Science.gov

Sample records for air-to-air heat pumps

  1. Dynamic Performance of a Residential Air-to-Air Heat Pump.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, George E.; Bean, John

    This publication is a study of the dynamic performance of a 5-ton air-to-air heat pump in a residence in Washington, D.C. The effect of part-load operation on the heat pump's cooling and heating coefficients of performance was determined. Discrepancies between measured performance and manufacturer-supplied performance data were found when the unit…

  2. Cold Climate and Retrofit Applications for Air-to-Air Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D

    2015-01-01

    Air source heat pumps (ASHP) including air-to-air ASHPs are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere for new construction as well as retrofits or renovations. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low heating efficiency and capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. Retrofitting air-to-air ASHPs to existing buildings is relatively easy if the building already has an air distribution system. For buildings without such systems alternative approaches are necessary. Examples are ductless, minisplit heat pumps or central heat pumps coupled to small diameter, high velocity (SDHV) air distribution systems. This article presents two subjects: 1) a summary of R&D investigations aimed at improving the cold weather performance of ASHPs, and 2) a brief discussion of building retrofit options using air-to-air ASHP systems.

  3. User's manual for steady-state computer simulation for air-to-air heat pumps with selected examples

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-06-30

    A steady-state computer simulation model has been developed for conventional, vapor compression cycle, electrically driven air-to-air heat pumps. Comparison between the heat pump simulation model predictions and available data from three heat pump experiments indicate that the predictions generally are within accepted tolerances. A sensitivity analysis was made to assess the effect of possible variations in some of the input parameters on the system's thermal performance. The computer simulation model is briefly described for heating and cooling modes, and simulation model input data and output are given. (LEW)

  4. Performance evaluation of a selected three-ton air-to-air heat pump in the heating mode

    SciTech Connect

    Domingorena, A.A.; Ball, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    An air-to-air split system residential heat pump of nominal three-ton capacity was instrumented and tested in the heating mode under laboratory conditions. This was the second of a planned series of experiments to obtain a data base of system and component performance for heat pumps. The system was evaluated under both steady-state and frosting-defrosting conditions; sensitivity of the system performance to variations in the refrigerant charge was measured. From the steady-state tests, the heating capacity and coefficient of performance were computed, and evaluations were made of the performance parameters of the fan and fan motor units, the heat exchangers and refrigerant metering device, and the compressor. System heat losses were analyzed. The frosting-defrosting tests allowed the observation of system and component performance under dynamic conditions, and measurement of performance degradation under frosting conditions.

  5. Influence of HX size and augmentation on performance potential of mixtures in air-to-air heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.K.

    1993-05-01

    A modified Carnot analysis with finite heat exchanger (HX) sizes, counterflow HX configurations, and ideal glide matching was conducted for an air-to-air heat pump application. The purpose of the analysis was to determine the envelope of potential HX size and refrigerant-side augmentation benefits for ideal mixtures relative to pure refrigerant alternatives. The mixture COP benefits examined are those due to exact external fluid glide-matching of idealized mixtures in more effective heat exchangers. Maximum possible mixture COP gains are evaluated for four steady-state air-to-air heat pump conditions. Performance improvement opportunities are found to be primarily in the cooling mode. The effects of deviation from counterflow by use of crossflow and countercrossflow HX configurations are addressed. Refrigerant-side augmentation with pure and mixed refrigerants is examined for air-side dominant and air-to-refrigerant balanced HXs.

  6. The Oak Ridge Heat Pump Models: I. A Steady-State Computer Design Model of Air-to-Air Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, S.K. Rice, C.K.

    1999-12-10

    The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model is a FORTRAN-IV computer program to predict the steady-state performance of conventional, vapor compression, electrically-driven, air-to-air heat pumps in both heating and cooling modes. This model is intended to serve as an analytical design tool for use by heat pump manufacturers, consulting engineers, research institutions, and universities in studies directed toward the improvement of heat pump performance. The Heat Pump Design Model allows the user to specify: system operating conditions, compressor characteristics, refrigerant flow control devices, fin-and-tube heat exchanger parameters, fan and indoor duct characteristics, and any of ten refrigerants. The model will compute: system capacity and COP (or EER), compressor and fan motor power consumptions, coil outlet air dry- and wet-bulb temperatures, air- and refrigerant-side pressure drops, a summary of the refrigerant-side states throughout the cycle, and overall compressor efficiencies and heat exchanger effectiveness. This report provides thorough documentation of how to use and/or modify the model. This is a revision of an earlier report containing miscellaneous corrections and information on availability and distribution of the model--including an interactive version.

  7. Comparison of residential air-to-air heat pump and air-conditioner/gas furnace systems in 16 California climatic zones

    SciTech Connect

    Ayres, J.M.; Lau, H.

    1987-06-01

    Heat pumps with coefficients of performance ranging from 2.5 to 3.1 and gas furnaces with thermal efficiencies of 75% to 90% are analyzed through DOE-2 computer simulations and life-cycle cost analyses. The annual heating performances and the life-cycle costs of air-to-air heat pump and air-conditioner/gas furnace systems operating in single-family detached residences located in 16 climatic zones defined by the California Energy Commission are compared. With standard performance equipment, heat pumps cost more in all zones except for China Lake and Sacramento, but with high performance equipment, heat pumps cost less in all zones except for Fresno and Mt. Shasta.

  8. Benchmark performance analysis of an ECM-modulated air-to-air heat pump with a reciprocating compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    A benchmark analysis was conducted to predict the maximum steady- state performance potential of a near-term modulating residential- size heat pump. Continuously variable-speed, permanent-magnet electronically commutated motors (ECMs) were assumed to modulate the compressor and the indoor and outdoor fans in conjunction with existing modulating reciprocating compressor technology. A modulating heat pump design tool was used to optimize this ECM benchmark heat pump, using speed ranges and total heat exchanger sizes per-unit-capacity equivalent to that used by the highest SEER-rated variable-speed unit presently on the market (SEER = 16.4). Parametric steady-state performance optimization was conducted at a nominal design cooling ambient of 95 F (35 C) and at three off-design ambients of 82 F (27.8 C) cooling and 47 F and 17 F (8.3 C and minus 8.3 C) heating. In comparison to the reference commercially available residential unit, the analysis for the ECM benchmark predicted steady-state heating COPs about 35 percent higher and a cooling EER almost 25 percent higher at the nominal design cooling condition. The cooling EER at 82 F (27.8 C) was 13 percent higher than that of the reference unit when a comparable sensible heat ratio of 0.71 was maintained, while an EER gain of 24 percent at the 82 F (27.8 C) rating point was predicted when the sensible heat ratio was relaxed to 0.83.

  9. Efficiency characteristics of speed modulated drives at predicted torque conditions for air-to-air heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, C. K.

    Examples of system (motor + inverter drive) efficiencies of two types of adjustable speed control are compared for predicted compressor and indoor blower load profiles. The two classifications are inverter-driven induction motors (IDIMs) and permanent-magnet electronically commutated motors (PM-ECMs). Reference sine-wave-driven induction motor (SWDIM) efficiencies are also given. Available bench data on late 70's IDIM compressor drives are compared to recent data on IDIM and PM-ECM drives. The drive efficiencies are compared over common operating torque requirements for heating and cooling. A modulating heat pump model was used to develop predicted reciprocating compressor torque/drive-frequency mappings and the expected operating torque ranges. The variation in modulating compressor torque requirements is analyzed. Ways to adjust the torque relation for different compressor types and sizing strategies are also discussed. Modulating blower performance data on an early '80s generation modulating heat pump with an IDIM drive (and SWDIM reference drive) were obtained and compared to bench data on recent IDIM and PM-ECM drives under similar torque conditions. In both compressor and blower applications, the combined system efficiency of the PM-ECM drives is nearly equal to or higher than that of the reference SWDIM cases and significantly better than IDIMs available in the late '70s. When compared to more recent IDIMs, the PM-ECM efficiency advantage over IDIM compressors has been reduced 40 to 50 percent between half and nominal speed (3600 rpm) but still remains 14 to 9 percent higher, respectively.

  10. Heat Recovery Ventilation for Housing: Air-to-Air Heat Exchangers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corbett, Robert J.; Miller, Barbara

    The air-to-air heat exchanger (a fan powered ventilation device that recovers heat from stale outgoing air) is explained in this six-part publication. Topic areas addressed are: (1) the nature of air-to-air heat exchangers and how they work; (2) choosing and sizing the system; (3) installation, control, and maintenance of the system; (4) heat…

  11. Simulation model air-to-air plate heat exchanger

    SciTech Connect

    Wetter, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A simple simulation model of an air-to-air plate heat exchanger is presented. The model belongs to a collection of simulation models that allows the eflcient computer simulation of heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. The main emphasis of the models is to shorten computation time and to use only input data that are known in the design process of an HVAC system. The target of the models is to describe the behavior of HVAC components in the part-load operation mode, which is becoming increasingly important in energy eficient HVAC systems. The models are intended to be used for yearly energy calculations or load calculations with time steps of about 10 minutes or larger. Short- time dynamic effects, which are of interest for different aspects of control theory, are neglected. The part-load behavior is expressed in terms of the nominal condition and the dimensionless variation of the heat transfer with change of mass flow and temperature. The effectiveness- NTU relations are used to parametrize the convective heat transfer at nominal conditions and to compute the part-load condition. If the heat transfer coefficients on the two exchanger sides are not equal (i. e. due to partial bypassing of air), their ratio can be easily calculated and set as a parameter. The model is static and uses explicit equations only. The explicit model formulation ensures short computation time and numerical stability, which allows using the model with sophisticated engineering methods like automatic system optimization. This paper fully outlines the algorithm description and its simplifications. It is not tailored for any particular simulation program to ensure easy implementation in any simulation program.

  12. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A heat exchanger includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications.

  13. Self-defrosting recuperative air-to-air heat exchanger

    DOEpatents

    Drake, R.L.

    1993-12-28

    A heat exchanger is described which includes a stationary spirally or concentrically wound heat exchanger core with rotating baffles on upper and lower ends thereof. The rotating baffles include rotating inlets and outlets which are in communication with respective fixed inlets and outlets via annuli. The rotation of the baffles causes a concurrent rotation of the temperature distribution within the stationary exchanger core, thereby preventing frost build-up in some applications and preventing the formation of hot spots in other applications. 3 figures.

  14. Modelling heat and mass transfer in a membrane-based air-to-air enthalpy exchanger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugaria, S.; Moro, L.; Del, D., Col

    2015-11-01

    The diffusion of total energy recovery systems could lead to a significant reduction in the energy demand for building air-conditioning. With these devices, sensible heat and humidity can be recovered in winter from the exhaust airstream, while, in summer, the incoming air stream can be cooled and dehumidified by transferring the excess heat and moisture to the exhaust air stream. Membrane based enthalpy exchangers are composed by different channels separated by semi-permeable membranes. The membrane allows moisture transfer under vapour pressure difference, or water concentration difference, between the two sides and, at the same time, it is ideally impermeable to air and other contaminants present in exhaust air. Heat transfer between the airstreams occurs through the membrane due to the temperature gradient. The aim of this work is to develop a detailed model of the coupled heat and mass transfer mechanisms through the membrane between the two airstreams. After a review of the most relevant models published in the scientific literature, the governing equations are presented and some simplifying assumptions are analysed and discussed. As a result, a steady-state, two-dimensional finite difference numerical model is setup. The developed model is able to predict temperature and humidity evolution inside the channels. Sensible and latent heat transfer rate, as well as moisture transfer rate, are determined. A sensitive analysis is conducted in order to determine the more influential parameters on the thermal and vapour transfer.

  15. FORMALDEHYDE AND TRACER GAS TRANSFER BETWEEN AIRSTREAMS IN ENTHALPY-TYPE AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, W. J.; Pedersen, B. S.; Hekmat, D.; Chant, R. E.; Kaboli, H.

    1984-07-01

    Enthalpy exchangers are frequently employed to transfer heat and water between the supply and exhaust airstreams of mechanical ventilation systems. Concern has been expressed that some indoor-generated air pollutants, especially formaldehyde, may be transferred between airstreams by this type of heat exchanger and, thus, returned to the indoor space. This paper describes an experimental study in which the formaldehyde, tracer gas, and water vapor transfer rates in two enthalpy exchangers were measured. The first exchanger uses a crossflow core fabricated from a treated paper. The core of the second heat exchanger is a rotating heat wheel coated with lithium chloride. To reduce the transfer of gases by air leakage each core was installed in a specially fabricated case. Only 5% to 8% of the two tracer gases and 7% to 15% of the formaldehyde injected into the exhaust airstream was transferred to the supply airstream. Therefore, formaldehyde transfer between airstreams by processes other than air leakage does not seriously compromise the performance of these enthalpy exchangers. Theoretical calculations indicate, however, that the transfer of water vapor between airstreams in enthalpy exchangers can significantly diminish their ability to lower indoor formaldehyde concentrations because of the positive coupling between indoor humidity and the emission rates of formaldehyde from building materials.

  16. Predicts the Steady-State Heating and Cooling Performance of Electric Heat Pump

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1993-01-13

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a leader in the development of analytical tools for the design of electrically driven, air-to-air heat pumps. Foremost among these tools is the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, which can be used to predict the steady-state heating and cooling performance of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump. This version is three to five times faster than the earlier version, easier to use and more versatile.

  17. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, Lance D.

    1988-01-01

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

  18. Rotary magnetic heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Kirol, L.D.

    1987-02-11

    A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

  19. Design of an optical system for a 5th generation multi-spectral air-to-air missile considering the imaging performance degradation due to the aerodynamic heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leite, Paulo R., Jr.; da Silva, Maurício; Paoli, Eduardo T.

    2009-05-01

    An air-to-air missile is always submitted to extremes conditions of temperature, such as a hot runway in the desert dropping down to very cold conditions at high altitudes. It is evident that the optical system must be able to provide satisfactory image quality under any circumstances without causing any major degradation to the image. Under this perspective, two different designs of optical systems will be considered for this missile: one catadioptric, using a modified Cassegrain telescope and another one purely dioptric. Both optical systems must be able to focus energy in two different arrays of detectors, one for the near infrared radiation and the other one for the medium infrared. Due to the special missile flight profile, the temperature operational range will be determined and considered in order to design and athermalize the optical systems. Due to the large temperatures range, the missile optical system will experience deformation effects that will cause defocus and image degradation. A correct choice of materials, including the telescope body and dome shroud must be determined to minimize the defocus effect. Also a thermal compensator ought to be strategically placed on both designs to provide focus correction for all the temperatures range. Following that, the optical designs will be analyzed for effects of stray light and ghost image to find out what are the most suitable absorbing paint and anti-reflective coatings to be used. In the last step, both systems will be classified accordingly to their characteristics of performance, weight, size, viability and price and the best will integrate the missile optical system.

  20. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  1. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  2. Champagne Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    2004-01-01

    The term champagne heat pump denotes a developmental heat pump that exploits a cycle of absorption and desorption of carbon dioxide in an alcohol or other organic liquid. Whereas most heat pumps in common use in the United States are energized by mechanical compression, the champagne heat pump is energized by heating. The concept of heat pumps based on other absorption cycles energized by heat has been understood for years, but some of these heat pumps are outlawed in many areas because of the potential hazards posed by leakage of working fluids. For example, in the case of the water/ammonia cycle, there are potential hazards of toxicity and flammability. The organic-liquid/carbon dioxide absorption/desorption cycle of the champagne heat pump is similar to the water/ammonia cycle, but carbon dioxide is nontoxic and environmentally benign, and one can choose an alcohol or other organic liquid that is also relatively nontoxic and environmentally benign. Two candidate nonalcohol organic liquids are isobutyl acetate and amyl acetate. Although alcohols and many other organic liquids are flammable, they present little or no flammability hazard in the champagne heat pump because only the nonflammable carbon dioxide component of the refrigerant mixture is circulated to the evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, which are the only components of the heat pump in direct contact with air in habitable spaces.

  3. Crawl space assisted heat pump. [using stored ground heat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    A variety of experiments and simulations, currently being designed or underway, to determine the feasibility of conditioning the source air of an air to air heat pump using stored ground heat or cool to produce higher seasonal COP's and net energy savings are discussed. The ground would condition ambient air as it is drawn through the crawl space of a house. Tests designed to evaluate the feasibility of the concept, to determine the amount of heat or cool available from the ground, to study the effect of the system on the heating and cooling loads of the house, to study possible mechanisms which could enhance heat flow through the ground, and to determine if diurnal temperature swings are necessary to achieve successful system performance are described.

  4. Regenerative adsorbent heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system and at least a portion of the heat of adsorption. A series of at least four compressors containing an adsorbent is provided. A large amount of heat is transferred from compressor to compressor so that heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  5. Nonazeotropic Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ealker, David H.; Deming, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    Heat pump collects heat from water circulating in heat-rejection loop, raises temperature of collected heat, and transfers collected heat to water in separate pipe. Includes sealed motor/compressor with cooling coils, evaporator, and condenser, all mounted in outer housing. Gradients of temperature in evaporator and condenser increase heat-transfer efficiency of vapor-compression cycle. Intended to recover relatively-low-temperature waste heat and use it to make hot water.

  6. Multiple source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating a fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid, at least three refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid, a second for effecting heat exchange with a heat exchange fluid, and a third for effecting heat exchange with ambient air; a compressor for compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve connected at the inlet side of a heat exchanger in which liquid refrigerant is vaporized; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circuit and pump for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and directional flow of refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. Also disclosed are a variety of embodiments, modes of operation, and schematics therefor.

  7. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  8. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-10-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  9. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  10. Advanced heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashley, Joseph L.; Matthews, John D.

    1989-09-01

    This patent application discloses a heat pump which includes a first packed bed of liquid desiccant for removing moisture from outside air in the heating mode of operation, and a pump for transferring the moisture laden desiccant to a second packed bed which humidifies condenser heated inside air by adding water vapor to the air. The first packed bed, by removing moisture from the outside air before it passes through the heat pump's evaporator coils, prevents frost from forming on the coils. In the cooling mode of operation the second packed bed of liquid desiccant removes water vapor from the air inside of the building. The moisture laden desiccant is then transferred to the first packed bed by a second pump where condenser heat transfers the moisture from the desiccant to outside air.

  11. Dual source heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.; Pietsch, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid provides energy for defrosting the second heat exchanger when operating in the air source mode and also provides a alternate source of heat.

  12. Absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.

    1987-03-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of absorption heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the absorption heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of absorption heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.

  13. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1980-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer. The heat pump part of the system heats or cools a house or other structure through a combination of evaporation and absorption or, conversely, condensation and desorption, in a pair of containers. A set of automatic controls change the system for operation during winter and summer months and for daytime and nighttime operation to satisfactorily heat and cool a house during an entire year. The absorber chamber is subjected to solar heating during regeneration cycles and is covered by one or more layers of glass or other transparent material. Daytime home air used for heating the home is passed at appropriate flow rates between the absorber container and the first transparent cover layer in heat transfer relationship in a manner that greatly reduce eddies and resultant heat loss from the absorbant surface to ambient atmosphere.

  14. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  15. Heat pump apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Horowitz, Jeffrey S.

    1983-01-01

    A heat pump apparatus including a compact arrangement of individual tubular reactors containing hydride-dehydride beds in opposite end sections, each pair of beds in each reactor being operable by sequential and coordinated treatment with a plurality of heat transfer fluids in a plurality of processing stages, and first and second valves located adjacent the reactor end sections with rotatable members having multiple ports and associated portions for separating the hydride beds at each of the end sections into groups and for simultaneously directing a plurality of heat transfer fluids to the different groups. As heat is being generated by a group of beds, others are being regenerated so that heat is continuously available for space heating. As each of the processing stages is completed for a hydride bed or group of beds, each valve member is rotated causing the heat transfer fluid for the heat processing stage to be directed to that bed or group of beds. Each of the end sections are arranged to form a closed perimeter and the valve member may be rotated repeatedly about the perimeter to provide a continuous operation. Both valves are driven by a common motor to provide a coordinated treatment of beds in the same reactors. The heat pump apparatus is particularly suitable for the utilization of thermal energy supplied by solar collectors and concentrators but may be used with any source of heat, including a source of low-grade heat.

  16. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium.

  17. Acoustical heat pumping engine

    DOEpatents

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1983-08-16

    The disclosure is directed to an acoustical heat pumping engine without moving seals. A tubular housing holds a compressible fluid capable of supporting an acoustical standing wave. An acoustical driver is disposed at one end of the housing and the other end is capped. A second thermodynamic medium is disposed in the housing near to but spaced from the capped end. Heat is pumped along the second thermodynamic medium toward the capped end as a consequence both of the pressure oscillation due to the driver and imperfect thermal contact between the fluid and the second thermodynamic medium. 2 figs.

  18. Metal hydride heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1983-12-27

    A metal hydride heat pump is disclosed comprising a first and a second heat medium receptacle having heat media flowing therein and a plurality of closed vessels each containing a hydrogen gas atmosphere and divided into a first chamber having a first metal hydride filled therein and a second chamber having a second metal hydride filled therein. The first and second chambers of each closed vessel are made to communicate with each other so that hydrogen gas passes from one chamber to the other but the metal hydrides do not, and a group of the first chambers of the closed vessels being located within the first heat medium receptacle and a group of the second chambers of the closed vessels being located within the second heat medium receptacle, whereby heat exchange is carried out between the heat media in the first and second heat medium receptacles and the first and second metal hydrides through the external walls of the closed vessels.

  19. Heat driven pulse pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steve M (Inventor); Martins, Mario S. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A heat driven pulse pump includes a chamber having an inlet port, an outlet port, two check valves, a wick, and a heater. The chamber may include a plurality of grooves inside wall of the chamber. When heated within the chamber, a liquid to be pumped vaporizes and creates pressure head that expels the liquid through the outlet port. As liquid separating means, the wick, disposed within the chamber, is to allow, when saturated with the liquid, the passage of only liquid being forced by the pressure head in the chamber, preventing the vapor from exiting from the chamber through the outlet port. A plurality of grooves along the inside surface wall of the chamber can sustain the liquid, which is amount enough to produce vapor for the pressure head in the chamber. With only two simple moving parts, two check valves, the heat driven pulse pump can effectively function over the long lifetimes without maintenance or replacement. For continuous flow of the liquid to be pumped a plurality of pumps may be connected in parallel.

  20. Guide to Geothermal Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Geothermal heat pumps, also known as ground source heat pumps, geoexchange, water-source, earth-coupled, and earth energy heat pumps, take advantage of this resource and represent one of the most efficient and durable options on the market to heat and cool your home.

  1. Air circuit with heating pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, H.; Bauder, H. J.; Brugger, H.; Reinhart, A.; Spott, K. H.

    1980-12-01

    A pump which draws energy from exhaust air from a paper drying process to heat up the blow air was studied. The use of a heat pump instead of a steam heated exchanger can reduce primary energy consumption for blown air heating by more than half and the costs for air heating up to half. The amortization times for the heat pump extend from 5 to 10 years. Since in the pulp and paper industry, amortization times of less than two years are required for such relatively small investments, the heat pump so far is only used to heat blown air under highly favorable conditions. The rising energy prices shorten the heat pump amortization time. The 100% fuel price increase brought the heat pump with diesel engine drive already to very favorable amortization times of 2 to 5 years. A 20% increase will make the heat pump economically advantageous with an amortization time between 1 and 2 years.

  2. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  3. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1981-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  4. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to faciliate installation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  5. Chemical heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Greiner, Leonard

    1984-01-01

    A chemical heat pump system is disclosed for use in heating and cooling structures such as residences or commercial buildings. The system is particularly adapted to utilizing solar energy, but also increases the efficiency of other forms of thermal energy when solar energy is not available. When solar energy is not available for relatively short periods of time, the heat storage capacity of the chemical heat pump is utilized to heat the structure, as during nighttime hours. The design also permits home heating from solar energy when the sun is shining. The entire system may be conveniently rooftop located. In order to facilitate intallation on existing structures, the absorber and vaporizer portions of the system may each be designed as flat, thin wall, thin pan vessels which materially increase the surface area available for heat transfer. In addition, this thin, flat configuration of the absorber and its thin walled (and therefore relatively flexible) construction permits substantial expansion and contraction of the absorber material during vaporization and absorption without generating voids which would interfere with heat transfer.

  6. Gas-heat-pump development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creswick, F. A.

    Incentives for the development of gas heat pumps are discussed. Technical progress made on several promising technologies was reviewed. The status of development of gas-engine-driven heat pumps, the absorption cycle for the near- and long-term gas heat pump systems, the Stirling engine, the small Rankine-cycle engines, and gas-turbine-driven heat pump systems were briefly reviewed. Progress in the US, Japan, and Europe is noted.

  7. Magnetic heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Hull, J.R.; Uherka, K.L.

    1988-01-01

    Magnetic heat pumps and refrigerators are potential replacements for vapor-compression devices that use chlorofluorocarbon refrigerants. Several room-temperature designs, using low-temperature superconducting magnets, have reached the experimental device stage. High-temperature superconducting materials may significantly increase the viability of the technology, both by enhancing existing design concepts and by enabling new major design types such as field switching of the superconducting magnets.

  8. Stirling Engine Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Noboru

    Recent advances in the feasibility studies related to the Stirling engines and Stirling engine heat pumps which have been considered attractive due to their promising role in helping to solve the global environmental and energy problems,are reviewed. This article begins to describe the brief history of the Stirling engines and theoretical thermodynamic analysis of the Stirling cycle in order to understand several advantages on the Stirling engine. Furthermore,they could throw light on our question why the dream engines had not been promoted to practical applications during two hundred years. The present review shows that the Stirling engines with several unique advantages including 30 to 40% thermal efficiency and preferable exhaust characteristics,had been designed and constructed by recent tackling for the development of the advanced automobile and other applications using them. Based on the current state of art,it is being provided to push the Stirling engines combined with heat pumps based on the reversed Rankine cycle to the market. At present,however, many problems, especially for the durability, cost, and delicate engine parts must be enforced to solve. In addition,there are some possibilities which can increase the attractiveness of the Stirling engines and heat pumps. The review closes with suggestions for further research.

  9. Hyperspectral air-to-air seeker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gat, Nahum; Barhen, Jacob; Gulati, Sandeep; Steiner, Todd D.

    1994-07-01

    Synthetic hyperspectral signatures representing an airborne target engine radiation, a decoy flare, and the engine plume radiation are used to demonstrate computational techniques for the discrimination between such objects. Excellent discrimination is achieved for a `single look' at SNR of -10 dB. Since the atmospheric transmittance perturbs the signature of all objects in an identical fashion, the transmittance is equivalent to a modulation of the target radiance (in the spectral domain). The proper spectral signal decomposition may, therefore, recover the original unperturbed signature accurately enough to allow discrimination. The algorithms described here, and in two accompanying papers, have been tested over the spectral range that includes the VNIR and MWIR and are most appropriate for an intelligent, autonomous, air-to-air or surface-to-air guided munitions. With additional enhancements, the techniques apply to ground targets and other dual-use applications.

  10. System Modeling of Gas Engine Driven Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Mahderekal, Isaac; Shen, Bo; Vineyard, Edward

    2012-01-01

    To improve the system performance of the GHP, modeling and experimental study has been made by using desiccant system in cooling operation (particularly in high humidity operations) and suction line waste heat recovery to augment heating capacity and efficiency. The performance of overall GHP system has been simulated by using ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Software, which is used to predict steady-state heating and cooling performance of variable-speed vapor compression air-to-air heat pumps for a wide range of operational variables. The modeling includes: (1) GHP cycle without any performance improvements (suction liquid heat exchange and heat recovery) as a baseline (both in cooling and heating mode), (2) the GHP cycle in cooling mode with desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine incorporated, (3) GHP cycle in heating mode with heat recovery (recovered heat from engine). According to the system modeling results, by using desiccant system regenerated by waste heat from engine, the SHR can be lowered to 40%. The waste heat of the gas engine can boost the space heating efficiency by 25% in rated operating conditions.

  11. Save by absorption heat pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.F.; Campagne, W.V.L.

    1987-12-01

    The author compares absorption heat pumping (AHP) to mechanical vapor compressor (MVC) heat pumping. The moving part of the AHP is a pump easy to maintain and inexpensive to spare. The mechanical component of the MVC is a vapor compressor which requires more maintenance and is cost-prohibitive to spare. Also, in the MVC system, a purified product stream is heat pumped in an open compressor, thus risking product contamination. In the AHP system, the cold and hot utilities are heat pumped. Therefore, product integrity with an AHP system is well protected as in a conventional fractionation column.

  12. Laser-initiated ordnance for air-to-air missiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumpter, David R.

    1993-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas Missile Systems Company (MDMSC) has developed a laser ignition subsystem (LIS) for air-to-air missile applications. The MDMSC subsystem is designed to activate batteries, unlock fins, and sequence propulsion system events. The subsystem includes Pyro Zirconium Pump (PZP) lasers, mechanical Safe & Arm, fiber-optic distribution system, and optically activated pyrotechnic devices (initiators, detonators, and thermal batteries). The LIS design has incorporated testability features for the laser modules, drive electronics, fiber-optics, and pyrotechnics. Several of the LIS have been fabricated and have supported thermal battery testing, integral rocket ramjet testing, and have been integrated into integral rocket ramjet flight test vehicles as part of the flight control subsystem.

  13. Stirling and Vuilleumier heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wurm, J.

    1990-01-01

    The book discuses the design, application, and performance evaluation of integrated engine-refrigerator heat pumps and provides an overview of heat pump theory, including a unique comparative analysis of six integrated Stirling and Vuilleumier heat pumps and their advantages in applications. It also evaluates the effect of key components on performance; lists and documents computer programs for comparative analysis; and summarizes current hardware development programs.

  14. Hydride heat pump with heat regenerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A regenerative hydride heat pump process and system is provided which can regenerate a high percentage of the sensible heat of the system. A series of at least four canisters containing a lower temperature performing hydride and a series of at least four canisters containing a higher temperature performing hydride is provided. Each canister contains a heat conductive passageway through which a heat transfer fluid is circulated so that sensible heat is regenerated. The process and system are useful for air conditioning rooms, providing room heat in the winter or for hot water heating throughout the year, and, in general, for pumping heat from a lower temperature to a higher temperature.

  15. Earth-coupled heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, J. A.

    1981-08-01

    The object of the research work was to demonstrate that a water source heat pump could be used with an earth-coupled heat exchanger which was buried in an absorption field of a domestic sewage disposal system to provide the heating and cooling requirements for residential use in an energy efficient fashion. The system consists of a 3 ton heat pump (nominal rating of 34,000 Btu/hr), a closed-loop heat exchanger which was fabricated from 200 feet of 2 inch diameter cast iron soil pipe, and a calorimeter house which had heat transmission characteristics similar to a 100 sq ft house. The earth-coupled heat exchanger was connected to the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. Water was circulated through the heat exchanger coil in the earth and through the water side heat exchanger of the heat pump. The earth served as the energy source (for heating) or sink (for cooling) for the heat pump.

  16. Industrial heat pump assessment study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chappell, R. N.; Priebe, S. J.; Wilfert, G. L.

    1989-03-01

    This report summarizes preliminary studies that assess the potential of industrial heat pumps for reduction of process heating requirements in industries receiving power from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). This project was initiated at the request of BPA to determine the potential of industrial heat pumps in BPA's service area. Working from known heat pump principles and from a list of BPA's industrial customers, the authors estimated the fuel savings potential for six industries. Findings indicate that the pulp and paper industry would yield the greatest fuel savings and increased electrical consumption. Assessments presented in this report represent a cooperative effort between The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), and Battelle-Northwest Laboratories.

  17. Evaluation of solar collectors for heat pump applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Skartvedt, Gary; Pedreyra, Donald; McMordle, Dr., Robert; Kidd, James; Anderson, Jerome; Jones, Richard

    1980-08-01

    The study was initiated to evaluate the potential utility of very low cost (possibly unglazed and uninsulated) solar collectors to serve as both heat collection and rejection devices for a liquid source heat pump. The approach consisted of exercising a detailed analytical simulation of the complete heat pump/solar collector/storage system against heating and cooling loads derived for typical single-family residences in eight US cities. The performance of each system was measured against that of a conventional air-to-air heat pump operating against the same loads. In addition to evaluation of solar collector options, the study included consideration of water tanks and buried pipe grids to provide thermal storage. As a supplement to the analytical tasks, the study included an experimental determination of night sky temperature and convective heat transfer coefficients for surfaces with dimensions typical of solar collectors. The experiments were conducted in situ by placing the test apparatus on the roofs of houses in the Denver, Colorado, area. (MHR)

  18. Magnetic heat pump flow director

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, Frank S. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A fluid flow director is disclosed. The director comprises a handle body and combed-teeth extending from one side of the body. The body can be formed of a clear plastic such as acrylic. The director can be used with heat exchangers such as a magnetic heat pump and can minimize the undesired mixing of fluid flows. The types of heat exchangers can encompass both heat pumps and refrigerators. The director can adjust the fluid flow of liquid or gas along desired flow directions. A method of applying the flow director within a magnetic heat pump application is also disclosed where the comb-teeth portions of the director are inserted into the fluid flow paths of the heat pump.

  19. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1979-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchangers and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  20. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1982-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion-type refrigeration circuit and a heat engine. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The heat engine includes a heat rejection circuit having a source of rejected heat and a primary heat exchanger connected to the source of rejected heat. The heat rejection circuit also includes an evaporator in heat exchange relation with the primary heat exchanger, a heat engine indoor heat exchanger, and a heat engine outdoor heat exchanger. The indoor heat exchangers are disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine indoor heat exchanger being disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit indoor heat exchanger. The outdoor heat exchangers are also disposed in series air flow relationship, with the heat engine outdoor heat exchanger disposed downstream from the refrigeration circuit outdoor heat exchanger. A common fluid is used in both of the indoor heat exchanges and in both of the outdoor heat exchangers. In a first embodiment, the heat engine is a Rankine cycle engine. In a second embodiment, the heat engine is a non-Rankine cycle engine.

  1. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  2. Geothermal heat pumps in Pierre

    SciTech Connect

    Wegman, S.

    1997-12-01

    There are two municipal connected heat pumps in Pierre, South Dakota: the South Dakota Discovery Center and Pierre City Hall.Both systems now utilize plate heat exchanger between the city water loop and the building loop. This article describes the geothermal system used in Pierre for both space heating and cooling of municipal buildings.

  3. Energy 101: Geothermal Heat Pumps

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2013-05-29

    An energy-efficient heating and cooling alternative, the geothermal heat pump system moves heat from the ground to a building (or from a building to the ground) through a series of flexible pipe "loops" containing water. This edition of Energy 101 explores the benefits Geothermal and the science behind how it all comes together.

  4. Heat Pumping in Nanomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo R.; Arrachea, Liliana; Capaz, Rodrigo B.

    2011-04-01

    We propose using a phonon pumping mechanism to transfer heat from a cold to a hot body using a propagating modulation of the medium connecting the two bodies. This phonon pump can cool nanomechanical systems without the need for active feedback. We compute the lowest temperature that this refrigerator can achieve.

  5. Portable Heat Pump Testing Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kłosowiak, R.; Bartoszewicz, J.; Urbaniak, R.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to present the design and working principle of a portable testing device for heat pumps in the energy recirculation system. The presented test stand can be used for any refrigerating/reverse flow cycle device to calculate the device energy balance. The equipment is made of two portable containers of the capacity of 250 liters to simulate the air heat source and ground heat source with a system of temperature stabilization, compressor heat pump of the coefficient of performance (COP) of = 4.3, a failsafe system and a control and measurement system.

  6. Industrial heat pump demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This booklet describes an industrial heat pump demonstration project conducted at a plant in Norwich, New York. The project required retrofitting an open-cycle heat pump to a single-effect, recirculating-type evaporator. The heat pump design uses an electrically driven centrifugal compressor to recover the latent heat of the water vapor generated by the evaporator. The compressed vapor is returned to the process, where it displaces the use of boiler steam. The goal was to reduce costs associated with operating the evaporator, which is used for reduction the water content of whey (a liquid by-product from cheese production). The retrofit equipment has now completed more than one year of successful operation. Heat pump coefficient of performance has been measured and is in the range of 14 to 18 under varying process conditions. Generalization of project results indicates that the demonstrated technology achieved attractive economics over a wide range of energy price assumptions, especially when the heat pump is applied to larger processes. 5 refs., 17 figs.

  7. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1977-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  8. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-01-01

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  9. Heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Paul F.; Moore, Paul B.

    1983-06-21

    An air heating and cooling system for a building includes an expansion type refrigeration circuit and a vapor power circuit. The refrigeration circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is communicated with a source of indoor air from the building and the other of which is communicated with a source of air from outside the building. The vapor power circuit includes two heat exchangers, one of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the indoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger and the other of which is disposed in series air flow relationship with the outdoor refrigeration circuit heat exchanger. Fans powered by electricity generated by a vapor power circuit alternator circulate indoor air through the two indoor heat exchangers and circulate outside air through the two outdoor heat exchangers. The system is assembled as a single roof top unit, with a vapor power generator and turbine and compressor thermally insulated from the heat exchangers, and with the indoor heat exchangers thermally insulated from the outdoor heat exchangers.

  10. Characterization of a mini-channel heat exchanger for a heat pump system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arteconi, A.; Giuliani, G.; Tartuferi, M.; Polonara, F.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper a mini-channel aluminum heat exchanger used in a reversible heat pump is presented. Mini-channel finned heat exchangers are getting more and more interest for refrigeration systems, especially when compactness and low refrigerant charge are desired. Purpose of this paper was to characterize the mini-channel heat exchanger used as evaporator in terms of heat transfer performance and to study the refrigerant distribution in the manifold. The heat exchanger characterization was performed experimentally by means of a test rig built up for this purpose. It is composed of an air-to-air heat pump, air channels for the external and internal air circulation arranged in a closed loop, measurement sensors and an acquisition system. The overall heat transfer capacity was assessed. Moreover, in order to characterize the flow field of the refrigerant in the manifold of the heat exchanger, a numerical investigation of the fluid flow by means of CFD was performed. It was meant to evaluate the goodness of the present design and to identify possible solutions for the future improvement of the manifold design.

  11. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  12. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N -2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  13. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration. PMID:24827213

  14. The Oak Ridge Heat Pump Design Model: Mark 3 version program documentationon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, S. K.; Rice, C. K.; Jackson, W. L.

    1988-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a leader in the development of analytical tools for the design of electrically driven, air-to-air heat pumps. Foremost among these tools is the ORNL Heat Pump Design Model, which can be used to predict the steady-state heating and cooling performance of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump. The ORNL Heat Pump Design Model has continued to evolve since the users' manual for the program, ORNL/CON-80/R1, was last revised in August 1983. This series of modifications to the heat pump model resulted in the Mark 3 Version, which is three to five times faster, easier to use, and more versatile than earlier versions and can be executed on a personal computer. The major changes made to earlier versions of the heat pump model relate to the organization of the input data, elimination of redundant calculations in the compressor and refrigerant property computations, improvement of thermostatic expansion valve and capillary tube correlations, revision of output format, and modifications to enable the model to run on a personal computer. The Mark 3 version is a comprehensive, easy-to-use program for the simulation of an electrically driven, air-source heat pump.

  15. Enceladus Heat Pump Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, T. V.; Lunine, J. I.; Castillo-Rogez, J. C.

    2010-10-01

    Plume gas composition and the presence of dust grains rich in sodium salts [1,2] support a subsurface liquid as the source of the plumes observed at the South pole of Enceladus. We suggest that seawater circulating from the ocean to the surface supplies water, gas, dust and heat to the plumes. Our model needs only a percent or two of gas dissolved in the ocean, a value that is very much consistent with available observations ([1] suggest 10 percent of various gas species in the plume). As seawater comes up, pressure is released and bubbles form. Bubbly seawater is less dense than ice. Expanding gas provides lifting energy (cf. [6], [7]). The model delivers the materials that Postberg et al. [2] use for plume eruptions. Popping bubbles throw a fine spray that contains salt. This aerosol exits with the plume gas [2]. Most significant is the south polar heat flow >15 GW [4]. Water-borne oceanic heat is transferred to the surface ice. Less this heat, the water becomes colder, dissolves the bubble gases and becomes dense. It returns to the ocean via cracks in the ice. A large volume of ice is accessible via cracks SO THAT chemical interactions, heat exchange and other processes are possible. [1] Waite Jr et al., Nature, 460, 487 (2009). [2] Postberg et al., Nature, 459, 1098 (2009). [4] Howett et al BAAS., 41, 1122 (2009). [6] Crawford, and Stevenson, Icarus, 73, 66 (1988). [7] Murchie, and Head, LPS XVII, 583 (1986). This work was conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology under NASA contract, and for JIL under "Incentivazione alla mobilita' di studiosi straineri e italiani residenti all'estero" of Italy.

  16. Integration of heat pumps into industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Chappell, R.N. ); Priebe, S.J. )

    1989-01-01

    The Department of Energy and others have funded studies to assess the potential for energy savings using industrial heat pumps. The studies included classifications of heat pumps, economic evaluations, and placement of heat pumps in industrial processes. Pinch technology was used in the placement studies to determine the placement, size, and type of heat pumps for a given applications. There appears to be considerable scope for heat pumping in several industries, but, where maximum process energy savings are desired, it is important to consider heat pumping in the context of overall process integration. 19 refs., 15 figs.

  17. Bayonet heat exchangers in heat-assisted Stirling heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Yagyu, S.; Fukuyama, Y.; Morikawa, T.; Isshiki, N.; Satoh, I.; Corey, J.; Fellows, C.

    1998-07-01

    The Multi-Temperature Heat Supply System is a research project creating a city energy system with lower environmental load. This system consists of a gas-fueled internal combustion engine and a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump utilizing shaft power and thermal power in a combination of several cylinders. The heat pump is mainly driven by engine shaft power and is partially assisted by thermal power from engine exhaust heat source. Since this heat pump is operated by proportioning the two energy sources to match the characteristics of the driving engine, the system is expected to produce cooling and heating water at high COP. This paper describes heat exchanger development in the project to develop a heat-assisted Stirling heat pump. The heat pump employs the Bayonet type heat exchangers (BHX Type I) for supplying cold and hot water and (BHX Type II) for absorbing exhaust heat from the driving engine. The heat exchanger design concepts are presented and their heat transfer and flow loss characteristics in oscillating gas flow are investigated. The main concern in the BHX Type I is an improvement of gas side heat transfer and the spirally finned tubes were applied to gas side of the heat exchanger. For the BHX Type II, internal heat transfer characteristics are the main concern. Shell-and-tube type heat exchangers are widely used in Stirling machines. However, since brazing is applied to the many tubes for their manufacturing processes, it is very difficult to change flow passages to optimize heat transfer and loss characteristics once they have been made. The challenge was to enhance heat transfer on the gas side to make a highly efficient heat exchanger with fewer parts. It is shown that the Bayonet type heat exchanger can have good performance comparable to conventional heat exchangers.

  18. Basic investigations on heat pumps, volume 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dick, H. G.; Nguyen, D. D.; Paul, J.; Reichelt, J.; Renz, M.; Tolle, A.

    1980-12-01

    Computer programs that determine the basic characteristics of heat pumps for different refrigerants and the interference between refrigerant and oil, and especially reciprocating compressors for heat pumps, are presented. The influence of electric-motor cooling, lubrication, different refrigerants, speed control and partial-load behavior of heat exchangers are emphasized. Mixtures of solvents and refrigerants for absorption heat pumps were studied and additional measurements for heat pump operation were carried out.

  19. Heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A simple heat cascading regenerative sorption heat pump process with rejected or waste heat from a higher temperature chemisorption circuit (HTCC) powering a lower temperature physisorption circuit (LTPC) which provides a 30% total improvement over simple regenerative physisorption compression heat pumps when ammonia is both the chemisorbate and physisorbate, and a total improvement of 50% or more for LTPC having two pressure stages. The HTCC contains ammonia and a chemisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of canisters, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, and a heater, operatively connected together. The LTPC contains ammonia and a physisorbent therefor contained in a plurality of compressors, a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. A closed heat transfer circuit (CHTC) is provided which contains a flowing heat transfer liquid (FHTL) in thermal communication with each canister and each compressor for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTPC. Heat is regenerated within the LTPC by transferring heat from one compressor to another. In one embodiment the regeneration is performed by another CHTC containing another FHTL in thermal communication with each compressor. In another embodiment the HTCC powers a lower temperature ammonia water absorption circuit (LTAWAC) which contains a generator-absorber system containing the absorbent, and a condenser-evaporator-radiator system, operatively connected together. The absorbent is water or an absorbent aqueous solution. A CHTC is provided which contains a FHTL in thermal communication with the generator for cascading heat from the HTCC to the LTAWAC. Heat is regenerated within the LTAWAC by transferring heat from the generator to the absorber. The chemical composition of the chemisorbent is different than the chemical composition of the physisorbent, and the absorbent. The chemical composition of the FHTL is different than the chemisorbent, the physisorbent, the absorbent, and ammonia.

  20. Staged regenerative sorption heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A regenerative adsorbent heat pump process and system for cooling and heating a space. A sorbent is confined in a plurality of compressors of which at least four are first stage and at least four are second stage. The first stage operates over a first pressure region and the second stage over a second pressure region which is higher than the first. Sorbate from the first stage enters the second stage. The sorbate loop includes a condenser, expansion valve, evaporator and the compressors. A single sorbate loop can be employed for single-temperature-control such as air conditioning and heating. Two sorbate loops can be used for two-temperature-control as in a refrigerator and freezer. The evaporator temperatures control the freezer and refrigerator temperatures. Alternatively the refrigerator temperature can be cooled by the freezer with one sorbate loop. A heat transfer fluid is circulated in a closed loop which includes a radiator and the compressors. Low temperature heat is exhausted by the radiator. High temperature heat is added to the heat transfer fluid entering the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Heat is transferred from compressors which are sorbing vapor to the heat transfer fluid, and from the heat transfer fluid to the compressors which are desorbing vapor. Each compressor is subjected to the following phases, heating to its highest temperature, cooling down from its highest temperature, cooling to its lowest temperature, and warming up from its lowest temperature. The phases are repeated to complete a cycle and regenerate heat.

  1. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  2. Magnetic heat pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A ferromagnetic or ferrimagnetic element is used to control the temperature and applied magnetic field of the element to cause the state of the element as represented on a temperature-magnetic entropy diagram to repeatedly traverse a loop. The loop may have a first portion of concurrent substantially isothermal or constant temperature and increasing applied magnetic field, a second portion of lowering temperature and constant applied magnetic field, a third portion of isothermal and decreasing applied magnetic field, and a fourth portion of increasing temperature and constant applied magnetic field. Other loops may be four-sided, with two isotherms and two adiabats. Preferably, a regenerator is used to enhance desired cooling or heating effects, with varied magnetic fields, or varying temperatures including three-sided figures traversed by the representative point.

  3. The use of heat pumps in district heat supply

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkens, H. P.

    1985-04-01

    The cost elements of heat pump heat supply stations are examined and the optimum relationship between peak load boiler and heat pump output is shown. The dependence of plant size and temperature on heat generating costs is indicated and the costs of heat distribution and heat transfer are analysed. The possibility of a combined system of chop and heat pumps for the transport of heat over larger distances is shown.

  4. Geothermal Heat Pump Benchmarking Report

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-17

    A benchmarking study was conducted on behalf of the Department of Energy to determine the critical factors in successful utility geothermal heat pump programs. A Successful program is one that has achieved significant market penetration. Successfully marketing geothermal heat pumps has presented some major challenges to the utility industry. However, select utilities have developed programs that generate significant GHP sales. This benchmarking study concludes that there are three factors critical to the success of utility GHP marking programs: (1) Top management marketing commitment; (2) An understanding of the fundamentals of marketing and business development; and (3) An aggressive competitive posture. To generate significant GHP sales, competitive market forces must by used. However, because utilities have functioned only in a regulated arena, these companies and their leaders are unschooled in competitive business practices. Therefore, a lack of experience coupled with an intrinsically non-competitive culture yields an industry environment that impedes the generation of significant GHP sales in many, but not all, utilities.

  5. Sorption Refrigeration / Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Over the past few decades there have been considerable efforts to use adsorption (solid/vapor) for cooling and heat pump applications, but intensified efforts were initiated only since the imposition of international restrictions on the production and use of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons). Up to now, only the desiccant evaporative cooling system of the open type has achieved commercial use, predominantly in the United States. Closed-type adsorption refrigeration and heat pump systems are rarely seen in the market, or are still in the laboratory testing stage. Promising recent development have been made in Japan for the use of porous metal hydrides and composite adsorbents. In this paper, a short description of adsorption theories along with an overview of present status and future development trends of thermally powered adsorption refrigeration cycles are outlined putting emphasis on experimental achievements. This paper also addressed some advanced absorption cycles having relatively higher COP, and also summarizes fundamental concepts of GAX cycles and various GAX cycles developed for heat pump applications.

  6. Solar preheater for residential heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    1983-01-01

    The Solar Preheater for Residential Heat PUmps was designed to offset the weakest points in a heat pump system using solar energy. These weak points affect both energy efficiency and comfort, and are: (1) the heat pumps need to defrost its outside coils, and (2) its use of resistance coils when outside air is very cold. While a heat pump can claim close to 100% efficiency in its conversion of electricity to heat, these efficiencies drop way off under the above circumstances. Less dramatic energy savings should also occur during the heat pump's normal operation, since a heat pump takes available heat and condenses it to heat the house. It seems reasonable to say that if there is more heat in the outside air it will take less time to raise the temperature inside. The net effect should be similar to having the heat pump located several hundred miles south of the home it is heating. There are several ways to achieve solar augmentation of heat pump operation, but most are either too expensive, too difficult for do-it-yourselfers, or are not easily adaptable to existing units. The solar preheater for residential heat pumps gets around all the above restrictions.

  7. Advanced electric residential heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.

    The heat pump concept developed uses the vapor compression refrigeration cycle with R22 as the working fluid. In order to achieve the target efficiency an improved reciprocating compressor with modulatable capacity was developed along with higher efficiency air movers, a breadboard microprocessor based control system and higher effectiveness heat exchangers. The relative proportions of the compressor, blower, fan, and heat exchangers are specified through system optimization to minimize annual ownership cost while constrained to provide comfort. The efficiency of this compressor is comparable to the best available while the ratio of minimum to maximum capacity can be selected as a parameter of optimization. The incremental cost of this compressor is estimated to be one third that of the compressor with two speed drive motor.

  8. Plasma heat pump and heat engine

    SciTech Connect

    Avinash, K.

    2010-08-15

    A model system where cold charged particles are locally confined in a volume V{sub P} within a warm plasma of volume V (V{sub P}<heat and vice versa. Two applications of this theory are, first we propose a pumping device which heats plasmas by an adiabatic/isothermal compression of fields. Heating power ranging from a few hundred watts to a few kilowatts is possible with the present day technology. Second, we discuss the feasibility of constructing an electrostatic heat engine which converts plasma heat into mechanical work via plasma electric fields. Effects of P{sub E} are shown to be observable in colloidal solutions.

  9. Metal hydride heat pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Nishizaki, T.; Miyamoto, K.; Miyamoto, M.; Nakata, Y.; Yamaji, K.; Yoshida, K.

    1985-06-18

    A metal hydride heat pump system has a plurality of operating units, the metal hydride heat exchange medium of each operating unit be a combination of a first metal hydride having a lower equilibrium dissociation pressure at the operating temperature and a second metal hydride having a higher equilibrium dissociation pressure at the opening temperature and the metal hydrides being such that hydrogen can flow freely between the two metal hydrides, wherein the equilibrium dissociation pressure characteristics of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in a given operating unit differ from those of one or both of the first and second metal hydrides in at least one other operating unit.

  10. Heat pump having improved defrost system

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C.; Mei, Viung C.; Murphy, Richard W.

    1998-01-01

    A heat pump system includes, in an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant: a compressor; an interior heat exchanger; an exterior heat exchanger; an accumulator; and means for heating the accumulator in order to defrost the exterior heat exchanger.

  11. Vertical integration of thermally activated heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1985-01-01

    Many thermally activated heat pump systems are being developed along technology lines, such as, engine-driven and absorption heat pumps. Their thermal performances are temperature dependent. Based on the temperature-dependent behavior of heat pump cycle performance and the energy cascading idea, the concept of vertically integrating various thermally activated heat pump technologies to maximize resources utilization is explored. Based on a preliminary analysis, it is found that integrating a desiccant dehumidification subsystem to an engine-driven heat pump could improve its cooling performance by 36% and integrating an ejector to it could improve its cooling performance by 20%. The added advantage of an ejector-coupled engine-driven heat pump is its system simplicity which should result in equipment cost savings.

  12. Design and development of a split-evaporator heat-pump system

    SciTech Connect

    Somerville, M.H.; Penoncello, S.G.

    1981-12-01

    The designs and experimental results of three types of multiple source heat pumps are presented. The three designs are the parallel evaporator, the series evaporator, and the parallel evaporator with active subcooling, with the parallel evaporator with the active subcooling showing the most promise for solving the problem of defrosting of air evaporators. Three design procedures for multiple source heat pumps were developed. One of these is a hand calculational procedure, the others are computer based. The models are based upon the refrigerant flow rate, rather than the refrigeration effect of the evaporator. The technical results of a detailed analytical and experimental model of the heat transfer rates on a flat plate ice maker are presented. It is shown, both analytically and experimentally, that the temperature of the air surrounding the flat plate ice maker can play a dominant role in the rate of ice formation. A detailed weather analysis for forty cities located throughout the nation was completed. These data were processed to allow easy computation of thermal storage requirements for full, partial, or minimum ACES systems, or upon other design requirements, such as off-peak air conditioning. The results of an innovative ice storage system that is thermally coupled to the earth are described. This system has the potential for meeting both the off-peak air conditioning needs and the thermal storage requirements for the heating cycle. An economic and energy comparison of multiple source heat pumps with ACES, and air-to-air heat pump systems is presented.

  13. Survey of advanced-heat-pump developments for space conditioning

    SciTech Connect

    Fairchild, P.D.

    1981-01-01

    A survey of heat pump projects with special emphasis on those supported by DOE, EPRI, and the Gas Research Institute is presented. Some historical notes on heat pump development are discussed. Market and equipment trends, well water and ground-coupled heat pumps, heat-actuated heat pump development, and international interest in heat pumps are also discussed. 30 references.

  14. DOE/ORNL heat pump design model, overview and application to R-22 alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.K.

    1997-12-01

    This computer program is a public-domain system design tool for application to air-to-air heat pumps. The main aspects of the program are reviewed with emphasis on the newest features of the current fifth-generation version (Mark V) and an upcoming more fully HFC-capable release (Mark VI). Current model predictions are compared to test data for a leading HFC alternative to HCFC-22 in heat pumps. Examples are shown of some user interfaces that have been recently developed for the program. To demonstrate the design capabilities of the model for R-22 alternatives, a refrigerant-side optimization was conducted to find the best balance of heat transfer versus pressure drop for HCFC R-22, HFCs R-134a and R-410A, and the natural refrigerant propane. COP was maximized while refrigerant charge and tube size were minimized. Independent design parameters were fraction of total area in the outdoor coil, tube diameter and number of circuits for each heat exchanger, and condenser subcooling. Heat exchanger design tradeoffs are discussed for a heat pump relative to air conditioners and heating-only units. A design optimized for heating-only operation is presented.

  15. GEOTHERMAL HEAT PUMP GROUTING MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    ALLAN,M.

    1998-04-01

    The thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts has been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. The cement-sand grouts were also tested for rheological characteristics, bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the thermal conductivity, permeability, bonding and exotherm data for selected cementitious grouts. The theoretical reduction in bore length that could be achieved with the BNL-developed cement-sand grouts is examined. Finally, the FY 98 research and field trials are discussed.

  16. Geothermal heat pump grouting materials

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, M.

    1998-08-01

    The thermal conductivity of cementitious grouts has been investigated in order to determine suitability of these materials for grouting vertical boreholes used with geothermal heat pumps. The roles of mix variables such as water/cement ratio, sand/cement ratio and superplasticizer dosage were measured. The cement-sand grouts were also tested for rheological characteristics, bleeding, permeability, bond to HDPE pipe, shrinkage, coefficient of thermal expansion, exotherm, durability and environmental impact. This paper summarizes the thermal conductivity, permeability, bonding and exotherm data for selected cementitious grouts. The theoretical reduction in bore length that could be achieved with the BNL-developed cement-sand grouts is examined. Finally, the FY 98 research and field trials are discussed.

  17. Flight testing air-to-air missiles for flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutschinski, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    The philosophy of the design of air-to-air missiles and hence of flight testing them for flutter differs from that of manned aircraft. Primary emphasis is put on analytical and laboratory evaluation of missile susceptibility to aeroelastic and aero-servo-elastic instabilities and uses flight testing for confirmation of the absence of such instabilities. Flight testing for flutter is accomplished by using specially instrumented programmed missiles, air or ground launched with a booster to reach the extreme flight conditions of tactical use, or by using guided missiles with telemetered performance data. The instrumentation and testing techniques are discussed along with the success of recent flight tests.

  18. Pumped two-phase heat transfer loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Fred

    1988-01-01

    A pumped loop two-phase heat transfer system, operating at a nearly constant temperature throughout, includes several independently operating grooved capillary heat exchanger plates supplied with working fluid through independent flow modulation valves connected to a liquid supply line, a vapor line for collecting vapor from the heat exchangers, a condenser between the vapor and the liquid lines, and a fluid circulating pump between the condenser and the heat exchangers.

  19. Pumped two-phase heat transfer loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edelstein, Fred (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A pumped loop two-phase heat transfer system, operating at a nearly constant temperature throughout, includes a plurality of independently operating grooved capillary heat exchanger plates supplied with working fluid through independent flow modulation valves connected to a liquid supply line, a vapor line for collecting vapor from the heat exchangers, a condenser between the vapor and the liquid lines, and a fluid circulating pump between the condenser and the heat exchangers.

  20. Frostless heat pump having thermal expansion valves

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Fang C [Knoxville, TN; Mei, Viung C [Oak Ridge, TN

    2002-10-22

    A heat pump system having an operable relationship for transferring heat between an exterior atmosphere and an interior atmosphere via a fluid refrigerant and further having a compressor, an interior heat exchanger, an exterior heat exchanger, a heat pump reversing valve, an accumulator, a thermal expansion valve having a remote sensing bulb disposed in heat transferable contact with the refrigerant piping section between said accumulator and said reversing valve, an outdoor temperature sensor, and a first means for heating said remote sensing bulb in response to said outdoor temperature sensor thereby opening said thermal expansion valve to raise suction pressure in order to mitigate defrosting of said exterior heat exchanger wherein said heat pump continues to operate in a heating mode.

  1. Heat pump technology: Responding to new opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, V.D.; Creswick, F.A. ); Snelson, W.K. . Institute for Mechnical Engineering)

    1993-01-01

    This paper provides an update on advanced heat pump research and development activities in the United States and Canada. Under the general area of vapor compression technology a major need toward which these research programs are directed is the development of viable alternatives to HCFC-22 for heat pump and air-conditioning applications. The HCFC phaseout provides an opportunity to develop advanced refrigeration equipment for the new refrigerants which has higher energy efficiency than current heat pump systems. Programs are underway in both industry and government laboratories and are characterized by close collaboration between major manufacturers and government agencies to plan and execute the research. Under the general area of thermally activated heat pump technology, there are several cooperative early-commercialization activities being conducted on gas-fired heat pumps and chillers by government, HVAC industry, and gas utility organizations.

  2. D-Zero HVAC Heat Pump Controls

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, Dan; /Fermilab

    2004-04-14

    This engineering note documents the integration of Dzero Heat Pump 1 through Heat Pump 15 into the cryo/gas process control system commonly referred to as the cryo control system. Heat pumps 1 through 15 control the ambient air temperature on the 3rd, 5th, and 6th floor office areas at Dzero. The entire Johnson HVAC control system was replaced with a Siemens control system in 1999 leaving behind the 15 heat pumps with stand-alone Johnson controllers. Now, these 15 heat pump Johnson controllers are being replaced with small stand alone Beckhoff BC9000 controllers. The Beckhoff BC9000 controllers are network able into the existing Intellution control system. The Beckhoff BC9000 controllers use the cryo private Ethernet network and an OPC driver to get data into the Intellution SCADA node databases. The BC9000 is also programmed over this same Ethernet network.

  3. Jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1978-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of an arterial heat pipe with a capillary driven jet pump. The jet pump generates a suction which pumps vapor and noncondensible gas from the artery. The suction also forces liquid into the artery and maintains it in a primed condition. A theoretical model was developed which predicts the existence of two stable ranges. Up to a certain tilt the artery will prime by itself once a heat load is applied to the heat pipe. At higher tilts, the jet pump can maintain the artery in a primed condition but self-priming is not possible. A prototype heat pipe was tested which self-primed up to a tilt of 1.9 cm, with a heat load of 500 watts. The heat pipe continued to prime reliably when operated as a VCHP, i.e., after a large amount of noncondensible gas was introduced.

  4. Heat exchangers for vuilleumier cycle heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, J.W.

    1984-02-07

    The invention relates to a heat pump device comprising a pair of chambers and a plurality of elements extending within both chambers. A working fluid is disposed in both of the chambers and a displacer means is positioned in each of the chambers such that they are movable within their respective chambers. Both of the displacer means have a wall that divides their respective chambers into two zones, a regenerator material that is housed therein, a plurality of elements extending outwardly from and in proximity to the elements extending within the respective chamber, and at least one passageway communicating through each displacer means and through the respective regenerator material for the working fluid to flow therethrough between the zones. There is a drive means for reciprocably moving both of the displacer means in their respective chamber between the respective zones of the chamber. There is also means for maintaining one of the zones of each of the chambers at a cool temperature and means for maintaining the other of the zones either at a relatively hot temperature or at a cold temperature.

  5. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, P.H.

    1984-09-28

    A solid state radiative heat pump operable at room temperature (300 K) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of change carriers as compared equilibrium. In one form of the invention an infrared semiconductor photodiode is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention, a homogenous semiconductor is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-refection layer is coated into the active surface of the semiconductor, the anti-reflection layer having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor. In the second method, a passive layer is speaced trom the active surface of the semiconductor by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler with a paraboloid reflecting surface surface is in contact with the active surface of the semiconductor, the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  6. Solid state radiative heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A solid state radiative heat pump (10, 50, 70) operable at room temperature (300.degree. K.) utilizes a semiconductor having a gap energy in the range of 0.03-0.25 eV and operated reversibly to produce an excess or deficit of charge carriers as compared to thermal equilibrium. In one form of the invention (10, 70) an infrared semiconductor photodiode (21, 71) is used, with forward or reverse bias, to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. In another form of the invention (50), a homogeneous semiconductor (51) is subjected to orthogonal magnetic and electric fields to emit an excess or deficit of infrared radiation. Three methods of enhancing transmission of radiation through the active surface of the semiconductor are disclosed. In one method, an anti-reflection layer (19) is coated into the active surface (13) of the semiconductor (11), the anti-reflection layer (19) having an index of refraction equal to the square root of that of the semiconductor (11). In the second method, a passive layer (75) is spaced from the active surface (73) of the semiconductor (71) by a submicron vacuum gap, the passive layer having an index of refractive equal to that of the semiconductor. In the third method, a coupler (91) with a paraboloid reflecting surface (92) is in contact with the active surface (13, 53) of the semiconductor (11, 51), the coupler having an index of refraction about the same as that of the semiconductor.

  7. Advanced heat pump research and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliasha, M. A.

    The Office of Building Energy Research and Development of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has been funding R&D in advanced heat pumps and appliances since 1976. Much of that research has been managed for DOE by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The objective of the Building Equipment Research (BER) program at ORNL has been to generate new concepts and develop a technology base for improving the energy efficiency and load characteristics of energy conversion equipment used in residential and commercial buildings. The research being pursued to achieve these objectives falls under three general areas: thermally activated heat pumps (TAHP), refrigeration systems, and building equipment systems. The TAHP work is concentrated on three technologies: (1) absorption heat pumps; (2) Stirling engine-driven heat pumps; and (3) internal combustion (IC) engine-driven heat pumps. Major project areas in refrigeration systems research include electric heat pumps, ground-coupled heat pumps, and refigerant mixtures. In the building equipment systems areas, project areas include advanced distribution systems, advanced insulation for appliances, and commercial building equipment.

  8. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-01-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  9. Heat and mass transfer considerations in advanced heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect

    Panchal, C.B.; Bell, K.J.

    1992-08-01

    Advanced heat-pump cycles are being investigated for various applications. However, the working media and associated thermal design aspects require new concepts for maintaining high thermal effectiveness and phase equilibrium for achieving maximum possible thermodynamic advantages. In the present study, the heat- and mass-transfer processes in two heat-pump systems -- those based on absorption processes, and those using refrigerant mixtures -- are analyzed. The major technical barriers for achieving the ideal performance predicted by thermodynamic analysis are identified. The analysis provides general guidelines for the development of heat- and mass-transfer equipment for advanced heat-pump systems.

  10. Heat pump with freeze-up prevention

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1981-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat pump apparatus for conditioning a fluid characterized by a fluid handler and path for circulating the fluid in heat exchange relationship with a refrigerant fluid; at least two refrigerant heat exchangers, one for effecting heat exchange with the fluid and a second for effecting heat exchange between refrigerant and a heat exchange fluid and the ambient air; a compressor for efficiently compressing the refrigerant; at least one throttling valve for throttling liquid refrigerant; a refrigerant circuit; refrigerant; a source of heat exchange fluid; heat exchange fluid circulating device and heat exchange fluid circuit for circulating the heat exchange fluid in heat exchange relationship with the refrigerant; and valves or switches for selecting the heat exchangers and direction of flow of the refrigerant therethrough for selecting a particular mode of operation. The heat exchange fluid prevents freeze up of the second heat exchanger by keeping the temperature above the dew point; and, optionally, provides heat for efficient operation.

  11. Transient Analysis of a Magnetic Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, E. A.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental heat pump that uses a rare earth element as the refrigerant is modeled using NASTRAN. The refrigerant is a ferromagnetic metal whose temperature rises when a magnetic field is applied and falls when the magnetic field is removed. The heat pump is used as a refrigerator to remove heat from a reservoir and discharge it through a heat exchanger. In the NASTRAN model the components modeled are represented by one-dimensional ROD elements. Heat flow in the solids and fluid are analyzed. The problem is mildly nonlinear since the heat capacity of the refrigerant is temperature-dependent. One simulation run consists of a series of transient analyses, each representing one stroke of the heat pump. An auxiliary program was written that uses the results of one NASTRAN analysis to generate data for the next NASTRAN analysis.

  12. Pump for delivering heated fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabelman, E. E. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A thermomechanical pump particularly suited for use in pumping a warming fluid obtained from an RTG (Radioisotope Thermal Generator) through science and flight instrumentation aboard operative spacecraft is described. The invention is characterized by a pair of operatively related cylinders, each including a reciprocating piston head dividing the cylinder into a pressure chamber confining therein a vaporizable fluid, and a pumping chamber for propelling the warming fluid, and a fluid delivery circuit for alternately delivering the warming fluid from the RTG through the pressure chamber of one cylinder to the pumping chamber of the other cylinder, whereby the vaporizable fluid within the pair of pressure chambers alternately is vaporized and condensed for driving the associated pistons in pumping and intake strokes.

  13. Absorption heat pump for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Tuan; Simon, William E.; Warrier, Gopinath R.; Woramontri, Woranun

    1993-01-01

    In the first part, the performance of the Absorption Heat Pump (AHP) with water-sulfuric acid and water-magnesium chloride as two new refrigerant-absorbent fluid pairs was investigated. A model was proposed for the analysis of the new working pairs in a heat pump system, subject to different temperature lifts. Computer codes were developed to calculate the Coefficient of Performance (COP) of the system with the thermodynamic properties of the working fluids obtained from the literature. The study shows the potential of water-sulfuric acid as a satisfactory replacement for water-lithium bromide in the targeted temperature range. The performance of the AHP using water-magnesium chloride as refrigerant-absorbent pair does not compare well with those obtained using water-lithium bromide. The second part concentrated on the design and testing of a simple ElectroHydrodynamic (EHD) Pump. A theoretical design model based on continuum electromechanics was analyzed to predict the performance characteristics of the EHD pump to circulate the fluid in the absorption heat pump. A numerical method of solving the governing equations was established to predict the velocity profile, pressure - flow rate relationship and efficiency of the pump. The predicted operational characteristics of the EHD pump is comparable to that of turbomachinery hardware; however, the overall efficiency of the electromagnetic pump is much lower. An experimental investigation to verify the numerical results was conducted. The pressure - flow rate performance characteristics and overall efficiency of the pump obtained experimentally agree well with the theoretical model.

  14. Hot Topics! Heat Pumps and Geothermal Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2009-01-01

    The recent rapid rises in the cost of energy has significantly increased interest in alternative energy sources. The author discusses the underlying principles of heat pumps and geothermal energy. Related activities for technology education students are included.

  15. Geothermal Heat Pumps for Federal Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    1999-08-01

    OFFICE OF GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES Geothermal Heat Pumps for Federal Buildings The U.S. Government spends approximately $8 billion annually on its energy needs. To reduce energy use in Federal buildings, President Bill Clinton issued Executive Order 13123 in June 1999, which calls for a 35% reduction in Federal energy use from 1985 levels by 2010. Geothermal heat pumps--when installed in virtually any type of building--can help accomplish this goal with energy savings of up to 40%. Geothermal he.

  16. Self-pumping solar heating system with geyser pumping action

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, E.L.; Bartera, R.E.

    1984-10-23

    A self-pumping solar heating system having a collector including a multitude of small diameter riser tubes from which heated liquid is pumped into a header by a geyser action. A vapor condenser assures a header pressure conducive to bubble nucleation in the riser tube upper end segments. The level of liquid within the header or its outlet is higher than the liquid level in the riser tubes to produce a gravity imbalance capable of circulating heated liquid past a storage heat exchanger, below the header, and then upwardly through the closed vapor condenser in the header prior to return to a collector inlet manifold. A modified header utilizes an open vapor condenser in vapor communication with the collector header.

  17. Capillary pumped loop body heat exchanger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, Theodore D. (Inventor); Wren, deceased, Paul (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A capillary pumped loop for transferring heat from one body part to another body part, the capillary pumped loop comprising a capillary evaporator for vaporizing a liquid refrigerant by absorbing heat from a warm body part, a condenser for turning a vaporized refrigerant into a liquid by transferring heat from the vaporized liquid to a cool body part, a first tube section connecting an output port of the capillary evaporator to an input of the condenser, and a second tube section connecting an output of the condenser to an input port of the capillary evaporator. A wick may be provided within the condenser. A pump may be provided between the second tube section and the input port of the capillary evaporator. Additionally, an esternal heat source or heat sink may be utilized.

  18. Thermodynamic evaluation of a microscale heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Drost, M.K.; Beckette, M.; Wegeng, R.

    1994-11-01

    The development of microscale thermal components has reached a level of maturity that suggests that complete microthermal systems can be developed. This paper presents the results of a thermodynamic evaluation of a microscale heat pump for space heating and cooling applications. The concept involves fabricating individual unit processes on separate sheets of material and then combining the sheets to form complete systems. The sheet architecture allows a large number of microheat pumps to be fabricated and operated in parallel. Results of the thermodynamic analysis suggest that the microscale heat pump is theoretically feasible. Pressure drop in the evaporators and condensers was not significant, and performance requirements for the microscale compressor are challenging but not unattainable. Results also suggest that there is significant potential for improving heat pump performance by optimizing the integration of the heat pump with the microchannel evaporators and condensers. Sensitivity studies investigated the impact of working fluid selection, heat exchanger approach temperature, and compressor efficiency on cycle performance. Based on the results of this evaluation, additional research on microscale heat exchangers and compressors is suggested.

  19. Solar-powered Rankine heat pump for heating and cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousseau, J.

    1978-01-01

    The design, operation and performance of a familyy of solar heating and cooling systems are discussed. The systems feature a reversible heat pump operating with R-11 as the working fluid and using a motor-driven centrifugal compressor. In the cooling mode, solar energy provides the heat source for a Rankine power loop. The system is operational with heat source temperatures ranging from 155 to 220 F; the estimated coefficient of performance is 0.7. In the heating mode, the vapor-cycle heat pump processes solar energy collected at low temperatures (40 to 80 F). The speed of the compressor can be adjusted so that the heat pump capacity matches the load, allowing a seasonal coefficient of performance of about 8 to be attained.

  20. Efficiency optimization of the classical molecular heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong-Qin; Zhong, Wei-Rong

    2011-07-01

    We investigate a three-terminal heat pump through classical molecular dynamics simulations. It is reported an asymmetrical structure is necessary for the molecular heat pump. There exists an optimum pumping efficiency by controlling the asymmetry and the average temperature of the heat pump. The efficiency increases with the decreasing of the temperature difference between the hot and cold heat baths.

  1. The application of heat pump water heating in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd, A.S.

    1995-12-01

    The Hawaiian Electric Company is the national leader in the application and general commercial acceptance of heat pump water heating. Since 1980, over 600 commercial-size heat pump water heaters have been installed in Hawaii. Over 300 apartment buildings with over 35,000 living units, some 30 hotels, 8 hospitals and numerous restaurants and lauderettes have replaced their central gas water heating systems with commercial-size heat pump water heaters. This exceptionally efficient electrotechnology permits hotels and apartments to extract significant amounts of solar energy from the warm sub-tropical atmosphere or to recycle waste heat from the building`s air conditioning system for water heating. Heat pump water heaters discharge thermal energy from their condensers that is 2.5 to 6.5 times greater than the electric energy that they consume. Existing gas and oil-fired water heater efficiencies will vary from 0.50 to 0.75 depending on their age, their duty cycle, their adjustment and the cleanliness of their heat exchange surfaces. As a result, these conventional fuel fired water heaters consume 3 to 12 times more energy than the heat pumps that replace them.

  2. Cold Climates Heat Pump Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Abdelaziz, Omar; Shen, Bo

    2012-01-01

    Heat pumps provide an efficient heating method; however they suffer from sever capacity and performance degradation at low ambient conditions. This has deterred market penetration in cold climates. There is a continuing effort to find an efficient air source cold climate heat pump that maintains acceptable capacity and performance at low ambient conditions. Systematic optimization techniques provide a reliable approach for the design of such systems. This paper presents a step-by-step approach for the design optimization of cold climate heat pumps. We first start by describing the optimization problem: objective function, constraints, and design space. Then we illustrate how to perform this design optimization using an open source publically available optimization toolbox. The response of the heat pump design was evaluated using a validated component based vapor compression model. This model was treated as a black box model within the optimization framework. Optimum designs for different system configurations are presented. These optimum results were further analyzed to understand the performance tradeoff and selection criteria. The paper ends with a discussion on the use of systematic optimization for the cold climate heat pump design.

  3. Capillary-Condenser-Pumped Heat-Transfer Loop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverstein, Calvin C.

    1989-01-01

    Heat being transferred supplies operating power. Capillary-condenser-pumped heat-transfer loop similar to heat pipe and to capillary-evaporator-pumped heat-transfer loop in that heat-transfer fluid pumped by evaporation and condensation of fluid at heat source and sink, respectively. Capillary condenser pump combined with capillary evaporator pump to form heat exchanger circulating heat-transfer fluids in both loops. Transport of heat more nearly isothermal. Thermal stress in loop reduced, and less external surface area needed in condenser section for rejection of heat to heat sink.

  4. Lunar base heat pump, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Harvey, A.; Lovell, T.; Walker, David H.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the Phase 1 process and analysis used to select a refrigerant and thermodynamic cycle as the basis of a vapor compression heat pump requiring a high temperature lift, then to perform a preliminary design to implement the selected concept, including major component selection. Use of a vapor compression heat pump versus other types was based on prior work performed for the Electric Power Research Institute. A high lift heat pump is needed to enable a thermal control system to remove heat down to 275 K from a habitable volume when the external thermal environment is severe. For example, a long-term lunar base habitat will reject heat from a space radiator to a 325 K environment. The first step in the selection process was to perform an optimization trade study, quantifying the effect of radiator operating temperature and heat pump efficiency on total system mass; then, select the radiator operating temperature corresponding to the lowest system mass. Total system mass included radiators, all heat pump components, and the power supply system. The study showed that lunar night operation, with no temperature lift, dictated the radiator size. To operate otherwise would require a high mass penalty to store power. With the defined radiation surface, and heat pump performances assumed to be from 40 percent to 60 percent of the Carnot ideal, the optimum heat rejection temperature ranged from 387 K to 377 K, as a function of heat pump performance. Refrigerant and thermodynamic cycles were then selected to best meet the previously determined design conditions. The system was then adapted as a ground-based prototype lifting temperature to 360 K (versus 385 K for flight unit) and using readily available commercial-grade components. Over 40 refrigerants, separated into wet and dry compression behavioral types, were considered in the selection process. Refrigerants were initially screened for acceptable critical temperature. The acceptable refrigerants were

  5. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, Joseph C.

    1997-01-01

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve.

  6. Heat pump system with selective space cooling

    DOEpatents

    Pendergrass, J.C.

    1997-05-13

    A reversible heat pump provides multiple heating and cooling modes and includes a compressor, an evaporator and heat exchanger all interconnected and charged with refrigerant fluid. The heat exchanger includes tanks connected in series to the water supply and a condenser feed line with heat transfer sections connected in counterflow relationship. The heat pump has an accumulator and suction line for the refrigerant fluid upstream of the compressor. Sub-cool transfer tubes associated with the accumulator/suction line reclaim a portion of the heat from the heat exchanger. A reversing valve switches between heating/cooling modes. A first bypass is operative to direct the refrigerant fluid around the sub-cool transfer tubes in the space cooling only mode and during which an expansion valve is utilized upstream of the evaporator/indoor coil. A second bypass is provided around the expansion valve. A programmable microprocessor activates the first bypass in the cooling only mode and deactivates the second bypass, and vice-versa in the multiple heating modes for said heat exchanger. In the heating modes, the evaporator may include an auxiliary outdoor coil for direct supplemental heat dissipation into ambient air. In the multiple heating modes, the condensed refrigerant fluid is regulated by a flow control valve. 4 figs.

  7. Heat Pumps With Direct Expansion Solar Collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Sadasuke

    In this paper, the studies of heat pump systems using solar collectors as the evaporators, which have been done so far by reserchers, are reviwed. Usually, a solar collector without any cover is preferable to one with ac over because of the necessity of absorbing heat from the ambient air when the intensity of the solar energy on the collector is not enough. The performance of the collector depends on its area and the intensity of the convective heat transfer on the surface. Fins are fixed on the backside of the collector-surface or on the tube in which the refrigerant flows in order to increase the convective heat transfer. For the purpose of using a heat pump efficiently throughout year, a compressor with variable capacity is applied. The solar assisted heat pump can be used for air conditioning at night during the summer. Only a few groups of people have studied cooling by using solar assisted heat pump systems. In Japan, a kind of system for hot water supply has been produced commercially in a company and a kind of system for air conditioning has been installed in buildings commercially by another company.

  8. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; Lackey, R.S.; Fagan, T.J. Jr.; Veyo, S.E.; Humphrey, J.R.

    1984-05-22

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module, an air mover module, and a resistance heat package module, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor in a space adjacent the heat exchanger, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations. 9 figs.

  9. Design manual. [High temperature heat pump for heat recovery system

    SciTech Connect

    Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.; Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.

    1980-01-01

    The design and performance of a waste heat recovery system which utilizes a high temperature heat pump and which is intended for use in those industries incorporating indirect drying processes are described. It is estimated that use of this heat recovery system in the paper, pulp, and textile industries in the US could save 3.9 x 10/sup 14/ Btu/yr. Information is included on over all and component design for the heat pump system, comparison of prime movers for powering the compressor, control equipment, and system economics. (LCL)

  10. Heat Balance Study for Submersible Mixer Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.Y.

    2003-07-21

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on waste temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the Type-I SRS tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing long-shaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The model will also be used to provide input to the operation planning. This planning will be used as input to pump run duration in order to maintain temperature requirements within the tank during SMP operation.

  11. Heat pump R and D at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, R. D.; Creswick, F. A.

    Heat pump system and component performance evaluations at steady state and under frosting conditions are described. A computer model of electric motor driven heat pumps was developed to explore the practical limits of steady-state heating efficiency of conventional air-source heat pumps, and to demonstrate an approach to computer-aided heat pump design techniques. Scoping calculations of alternative heat pump systems, such as aircycle heat pumps and electric motor driven Stirling heat pumps are presented. Computer programs were written to model the expected performance of vertical-pipe ground-coupled heat exchangers, and for the detailed performance analysis of air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers with complex refrigerant circuiting by calculating the performance of each tube of the heat exchanger individually. Seasonal performance factors for air-source heat pumps using hour-by-hour calculations with empirical temperature dependent degradation factors were estimated.

  12. Natural Thermoelectric Heat Pump in Social Wasps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishay, Jacob S.; Pertsis, Vitaly; Rave, Eran; Goren, Alon; Bergman, David J.

    2003-05-01

    Photographs of wasps or hornets, taken with different temperature sensitive infrared cameras, reveal body temperatures that are sometimes significantly lower than the ambient temperature. This suggests that the hornets possess an intrinsic biological heat pump mechanism which can be used to achieve such cooling. Evidence is presented to substantiate this novel suggestion and to argue that the heat pump is most likely implemented by exploiting a thermoelectric effect in the hornet cuticle. Such a natural heat pump can conceivably also serve to cool the active hornet, engaged in daytime activities outside the nest at ambient temperatures exceeding 40 °C, to a body temperature that is low enough to allow its survival in extreme thermal conditions. It might also function as a means of raising the body temperature up to a level that enables the hornet to remain active even when the ambient temperature is as low as 10 °C.

  13. Electric Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles: Electric-Powered Adsorption Heat Pump for Electric Vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    2011-11-21

    HEATS Project: PNNL is developing a new class of advanced nanomaterial called an electrical metal organic framework (EMOF) for EV heating and cooling systems. The EMOF would function similar to a conventional heat pump, which circulates heat or cold to the cabin as needed. However, by directly controlling the EMOF's properties with electricity, the PNNL design is expected to use much less energy than traditional heating and cooling systems. The EMOF-based heat pumps would be light, compact, efficient, and run using virtually no moving parts.

  14. Performance of a solar augmented heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedinger, A. F. G.; Tomlinson, J. J.; Reid, R. L.; Chaffin, D. J.

    Performance of a residential size solar augmented heat pump is reported for the 1979-1980 heating season. The facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee, has a measured heat load coefficient of 339.5 watt/C (644 BTU/hr- F). The solar augmented heat pump system consists of 7.4 cu m of one inch diameter crushed limestone. The heat pump is a nominal 8.8 KW (2 1/2 ton) high efficiency unit. The system includes electric resistance heaters to give the option of adding thermal energy to the pebble bed storage during utility off-peak periods, thus offering considerable load management capability. A 15 KW electric resistance duct heater is used to add thermal energy to the pebble bin as required during off-peak periods. Hourly thermal performance and on site weather data was taken for the period November 1, 1979, to April 13, 1980. Thermal performance data consists of heat flow summations for all modes of the system, pebble bed temperatures, and space temperature. Weather data consists of dry bulb temperature, dew point temperature, total global insolation (in the plane of the collector), and wind speed and direction. An error analysis was performed and the least accurate of the measurements was determined to be the heat flow at 5%. Solar system thermal performance factor was measured to be 8.77. The heat pump thermal performance factor was 1.64. Total system seasonal performance factor was measured to be 1.66. Using a modified version of TRNSYS, the thermal performance of this system was simulated. When simulation results were compared with data collected onsite, the predicted heat flow and power consumption generally were within experimental accuracy.

  15. Practical and efficient magnetic heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1978-01-01

    Method for pumping heat magnetically at room temperature is more economical than existing refrigeration systems. Method uses natural magneto-thermal effect of gadolinium metal to establish temperature gradient across length of tube. Regenerative cyclic process in which gadolinium sample is magnetized and gives off heat at one end of tube, and then is demagnetized at other end to absorb heat has established temperature gradients of 144 degrees F in experiments near room temperature. Other materials with large magnetothermal effects can be used below room temperature. Possible commercial applications include freeze-drying and food processing, cold storage, and heating and cooling of buildings, plants, and ships.

  16. Submersible pumping system with heat transfer mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Daniel Francis Alan; Prenger, F. Coyne; Hill, Dallas D; Jankowski, Todd Andrew

    2014-04-15

    A submersible pumping system for downhole use in extracting fluids containing hydrocarbons from a well. In one embodiment, the pumping system comprises a rotary induction motor, a motor casing, one or more pump stages, and a cooling system. The rotary induction motor rotates a shaft about a longitudinal axis of rotation. The motor casing houses the rotary induction motor such that the rotary induction motor is held in fluid isolation from the fluid being extracted. The pump stages are attached to the shaft outside of the motor casing, and are configured to impart fluid being extracted from the well with an increased pressure. The cooling system is disposed at least partially within the motor casing, and transfers heat generated by operation of the rotary induction motor out of the motor casing.

  17. Dual-stroke heat pump field performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veyo, S. E.

    1984-11-01

    Two nearly identical proprototype systems, each employing a unique dual-stroke compressor, were built and tested. One was installed in an occupied residence in Jeannette, Pa. It has provided the heating and cooling required from that time to the present. The system has functioned without failure of any prototypical advanced components, although early field experience did suffer from deficiencies in the software for the breadboard micro processor control system. Analysis of field performance data indicates a heating performance factor (HSPF) of 8.13 Stu/Wa, and a cooling energy efficiency (SEER) of 8.35 Scu/Wh. Data indicate that the beat pump is oversized for the test house since the observed lower balance point is 3 F whereas 17 F La optimum. Oversizing coupled with the use of resistance heat ot maintain delivered air temperature warmer than 90 F results in the consumption of more resistance heat than expected, more unit cycling, and therefore lower than expected energy efficiency. Our analysis indicates that with optimal mixing the dual stroke heat pump will yield as HSFF 30% better than a single capacity heat pump representative of high efficiency units in the market place today for the observed weather profile.

  18. Multi-Function Gas Fired Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Abu-Heiba, Ahmad; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2015-11-30

    The aim of this project was to design a residential fuel fired heat pump and further improve efficiency in collaboration with an industry partner – Southwest Gas, the developer of the Nextaire commercial rooftop fuel-fired heat pump. Work started in late 2010. After extensive search for suitable engines, one manufactured by Marathon was selected. Several prototypes were designed and built over the following four years. Design changes were focused on lowering the cost of components and the cost of manufacturing. The design evolved to a final one that yielded the lowest cost. The final design also incorporates noise and vibration reduction measures that were verified to be effective through a customer survey. ETL certification is currently (as of November 2015) underway. Southwest Gas is currently in talks with GTI to reach an agreement through which GTI will assess the commercial viability and potential of the heat pump. Southwest Gas is searching for investors to manufacture the heat pump and introduce it to the market.

  19. Process Integration Study [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1992-06-01

    This work was carried out in two phases: Phase 1; identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2; evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  20. Heat pump evaluation for Space Station ATCS evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ames, Brian E.; Petete, Patricia A.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary feasibility assessment of the application of a vapor compression heat pump to the Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) of SSF is presented. This paper focuses on the methodology of raising the surface temperature of the radiators for improved heat rejection. Some of the effects of the vapor compression cycle on SSF examined include heat pump integration into ATCS, constraints on the heat pump operating parameters, and heat pump performance enhancements.

  1. Residential Variable-Capacity Heat Pumps Sized to Heating Loads

    SciTech Connect

    Munk, Jeffrey D.; Jackson, Roderick K.; Odukomaiya, Adewale; Gehl, Anthony C.

    2014-01-01

    Variable capacity heat pumps are an emerging technology offering significant energy savings potential and improved efficiency. With conventional single-speed systems, it is important to appropriately size heat pumps for the cooling load as over-sizing would result in cycling and insufficient latent capacity required for humidity control. These appropriately sized systems are often under-sized for the heating load and require inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat to meet the heating demand. Variable capacity heat pumps address these shortcomings by providing an opportunity to intentionally size systems for the dominant heating season load without adverse effects of cycling or insufficient dehumidification in the cooling season. This intentionally-sized system could result in significant energy savings in the heating season, as the need for inefficient supplemental electric resistance heat is drastically reduced. This is a continuation of a study evaluating the energy consumption of variable capacity heat pumps installed in two unoccupied research homes in Farragut, a suburb of Knoxville, Tennessee. In this particular study, space conditioning systems are intentionally sized for the heating season loads to provide an opportunity to understand and evaluate the impact this would have on electric resistance heat use and dehumidification. The results and conclusions drawn through this research are valid and specific for portions of the Southeastern and Midwestern United States falling in the mixed-humid climate zone. While other regions in the U.S. do not experience this type of climate, this work provides a basis for, and can help understand the implications of other climate zones on residential space conditioning energy consumption. The data presented here will provide a framework for fine tuning residential building EnergyPlus models that are being developed.

  2. Solar-powered turbocompressor heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Landerman, A.M.; Biancardi, F.R.; Melikian, G.; Meader, M.D.; Kepler, C.E.; Anderson, T.J.; Sitler, J.W.

    1982-08-12

    The turbocompressor comprises a power turbine and a compressor turbine having respective rotors and on a common shaft, rotatably supported by bearings. A first working fluid is supplied by a power loop and is expanded in the turbine. A second working fluid is compressed in the turbine and is circulated in a heat pump loop. A lubricant is mixed with the second working fluid but is excluded from the first working fluid. The bearings are cooled and lubricated by a system which circulates the second working fluid and the intermixed lubricant through the bearings. Such system includes a pump, a thermostatic expansion valve for expanding the working fluid into the space between the bearings, and a return conduit system for withdrawing the expanded working fluid after it passes through the bearings and for returning the working fluid to the evaporator. A shaft seal excludes the lubricant from the power turbine. The power loop includes a float operable by liquid working fluid in the condenser for controlling a recirculation valve so as to maintain a minimum liquid level in the condenser, while causing a feed pump to pump most of the working fluid into the vapor generator. The heat pump compressor loop includes a float in the condenser for operating and expansion valve to maintain a minimum liquid working fluid level in the condenser while causing most of the working fluid to be expanded into the evaporator.

  3. Performance of a solar augmented heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bedinger, A. F. G.; Tomlinsin, J. J.; Reid, R. L.; Chaffin, D. J.

    Performance results from a test house equipped with a parallel solar augmented heat pump system with off-peak storage and a utility interconnection back-up, are presented. The collector array consisted of 12 air heating flat plates with a 9 l/sec flow. Thermal storage was consigned to a 260 cu ft crushed limestone pebble bed, with an 8.8 kW heat pump used to draw heat from storage during off-peak hours and a 15 kW electrical resistance heater used to charge the pebble bed. Monitoring and data recording were carried out on all energy inputs and outputs of the systems, and a modified TRNSYS program was employed to model the system performance. The data indicate that although the system offered the possibility of reducing the utility capacity, the addition of the solar system did not significantly augment the performance of the heat-pump system, at least in terms of the cost of supplementary electricity.

  4. Magnetic heat pumping near room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, G. V.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that magnetic heat pumping can be made practical at room temperature by using a ferromagnetic material with a Curie point at or near operating temperature and an appropriate regenerative thermodynamic cycle. Measurements are performed which show that gadolinium is a resonable working material and it is found that the application of a 7-T magnetic field to gadolinium at the Curie point (293 K) causes a heat release of 4 kJ/kg under isothermal conditions or a temperature rise of 14 K under adiabatic conditions. A regeneration technique can be used to lift the load of the lattice and electronic heat capacities off the magnetic system in order to span a reasonable temperature difference and to pump as much entropy per cycle as possible

  5. Ground-coupled heat pump demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, T.

    1983-09-01

    This report presents the results of a field evaluation of an innovative ground-coupled heat pump system which features a unique collector design and system control strategy aimed at maximizing heat pump performance by minimizing ground temperature change. The collector design includes several short closed loops, each consisting of a pair of polyethylene pipes buried 12 to 18 inches apart in a horizontal trench approximately six feet below ground. A micropressor is used to control flow and optimize system operation. Extrapolation of the results of experiments conducted on a unit length (250 ft.) of collector field during the 1981-82 and 1982-83 heating seasons indicates that a system seasonal performance factor of 2.75 to 3.0 will be achievable in practice.

  6. Evaluation of Thermocompression Heat Pump Performance for American Maize, Decatur, AL [Advanced Industrial Heat Pump Applications and Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Eastwood, A.

    1993-06-01

    This work was carried out in two phases: Phase 1, identification of opportunities for heat pumps in industrial applications and Phase 2, evaluation of heat pumps in industrial applications. In Phase 1, pinch analysis was applied to several industrial sites to identify the best opportunities for heat pumping and other forms of heat integration. In Phase 2, more detailed analyses were undertaken, including the evaluation of a heat pump installed as a recommendation of Phase 1.

  7. Indoor unit for electric heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; Lackey, Robert S.; Fagan, Jr., Thomas J.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Humphrey, Joseph R.

    1984-01-01

    An indoor unit for an electric heat pump is provided in modular form including a refrigeration module 10, an air mover module 12, and a resistance heat package module 14, the refrigeration module including all of the indoor refrigerant circuit components including the compressor 36 in a space adjacent the heat exchanger 28, the modules being adapted to be connected to air flow communication in several different ways as shown in FIGS. 4-7 to accommodate placement of the unit in various orientations.

  8. DOE Webinar - Residential Geothermal Heat Pump Retrofits (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, E. R.

    2010-12-14

    This presentation was given December 14, 2010, as part of DOE's Webinar series. The presentation discusses geothermal heat pump retrofits, technology options, and an overview of geothermal energy and geothermal heat pumps.

  9. Hydroxide absorption heat pumps with spray absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Summerer, F.; Alefeld, G.; Zeigler, F.; Riesch, P.

    1996-11-01

    The absorber is one of the most expensive components of an absorption heat pump or chiller, respectively. In order to reduce the cost of a heat exchanger, much effort is invested into searching for additives for heat transfer enhancement. Another way to reduce heat exchanger cost, especially for machines with low capacities, is to use an adiabatic spray absorber. The basic principles of the spray absorber is to perform heat and mass transfer separated from each other in two different components. In this way the heat can be rejected effectively in a liquid-liquid heat exchanger, whereas the mass transfer occurs subsequently in a simple vessel. The spray technique can not only save heat exchanger cost in conventional absorption systems working with water and lithium bromide, it also allows the use of quite different working fluids such as hydroxides, which have lower heat transfer coefficients in falling films. Moreover, the separated heat transfer can easily be performed in a liquid-to-air heat exchanger. Hence it is obvious to use hydroxides that allow for a high temperature lift for building an air-cooled chiller with spray absorber. In this presentation theoretical and experimental investigations of the spray absorber as well as the setup will be described. Finally, possible applications will be outlined.

  10. Open-cycle vapor compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhuja, R.; Becker, F. E.

    1981-05-01

    Recovery and upgrading of low-grade steam or waste heat sources offers a great potential of energy conservation. Thermo Electron is developing an open cycle vapor compression steam heat pump to meet this objective. The system utilizes excess low-pressure steam or that produced from an industrial excess heat source with a waste heat boiler and compresses this steam to the desired pressure level for process use. The compressor is driven by a prime mover such as a gas turbine, gas engine, etc. The prime mover exhaust heat also can be recovered to generate additional process steam. The fuel consumption of this system can be as low as 30 to 50 percent in comparison to a direct-fired boiler over the expected range of process conditions. Simple payback periods as low as one year can be achieved.

  11. Cradle/pump heating system operation and maintenance manual

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, S.L., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-02-01

    This is the operation and maintenance manual for the 241-SY-101 Cradle/Pump Heating System. The Heating System provides the means to heat the pump (HMT {number_sign}2) during cold weather to assure safe and smooth pump installation.

  12. Refrigerant charge management in a heat pump water heater

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jie; Hampton, Justin W.

    2014-06-24

    Heat pumps that heat or cool a space and that also heat water, refrigerant management systems for such heat pumps, methods of managing refrigerant charge, and methods for heating and cooling a space and heating water. Various embodiments deliver refrigerant gas to a heat exchanger that is not needed for transferring heat, drive liquid refrigerant out of that heat exchanger, isolate that heat exchanger against additional refrigerant flowing into it, and operate the heat pump while the heat exchanger is isolated. The heat exchanger can be isolated by closing an electronic expansion valve, actuating a refrigerant management valve, or both. Refrigerant charge can be controlled or adjusted by controlling how much liquid refrigerant is driven from the heat exchanger, by letting refrigerant back into the heat exchanger, or both. Heat pumps can be operated in different modes of operation, and segments of refrigerant conduit can be interconnected with various components.

  13. Heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for Felix Spa, Romania

    SciTech Connect

    Rosca, Marcel; Maghiar, Teodor

    1996-01-24

    The paper presents a pre-feasibility type study of a proposed heat pump assisted geothermal heating system for an average hotel in Felix Spa, Romania. After a brief presentation of the geothermal reservoir, the paper gives the methodology and the results of the technical and economical calculations. The technical and economical viability of the proposed system is discussed in detail in the final part of the paper.

  14. Advanced heat pump cycle for district heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Radermacher, R.

    1991-07-01

    A bread board heat pump was designed and built to test the performance of a vapor compression heat pump with two stage ammonia-water solution circuits. The design was updated based on the experience gained with the single stage version of this heat pump. A major improvement was obtained by eliminating the rectifier. The new scheme was first investigated by computer simulation and then incorporated in the experimental setup. Water balance in the high and low temperature circuits is now maintained by bleeding up to 2.5% of the weak solution flow from one solution circuit to the other. The advantages of this scheme are reduced first cost, simplified design and control, 20--30% improvement in cooling coefficient of performance and 10--15% increase in cooling capacity as compared to the cycle with a rectifier. Coefficients of performance in the range of 0.84 to 1.03 were obtained experimentally for a temperature lift of 100-K. The pressure ratios encountered were in the range of 7.6 to 9.9, which are 35 to 50% of the pressure ratio expected for a conventional heat pump. Thus the results demonstrate that high temperature lifts can be achieved at pressure ratios which are less than half as large as for conventional systems. The cooling capacities were in the range of 2.79 to 4.21 kW. 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Field Monitoring Protocol. Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, C. E.

    2013-02-01

    This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

  16. Field Monitoring Protocol: Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, B.; Earle, L.; Christensen, D.; Maguire, J.; Wilson, E.; Hancock, E.

    2013-02-01

    This document provides a standard field monitoring protocol for evaluating the installed performance of Heat Pump Water Heaters in residential buildings. The report is organized to be consistent with the chronology of field test planning and execution. Research questions are identified first, followed by a discussion of analysis methods, and then the details of measuring the required information are laid out. A field validation of the protocol at a house near the NREL campus is included for reference.

  17. Phonon Cooling by an Optomechanical Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ying; Bariani, F.; Meystre, P.

    2015-11-01

    We propose and analyze theoretically a cavity optomechanical analog of a heat pump that uses a polariton fluid to cool mechanical modes coupled to a single precooled phonon mode via external modulation of the substrate of the mechanical resonator. This approach permits us to cool phonon modes of arbitrary frequencies not limited by the cavity-optical field detuning deep into the quantum regime from room temperature.

  18. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  19. Open-cycle vapor compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, F. E.; Ruggles, A. E.

    A prototype gas-fired steam heat pump was developed. The system utilizes a dry screw compressor driven by a 500-hp natural gas industrial engine. The system can recompress 10,000 lb per hr of clean steam over a 3 to 1 pressure ratio. The fuel consumption of this system is approximately 50 percent that of a direct-fired boiler. A similar size system capable of operating with contaminated steam is also being developed.

  20. Innovative Miniaturized Heat Pumps for Buildings: Modular Thermal Hub for Building Heating, Cooling and Water Heating

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Georgia Tech is using innovative components and system design to develop a new type of absorption heat pump. Georgia Tech’s new heat pumps are energy efficient, use refrigerants that do not emit greenhouse gases, and can run on energy from combustion, waste heat, or solar energy. Georgia Tech is leveraging enhancements to heat and mass transfer technology possible in microscale passages and removing hurdles to the use of heat-activated heat pumps that have existed for more than a century. Use of microscale passages allows for miniaturization of systems that can be packed as monolithic full-system packages or discrete, distributed components enabling integration into a variety of residential and commercial buildings. Compared to conventional heat pumps, Georgia Tech’s design innovations will create an absorption heat pump that is much smaller, has higher energy efficiency, and can also be mass produced at a lower cost and assembly time.

  1. Rotary absorption heat pump sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamberger, J. A.; Zalondek, F. R.

    1990-03-01

    Conserve Resources, Incorporated is currently developing an innovative, patented absorption heat pump. The heat pump uses rotation and thin film technology to enhance the absorption process and to provide a more efficient, compact system. The results are presented of a sensitivity analysis of the rotary absorption heat pump (RAHP) performance conducted to further the development of a 1-ton RAHP. The objective of the uncertainty analysis was to determine the sensitivity of RAHP steady state performance to uncertainties in design parameters. Prior to conducting the uncertainty analysis, a computer model was developed to describe the performance of the RAHP thermodynamic cycle. The RAHP performance is based on many interrelating factors, not all of which could be investigated during the sensitivity analysis. Confirmatory measurements of LiBr/H2O properties during absorber/generator operation will provide experimental verification that the system is operating as it was designed to operate. Quantities to be measured include: flow rate in the absorber and generator, film thickness, recirculation rate, and the effects of rotational speed on these parameters.

  2. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    R.K. Johnson

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor “boosted heat pump” technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pump system operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops.

  3. Demonstration of a heat pump water heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, R. P.

    1982-03-01

    In the period between March 1979 and January 1980, 85 prototype heat pump water heaters were installed in single-family residences. Each system was monitored for a period of one year and total program monitoring was concluded at the end of December 1980. The field demonstration provided a total of 643 unit-months of usable operational data which showed an average OOP of 1.93, or an average 48% operating savings compared to resistance water heating. Average operating conditions were 73 gallons of 140 F water consumed each day with an average inlet water temperature of 71 F. Despite a high initial failure rate for the prototypes, which resulted in a protracted debugging period, consumer reaction to the system was extremely positive. The data suggests that the HPWH would save the average consumer in the test program 2917 kWh per year. Measurable impacts on heating/cooling systems were detected in only 8% of the test homes.

  4. Experimental Validation of the Optimum Design of an Automotive Air-to-Air Thermoelectric Air Conditioner (TEAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Attar, Alaa; Lee, HoSung; Weera, Sean

    2015-06-01

    The optimization of thermoelectric air conditioners (TEAC) has been a challenging topic due to the multitude of variables that must be considered. The present work discusses an experimental validation of the optimum design for an automotive air-to-air TEAC. The TEAC optimum design was obtained by using a new optimal design method with dimensional analysis that has been recently developed. The design constraints were obtained through a previous analytical study on the same topic. To simplify the problem, a unit cell representing the entire TEAC system was analytically simulated and experimentally tested. Moreover, commercial TEC modules and heat sinks were selected and tested based on the analytical optimum design results.

  5. Thermodynamic Efficiency of Pumped Heat Electricity Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thess, André

    2013-09-01

    Pumped heat electricity storage (PHES) has been recently suggested as a potential solution to the large-scale energy storage problem. PHES requires neither underground caverns as compressed air energy storage (CAES) nor kilometer-sized water reservoirs like pumped hydrostorage and can therefore be constructed anywhere in the world. However, since no large PHES system exists yet, and theoretical predictions are scarce, the efficiency of such systems is unknown. Here we formulate a simple thermodynamic model that predicts the efficiency of PHES as a function of the temperature of the thermal energy storage at maximum output power. The resulting equation is free of adjustable parameters and nearly as simple as the well-known Carnot formula. Our theory predicts that for storage temperatures above 400°C PHES has a higher efficiency than existing CAES and that PHES can even compete with the efficiencies predicted for advanced-adiabatic CAES.

  6. Thermodynamic efficiency of pumped heat electricity storage.

    PubMed

    Thess, André

    2013-09-13

    Pumped heat electricity storage (PHES) has been recently suggested as a potential solution to the large-scale energy storage problem. PHES requires neither underground caverns as compressed air energy storage (CAES) nor kilometer-sized water reservoirs like pumped hydrostorage and can therefore be constructed anywhere in the world. However, since no large PHES system exists yet, and theoretical predictions are scarce, the efficiency of such systems is unknown. Here we formulate a simple thermodynamic model that predicts the efficiency of PHES as a function of the temperature of the thermal energy storage at maximum output power. The resulting equation is free of adjustable parameters and nearly as simple as the well-known Carnot formula. Our theory predicts that for storage temperatures above 400 °C PHES has a higher efficiency than existing CAES and that PHES can even compete with the efficiencies predicted for advanced-adiabatic CAES. PMID:24074066

  7. Cold Climate Heat Pumps Using Tandem Compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2016-01-01

    In cold climate zones, e.g. ASHRAE climate regions IV and V, conventional electric air-source heat pumps (ASHP) do not work well, due to high compressor discharge temperatures, large pressure ratios and inadequate heating capacities at low ambient temperatures. Consequently, significant use of auxiliary strip heating is required to meet the building heating load. We introduce innovative ASHP technologies as part of continuing efforts to eliminate auxiliary strip heat use and maximize heating COP with acceptable cost-effectiveness and reliability. These innovative ASHP were developed using tandem compressors, which are capable of augmenting heating capacity at low temperatures and maintain superior part-load operation efficiency at moderate temperatures. Two options of tandem compressors were studied; the first employs two identical, single-speed compressors, and the second employs two identical, vapor-injection compressors. The investigations were based on system modeling and laboratory evaluation. Both designs have successfully met the performance criteria. Laboratory evaluation showed that the tandem, single-speed compressor ASHP system is able to achieve heating COP = 4.2 at 47 F (8.3 C), COP = 2.9 at 17 F (-8.3 C), and 76% rated capacity and COP = 1.9 at -13 F (-25 C). This yields a HSPF = 11.0 (per AHRI 210/240). The tandem, vapor-injection ASHP is able to reach heating COP = 4.4 at 47 F, COP = 3.1 at 17 F, and 88% rated capacity and COP = 2.0 at -13 F. This yields a HSPF = 12.0. The system modeling and further laboratory evaluation are presented in the paper.

  8. Absorption heat pump in heating and cooling systems of buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, I.

    This report focuses on the operation and applicability of absorption heat pumps (AHP) in building heating and cooling systems. Examples are presented on heating systems of residential buildings and a heating/cooling system of an office building. Despite the limitations of present AHP technology the examples assume AHPs which produce heat at an appropriate temperature level for each application. According to the calculations the primary energy saving potential of AHPs in building specific heat production is 20 to 40 percent. For AHPs coupled with district heating systems the primary energy saving potential can not be unambiguously defined because it is influenced by the production form of district heat, the influence of district heat demand on power generation etc. For the time being economical aspects limit the application potential of AHPs. The profitability of AHP investments is quite poor because of present energy prices, the price ratio of different energy forms and the high investment cost of AHP-systems. The environmental impact of AHPs depend on the fuel used in the generator. Using fuel oil or gas will decrease sulphur and particle emissions but might increase the emissions of NO(x) and hydrocarbons because of the smaller size of combustion units. CFC-emissions will be decreased because AHPs apply alternative refrigerants.

  9. A geothermal heat pump for every home?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, M. Catherine

    Witnesses representing government, industry, and education requested increased federal funding to explore and utilize geothermal resources at a House Subcommittee on Environment hearing July 30. Citing the minimal environmental impact, low cost, and abundance of geothermal energy, and the chance to cut dependence on fossil fuels, the witnesses discussed the geothermal heat pump (GHP)—one of the energy source's most promising applications, according to testimony. The GHP has the capacity to help utility companies manage increased demand for electricity, and its small scale—one to a home—makes it highly accessible.

  10. Operator manual: High temperature heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, D. F.; Maples, G.; Burch, T. E.; Chancellor, P. D.

    1980-03-01

    Experimental data were obtained from operating a high temperature heat pump system. The use of methanol as a working fluid necessitated careful monitoring of refrigerant temperatures and pressures with chemical analysis performed on the working fluid during scheduled down time. Materials sent to vendors and quotes received concerning equipment (compressor, evaporator, condensor, air heater, dryer, two accumulator tanks, and three expansion valves) are discussed. The detailed design and pricing estimates are included. Additional information on layout and construction; start-up; testing; shut down; scheduled maintenance and inspection; safety precautions; control system; and trouble shooting is presented.

  11. Ground Source Heat Pump Computational Results

    DOE Data Explorer

    James Menart

    2013-07-31

    This data submission includes simulation results for ground loop heat pump systems located in 6 different cities across the United States. The cities are Boston, MA, Dayton, OH, Omaha, NE, Orlando, FL, Sacramento, CA, and St. Paul, MN. These results were obtained from the two-dimensional geothermal computer code called GEO2D. GEO2D was written as part of this DOE funded grant. The results included in this submission for each of the 6 cities listed above are: 1) specific information on the building being heated or cooled by the ground loop geothermal system, 2) some extreme values for the building heating and cooling loads during the year, 3) the inputs required to carry out the simulation, 4) a plot of the hourly building heating and cooling loads throughout the year, 5) a plot of the fluid temperature exiting the ground loop for a 20 year period, 6) a plot of the heat exchange between the ground loop and the ground for a 20 year period, and 7) ground and ground loop temperature contour plots at different times of the year for the 20 year period.

  12. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, Van D.; Payne, W. Vance; Ling, Jiazhen; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  13. Nanoscale magnetic heat pumps and engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Gerrit E. W.; Bretzel, Stefan; Brataas, Arne; Tserkovnyak, Yaroslav

    2010-01-01

    We present the linear-response matrix for a sliding domain wall in a rotatable magnetic nanowire, which is driven out of equilibrium by temperature and voltage bias, mechanical torque, and magnetic field. An expression for heat-current-induced domain-wall motion is derived. Application of Onsager’s reciprocity relation leads to a unified description of the Barnett and Einstein-de Haas effects as well as spin-dependent thermoelectric properties. We envisage various heat pumps and engines, such as coolers driven by magnetic fields or mechanical rotation as well as nanoscale motors that convert temperature gradients into useful work. All parameters (with the exception of mechanical friction) can be computed microscopically by the scattering theory of transport.

  14. HEAT PUMPS: SUBSTITUTES FOR OUTMODED FOSSIL-FUELED SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report reviews the state-of-the-art relative to development, capacity, and adequacy of the heat pump as a potential replacement for outmoded fossil-fueled heating and cooling systems in the residential and commercial sector. Projections are made of the rate at which heat pump...

  15. Refrigerant charge management in a heat pump water heater

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Jie; Hampton, Justin W.

    2016-07-05

    Heat pumps that heat or cool a space and that also heat water, refrigerant management systems for such heat pumps, and methods of managing refrigerant charge. Various embodiments remove idle refrigerant from a heat exchanger that is not needed for transferring heat by opening a refrigerant recovery valve and delivering the idle refrigerant from the heat exchanger to an inlet port on the compressor. The heat exchanger can be isolated by closing an electronic expansion valve, actuating a refrigerant management valve, or both. Refrigerant charge can be controlled by controlling how much refrigerant is drawn from the heat exchanger, by letting some refrigerant back into the heat exchanger, or both. Heat pumps can be operated in different modes of operation, and various components can be interconnected with refrigerant conduit. Some embodiments deliver refrigerant gas to the heat exchanger and drive liquid refrigerant out prior to isolating the heat exchanger.

  16. Relevance of existing heat pump testing and rating method assumptions to residential gas engine heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Talbert, S.G.; Atterbury, W.G.; Klausing, T.A.; Jakob, F.E.

    1998-10-01

    ASHRAE Research Project 780 evaluated the relevance of existing heat pump testing and rating method assumptions to a method of test for residential gas engine-driven heat pumps (GEHP). The intrinsic cyclic behavior of GEHP systems suggests changing the heating cycling test from a 20% duty cycle to a 35% duty cycle. GEHP seasonal heating performance should be calculated for the design heating requirement (DHR) maximum and minimum loads to encompass the range of expected heating loads, reflecting that the GEHP can be sized for the heating load in predominantly heating climates. Oversizing for the cooling load will tend to improve the seasonal cooling performance while maintaining adequate humidity control. Using quadratic fits to interpolate performance in test procedures can produce erroneous results due to the characteristics of the formulas used. Changes to standards dealing with coil fouling, low outdoor temperature cutout, and size of temperature bins used in the performance calculations were judged not warranted because sensitivity analyses indicated that performance was not significantly affected by these parameters.

  17. Solar assisted heat pump on air collectors: A simulation tool

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiorgas, Michalis; Galatis, Kostas; Tsagouri, Manolis; Tsoutsos, Theocharis; Botzios-Valaskakis, Aristotelis

    2010-01-15

    The heating system of the bioclimatic building of the Greek National Centre for Renewable Energy Sources (CRES) comprises two heating plants: the first one includes an air source heat pump, Solar Air Collectors (SACs) and a heat distribution system (comprising a fan coil unit network); the second one is, mainly, a geothermal heat pump unit to cover the ground floor thermal needs. The SAC configuration as well as the fraction of the building heating load covered by the heating plant are assessed in two operation modes; the direct (hot air from the collectors is supplied directly to the heated space) and the indirect mode (warm air from the SAC or its mixture with ambient air is not supplied directly to the heated space but indirectly into the evaporator of the air source heat pump). The technique of the indirect mode of heating aims at maximizing the efficiency of the SAC, saving electrical power consumed by the compressor of the heat pump, and therefore, at optimizing the coefficient of performance (COP) of the heat pump due to the increased intake of ambient thermal energy by means of the SAC. Results are given for three research objectives: assessment of the heat pump efficiency whether in direct or indirect heating mode; Assessment of the overall heating plant efficiency on a daily or hourly basis; Assessment of the credibility of the suggested simulation model TSAGAIR by comparing its results with the TRNSYS ones. (author)

  18. Heat Pump Clothes Dryer Model Development

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A heat pump clothes dryer (HPCD) is an innovative appliance that uses a vapor compression system to dry clothes. Air circulates in a closed loop through the drum, so no vent is required. The condenser heats air to evaporate moisture out of the clothes, and the evaporator condenses water out of the air stream. As a result, the HPCD can achieve 50% energy savings compared to a conventional electric resistance dryer. We developed a physics-based, quasi-steady-state HPCD system model with detailed heat exchanger and compressor models. In a novel approach, we applied a heat and mass transfer effectiveness model to simulate the drying process of the clothes load in the drum. The system model is able to simulate the inherently transient HPCD drying process, to size components, and to reveal trends in key variables (e.g. compressor discharge temperature, power consumption, required drying time, etc.) The system model was calibrated using experimental data on a prototype HPCD. In the paper, the modeling method is introduced, and the model predictions are compared with experimental data measured on a prototype HPCD.

  19. Open-cycle vapor compression heat pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, F. E.; Ruggles, A. E.

    1984-05-01

    Large quantities of low-grade energy in the form of low-pressure steam and low-temperature heat are wasted by industry. The practical and economical recovery of energy from these sources is often limited by the number of applications for the use of low-temperature heat. Thermo Electron has developed an open-cycle steam heat pump system capable of the direct recovery and upgrading of low-grade waste steam. The system compresses low-pressure waste steam (or steam made from sources of low-temperature waste heat) to produce high-pressure steam suitable for use in industrial processes. A prototype system was developed that is capable of recovering and recompressing up to 10,000 lb/hr of waste steam, while using only 50 percent of the fuel that would be required to produce comparable steam in a boiler. The prototype steam recompression system, using a 2200-cfm rotary screw compressor driven by a 500-hp natural gas engine, was tested for a yearlong field test.

  20. The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool User's Guide

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, C.K.

    2001-06-01

    The ORNL Modulating Heat Pump Design Tool consists of a Modulating HPDM (Heat Pump Design Model) and a parametric-analysis (contour-data generating) front-end. Collectively the program is also referred to as MODCON which is in reference to the modulating and the contour data generating capabilities. The program was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the Department of Energy to provide a publicly-available system design tool for variable- and single-speed heat pumps.

  1. Development of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grzyll, Lawrence R.; Silvestri, John J.; Scaringe, Robert P.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the current development status of a hybrid chemical/mechanical heat pump for low-lift applications. The heat pump provides electronics cooling by evaporating a pure refrigerant from an absorbent/refrigerant mixture in a generator/cold plate. The current development focused on evaluation of absorbent/refrigerant pairs, corrosion testing, pump and compressor design, and electronic cold plate design. Two cycle configurations were considered. The first configuration utilized a standard mechanical compressor and pump. The second cycle configuration investigated pumps and compressors with non-moving parts. An innovative generator/cold plate design is also presented. The development to date shows that this cycle has about the same performance as standard vapor compression heat pumps with standard refrigerants but may have some performance and reliability advantages over vapor compression heat pumps.

  2. Heat pumps and manufactured homes: Making the marriage work

    SciTech Connect

    Conlin, F.; Neal, C.L.

    1996-11-01

    Manufactured homes make up over 7% of the US housing stock, including over 15% of the homes in North Carolina. As more of these homes are being equipped with heat pumps, it becomes important to figure out how to make these systems efficient. This article describes a number of ways of increasing the efficiency. The following topics are included: heat pump actual and rated capacity; heat pump sizing; air flow to the coil; indoor thermostat placement; outdoor thermostat; condensate; leaky ducts; pressure boundary breaches; pressure problems; what you should look for in heat pumps; manufactured housing - an evolutionary home.

  3. Real-time simulation of helicopter air-to-air combat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Fred; George, Dino; Bivens, Court

    1991-01-01

    The AUTOMAN computer program develops automated maneuvering decisions for helicopters during air-to-air combat over hilly terrain. Recently, the capabilities of this program have been extended and enhanced significantly. The revised program was installed at the NASA Ames manned flight-simulation facility to drive a computer-generated image of an enemy helicopter, thereby providing an adversary for the human pilot. Maneuvers are selected by employing game theory. Enhancements include a guidance law for target acquisition when a firing opportunity arises; fire-control sequence logic; improved low-flying capabilities; line-of-sight computations for the cockpit field-of-view, terrain obstructions, and visual range limits; use of terrain for masking; air-to-air collision-avoidance maneuvers; decision on dispensing flares and chaff; and adjustable levels of pilot experience. The program was found to be extremely useful for both rotorcraft handling-quality evaluations and air-to-air combat training.

  4. Ground-source Heat Pumps Applied to Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Steven A.; Hadley, Donald L.

    2009-07-14

    Ground-source heat pumps can provide an energy-efficient, cost-effective way to heat and cool commercial facilities. While ground-source heat pumps are well established in the residential sector, their application in larger, commercial-style, facilities is lagging, in part because of a lack of experience with the technology by those in decision-making positions. Through the use of a ground-coupling system, a conventional water-source heat pump design is transformed to a unique means of utilizing thermodynamic properties of earth and groundwater for efficient operation throughout the year in most climates. In essence, the ground (or groundwater) serves as a heat source during winter operation and a heat sink for summer cooling. Many varieties in design are available, so the technology can be adapted to almost any site. Ground-source heat pump systems can be used widely in commercial-building applications and, with proper installation, offer great potential for the commercial sector, where increased efficiency and reduced heating and cooling costs are important. Ground-source heat pump systems require less refrigerant than conventional air-source heat pumps or air-conditioning systems, with the exception of direct-expansion-type ground-source heat pump systems. This chapter provides information and procedures that an energy manager can use to evaluate most ground-source heat pump applications. Ground-source heat pump operation, system types, design variations, energy savings, and other benefits are explained. Guidelines are provided for appropriate application and installation. Two case studies are presented to give the reader a sense of the actual costs and energy savings. A list of manufacturers and references for further reading are included for prospective users who have specific or highly technical questions not fully addressed in this chapter. Sample case spreadsheets are provided in Appendix A. Additional appendixes provide other information on the ground

  5. Optimal Ground Source Heat Pump System Design

    SciTech Connect

    Ozbek, Metin; Yavuzturk, Cy; Pinder, George

    2015-04-15

    Despite the facts that GSHPs first gained popularity as early as the 1940’s and they can achieve 30 to 60 percent in energy savings and carbon emission reductions relative to conventional HVAC systems, the use of geothermal energy in the U.S. has been less than 1 percent of the total energy consumption. The key barriers preventing this technically-mature technology from reaching its full commercial potential have been its high installation cost and limited consumer knowledge and trust in GSHP systems to deliver the technology in a cost-effective manner in the market place. Led by ENVIRON, with support from University Hartford and University of Vermont, the team developed and tested a software-based a decision making tool (‘OptGSHP’) for the least-cost design of ground-source heat pump (‘GSHP’) systems. OptGSHP combines state of the art optimization algorithms with GSHP-specific HVAC and groundwater flow and heat transport simulation. The particular strength of OptGSHP is in integrating heat transport due to groundwater flow into the design, which most of the GSHP designs do not get credit for and therefore are overdesigned.

  6. Operator manual: high temperature heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, D.F.; Maples, G.; Burch, T.E.; Chancellor, P.D.

    1980-03-04

    Experimental data is being obtained from operating a high temperature heat pump system. The use of methanol as a working fluid will necessitate careful monitoring of refrigerant temperatures and pressures with chemical analysis performed on the working fluid during scheduled down time. Materials sent to vendors by Auburn University and quotes received by Auburn concerning equipment (compressor, evaporator, condensor, air heater, dryer, two accumulator tanks, and three expansion valves) are discussed. The simulated dryer and two accumulator tanks were designed by Auburn. The detailed design and pricing estimates are included. Additional information is presented on layout and construction; start-up; testing; shut down; scheduled maintenance and inspection; safety precautions; control system; and trouble shooting.

  7. Recent advances in magnetic heat pump technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uherka, Kenneth L.; Hull, John R.; Scheihing, Paul E.

    Magnetic heat pump (MHP)/refrigeration systems, incorporating state-of-the-art superconducting magnet technology, were assessed for industrial applications ranging from the liquefaction of gases (20 K to 100 K range) to cold storage refrigeration for food preservation (250 K to 320 K range). Initial market penetration of MHP technology is anticipated to occur in the gas liquefaction sector, since the performance advantages of magnetic refrigeration cycles relative to gas compression cycles and other conventional systems are more pronounced in the lower temperature ranges. Design options for rotary MHP devices include alternative regeneration schemes to obtain the temperature spans necessary for industrial applications. The results of preliminary design assessment studies indicate that active magnetic regenerator concepts, in which the magnetic working material also serves as the regenerative medium, offer advantages over alternative MHP designs for industrial applications.

  8. Solar/gas Brayton/Rankine cycle heat pump assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, J.; Liu, A. Y.

    1982-05-01

    A 10-ton gas-fired heat pump is currently under development at AiResearch under joint DOE and GRI sponsorship. This heat pump features a highly efficient, recuperated, subatmospheric Brayton-cycle engine which drives the centrifugal compressor of a reversible vapor compression heat pump. The investigations under this program were concerned initially with the integration of this machine with a parabolic dish-type solar collector. Computer models were developed to accurately describe the performance of the heat pump packaged in this fashion. The study determined that (1) only a small portion (20 to 50 percent) of the available solar energy could be used because of a fundamental mismatch between the heating and cooling demand and the availability of solar energy, and (2) the simple pay back period, by comparison to the baseline non-solar gas-fired heat pump, was unacceptable (15 to 36 years).

  9. United States Department of Energy Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program

    SciTech Connect

    Fiskum, R.J.; Adcock, P.W.; DeVault, R.C.

    1996-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is working with partners from the gas heating and cooling industry to improve energy efficiency using advance absorption technologies, to eliminate chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) and hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), to reduce global warming through more efficient combustion of natural gas, and to impact electric peak demand of air conditioning. To assist industry in developing these gas heating and cooling absorption technologies, the US DOE sponsors the Thermally Activated Heat Pump Program. It is divided into five key activities, addressing residential gas absorption heat pumps, large commercial chillers, advanced absorption fluids, computer-aided design, and advanced ``Hi-Cool`` heat pumps.

  10. Corrosion protection of steel in ammonia/water heat pumps

    DOEpatents

    Mansfeld, Florian B.; Sun, Zhaoli

    2003-10-14

    Corrosion of steel surfaces in a heat pump is inhibited by adding a rare earth metal salt to the heat pump's ammonia/water working fluid. In preferred embodiments, the rare earth metal salt includes cerium, and the steel surfaces are cerated to enhance the corrosion-inhibiting effects.

  11. Computational Simulation of a Water-Cooled Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozarth, Duane

    2008-01-01

    A Fortran-language computer program for simulating the operation of a water-cooled vapor-compression heat pump in any orientation with respect to gravity has been developed by modifying a prior general-purpose heat-pump design code used at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  12. Mathematical model development and simulation of heat pump fruit dryer

    SciTech Connect

    Achariyaviriya, S.; Soponronnarit, S.; Terdyothin, A.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model of a heat pump fruit dryer was developed to study the performance of heat pump dryers. Using the moisture content of papaya glace drying, the refrigerant temperature at the evaporator and condenser and the performance, was verified. It was found that the simulated results using closed loop heat pump dryer were close to the experimental results. The criteria for evaluating the performance were specific moisture extraction rate and drying rate. The results showed that ambient conditions affected significantly on the performance of the open loop dryer and the partially closed loop dryer. Also, the fraction of evaporator bypass air affected markedly the performance of all heat pump dryers. In addition, it was found that specific air flow rate and drying air temperature affected significantly the performance of all heat pump dryers.

  13. Preliminary Market Assessment for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Sikes, Karen; Khowailed, Gannate; Abdelaziz, Omar

    2011-09-01

    Cold climate heat pump (HP) technology is relevant to a substantial portion of the U.S. population, especially with more than one-third of U.S. housing stock concentrated in colder regions of the country and another 31% in the mixed-humid climate region. Specifically, it is estimated that in 2010 almost 1.37 million heating equipment units were shipped to the cold/very cold climate regions and that 1.41 million were shipped to the nation s mixed-humid region. On a national level, the trend in the last decade has indicated that shipments of gas furnaces have grown at a slower rate than HPs. This indicates a potential opportunity for the cold climate HP, a technology that may be initially slow to penetrate its potential market because of the less expensive operating and first costs of gas furnaces. Anticipated implementation of regional standards could also negatively affect gas furnace shipments, especially with the higher initial cost for more efficient gas furnaces. However, as of 2011, the fact that there are more than 500 gas furnace product models that already achieve the expected efficiency standard indicates that satisfying the regional standard will be a challenge but not an obstacle. A look at the heating fuel and equipment currently being used in the housing stock provides an insight into the competing equipment that cold climate HPs hope to replace. The primary target market for the cold climate HP is the 2.6 million U.S. homes using electric furnaces and HPs in the cold/very cold region. It is estimated that 4.75% of these homeowners either replace or buy new heating equipment in a given year. Accordingly, the project team could infer that the cold climate HP primary market is composed of 123,500 replacements of electric furnaces and conventional air-to-air HPs annually. A secondary housing market for the cold climate HP comprises homes in the mixed-humid region of the country that are using electric furnaces. Homes using gas furnaces across both the

  14. High-lift chemical heat pump technologies for industrial processes

    SciTech Connect

    Olszewski, M.; Zaltash, A.

    1995-03-01

    Traditionally industrial heat pumps (IHPs) have found applications on a process specific basis with reject heat from a process being upgraded and returned to the process. The IHP must be carefully integrated into a process since improper placement may result in an uneconomic application. Industry has emphasized a process integration approach to the design and operation of their plants. Heat pump applications have adopted this approach and the area of applicability was extended by utilizing a process integrated approach where reject heat from one process is upgraded and then used as input for another process. The DOE IHP Program has extended the process integration approach of heat pump application with a plant utility emphasis. In this design philosophy, reject heat from a process is upgraded to plant utility conditions and fed into the plant distribution system. This approach has the advantage that reject heat from any pr@s can be used as input and the output can be used at any location within the plant. Thus the approach can be easily integrated into existing industrial applications and all reject heat streams are potential targets of opportunity. The plant utility approach can not be implemented without having heat pumps with high-lift capabilities (on the order of 65{degree}C). Current heat pumps have only about half the lift capability required. Thus the current emphasis for the DOE IHP Program is the development of high lift chemical heat pumps that can deliver heat more economically to higher heat delivery temperatures. This is achieved with innovative cooling (refrigeration) and heating technologies which are based on advanced cycles and advanced working fluids or a combination of both. This paper details the plan to develop economically competitive, environmentally acceptable heat pump technologies that are capable of providing the delivery temperature and lift required to supply industrial plant utility-grade process heating and/or cooling.

  15. Heat pump system and heat pump device using a constant flow reverse stirling cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1993-08-31

    A constant flow reverse Stirling cycle heat pump system is described comprising: a constant flow isothermal compression means for compressing a working gas, the compression means including a drive means, an inlet, and an outlet, and further including a cooling means to remove heat of compression from the working gas; a constant flow isothermal expansion means for expanding the working gas, the expansion means including an inlet, an outlet, and a heat source means to provide isothermal expansion of the working gas while removing heat from said heat source means; and a constant volume regenerative heat exchange means for transferring heat from compressed working gas to expanded working gas, the constant volume regenerative heat exchange means comprising: an enclosure, the enclosure containing a high pressure portion with an inlet receiving compressed working gas from the compression means outlet and with an outlet discharging cooled working gas to the expansion means inlet, a low pressure portion with an inlet receiving expanded working gas from the expansion means outlet and with an outlet discharging heated working gas to the compression means inlet, a slotted rotor in a central portion of the enclosure, the rotor containing a plurality of radially extending slots, and a plurality of radially sliding vanes mounted in the slots and extending to seal against a wall of the enclosure, wherein a first portion of the wall having a constant first radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a first constant volume channel defining the high pressure portion and a second portion of the wall having a constant second radial distance from the rotor cooperates with the vanes to form a second constant volume channel defining the low pressure portion; and heat transfer means in thermal contact with the high pressure portion and the low pressure portion for transferring heat from the compressed working gas to the expanded working gas.

  16. Development of a jet pump-assisted arterial heat pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bienert, W. B.; Ducao, A. S.; Trimmer, D. S.

    1977-01-01

    The development of a jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is described. The concept utilizes a built-in capillary driven jet pump to remove vapor and gas from the artery and to prime it. The continuous pumping action also prevents depriming during operation of the heat pipe. The concept is applicable to fixed conductance and gas loaded variable conductance heat pipes. A theoretical model for the jet pump assisted arterial heat pipe is presented. The model was used to design a prototype for laboratory demonstration. The 1.2 m long heat pipe was designed to transport 500 watts and to prime at an adverse elevation of up to 1.3 cm. The test results were in good agreement with the theoretical predictions. The heat pipe carried as much as 540 watts and was able to prime up to 1.9 cm. Introduction of a considerable amount of noncondensible gas had no adverse effect on the priming capability.

  17. New industrial heat pump applications to phosphate fertilizer production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    In this study Process Integration techniques based on Pinch Technology have been applied to Chevron's fertilizer complex in Rock Springs, Wyoming. The objectives of the study were to: identify heat pump opportunities and to determine the cost effectiveness of heat pumping compared to other process improvements. Significance of this Work Chevron's fertilizer complex is an example of an exothermic process. The sulfuric acid plant produces more heat than is needed for the rest of the site. The complex has, therefore, no need for a heating utility. The heat created in the sulfuric acid plant is used to produce high pressure steam, which is let down through a turbo generator satisfying most of the site's electrical needs. This type of process would normally not be considered for heat pumping because there is no heating utility load to reduce. However, reducing the requirements for extraction steam will liberate more steam for power generation. Heat recovery and heat pumping, therefore, have the unusual effect of an increase in electricity production, resulting in a reduction in electricity import, rather than a reduction in fuel consumption. Heat recovery opportunities show promise at both the sulfuric acid and phosphoric acid plants. No economically attractive opportunities were found for heat pumps in the process units when they were considered individually; however, the study identified that significant energy savings can be achieved by heat integration between the sulfuric acid plant and the phosphoric acid plant. 16 figs.

  18. Capillary Pumped Heat Transfer (CHT) Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hallinan, Kevin P.; Allen, J. S.

    1998-01-01

    The operation of Capillary Pumped Loops (CPL's) in low gravity has generally been unable to match ground-based performance. The reason for this poorer performance has been elusive. In order to investigate the behavior of a CPL in low-gravity, an idealized, glass CPL experiment was constructed. This experiment, known as the Capillary-driven Heat Transfer (CHT) experiment, was flown on board the Space Shuttle Columbia in July 1997 during the Microgravity Science Laboratory mission. During the conduct of the CHT experiment an unexpected failure mode was observed. This failure mode was a result of liquid collecting and then eventually bridging the vapor return line. With the vapor return line blocked, the condensate was unable to return to the evaporator and dry-out subsequently followed. The mechanism for this collection and bridging has been associated with long wavelength instabilities of the liquid film forming in the vapor return line. Analysis has shown that vapor line blockage in present generation CPL devices is inevitable. Additionally, previous low-gravity CPL tests have reported the presence of relatively low frequency pressure oscillations during erratic system performance. Analysis reveals that these pressure oscillations are in part a result of long wavelength instabilities present in the evaporator pores, which likewise lead to liquid bridging and vapor entrapment in the porous media. Subsequent evaporation to the trapped vapor increases the vapor pressure. Eventually the vapor pressure causes ejection of the bridged liquid. Recoil stresses depress the meniscus, the vapor pressure rapidly increases, and the heated surface cools. The process then repeats with regularity.

  19. Methodology for determination and use of the no-escape envelope of an air-to-air-missile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, Frank

    1988-01-01

    A large gap exists between optimal control and differential-game theory and their applications. The purpose of this paper is to show how this gap may be bridged. Missile-avoidance of realistically simulated infrared heat-seeking, fire-and-forget missile is studied. In detailed simulations, sweeping out the discretized initial condition space, avoidance methods based on pilot experience are combined with those based on simplified optimal control analysis to derive an approximation to the no-escape missile envelopes. The detailed missile equations and no-escape envelopes were then incorporated into an existing piloted simulation of air-to-air combat to generate missile firing decisions as well as missile avoidance commands. The use of these envelopes was found to be effective in both functions.

  20. Shortening the Defrost Time on a Heat Pump Air Conditioner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Eiji; Yamazaki, Masaya; Kawamura, Toshiaki

    Methods to shorten the defrost time have been studied on a heat pump air conditioner. The experiment has been carried out using a 0.75kW heat pump and the energy balance during defrosting has been analyzed. We have found that the following methods are effective to shorten the defrost time; (1) Increase in power inqut to the compressor during defrosting, (2) Utilization of the compressor for thermal energy storage, (3) Reduction of the water left on the outdoor heat exchanger fins. The heat pump with the new defrosting system has been made on an experimental basis. lts defrost time is 1 minute and 55 seconds under the defrost condition of the Japanese Industrial Standard. The defrost time of a conventional heat pump is about 4 or 5 minutes.

  1. Arena retrofit includes ground-source heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, S.F.

    1996-01-01

    The venue for Sacramento`s first professional basketball games was the {open_quotes}old Arco Arena,{close_quotes} built in 1985 just north of the downtown area and converted to offices after a large, permanent arena was constructed. In 1994, the {open_quotes}old arena{close_quotes} was acquired by a California general partnership called Del Paso Venture. To heat and cool the 3-story, 211,000-square foot structure, Del Paso has installed a ground-source heat pump system. The project is significant for the ground-source heat pump industry, because this is the first ground-source heat pump site ever designed specifically for the energy load of the building it will serve. Other projects have been calculated by rule-of-thumb. The installation and cost of the heat pump system are discussed.

  2. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A heat pump system is currently under development to produce hot water for crew hygiene on future manned space missions. The heat pump uses waste heat sources and a nonazeotropic working fluid in a highly efficient cycle. The potential benefits include a reduction in peak power draw from 2 to 5 kW for electric cartridge heaters to just more than 100 W for the heat pump. As part of the heat pump development project, a unique high efficiency compressor was developed to maintain lubrication in a zero-gravity environment.

  3. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, James R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    The invention does away with the necessity of moving parts such as a check valve in a nuclear reactor cooling system. Instead, a jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A main flow exists for a reactor coolant. A point of withdrawal is provided for a secondary flow. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from said coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps said withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature where the heat is no longer a problem. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet pump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. When the nuclear reactor is restarted and the coolant again exceeds the lower temperature setting, the TEMP/jet pump automatically resumes operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is thus automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  4. Assessment of Japanese variable speed heat pump technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushimaru, Kenji

    An analysis of critical component technologies and design methodologies for Japanese variable speed heat pumps are presented. The market for variable speed heat pumps in Japan is predominantly residential split-type, between the fractional to 2.5 ton capacity range. Approximately 1.1 million residential inverter-driven heat pumps were sold in 1987. Based on the market trends, component technology and several advanced features are described. Similarities and differences between Japanese and U.S. system design methodologies are discussed. Finally, the outlook for future technology trends is briefly described.

  5. Residential vertical geothermal heat pump system models: Calibration to data

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, J.W.; McDowell, T.P.; Shonder, J.A.; Hughes, P.J.; Pahud, D.; Hellstroem, G.A.J.

    1997-12-31

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was tuned to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnected to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonstrate its capabilities.

  6. Residential Vertical Geothermal Heat Pump System Models: Calibration to Data:

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, Jeff W.; McDowell, T. P.; Shonder, John A; Hughes, Patrick; Pahud, D.; Hellstrom, G.

    1997-06-01

    A detailed component-based simulation model of a geothermal heat pump system has been calibrated to monitored data taken from a family housing unit located at Fort Polk, Louisiana. The simulation model represents the housing unit, geothermal heat pump, ground heat exchanger, thermostat, blower, and ground-loop pump. Each of these component models was 'tuned' to better match the measured data from the site. These tuned models were then interconnect to form the system model. The system model was then exercised in order to demonatrate its capabilities.

  7. Air-to-air view of STS-26 Discovery, OV-103, launch from KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Air-to-air view of STS-26 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, launch taken by T. Haydee Laguna, an airline passenger bound for Paradise Island in the Bahamas. She sent the photo of what she called 'the most beautiful sight this side of Heaven' to NASA along with a congratulatory letter. OV-103 is a small dot as it rises through the clouds from Kennedy Space Center Launch Complex (LC) pad 39B with a exhaust plume trailing behind it.

  8. Geothermal Heat Pump Profitability in Energy Services

    SciTech Connect

    1997-11-01

    If geothermal heat pumps (GHPs) are to make a significant mark in the market, we believe that it will be through energy service pricing contracts offered by retailcos. The benefits of GHPs are ideally suited to energy service pricing (ESP) contractual arrangements; however, few retailcos are thoroughly familiar with the benefits of GHPs. Many of the same barriers that have prevented GHPs from reaching their full potential in the current market environment remain in place for retailcos. A lack of awareness, concerns over the actual efficiencies of GHPs, perceptions of extremely high first costs, unknown records for maintenance costs, etc. have all contributed to limited adoption of GHP technology. These same factors are of concern to retailcos as they contemplate long term customer contracts. The central focus of this project was the creation of models, using actual GHP operating data and the experience of seasoned professionals, to simulate the financial performance of GHPs in long-term ESP contracts versus the outcome using alternative equipment. We have chosen two case studies, which may be most indicative of target markets in the competitive marketplace: A new 37,000 square foot office building in Toronto, Ontario; we also modeled a similar building under the weather conditions of Orlando, Florida. An aggregated residential energy services project using the mass conversion of over 4,000 residential units at Ft. Polk, Louisiana. Our method of analyses involved estimating equipment and energy costs for both the base case and the GHP buildings. These costs are input in to a cash flow analysis financial model which calculates an after-tax cost for the base and GHP case. For each case study customers were assumed to receive a 5% savings over their base case utility bill. A sensitivity analysis was then conducted to determine how key variables affect the attractiveness of a GHP investment.

  9. Testing of a heat pump clothes dryer. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    McFadden, D.; Dieckmann, J.; Mallory, D.

    1995-05-01

    The integration of a heat pump heat source into a clothes dryer has been investigated by several U.S. and foreign appliance developers and manufacturers but no commercial or residential heat pump clothes dryers are currently available in North America. The objectives of this effort were to: (1) Evaluate a heat pump dryer prototype relative to residential dryer performance tests. (2) Quantify the product limitations. (3) Suggest design changes that would reduce the impact of the limitations or that have a positive impact on the benefits. (4) Position the product relative to utility DSM/IRP opportunities (e.g., reduced connected load, or energy conservation). (5) Develop preliminary cost data The program evaluated the performance of a prototype closed-cycle heat pump clothes dryer designed and built by the Nyle Corporation. The prototype design goals were: (1) Drying times equivalent to a conventional electric clothes dryer. (2) 60% reduction in energy consumption. (3) Effective lint removal (to prevent coil fouling). (4) Cool-down mode performance similar to conventional dryer. (5) 20 lb load capacity. (6) Low temperature dry for reduced clothes wrinkle. Test results indicated that the closed-cycle heat pump met some of the above mentioned goals but it fell short with respect to energy savings and dry time. Performance improvement recommendations were developed for the closed-cycle dryer approach. In addition, the closed-cycle design potential was compared to an open-cycle heat pump dryer configuration.

  10. Community heat-pump system, Klamath County, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-03-01

    The possibility of heating 47 proposed homes on a new development site using ground water source heat pumps is discussed. The pumping temperatures are 780 F for No. 2 Well, neither temperature is hot enough for direct space heating. Temperature profiles of the wells indicate that a temperature hot enough for direct heating (about 1100 F or above) cannot be found at reasonable depth. Since direct geothermal heating is not a practical alternative, the tract will be all-electric since this is the only energy source in the area. The economic feasibility of a community heat pump system that would reduce the amount of electrical energy required to service the homes is addressed.

  11. ATES/heat pump simulations performed with ATESSS code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, L. W.

    1989-01-01

    Modifications to the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage System Simulator (ATESSS) allow simulation of aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES)/heat pump systems. The heat pump algorithm requires a coefficient of performance (COP) relationship of the form: COP = COP sub base + alpha (T sub ref minus T sub base). Initial applications of the modified ATES code to synthetic building load data for two sizes of buildings in two U.S. cities showed insignificant performance advantage of a series ATES heat pump system over a conventional groundwater heat pump system. The addition of algorithms for a cooling tower and solar array improved performance slightly. Small values of alpha in the COP relationship are the principal reason for the limited improvement in system performance. Future studies at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) are planned to investigate methods to increase system performance using alternative system configurations and operations scenarios.

  12. Field Monitoring Protocol: Mini-Split Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, D.; Fang, X.; Tomerlin, J.; Winkler, J.; Hancock, E.

    2011-03-01

    The report provides a detailed method for accurately measuring and monitoring performance of a residential Mini-Split Heat Pump. It will be used in high-performance retrofit applications, and as part of DOE's Building America residential research program.

  13. Solar assisted heat pumps: A possible wave of the future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smetana, F. O.

    1976-01-01

    With the higher costs of electric power and the widespread interest to use solar energy to reduce the national dependence on fossil fuels, heat pumps are examined to determine their suitability for use with solar energy systems.

  14. Technology Solutions Case Study: Heat Pump Water Heater Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-08-01

    In this project, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory studied heat pump water heaters, an efficient, cost-effective alternative to traditional electric resistance water heaters that can improve energy efficiency by up to 62%.

  15. Field Monitoring Protocol. Mini-Split Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Dane; Fang, Xia; Tomerlin, Jeff; Winkler, Jon; Hancock, E.

    2011-03-01

    This Building America program report provides a detailed method for accurately measuring and monitoring performance of a residential mini-split heat pump, which will be used in high-performance retrofit applications.

  16. Improving Air-Conditioner and Heat Pump Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, J.

    2012-03-01

    A new approach to modeling residential air conditioners and heat pumps allows users to model systems by specifying only the more readily-available SEER/EER/HSPF-type metrics. Manufacturer data was used to generate full sets of model inputs for over 450 heat pumps and air conditioners. A sensitivity analysis identified which inputs can be safely defaulted 'behind-the-scenes' without negatively impacting the reliability of energy simulations.

  17. An overview of the Stirling engine heat pump program

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The paper summarizes the recent developments in the Stirling engine-driven heat pump program activities sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This technology has displayed its ability to meet the thermal performance objectives. Enhance technology options guided by value engineering principles are being pursued toward the development of an economically viable household engine-driven heat pump. 12 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Measured effects of retrofits -- a refrigerant oil additive and a condenser spray device -- on the cooling performance of a heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Levins, W.P.; Sand, J.R.; Baxter, V.D.; Linkous, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    A 15-year old, 3-ton single package air-to-air heat pump was tested in laboratory environmental chambers simulating indoor and outdoor conditions. After documenting initial performance, the unit was retrofitted with a prototype condenser water-spray device and retested. Results at standard ARI cooling rating conditions (95 F outdoor dry bulb and 80/67 F indoor dry bulb/wet bulb temperatures) showed the capacity increased by about 7%, and the electric power demand dropped by about 8%, resulting in a steady-state EER increase of 17%. Suction and discharge pressures were reduced by 7 and 37 psi, respectively. A refrigerant oil additive formulated to enhance refrigerant-side heat transfer was added at a dose of one ounce per ton of rated capacity, and the unit was tested for several days at the same 95 F outdoor conditions and showed essentially no increase in capacity, and a slight 3% increase in steady-state EER. Adding more additive lowered the EER slightly. Suction and discharge pressures were essentially unchanged. The short-term testing showed that the condenser-spray device was effective in increasing the cooling capacity and lowering the electrical demand on an old and relatively inefficient heat pump, but the refrigerant additive had little effect on the cooling performance of the unit. Sprayer issues to be resolved include the effect of a sprayer on a new, high-efficiency air conditioner/heat pump, reliable long-term operation, and economics.

  19. Investigation of an ejector heat pump by analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, C.T.

    1984-07-01

    Using existing theories of ejector design, the optimum geometry of a high-efficiency ejector - including mixing section cross-sectional area, mass flow entrainment rate, ejector efficiency, and overall COP - for a heat pump cycle was determined. A parametric study was performed to evaluate the COP values for different operating conditions. A sensitivity study determined th effects of nozzle efficiency and diffuser efficiency on the overall ejector heat pump COP. The off-design study estimated the COP for an ejector heat pump operating at off-design conditions. Refrigerants 11, 113, and 114 are three of the halocarbons which best satisfy the criteria for an ejector heat pump system. The estimated COPs were 0.3 for the cooling mode and 1.3 for the heating mode at standard operating conditions: a boiler temperature of 93.3/sup 0/C (200/sup 0/F), a condenser temperature of 43.3/sup 0/C (110/sup 0/F), and an evaporator temperature of 10/sup 0/C (50/sup 0/F). Based on the same operating conditions, an optimum ejector geometry was estimated for each of the refrigerants R-11 and R-113. Since the COP values for heating obtained in this analysis are greater than unity, the performance of an ejector heat pump operating in the heating mode should be competitive with that of oil- or gas-fired furnaces or electrical resistance heaters.

  20. Feasibility analysis of a vortex generator for absorption heat pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Fineblum, S.S.

    1996-12-31

    Significant thermal resources in the form of low temperature industrial waste heat, between 211 to 528 trillion kJ (200 and 500 trillion BTU`s) per annum, have the potential to drive absorption heat pumps. The proposed vortex generator permits a practical heat pump to operate efficiently with as much as 20 to 30 C below the boiling temperature of water (70--80 C (158--176 F)). Energy flows and auxiliary power requirements are computed. The system is shown to operate with relatively low temperature waste heat with higher specific capacity than conventional systems.

  1. Generator-absorber-heat exchange heat transfer apparatus and method and use thereof in a heat pump

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Benjamin A.; Zawacki, Thomas S.; Marsala, Joseph

    1994-11-29

    Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium.

  2. Hydrodynamic performance and heat generation by centrifugal pumps.

    PubMed

    Ganushchak, Y; van Marken Lichtenbelt, W; van der Nagel, T; de Jong, D S

    2006-11-01

    For over a century, centrifugal pumps (CP) have been used in various applications, from large industrial pumps to flow pumps for aquariums. However, the use of CP as blood pumps has a rather short history. Consequently, the hydraulic performance data for a blood CP are limited. The aim of our investigation was to study the hydraulic performance and the heat generation of three commercially available CP: Bio-Medicus Bio-Pump BP80 (Medtronic), Rotaflow (Jostra Medizintechnik), and DeltaStream DP2 (MEDOS Medizintechnik AQ). The study was performed using a circuit primed with a water-glycerin mixture with a dynamic viscosity of 0.00272 pa/s. Pressure-flow curves were obtained by a stepwise stagnation of the pump outlet or inlet. The temperature changes were observed using ThermaCAM SC2000 (Flir Systems). The pumps' performance in close to clinical conditions ('operating region') was analysed in this report. The 'operating region' in the case of the BP80 is positioned around the pressure-flow curve at a pump speed of 3000 rpm. In the case of the Rotaflow, the 'operating region' was between the pump pressure-flow curves at a speed of 3000 and 4000 rpm, and the DP2 was found between 7000 and 8000 rpm. The standard deviation of mean pressure through the pump was used to characterise the stability of the pump. In experiments with outlet stagnation, the BP80 demonstrated high negative association between flow and pressure variability (r = -0.68, p < 0.001). In experiments with the DP2, this association was positive (r = 0.68, p < 0.001). All pumps demonstrated significantly higher variability of pressure in experiments with inlet stagnation in comparison to the experiments with outlet stagnation. The rise of relative temperature in the inlet of a pump was closely related to the flow rate. The heating of fluid was more pronounced in the 'zero-flow' mode, especially in experiments with inlet stagnation. In summary, (1) the 'zero-flow' regime, which is described in the manuals

  3. New industrial heat pump applications to textile production

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-01

    Application of pinch technology to the US industries in an early screening study has identified potential for heat pumps in several standard processes such as distillation and drying processes. Due to lack process information, the previous study was not able to draw any definite conclusion concerning the heat pump application potential in textile process. However, the commonly encountered drying process in the finishing section of textile plant has been shown to create opportunities for heat pump placement. The site selected for this study is a textile plant in North Carolina and the participating utility is Duke Power Company. The objective of this study is to further identify the energy savings potential through advanced heat pumps and other energy conservation methods developed in the context of pinch technology. The key findings of this study are as follows. The previously unrecoverable waste heat from the exhaust air can now be reclaimed through a spray type air washer and heat pump system. The recommended heat pump system recovers heat from the looper exhaust and use it to preheat the air in the gas tenter. A reduction of 50% of the gas consumption in the tenter can be achieved. The removal of lint from the exhaust air reduced the potential of air pollution. The collected lint can be burned in the boiler as a supplemental fuel source to reduce the fuel consumption in the plant. With fuel price predicted to go up and electricity price remain relatively stable in the future, the heat pump system can payback in less than three years. 15 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. A mechanically assisted heat pipe using micro-pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.L.; Campbell, G.; Hassapis, C.; Chang, W.S.

    1996-12-31

    A new mechanically assisted heat pipe has been developed and tested by the authors that combines the high performance of a pumped fluid loop with the reliability of passive heat pipes. The new unit employs micro-pumps inside a passive heat pipe to enhance the return of working fluid from the condenser to the evaporator, and thereby increases the capability of the system. This hybrid device is lighter, smaller and handles higher heat flux compared with a passive heat pipe of similar weight and dimensions. Best of all, if the mechanical pump fails, the heat transport will be impaired, but not totally paralyzed, allowing some form of lower level operation. This micro-pump design installs fins at critical locations inside the heat pipe. These fins can be parallel (flag) or perpendicular (flap) to the flow direction. By vibrating these fins in a motion similar to dolphin kicks for the flaps, and in a motion similar to a fishtail for the flags, these fins were found capable of pumping the working fluid effectively. The size and geometry of these fins were tested extensively. Several actuation approaches were examined. The results of these tests are presented in this paper.

  5. Study of a heat rejection system using capillary pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neal, L. G.; Wanous, D. J.; Clausen, O. W.

    1971-01-01

    Results of an analytical study investigating the application of capillary pumping to the heat rejection loop of an advanced Rankine cycle power conversion system are presented. The feasibility of the concept of capillary pumping as an alternate to electromagnetic pumping is analytically demonstrated. Capillary pumping is shown to provide a potential for weight and electrical power saving and reliability through the use of redundant systems. A screen wick pump design with arterial feed lines was analytically developed. Advantages of this design are high thermodynamic and hydrodynamic efficiency, which provide a lightweight easily packaged system. Operational problems were identified which must be solved for successful application of capillary pumping. The most important are the development of start up and shutdown procedures, and development of a means of keeping noncondensibles from the system and of earth-bound testing procedures.

  6. Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface Controls Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Josh A. Salmond

    2009-08-07

    The modernization of the Mold Heating and Cooling Pump Package Operator Interface (MHC PP OI) consisted of upgrading the antiquated single board computer with a proprietary operating system to off-the-shelf hardware and off-the-shelf software with customizable software options. The pump package is the machine interface between a central heating and cooling system that pumps heat transfer fluid through an injection or compression mold base on a local plastic molding machine. The operator interface provides the intelligent means of controlling this pumping process. Strict temperature control of a mold allows the production of high quality parts with tight tolerances and low residual stresses. The products fabricated are used on multiple programs.

  7. Monitoring and evaluating ground-source heat pump. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Stoltz, S.V.; Cade, D.; Mason, G.

    1996-05-01

    This report presents the measured performance of four advanced residential ground-source heat pump (GSHP) systems. The GSHP systems were developed by WaterFurnace International to minimize the need for electric resistance backup heating and featured multiple speed compressors, supplemental water heating, and at most sites, multiple-speed fans. Detailed data collected for a complete year starting in June 1994 shows that the advanced design is capable of maintaining comfort without the use of electric resistance backup heating. In comparison with a conventional air-source heat pump, the advanced-design GSHP reduced peak heating demand by more than 12 kilowatts (kW) per residence and provided energy savings. The report describes the cooling and heating season operation of the systems, including estimated seasonal efficiency, hours of operation, and load profiles for average days and peak days. The electrical energy input, cooling output, and efficiency are presented as a function of return air temperature and ground loop temperature.

  8. HPASS: a computer program for evaluation of district heating with heat pumps. Users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Sapienza, G.R.; Calm, J.M.

    1981-03-01

    HPASS (Heat Pump district heating ASSessment) is a computer program for assessment of district heating and cooling with heat pumps. The software facilitates comparison of site- and source-energy use, discounted payback, and life-cycle costs of these systems with alternative systems providing similar services. The program also performs parametric studies of these analyses. This report explains the use of HPASS; the input requirements, available outputs, and program options are described.

  9. Compressor Selection and Equipment Sizing for Cold Climate Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Abdelaziz, Omar; Rice, C Keith

    2014-01-01

    In order to limit heating capacity degradation at -25 C (-13 F) ambient to 25%, compared to the nominal rating point capacity at 8.3 C (47 F), an extensive array of design and sizing options were investigated, based on fundamental equipment system modeling and building energy simulation. Sixteen equipment design options were evaluated in one commercial building and one residential building, respectively in seven cities. The energy simulation results were compared to three baseline cases: 100% electric resistance heating, a 9.6 HSPF single-speed heat pump unit, and 90% AFUE gas heating system. The general recommendation is that variable-speed compressors and tandem compressors, sized such that their rated heating capacity at a low speed matching the building design cooling load, are able to achieve the capacity goal at low ambient temperatures by over-speeding, for example, a home with a 3.0 ton design cooling load, a tandem heat pump could meet this cooling load running a single compressor, while running both compressors to meet heating load at low ambient temperatures in a cold climate. Energy savings and electric resistance heat reductions vary with building types, energy codes and climate zones. Oversizing a heat pump can result in larger energy saving in a less energy efficient building and colder regions due to reducing electric resistance heating. However, in a more energy-efficient building or for buildings in warmer climates, one has to consider balance between reduction of resistance heat and addition of cyclic loss.

  10. The Commonwealth Building: Groundbreaking history with a groundwater heat pump

    SciTech Connect

    Hatten, M.J.; Morrison, W.B.

    1995-07-01

    In 1946, following a wartime moratorium on the construction of commercial buildings, a savings and loan in Portland, Oregon, was granted the first permit to build a new commercial office building. The Equitable Building -- known today as the Commonwealth Building -- was subsequently designed and constructed, incorporating many other ``firsts`` in the architectural, mechanical, and electrical design of commercial buildings. For example, the groundwater heat pump plant, designed by J. Donald Kroeker, has become known as the first major commercial installation of a central ground-coupled heat pump in the US. In addition to being the first large commercial groundwater source heat pump installation, the Commonwealth Building was the first building designed in an architectural style that was to become the standard for many decades. The architect, Pietro Belluschi, was a nationally recognized Portland architect. The building has become something of a legend in its use of innovative building systems technology. Throughout the intervening years, the Commonwealth Building has received credit as: (1) The first building to use a central heat pump system, coupled to the earth, in the form of well water, for both heating and cooling. (2) The first building in the United States to be constructed with fixed double-paned glazing. (3) The first building to recover heat from toilet exhaust for use in pre-heating fresh air. (4) The first building to use an exterior building system composed of aluminum sheathing. (5) The first building to make significant use of cold cathode fluorescent lighting for flexibility in tenant space layout. Within the building engineering community, the central, well-coupled heat pump system in the Commonwealth Building has received the greatest acclaim. The building was recognized by the ASME as a National Historical Mechanical Engineering Landmark in 1980. The central heat pump plant has many unique features and an intriguing operational history.

  11. New Hypothesis about Hypersonic Technological Demonstrators based on Standard Air to Air Missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiesa, S.; Corpino, S.; Sembenini, G.; Viola, N.

    2002-01-01

    The present paper is based on an extreme interest in technological demonstrators of future hypersonic transatmospheric planes. Technological demonstrators provide a good set of information with a high benefit to cost ratio. This fact is confirmed by the increasing number of technological demonstrators and by the study and development of smaller technological demonstrators conceived to carry out bigger ones. Affordability is certainly an important key in new demonstrators' development but many times the target of affordability is reached only if new, unconventional concepts are developed and applied. Our Research Group has developed a first idea concerning the use of a standard air to air missile as basis element of a demonstrators' family. In this way two goals can be reached: (1) thanks to a modular conception, which allows to investigate several aerodynamic configurations by simply (2) the utilization of existing items, like the basic element of the demonstrator, the air-to-air missile which holds In order to minimize the development effort, that is the modification of the missile internal layout to accomplish the new and unusual role, another interesting idea has been conceived. It concerns the study of a smaller not powered technological demonstrator attached to the air to air missile in central position, being the missile now used as a big booster. The poorer aerodynamic characteristics and the practical impossibility of reusing the missile have to be evaluated and compared with the easier development. Many different configurations of both concepts have been investigated. The simulations' outcomes are attractive and both projects seem to be feasible. At the moment these ideas are considered for a pre-demonstrator of a future demonstrator of considerable size which is now under development by Italian Aerospace Research Centre (CIRA) and Aerospace Industry.

  12. Capillary Pump Loop (CPL) heat pipe development status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    The capillary pump loop (CPL) was re-introduced as a potential candidate for the management of large heat loads. It is currently being evaluated for application in the thermal management of large space structures. Test efforts were conducted to establish the feasibility of the CPL heat pipe design.

  13. Laboratory Performance Evaluation of Residential Integrated Heat Pump Water Heaters

    SciTech Connect

    Sparn, B.; Hudon, K.; Christensen, D.

    2011-09-01

    This report discusses how a significant opportunity for energy savings is domestic hot water heating, where an emerging technology has recently arrived in the U.S. market: the residential integrated heat pump water heater. A laboratory evaluation is presented of the five integrated HPWHs available in the U.S. today.

  14. Measured Performance of a Low Temperature Air Source Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R. K.

    2013-09-01

    A 4-ton Low Temperature Heat Pump (LTHP) manufactured by Hallowell International was installed in a residence near New Haven, Connecticut and monitored over two winters of operation. After attending to some significant service issues, the heat pump operated as designed. This report should be considered a review of the dual compressor 'boosted heat pump' technology. The Low Temperature Heat Pumpsystem operates with four increasing levels of capacity (heat output) as the outdoor temperature drops. The system was shown to select capacity correctly, supplying the appropriate amount of heat to the house across the full range of outdoor temperatures. The system's Coefficient of Performance (Seasonal COP, or SCOP) over two entire winters was calculated, based on measured data, to be 3.29over the first winter and 2.68 over the second winter. A second seasonal efficiency calculation by a different method yielded a SCOP of 2.78 for the first winter and 2.83 for the second winter. This second seasonal efficiency calculation was determined by comparing measured heat pump energy use to the in situ energy use with resistance heat alone. This method is the ratio of the slopes of thedaily energy use load lines.

  15. 19. Heat Pump, view to the southwest. This system provides ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Heat Pump, view to the southwest. This system provides ventilation air heating and cooling throughout the powerhouse. - Washington Water Power Clark Fork River Noxon Rapids Hydroelectric Development, Powerhouse, South bank of Clark Fork River at Noxon Rapids, Noxon, Sanders County, MT

  16. Air-to-air view of STS-32 Columbia, OV-102, liftoff and SRB separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Air-to-air view of STS-32 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, shows solid rocket booster (SRB) separation. Leaving from Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A at 7:34:59:98 am Eastern Standard Time (EST), OV-102 is backdropped against relatively clear Florida skies some 24 hours after dubious weather at the return-to-landing site (RTLS) had cancelled a scheduled launch. An exhaust plume trails behind OV-102. The photo was taken by astronaut Michael L. Coats, acting chief of the Astronaut Office, from the shuttle trainer aircraft (STA).

  17. Heat pumps for geothermal applications: availability and performance. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Reistad, G.M.; Means, P.

    1980-05-01

    A study of the performance and availability of water-source heat pumps was carried out. The primary purposes were to obtain the necessary basic information required for proper evaluation of the role of water-source heat pumps in geothermal energy utilization and/or to identify the research needed to provide this information. The Search of Relevant Literature considers the historical background, applications, achieved and projected performance evaluations and performance improvement techniques. The commercial water-source heat pump industry is considered in regard to both the present and projected availability and performance of units. Performance evaluations are made for units that use standard components but are redesigned for use in geothermal heating.

  18. Energy and Exergy Analysis of an Annular Thermoelectric Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S. C.; Manikandan, S.; Hans, Ranjana

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, the concept of an annular thermoelectric heat pump (ATEHP) has been introduced. An exoreversible thermodynamic model of the ATEHP considering the Thomson effect in conjunction with Peltier, Joule and Fourier heat conduction has been investigated using exergy analysis. New expressions for dimensionless heating power, optimum current at the maximum energy, exergy efficiency conditions and dimensionless irreversibilities in the ATEHP are derived. The results show that the heating power, energy and exergy efficiency of the ATEHP are lower than the flat-plate thermoelectric heat pump. The effects of annular shape parameter ( S r = r 2 /r 1), dimensionless temperature ratio ( θ = T h /T c) and the electrical contact resistances on the heating power, energy/exergy efficiency of an ATEHP have been studied. This study will help in the designing of actual ATEHP systems.

  19. Mini-Split Heat Pumps Multifamily Retrofit Feasibility Study

    SciTech Connect

    Dentz, Jordan; Podorson, David; Varshney, Kapil

    2014-05-01

    Mini-split heat pumps can provide space heating and cooling in many climates and are relatively affordable. These and other features make them potentially suitable for retrofitting into multifamily buildings in cold climates to replace electric resistance heating or other outmoded heating systems. This report investigates the suitability of mini-split heat pumps for multifamily retrofits. Various technical and regulatory barriers are discussed and modeling was performed to compare long-term costs of substituting mini-splits for a variety of other heating and cooling options. A number of utility programs have retrofit mini-splits in both single family and multifamily residences. Two such multifamily programs are discussed in detail.

  20. Energy and Exergy Analysis of an Annular Thermoelectric Heat Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaushik, S. C.; Manikandan, S.; Hans, Ranjana

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the concept of an annular thermoelectric heat pump (ATEHP) has been introduced. An exoreversible thermodynamic model of the ATEHP considering the Thomson effect in conjunction with Peltier, Joule and Fourier heat conduction has been investigated using exergy analysis. New expressions for dimensionless heating power, optimum current at the maximum energy, exergy efficiency conditions and dimensionless irreversibilities in the ATEHP are derived. The results show that the heating power, energy and exergy efficiency of the ATEHP are lower than the flat-plate thermoelectric heat pump. The effects of annular shape parameter (S r = r 2 /r 1), dimensionless temperature ratio (θ = T h /T c) and the electrical contact resistances on the heating power, energy/exergy efficiency of an ATEHP have been studied. This study will help in the designing of actual ATEHP systems.

  1. Jet pump-drive system for heat removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    French, J. R. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A jet pump, in combination with a TEMP, is employed to assure safe cooling of a nuclear reactor after shutdown. A TEMP, responsive to the heat from the coolant in the secondary flow path, automatically pumps the withdrawn coolant to a higher pressure and thus higher velocity compared to the main flow. The high velocity coolant is applied as a driver flow for the jet pump which has a main flow chamber located in the main flow circulation pump. Upon nuclear shutdown and loss of power for the main reactor pumping system, the TEMP/jet pump combination continues to boost the coolant flow in the direction it is already circulating. During the decay time for the nuclear reactor, the jet pump keeps running until the coolant temperature drops to a lower and safe temperature. At this lower temperature, the TEMP/jet jump combination ceases its circulation boosting operation. The TEMP/jet pump combination is automatic, self-regulating and provides an emergency pumping system free of moving parts.

  2. Heat pump water heater and method of making the same

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Tomlinson, John J.; Chen, Fang C.

    2001-01-01

    An improved heat pump water heater wherein the condenser assembly of the heat pump is inserted into the water tank through an existing opening in the top of the tank, the assembly comprising a tube-in-a-tube construction with an elongated cylindrical outer body heat exchanger having a closed bottom with the superheated refrigerant that exits the compressor of the heat pump entering the top of the outer body. As the refrigerant condenses along the interior surface of the outer body, the heat from the refrigerant is transferred to the water through the outer body. The refrigerant then enters the bottom of an inner body coaxially disposed within the outer body and exits the top of the inner body into the refrigerant conduit leading into the expansion device of the heat pump. The outer body, in a second embodiment of the invention, acts not only as a heat exchanger but also as the sacrificial anode in the water tank by being constructed of a metal which is more likely to corrode than the metal of the tank.

  3. Chemical heat pump and chemical energy storage system

    DOEpatents

    Clark, Edward C.; Huxtable, Douglas D.

    1985-08-06

    A chemical heat pump and storage system employs sulfuric acid and water. In one form, the system includes a generator and condenser, an evaporator and absorber, aqueous acid solution storage and water storage. During a charging cycle, heat is provided to the generator from a heat source to concentrate the acid solution while heat is removed from the condenser to condense the water vapor produced in the generator. Water is then stored in the storage tank. Heat is thus stored in the form of chemical energy in the concentrated acid. The heat removed from the water vapor can be supplied to a heat load of proper temperature or can be rejected. During a discharge cycle, water in the evaporator is supplied with heat to generate water vapor, which is transmitted to the absorber where it is condensed and absorbed into the concentrated acid. Both heats of dilution and condensation of water are removed from the thus diluted acid. During the discharge cycle the system functions as a heat pump in which heat is added to the system at a low temperature and removed from the system at a high temperature. The diluted acid is stored in an acid storage tank or is routed directly to the generator for reconcentration. The generator, condenser, evaporator, and absorber all are operated under pressure conditions specified by the desired temperature levels for a given application. The storage tanks, however, can be maintained at or near ambient pressure conditions. In another form, the heat pump system is employed to provide usable heat from waste process heat by upgrading the temperature of the waste heat.

  4. Miniature reciprocating heat pumps and engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiesen, Jack H. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The present invention discloses a miniature thermodynamic device that can be constructed using standard micro-fabrication techniques. The device can be used to provide cooling, generate power, compress gases, pump fluids and reduce pressure below ambient (operate as a vacuum pump). Embodiments of the invention relating to the production of a cooling effect and the generation of electrical power, change the thermodynamic state of the system by extracting energy from a pressurized fluid. Energy extraction is attained using an expansion process, which is as nearly isentropic as possible for the appropriately chosen fluid. An isentropic expansion occurs when a compressed gas does work to expand, and in the disclosed embodiments, the gas does work by overcoming either an electrostatic or a magnetic force.

  5. Stirling cycle heat pump for heating and/or cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, R.J.; Khalili, K.; Meijer, E.; Godett, T.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a duplex Stirling cycle machine acting as a heat pump. It comprises: a Stirling engine having pistons axially displaceable within parallel cylinders, the engine further having a swashplate rotatable about an axis of, rotation parallel to the cylinders and defining a plane inclined from the axis of rotation. The pistons connected to the swashplate via crossheads whereby axial displacement of the pistons is converted to rotation of the swashplate, and a Stirling cycle heat pump having a compression heat exchanger, an expansion heat exchanger and a regenerator with pistons equal in number to the engine pistons and axially displaceable within cylinders which are oriented co-axially with the engine cylinders. The crossheads further connected to the heat pump pistons whereby the heat pump pistons move simultaneously with the engine pistons over an equal stroke distance.

  6. Development of a nonazeotropic heat pump for crew hygiene water heating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David H.; Deming, Glenn I.

    1991-01-01

    A Phase 2 SBIR Program funded by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to develop a Nonazeotropic Heat Pump is described. The heat pump system which was designed, fabricated, and tested in the Foster-Miller laboratory, is capable of providing crew hygiene water heating for future manned missions. The heat pump utilizes a nonazeotropic refrigerant mixture which, in this application, provides a significant Coefficient of Performance improvement over a single-constituent working fluid. In order to take full advantage of the refrigerant mixture, compact tube-in-tube heat exchangers were designed. A high efficiency scroll compressor with a proprietary lubrication system was developed to meet the requirements of operation in zero-gravity. The prototype heat pump system consumes less than 200W of power compared to the alternative of electric cartridge heaters which would require 2 to 5 kW.

  7. New industrial heat pump applications to cheese production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-04-01

    A energy cost reduction of the Sorrento Cheese Co. Inc. cheese/whey powder process has been completed. Of Particular interest were the opportunities for utilizing heat pumps for energy cost reduction or other profit improving uses. Pinch Technology was used to identify heat recovery, heat pumping, process modification and congeneration options. Pinch Technology provides a thermodynamically consistent base from which the relative merits of competing cost reduction options can be assessed. The study identified heat recovery opportunities which could save $198,000/yr at an over all payback of 26 months. Individual project paybacks range from 18 to 36 months. The use of heat pumps in the form of MVR and TVR evaporators is well established in the dairy industry. For this process, which already incorporates a TVR evaporator, no additional cost effective opportunities for utilizing heat pumps were identified. It is felt that the results obtained in this study are applicable to other cheese/whey powder manufacturing sits. This study, and others, indicate that reductions in thermal energy consumption of 10--15% can be expected. Also the use of MVR and TVR evaporators is appropriate. 10 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Evaluating the heat pump alternative for heating enclosed wastewater treatment facilities in cold regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martel, C. J.; Phetteplace, G. E.

    1982-05-01

    This report presents a five-step procedure for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of using heat pumps to recover heat from treatment plant effluent. The procedure is meant to be used at the facility planning level by engineers who are unfamiliar with this technology. An example of the use of the procedure and general design information are provided. Also, the report reviews the operational experience with heat pumps at wastewater plants located in Fairbanks, Alaska, Madison, Wisconsin, and Wilton, Maine.

  9. Microgravity heat pump for space station thermal management.

    PubMed

    Domitrovic, R E; Chen, F C; Mei, V C; Spezia, A L

    2003-01-01

    A highly efficient recuperative vapor compression heat pump was developed and tested for its ability to operate independent of orientation with respect to gravity while maximizing temperature lift. The objective of such a heat pump is to increase the temperature of, and thus reduce the size of, the radiative heat rejection panels on spacecrafts such as the International Space Station. Heat pump operation under microgravity was approximated by gravitational-independent experiments. Test evaluations include functionality, efficiency, and temperature lift. Commercially available components were used to minimize costs of new hardware development. Testing was completed on two heat pump design iterations--LBU-I and LBU--II, for a variety of operating conditions under the variation of several system parameters, including: orientation, evaporator water inlet temperature (EWIT), condenser water inlet temperature (CWIT), and compressor speed. The LBU-I system employed an ac motor, belt-driven scroll compressor, and tube-in-tube heat exchangers. The LBU-II system used a direct-drive AC motor compressor assembly and plate heat exchangers. The LBU-II system in general outperformed the LBU-I system on all accounts. Results are presented for all systems, showing particular attention to those states that perform with a COP of 4.5 +/- 10% and can maintain a temperature lift of 55 degrees F (30.6 degrees C) +/- 10%. A calculation of potential radiator area reduction shows that points with maximum temperature lift give the greatest potential for reduction, and that area reduction is a function of heat pump efficiency and a stronger function of temperature lift. PMID:14632004

  10. Meetings to share advancements in heat pump technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creswick, F. A.; Devault, R. C.; Fairchild, P. D.

    1990-04-01

    The Conference brought together researchers, engineers, managers, and government policy makers from the various participating countries and provided a forum to share information on heat pump technological advancements and related environmental issues. From interactions with the Japanese participants in various working meetings and site visits, it is clear that heat pumps represent a major technology emphasis in Japan for industry and utility supported R and D, as well as government sponsored programs. The Super Heat Pump (SHP) project sponsored by the Agency of Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) and aimed at leveling electric power demand in addition to higher heat pump performance, is a notable example of this emphasis and of the way in which industry, research institutes, and government are working together in Japan. A joint industry R and D association established for the SHP effort, for example, includes sixteen (16) major corporate members (Mitsubishi, Toshiba, etc.). Also, gas fired heat pumps have moved beyond laboratory prototypes and field tests and have emerged in Japan in production quantities. These first market entry products use near conventional small I.C. engines and are sized for residential and small commercial building applications. Sales are already in the ten thousands annually, and are increasing. Four major companies are already manufacturing and marketing such units (Yamaha, Yanmar, Aisin Seiki, and Sanyo). The Japanese companies and research organizations were much more open and frank about their research activities and progress than anticipated. The new Heat Pump Technology Center of Japan (HPTCJ) was an excellent host and established a positive atmosphere for international dialogue and cooperation.