, in particular, attracted our attention: dry air is, below about 400K potential temperature, localized in the regions of the west Pacific and equatorial South America. We have been analyzing air trajectories to determine how air passes through the tropopause cold trap. This work is now being completed, and a paper will be submitted to Geophys. Res. Lett. before the end of summer. We are continuing to perform experiments with the 'MATCH' CTM, in both sigma- and entropy-coordinate forms. We earlier found (in collaboration with Dr Natalie Mahowald, and as part of an NSF-funded project) that switching to isentropic coordinates made a substantial improvement to the simulation of the age of stratospheric air. We are now running experiments with near-tropopause sources in both versions of the model, to see if and to what extent the simulation of stratosphere-troposphere transport is dependent on the model coordinate. Personnel Research is supervised by the PI, Prof. Alan Plumb. Mr William Heres conducts the tracer modeling work and performs other modeling tasks. Two graduate students, Ms Irene Lee and Mr Michael Ring, have been participating

  16. Training pilots to visualize large-scale spatial relationships in a stereoscopic display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mowafy, Lyn; Thurman, Richard A.

    1993-09-01

    In flying air intercepts, a fighter pilot must plan most tactical maneuvers well before acquiring visual contact. Success depends on one's ability to create an accurate mental model of dynamic 3D spatial relationships from 2D information displays. This paper describes an Air Force training program for visualizing large- scale dynamic spatial relationships. It employs a low-cost, portable system in which the helmet-mounted stereoscopic display reveals the unobservable spatial relationships in a virtual world. We also describe recent research which evaluated the training effectiveness of this interactive three-dimensional display technology. Three display formats have been tested for their impact on the pilot's ability to encode, retain and recall functionally relevant spatial information: (1) a set of 2D orthographic plan views, (2) a flat panel 3D perspective rendering and, (3) the 3D virtual environment. Trainees flew specified air intercepts and reviewed the flights in one of the display formats. Experts' trajectories were provided for comparison. After training, flight performance was tested on a new set of scenarios. Differences in pilots' performances under the three formats suggest how virtual environment displays can aid people learning to visualize 3D spatial relationships from 2D information.

  17. Population generation for large-scale simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannon, Andrew C.; King, Gary; Morrison, Clayton; Galstyan, Aram; Cohen, Paul

    2005-05-01

    Computer simulation is used to research phenomena ranging from the structure of the space-time continuum to population genetics and future combat.1-3 Multi-agent simulations in particular are now commonplace in many fields.4, 5 By modeling populations whose complex behavior emerges from individual interactions, these simulations help to answer questions about effects where closed form solutions are difficult to solve or impossible to derive.6 To be useful, simulations must accurately model the relevant aspects of the underlying domain. In multi-agent simulation, this means that the modeling must include both the agents and their relationships. Typically, each agent can be modeled as a set of attributes drawn from various distributions (e.g., height, morale, intelligence and so forth). Though these can interact - for example, agent height is related to agent weight - they are usually independent. Modeling relations between agents, on the other hand, adds a new layer of complexity, and tools from graph theory and social network analysis are finding increasing application.7, 8 Recognizing the role and proper use of these techniques, however, remains the subject of ongoing research. We recently encountered these complexities while building large scale social simulations.9-11 One of these, the Hats Simulator, is designed to be a lightweight proxy for intelligence analysis problems. Hats models a "society in a box" consisting of many simple agents, called hats. Hats gets its name from the classic spaghetti western, in which the heroes and villains are known by the color of the hats they wear. The Hats society also has its heroes and villains, but the challenge is to identify which color hat they should be wearing based on how they behave. There are three types of hats: benign hats, known terrorists, and covert terrorists. Covert terrorists look just like benign hats but act like terrorists. Population structure can make covert hat identification significantly more

  18. The variability of winter high temperature extremes in Romania and its relationship with large-scale atmospheric circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimbu, N.; Stefan, S.; Necula, C.

    2015-07-01

    The frequency variability of extreme high winter temperature as recorded at 85 meteorological stations from Romania during 1962-2010 period and its relationship with large-scale atmospheric circulation was investigated. An Empirical Orthogonal Function analysis reveals that large part of the extreme temperature frequency variability is common to all stations suggesting a strong influence of large-scale circulation anomalies. The North Atlantic Oscillation, West Pacific, East Atlantic, and Scandinavian patterns are related with extreme temperature frequency variability. We show that the East Atlantic Oscillation controls a significant part of interannual extreme high temperature variability over Romania via advection of warm air from the west. In addition, a strong relationship between blocking activity and frequency of extreme high temperature events in Romania was found. High blocking activity in the (20°W-70°E) sector is related with relatively strong advection of cold air over the country during winter. On the other hand, low blocking activity in the same sector is related with weak advection of relatively cold air in the region. Moreover, the blocking frequency in this sector is modulated mainly by the East Atlantic Oscillation.

  19. The large-scale radio structure of R Aquarii

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Michalitsianos, A. G.; Oliversen, R. J.; Yusef-Zadeh, F.; Kafatos, M.

    1987-01-01

    Radio continuum observations of the R Aqr symbiotic star system, using the compact D configuration of the VLA at 6-cm wavelength, reveal a large-scale about 2-arcmin structure engulfing the binary, which has long been known to have a similar optical nebula. This optical/radio nebula possesses about 4 x 10 to the 42nd ergs of kinetic energy which is typical of a recurrent nova outburst. Moreover, a cluster of a dozen additional 6-cm radio sources were observed in proximity to R Aqr, most of these discrete sources lie about 3 arcmin south and/or west of R Aqr and, coupled with previous 20-cm data, spectral indices limits suggest a thermal nature for some of these sources. If the thermal members of the cluster are associated with R Aqr, it may indicate a prehistoric eruption of the system's suspected recurrent nova. The nonthermal cluster members may be extragalactic background radio sources.

  20. Large scale motions of thermal transport in a turbulent channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dharmarathne, Suranga; Tutkun, Murat; Araya, Guillermo; Leonardi, Stefano; Castillo, Luciano

    2015-11-01

    The importance of large scale motions (LSMs) on thermal transport in a turbulent channel flow at friction number of 394 is investigated. Two-point correlation analysis reveals that LSM which significantly contribute to turbulence kinetic energy and scalar transport is a reminiscent of a hairpin packet. Low-order mode representation of the original fields using proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) unveils that the most dominant mode that transports is 3-4 channel half-heights long and such structure which contribute to scalar transport is 2-4 channel half-heights long. Consequently, the study discloses that LSMs are effective in transporting both streamwise component of turbulence kinetic energy and scalar variances.

  1. Successful Physician Training Program for Large Scale EMR Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, L.A.; Mailes, E.S.; Goad, B.A.; Longhurst, C.A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary End-user training is an essential element of electronic medical record (EMR) implementation and frequently suffers from minimal institutional investment. In addition, discussion of successful EMR training programs for physicians is limited in the literature. The authors describe a successful physician-training program at Stanford Children’s Health as part of a large scale EMR implementation. Evaluations of classroom training, obtained at the conclusion of each class, revealed high physician satisfaction with the program. Free-text comments from learners focused on duration and timing of training, the learning environment, quality of the instructors, and specificity of training to their role or department. Based upon participant feedback and institutional experience, best practice recommendations, including physician engagement, curricular design, and assessment of proficiency and recognition, are suggested for future provider EMR training programs. The authors strongly recommend the creation of coursework to group providers by common workflow. PMID:25848415

  2. Multitree Algorithms for Large-Scale Astrostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    March, William B.; Ozakin, Arkadas; Lee, Dongryeol; Riegel, Ryan; Gray, Alexander G.

    2012-03-01

    this number every week, resulting in billions of objects. At such scales, even linear-time analysis operations present challenges, particularly since statistical analyses are inherently interactive processes, requiring that computations complete within some reasonable human attention span. The quadratic (or worse) runtimes of straightforward implementations become quickly unbearable. Examples of applications. These analysis subroutines occur ubiquitously in astrostatistical work. We list just a few examples. The need to cross-match objects across different catalogs has led to various algorithms, which at some point perform an AllNN computation. 2-point and higher-order spatial correlations for the basis of spatial statistics, and are utilized in astronomy to compare the spatial structures of two datasets, such as an observed sample and a theoretical sample, for example, forming the basis for two-sample hypothesis testing. Friends-of-friends clustering is often used to identify halos in data from astrophysical simulations. Minimum spanning tree properties have also been proposed as statistics of large-scale structure. Comparison of the distributions of different kinds of objects requires accurate density estimation, for which KDE is the overall statistical method of choice. The prediction of redshifts from optical data requires accurate regression, for which kernel regression is a powerful method. The identification of objects of various types in astronomy, such as stars versus galaxies, requires accurate classification, for which KDA is a powerful method. Overview. In this chapter, we will briefly sketch the main ideas behind recent fast algorithms which achieve, for example, linear runtimes for pairwise-distance problems, or similarly dramatic reductions in computational growth. In some cases, the runtime orders for these algorithms are mathematically provable statements, while in others we have only conjectures backed by experimental observations for the time being

  3. The role of large-scale, extratropical dynamics in climate change

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, T.G.

    1994-02-01

    The climate modeling community has focused recently on improving our understanding of certain processes, such as cloud feedbacks and ocean circulation, that are deemed critical to climate-change prediction. Although attention to such processes is warranted, emphasis on these areas has diminished a general appreciation of the role played by the large-scale dynamics of the extratropical atmosphere. Lack of interest in extratropical dynamics may reflect the assumption that these dynamical processes are a non-problem as far as climate modeling is concerned, since general circulation models (GCMs) calculate motions on this scale from first principles. Nevertheless, serious shortcomings in our ability to understand and simulate large-scale dynamics exist. Partly due to a paucity of standard GCM diagnostic calculations of large-scale motions and their transports of heat, momentum, potential vorticity, and moisture, a comprehensive understanding of the role of large-scale dynamics in GCM climate simulations has not been developed. Uncertainties remain in our understanding and simulation of large-scale extratropical dynamics and their interaction with other climatic processes, such as cloud feedbacks, large-scale ocean circulation, moist convection, air-sea interaction and land-surface processes. To address some of these issues, the 17th Stanstead Seminar was convened at Bishop`s University in Lennoxville, Quebec. The purpose of the Seminar was to promote discussion of the role of large-scale extratropical dynamics in global climate change. Abstracts of the talks are included in this volume. On the basis of these talks, several key issues emerged concerning large-scale extratropical dynamics and their climatic role. Individual records are indexed separately for the database.

  4. Probes of large-scale structure in the universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suto, Yasushi; Gorski, Krzysztof; Juszkiewicz, Roman; Silk, Joseph

    1988-01-01

    A general formalism is developed which shows that the gravitational instability theory for the origin of the large-scale structure of the universe is now capable of critically confronting observational results on cosmic background radiation angular anisotropies, large-scale bulk motions, and large-scale clumpiness in the galaxy counts. The results indicate that presently advocated cosmological models will have considerable difficulty in simultaneously explaining the observational results.

  5. Penetration of Large Scale Electric Field to Inner Magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S. H.; Fok, M. C. H.; Sibeck, D. G.; Wygant, J. R.; Spence, H. E.; Larsen, B.; Reeves, G. D.; Funsten, H. O.

    2015-12-01

    simulations reveal alternating penetration and shielding electric fields during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm, indicating an impulsive nature of the large scale penetrating electric field in regulating the gain and loss of radiation belt particles. We will present the statistical analysis and simulations results.

  6. Large-scale reconstruction and phylogenetic analysis of metabolic environments

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein, Elhanan; Kupiec, Martin; Feldman, Marcus W.; Ruppin, Eytan

    2008-01-01

    The topology of metabolic networks may provide important insights not only into the metabolic capacity of species, but also into the habitats in which they evolved. Here we introduce the concept of a metabolic network's “seed set”—the set of compounds that, based on the network topology, are exogenously acquired—and provide a methodological framework to computationally infer the seed set of a given network. Such seed sets form ecological “interfaces” between metabolic networks and their surroundings, approximating the effective biochemical environment of each species. Analyzing the metabolic networks of 478 species and identifying the seed set of each species, we present a comprehensive large-scale reconstruction of such predicted metabolic environments. The seed sets' composition significantly correlates with several basic properties characterizing the species' environments and agrees with biological observations concerning major adaptations. Species whose environments are highly predictable (e.g., obligate parasites) tend to have smaller seed sets than species living in variable environments. Phylogenetic analysis of the seed sets reveals the complex dynamics governing gain and loss of seeds across the phylogenetic tree and the process of transition between seed and non-seed compounds. Our findings suggest that the seed state is transient and that seeds tend either to be dropped completely from the network or to become non-seed compounds relatively fast. The seed sets also permit a successful reconstruction of a phylogenetic tree of life. The “reverse ecology” approach presented lays the foundations for studying the evolutionary interplay between organisms and their habitats on a large scale. PMID:18787117

  7. The Large-scale Component of Mantle Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cserepes, L.

    Circulation in the Earth's mantle occurs on multiple spatial scales: this review dis- cusses the character of its large-scale or global components. Direct and strong evi- dence concerning the global flow comes, first of all, from the pattern of plate motion. Further indirect observational data which can be transformed into flow velocities by the equation of motion are the internal density heterogeneities revealed by seismic to- mography, and the geoid can also be used as an observational constraint. Due to their limited spatial resolution, global tomographic data automatically filter out the small- scale features and are therefore relevant to the global flow pattern. Flow solutions obtained from tomographic models, using the plate motion as boundary condition, re- veal that subduction is the downwelling of the global mantle circulation and that the deep-rooted upwellings are concentrated in 2-3 superplumes. Spectral analysis of the tomographic heterogeneities shows that the power of global flow appears dominantly in the lowest spherical harmonic orders 2-5. Theoretical convection calculations con- tribute substantially to the understanding of global flow. If basal heating of the mantle is significant, numerical models can reproduce the basic 2 to 5 cell pattern of con- vection even without the inclusion of surface plates. If plates are superimposed on the solution with their present arrangement and motion, the dominance of these low spherical harmonic orders is more pronounced. The cells are not necessarily closed, rather they show chaotic time-dependence, but they are normally bordered by long downwelling features, and they have usually a single superplume in the cell interior. Swarms of small plumes can develop in the large cells, especially when convection is partially layered due to an internal boundary such as the 670 km discontinuity (source of small plumes). These small plumes are usually tilted by the background large-scale flow which shows that they are

  8. GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED SALTSTONE FACILITY

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S

    2008-05-28

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods have been used to estimate the flow patterns mainly driven by temperature gradients inside vapor space in a large-scaled Saltstone vault facility at Savannah River site (SRS). The purpose of this work is to examine the gas motions inside the vapor space under the current vault configurations by taking a three-dimensional transient momentum-energy coupled approach for the vapor space domain of the vault. The modeling calculations were based on prototypic vault geometry and expected normal operating conditions as defined by Waste Solidification Engineering. The modeling analysis was focused on the air flow patterns near the ventilated corner zones of the vapor space inside the Saltstone vault. The turbulence behavior and natural convection mechanism used in the present model were benchmarked against the literature information and theoretical results. The verified model was applied to the Saltstone vault geometry for the transient assessment of the air flow patterns inside the vapor space of the vault region using the potential operating conditions. The baseline model considered two cases for the estimations of the flow patterns within the vapor space. One is the reference nominal case. The other is for the negative temperature gradient between the roof inner and top grout surface temperatures intended for the potential bounding condition. The flow patterns of the vapor space calculated by the CFD model demonstrate that the ambient air comes into the vapor space of the vault through the lower-end ventilation hole, and it gets heated up by the Benard-cell type circulation before leaving the vault via the higher-end ventilation hole. The calculated results are consistent with the literature information. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  9. Stochastic pattern transitions in large scale swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, Ira; Lindley, Brandon; Mier-Y-Teran, Luis

    2013-03-01

    We study the effects of time dependent noise and discrete, randomly distributed time delays on the dynamics of a large coupled system of self-propelling particles. Bifurcation analysis on a mean field approximation of the system reveals that the system possesses patterns with certain universal characteristics that depend on distinguished moments of the time delay distribution. We show both theoretically and numerically that although bifurcations of simple patterns, such as translations, change stability only as a function of the first moment of the time delay distribution, more complex bifurcating patterns depend on all of the moments of the delay distribution. In addition, we show that for sufficiently large values of the coupling strength and/or the mean time delay, there is a noise intensity threshold, dependent on the delay distribution width, that forces a transition of the swarm from a misaligned state into an aligned state. We show that this alignment transition exhibits hysteresis when the noise intensity is taken to be time dependent. Research supported by the Office of Naval Research

  10. Biomimetic gas sensors for large-scale drying of wood particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paczkowski, Sebastian; Sauerwald, Tilman; Weiß, Alexander; Bauer, Marco; Kohl, Dieter; Schütz, Stefan

    2011-04-01

    The sensitivity and selectivity of insect antennae are evolutionary tuned to specific needs of the insect. The Australian pyrophilic beetle Merimna atrata needs freshly heated wood to bring up its offspring and, consequently, shows a very high sensitivity to volatiles specific for wood-fires and heated wood. Volatile organic compounds released by wood particles heated at different temperatures were collected. Parallel trace analytical examination and antennal responses of the pyrophilic beetles to volatiles released by the wood reveal a highly differentiated detection system of these insects for early and late products of wood fires. This enabled a selection of marker compounds used by insects since several million years for the discrimination of different stages of wood fires. In the industrial production of engineered wood such as particle boards, wooden particles are dried in large-scale high temperature dryers. Air temperatures between 150-600°C are essential for the required material flow in the particle board production. Despite the resulting energy-efficiency of high temperature drying, high temperatures are avoided because of the increased risk of spontaneous combustion. Losses in productivity caused by fire have a strong impact on the whole production system. In order to raise the drying temperature without risking a fire, it is important to develop a monitoring system that will reliably detect early fire stages by their characteristic volatile pattern. Thus, perception filters and evaluation algorithms of pyrophilic insects can provide blue prints for biomimetic gas sensors for large-scale drying of wood particles. Especially tungsten oxide sensor elements exhibit a high sensitivity to some of the key substances. Their high sensitivity and selectivity to terpenes and aldehydes in combination with high sensitivity and selectivity of tin oxide sensor elements to hydroxylated and phenolic compounds, both showing low cross-reactivity with water and carbon

  11. Large-scale Changes in Marine Fog in a Warmer Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, H.; Koshiro, T.; Endo, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine fog especially over the mid-latitude ocean is an important target in climate simulation because it affects maritime traffic in human lives and the sky obscuring marine fog is a contributor to the earth radiation budget due to its significant coverage. The purpose of the present study is to reveal global-scale changes in marine fog in a warmer climate. The changes in marine fog with climate change are investigated using AMIP, AMIP4K (where a uniform +4 K SST is added to the AMIP SSTs), and AMIPfuture (where a patterned SST perturbation is added to the AMIP SSTs) experiment data simulated by the MRI-CGCM3 (Yukimoto et al. 2012), which was used for CMIP5 runs. First, the representation of the fog in the model was examined using ship observation data and cloud mask data retrieved from CALIPSO satellite data (Kawai et al. 2015). The comparison showed that the MRI-CGCM3 can represent the climatological global distribution of marine fog relatively well. Basically marine fog represented by the model is warm air advection fog, and it was found that the change in the horizontal temperature advection near the surface mostly determines the changes in marine fog in a warmer climate. Therefore, the changes in marine fog can be almost explained by the large-scale circulation changes. On the other hand, in-cloud LWC (liquid water content) of the fog is consistently increased in a warmer climate for the same horizontal surface temperature advection. The changes in mid-latitude marine fog in both the northern and southern hemispheres and for both summer and winter seasons are discussed in connection with the large-scale circulation changes.

  12. INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP ON LARGE-SCALE REFORESTATION: PROCEEDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of the workshop was to identify major operational and ecological considerations needed to successfully conduct large-scale reforestation projects throughout the forested regions of the world. Large-scale" for this workshop means projects where, by human effort, approx...

  13. Using Large-Scale Assessment Scores to Determine Student Grades

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tess

    2013-01-01

    Many Canadian provinces provide guidelines for teachers to determine students' final grades by combining a percentage of students' scores from provincial large-scale assessments with their term scores. This practice is thought to hold students accountable by motivating them to put effort into completing the large-scale assessment, thereby…

  14. The Challenge of Large-Scale Literacy Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levin, Ben

    2010-01-01

    This paper discusses the challenge of making large-scale improvements in literacy in schools across an entire education system. Despite growing interest and rhetoric, there are very few examples of sustained, large-scale change efforts around school-age literacy. The paper reviews 2 instances of such efforts, in England and Ontario. After…

  15. Large-scale anisotropy of the cosmic-ray muon flux in Kamiokande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munakata, K.; Kiuchi, T.; Yasue, S.; Kato, C.; Mori, S.; Hirata, K. S.; Kihara, K.; Oyama, Y.; Mori, M.; Fujita, K.; Hatakeyama, S.; Koga, M.; Maruyama, T.; Suzuki, A.; Ishizuka, T.; Miyano, K.; Okazawa, H.; Fukuda, Y.; Hayakawa, T.; Inoue, K.; Ishihara, K.; Ishino, H.; Joukou, S.; Kajita, T.; Kasuga, S.; Koshio, Y.; Kumita, T.; Matsumoto, K.; Nakahata, M.; Nakamura, K.; Okumura, K.; Sakai, A.; Shiozawa, M.; Suzuki, J.; Suzuki, Y.; Tomoeda, T.; Totsuka, Y.; Horiuchi, T.; Nishijima, K.; Koshiba, M.; Suda, T.; Suzuki, A. T.; Hara, T.; Nagashima, Y.; Takita, M.; Yamaguchi, T.; Hayato, Y.; Kaneyuki, K.; Suzuki, T.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanimori, T.; Tasaka, S.; Ichihara, E.; Miyamoto, S.; Nishikawa, K.

    1997-07-01

    The large-scale anisotropy of cosmic-ray primaries in the celestial coordinate was studied using cosmic-ray muons recorded in a large water Cherenkov detector, Kamiokande. The right-ascension distribution of the muon arrival directions deviated from an isotropic distribution with a 2.8 standard deviation, and agreed well with the first harmonics with an amplitude of (5.6+/-1.9)×10-4 and a phase of 8.0°+/-19.1°. This is the deepest underground observation of the large-scale anisotropy of cosmic rays, and agrees with observations with other underground experiments and extensive air-shower array experiments.

  16. 78 FR 11632 - Record of Decision for Land Acquisition and Airspace Establishment To Support Large-Scale Marine...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ...-Scale Marine Air Ground Task Force Live- Fire and Maneuver Training at the Marine Corps Air Ground... decision to establish a large-scale Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) training facility at the Marine... Marine Expeditionary Brigade (MEB)-sized MAGTF, including full-scale MEB Exercises and associated...

  17. Large-scale epitaxial growth kinetics of graphene: A kinetic Monte Carlo study

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huijun; Hou, Zhonghuai

    2015-08-28

    Epitaxial growth via chemical vapor deposition is considered to be the most promising way towards synthesizing large area graphene with high quality. However, it remains a big theoretical challenge to reveal growth kinetics with atomically energetic and large-scale spatial information included. Here, we propose a minimal kinetic Monte Carlo model to address such an issue on an active catalyst surface with graphene/substrate lattice mismatch, which facilitates us to perform large scale simulations of the growth kinetics over two dimensional surface with growth fronts of complex shapes. A geometry-determined large-scale growth mechanism is revealed, where the rate-dominating event is found to be C{sub 1}-attachment for concave growth-front segments and C{sub 5}-attachment for others. This growth mechanism leads to an interesting time-resolved growth behavior which is well consistent with that observed in a recent scanning tunneling microscopy experiment.

  18. Distribution probability of large-scale landslides in central Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timilsina, Manita; Bhandary, Netra P.; Dahal, Ranjan Kumar; Yatabe, Ryuichi

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale landslides in the Himalaya are defined as huge, deep-seated landslide masses that occurred in the geological past. They are widely distributed in the Nepal Himalaya. The steep topography and high local relief provide high potential for such failures, whereas the dynamic geology and adverse climatic conditions play a key role in the occurrence and reactivation of such landslides. The major geoscientific problems related with such large-scale landslides are 1) difficulties in their identification and delineation, 2) sources of small-scale failures, and 3) reactivation. Only a few scientific publications have been published concerning large-scale landslides in Nepal. In this context, the identification and quantification of large-scale landslides and their potential distribution are crucial. Therefore, this study explores the distribution of large-scale landslides in the Lesser Himalaya. It provides simple guidelines to identify large-scale landslides based on their typical characteristics and using a 3D schematic diagram. Based on the spatial distribution of landslides, geomorphological/geological parameters and logistic regression, an equation of large-scale landslide distribution is also derived. The equation is validated by applying it to another area. For the new area, the area under the receiver operating curve of the landslide distribution probability in the new area is 0.699, and a distribution probability value could explain > 65% of existing landslides. Therefore, the regression equation can be applied to areas of the Lesser Himalaya of central Nepal with similar geological and geomorphological conditions.

  19. Bio-Inspired Wooden Actuators for Large Scale Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules. PMID:25835386

  20. Silver nanoparticles: Large scale solvothermal synthesis and optical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Wani, Irshad A.; Khatoon, Sarvari; Ganguly, Aparna; Ahmed, Jahangeer; Ganguli, Ashok K.; Ahmad, Tokeer

    2010-08-15

    Silver nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a simple and modified solvothermal method at large scale using ethanol as the refluxing solvent and NaBH{sub 4} as reducing agent. The nanopowder was investigated by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), UV-visible and BET surface area studies. XRD studies reveal the monophasic nature of these highly crystalline silver nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopic studies show the monodisperse and highly uniform nanoparticles of silver of the particle size of 5 nm, however, the size is found to be 7 nm using dynamic light scattering which is in good agreement with the TEM and X-ray line broadening studies. The surface area was found to be 34.5 m{sup 2}/g. UV-visible studies show the absorption band at {approx}425 nm due to surface plasmon resonance. The percentage yield of silver nanoparticles was found to be as high as 98.5%.

  1. Bio-inspired wooden actuators for large scale applications.

    PubMed

    Rüggeberg, Markus; Burgert, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Implementing programmable actuation into materials and structures is a major topic in the field of smart materials. In particular the bilayer principle has been employed to develop actuators that respond to various kinds of stimuli. A multitude of small scale applications down to micrometer size have been developed, but up-scaling remains challenging due to either limitations in mechanical stiffness of the material or in the manufacturing processes. Here, we demonstrate the actuation of wooden bilayers in response to changes in relative humidity, making use of the high material stiffness and a good machinability to reach large scale actuation and application. Amplitude and response time of the actuation were measured and can be predicted and controlled by adapting the geometry and the constitution of the bilayers. Field tests in full weathering conditions revealed long-term stability of the actuation. The potential of the concept is shown by a first demonstrator. With the sensor and actuator intrinsically incorporated in the wooden bilayers, the daily change in relative humidity is exploited for an autonomous and solar powered movement of a tracker for solar modules. PMID:25835386

  2. Functional interactions between large-scale networks during memory search.

    PubMed

    Kragel, James E; Polyn, Sean M

    2015-03-01

    Neuroimaging studies have identified two major large-scale brain networks, the default mode network (DMN) and the dorsal attention network (DAN), which are engaged for internally and externally directed cognitive tasks respectively, and which show anticorrelated activity during cognitively demanding tests and at rest. We identified these brain networks using independent component analysis (ICA) of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, and examined their interactions during the free-recall task, a self-initiated memory search task in which retrieval is performed in the absence of external cues. Despite the internally directed nature of the task, the DAN showed transient engagement in the seconds leading up to successful retrieval. ICA revealed a fractionation of the DMN into 3 components. A posteromedial network increased engagement during memory search, while the two others showed suppressed activity during memory search. Cooperative interactions between this posteromedial network, a right-lateralized frontoparietal control network, and a medial prefrontal network were maintained during memory search. The DAN demonstrated heterogeneous task-dependent shifts in functional coupling with various subnetworks within the DMN. This functional reorganization suggests a broader role of the DAN in the absence of externally directed cognition, and highlights the contribution of the posteromedial network to episodic retrieval. PMID:24084128

  3. Can global hydrological models reproduce large scale river flood regimes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisner, Stephanie; Flörke, Martina

    2013-04-01

    River flooding remains one of the most severe natural hazards. On the one hand, major flood events pose a serious threat to human well-being, causing deaths and considerable economic damage. On the other hand, the periodic occurrence of flood pulses is crucial to maintain the functioning of riverine floodplains and wetlands, and to preserve the ecosystem services the latter provide. In many regions, river floods reveal a distinct seasonality, i.e. they occur at a particular time during the year. This seasonality is related to regionally dominant flood generating processes which can be expressed in river flood types. While in data-rich regions (esp. Europe and North America) the analysis of flood regimes can be based on observed river discharge time series, this data is sparse or lacking in many other regions of the world. This gap of knowledge can be filled by global modeling approaches. However, to date most global modeling studies have focused on mean annual or monthly water availability and their change over time while simulating discharge extremes, both floods and droughts, still remains a challenge for large scale hydrological models. This study will explore the ability of the global hydrological model WaterGAP3 to simulate the large scale patterns of river flood regimes, represented by seasonal pattern and the dominant flood type. WaterGAP3 simulates the global terrestrial water balance on a 5 arc minute spatial grid (excluding Greenland and Antarctica) at a daily time step. The model accounts for human interference on river flow, i.e. water abstraction for various purposes, e.g. irrigation, and flow regulation by large dams and reservoirs. Our analysis will provide insight in the general ability of global hydrological models to reproduce river flood regimes and thus will promote the creation of a global map of river flood regimes to provide a spatially inclusive and comprehensive picture. Understanding present-day flood regimes can support both flood risk

  4. Strategies for Interactive Visualization of Large Scale Climate Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, J.; Chen, C.; Ma, K.; Parvis

    2011-12-01

    With the advances in computational methods and supercomputing technology, climate scientists are able to perform large-scale simulations at unprecedented resolutions. These simulations produce data that are time-varying, multivariate, and volumetric, and the data may contain thousands of time steps with each time step having billions of voxels and each voxel recording dozens of variables. Visualizing such time-varying 3D data to examine correlations between different variables thus becomes a daunting task. We have been developing strategies for interactive visualization and correlation analysis of multivariate data. The primary task is to find connection and correlation among data. Given the many complex interactions among the Earth's oceans, atmosphere, land, ice and biogeochemistry, and the sheer size of observational and climate model data sets, interactive exploration helps identify which processes matter most for a particular climate phenomenon. We may consider time-varying data as a set of samples (e.g., voxels or blocks), each of which is associated with a vector of representative or collective values over time. We refer to such a vector as a temporal curve. Correlation analysis thus operates on temporal curves of data samples. A temporal curve can be treated as a two-dimensional function where the two dimensions are time and data value. It can also be treated as a point in the high-dimensional space. In this case, to facilitate effective analysis, it is often necessary to transform temporal curve data from the original space to a space of lower dimensionality. Clustering and segmentation of temporal curve data in the original or transformed space provides us a way to categorize and visualize data of different patterns, which reveals connection or correlation of data among different variables or at different spatial locations. We have employed the power of GPU to enable interactive correlation visualization for studying the variability and correlations of a

  5. Needs, opportunities, and options for large scale systems research

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, G.L.

    1984-10-01

    The Office of Energy Research was recently asked to perform a study of Large Scale Systems in order to facilitate the development of a true large systems theory. It was decided to ask experts in the fields of electrical engineering, chemical engineering and manufacturing/operations research for their ideas concerning large scale systems research. The author was asked to distribute a questionnaire among these experts to find out their opinions concerning recent accomplishments and future research directions in large scale systems research. He was also requested to convene a conference which included three experts in each area as panel members to discuss the general area of large scale systems research. The conference was held on March 26--27, 1984 in Pittsburgh with nine panel members, and 15 other attendees. The present report is a summary of the ideas presented and the recommendations proposed by the attendees.

  6. Large scale suppression of scalar power on a spatial condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouwn, Seyen; Kwon, O.-Kab; Oh, Phillial

    2015-03-01

    We consider a deformed single-field inflation model in terms of three SO(3) symmetric moduli fields. We find that spatially linear solutions for the moduli fields induce a phase transition during the early stage of the inflation and the suppression of scalar power spectrum at large scales. This suppression can be an origin of anomalies for large-scale perturbation modes in the cosmological observation.

  7. Interpretation of large-scale deviations from the Hubble flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinstein, B.; Politzer, H. David; Rey, S.-J.; Wise, Mark B.

    1987-03-01

    The theoretical expectation for large-scale streaming velocities relative to the Hubble flow is expressed in terms of statistical correlation functions. Only for objects that trace the mass would these velocities have a simple cosmological interpretation. If some biasing effects the objects' formation, then nonlinear gravitational evolution is essential to predicting the expected large-scale velocities, which also depend on the nature of the biasing.

  8. Large-scale motions in a plane wall jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnanamanickam, Ebenezer; Jonathan, Latim; Shibani, Bhatt

    2015-11-01

    The dynamic significance of large-scale motions in turbulent boundary layers have been the focus of several recent studies, primarily focussing on canonical flows - zero pressure gradient boundary layers, flows within pipes and channels. This work presents an investigation into the large-scale motions in a boundary layer that is used as the prototypical flow field for flows with large-scale mixing and reactions, the plane wall jet. An experimental investigation is carried out in a plane wall jet facility designed to operate at friction Reynolds numbers Reτ > 1000 , which allows for the development of a significant logarithmic region. The streamwise turbulent intensity across the boundary layer is decomposed into small-scale (less than one integral length-scale δ) and large-scale components. The small-scale energy has a peak in the near-wall region associated with the near-wall turbulent cycle as in canonical boundary layers. However, eddies of large-scales are the dominating eddies having significantly higher energy, than the small-scales across almost the entire boundary layer even at the low to moderate Reynolds numbers under consideration. The large-scales also appear to amplitude and frequency modulate the smaller scales across the entire boundary layer.

  9. The large-scale landslide risk classification in catchment scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Che-Hsin; Wu, Tingyeh; Chen, Lien-Kuang; Lin, Sheng-Chi

    2013-04-01

    The landslide disasters caused heavy casualties during Typhoon Morakot, 2009. This disaster is defined as largescale landslide due to the casualty numbers. This event also reflects the survey on large-scale landslide potential is so far insufficient and significant. The large-scale landslide potential analysis provides information about where should be focused on even though it is very difficult to distinguish. Accordingly, the authors intend to investigate the methods used by different countries, such as Hong Kong, Italy, Japan and Switzerland to clarify the assessment methodology. The objects include the place with susceptibility of rock slide and dip slope and the major landslide areas defined from historical records. Three different levels of scales are confirmed necessarily from country to slopeland, which are basin, catchment, and slope scales. Totally ten spots were classified with high large-scale landslide potential in the basin scale. The authors therefore focused on the catchment scale and employ risk matrix to classify the potential in this paper. The protected objects and large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio are two main indexes to classify the large-scale landslide risk. The protected objects are the constructions and transportation facilities. The large-scale landslide susceptibility ratio is based on the data of major landslide area and dip slope and rock slide areas. Totally 1,040 catchments are concerned and are classified into three levels, which are high, medium, and low levels. The proportions of high, medium, and low levels are 11%, 51%, and 38%, individually. This result represents the catchments with high proportion of protected objects or large-scale landslide susceptibility. The conclusion is made and it be the base material for the slopeland authorities when considering slopeland management and the further investigation.

  10. Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Nuclear Physics Research

    SciTech Connect

    Gerber, Richard A.; Wasserman, Harvey J.

    2012-03-02

    IThe National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) is the primary computing center for the DOE Office of Science, serving approximately 4,000 users and hosting some 550 projects that involve nearly 700 codes for a wide variety of scientific disciplines. In addition to large-scale computing resources NERSC provides critical staff support and expertise to help scientists make the most efficient use of these resources to advance the scientific mission of the Office of Science. In May 2011, NERSC, DOE’s Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (ASCR) and DOE’s Office of Nuclear Physics (NP) held a workshop to characterize HPC requirements for NP research over the next three to five years. The effort is part of NERSC’s continuing involvement in anticipating future user needs and deploying necessary resources to meet these demands. The workshop revealed several key requirements, in addition to achieving its goal of characterizing NP computing. The key requirements include: 1. Larger allocations of computational resources at NERSC; 2. Visualization and analytics support; and 3. Support at NERSC for the unique needs of experimental nuclear physicists. This report expands upon these key points and adds others. The results are based upon representative samples, called “case studies,” of the needs of science teams within NP. The case studies were prepared by NP workshop participants and contain a summary of science goals, methods of solution, current and future computing requirements, and special software and support needs. Participants were also asked to describe their strategy for computing in the highly parallel, “multi-core” environment that is expected to dominate HPC architectures over the next few years. The report also includes a section with NERSC responses to the workshop findings. NERSC has many initiatives already underway that address key workshop findings and all of the action items are aligned with NERSC strategic plans.