Science.gov

Sample records for airborne particles

  1. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles. PMID:7005667

  2. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-06-01

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth's climate, public health, air quality, and hydrological and carbon cycles. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemical composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. We suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events.

  3. A new method for determining the sources of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Oteros, J; García-Mozo, H; Alcázar, P; Belmonte, J; Bermejo, D; Boi, M; Cariñanos, P; Díaz de la Guardia, C; Fernández-González, D; González-Minero, F; Gutiérrez-Bustillo, A M; Moreno-Grau, S; Pérez-Badía, R; Rodríguez-Rajo, F J; Ruíz-Valenzuela, L; Suárez-Pérez, J; Trigo, M M; Domínguez-Vilches, E; Galán, C

    2015-05-15

    Air quality is a major issue for humans owing to the fact that the content of particles in the atmosphere has multiple implications for life quality, ecosystem dynamics and environment. Scientists are therefore particularly interested in discovering the origin of airborne particles. A new method has been developed to model the relationship between the emission surface and the total amount of airborne particles at a given distance, employing olive pollen and olive groves as examples. A third-degree polynomial relationship between the air particles at a particular point and the distance from the source was observed, signifying that the nearest area to a point is not that which is most correlated with its air features. This work allows the origin of airborne particles to be discovered and could be implemented in different disciplines related to atmospheric aerosol, thus providing a new approach with which to discover the dynamics of airborne particles. PMID:25837296

  4. Enumerating Spore-Forming Bacteria Airborne with Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, Ying; Barengoltz, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A laboratory method has been conceived to enable the enumeration of (1) Cultivable bacteria and bacterial spores that are, variously, airborne by themselves or carried by, parts of, or otherwise associated with, other airborne particles; and (2) Spore-forming bacteria among all of the aforementioned cultivable microbes.

  5. The impact of fireworks on airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchi, Roberta; Bernardoni, Vera; Cricchio, Diana; D'Alessandro, Alessandra; Fermo, Paola; Lucarelli, Franco; Nava, Silvia; Piazzalunga, Andrea; Valli, Gianluigi

    Fireworks are one of the most unusual sources of pollution in atmosphere; although transient, these pollution episodes are responsible for high concentrations of particles (especially metals and organic compounds) and gases. In this paper, results of a study on chemical-physical properties of airborne particles (elements, ions, organic and elemental carbon and particles size distributions) collected during a fireworks episode in Milan (Italy) are reported. Elements typically emitted during pyrotechnic displays increased in 1 h as follows: Sr (120 times), Mg (22 times), Ba (12 times), K (11 times), and Cu (6 times). In our case study, Sr was recognised as the best fireworks tracer because its concentration was very high during the event and lower than, or comparable with, minimum detection limits during other time intervals, suggesting that it was mainly due to pyrotechnic displays. In addition, particles number concentrations increased significantly during the episode (up to 6.7 times in 1 h for the 0.5< d<1 μm size bin). Contributions (e.g. Cu, elemental carbon and nitrogen oxides) to air pollution due to the large traffic volume registered during the same night were also singled out. The original application of Positive Matrix Factorisation and Multiple Linear Regression allowed, as far as we know, here for the first time, the quantification of the fireworks contribution to atmospheric particulate matter (PM) and the resolution of their chemical profile. The contribution of fireworks to the local environment in terms of PM 10 mass, elements and chemical components was assessed with 4-h time resolution. PM 10 mass apportioned by fireworks was up to 33.6 μg m -3 (about 50% of the total PM 10 mass). Major contributors were elemental and organic carbon (2.8 and 8.1 μg m -3, respectively) as well as metals like Mg, K, Sr, Ba, and Cu (0.4, 0.7, 0.07, 0.1, and 0.1 μg m -3, respectively).

  6. HUMAN INTERINDIVIDUAL VARIABILITY IN SUSCEPTIBILITY TO AIRBORNE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Part of the explanation for the persistent epidemiological findings of associations between mortality and morbidity with relatively modest ambient exposures to airborne particles may be that some people are much more susceptible to particle-induced responses than others. This stu...

  7. Transport of airborne particles in straight and curved microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaap, Allison; Chu, Winnie C.; Stoeber, Boris

    2012-08-01

    The measurement of airborne particles is important for environmental and exposure monitoring. Microfluidic technologies present potential advantages for aerosol monitoring but have been applied very little to the handling of airborne particles. In this paper, we examine the flow focusing and cross-streamline diffusion of aerosols in straight microchannels, and the size-based lateral displacement of aerosols caused by centrifugal forces in a curved channel. We present calculations, simulations, and experimental results verifying the models: measurements of the focusing and diffusion of 0.2 μm and 0.75 μm particles in straight channels and of the size-dependent lateral displacement of particles between 0.2 μm and 2 μm in curved channels are demonstrated and shown to match well with the simulations. We observe lateral dispersion of the particles: particles closer to the top and bottom wall of the channel experience less lateral displacement than particles near the center due to the flow velocity distribution across the channel cross section. These results confirm that the microchannel techniques presented are a viable method for the size-based manipulation of airborne particles.

  8. Airborne soil organic particles generated by precipitation

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Bingbing; Harder, Tristan H.; Kelly, Stephen T.; Piens, Dominique S.; China, Swarup; Kovarik, Libor; Keiluweit, Marco; Arey, Bruce W.; Gilles, Mary K.; Laskin, Alexander

    2016-05-02

    Airborne organic particles play a critical role in Earth’s climate1, public health2, air quality3, and hydrological and carbon cycles4. However, sources and formation mechanisms for semi-solid and solid organic particles5 are poorly understood and typically neglected in atmospheric models6. Laboratory evidence suggests that fine particles can be formed from impaction of mineral surfaces by droplets7. Here, we use chemical imaging of particles collected following rain events in the Southern Great Plains, Oklahoma, USA and after experimental irrigation to show that raindrop impaction of soils generates solid organic particles. We find that after rain events, sub-micrometre solid particles, with a chemicalmore » composition consistent with soil organic matter, contributed up to 60% of atmospheric particles. Our irrigation experiments indicate that intensive water impaction is sufficient to cause ejection of airborne soil organic particles from the soil surface. Chemical imaging and micro-spectroscopy analysis of particle physico-chemical properties suggest that these particles may have important impacts on cloud formation and efficiently absorb solar radiation. Lastly, we suggest that raindrop-induced formation of solid organic particles from soils may be a widespread phenomenon in ecosystems such as agricultural systems and grasslands where soils are exposed to strong, episodic precipitation events8.« less

  9. Airborne particle exposure and extrinsic skin aging.

    PubMed

    Vierkötter, Andrea; Schikowski, Tamara; Ranft, Ulrich; Sugiri, Dorothea; Matsui, Mary; Krämer, Ursula; Krutmann, Jean

    2010-12-01

    For decades, extrinsic skin aging has been known to result from chronic exposure to solar radiation and, more recently, to tobacco smoke. In this study, we have assessed the influence of air pollution on skin aging in 400 Caucasian women aged 70-80 years. Skin aging was clinically assessed by means of SCINEXA (score of intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging), a validated skin aging score. Traffic-related exposure at the place of residence was determined by traffic particle emissions and by estimation of soot in fine dust. Exposure to background particle concentration was determined by measurements of ambient particles at fixed monitoring sites. The impact of air pollution on skin aging was analyzed by linear and logistic regression and adjusted for potential confounding variables. Air pollution exposure was significantly correlated to extrinsic skin aging signs, in particular to pigment spots and less pronounced to wrinkles. An increase in soot (per 0.5 × 10(-5) per m) and particles from traffic (per 475  kg per year and square km) was associated with 20% more pigment spots on forehead and cheeks. Background particle pollution, which was measured in low residential areas of the cities without busy traffic and therefore is not directly attributable to traffic but rather to other sources of particles, was also positively correlated to pigment spots on face. These results indicate that particle pollution might influence skin aging as well. PMID:20664556

  10. Acoustic Resonator Optimisation for Airborne Particle Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devendran, Citsabehsan; Billson, Duncan R.; Hutchins, David A.; Alan, Tuncay; Neild, Adrian

    Advances in micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology and biomedical research necessitate micro-machined manipulators to capture, handle and position delicate micron-sized particles. To this end, a parallel plate acoustic resonator system has been investigated for the purposes of manipulation and entrapment of micron sized particles in air. Numerical and finite element modelling was performed to optimise the design of the layered acoustic resonator. To obtain an optimised resonator design, careful considerations of the effect of thickness and material properties are required. Furthermore, the effect of acoustic attenuation which is dependent on frequency is also considered within this study, leading to an optimum operational frequency range. Finally, experimental results demonstrated good particle levitation and capture of various particle properties and sizes ranging to as small as 14.8 μm.

  11. Real-time airborne particle analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T.A.

    2012-10-16

    An aerosol particle analyzer includes a laser ablation chamber, a gas-filled conduit, and a mass spectrometer. The laser ablation chamber can be operated at a low pressure, which can be from 0.1 mTorr to 30 mTorr. The ablated ions are transferred into a gas-filled conduit. The gas-filled conduit reduces the electrical charge and the speed of ablated ions as they collide and mix with buffer gases in the gas-filled conduit. Preferably, the gas filled-conduit includes an electromagnetic multipole structure that collimates the nascent ions into a beam, which is guided into the mass spectrometer. Because the gas-filled conduit allows storage of vast quantities of the ions from the ablated particles, the ions from a single ablated particle can be analyzed multiple times and by a variety of techniques to supply statistically meaningful analysis of composition and isotope ratios.

  12. Photophoretic trapping of airborne particles using ultraviolet illumination.

    PubMed

    Redding, Brandon; Hill, Steven C; Alexson, Dimitri; Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate photophoretic trapping of micron-sized absorbing particles in air using pulsed and continuous-wave (CW) ultraviolet laser illumination at wavelengths of 351 nm and 244 nm. We compared the particle trapping dynamics in two trapping geometries consisting of a hollow optical cone formed by light propagating either with or against gravity. This comparison allowed us to isolate the influence of the photophoretic force from the radiative pressure and the convective forces. We found that the absorbing spherical particles tested experienced a positive photophoretic force, whereas the spatially irregular, non-spherical particles tested experienced a negative photophoretic force. By using two trapping geometries, both spherical and non-spherical absorbing particles could be trapped and held securely in place. The position of the trapped particles exhibited a standard deviation of less than 1 µm over 20 seconds. Moreover, by operating in the UV and deep-UV where the majority of airborne materials are absorptive, the system was able to trap a wide range of particle types. Such a general purpose optical trap could enable on-line characterization of airborne particles when coupled with interrogation techniques such as Raman spectroscopy. PMID:25836215

  13. [Investigation of Carbonaceous Airborne Particles by Scanning Proton Microprobe].

    PubMed

    Bao, Liang-man; Liu, Jiang-feng; Lei, Qian-tao; Li, Xiao-lin; Zhang, Gui-lin; Li, Yan

    2016-01-15

    Carbonaceous particles are an important component of the atmospheric aerosol particles and important for global climate change, air quality and human health. The PM₁₀ single particles from two environmental monitor locations and seven pollution emission sources were analyzed using scanning proton microprobe (SPM) techniques. The concentration of carbon in individual particles was quantitatively determined by proton non-Rutherford elastic backscattering spectrometry (EBS). The results of this investigation showed that carbonaceous particles were dominant in the pollution sources of coal and oil combustions, diesel busexhaust and automobile exhaust, while inorganic particles were dominant in the sources of steel industry, cement dust and soil dust. Carbonaceous matter was enriched in particles from the city center, while mineral matter was the main component of airborne particles in the industrial area. Elemental mapping of single aerosol particles yielded important information on the chemical reactions of aerosol particles. The micro-PIXE (particle induced X-ray emission) maps of S, Ca and Fe of individual carbonaceous particles showed that sulfuration reaction occurred between SO₂and mineral particles, which increased the sulfur content of particles. PMID:27078933

  14. Effect of airborne particle on SO 2-calcite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böke, Hasan; Göktürk, E. Hale; Caner-Saltık, Emine N.; Demirci, Şahinde

    1999-02-01

    In modern urban atmosphere, sulphur dioxide (SO 2) attacks calcite (CaCO 3) in calcareous stone-producing gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) which forms crust at rain sheltered surfaces and accelerates erosion at areas exposed to rain. The airborne particles collected on stone surfaces have always been considered to enhance the gypsum crust formation and thus it is believed that they should be removed from the surface to decrease the effects of SO 2. In this study, our aim was to investigate this event by carrying out a series of experiments in laboratory using pure calcium carbonate powder to represent calcareous stone. Sodium montmorillonite, activated carbon, ferric oxide, vanadium pentoxide and cupric chloride were mixed in the pure calcium carbonate powder as substitutes of the airborne particles in the polluted atmosphere. The samples have been exposed at nearly 10 ppmv SO 2 concentrations at 90% relative humidity conditions in a reaction chamber for several days. The mineralogical composition of the exposed samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and infrared spectrometer (IR). Sulphation reaction products, calcium sulphite hemihydrate, gypsum and unreacted calcite, were determined quantitatively using IR. Exposed samples have also been investigated morphologically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental results reveal that calcium sulphite hemihydrate is the main reaction product of the SO 2-calcite reaction. It turns out that airborne particles play an important catalytic role in the oxidation of calcium sulphite hemihydrate into gypsum, although their presence does not very significantly affect the extent of sulphation reaction. This behaviour of airborne particles is explained by the presence of liquid film on the calcium carbonate surface where a series of reactions in the gas-liquid-solid interfaces takes place.

  15. Discrimination of airborne material particles from light scattering (TAOS) patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yong-Le; Videen, Gorden; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Chang, Richard K.

    2013-05-01

    Two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) is an experimental method which collects the intensity pattern of monochromatic light scattered by a single, micron-sized airborne particle. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. The solution proposed herewith relies on a learning machine (LM): rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified. The LM consists of two interacting modules: a feature extraction module and a linear classifier. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine Fourier transform and non-linear operations. Linear classification relies on multivariate statistical analysis. Interaction enables supervised training of the LM. The application described in this article aims at discriminating the TAOS patterns of single bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis) from patterns of atmospheric aerosol and diesel soot particles. The latter are known to interfere with the detection of bacterial spores. Classification has been applied to a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns from various materials. Some classification experiments are described, where the size of training sets has been varied as well as many other parameters which control the classifier. By assuming all training and recognition patterns to come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to ≍ 20% false negatives from Bacillus subtilis particles and <= 11% false positives from environmental and diesel particles.

  16. Current concepts on airborne particles and health

    SciTech Connect

    Mauderly, J.L.

    1994-11-01

    Epidemiological evidence of associations between environmental particulate concentrations and both acute and chronic health effects has grown with numerous recent studies conducted in the US and other countries. An association between short-term changes in particulate levels and acute mortality now seems certain. The association is consistent among studies and coherent among indicators of mortality and morbidity. Effects observed at surprisingly low pollution levels have raised concern for current exposures even in modestly polluted cities. Toxicology did not predict the acute mortality effect, and causal mechanisms are difficult to rationalize. Present data suggest that the fine fraction of particulate pollution is more toxic than larger particles, but the contribution of specific particulate species is poorly understood.

  17. Transport of airborne particles within a room.

    PubMed

    Richmond-Bryant, J; Eisner, A D; Brixey, L A; Wiener, R W

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this study is to test a technique used to analyze contaminant transport in the wake of a bluff body under controlled experimental conditions for application to aerosol transport in a complex furnished room. Specifically, the hypothesis tested by our work is that the dispersion of contaminants in a room is related to the turbulence kinetic energy and length scale. This turbulence is, in turn, determined by the size and shape of furnishings within the room and by the ventilation characteristics. This approach was tested for indoor dispersion through computational fluid dynamics simulations and laboratory experiments. In each, 3 mum aerosols were released in a furnished room with varied contaminant release locations (at the inlet vent or under a desk). The realizable k approximately epsilon model was employed in the simulations, followed by a Lagrangian particle trajectory simulation used as input for an in-house FORTRAN code to compute aerosol concentration. For the experiments, concentrations were measured simultaneously at seven locations by laser photometry, and air velocity was measured using laser Doppler velocimetry. The results suggest that turbulent diffusion is a significant factor in contaminant residence time in a furnished room. This procedure was then expanded to develop a simplified correlation between contaminant residence time and the number of enclosing surfaces around a point containing the contaminant. Practical Implications The work presented here provides a methodology for relating local aerosol residence time to properties of room ventilation and furniture arrangement. This technique may be used to assess probable locations of high concentration by knowing only the particle release location, furniture configuration, inlet and outlet locations, and air speeds, which are all observable features. Applications of this method include development of 'rules of thumb' for first responders entering a room where an agent has been released

  18. Inversely tracking indoor airborne particles to locate their release sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tengfei (Tim); Li, Hongzhu; Wang, Shugang

    2012-08-01

    Airborne particles can have numerous adverse effects on human health. Knowing the release locations of airborne particulate sources is helpful in minimizing pollutant exposure. This paper describes a proposal to locate indoor particulate sources by two inverse models: the quasi-reversibility (QR) model and the zone prescription of contaminant sources with the Lagrangian-reversibility (LR) model. The QR model reverses the time marching direction of the Eulerian governing equation and replaces the second-order diffusion term with a fourth-order stabilization term. The zone prescription LR model traces individual particulate motion in a Lagrangian reference frame after reversing the flow field. The particle trajectories are solved backward to the initial release once the conservative forces acting on particles are reversed. The tracked particles are proposed to be placed at the zone boundary of the largest concentration contour within the domain at a given time, which is provided as the initially known information. By connecting all particles at t = 0, a zone is formed that can prescribe the actual contaminant source. This study finds that both models can accurately locate particulate sources released instantaneously at a spot. The QR model performs slightly better than the LR model but is much more computationally demanding.

  19. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Kirsten A.; Peters, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary, central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual’s exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-hour monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  20. New Methods for Personal Exposure Monitoring for Airborne Particles.

    PubMed

    Koehler, Kirsten A; Peters, Thomas M

    2015-12-01

    Airborne particles have been associated with a range of adverse cardiopulmonary outcomes, which has driven its monitoring at stationary central sites throughout the world. Individual exposures, however, can differ substantially from concentrations measured at central sites due to spatial variability across a region and sources unique to the individual, such as cooking or cleaning in homes, traffic emissions during commutes, and widely varying sources encountered at work. Personal monitoring with small, battery-powered instruments enables the measurement of an individual's exposure as they go about their daily activities. Personal monitoring can substantially reduce exposure misclassification and improve the power to detect relationships between particulate pollution and adverse health outcomes. By partitioning exposures to known locations and sources, it may be possible to account for variable toxicity of different sources. This review outlines recent advances in the field of personal exposure assessment for particulate pollution. Advances in battery technology have improved the feasibility of 24-h monitoring, providing the ability to more completely attribute exposures to microenvironment (e.g., work, home, commute). New metrics to evaluate the relationship between particulate matter and health are also being considered, including particle number concentration, particle composition measures, and particle oxidative load. Such metrics provide opportunities to develop more precise associations between airborne particles and health and may provide opportunities for more effective regulations. PMID:26385477

  1. Temporal variations of airborne particles concentration in the Brussels environment.

    PubMed

    Vanderstraeten, P; Lénelle, Y; Meurrens, A; Carati, D; Brenig, L; Offer, Z Y

    2007-09-01

    We report and analyze data on the PM10 fraction of airborne particles measured at five recording stations in the Brussels region from October 2002 till September 2003. These stations are representative of the various activity sectors of the Brussels urban area. The objective was the determination of the origin of the PM10 particles (particles up to 10 mum) that are recorded in that region in order to follow the EU directives concerning tolerance level of airborne particles concentration. In order to evaluate the impacts of local and external factors that inject solid particles in the atmosphere of Brussels we compared concentration data from working and not working (holidays) periods. Moreover, we also compared concentrations from periods of agricultural activity and rest in the Brabant provinces surrounding the Brussels region for various crop types. The results lead to the conclusion that the impact or urban traffic is rather limited while that of the agricultural activities is important. Moreover, there appears a clear-cut distinction between different types of crops. PMID:17180416

  2. Flow analysis of airborne particles in a hospital operating room

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faeghi, Shiva; Lennerts, Kunibert

    2016-06-01

    Preventing airborne infections during a surgery has been always an important issue to deliver effective and high quality medical care to the patient. One of the important sources of infection is particles that are distributed through airborne routes. Factors influencing infection rates caused by airborne particles, among others, are efficient ventilation and the arrangement of surgical facilities inside the operating room. The paper studies the ventilation airflow pattern in an operating room in a hospital located in Tehran, Iran, and seeks to find the efficient configurations with respect to the ventilation system and layout of facilities. This study uses computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and investigates the effects of different inflow velocities for inlets, two pressurization scenarios (equal and excess pressure) and two arrangements of surgical facilities in room while the door is completely open. The results show that system does not perform adequately when the door is open in the operating room under the current conditions, and excess pressure adjustments should be employed to achieve efficient results. The findings of this research can be discussed in the context of design and controlling of the ventilation facilities of operating rooms.

  3. Anthropogenic Osmium in Airborne Particles from Woods Hole, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peucker-Ehrenbrink, B.; Sen, I. S.; Geboy, N.

    2012-12-01

    The global geochemical cycle of osmium has been significantly disturbed by the introduction of automobile exhaust catalysts to convert noxious gas emissions into more benign forms. Anthropogenic osmium has been reported in rainwater, snow, and in the urban airborne particles from around the world to reveal global-scale osmium pollution [1, 2]. In this study, we report on the platinum group element (PGE) concentrations and osmium isotope ratios of airborne particles (PM10) collected in Woods Hole, a small coastal town in Massachusetts to better understand inputs of anthropogenic osmium to rural environments. We further investigate the use of osmium isotopes to track sources of airborne particles and support source apportionment studies on a continental scale. The samples used in this study were collected at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution over one year (2008-2009). From this collection twelve samples for which the backward air mass trajectories have been determined were selected for osmium isotope analyses. Our results show that the osmium and platinum concentrations are an order of magnitude lower when compared to downtown Boston [2]. The average Os, Pt and Ir concentrations are 0.006±0.012, 0.019±0.023, and 0.685±0.634 pg m-3, respectively. The 187Os/188Os of the aerosols range from 0.275 to 0.788. As continental crust is radiogenic (187Os/188Os >1) and PGE ore bodies generally have unradiogenic 187Os/188Os (~0.2), the unradiogenic 187Os/188Os signature of the aerosols indicates anthropogenic contributions. With 95% of the total osmium mobilization on land being attributed to human activities [3], it is clear that human imprint on airborne particles is not restricted to urban centers with high traffic flows, but also affects rural environments. Aerosol particles that have backward air mass trajectories from the Southwest, the densely populated and industrialized Eastern seaboard, are characterized by unradiogenic osmium, while air masses from the North

  4. Effects of particle size and velocity on burial depth of airborne particles in glass fiber filters

    SciTech Connect

    Higby, D.P.

    1984-11-01

    Air sampling for particulate radioactive material involves collecting airborne particles on a filter and then determining the amount of radioactivity collected per unit volume of air drawn through the filter. The amount of radioactivity collected is frequently determined by directly measuring the radiation emitted from the particles collected on the filter. Counting losses caused by the particle becoming buried in the filter matrix may cause concentrations of airborne particulate radioactive materials to be underestimated by as much as 50%. Furthermore, the dose calculation for inhaled radionuclides will also be affected. The present study was designed to evaluate the extent to which particle size and sampling velocity influence burial depth in glass-fiber filters. Aerosols of high-fired /sup 239/PuO/sub 2/ were collected at various sampling velocities on glass-fiber filters. The fraction of alpha counts lost due to burial was determined as the ratio of activity detected by direct alpha count to the quantity determined by photon spectrometry. The results show that burial of airborne particles collected on glass-fiber filters appears to be a weak function of sampling velocity and particle size. Counting losses ranged from 0 to 25%. A correction that assumes losses of 10 to 15% would ensure that the concentration of airborne alpha-emitting radionuclides would not be underestimated when glass-fiber filters are used. 32 references, 21 figures, 11 tables.

  5. Airborne Particle Size Distribution Measurements at USDOE Fernald

    SciTech Connect

    Harley, N.H.; Chittaporn, P.; Heikkinen, M.; Medora, R.; Merrill, R.

    2003-03-27

    There are no long term measurements of the particle size distribution and concentration of airborne radionuclides at any USDOE facility except Fernald. Yet the determinant of lung dose is the particle size, determining the airway and lower lung deposition. Beginning in 2000, continuous (6 to 8 weeks) measurements of the aerosol particle size distribution have been made with a miniature sampler developed under EMSP. Radon gas decays to a chain of four short lived solid radionuclides that attach immediately to the resident atmospheric aerosol. These in turn decay to long lived polonium 210. Alpha emitting polonium is a tracer for any atmospheric aerosol. Six samplers at Fernald and four at QC sites in New Jersey show a difference in both polonium concentration and size distribution with the winter measurements being higher/larger than summer by almost a factor of two at all locations. EMSP USDOE Contract DE FG07 97ER62522.

  6. Particle size of airborne mouse crude and defined allergens.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, M; Inouye, S; Miyazawa, H; Kamimura, H; Kimura, M; Yamazaki, S

    1989-05-01

    Laboratory animal allergy is a serious occupational diseases of many workers and scientists engaged in animal experimentation. Control measures depend upon characterization of allergens including airborne particles. This study measured the particle size of crude mouse urine and pelt aeroallergens generated in mouse housing rooms and compared them with mouse serum albumin, a defined major allergen. Allergens were detected by specific immunological methods. Most crude and defined allergens (74.5-86.4%) concentrated on a filter with a retention size greater than 7 microns. In distrubed air, allergen concentration increased 1.4 (albumin) to 5 (crude) fold and the proportion of small particles increased from 1.4% in calm air to 4.5% in distrubed air. This information on the generation and size distribution of aeroallergens will be important in the development of effective counter measures. PMID:2724924

  7. Dry deposition of large, airborne particles onto a surrogate surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eugene; Kalman, David; Larson, Timothy

    Simultaneous measurements of particle dry deposition flux and airborne number concentration in the open atmosphere were made using three different types of artificially generated particles in the size range 10-100 μm - perlite, diatomaceous earth and glass beads. A combination of gravimetric analysis, automated microscopy and sonic anemometry provided size-resolved estimates of both the inertial and gravitational components of the quasi-laminar layer particle deposition velocity, ( Vd) b, as a function of size. Eddy inertial deposition efficiency ( ηdI) was determined as a function of dimensionless eddy Stokes number (Stk e). In the range 3particles and gases to environmental surfaces. DOE Report PNL-SA-6721, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA), used in several regulatory models, significantly under-predicted (up to seven times) ( Vd) b for large particles ( da>10 μm).

  8. Size distribution of airborne particles controls outcome of epidemiological studies.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Roy M; Giorio, Chiara; Beddows, David C S; Dall'Osto, Manuel

    2010-12-15

    Epidemiological studies typically using wide size range mass metrics (e.g. PM(10)) have demonstrated associations between airborne particulate matter and several adverse health outcomes. This approach ignores the fact that mass concentration may not correlate with regional lung dose, unlike the case of trace gases. When using measured particle size distributions as the basis for calculating regional lung dose, PM(10) mass concentration is found to be a good predictor of the mass dose in all regions of the lung, but is far less predictive of the surface area and particle number dose. On the other hand, measurements of particle number do not well predict mass dose, indicating that the chosen particle metric is likely to determine the health outcomes detectable by an epidemiological study. Consequently, epidemiological studies using mass metrics (PM(2.5) and PM(10)) may fail to recognise important health consequences of particulate matter exposure, leading to an underestimate of the public health consequences of particle exposure. PMID:21109288

  9. Measurement of airborne particle concentrations near the Sunset Crater volcano, Arizona.

    PubMed

    Benke, Roland R; Hooper, Donald M; Durham, James S; Bannon, Donald R; Compton, Keith L; Necsoiu, Marius; McGinnis, Ronald N

    2009-02-01

    Direct measurements of airborne particle mass concentrations or mass loads are often used to estimate health effects from the inhalation of resuspended contaminated soil. Airborne particle mass concentrations were measured using a personal sampler under a variety of surface-disturbing activities within different depositional environments at both volcanic and nonvolcanic sites near the Sunset Crater volcano in northern Arizona. Focused field investigations were performed at this analog site to improve the understanding of natural and human-induced processes at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The level of surface-disturbing activity was found to be the most influential factor affecting the measured airborne particle concentrations, which increased over three orders of magnitude relative to ambient conditions. As the surface-disturbing activity level increased, the particle size distribution and the majority of airborne particle mass shifted from particles with aerodynamic diameters less than 10 mum (0.00039 in) to particles with aerodynamic diameters greater than 10 mum (0.00039 in). Under ambient conditions, above average wind speeds tended to increase airborne particle concentrations. In contrast, stronger winds tended to decrease airborne particle concentrations in the breathing zone during light and heavy surface-disturbing conditions. A slight increase in the average airborne particle concentration during ambient conditions was found above older nonvolcanic deposits, which tended to be finer grained than the Sunset Crater tephra deposits. An increased airborne particle concentration was realized when walking on an extremely fine-grained deposit, but the sensitivity of airborne particle concentrations to the resuspendible fraction of near-surface grain mass was not conclusive in the field setting when human activities disturbed the bulk of near-surface material. Although the limited sample size precluded detailed statistical analysis, the differences in airborne particle

  10. Airborne particle concentrations at schools measured at different spatial scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buonanno, G.; Fuoco, F. C.; Morawska, L.; Stabile, L.

    2013-03-01

    Potential adverse effects on children health may result from school exposure to airborne particles. To address this issue, measurements in terms of particle number concentration, particle size distribution and black carbon (BC) concentrations were performed in three school buildings in Cassino (Italy) and its suburbs, outside and inside of the classrooms during normal occupancy and use. Additional time resolved information was gathered on ventilation condition, classroom activity, and traffic count data around the schools were obtained using a video camera. Across the three investigated school buildings, the outdoor and indoor particle number concentration monitored down to 4 nm and up to 3 μm ranged from 2.8 × 104 part cm-3 to 4.7 × 104 part cm-3 and from 2.0 × 104 part cm-3 to 3.5 × 104 part cm-3, respectively. The total particle concentrations were usually higher outdoors than indoors, because no indoor sources were detected. I/O measured was less than 1 (varying in a relatively narrow range from 0.63 to 0.74), however one school exhibited indoor concentrations higher than outdoor during the morning rush hours. Particle size distribution at the outdoor site showed high particle concentrations in different size ranges, varying during the day; in relation to the starting and finishing of school time two modes were found. BC concentrations were 5 times higher at the urban school compared with the suburban and suburban-to-urban differences were larger than the relative differences of ultrafine particle concentrations.

  11. CHARACTERIZING THE SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO MUTAGENIC AND CARCINOGENIC CHEMICALS IN AIRBORNE FINE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal and ambient exposures to airborne fine particles, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and genotoxic activity has been studied in populations in the US, Japan, China, and the Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors used to collect fine particles were extracted f...

  12. Iridium enrichment in airborne particles from kilauea volcano: january 1983.

    PubMed

    Zoller, W H; Parrington, J R; Kotra, J M

    1983-12-01

    Airborne particulate matter from the January 1983 eruption of Kilauea volcano was inadvertently collected on air filters at Mauna Loa Observatory at a sampling station used to observe particles in global circulation. Analyses of affected samples revealed unusually large concentrations of selenium, arsenic, indium, gold, and sulfur, as expected for volcanic emissions. Strikingly large concentrations of iridium were also observed, the ratio of iridium to aluminum being 17,000 times its value in Hawaiian basalt. Since iridium enrichments have not previously been observed in volcanic emissions, the results for Kilauea suggest that it is part of an unusual volcanic system which may be fed by magma from the mantle. The iridium enrichment appears to be linked with the high fluorine content of the volcanic gases, which suggests that the iridium is released as a volatile IrF(6). PMID:17747384

  13. Latex allergens in tire dust and airborne particles.

    PubMed Central

    Miguel, A G; Cass, G R; Weiss, J; Glovsky, M M

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence and severity of latex allergy has increased dramatically in the last 15 years due to exposure to natural rubber products. Although historically this health risk has been elevated in hospital personnel and patients, a recent survey has indicated a significant potential risk for the general population. To obtain a wide-spread source for latex exposure, we have considered tire debris. We have searched for the presence of latex allergens in passenger car and truck tire tread, in debris deposited from the atmosphere near a freeway, and in airborne particulate matter samples representative of the entire year 1993 at two sites in the Los Angeles basin (California). After extraction of the samples with phosphate buffered saline, a modified-ELISA inhibition assay was used to measure relative allergen potency and Western blot analyses were used to identify latex allergens. The inhibition studies with the human IgE latex assay revealed inhibition by the tire tread source samples and ambient freeway dust, as well as by control latex sap and latex glove extracts. Levels of extractable latex allergen per unit of protein extracted were about two orders of magnitude lower for tire tread as compared to latex gloves. Western blot analyses using binding of human IgE from latex-sensitive patients showed a band at 34-36 kDa in all tire and ambient samples. Long Beach and Los Angeles, California, air samples showed four additional bands between 50 and 135 kDa. Alternative Western blot analyses using rabbit IgG raised against latex proteins showed a broad band at 30-50 kDa in all samples, with additional bands in the urban air samples similar to the IgE results. A latex cross-reactive material was identified in mountain cedar. In conclusion, the latex allergens or latex cross-reactive material present in sedimented and airborne particulate material, derived from tire debris, and generated by heavy urban vehicle traffic could be important factors in producing latex allergy

  14. Machine vision based particle size and size distribution determination of airborne dust particles of wood and bark pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Igathinathane, C; Pordesimo, L.O.

    2009-08-01

    Dust management strategies in industrial environment, especially of airborne dust, require quantification and measurement of size and size distribution of the particles. Advanced specialized instruments that measure airborne particle size and size distribution apply indirect methods that involve light scattering, acoustic spectroscopy, and laser diffraction. In this research, we propose a simple and direct method of airborne dust particle dimensional measurement and size distribution analysis using machine vision. The method involves development of a user-coded ImageJ plugin that measures particle length and width and analyzes size distribution of particles based on particle length from high-resolution scan images. Test materials were airborne dust from soft pine wood sawdust pellets and ground pine tree bark pellets. Subsamples prepared by dividing the actual dust using 230 mesh (63 m) sieve were analyzed as well. A flatbed document scanner acquired the digital images of the dust particles. Proper sampling, layout of dust particles in singulated arrangement, good contrast smooth background, high resolution images, and accurate algorithm are essential for reliable analysis. A halo effect around grey-scale images ensured correct threshold limits. The measurement algorithm used Feret s diameter for particle length and pixel-march technique for particle width. Particle size distribution was analyzed in a sieveless manner after grouping particles according to their distinct lengths, and several significant dimensions and parameters of particle size distribution were evaluated. Results of the measurement and analysis were presented in textual and graphical formats. The developed plugin was evaluated to have a dimension measurement accuracy in excess of 98.9% and a computer speed of analysis of <8 s/image. Arithmetic mean length of actual wood and bark pellets airborne dust particles were 0.1138 0.0123 and 0.1181 0.0149 mm, respectively. The airborne dust particles of

  15. Evaluation of Airborne Particle Emissions from Commercial Products Containing Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Guannan; Park, Jae Hong; Cena, Lorenzo G.; Shelton, Betsy L.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    The emission of the airborne particles from epoxy resin test sticks with different CNT loadings and two commercial products were characterized while sanding with three grit sizes and three disc sander speeds. The total number concentrations, respirable mass concentrations, and particle size number/mass distributions of the emitted particles were measured using a condensation particle counter, an optical particle counter, and a scanning mobility particle sizer. The emitted particles were sampled on a polycarbonate filter and analyzed using electron microscopy. The highest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 4670 particles/cm3) were produced with coarse sandpaper, 2% (by weight) CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed, whereas the lowest number concentrations (arithmetic mean = 92 particles/cm3) were produced with medium sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and slow disc sander speed. Respirable mass concentrations were highest (arithmetic mean = 1.01 mg/m3) for fine sandpaper, 2% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed and lowest (arithmetic mean = 0.20 mg/m3) for medium sandpaper, 0% CNT test sticks and medium disc sander speed. For CNT-epoxy samples, airborne particles were primarily micrometer-sized epoxy cores with CNT protrusions. No free CNTs were observed in airborne samples, except for tests conducted with 4% CNT epoxy. The number concentration, mass concentration, and size distribution of airborne particles generated when products containing CNTs are sanded depends on the conditions of sanding and the characteristics of the material being sanded. PMID:23204914

  16. Measurement of Raman spectra of single airborne absorbing particles trapped by a single laser beam.

    PubMed

    Ling, Lin; Li, Yong-qing

    2013-02-15

    We demonstrate a method for optical trapping and Raman spectroscopy of micron-sized, airborne absorbing particles using a single focused laser beam. A single Gaussian beam at 532 nm is used to trap and precisely manipulate absorbing airborne particles. The fluctuation of the position of the trapped particles is substantially reduced by controlling the power of the laser beam with a position-sensitive detector and a locking circuit. Raman spectra of the position-stabilized particles or clusters are then measured with an objective and CCD spectrograph. PMID:23455087

  17. Self-refreshing characteristics of an airborne particle sensor using a bridged paddle oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsuk; Lee, Seung-Beck; Park, Bonghyun; Sul, Onejae

    2016-05-01

    We report on the self-refreshing characteristics of a micromachined airborne particle sensor. The sensor consists of a bridge-type beam having an oscillating paddle-type particle collector at its center. When a positive potential is applied to the paddle, the sensor is able to attract and collect negatively charged airborne particles while oscillating close to its resonant frequency and thereby measure their density from the change in the oscillating phase at ˜10 pg resolution. When the applied potential is removed, the collected particles are detached from the sensor due to momentum transfer from the oscillating paddle, thus demonstrating a self-refreshing capability.

  18. Evidence for more than one division of bacteria within airborne particles.

    PubMed Central

    Dimmick, R L; Wolochow, H; Chatigny, M A

    1979-01-01

    When the protocol that we had used to demonstrate a single division of bacterial cells in airborne particles was changed to one that increased the glycerol content of the atomizer fluid from 1 to 5% (vol/vol), thus producing larger particles, more than two (and nearly three) divisions of bacteria occurred within 6 h of aerosol time. PMID:395898

  19. Immunological Assays as an Opportunity of Assessment of Health Risks of Airborne Particle Mixture Including Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzicová, Táňa; Lochman, Ivo; Danihelka, Pavel; Lochmanová, Alexandra; Lach, Karel; Mička, Vladimír

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate perspectives of the assessment of nonspecific biological effects of airborne particulate matter including nanoparticles using appropriate immunological assays. We have selected various in vitro immunological assays to establish an array allowing us to monitor activation of the cell-mediated and humoral response of both the innate and adaptive immunity. To assess comprehensive interactions and effects, the assays were performed in whole blood cultures from healthy volunteers and we used an original airborne particle mixture from high pollution period in Ostrava region representing areas with one of the most polluted air in Europe. Even if certain effects were observed, the results of the immunological assays did not prove significant effects of airborne particles on immune cells' functions of healthy persons. However, obtained data do not exclude health risks of long-term exposure to airborne particles, especially in case of individuals with genetic predisposition to certain diseases or already existing disease. This study emphasizes the in vitro assessment of complex effects of airborne particles in conditions similar to actual ones in an organism exposed to particle mixture present in the polluted air.

  20. Laboratory Study of Airborne Fallout Particles and Their Time Distribution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, H. A., Jr.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Samples of filtered airborne particulate, collected daily for the first month after the September 18, 1977 Chinese nuclear detonation, showed fourteen fission products. Fluctuations in the daily fallout activity levels suggested a global fallout orbit time of approximately twenty days. (Author/BB)

  1. Airborne measurements of cloud forming nuclei and aerosol particles at Kennedy Space Center, Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radke, L. F.; Langer, G.; Hindman, E. E., II

    1978-01-01

    Results of airborne measurements of the sizes and concentrations of aerosol particles, ice nuclei, and cloud condensation nuclei that were taken at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, are presented along with a detailed description of the instrumentation and measuring capabilities of the University of Washington airborne measuring facility (Douglas B-23). Airborne measurements made at Ft. Collins, Colorado, and Little Rock, Arkansas, during the ferry of the B-23 are presented. The particle concentrations differed significantly between the clean air over Ft. Collins and the hazy air over Little Rock and Kennedy Space Center. The concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei over Kennedy Space Center were typical of polluted eastern seaboard air. Three different instruments were used to measure ice nuclei: one used filters to collect the particles, and the others used optical and acoustical methods to detect ice crystals grown in portable cloud chambers. A comparison of the ice nucleus counts, which are in good agreement, is presented.

  2. Plasmonic spectra of individual subwavelength particles under the infrared microscope: cells and airborne dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, James V.; Lioi, David B.; Shaffer, Lindsey; Malone, Marvin A.; Luthra, Antriksh; Ravi, Aruna

    2014-03-01

    A plasmonic metal film with a subwavelength hole array (a mesh) is used to capture an individual subwavelength particle, like a single yeast cell or airborne dust particle, and an imaging infrared (IR) microscope, records a scatterfree, IR absorption spectrum of the particle. Individual spectra of wavelength scale particles usually suffer from large scattering effects. This paper starts by demonstrating the plasmonic nature of the mesh in the infrared, proceeds to how this special form of light (surface plasmon polariton mediated transmission resonance) leads to scatter-free IR absorption spectra of individual, subwavelength particles, and ends with work on yeast cells and dust particles from our laboratory air and a household filter.

  3. Airborne particle monitoring with urban closed-circuit television camera networks and a chromatic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolupula, Y. R.; Aceves-Fernandez, M. A.; Jones, G. R.; Deakin, A. G.; Spencer, J. W.

    2010-11-01

    An economic approach for the preliminary assessment of 2-10 µm sized (PM10) airborne particle levels in urban areas is described. It uses existing urban closed-circuit television (CCTV) surveillance camera networks in combination with particle accumulating units and chromatic quantification of polychromatic light scattered by the captured particles. Methods for accommodating extraneous light effects are discussed and test results obtained from real urban sites are presented to illustrate the potential of the approach.

  4. Airborne particle generation for optical tweezers by thermo-mechanical membrane actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polster, T.; Leopold, S.; Hoffmann, M.

    2011-06-01

    This article presents a new approach for airborne particle generation for optical tweezers. The used element is a 500 nm thin aluminum nitride membrane with an integrated heating element. Thus the membrane works as thermo-mechanical actor. The membrane device is characterized concerning their mechanical and thermal behavior. Successful airborne particle generation is demonstrated with 10 μm silicon dioxide spheres. They are lifted up some 10th of μm from the membrane surface. The development and test of this device serves as starting point for experiments with optical tweezers in air.

  5. Airborne particles in Swansea, UK: their collection and characterization.

    PubMed

    Price, Heather; Arthur, Robert; Sexton, Keith; Gregory, Clive; Hoogendoorn, Bastiaan; Matthews, Ian; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Urban air particulate matter (PM) has previously been associated with a variety of adverse health effects. It is now believed that the smallest particles, ultrafine or nanoparticles, are linked to the greatest health effects. The physicochemistry of these particles is likely to provide information regarding their toxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to further the understanding of the heterogeneous and changing particle concentrations in urban air, in conjunction with gaining an understanding of the physicochemistry of the particles. A Dekati electrical low-pressure impactor was used to collect the particles and real-time data in a busy traffic corridor in Swansea, Wales, over a period of 10 nonconsecutive weeks. Particle concentrations in the street canyon were analyzed and particle physicochemistries investigated using a variety of techniques. Particle number concentrations were found to vary both diurnally and from day to day in the traffic corridor. Of all particles, the nano to fine size fraction was consistently identified in the highest concentrations (maximum: 140,000 particles cm(-3)). Particle physicochemistry was found to vary as a function of size, with larger particles exhibiting a greater variety of morphologies (and consequently particle types) and associated metals. PMID:20155578

  6. Assessment of Airborne Particles. Fundamentals, Applications, and Implications to Inhalation Toxicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercer, Thomas T., Ed.; And Others

    Concern over chemical and radioactive particulate matter in industry and over rapidly increasing air pollution has stimulated research both on the properties of airborne particles and methods for assessing them and on their biological effects following inhalation. The Third Rochester International Conference on Environmental Toxicity was,…

  7. Contribution of particle counting in assessment of exposure to airborne microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parat, Sylvie; Perdrix, Alain; Mann, Sylvie; Baconnier, Pierre

    The aim of the study was to determine the relationship between airborne bacterial concentrations and particle counts measured simultaneously at different sites. Andersen single stage viable particle samplers were used for microbial measurements while a Laser particle counter gave the cumulated counts of particles larger than 0.5 μm diameter. The first phase of the study was performed in two experimental rooms where the basic level of microbial contamination was low. Peaks of concentrations were generated by human activity and both bacterial and particle counts were monitored over 1 h. In the second phase, measurements were run for several days in three different buildings normally occupied. Natural variations of bacterial and particle counts were monitored: microbial measurements were performed each hour while particle counts were started with a 10 min frequency. Statistics revealed strong positive correlations between bacterial and particle counts in four sites out of five. Analyses of covariance used to compare the regression lines obtained in each area showed that except for two natural sites, the regression lines were significantly different, indicating that no absolute relationship can be established between the two parameters. Therefore, particle counting should, of course, not take the place of microorganism measurements, but combining particle counting with bioaerosols measurements may allow detection of rapid variations instantaneously and indicate further microbial measurements. This strategy should improve the assessment of people"s real exposure to airborne microorganisms.

  8. Identifying airborne metal particles sources near an optoelectronic and semiconductor industrial park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ho-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yea; Chang, Cheng-Nan; Chuang, Yen-Hsun; Lin, Yu-Hao

    2016-06-01

    The recently developed Central Taiwan Science Park (CTSP) in central Taiwan is home to an optoelectronic and semiconductor industrial cluster. Therefore, exploring the elemental compositions and size distributions of airborne particles emitted from the CTSP would help to prevent pollution. This study analyzed size-fractionated metal-rich particle samples collected in upwind and downwind areas of CTSP during Jan. and Oct. 2013 by using micro-orifice uniform deposited impactor (MOUDI). Correlation analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis and particle mass-size distribution analysis are performed to identify the source of metal-rich particle near the CTSP. Analyses of elemental compositions and particle size distributions emitted from the CTSP revealed that the CTSP emits some metals (V, As, In Ga, Cd and Cu) in the ultrafine particles (< 1 μm). The statistical analysis combines with the particle mass-size distribution analysis could provide useful source identification information. In airborne particles with the size of 0.32 μm, Ga could be a useful pollution index for optoelectronic and semiconductor emission in the CTSP. Meanwhile, the ratios of As/Ga concentration at the particle size of 0.32 μm demonstrates that humans near the CTSP would be potentially exposed to GaAs ultrafine particles. That is, metals such as Ga and As and other metals that are not regulated in Taiwan are potentially harmful to human health.

  9. An analytical electron microscope study of airborne industrial particles in Sosnowiec, Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rietmeijer, Frans J. M.; Janeczek, Janusz

    The types and the relative amounts of airborne particles in the city of Sosnowiec (Poland) during 21-22 June, 1994 were identified by analytical electron microscope analyses. They are mostly aspherical angular Al-bearing silica particles (0.1-5.15 μm) and clusters thereof. Carbonaceous particles form sheets of soluble volatile-rich materials (0.3-33.9 μm) and rare soot. Numerous nanometer-sized Al-bearing silica grains and salt minerals are associated with the larger particles. They resulted from inefficient combustion of low-grade coals by the local industries whereby the silica particles are coal impurities that survived combustion. The total particle emission was constant during a 24 h period but silica shards dominated the nighttime emission while carbonaceous particles abounded during the daytime. This study showed that tropospheric particles in regions dominated by inefficient coal combustion are fundamentally different from typical coal fly ash spheres.

  10. Aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer: real-time measurement of emission spectra of airborne biological particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Nachman, Paul; Chen, Gang; Chang, Richard K.; Mayo, Michael W.; Fernandez, Gilbert L.

    1995-10-01

    We have assembled an aerosol-fluorescence spectrum analyzer (AFS), which can measure the fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering of airborne particles as they flow through a laser beam. The aerosols traverse a scattering cell where they are illuminated with intense (50 kW/cm 2) light inside the cavity of an argon-ion laser operating at 488 nm. This AFS can obtain fluorescence spectra of individual dye-doped polystyrene microspheres as small as 0.5 mu m in diameter. The spectra obtained from microspheres doped with pink and green-yellow dyes are clearly different. We have also detected the fluorescence spectra of airborne particles (although not single particles) made from various

  11. Direct Characterization of Airborne Particles Associated with Arsenic-rich Mine Tailings: Particle Size Mineralogy and Texture

    SciTech Connect

    M Corriveau; H Jamieson; M Parsons; J Campbell; A Lanzirotti

    2011-12-31

    Windblown and vehicle-raised dust from unvegetated mine tailings can be a human health risk. Airborne particles from As-rich abandoned Au mine tailings from Nova Scotia, Canada have been characterized in terms of particle size, As concentration, As oxidation state, mineral species and texture. Samples were collected in seven aerodynamically fractionated size ranges (0.5-16 {micro}m) using a cascade impactor deployed at three tailings fields. All three sites are used for recreational activities and off-road vehicles were racing on the tailings at two mines during sample collection. Total concentrations of As in the <8 {micro}m fraction varied from 65 to 1040 ng/m{sup 3} of air as measured by proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analysis. The same samples were analysed by synchrotron-based microfocused X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy ({micro}XANES) and X-ray diffraction ({micro}XRD) and found to contain multiple As-bearing mineral species, including Fe-As weathering products. The As species present in the dust were similar to those observed in the near-surface tailings. The action of vehicles on the tailings surface may disaggregate material cemented with Fe arsenate and contribute additional fine-grained As-rich particles to airborne dust. Results from this study can be used to help assess the potential human health risks associated with exposure to airborne particles from mine tailings.

  12. Airborne endotoxin associated with particles of different sizes and affected by water content in handled straw.

    PubMed

    Madsen, A M; Nielsen, S H

    2010-07-01

    High exposures to endotoxin are observed in environments where organic materials are handled and lower exposures are found in e.g. indoor air. Inhaled endotoxin contributes significantly to the induction of airway inflammation and dysfunction. The size of an inhaled particle influences the deposition in the airways and the following health symptoms. The objective is to characterise the distribution of endotoxin on airborne particles of different sizes in straw storage halls with high exposure and in other environments with lower exposure levels to endotoxin. Furthermore we have studied the influence of water content of handled straw on the size distribution of endotoxin containing particles. Total, inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin and particles have each been quantified in aerosols from boiler rooms and straw storage halls at 24 power plants, including 21 biofuel plants. Inhalable, thoracic and respirable endotoxin have been quantified in aerosols from offices and outdoor air. The endotoxin concentration was higher in airborne thoracic dust than in airborne 'total dust'. The median respirable fraction in the straw storage halls, boiler rooms at biofuel plants, boiler rooms at conventional plants, offices and outdoors was respectively 42%, 9%, 19%, 24% and 34%. Thoracic endotoxin per number of thoracic particles was higher than respirable endotoxin per number of respirable particles at the biofuel plants. In straw storage halls the fraction of endotoxin of respirable size was highest on the days with lowest water content in the received straw. Furthermore the exposures to all endotoxin fractions were highest on days with the lowest water content in the received straw. In conclusion the highest exposures and concentrations of endotoxin occur or tend to occur from thoracic dust. A high variation in endotoxin concentrations and in fractions of respirable or thoracic size is found in the different working areas. This is important in the risk assessment and

  13. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm3. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 104 /cm3 and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  14. A Micro Aerosol Sensor for the Measurement of Airborne Ultrafine Particles.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhu, Rong; Yang, Wenming

    2016-01-01

    Particle number concentration and particle size are the two key parameters used to characterize exposure to airborne nanoparticles or ultrafine particles that have attracted the most attention. This paper proposes a simple micro aerosol sensor for detecting the number concentration and particle size of ultrafine particles with diameters from 50 to 253 nm based on electrical diffusion charging. The sensor is composed of a micro channel and a couple of planar electrodes printed on two circuit boards assembled in parallel, which thus integrate charging, precipitating and measurement elements into one chip, the overall size of which is 98 × 38 × 25 mm³. The experiment results demonstrate that the sensor is useful for measuring monodisperse aerosol particles with number concentrations from 300 to 2.5 × 10⁴ /cm³ and particle sizes from 50 to 253 nm. The aerosol sensor has a simple structure and small size, which is favorable for use in handheld devices. PMID:26999156

  15. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety.

    PubMed

    Peters, Thomas M; Elzey, Sherrie; Johnson, Ronald; Park, Heaweon; Grassian, Vicki H; Maher, Tabitha; O'Shaughnessy, Patrick

    2009-02-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg/m(3)) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m(-3)) and contained up to 39% +/- 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10-80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they demonstrate

  16. Airborne monitoring to distinguish engineered nanomaterials from incidental particles for environmental health and safety

    PubMed Central

    Peters, TM; Elzey, S; Johnson, R; Park, H; Grassian, VH; Maher, T; O'Shaughnessy, P

    2016-01-01

    Two methods were used to distinguish airborne engineered nanomaterials from other airborne particles in a facility that produces nano-structured lithium titanate metal oxide powder. The first method involved off-line analysis of filter samples collected with conventional respirable samplers at each of seven locations (six near production processes and one outdoors). Throughout most of the facility and outdoors, respirable mass concentrations were low (<0.050 mg m−3) and were attributed to particles other than the nanomaterial (<10% by mass titanium determined with inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry). In contrast, in a single area with extensive material handling, mass concentrations were greatest (0.118 mg m−3) and contained up to 39% +/− 11% lithium titanium, indicating the presence of airborne nanomaterial. Analysis of the filter samples collected in this area by transmission electron microscope and scanning electron microscope revealed that the airborne nanomaterial was associated only with spherical aggregates (clusters of fused 10–80 nm nanoparticles) that were larger than 200 nm. This analysis also showed that nanoparticles in this area were the smallest particles of a larger distribution of submicrometer chain agglomerates likely from welding in an adjacent area of the facility. The second method used two, hand-held, direct-reading, battery-operated instruments to obtain a time series of very fine particle number (<300 nm), respirable mass, and total mass concentration, which were then related to activities within the area of extensive material handling. This activity-based monitoring showed that very fine particle number concentrations (<300 nm) had no apparent correlation to worker activities, but that sharp peaks in the respirable and total mass concentration coincided with loading a hopper and replacing nanomaterial collection bags. These findings were consistent with those from the filter-based method in that they

  17. Receptor modeling of globally circulating airborne particles collected at Mauna Loa Observatory, Hawaii

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    Weekly airborne particle samples were collected at Mauna Loa Observatory (MLO), Hawaii from February 1979 through May 1985. Receptor models were used to identify sources of airborne particles at MLO, determine compositions of particles from these sources, and assess the relative impacts of them. Major sources of ambient particles at MLO include Asian continental material, oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} species, marine particles, Asian anthropogenic material, local volcanic emissions, and basalt. Source composition profiles were developed for each component. The Asian continental component represents particles transported from Eastern Asia to the North Pacific, and the component consists of crustal material contaminated by anthropogenic emissions. To account for variations in the relative strengths of anthropogenic and crustal sources, a separate Asian anthropogenic component was also developed. During the dust season, Asian continental material accounts for 80% of total suspended particulate material (TSP) at MLO, oceanic productions of Se and SO{sub 4} 11%, marine particles 2.8%, basalt 1.9%, volcanic emissions 1.7%, and Asian anthropogenic material in excess of Asian continental material 3.2%. During the clean season, the oceanic biological production of Se and SO{sub 4} contributes 62% of TSP at MLO. Continental material contributes 22%, marine particles 6.4%, basalt 2.7%, volcanic emissions 2.4%, and anthropogenic materials in excess of continental material 4.3%.

  18. THEORETICAL MODEL OF SOILING OF SURFACES BY AIRBORNE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model is developed which can be used to predict the change in reflectance from a surface as a function of time. Reflectance change is a measure of soiling caused by the deposition of particles on a surface. The major inputs to the model are the parameters to a bimodal distribut...

  19. AIRBORNE PARTICLE SIZES AND SOURCES FOUND IN INDOOR AIR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper summarizes results of a literature search into the sources, sizes, and concentrations of particles in indoor air, including the various types: plant, animal, mineral, combustion, home/personal care, and radioactive aerosols. This information, presented in a summary figu...

  20. Genotoxicity of organic extracts of airborne particles in somatic cells of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Delgado-Rodríguez, A; Ortíz-Marttelo, R; Villalobos-Pietrini, R; Gómez-Arroyo, S; Graf, U

    1999-07-01

    Complex mixtures extracted from air filters exposed for 24 h in two sessions (27 July and 02 August 1991) and at two locations (Merced, downtown, and Pedregal de San Angel, south-west) in Mexico City were analysed. The organic extracts were from airborne particles equal or smaller than 10 microns (PM10), and from total suspended particles (TSP). These organic extracts were assayed in the somatic mutation and recombination test (SMART) in wings of Drosophila melanogaster using two different crosses as well as in the Salmonella/microsome assay using strain TA98 with and without S9 fraction. The presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the extracts was determined by gas chromatography. The genotoxic activities observed in the two test systems were comparable with the indirect mutagens producing greater response than the direct mutagens. The quantities of particulate matter as well as the genotoxic activities were higher on 02 August than on 27 July 1991 for both locations. The amounts of airborne particles and the resulting genotoxic activities were higher at Merced than at Pedregal. In both biological systems, PM10 were more genotoxic than TSP. These results demonstrate the sensitivity of the Drosophila wing SMART-which is an in vivo eukaryotic genotoxicity assay-as a biological monitor of environmental pollution related to airborne particles. PMID:10377966

  1. Evaluation of cell sorting aerosols and containment by an optical airborne particle counter.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mike; Waring, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    Understanding aerosols produced by cell sorting is critical to biosafety risk assessment and validation of containment efficiency. In this study an Optical Airborne Particle Counter was used to analyze aerosols produced by the BD FACSAria and to assess the effectiveness of its aerosol containment. The suitability of using this device to validate containment was directly compared to the Glo-Germ method put forth by the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) as a standard for testing. It was found that high concentrations of aerosols ranging from 0.3 µm to 10 µm can be detected in failure mode, with most less than 5 µm. In most cases, while numerous aerosols smaller than 5 µm were detected by the Optical Airborne Particle Counter, no Glo-Germ particles were detected, indicating that small aerosols are under-evaluated by the Glo-Germ method. The results demonstrate that the Optical Airborne Particle Counter offers a rapid, economic, and quantitative analysis of cell sorter aerosols and represents an improved method over Glo-Germ for the task of routine validation and monitoring of aerosol containment for cell sorting. PMID:26012776

  2. Characterization of Hairdresser Exposure to Airborne Particles during Hair Bleaching.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Patrik T; Marini, Sara; Wierzbicka, Aneta; Kåredal, Monica; Blomgren, Eva; Nielsen, Jörn; Buonanno, Giorgio; Gudmundsson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory symptoms among hairdressers are often ascribed to the use of bleaching powders that contain persulfate salts. Such salts can act as allergens and airway irritants but the mechanisms behind the negative health effects are not fully known. In order to understand why some hairdressers experience respiratory symptoms during, and after, sessions of hair bleaching, it is of importance to characterize how exposure occurs. In this work we used time and particle size resolved instrumentation with the aim to measure the concentration of particles that hairdressers are exposed to during sessions of hair bleaching. We also used filter samples to collect particles for quantitative determination of persulfate (S2O8(2-)) content and for analysis by light microscopy. Two different types of bleaching powders were used, one marked as dust-free and one without this marking (denoted regular). The time resolved instrumentation revealed that particles <10 µm were emitted, specifically when the regular powder was prepared and mixed with hydrogen peroxide. In contrast to other research our work also revealed that supercoarse particles (>10 µm) were emitted during application of the bleaching, when both the regular and the dust-free powders were used. The measured level of persulfate, sampled in the breathing zone of the hairdressers, was on average 26 µg m(-3) when the regular powder was used and 11 µg m(-3) when the dust-free powder was used. This indicates that use of dust-free powder does not eliminate exposure to persulfates, it only lowers the concentration. We show that the site of sampling, or position of the hairdresser with regards to the hair being bleached, is of high importance in the determination of persulfate levels and exposure. This work focuses on the physical and chemical characterization of the particles released to the air and the results are important for accurate exposure assessments. Accurate assessments may in turn lead to a better understanding of

  3. Simultaneous light scattering and intrinsic fluorescence measurement for the classification of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Kaye, P H; Barton, J E; Hirst, E; Clark, J M

    2000-07-20

    We describe a prototype laboratory light-scattering instrument that integrates two approaches to airborne particle characterization: spatial light-scattering analysis and intrinsic fluorescence measurement, with the aim of providing an effective means of classifying biological particles within an ambient aerosol. The system uses a single continuous-wave 266-nm ultraviolet laser to generate both the spatial elastic scatter data (from which an assessment of particle size and shape is made) and the particle intrinsic fluorescence data from particles in the approximate size range of 1-10-mum diameter carried in a sample airflow through the laser beam. Preliminary results suggest that this multiparameter measurement approach can provide an effective means of classifying different particle types and can reduce occurrences of false-positive detection of biological aerosols. PMID:18349949

  4. Identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash particles by Raman microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ivleva, Natalia P; Huckele, Susanne; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph; Baumann, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    We present for the first time the Raman microspectroscopic identification and characterization of individual airborne volcanic ash (VA) particles. The particles were collected in April/May 2010 during research aircraft flights, which were performed by Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt in the airspace near the Eyjafjallajökull volcano eruption and over Europe (between Iceland and Southern Germany). In addition, aerosol particles were sampled by an Electrical Low Pressure Impactor in Munich, Germany. As references for the Raman analysis, we used the spectra of VA collected at the ground near the place of eruption, of mineral basaltic rock, and of different minerals from a database. We found significant differences in the spectra of VA and other aerosol particles (e.g., soot, nitrates, sulfates, and clay minerals), which allowed us to identify VA among other atmospheric particulate matter. Furthermore, while the airborne VA shows a characteristic Raman pattern (with broad band from ca. 200 to ca. 700 cm(-1) typical for SiO₂ glasses and additional bands of ferric minerals), the differences between the spectra of aged and fresh particles were observed, suggesting differences in their chemical composition and/or structure. We also analyzed similarities between Eyjafjallajökull VA particles collected at different sampling sites and compared the particles with a large variety of glassy and crystalline minerals. This was done by applying cluster analysis, in order to get information on the composition and structure of volcanic ash. PMID:24121468

  5. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J; Banfield, Jillian F; Nazaroff, William W

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses' station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3-1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3-10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37-81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18-59% and 1-5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1-10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  6. Concentrations and Sources of Airborne Particles in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Licina, Dusan; Bhangar, Seema; Brooks, Brandon; Baker, Robyn; Firek, Brian; Tang, Xiaochen; Morowitz, Michael J.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2016-01-01

    Premature infants in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) have underdeveloped immune systems, making them susceptible to adverse health consequences from air pollutant exposure. Little is known about the sources of indoor airborne particles that contribute to the exposure of premature infants in the NICU environment. In this study, we monitored the spatial and temporal variations of airborne particulate matter concentrations along with other indoor environmental parameters and human occupancy. The experiments were conducted over one year in a private-style NICU. The NICU was served by a central heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC) system equipped with an economizer and a high-efficiency particle filtration system. The following parameters were measured continuously during weekdays with 1-min resolution: particles larger than 0.3 μm resolved into 6 size groups, CO2 level, dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity, and presence or absence of occupants. Altogether, over sixteen periods of a few weeks each, measurements were conducted in rooms occupied with premature infants. In parallel, a second monitoring station was operated in a nearby hallway or at the local nurses’ station. The monitoring data suggest a strong link between indoor particle concentrations and human occupancy. Detected particle peaks from occupancy were clearly discernible among larger particles and imperceptible for submicron (0.3–1 μm) particles. The mean indoor particle mass concentrations averaged across the size range 0.3–10 μm during occupied periods was 1.9 μg/m3, approximately 2.5 times the concentration during unoccupied periods (0.8 μg/m3). Contributions of within-room emissions to total PM10 mass in the baby rooms averaged 37–81%. Near-room indoor emissions and outdoor sources contributed 18–59% and 1–5%, respectively. Airborne particle levels in the size range 1–10 μm showed strong dependence on human activities, indicating the importance of indoor

  7. Contribution of airborne dust particles to HONO sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saliba, N. A.; Moussa, S. G.; El Tayyar, G.

    2014-02-01

    HONO is a major precursor for OH radicals in early mornings. Its formation has been mainly attributed to the heterogeneous hydrolysis of NO2 on surfaces such as soot, glass, mineral oxides and aerosol surfaces. In particular, dust events which are loaded with mineral oxide aerosols have been associated with higher HONO concentrations in the gas phase. In order to understand the mechanism of reactions related to this process, samples during dusty and non-dusty days were collected between October 2009 and April 2011. Based on HYSPLIT backward trajectories, data were divided between wind trajectories originating from Arabian or African deserts. In this study an increase of HONO levels was observed during dusty days. The increase in the acidic gas concentrations was accompanied by an increase in the PM nitrate and sulfate ion concentrations. During high relative humidity (African dusty days), it is proposed that the mechanism of NO2 hydrolysis predominates whereas during Arabian dusty days, where the air is relatively dry, a synergistic mechanism of adsorption and reaction between NO2 and SO2 on dust particles to produce HONO and sulfate in the particle phase is suggested. This study implies that the NOx reactivity on mineral oxide surfaces leads to a higher mixing level of OH. An increase in the sulfate forming capacity could account for the underestimation of sulfates in aerosols when the reactive uptake of SO2 alone is considered.

  8. Physical and chemical characterization of airborne particles from welding operations in automotive plants.

    PubMed

    Dasch, Jean; D'Arcy, James

    2008-07-01

    Airborne particles were characterized from six welding operations in three automotive plants, including resistance spot welding, metal inert gas (MIG) welding and tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding of aluminum and resistance spot welding, MIG welding and weld-through sealer of galvanized steel. Particle levels were measured throughout the process area to select a sampling location, followed by intensive particle sampling over one working shift. Temporal trends were measured, and particles were collected on filters to characterize their size and chemistry. In all cases, the particles fell into a bimodal size distribution with very large particles >20 mum in diameter, possibly emitted as spatter or metal expulsions, and very small particles about 1 mum in diameter, possibly formed from condensation of vaporized metal. The mass median aerodynamic diameter was about 1 mum, with only about 7% of the particle mass present as ultrafine particles <100 nm. About half the mass of aluminum welding particles could be accounted for by chemical analysis, with the remainder possibly present as oxygen. Predominant species were organic carbon, elemental carbon, iron, and aluminum. More than 80% of the particle mass could be accounted for from steel welding, primarily present as iron, organic carbon, zinc, and copper. Particle concentrations and elemental concentrations were compared with allowable concentrations as recommended by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists. In all cases, workplace levels were at least 11 times lower than recommended levels. PMID:18464098

  9. Predicting emissions of SVOCs from polymeric materials and their interaction with airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Little, John C

    2006-01-15

    A model that predicts the emission rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from building materials is extended and used to predict the emission rate of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) from polymeric materials. Reasonable agreement between model predictions and gas-phase di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) concentrations is achieved using data collected in a previous experimental study that measured emissions of DEHP from vinyl flooring in two very different chambers. While emissions of highly volatile VOCs are subject to "internal" control (the material-phase diffusion coefficient), emissions of the very low volatility SVOCs are subject to "external" control (partitioning into the gas phase, the convective mass-transfer coefficient, and adsorption onto interior surfaces). The effect of SVOCs partitioning onto airborne particles is also examined. The DEHP emission rate is increased when the gas-phase concentration is high, and especially when partitioning to the airborne particles is strong. Airborne particles may play an important role in inhalation exposure as well as in transporting SVOCs well beyond the source. Although more rigorous validation is needed, the model should help elucidate the mechanisms governing emissions of phthalate plasticizers, brominated flame retardants, biocides, and other SVOCs from a wide range of building materials and consumer products. PMID:16468389

  10. Total airborne mold particle sampling: evaluation of sample collection, preparation and counting procedures, and collection devices.

    PubMed

    Godish, Diana; Godish, Thad

    2008-02-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate (i) procedures used to collect, prepare, and count total airborne mold spore/particle concentrations, and (ii) the relative field performance of three commercially available total airborne mold spore/particle sampling devices. Differences between factory and laboratory airflow calibration values of axial fan-driven sampling instruments (used in the study) indicated a need for laboratory calibration using a mass flow meter to ensure that sample results were accurately calculated. An aniline blue-amended Calberla's solution adjusted to a pH of 4.2-4.4 provided good sample mounting/counting results using Dow Corning high vacuum grease, Dow Corning 280A adhesive, and Dow Corning 316 silicone release spray for samples collected using mini-Burkard and Allergenco samplers. Count variability among analysts was most pronounced in 5% counts of relatively low mold particle deposition density samples and trended downward with increased count percentage and particle deposition density. No significant differences were observed among means of 5, 10, and 20% counts and among analysts; a significant interaction effect was observed between analysts' counts and particle deposition densities. Significantly higher mini-Burkard and Air-O-Cell total mold spore/particle counts for 600x vs. 400x (1.9 and 2.3 x higher, respectively), 1000x vs. 600x (1.9 and 2.2 x higher, respectively) and 1000x vs. 400x (3.6 and 4.6 x higher, respectively) comparisons indicated that 1000x magnification counts best quantified total airborne mold spore/particles using light microscopy, and that lower magnification counts may result in unacceptable underreporting of airborne mold spore/particle concentrations. Modest but significantly higher (1.2x) total mold spore concentrations were observed with Allergenco vs. mini-Burkard samples collected in co-located, concurrently operated sampler studies; moderate but significantly higher mini-Burkard count values (1.4x) were

  11. Concentration and characterization of airborne particles in Tehran's subway system.

    PubMed

    Kamani, Hosein; Hoseini, Mohammad; Seyedsalehi, Mahdi; Mahdavi, Yousef; Jaafari, Jalil; Safari, Gholam Hosein

    2014-06-01

    Particulate matter is an important air pollutant, especially in closed environments like underground subway stations. In this study, a total of 13 elements were determined from PM10 and PM2.5 samples collected at two subway stations (Imam Khomeini and Sadeghiye) in Tehran's subway system. Sampling was conducted in April to August 2011 to measure PM concentrations in platform and adjacent outdoor air of the stations. In the Imam Khomeini station, the average concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 94.4 ± 26.3 and 52.3 ± 16.5 μg m(-3) in the platform and 81.8 ± 22.2 and 35 ± 17.6 μg m(-3) in the outdoor air, respectively. In the Sadeghiye station, mean concentrations of PM10 and PM2.5 were 87.6 ± 23 and 41.3 ± 20.4 μg m(-3) in the platform and 73.9 ± 17.3 and 30 ± 15 μg m(-3), in the outdoor air, respectively. The relative contribution of elemental components in each particle fraction were accounted for 43% (PM10) and 47.7% (PM2.5) in platform of Imam Khomeini station and 15.9% (PM10) and 18.5% (PM2.5) in the outdoor air of this station. Also, at the Sadeghiye station, each fraction accounted for 31.6% (PM10) and 39.8% (PM2.5) in platform and was 11.7% (PM10) and 14.3% (PM2.5) in the outdoor. At the Imam Khomeini station, Fe was the predominant element to represent 32.4 and 36 % of the total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 11.5 and 13.3% in the outdoor, respectively. At the Sadeghiye station, this element represented 22.7 and 29.8% of total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in the platform and 8.7 and 10.5% in the outdoor air, respectively. Other major crustal elements were 5.8% (PM10) and 5.3% (PM2.5) in the Imam Khomeini station platform and 2.3 and 2.4% in the outdoor air, respectively. The proportion of other minor elements was significantly lower, actually less than 7% in total samples, and V was the minor concentration in total mass of PM10 and PM2.5 in both platform stations. PMID:24573466

  12. Comparison of deposited surface area of airborne ultrafine particles generated from two welding processes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, J F; Albuquerque, P C; Miranda, Rosa M; Santos, Telmo G; Vieira, M T

    2012-09-01

    This article describes work performed on the assessment of the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in two welding processes metal-active gas (MAG) of carbon steel and friction-stir welding (FSW) of aluminium in terms of deposited area in alveolar tract of the lung using a nanoparticle surface area monitor analyser. The obtained results showed the dependence from process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and clearly demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles, when compared with background levels. The obtained results showed that the process that results on the lower levels of alveolar-deposited surface area is FSW, unlike MAG. Nevertheless, all the tested processes resulted in important doses of ultrafine particles that are to be deposited in the human lung of exposed workers. PMID:22954401

  13. Characterization and Control of Airborne Particles Emitted During Production of Epoxy / Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Cena, Lorenzo G.; Peters, Thomas M.

    2016-01-01

    This work characterized airborne particles that were generated from the weighing of bulk, multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratiô1). The particles generated during sanding were predominately micron-sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator’s breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m3) compared to those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m3; p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  14. Characterization and control of airborne particles emitted during production of epoxy/carbon nanotube nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Cena, Lorenzo G; Peters, Thomas M

    2011-02-01

    This work characterized airborne particles generated from the weighing of bulk, multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the manual sanding of epoxy test samples reinforced with CNTs. It also evaluated the effectiveness of three local exhaust ventilation (LEV) conditions (no LEV, custom fume hood, and biosafety cabinet) for control of particles generated during sanding of CNT-epoxy nanocomposites. Particle number and respirable mass concentrations were measured using an optical particle counter (OPC) and a condensation particle counter (CPC), and particle morphology was assessed by transmission electron microscopy. The ratios of the geometric mean (GM) concentrations measured during the process to that measured in the background (P/B ratios) were used as indices of the impact of the process and the LEVs on observed concentrations. Processing CNT-epoxy nanocomposites materials released respirable size airborne particles (P/B ratio: weighing = 1.79; sanding = 5.90) but generally no nanoparticles (P/B ratio ∼1). The particles generated during sanding were predominantly micron sized with protruding CNTs and very different from bulk CNTs that tended to remain in large (>1 μm) tangled clusters. Respirable mass concentrations in the operator's breathing zone were lower when sanding was performed in the biological safety cabinet (GM = 0.20 μg/m(3) compared with those with no LEV (GM = 2.68 μg/m(3) or those when sanding was performed inside the fume hood (GM = 21.4 μg/m(3); p-value < 0.0001). The poor performance of the custom fume hood used in this study may have been exacerbated by its lack of a front sash and rear baffles and its low face velocity (0.39 m/sec). PMID:21253981

  15. A Novel Size-Selective Airborne Particle Sampling Instrument (Wras) for Health Risk Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnewuch, H.; Muir, R.; Gorbunov, B.; Priest, N. D.; Jackson, P. R.

    Health risks associated with inhalation of airborne particles are known to be influenced by particle sizes. A reliable, size resolving sampler, classifying particles in size ranges from 2 nm—30 μm and suitable for use in the field would be beneficial in investigating health risks associated with inhalation of airborne particles. A review of current aerosol samplers highlighted a number of limitations. These could be overcome by combining an inertial deposition impactor with a diffusion collector in a single device. The instrument was designed for analysing mass size distributions. Calibration was carried out using a number of recognised techniques. The instrument was tested in the field by collecting size resolved samples of lead containing aerosols present at workplaces in factories producing crystal glass. The mass deposited on each substrate proved sufficient to be detected and measured using atomic absorption spectroscopy. Mass size distributions of lead were produced and the proportion of lead present in the aerosol nanofraction calculated and varied from 10% to 70% by weight.

  16. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  17. Concentration, Size Distribution, and Infectivity of Airborne Particles Carrying Swine Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Carmen; Raynor, Peter C.; Davies, Peter R.; Torremorell, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    When pathogens become airborne, they travel associated with particles of different size and composition. Particle size determines the distance across which pathogens can be transported, as well as the site of deposition and the survivability of the pathogen. Despite the importance of this information, the size distribution of particles bearing viruses emitted by infectious animals remains unknown. In this study we characterized the concentration and size distribution of inhalable particles that transport influenza A virus (IAV), porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), and porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) generated by acutely infected pigs and assessed virus viability for each particle size range. Aerosols from experimentally infected pigs were sampled for 24 days using an Andersen cascade impactor able to separate particles by size (ranging from 0.4 to 10 micrometer (μm) in diameter). Air samples collected for the first 9, 20 and the last 3 days of the study were analyzed for IAV, PRRSV and PEDV, respectively, using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and quantified as geometric mean copies/m3 within each size range. IAV was detected in all particle size ranges in quantities ranging from 5.5x102 (in particles ranging from 1.1 to 2.1μm) to 4.3x105 RNA copies/m3 in the largest particles (9.0–10.0μm). PRRSV was detected in all size ranges except particles between 0.7 and 2.1μm in quantities ranging from 6x102 (0.4–0.7μm) to 5.1x104 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). PEDV, an enteric virus, was detected in all particle sizes and in higher quantities than IAV and PRRSV (p < 0.0001) ranging from 1.3x106 (0.4–0.7μm) to 3.5x108 RNA copies/m3 (9.0–10.0μm). Infectious status was demonstrated for the 3 viruses, and in the case of IAV and PRRSV, viruses were isolated from particles larger than 2.1μm. In summary, our results indicated that airborne PEDV, IAV and PRRSV can be found in a wide range of

  18. Analysing the health effects of simultaneous exposure to physical and chemical properties of airborne particles

    PubMed Central

    Pirani, Monica; Best, Nicky; Blangiardo, Marta; Liverani, Silvia; Atkinson, Richard W.; Fuller, Gary W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Airborne particles are a complex mix of organic and inorganic compounds, with a range of physical and chemical properties. Estimation of how simultaneous exposure to air particles affects the risk of adverse health response represents a challenge for scientific research and air quality management. In this paper, we present a Bayesian approach that can tackle this problem within the framework of time series analysis. Methods We used Dirichlet process mixture models to cluster time points with similar multipollutant and response profiles, while adjusting for seasonal cycles, trends and temporal components. Inference was carried out via Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. We illustrated our approach using daily data of a range of particle metrics and respiratory mortality for London (UK) 2002–2005. To better quantify the average health impact of these particles, we measured the same set of metrics in 2012, and we computed and compared the posterior predictive distributions of mortality under the exposure scenario in 2012 vs 2005. Results The model resulted in a partition of the days into three clusters. We found a relative risk of 1.02 (95% credible intervals (CI): 1.00, 1.04) for respiratory mortality associated with days characterised by high posterior estimates of non-primary particles, especially nitrate and sulphate. We found a consistent reduction in the airborne particles in 2012 vs 2005 and the analysis of the posterior predictive distributions of respiratory mortality suggested an average annual decrease of − 3.5% (95% CI: − 0.12%, − 5.74%). Conclusions We proposed an effective approach that enabled the better understanding of hidden structures in multipollutant health effects within time series analysis. It allowed the identification of exposure metrics associated with respiratory mortality and provided a tool to assess the changes in health effects from various policies to control the ambient particle matter mixtures. PMID:25795926

  19. COLLECTION OF AIRBORNE PARTICLES BY A HIGH-GRADIENT PERMANENT MAGNETIC METHOD

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Mengdawn; Allman, Steve L; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Avens, Larry R

    2014-01-01

    We report on the use of magnetic force in collection of airborne particles by a high- gradient permanent magnetic separation (HGPMS) device. Three aerosol particles of different magnetic susceptibility (NaCl, CuO, and Fe2O3) were generated in the electrical mobility size range of 10 to 200 nm and were used to study HGPMS collection. One HGPMS matrix element, made of stainless steel wool, was used in the device configuration. Three flow rates were selected to simulate the environmental wind speeds of interest to the study. Magnetic force was found to exhibit an insignificant effect on the separation of NaCl particles, even in the HGPMS configuration. Diffusion was a major mechanism in the removal of the diamagnetic particles; however, diffusion is insignificant under the influence of a high-gradient magnetic field for paramagnetic or ferromagnetic particles. The HGPMS showed high-performance collection (> 99%) of paramagnetic CuO and ferromagnetic Fe2O3 particles for particle sizes greater than or equal to 60 nm. As the wind speed increases, the influence of the magnetic force weakens, and the capability to remove particles from the gas stream diminishes. The results suggest that the HGPMS principle could be explored for development of an advanced miniaturized passive aerosol collector.

  20. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    MacVean, D W; Franzen, D K; Keefe, T J; Bennett, B W

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring. PMID:3800131

  1. Airborne particle concentration and meteorologic conditions associated with pneumonia incidence in feedlot cattle

    SciTech Connect

    MacVean, D.W.; Franzen, D.K.; Keefe, T.J.; Bennett, B.W.

    1986-12-01

    To elucidate the role of air quality on the occurrence of pneumonia in feedlot cattle, the following environmental values were measured at a feedlot: suspended particulates in 5 particle-size fractions, relative humidity, air temperature, and barometric pressure. Pneumonia incidence data were classified by the number of days the cattle had been at the feedlot (days on feed). The concentration of airborne particles, range of temperature, days on feed, and season of the year were associated with incidence of pneumonia in cattle. Pneumonia incidence rates were greatest both within 15 days of arrival at the feedlot and during the fall sampling periods. The incidence of pneumonia in the 16 to 30 days-on-feed group was closely associated with the concentration of particles 2.0 to 3.3 microns in diameter and the range of daily temperature when exposure occurred 15 days before the onset of disease in the fall and 10 days before in the spring.

  2. A microfluidics-based on-chip impinger for airborne particle collection.

    PubMed

    Mirzaee, I; Song, M; Charmchi, M; Sun, H

    2016-06-21

    Capturing airborne particles from air into a liquid is a critical process for the development of many sensors and analytical systems. A miniaturized airborne particle sampling device (microimpinger) has been developed in this research. The microimpinger relies on a controlled bubble generation process produced by driving air through microchannel arrays. The particles confined in the microscale bubbles are captured in the sampling liquid while the bubbles form, are released and travel in a millimetre-scale sealed liquid reservoir. The microchannel arrays in the impinger are fabricated using a soft-lithography method with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) as the structural material. To prevent air leakage at the connections, a PDMS-only sealing technique is successfully developed. The hydrophobicity of the microchannel surface is found to be critical for generating continuous and stable bubbles in the bubbling process. A Teflon layer is coated on the walls of a microchannel array by vapor deposition which effectively increases the hydrophobicity of the PDMS. The collection efficiency of the microimpinger is measured by counting different sizes of fluorescent polystyrene latex particles on polycarbonate membrane filters. Collection efficiencies above 90% are achieved. Furthermore, the particle capturing mechanisms during the injection, formation and rise of a single microbubble are investigated by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model. The Navier-Stokes equations are solved along with the use of the volume-of-fluid (VOF) method to capture the bubble deformations and the particles are tracked using a Lagrangian equation of motion. The model is also employed to study the effect of bubble size on the collection efficiency of the microimpinger. PMID:27185303

  3. Characterization of airborne particles generated from metal active gas welding process.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, C; Gomes, J F; Carvalho, P; Santos, T J G; Miranda, R M; Albuquerque, P

    2014-05-01

    This study is focused on the characterization of particles emitted in the metal active gas welding of carbon steel using mixture of Ar + CO2, and intends to analyze which are the main process parameters that influence the emission itself. It was found that the amount of emitted particles (measured by particle number and alveolar deposited surface area) are clearly dependent on the distance to the welding front and also on the main welding parameters, namely the current intensity and heat input in the welding process. The emission of airborne fine particles seems to increase with the current intensity as fume-formation rate does. When comparing the tested gas mixtures, higher emissions are observed for more oxidant mixtures, that is, mixtures with higher CO2 content, which result in higher arc stability. These mixtures originate higher concentrations of fine particles (as measured by number of particles by cm(3) of air) and higher values of alveolar deposited surface area of particles, thus resulting in a more severe worker's exposure. PMID:24730680

  4. Characterisation of airborne particles collected within and proximal to an opencast coalmine: South Wales, U.K.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim; Blackmore, Pete; Leach, Matt; Bérubé, Kelly; Sexton, Keith; Richards, Roy

    2002-05-01

    Airborne particulate matter has been collected from within, and proximal to, an opencast coal mine in south Wales. This work forms the first part of a three year project to collect and characterise, then determine the possible toxicology of airborne particles in the south Wales region. High-resolution Field Emission SEM has shown that the coal mine dusts consist largely of an assemblage of mineral grains and vehicle exhaust particles. SEM-EDX has shown that the mineralogical make-up of the PM10 is complex, heterogeneous, and constantly changing. These findings are supported by analytical TEM-EPXMA. However, patterns can be determined relating the mineralogical composition of the airborne particles to collection locations and mining activities within the opencast. At our study opencast, Park Slip West, quartz, which has known health effects, never exceeded 30% of the total collection mass, and average levels were much less. Vehicle exhaust emissions was the largest source in terms of particle numbers. The mass of airborne particulate matter within the pit averaged approximately twice that of outside the pit: importantly however, this higher mass was due to relatively large, and non-respirable, mineral grains. This study demonstrates that the physicochemical and mineralogical characterisation of airborne particles from mining and quarrying is essential to quantify the respirable fraction, and to identify potentially hazardous components within the PM10. PMID:12004982

  5. Characterization of Exposures to Airborne Nanoscale Particles During Friction Stir Welding of Aluminum

    PubMed Central

    Pfefferkorn, Frank E.; Bello, Dhimiter; Haddad, Gilbert; Park, Ji-Young; Powell, Maria; Mccarthy, Jon; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Fehrenbacher, Axel; Jeon, Yongho; Virji, M. Abbas; Gruetzmacher, George; Hoover, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered one of the most significant developments in joining technology over the last half century. Its industrial applications are growing steadily and so are the number of workers using this technology. To date, there are no reports on airborne exposures during FSW. The objective of this study was to investigate possible emissions of nanoscale (<100 nm) and fine (<1 μm) aerosols during FSW of two aluminum alloys in a laboratory setting and characterize their physicochemical composition. Several instruments measured size distributions (5 nm to 20 μm) with 1-s resolution, lung deposited surface areas, and PM2.5 concentrations at the source and at the breathing zone (BZ). A wide range aerosol sampling system positioned at the BZ collected integrated samples in 12 stages (2 nm to 20 μm) that were analyzed for several metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Airborne aerosol was directly collected onto several transmission electron microscope grids and the morphology and chemical composition of collected particles were characterized extensively. FSW generates high concentrations of ultrafine and submicrometer particles. The size distribution was bimodal, with maxima at ∼30 and ∼550 nm. The mean total particle number concentration at the 30 nm peak was relatively stable at ∼4.0 × 105 particles cm−3, whereas the arithmetic mean counts at the 550 nm peak varied between 1500 and 7200 particles cm−3, depending on the test conditions. The BZ concentrations were lower than the source concentrations by 10–100 times at their respective peak maxima and showed higher variability. The daylong average metal-specific concentrations were 2.0 (Zn), 1.4 (Al), and 0.24 (Fe) μg m−3; the estimated average peak concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. Potential for significant exposures to fine and ultrafine aerosols, particularly of Al, Fe, and Zn, during FSW may exist, especially in larger scale industrial

  6. Characterization of exposures to airborne nanoscale particles during friction stir welding of aluminum.

    PubMed

    Pfefferkorn, Frank E; Bello, Dhimiter; Haddad, Gilbert; Park, Ji-Young; Powell, Maria; McCarthy, Jon; Bunker, Kristin Lee; Fehrenbacher, Axel; Jeon, Yongho; Virji, M Abbas; Gruetzmacher, George; Hoover, Mark D

    2010-07-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is considered one of the most significant developments in joining technology over the last half century. Its industrial applications are growing steadily and so are the number of workers using this technology. To date, there are no reports on airborne exposures during FSW. The objective of this study was to investigate possible emissions of nanoscale (<100 nm) and fine (<1 microm) aerosols during FSW of two aluminum alloys in a laboratory setting and characterize their physicochemical composition. Several instruments measured size distributions (5 nm to 20 microm) with 1-s resolution, lung deposited surface areas, and PM(2.5) concentrations at the source and at the breathing zone (BZ). A wide range aerosol sampling system positioned at the BZ collected integrated samples in 12 stages (2 nm to 20 microm) that were analyzed for several metals using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Airborne aerosol was directly collected onto several transmission electron microscope grids and the morphology and chemical composition of collected particles were characterized extensively. FSW generates high concentrations of ultrafine and submicrometer particles. The size distribution was bimodal, with maxima at approximately 30 and approximately 550 nm. The mean total particle number concentration at the 30 nm peak was relatively stable at approximately 4.0 x 10(5) particles cm(-3), whereas the arithmetic mean counts at the 550 nm peak varied between 1500 and 7200 particles cm(-3), depending on the test conditions. The BZ concentrations were lower than the source concentrations by 10-100 times at their respective peak maxima and showed higher variability. The daylong average metal-specific concentrations were 2.0 (Zn), 1.4 (Al), and 0.24 (Fe) microg m(-3); the estimated average peak concentrations were an order of magnitude higher. Potential for significant exposures to fine and ultrafine aerosols, particularly of Al, Fe, and Zn, during FSW may

  7. Uranium oxide and other airborne particles deposited on cypress leaves close to a nuclear facility.

    PubMed

    Gieré, Reto; Kaltenmeier, Ramona; Pourcelot, Laurent

    2012-04-01

    Enhanced activity of actinides and some decay products has been reported for the leaves of cypress trees (Chamaecyparis nootkatensis) at the edge of the Malvési uranium-processing facility, southwestern France. The enhanced activity is due to the release of actinides via the smokestacks and from artificial ponds inside the facility. This study was conducted to characterize airborne particulate matter deposited on the leaf surfaces and to investigate whether or not radioactive particles may be identified. Air-dried leaf samples were examined by scanning electron microscopy, in combination with energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The samples were scanned systematically in both secondary and backscattered electron modes. Particles ranging in size from <200 nm to ~40 μm were found on most portions of the adaxial leaf surface, but they are especially abundant at the boundary between facial and lateral leaves. The majority of the analyzed particles could be attributed to five principal classes: carbonates, silicates, sulfates, oxides/hydroxides, and halides. In addition, other types of particles were found, including Fe alloys; scheelite-group phases; phosphates; sulfides; and fly ash spheres. Similar particles were also observed on the surface of a wheat sample used for comparison. Of special interest are U-rich particles, which were observed on the cypress leaves only and which were identified as U oxides, except for one particle, which was a U-oxide-fluoride. These U-rich particles were released into the atmosphere by the nuclear facility prior to their deposition on the leaf surfaces. As most of the U-rich particles are <2.5 μm across, they are respirable. Once inhaled, particles containing alpha-emitting isotopes represent a potentially long-term source of ionizing radiation inside the lungs and thus, pose a threat to the health of people living nearby. PMID:22422019

  8. Relating urban airborne particle concentrations to shipping using carbon based elemental emission ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Graham R.; Juwono, Alamsyah M.; Friend, Adrian J.; Cheung, Hing-Cho; Stelcer, Eduard; Cohen, David; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia

    2014-10-01

    This study demonstrates a novel method for testing the hypothesis that variations in primary and secondary particle number concentration (PNC) in urban air are related to residual fuel oil combustion at a coastal port lying 30 km upwind, by examining the correlation between PNC and airborne particle composition signatures chosen for their sensitivity to the elemental contaminants present in residual fuel oil. Residual fuel oil combustion indicators were chosen by comparing the sensitivity of a range of concentration ratios to airborne emissions originating from the port. The most responsive were combinations of vanadium and sulphur concentration ([S], [V]) expressed as ratios with respect to black carbon concentration ([BC]). These correlated significantly with ship activity at the port and with the fraction of time during which the wind blew from the port. The average [V] when the wind was predominantly from the port was 0.52 ng m-3 (87%) higher than the average for all wind directions and 0.83 ng m-3 (280%) higher than that for the lowest vanadium yielding wind direction considered to approximate the natural background. Shipping was found to be the main source of V impacting urban air quality in Brisbane. However, contrary to the stated hypothesis, increases in PNC related measures did not correlate with ship emission indicators or ship traffic. Hence at this site ship emissions were not found to be a major contributor to PNC compared to other fossil fuel combustion sources such as road traffic, airport and refinery emissions.

  9. Discriminating bacterial spores from inert airborne particles by classification of optical scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yongle; Videen, Gorden

    2014-05-01

    Scattering patterns are made available by the TAOS (Two-dimensional Angle-resolved Optical Scattering) method, which consists of detecting micrometer-sized single airborne aerosol particles and collecting the intensity of the light they scatter from a pulsed, monochromatic laser beam. TAOS patterns have been classified by a learning machine, the training stage of which depends on many control parameters. Patterns due to single bacterial spores (Bq class) have to be discriminated from those produced by outdoor aerosol particles (Kq set) and diesel soot aggregates (sq set), where both Kq and sq are assumed not to contain patterns of bacterial origin. This work describes two directions along which classification continues to develop: the enlargement of the control parameter set and the simultaneous processing of two areas (sectors) selected from the TAOS pattern. The latter algorithm is meant to make the classifier sensitive to simmetry exhibited by some patterns. The available classification scheme is summarized, as well as the rule by which discrimination is rated off-line. Discrimination based on one pattern sector alone scores fewer than 15% false negatives (misclassified Bq patterns) and false positives from Kq and sq. Discrimination based on the symmetry of two pattern sectors fails to recognize 30% of the Bq (bacterial) patterns, whereas < 5% Kq (environmental) patterns are assigned to the Bq class; false positives from sq (diesel) patterns drop to zero. The issue of false positives is briefly discussed in relation to the fraction of airborne bacteria found in aerosols.

  10. A comparison study on airborne particles during haze days and non-haze days in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenquan; Mu, Yujing; Liu, Yanju; Shao, Longyi

    2013-07-01

    Airborne particles in Beijing during haze days and non-haze days were collected by an eleven-stage cascade impactor (MOUDI 110, MSP, USA), and the mass concentrations and water soluble inorganic ions of the size segregated airborne particles were quantitatively analyzed. PM10 concentrations during haze days ranged from 250.5 to 519.4 μgm(-3) which were about 3-8 times greater than those (ranged from 67.6 to 94.0 μgm(-3)) during non-haze days, and PM1.8 concentrations during haze periods were in the range of 117.6-378.6 μgm(-3) which were 3-14 times higher than those (27.0 to 36.8 μgm(-3)) during non-haze days. In comparison with non-haze days, all water soluble inorganic ions investigated in the airborne particles greatly enhanced during haze days. NH₄(+), NO₃(-) and SO₄(2-) were found to be the dominant water soluble inorganic ions, accounting for 91-95% of the total inorganic ions in PM1.8 during haze days, and 73-81% during non-haze days. The size distributions of SO₄(2-), NO₃(-), Cl(-), K(+) and Na(+) exhibited bimodal types, while single mode was found for NH₄(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+). Only with exception of Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), all ions were concentrated in fine particles around 0.56-1.0 μm of "droplet mode" during haze days, while 0.32-0.56 μm of "condensation mode" during non-haze days. The extremely high mole ratio (>2) of [NH4(+)]/[SO₄(2-)] during haze days implied that the main form of ammonium in PM1.8 might be (NH4)₂SO₄ and NH₄NO₃. The mass ratio of NO₃(-)/SO₄(2-) was >1 in PM1.8 during haze days and ~1 during non-haze days, indicating that NOx from the vehicle exhaust in Beijing is playing more and more important role on fine particle formation. PMID:23583755

  11. Laboratory testing of airborne brake wear particle emissions using a dynamometer system under urban city driving cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagino, Hiroyuki; Oyama, Motoaki; Sasaki, Sousuke

    2016-04-01

    To measure driving-distance-based mass emission factors for airborne brake wear particulate matter (PM; i.e., brake wear particles) related to the non-asbestos organic friction of brake assembly materials (pads and lining), and to characterize the components of brake wear particles, a brake wear dynamometer with a constant-volume sampling system was developed. Only a limited number of studies have investigated brake emissions under urban city driving cycles that correspond to the tailpipe emission test (i.e., JC08 or JE05 mode of Japanese tailpipe emission test cycles). The tests were performed using two passenger cars and one middle-class truck. The observed airborne brake wear particle emissions ranged from 0.04 to 1.4 mg/km/vehicle for PM10 (particles up to 10 μm (in size), and from 0.04 to 1.2 mg/km/vehicle for PM2.5. The proportion of brake wear debris emitted as airborne brake wear particles was 2-21% of the mass of wear. Oxygenated carbonaceous components were included in the airborne PM but not in the original friction material, which indicates that changes in carbon composition occurred during the abrasion process. Furthermore, this study identified the key tracers of brake wear particles (e.g., Fe, Cu, Ba, and Sb) at emission levels comparable to traffic-related atmospheric environments.

  12. Size and composition of airborne particles from pavement wear, tires, and traction sanding.

    PubMed

    Kupiainen, Kaarle J; Tervahattu, Heikki; Räisänen, Mika; Mäkelä, Timo; Aurela, Minna; Hillamo, Risto

    2005-02-01

    Mineral matter is an important component of airborne particles in urban areas. In northern cities of the world, mineral matter dominates PM10 during spring because of enhanced road abrasion caused by the use of antiskid methods, including studded tires and traction sanding. In this study, factors that affect formation of abrasion components of springtime road dust were assessed. Effects of traction sanding and tires on concentrations, mass size distribution, and composition of the particles were studied in a test facility. Lowest particle concentrations were observed in tests without traction sanding. The concentrations increased when traction sand was introduced and continued to increase as a function of the amount of aggregate dispersed. Emissions were additionally affected by type of tire, properties of traction sand aggregate, and driving speed. Aggregates with high fragmentation resistance and coarse grain size distribution had the lowest emissions. Over 90% of PM10 was mineral particles. Mineralogy of the dust and source apportionment showed that they originated from both traction sand and pavement aggregates. The remaining portion was mostly carbonaceous and originated from tires and road bitumen. Mass size distributions were dominated by coarse particles. Contribution of fine and submicron size ranges were approximately 15 and 10% in PM10, respectively. PMID:15757329

  13. In situ real-time measurement of physical characteristics of airborne bacterial particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Hee; Lee, Jung Eun

    2013-12-01

    Bioaerosols, including aerosolized bacteria, viruses, and fungi, are associated with public health and environmental problems. One promising control method to reduce the harmful effects of bioaerosols is thermal inactivation via a continuous-flow high-temperature short-time (HTST) system. However, variations in bioaerosol physical characteristics - for example, the particle size and shape - during the continuous-flow inactivation process can change the transport properties in the air, which can affect particle deposition in the human respiratory system or the filtration efficiency of ventilation systems. Real-time particle monitoring techniques are a desirable alternative to the time-consuming process of microscopic analysis that is conventionally used in sampling and particle characterization. Here, we report in situ real-time optical scattering measurements of the physical characteristics of airborne bacteria particles following an HTST process in a continuous-flow system. Our results demonstrate that the aerodynamic diameter of bacterial aerosols decreases when exposed to a high-temperature environment, and that the shape of the bacterial cells is significantly altered. These variations in physical characteristics using optical scattering measurements were found to be in agreement with the results of scanning electron microscopy analysis.

  14. The control by ventilation of airborne bacterial transfer between hospital patients, and its assessment by means of a particle tracer

    PubMed Central

    Foord, N.; Lidwell, O. M.

    1972-01-01

    A simple and convenient particle tracer for studies of the effectiveness of isolation units and other places in limiting the airborne transfer of bacteria is described. Particles of potassium iodide 7-8 μm. diameter are generated by spraying from solution and collected on membrane filters. The particles can be identified by development with 0·1% acid palladium chloride solution, when dark brown spots approximately 100 μm. in diameter are produced. ImagesPlate 1 PMID:4503869

  15. Chemical and isotopic properties and origin of coarse airborne particles collected by passive samplers in industrial, urban, and rural environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéguen, Florence; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volke; Gieré, Reto

    2012-12-01

    Passive air samplers have been installed in industrial, urban, rural and remote forested environments in order to collect coarse airborne particles for subsequent chemical characterization. To identify principal polluting sources, isotopic tracers, such as Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic ratios, have been used. The mass deposition rates (MDRs) of trace metals, determined for each of the studied environments, clearly indicate that industrial and traffic sites are especially affected by air pollution. Elements such as V, Pb, Fe, Cr, Co, Mo, Cd, Ni, As, Sb and Zn are notably enriched in samples from industrial zones, whereas V, Mn, Ba, Sr, Al, U, Th, rare earth elements (REE), Zr, Y, Cs, Rb, Sb, Sn and Cu are principal components of the airborne particles collected close to areas influenced by heavy traffic. The chemical/isotopic baseline composition derived from the airborne particles is the result of mixing of particles from different industrial sources, traffic and fertilizers. The monthly analysis of trace-metal MDRs of the collected airborne particle samples from different stations around the industrial zone allows for the detection of distinct atmospheric dust-deposition events during the year, characterized by high MDRs. "Natural" dusts from regional soil re-suspension, including from more distant regions like the Sahara desert, might overprint the regional atmospheric baseline composition, as suggested by trace metal trajectories in ternary diagrams and by Sr, Nd and Pb isotope data.

  16. A new look at inhalable metalliferous airborne particles on rail subway platforms.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Martins, Vânia; Querol, Xavier; Jones, Tim; BéruBé, Kelly; Minguillón, Maria Cruz; Amato, Fulvio; Capdevila, Marta; de Miguel, Eladio; Centelles, Sonia; Gibbons, Wes

    2015-02-01

    Most particles breathed on rail subway platforms are highly ferruginous (FePM) and extremely small (nanometric to a few microns in size). High magnification observations of particle texture and chemistry on airborne PM₁₀ samples collected from the Barcelona Metro, combined with published experimental work on particle generation by frictional sliding, allow us to propose a general model to explain the origin of most subway FePM. Particle generation occurs by mechanical wear at the brake-wheel and wheel-rail interfaces, where magnetic metallic flakes and splinters are released and undergo progressive atmospheric oxidation from metallic iron to magnetite and maghemite. Flakes of magnetite typically comprise mottled mosaics of octahedral nanocrystals (10-20 nm) that become pseudomorphed by maghemite. Continued oxidation results in extensive alteration of the magnetic nanostructure to more rounded aggregates of non-magnetic hematite nanocrystals, with magnetic precursors (including iron metal) still preserved in some particle cores. Particles derived from steel wheel and rails contain a characteristic trace element chemistry, typically with Mn/Fe=0.01. Flakes released from brakes are chemically very distinctive, depending on the pad composition, being always carbonaceous, commonly barium-rich, and texturally inhomogeneous, with trace elements present in nanominerals incorporated within the crystalline structure. In the studied subway lines of Barcelona at least there appears to be only a minimal aerosol contribution from high temperature processes such as sparking. To date there is no strong evidence that these chemically and texturally complex inhalable metallic materials are any more or less toxic than street-level urban particles, and as with outdoor air, the priority in subway air quality should be to reduce high mass concentrations of aerosol present in some stations. PMID:25461038

  17. Characterisation of nano- and micron-sized airborne and collected subway particles, a multi-analytical approach.

    PubMed

    Midander, Klara; Elihn, Karine; Wallén, Anna; Belova, Lyuba; Karlsson, Anna-Karin Borg; Wallinder, Inger Odnevall

    2012-06-15

    Continuous daily measurements of airborne particles were conducted during specific periods at an underground platform within the subway system of the city center of Stockholm, Sweden. Main emphasis was placed on number concentration, particle size distribution, soot content (analyzed as elemental and black carbon) and surface area concentration. Conventional measurements of mass concentrations were conducted in parallel as well as analysis of particle morphology, bulk- and surface composition. In addition, the presence of volatile and semi volatile organic compounds within freshly collected particle fractions of PM(10) and PM(2.5) were investigated and grouped according to functional groups. Similar periodic measurements were conducted at street level for comparison. The investigation clearly demonstrates a large dominance in number concentration of airborne nano-sized particles compared to coarse particles in the subway. Out of a mean particle number concentration of 12000 particles/cm(3) (7500 to 20000 particles/cm(3)), only 190 particles/cm(3) were larger than 250 nm. Soot particles from diesel exhaust, and metal-containing particles, primarily iron, were observed in the subway aerosol. Unique measurements on freshly collected subway particle size fractions of PM(10) and PM(2.5) identified several volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds, the presence of carcinogenic aromatic compounds and traces of flame retardants. This interdisciplinary and multi-analytical investigation aims to provide an improved understanding of reported adverse health effects induced by subway aerosols. PMID:22551935

  18. Atmospheric Solids Analysis Probe Mass Spectrometry: A New Approach for Airborne Particle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bruns, Emily A.; Perraud, Veronique M.; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2010-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed in the atmosphere from the condensation of semivolatile oxidation products are a significant component of airborne particles which have deleterious effects on health, visibility, and climate. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) is applied for the first time to the identification of organics in particles from laboratory systems as well as from ambient air. SOA were generated in the laboratory from the ozonolysis of r-pinene and isoprene, as well as from NO3 oxidation of r-pinene, and ambient air was sampled at forested and suburban sites. Particles were collected by impaction on ZnSe disks, analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and then transferred to an ASAP-MS probe for further analysis. ASAP-MS data for the laboratory-generated samples show peaks from wellknown products of these reactions, and higher molecular weight oligomers are present in both laboratory and ambient samples. Oligomeric products are shown to be present in the NO3 reaction products for the first time. A major advantage of this technique is that minimal sample preparation is required, and complementary information from nondestructive techniques such as FT-IR can be obtained on the same samples. In addition, a dedicated instrument is not required for particle analysis. This work establishes that ASAP-MS will be useful for identification of organic components of SOA in a variety of field and laboratory studies.

  19. Atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry: a new approach for airborne particle analysis.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Emily A; Perraud, Véronique; Greaves, John; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2010-07-15

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) formed in the atmosphere from the condensation of semivolatile oxidation products are a significant component of airborne particles which have deleterious effects on health, visibility, and climate. In this study, atmospheric solids analysis probe mass spectrometry (ASAP-MS) is applied for the first time to the identification of organics in particles from laboratory systems as well as from ambient air. SOA were generated in the laboratory from the ozonolysis of alpha-pinene and isoprene, as well as from NO(3) oxidation of alpha-pinene, and ambient air was sampled at forested and suburban sites. Particles were collected by impaction on ZnSe disks, analyzed by Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and then transferred to an ASAP-MS probe for further analysis. ASAP-MS data for the laboratory-generated samples show peaks from well-known products of these reactions, and higher molecular weight oligomers are present in both laboratory and ambient samples. Oligomeric products are shown to be present in the NO(3) reaction products for the first time. A major advantage of this technique is that minimal sample preparation is required, and complementary information from nondestructive techniques such as FT-IR can be obtained on the same samples. In addition, a dedicated instrument is not required for particle analysis. This work establishes that ASAP-MS will be useful for identification of organic components of SOA in a variety of field and laboratory studies. PMID:20568716

  20. Occupational exposure to airborne particles and other pollutants in an aviation base.

    PubMed

    Buonanno, Giorgio; Bernabei, Manuele; Avino, Pasquale; Stabile, Luca

    2012-11-01

    The occupational exposure to airborne particles and other pollutants in a high performance jet engine airport was investigated. Three spatial scales were considered: i) a downwind receptor site, ii) close to the airstrip, iii) personal monitoring. Particle number, surface area, mass concentrations and distributions were measured as well as inorganic and organic fractions, ionic fractions and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. Particle number distribution measured at a receptor site presents a mode of 80 nm and an average total concentration of 6.5 × 10(3) part. cm(-3); the chemical analysis shows that all the elements may be attributed to long-range transport from the sea. Particle number concentrations in the proximity of the airstrip show short term peaks during the working day mainly related to takeoff, landing and pre-flight operations of jet engines. Personal exposure of workers highlights a median number concentration of 2.5 × 10(4) part. cm(-3) and 1.7 × 10(4) part. cm(-3) for crew chief and hangar operator. PMID:22771354

  1. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges and bacterial revertants by organic extracts of airborne particles. [Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Lockard, J.M.; Viau, C.J.; Lee-Stephens, C.; Caldwell, J.C.; Wojciechowski, J.P.; Enoch, H.G.; Sabharwal, P.S.

    1981-01-01

    The genotoxicities of organic extracts of airborne particles have been studied extensively in the Salmonella/mammalian microsome (Ames) test, but in few other bioassays. In these studies, we tested benzene-acetone extracts of particulate pollutants collected in Lexington, Kentucky, for capacity to induce increases in sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in human lumphocytes and V79 cells, as well as in the Ames assay. Extracts induced linear dose-related increases in SCE in human lumphocytes and in bacterial revertants.However, variable responses were observed in SCE assays in V79 cells with and without activation by rat liver S9 or feeder layers of irradiated Syrian hamster fetal cells. We conclude that the SCE assay in human lumphocytes may be a useful indicator of the potential risks to humans of airborne particulate pollutants, as it utilizes human cells recently taken from the host, is rapid and economical, and requires small quantities of test materials. However, thorough studies of the quantitative relationships between SCE induction and mutagenicity in human cells are needed.

  2. Performance of N95 respirators: filtration efficiency for airborne microbial and inert particles.

    PubMed

    Qian, Y; Willeke, K; Grinshpun, S A; Donnelly, J; Coffey, C C

    1998-02-01

    In 1995 the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health issued new regulations for nonpowered particulate respirators (42 CFR Part 84). A new filter certification system also was created. Among the new particulate respirators that have entered the market, the N95 respirator is the most commonly used in industrial and health care environments. The filtration efficiencies of unloaded N95 particulate respirators have been compared with those of dust/mist (DM) and dust/fume/mist (DFM) respirators certified under the former regulations (30 CFR Part 11). Through laboratory tests with NaCl certification aerosols and measurements with particle-size spectrometers, N95 respirators were found to have higher filtration efficiencies than DM and DFM respirators and noncertified surgical masks. N95 respirators made by different companies were found to have different filtration efficiencies for the most penetrating particle size (0.1 to 0.3 micron), but all were at least 95% efficient at that size for NaCl particles. Above the most penetrating particle size the filtration efficiency increases with size; it reaches approximately 99.5% or higher at about 0.75 micron. Tests with bacteria of size and shape similar to Mycobacterium tuberculosis also showed filtration efficiencies of 99.5% or higher. Experimental data were used to calculate the aerosol mass concentrations inside the respirator when worn in representative work environments. The penetrated mass fractions, in the absence of face leakage, ranged from 0.02% for large particle distributions to 1.8% for submicrometer-size welding fumes. Thus, N95 respirators provide excellent protection against airborne particles when there is a good face seal. PMID:9487666

  3. Assessment of oxidative DNA damage formation by organic complex mixtures from airborne particles PM(10).

    PubMed

    Gábelová, Alena; Valovicová, Zuzana; Lábaj, Juraj; Bacová, Gabriela; Binková, Blanka; Farmer, Peter B

    2007-07-01

    The free radical generating activity of airborne particulate matter (PM(10)) has been proposed as a primary mechanism in biological activity of ambient air pollution. In an effort to determine the impact of the complex mixtures of extractable organic matter (EOM) from airborne particles on oxidative damage to DNA, the level of 8-oxo-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG), the most prevalent and stable oxidative lesion, was measured in the human metabolically competent cell line Hep G2. Cultured cells were exposed to equivalent EOM concentrations (5-150microg/ml) and oxidative DNA damage was analyzed using a modified single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE), which involves the incubation of whole cell DNA with repair specific DNA endonuclease, which cleaves oxidized DNA at the sites of 8-oxodG. EOMs were extracted from PM(10) collected daily (24h intervals) in three European cities: Prague (Czech Republic, two monitoring sites, Libus and Smíchov), Kosice (Slovak Republic) and Sofia (Bulgaria) during 3-month sampling periods in the winter and summer seasons. No substantial time- and dose-dependent increase of oxidative DNA lesions was detected in EOM-treated cells with the exception of the EOM collected at the monitoring site Kosice, summer sampling. In this case, 2h cell exposure to EOM resulted in a slight but significant increase of oxidative DNA damage at three from total of six concentrations. The mean 8-oxodG values at these concentrations ranged from 15.3 to 26.1 per 10(6) nucleotides with a value 3.5 per 10(6) nucleotides in untreated cells. B[a]P, the positive control, induced a variable but insignificant increase of oxidative DNA damage in Hep G2 cell (approximately 1.6-fold increase over control value). Based on these data we believe that EOM samples extracted from airborne particle PM(10) play probably only a marginal role in oxidative stress generation and oxidative lesion formation to DNA. However, adsorbed organic compounds can undergo various interactions

  4. Characterisation of airborne particles and associated organic components produced from incense burning.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Chi; Jones, Tim; Chen, Yang; Bell, Jennifer; Wenger, John; BéruBé, Kelly

    2011-12-01

    Airborne particles generated from the burning of incense have been characterized in order to gain an insight into the possible implications for human respiratory health. Physical characterization performed using field-emission scanning electron microscopy showed incense particulate smoke mainly consisted of soot particles with fine and ultrafine fractions in various aggregated forms. A range of organic compounds present in incense smoke have been identified using derivatisation reactions coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. A total of 19 polar organic compounds were positively identified in the samples, including the biomass burning markers levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan, as well as a number of aromatic acids and phenols. Formaldehyde was among 12 carbonyl compounds detected and predominantly associated with the gas phase, whereas six different quinones were also identified in the incense particulate smoke. The nano-structured incense soot particles intermixed with organics (e.g. formaldehyde and quinones) could increase the oxidative capacity. When considering the worldwide prevalence of incense burning and resulting high respiratory exposures, the oxygenated organics identified in this study have significant human health implications, especially for susceptible populations. PMID:21769554

  5. Alternate particle removal technologies for the Airborne Activity Confinement System at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Brockmann, J.E.; Adkins, C.L.J.; Gelbard, F. )

    1991-09-01

    This report presents a review of the filtration technologies available for the removal of particulate material from a gas stream. It was undertaken to identify alternate filtration technologies that may be employed in the Airborne Activity Confinement System (AACS) at the Savannah River Plant. This report is organized into six sections: (1) a discussion of the aerosol source term and its definition, (2) a short discussion of particle and gaseous contaminant removal mechanisms, (3) a brief overview of particle removal technologies, (4) a discussion of the existing AACS and its potential shortcomings, (5) an enumeration of issues to be addressed in upgrading the AACS, and, (6) a detailed discussion of the identified technologies. The purpose of this report is to identity available options to the existing particle removal system. This system is in continuous operation during routine operation of the reactor. As will be seen, there are a number of options and the selection of any technology or combination of technologies will depend on the design aerosol source term (yet to be appropriately defined) as well as the flow requirements and configuration. This report does not select a specific technology. It focuses on particulate removal and qualitatively on the removal of radio-iodine and mist elimination. Candidate technologies have been selected from industrial and nuclear gas cleaning applications.

  6. On the interaction between glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and airborne particles: Evidence for electrophilic species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinyashiki, Masaru; Rodriguez, Chester E.; Di Stefano, Emma W.; Sioutas, Constantinos; Delfino, Ralph J.; Kumagai, Yoshito; Froines, John R.; Cho, Arthur K.

    Many of the adverse health effects of airborne particulate matter (PM) have been attributed to the chemical properties of some of the large number of chemical species present in PM. Some PM component chemicals are capable of generating reactive oxygen species and eliciting a state of oxidative stress. In addition, however, PM can contain chemical species that elicit their effects through covalent bond formation with nucleophilic functions in the cell. In this manuscript, we report the presence of constituents with electrophilic properties in ambient and diesel exhaust particles, demonstrated by their ability to inhibit the thiol enzyme, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). GAPDH is irreversibly inactivated by electrophiles under anaerobic conditions by covalent bond formation. This inactivation can be blocked by the prior addition of a high concentration of dithiothreitol (DTT) as an alternate nucleophile. Addition of DTT after the reaction between the electrophile and GAPDH, however, does not reverse the inactivation. This property has been utilized to develop a procedure that provides a quantitative measure of electrophiles present in samples of ambient particles collected in the Los Angeles Basin and in diesel exhaust particles. The toxicity of electrophiles is the result of irreversible changes in biological molecules; recovery is dependent on resynthesis. If the resynthesis is slow, the irreversible effects can be cumulative and manifest themselves after chronic exposure to low levels of electrophiles.

  7. Wind barriers suppress fugitive dust and soil-derived airborne particles in arid regions

    SciTech Connect

    Grantz, D.A.; Vaughn, D.L.; Farber, R.J.; Kim, B.; Ashbaugh, L.; Van Curen, T.; Campbell, R.

    1998-07-01

    Areas of abandoned agricultural land in the Antelope Valley, western Mojave (high) desert of California have proven in the previous studies to be recalcitrant to conventional tillage and revegetation strategies designed to suppress wind erosion of soil and transport of sediment and fugitive dust. These areas represented a continuing source of drifting sand and of coarse and respirable suspended particulate matter. The traditional techniques failed because furrows collapsed and the water holding capacity of the overburden was too low to support seed germination and transplant survival. In this study a variety of wind barriers were evaluated for suppression of sediment transport. Airborne particles were measured with an array of coarse particle samplers at heights of 0.2, 1.0, and 2.0 m above the soil surface. Discrete artificial wind barriers, consisting of widely spaced roughness elements were effective in suppressing fugitive emissions. Wind fences established along the leeward edge of an area of blowing sand, perpendicular to the prevailing wind, significantly decreased fugitive emissions. Control was greatest and precision of the measurements was highest under high wind conditions. These techniques provide rapid and effective suppression of fugitive emissions of soil-derived particles under conditions that resist conventional tillage and revegetation techniques. A simple, indirect procedure for determining local wind velocity erosion thresholds requiring only sampling of wind run and suspended particulate mass compared favorably with direct measurement of saltation as a function of wind velocity.

  8. Determination of chemical composition of individual airborne particles by SEM/EDX and micro-Raman spectrometry: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefaniak, E. A.; Buczynska, A.; Novakovic, V.; Kuduk, R.; Van Grieken, R.

    2009-04-01

    The strategies for sampling and analysis by SEM/EDX and micro-Raman spectrometry for individual airborne particles analysis as applied at the University of Antwerp (Belgium) by the MITAC group have been reviewed. Microbeam techniques provide detailed information concerning the origin, formation, transport, reactivity, transformation reactions and environmental impact of particulate matter. Moreover, some particles of certain chemical properties have been recognized as a threat for human health and cultural heritage objects. However, the small sizes of particles result in specific problems with respect to single particle analysis. Development of equipment and software for improvement of analysis and quantification are reported.

  9. Airborne observations of new particle formation events in the boundary layer using a Zeppelin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampilahti, Janne; Manninen, Hanna E.; Nieminen, Tuomo; Mirme, Sander; Pullinen, Iida; Yli-Juuti, Taina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kontkanen, Jenni; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Ehn, Mikael; Mentel, Thomas F.; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) is a frequent and ubiquitous process in the atmosphere and a major source of newly formed aerosol particles [1]. However, it is still unclear how the aerosol particle distribution evolves in space and time during an NPF. We investigated where in the planetary boundary layer does NPF begin and how does the aerosol number size distribution develop in space and time during it. We measured in Hyytiälä, southern Finland using ground based and airborne measurements. The measurements were part of the PEGASOS project. NPF was studied on six scientific flights during spring 2013 using a Zeppelin NT class airship. Ground based measurements were simultaneously conducted at SMEAR II station located in Hyytiälä. The flight profiles over Hyytiälä were flown between sunrise and noon during the growth of the boundary layer. The profiles over Hyytiälä covered vertically a distance of 100-1000 meters reaching the mixed layer, stable (nocturnal) boundary layer and the residual layer. Horizontally the profiles covered approximately a circular area of four kilometers in diameter. The measurements include particle number size distribution by Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS), Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (DMPS) and Particle Size Magnifier (PSM) [2], meteorological parameters and position (latitude, longitude and altitude) of the Zeppelin. Beginning of NPF was determined from an increase in 1.7-3 nm ion concentration. Height of the mixed layer was estimated from relative humidity measured on-board the Zeppelin. Particle growth rate during NPF was calculated. Spatial inhomogeneities in particle number size distribution during NPF were located and the birthplace of the particles was estimated using the growth rate and trajectories. We observed a regional NPF event that began simultaneously and evolved uniformly inside the mixed layer. In the horizontal direction we observed a long and narrow high concentration plume of

  10. Comparison of Size and Geography of Airborne Tungsten Particles in Fallon, Nevada, and Sweet Home, Oregon, with Implications for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Paul R.; Bierman, Brian J.; Rhodes, Kent; Ridenour, Gary; Witten, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    To improve understanding of possible connections between airborne tungsten and public health, size and geography of airborne tungsten particles collected in Fallon, Nevada, and Sweet Home, Oregon, were compared. Both towns have industrial tungsten facilities, but only Fallon has experienced a cluster of childhood leukemia. Fallon and Sweet Home are similar to one another by their particles of airborne tungsten being generally small in size. Meteorologically, much, if not most, of residential Fallon is downwind of its hard metal facility for at least some fraction of time at the annual scale, whereas little of residential Sweet Home is downwind of its tungsten facility. Geographically, most Fallon residents potentially spend time daily within an environment containing elevated levels of airborne tungsten. In contrast, few Sweet Home residents potentially spend time daily within an airborne environment with elevated levels of airborne tungsten. Although it cannot be concluded from environmental data alone that elevated airborne tungsten causes childhood leukemia, the lack of excessive cancer in Sweet Home cannot logically be used to dismiss the possibility of airborne tungsten as a factor in the cluster of childhood leukemia in Fallon. Detailed modeling of all variables affecting airborne loadings of heavy metals would be needed to legitimately compare human exposures to airborne tungsten in Fallon and Sweet Home. PMID:22523506

  11. MEMS-based silicon cantilevers with integrated electrothermal heaters for airborne ultrafine particle sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasisto, Hutomo Suryo; Merzsch, Stephan; Waag, Andreas; Peiner, Erwin

    2013-05-01

    The development of low-cost and low-power MEMS-based cantilever sensors for possible application in hand-held airborne ultrafine particle monitors is described in this work. The proposed resonant sensors are realized by silicon bulk micromachining technology with electrothermal excitation, piezoresistive frequency readout, and electrostatic particle collection elements integrated and constructed in the same sensor fabrication process step of boron diffusion. Built-in heating resistor and full Wheatstone bridge are set close to the cantilever clamp end for effective excitation and sensing, respectively, of beam deflection. Meanwhile, the particle collection electrode is located at the cantilever free end. A 300 μm-thick, phosphorus-doped silicon bulk wafer is used instead of silicon-on-insulator (SOI) as the starting material for the sensors to reduce the fabrication costs. To etch and release the cantilevers from the substrate, inductively coupled plasma (ICP) cryogenic dry etching is utilized. By controlling the etching parameters (e.g., temperature, oxygen content, and duration), cantilever structures with thicknesses down to 10 - 20 μm are yielded. In the sensor characterization, the heating resistor is heated and generating thermal waves which induce thermal expansion and further cause mechanical bending strain in the out-of-plane direction. A resonant frequency of 114.08 +/- 0.04 kHz and a quality factor of 1302 +/- 267 are measured in air for a fabricated rectangular cantilever (500x100x13.5 μm3). Owing to its low power consumption of a few milliwatts, this electrothermal cantilever is suitable for replacing the current external piezoelectric stack actuator in the next generation of the miniaturized cantilever-based nanoparticle detector (CANTOR).

  12. Airborne particles of the california central valley alter the lungs of healthy adult rats.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kevin R; Kim, Seongheon; Recendez, Julian J; Teague, Stephen V; Ménache, Margaret G; Grubbs, David E; Sioutas, Constantinos; Pinkerton, Kent E

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that airborne particulate matter (PM) with a mass median aerodynamic diameter < 10 microm (PM10) is associated with an increase in respiratory-related disease. However, there is a growing consensus that particles < 2.5 microm (PM2.5), including many in the ultrafine (< 0.1 microm) size range, may elicit greater adverse effects. PM is a complex mixture of organic and inorganic compounds; however, those components or properties responsible for biologic effects on the respiratory system have yet to be determined. During the fall and winter of 2000-2001, healthy adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed in six separate experiments to filtered air or combined fine (PM2.5) and ultrafine portions of ambient PM in Fresno, California, enhanced approximately 20-fold above outdoor levels. The intent of these studies was to determine if concentrated fine/ultrafine fractions of PM are cytotoxic and/or proinflammatory in the lungs of healthy adult rats. Exposures were for 4 hr/day for 3 consecutive days. The mean mass concentration of particles ranged from 190 to 847 microg/m3. PM was enriched primarily with ammonium nitrate, organic and elemental carbon, and metals. Viability of cells recovered by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from rats exposed to concentrated PM was significantly decreased during 4 of 6 weeks, compared with rats exposed to filtered air (p< 0.05). Total numbers of BAL cells were increased during 1 week, and neutrophil numbers were increased during 2 weeks. These observations strongly suggest exposure to enhanced concentrations of ambient fine/ultrafine particles in Fresno is associated with mild, but significant, cellular effects in the lungs of healthy adult rats. PMID:12782490

  13. What We are Learning about Airborne Particles from MISR Multi-angle Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, Ralph

    The NASA Earth Observing System’s Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) instrument has been collecting global observations in 36 angular-spectral channels about once per week for over 14 years. Regarding airborne particles, MISR is contributing in three broad areas: (1) aerosol optical depth (AOD), especially over land surface, including bright desert, (2) wildfire smoke, desert dust, and volcanic ash injection and near-source plume height, and (3) aerosol type, the aggregate of qualitative constraints on particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA). Early advances in the retrieval of these quantities focused on AOD, for which surface-based sun photometers provided a global network of ground truth, and plume height, for which ground-based and airborne lidar offered near-coincident validation data. MSIR monthly, global AOD products contributed directly to the advances in modeling aerosol impacts on climate made between the Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) third and fourth assessment reports. MISR stereo-derived plume heights are now being used to constrain source inventories for the AeroCom aerosol-climate modeling effort. The remaining challenge for the MISR aerosol effort is to refine and validate our global aerosol type product. Unlike AOD and plume height, aerosol type as retrieved by MISR is a qualitative classification derived from multi-dimensional constraints, so evaluation must be done on a categorical basis. Coincident aerosol type validation data are far less common than for AOD, and, except for rare Golden Days during aircraft field campaigns, amount to remote sensing retrievals from suborbital instruments having uncertainties comparable to those from the MISR product itself. And satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol type are much more sensitive to scene conditions such as surface variability and AOD than either AOD or plume height. MISR aerosol type retrieval capability and information content have been

  14. The use of an experimental room for monitoring of airborne concentrations of microorganisms, glass fibers, and total particles

    SciTech Connect

    Buttner, M.P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.

    1996-12-31

    An experimental room was used as a microcosm for studies of airborne particles and microorganisms in indoor environments. The interior of the room measures 4 by 4 by 2.2 m high and has a hardwood floor and the walls and ceiling are sheetrocked and coated with interior latex paint. Exterior walls are 11.4-cm thick plywood panels consisting of two outer sections of plywood insulated with fiber glass batts. The ceiling is of similar construction with 17.1-cm thick panels. Attached to the room entrance is an anteroom equipped with a HEPA-filtered air shower to reduce mixing of air resulting from entering and exiting during experiments. The room is equipped with a computer-controlled heating, ventilation, and cooling system. Temperature, relative humidity, air flow, and room pressure can be continuously monitored by probes located in the room and air handling system components. Several research projects have been conducted using this room including monitoring the potential for airborne glass fibers released from rigid fibrous ductboard, comparisons of commercially available samplers for monitoring of airborne fungal spores, and a study on the efficacy of vacuum bags to minimize dispersal of particles, including fungal spores from fungal-contaminated carpet. During studies designed to monitor airborne fiberglass, air samples were taken in the room serviced by new rigid fibrous glass ductwork, and the results were compared to those obtained in the room with bare metal ductwork installed. Monitoring of airborne fungal spores using the Andersen six-stage sampler, the high flow Spiral Biotech sampler, the Biotest RCS Plus sampler, and the Burkard spore trap sampler was performed following the release of Penicillium spores into the room through the supply register. Dispersal of carpet-associated particles and fungal spores was measured after vacuuming using conventional cellulose vacuum bags in comparison to recently developed bags.

  15. Beryllium solubility in occupational airborne particles: Sequential extraction procedure and workplace application.

    PubMed

    Rousset, Davy; Durand, Thibaut

    2016-01-01

    Modification of an existing sequential extraction procedure for inorganic beryllium species in the particulate matter of emissions and in working areas is described. The speciation protocol was adapted to carry out beryllium extraction in closed-face cassette sampler to take wall deposits into account. This four-step sequential extraction procedure aims to separate beryllium salts, metal, and oxides from airborne particles for individual quantification. Characterization of the beryllium species according to their solubility in air samples may provide information relative to toxicity, which is potentially related to the different beryllium chemical forms. Beryllium salts (BeF(2), BeSO(4)), metallic beryllium (Bemet), and beryllium oxide (BeO) were first individually tested, and then tested in mixtures. Cassettes were spiked with these species and recovery rates were calculated. Quantitative analyses with matched matrix were performed using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Method Detection Limits (MDLs) were calculated for the four matrices used in the different extraction steps. In all cases, the MDL was below 4.2 ng/sample. This method is appropriate for assessing occupational exposure to beryllium as the lowest recommended threshold limit values are 0.01 µg.m(-3) in France([) (1) (]) and 0.05 µg.m(-3) in the USA.([ 2 ]) The protocol was then tested on samples from French factories where occupational beryllium exposure was suspected. Beryllium solubility was variable between factories and among the same workplace between different tasks. PMID:26327570

  16. Airborne measurements of NOx, tracer species, and small particles during the European Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huntrieser, H.; Feigl, C.; Schlager, H.; Schröder, F.; Gerbig, C.; van Velthoven, P.; Flatøy, F.; Théry, C.; Petzold, A.; Höller, H.; Schumann, U.

    2002-06-01

    Airborne in situ measurements of NO, NO2, NOy, CO, CO2, O3, J(NO2), and CN were performed in European thunderstorms during the field experiment EULINOX in July 1998. The measurements in the upper troposphere show enhanced NOx (= NO + NO2) concentrations within thunderstorms and their outflow at horizontal scales from 300 m to several 100 km. The maximum NO mixing ratio measured inside a thundercloud close to lightning (the aircraft was also hit by a small lightning strike) was 25 ppbv. A regional NOx enhancement of 0.5 ppbv over central Europe could be traced back to a thunderstorm event starting ~24 hours earlier over Spain. The fractions of NOx in thunderclouds which are produced by lightning and convectively transported from the polluted boundary layer are determined by using CO2 and CO as tracers for boundary layer air. The analyses show that on average about 70% of the NOx increase measured in the anvil region was found to result from production by lightning and about 30% from NOx in the boundary layer. Thunderstorms are also strong sources of small particles. The peak CN concentrations measured within thunderstorm outflows (>30,000 particles STP cm-3) were distinctly higher than in the polluted boundary layer. The amount of NOx produced per thunderstorm and NO produced per lightning flash was estimated. The results imply that the annual mean NOx budget in the upper troposphere over Europe is dominated by aircraft emissions (0.1 TgN yr-1) in comparison to lightning production (~0.03 TgN yr-1). On the global scale, NOx produced by lightning (mean 3 TgN yr-1) prevails over aircraft-produced NOx (0.6 TgN yr-1).

  17. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles: airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouche, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Bourianne, T.; Gomes, L.; Prevot, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2014-02-01

    The MEGAPOLI (Megacities: Emissions, urban, regional and Global Atmospheric POLlution and climate effects, and Integrated tools for assessment and mitigation) experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris, using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS), giving detailed information on the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of black carbon (BC), measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), BC, and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy)). Plotting the equivalent ratios of different organic aerosol species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation. Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in London, Mexico City, and in New England, USA. Using the measured SOA volatile organic compounds (VOCs) species together with organic aerosol formation

  18. Characterizing the impact of urban emissions on regional aerosol particles; airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freney, E. J.; Sellegri, K.; Canonaco, F.; Colomb, A.; Borbon, A.; Michoud, V.; Doussin, J.-F.; Crumeyrolle, S.; Amarouch, N.; Pichon, J.-M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Beekmann, M.; Schwarzenböeck, A.

    2013-09-01

    The MEGAPOLI experiment took place in July 2009. The aim of this campaign was to study the aging and reactions of aerosol and gas-phase emissions in the city of Paris. Three ground-based measurement sites and several mobile platforms including instrument equipped vehicles and the ATR-42 aircraft were involved. We present here the variations in particle- and gas-phase species over the city of Paris using a combination of high-time resolution measurements aboard the ATR-42 aircraft. Particle chemical composition was measured using a compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (C-ToF-AMS) giving detailed information of the non-refractory submicron aerosol species. The mass concentration of BC, measured by a particle absorption soot photometer (PSAP), was used as a marker to identify the urban pollution plume boundaries. Aerosol mass concentrations and composition were affected by air-mass history, with air masses that spent longest time over land having highest fractions of organic aerosol and higher total mass concentrations. The Paris plume is mainly composed of organic aerosol (OA), black carbon and nitrate aerosol, as well as high concentrations of anthropogenic gas-phase species such as toluene, benzene, and NOx. Using BC and CO as tracers for air-mass dilution, we observe the ratio of ΔOA / ΔBC and ΔOA / ΔCO increase with increasing photochemical age (-log(NOx / NOy). Plotting the equivalent ratios for the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) resolved species (LV-OOA, SV-OOA, and HOA) illustrate that the increase in OA is a result of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Within Paris the changes in the ΔOA / ΔCO are similar to those observed during other studies in Mexico city, Mexico and in New England, USA. Using the measured VOCs species together with recent organic aerosol formation yields we predicted ~ 50% of the measured organics. These airborne measurements during the MEGAPOLI experiment show that urban emissions contribute to the formation of OA

  19. Comparative study of airborne viable particles assessment methods in microbiological environmental monitoring.

    PubMed

    Temprano, G; Garrido, D; Daquino, M

    2004-01-01

    A comparative study was done among available assessment methods to measure airborne viable particles in controlled rooms. Active methods were compared (sieve/nozzle impactor, slit-to-agar, centrifugal, filtration, and impinger). The comparative study was carried out by means of a two-way (factors: day and method) analysis of variance, after to logarithmical transformation of experimental results in order to fulfill the normality test of the variables. Statistically significant differences were found among the results of the five methods (P < 0.0001). In a post hoc study, by means of Tukey's test, no differences were found among centrifugal, filtration, and impinger methods. Differences were found among all the other methods (P < 0.05). It is concluded that centrifugal, filtration, and impinger methods (in which numerical results were higher than in the others) may be the most suitable methods for microbiological monitoring of a clean room. The mean results among the three selected active methods were compared with results on the settle plate (SP) (the passive method). A relationship was established between results of the passive method (CFU/h/plate 90 mmø) and the results of active methods (CFU/m3 air). By means of a lineal regression study, it was obtained a relation factor of 22.7; (95% CI: 19.7, 25.7). This factor is only valid for values between 3 and 16 in CFU/h/plate 90 mmø, and it is put on record that the experimental study took place in a room that fulfills Class D clean room specifications (WHO standards) in microbiological terms. PMID:15368991

  20. Rapid identification of airborne biological particles by flow cytometry, gas chromatography, and genetic probes. Final report, January 1995-January 1997

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, C.H.; Carlon, H.R.; Edmonds, R.L.; Robert, L.; Blew, J.

    1997-09-01

    Detection of airborne biological particulates is a primary mission of the U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center biological defense program. If biological particles could be characterized according to their unique physical and biochemical profiles, detection and perhaps even identification of the particles might be possible. This study focused upon microbial particles, more specifically upon fungal spores, yeast cells, and bacterial cells. Physical characteristics of the particles, it was proposed, could be detected by flow cytometry, while their biochemical profiles could be determined by gas chromatography, and their genetic identity could be obtained by either a suitable genetic probe or by matching its genetic fingerprint. Genetic techniques were not attempted in the work reported here, but the approach was investigated further. Trial results were encouraging.

  1. The white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS) - a novel airborne system to characterize aerosol hygroscopicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosati, B.; Wehrle, G.; Gysel, M.; Zieger, P.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.

    2015-02-01

    Aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth at enhanced relative humidity (RH), which leads to changes in their optical properties. We developed the white-light humidified optical particle spectrometer (WHOPS), a new instrument to investigate the particles' hygroscopic growth. Here we present a detailed technical description and characterization of the WHOPS in laboratory and field experiments. The WHOPS consists of a differential mobility analyzer, a humidifier/bypass and a white-light aerosol spectrometer (WELAS) connected in series to provide fast measurements of particle hygroscopicity at subsaturated RH and optical properties on airborne platforms. The WELAS employs a white-light source to minimize ambiguities in the optical particle sizing. In contrast to other hygroscopicity instruments, the WHOPS retrieves information of relatively large particles (i.e., diameter D > 280 nm), therefore investigating the more optically relevant size ranges. The effective index of refraction of the dry particles is retrieved from the optical diameter measured for size-selected aerosol samples with a well-defined dry mobility diameter. The data analysis approach for the optical sizing and retrieval of the index of refraction was extensively tested in laboratory experiments with polystyrene latex size standards and ammonium sulfate particles of different diameters. The hygroscopic growth factor (GF) distribution and aerosol mixing state is inferred from the optical size distribution measured for the size-selected and humidified aerosol sample. Laboratory experiments with pure ammonium sulfate particles revealed good agreement with Köhler theory (mean bias of ~3% and maximal deviation of 8% for GFs at RH = 95%). During first airborne measurements in the Netherlands, GFs (mean value of the GF distribution) at RH = 95% between 1.79 and 2.43 with a median of 2.02 were observed for particles with a dry diameter of 500 nm. This corresponds to hygroscopicity parameters (κ

  2. Source apportionment of airborne particles in commercial aircraft cabin environment: Contributions from outside and inside of cabin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zheng; Guan, Jun; Yang, Xudong; Lin, Chao-Hsin

    2014-06-01

    Airborne particles are an important type of air pollutants in aircraft cabin. Finding sources of particles is conducive to taking appropriate measures to remove them. In this study, measurements of concentration and size distribution of particles larger than 0.3 μm (PM>0.3) were made on nine short haul flights from September 2012 to March 2013. Particle counts in supply air and breathing zone air were both obtained. Results indicate that the number concentrations of particles ranged from 3.6 × 102 counts L-1 to 1.2 × 105 counts L-1 in supply air and breathing zone air, and they first decreased and then increased in general during the flight duration. Peaks of particle concentration were found at climbing, descending, and cruising phases in several flights. Percentages of particle concentration in breathing zone contributed by the bleed air (originated from outside) and cabin interior sources were calculated. The bleed air ratios, outside airflow rates and total airflow rates were calculated by using carbon dioxide as a ventilation tracer in five of the nine flights. The calculated results indicate that PM>0.3 in breathing zone mainly came from unfiltered bleed air, especially for particle sizes from 0.3 to 2.0 μm. And for particles larger than 2.0 μm, contributions from the bleed air and cabin interior were both important. The results would be useful for developing better cabin air quality control strategies.

  3. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals. PMID:26177695

  4. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-07-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals.

  5. Nanoscale characterization of PM2.5 airborne pollutants reveals high adhesiveness and aggregation capability of soot particles

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuanyuan; Ji, Yanfeng; Sun, Hui; Hui, Fei; Hu, Jianchen; Wu, Yaxi; Fang, Jianlong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Jianxiang; Duan, Huiling; Lanza, Mario

    2015-01-01

    In 2012 air pollutants were responsible of seven million human death worldwide, and among them particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter of 2.5 micrometers or less (PM2.5) are the most hazardous because they are small enough to invade even the smallest airways and penetrate to the lungs. During the last decade the size, shape, composition, sources and effect of these particles on human health have been studied. However, the noxiousness of these particles not only relies on their chemical toxicity, but particle morphology and mechanical properties affect their thermodynamic behavior, which has notable impact on their biological activity. Therefore, correlating the physical, mechanical and chemical properties of PM2.5 airborne pollutants should be the first step to characterize their interaction with other bodies but, unfortunately, such analysis has never been reported before. In this work, we present the first nanomechanical characterization of the most abundant and universal groups of PM2.5 airborne pollutants and, by means of atomic force microscope (AFM) combined with other characterization tools, we observe that fluffy soot aggregates are the most sticky and unstable. Our experiments demonstrate that such particles show strong adhesiveness and aggregation, leading to a more diverse composition and compiling all possible toxic chemicals. PMID:26177695

  6. Chemical speciation of size-segregated floor dusts and airborne magnetic particles collected at underground subway stations in Seoul, Korea.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hae-Jin; Kim, BoWha; Malek, Md Abdul; Koo, Yong Sung; Jung, Jong Hoon; Son, Youn-Suk; Kim, Jo-Chun; Kim, HyeKyoung; Ro, Chul-Un

    2012-04-30

    Previous studies have reported the major chemical species of underground subway particles to be Fe-containing species that are generated from wear and friction processes at rail-wheel-brake and catenaries-pantographs interfaces. To examine chemical composition of Fe-containing particles in more details, floor dusts were collected at five sampling locations of an underground subway station. Size-segregated floor dusts were separated into magnetic and non-magnetic fractions using a permanent magnet. Using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry (SEM/EDX), iron metal, which is relatively harmless, was found to be the dominating chemical species in the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions with minor fractions of Mg, Al, Si, Ca, S, and C. From SEM analysis, the floor dusts of the <25 μm size fractions collected on railroad ties appeared to be smaller than 10 μm, indicating that their characteristics should somewhat reflect the characteristics of airborne particles in the tunnel and the platform. As most floor dusts are magnetic, PM levels at underground subway stations can be controlled by removing magnetic indoor particles using magnets. In addition, airborne subway particles, most of which were smaller than 10 μm, were collected using permanent magnets at two underground subway stations, namely Jegi and Yangjae stations, in Seoul, Korea. XRD and SEM/EDX analyses showed that most of the magnetic aerosol particles collected at Jegi station was iron metal, whereas those at Yangjae station contained a small amount of Fe mixed with Na, Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, and C. The difference in composition of the Fe-containing particles between the two subway stations was attributed to the different ballast tracks used. PMID:22381374

  7. Automated classification of single airborne particles from two-dimension, angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni F.; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.

    2011-06-01

    Two-dimension, angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) is an experimental technique by which patterns of LASER light intensity scattered by single (micrometer or sub-micrometer sized) airborne particles are collected. In the past 10 years TAOS instrumentation has evolved from laboratory prototypes to field-deployable equipment; patterns are collected by the thousands during indoor or outdoor sampling in short times. Although comparison between experimental and computed scattering patterns has been carried out extensively, there is no satisfactory way to relate a given pattern to the particle it comes from. This paper reports about the ongoing development and implementation of a method which is aimed at classifying patterns, rather than identifying original particles. A machine learning algorithm includes the extraction of morphological features and their multivariate statistical analysis. A classifier is trained and validated in a supervised mode, by relying on patterns from known materials. Then the tuned classifier is applied to the recognition of patterns of unknown origin.

  8. LOREP 1993 summary report: Airborne measurements of meteorological variables, atmospheric particles and sulfur hexafluoride. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkison, S.W.; Wellman, D.L.

    1996-03-01

    Meteorological variables and sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) were measured using the NOAA King Air research aircraft during February and March, 1993, over the Sierra Nevada Range of northern California as part of the Lake Oroville Runoff Enhancement Prototype Program (LOREP 1993). Race track pattern flights were made from approximately Sierraville, CA, to Gasner, CA. Airborne sampling was used to locate a plume containing sulfur hexafluoride as a tracer and propane as a seeding agent. The aircraft also carried an optical imaging probe. This report introduces the program in general, discusses the objectives of LOREP 1993, the instrumentation used and the data obtained by the NOAA airborne operation.

  9. PHIPS-HALO: the airborne Particle Habit Imaging and Polar Scattering probe - Part 1: Design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmonem, Ahmed; Järvinen, Emma; Duft, Denis; Hirst, Edwin; Vogt, Steffen; Leisner, Thomas; Schnaiter, Martin

    2016-07-01

    The number and shape of ice crystals present in mixed-phase and ice clouds influence the radiation properties, precipitation occurrence and lifetime of these clouds. Since clouds play a major role in the climate system, influencing the energy budget by scattering sunlight and absorbing heat radiation from the earth, it is necessary to investigate the optical and microphysical properties of cloud particles particularly in situ. The relationship between the microphysics and the single scattering properties of cloud particles is usually obtained by modelling the optical scattering properties from in situ measurements of ice crystal size distributions. The measured size distribution and the assumed particle shape might be erroneous in case of non-spherical ice particles. There is a demand to obtain both information correspondently and simultaneously for individual cloud particles in their natural environment. For evaluating the average scattering phase function as a function of ice particle habit and crystal complexity, in situ measurements are required. To this end we have developed a novel airborne optical sensor (PHIPS-HALO) to measure the optical properties and the corresponding microphysical parameters of individual cloud particles simultaneously. PHIPS-HALO has been tested in the AIDA cloud simulation chamber and deployed in mountain stations as well as research aircraft (HALO and Polar 6). It is a successive version of the laboratory prototype instrument PHIPS-AIDA. In this paper we present the detailed design of PHIPS-HALO, including the detection mechanism, optical design, mechanical construction and aerodynamic characterization.

  10. Investigation of fluorine content in PM2.5 airborne particles of Istanbul, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Ozbek, Nil; Baltaci, Hakki; Baysal, Asli

    2016-07-01

    Fluorine determination in airborne samples is important due to its spread into the air from both natural and artificial sources. It can travel by wind over large distances before depositing on the Earth's surface. Its concentration in various matrices are limited and controlled by the regulations for causing health risks associated with environmental exposures. In this work, fluorine was determined in PM2.5 airborne samples by high-resolution continuum source electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry. For these purpose, the PM2.5 airborne particulates were collected on quartz filters using high-volume samplers (500 L/min) in Istanbul (Turkey) for 96 h during January to June in 2 years. Then, instrumental and experimental parameters were optimized for the analyte in airborne samples. The validity of the method for the analyte was tested using standard reference material, and certified values were found in the limits of 95 % confidence level. The fluorine concentrations and meteorological conditions were compared statistically. PMID:27023803

  11. Airborne measurements of cloud-forming nuclei and aerosol particles in stabilized ground clouds produced by solid rocket booster firings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E., II; Ala, G. G.; Parungo, F. P.; Willis, P. T.; Bendura, R. J.; Woods, D.

    1978-01-01

    Airborne measurements of cloud volumes, ice nuclei and cloud condensation nuclei, liquid particles, and aerosol particles were obtained from stabilized ground clouds (SGCs) produced by Titan 3 launches at Kennedy Space Center, 20 August and 5 September 1977. The SGCs were bright, white, cumulus clouds early in their life and contained up to 3.5 g/m3 of liquid in micron to millimeter size droplets. The measured cloud volumes were 40 to 60 cu km five hours after launch. The SGCs contained high concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei active at 0.2%, 0.5%, and 1.0% supersaturation for periods of three to five hours. The SGCs also contained high concentrations of submicron particles. Three modes existed in the particle population: a 0.05 to 0.1 micron mode composed of aluminum-containing particles, a 0.2 to 0.8 micron mode, and a 2.0 to 10 micron mode composed of particles that contained primarily aluminum.

  12. Comparison of Three Real-Time Measurement Methods for Airborne Ultrafine Particles in the Silicon Alloy Industry.

    PubMed

    Kero, Ida Teresia; Jørgensen, Rikke Bramming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the applicability and the correlation between three commercially available instruments capable of detection, quantification, and characterization of ultrafine airborne particulate matter in the industrial setting of a tapping area in a silicon alloy production plant. The number concentration of ultrafine particles was evaluated using an Electric Low Pressure Impactor (ELPI(TM)), a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS(TM)), and a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC). The results are discussed in terms of particle size distribution and temporal variations linked to process operations. The instruments show excellent temporal covariation and the correlation between the FMPS and ELPI is good. The advantage of the FMPS is the excellent time- and size resolution of the results. The main advantage of the ELPI is the possibility to collect size-fractionated samples of the dust for subsequent analysis by, for example, electron microscopy. The CPC does not provide information about the particle size distribution and its correlation to the other two instruments is somewhat poor. Nonetheless, the CPC gives basic, real-time information about the ultrafine particle concentration and can therefore be used for source identification. PMID:27598180

  13. Application of traditional cyclone with spray scrubber to remove airborne silica particles emitted from stone-crushing factories.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Abdulrahman; Ghorbani, Farshid; Mahjub, Hossien; Golbabei, Farideh; Aliabadi, Mohsan

    2009-08-01

    The traditional cyclone with spray scrubber was developed for the removal of airborne silica particles from local exhaust ventilation (LEV). The objective of this research is to evaluate the efficiency of this process for removing silica particles in LEV. After designing and installing a traditional cyclone and spray scrubber, air samples were obtained at the inlet and outlet of the apparatus. The mass of each collected sample was determined gravimetrically using EPA method. The efficiency of the cyclone with spray scrubber for the removal of dust particles from the LEV system was determined to be in the range of 92-99%. There was a high correlation between the inlet concentration of dust particles and the efficiency of the apparatus. The total pressure across the system was 772.17-1120.90 Pa. It was concluded that a traditional cyclone with a spray scrubber can effectively remove a very high percentage of the incoming silica particles from an LEV. The total pressure drop across the current process is less than the pressure drop across other treatment equipment, which means that our process can effectively remove silica particles while using less electricity than other processes. PMID:19672019

  14. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition - Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. C.; Stolzenburg, M. R.; Clark, W. E.; Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G. V.; Chan, K. R.

    1990-01-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 to approximately 1 micron. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N2O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  15. Measurements of condensation nuclei in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition: Observations of particle production in the polar vortex

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, J.C.; Stolzenburg, M.R. ); Clark, W.E. ); Loewenstein, M.; Ferry, G.V.; Chan, K.R. )

    1990-03-01

    The ER-2 Condensation Nucleus Counter (ER-2 CNC) was operated in the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition (AASE) in January and February 1989. The ER-2 CNC measures the mixing ratio of particles, CN, with diameters from approximately 0.02 {mu}m to approximately 1 {mu}m. The spatial distribution of CN in the Arctic polar vortex was found to resemble that measured in the Antarctic in the Spring of 1987. The vertical profile of CN in the vortex was lowered by subsidence. At altitudes above the minimum in the CN mixing ratio profile, CN mixing ratios correlated negatively with that of N{sub 2}O, demonstrating new particle production. CN serve as nuclei in the formation of Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSC's) and the concentration of CN can affect PSC properties.

  16. Factors influencing the airborne capture of respirable charged particles by surfactants in water sprays.

    PubMed

    Tessum, Mei W; Raynor, Peter C; Keating-Klika, Lorraine

    2014-01-01

    This research measured the effects of particle diameter, surfactant-containing spray solution, and particle charge on the capture of respirable particles by surfactant-containing water spray droplets. Polystyrene latex particles with diameters of 0.6, 1.0, or 2.1 μm were generated in a wind tunnel. Particles were given either a neutralized, unneutralized, net positive, or net negative charge, and then were captured as they passed through sprays containing anionic, cationic, or nonionic surfactant. The remaining particles were sampled, charge-separated, and counted with the sprays on and off at varying voltage levels to assess collection efficiency. Overall efficiencies were measured for particles with all charge levels, as well as efficiencies for particles with specific charge levels. The overall collection efficiency significantly increased with increasing particle diameter. Collection efficiencies of 21.5% ± 9.0%, 58.8% ± 12.5%, and 86.6% ± 43.5% (Mean ± SD) were observed for particles 0.6, 1.0, and 2.1 μm in diameter, respectively. The combination of surfactant classification and concentration also significantly affected both overall spray collection efficiency and collection efficiency for particles with specific charge levels. Ionic surfactant-containing sprays had the best performance for charged particles with the opposite sign of charge but the worst performance for charged particles with the same sign of charge, while nonionic surfactant-containing spray efficiently removed particles carrying relatively few charges. Particle charge level impacted the spray collection efficiency. Highly charged particles were removed more efficiently than weakly charged particles. PMID:24479508

  17. MicroMED: a dust particle counter for the characterization of airborne dust close to the surface of Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cozzolino, Fabio; Esposito, Francesca; Molfese, Cesare; Cortecchia, Fausto; Saggin, Bortolino; D'amato, Francesco

    2015-04-01

    Monitoring of airborne dust is very important in planetary climatology. Indeed, dust absorbs and scatter solar and thermal radiation, severely affecting atmospheric thermal structure, balance and dynamics (in terms of circulations). Wind-driven blowing of sand and dust is also responsible for shaping planetary surfaces through the formation of sand dunes and ripples, the erosion of rocks, and the creation and transport of soil particles. Dust is permanently present in the atmosphere of Mars and its amount varies with seasons. During regional or global dust storms, more than 80% of the incoming sunlight is absorbed by dust causing an intense atmospheric heating. Airborne dust is therefore a crucial climate component on Mars which impacts atmospheric circulations at all scales. Main dust parameters influencing the atmosphere heating are size distribution, abundance, albedo, single scattering phase function, imaginary part of the index of refraction. Moreover, major improvements of Mars climate models require, in addition to the standard meteorological parameters, quantitative information about dust lifting, transport and removal mechanisms. In this context, two major quantities need to be measured for the dust source to be understood: surface flux and granulometry. While many observations have constrained the size distribution of the dust haze seen from the orbit, it is still not known what the primary airborne dust (e.g. the recently lifted dust) is made of, size-wise. MicroMED has been designed to fill this gap. It will measure the abundance and size distribution of dust, not in the atmospheric column, but close to the surface, where dust is lifted, so to be able to monitor dust injection into the atmosphere. This has never been performed in Mars and other planets exploration. MicroMED is an Optical Particle Counter, analyzing light scattered from single dust particles to measure their size and abundance. A proper fluid-dynamic system, including a pump and a

  18. Possible evidence of new particle formation and its impact on cloud microphysics from airborne measurements over Bay of Bengal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshpande, C. G.; Bhalwankar, Rohini; Padmakumari, B.; Maheskumar, R. S.; Axisa, Duncan; Kulkarni, J. R.

    2014-04-01

    Airborne measurements conducted under a special mission over Bay of Bengal (BoB) during the CAIPEEX (Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement EXperiment) in 2011 were analyzed in the present study. Research flights were carried out on 19 and 20 October, 2011 (referred as RF1 and RF2), in the region over BoB, which was influenced by a depression to evaluate the aerosol-cloud interactions over marine environment. The increased concentration of aitken/accumulation mode particles was observed at 500 m above sea surface level over the ocean after the passage of the depression. The source of these particles and their subsequent growth during RF1 at about 200 km from coastline has been attributed to (i) increased production of aerosols due to oxidation of dimethyl sulfide (DMS) because of upwelling of the deep ocean water during the depression and (ii) anthropogenic aerosols transported from inland. Moreover, measurements of accumulation and coarse mode particles with diameter ranging from 0.1 to 3 μm and cloud droplets in the range 3 to 47 μm show systematic growth associated with cloud microphysical/rain formation process. On the other hand, no such evidence of increasing particle concentration and growth has been observed at about 60 km from coastline towards southeast during RF2. Evidently, the rain event observed during the night hours of 19 October caused the washout and scavenging of aerosols which contributed towards the decreased aerosol concentration observed near the coast.

  19. Adaptation of an Ambient Ion Monitor for Detection of Amines in Airborne Particles

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Agricultural facilities are the source of particles and gases that can exhibit an influence on air quality. Particle mass concentration influences from agricultural sources can include both primary emissions and secondary particle formation through emission of gaseous precursors. An ambient ion moni...

  20. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm < Dp < 50 nm) to total particles was recorded also in winter and was attributed partly to the effect of local heating. Furthermore, back trajectories (HYSPLIT model) showed that different air mass origins are linked to different levels of particle number concentrations, with higher values associated with air masses passing from polluted areas before reaching the Akrotiri station. Modal analysis of the measured size distribution data revealed a strong nucleation mode during winter (15-25 nm), which can be correlated with emissions from local sources (domestic heating). The nucleation mode was observed also during the spring campaigns and was partly linked to new particle formation events. On the contrary, an accumulation mode (80-120 nm) prevailed in the measurements during summer campaigns, when the station area was influenced by polluted air masses arriving mainly from Eastern Europe. In total, 13 new particle formation events were recorded

  1. Pb, Sr and Nd isotopic composition and trace element characteristics of coarse airborne particles collected with passive samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoàng-Hòa, Thi Bich; Stille, Peter; Dietze, Volker; Guéguen, Florence; Perrone, Thierry; Gieré, Reto

    2015-09-01

    Passive samplers for collection of coarse airborne particulate matter have been installed in and around the coal-mining town of Cam Pha, Quang Ninh Province (Vietnam). Analysis of Pb, Sr, and Nd isotope ratios and of major and trace element distribution patterns in atmospheric particulates collected at three stations allowed for the identification of four important dust components: (1) coal dust from an open-pit mine and fly ash particles from a coal-fired power station, (2) diesel soot, (3) traffic dust from metal, tire and pavement abrasion, and (4) limestone-derived dust. Outside of the coal-mining area, traffic-derived dust defines the atmospheric baseline composition of the studied environment.

  2. Effect of indoor-generated airborne particles on radon progeny dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trassierra, C Vargas; Stabile, L; Cardellini, F; Morawska, L; Buonanno, G

    2016-08-15

    In order to investigate the interaction between radon progeny and particles, an experimental campaign was carried out in a radon chamber at the Italian National Institute of Ionizing Radiation Metrology, quantifying the amount of attached and unattached radon daughters present in air, as well as the equilibrium factor in the presence of particles generated through indoor sources. A fixed radon concentration was maintained, while particles were generated using incense sticks, mosquito coils and gas combustion. Aerosols were characterized in terms of particle concentrations and size distributions. Simultaneously, radon concentration and attached/unattached potential alpha energy concentration in the air were continuously monitored by two different devices, based on alpha spectroscopy techniques. The presence of particles was found to affect the attached fraction of radon decay products, in such a way that the particles acted as a sink for radionuclides. In terms of sources which emit large particles (e.g. incense, mosquito coils), which greatly increase particle surface area concentrations, the Equilibrium Factor was found to double with respect to the background level before particle generation sessions. On the contrary, the radon decay product dynamics were not influenced by gas combustion processes, mainly due to the small surface area of the particles emitted. PMID:27131455

  3. Airborne Particles: What We Have Learned About Their Role in Climate from Remote Sensing, and Prospects for Future Advances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2013-01-01

    Desert dust, wildfire smoke, volcanic ash, biogenic and urban pollution particles, all affect the regional-scale climate of Earth in places and at times; some have global-scale impacts on the column radiation balance, cloud properties, atmospheric stability structure, and circulation patterns. Remote sensing has played a central role in identifying the sources and transports of airborne particles, mapping their three-dimensional distribution and variability, quantifying their amount, and constraining aerosol air mass type. The measurements obtained from remote sensing have strengths and limitations, and their value for characterizing Earths environment is enhanced immensely when they are combined with direct, in situ observations, and used to constrain aerosol transport and climate models. A similar approach has been taken to study the role particles play in determining the climate of Mars, though based on far fewer observations. This presentation will focus what we have learned from remote sensing about the impacts aerosol have on Earths climate; a few points about how aerosols affect the climate of Mars will also be introduced, in the context of how we might assess aerosol-climate impacts more generally on other worlds.

  4. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of a Sequential Spot Sampler for Time-Resolved Measurement of Airborne Particle Composition

    PubMed Central

    Eiguren Fernandez, Arantzazu; Lewis, Gregory S.; Hering, Susanne V.

    2014-01-01

    A new sampling approach has been developed to enable affordable, time-resolved monitoring of particulate chemical compositions, and more generally to provide concentrated samples of airborne particles. Using a newly developed, moderated water-based condensational growth technology, individual particle samples are deposited in a 1-mm diameter dry “spot”. The moderated condensation technology enables this collection with minimal temperature rise, providing robust collection for volatile constituents. Measured collection efficiencies are above 95% for particles in the size range from 0.010 μm to 2.5 μm. A set of 20 or more time-resolved samples, plus blanks, may be collected onto a multiwell collection plate. For chemical analysis the plate is returned to the laboratory, and placed directly into a modified autosampler, without extraction or preparation. The autosampler handles the addition of eluent, extraction, and sample injection without user manipulation. This paper presents the design and laboratory evaluation of a 1.5 L/min sampling rate version of this system. PMID:25045199

  5. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing

    2014-03-01

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4-20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ˜20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  6. Optical trapping and rotation of airborne absorbing particles with a single focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jinda; Li, Yong-qing

    2014-03-10

    We measure the periodic circular motion of single absorbing aerosol particles that are optically trapped with a single focused Gaussian beam and rotate around the laser propagation direction. The scattered light from the trapped particle is observed to be directional and change periodically at 0.4–20 kHz. The instantaneous positions of the moving particle within a rotation period are measured by a high-speed imaging technique using a charge coupled device camera and a repetitively pulsed light-emitting diode illumination. The centripetal acceleration of the trapped particle as high as ∼20 times the gravitational acceleration is observed and is attributed to the photophoretic forces.

  7. Chemical characterisation of single airborne particles in Athens (Greece) by ATOFMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M.

    A TSI Model 3800 aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) was deployed for single-particle analysis to Athens (Greece) during August 2003. It has revealed particle types not previously reported in urban air, as well as adding appreciably to the knowledge of aerosol in the Athens atmosphere. Sampling was carried out on a minor road in the city centre and the mass spectra of 166,603 particles were recorded, with 128,290 presenting both positive and negative spectra. The ART-2a neural network algorithm was applied and five main classes of particle were characterised: sea salt, dust, carbon, inorganic and K-rich, with sub-classes within each. Dust (with five sub-classes) was the main class, accounting for up to 49.5% of the particles characterised. Oxygenated organic particles feature heavily in the dataset and some are internally mixed with nitrate and sulphate. Most of the carbon-containing particles appeared to be a secondary product of atmospheric chemistry and one specific class (C-SEC_2) peaked every night at 22:00, when temperature and RH values favoured condensation. The secondary particles showed clear internal mixing of organic and inorganic constituents in contrast to their common theoretical treatment as external mixtures. The apparent semi-volatility of one class was striking. Compared with measurements in northern Europe, the abundance of relatively coarse dust particles and of secondary organic particles is notable. The particle classes derived from analysis of the ATOFMS data were compared with published data on the composition of aerosol in Athens. The latter is largely restricted to major water-soluble ions, and the two measurement techniques proved to be highly complementary.

  8. Characterisation of indoor airborne particles by using real-time aerosol mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Harrison, Roy M; Charpantidou, E; Loupa, G; Rapsomanikis, S

    2007-10-01

    An Aerosol Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ATOFMS; TSI 3800) was deployed to Athens (Greece) during August 2003. The instrument provides information on a polydisperse aerosol, acquiring precise aerodynamic diameter (+/-1%) within the range 0.3 to 3 mum and individual particle positive and negative mass spectral data in real time. Sampling was carried out indoors and outdoors at an office in a building on a minor road in the city centre and various outdoor and indoor sources were identified. Specific outdoor particles such as dust and carbon particles were detected in indoor air. The generation of particles from indoor sources was studied and several different types of particle were found to be present in environmental tobacco smoke (ETS): three were potassium-rich (with differing proportions of carbon) emitted directly in the exhaled mainstream smoke. Two other types arose mainly when the cigarette was left smouldering on an ash-tray. Another particle type exhibited a strong signal at m/z 84, most likely due to a nicotine fragment. The temporal trend of this specific particle type showed likely condensation of semi-volatile constituents on existing potassium-rich particles. A release of insect repellent in the room was also successfully monitored. PMID:17628640

  9. A benchmark for numerical scheme validation of airborne particle exposure in street canyons.

    PubMed

    Marini, S; Buonanno, G; Stabile, L; Avino, P

    2015-02-01

    Measurements of particle concentrations and distributions in terms of number, surface area, and mass were performed simultaneously at eight sampling points within a symmetric street canyon of an Italian city. The aim was to obtain a useful benchmark for validation of wind tunnel experiments and numerical schemes: to this purpose, the influence of wind directions and speeds was considered. Particle number concentrations (PNCs) were higher on the leeward side than the windward side of the street canyon due to the wind vortex effect. Different vertical PNC profiles were observed between the two canyon sides depending on the wind direction and speed at roof level. A decrease in particle concentrations was observed with increasing rooftop wind speed, except for the coarse fraction indicating a possible particle resuspension due to the traffic and wind motion. This study confirms that particle concentration fields in urban street canyons are strongly influenced by traffic emissions and meteorological parameters, especially wind direction and speed. PMID:25167823

  10. Composition and Morphology of Major Particle Types from Airborne Measurements during ICE-T and PRADACS Field Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venero, I. M.; Mayol-Bracero, O. L.; Anderson, J. R.

    2012-12-01

    As part of the Puerto Rican African Dust and Cloud Study (PRADACS) and the Ice in Clouds Experiment - Tropical (ICE-T), we sampled giant airborne particles to study their elemental composition, morphology, and size distributions. Samples were collected in July 2011 during field measurements performed by NCAR's C-130 aircraft based on St Croix, U.S Virgin Island. The results presented here correspond to the measurements done during research flight #8 (RF8). Aerosol particles with Dp > 1 um were sampled with the Giant Nuclei Impactor and particles with Dp < 1 um were collected with the Wyoming Inlet. Collected particles were later analyzed using an automated scanning electron microscope (SEM) and manual observation by field emission SEM. We identified the chemical composition and morphology of major particle types in filter samples collected at different altitudes (e.g., 300 ft, 1000 ft, and 4500ft). Results from the flight upwind of Puerto Rico show that particles in the giant nuclei size range are dominated by sea salt. Samples collected at altitudes 300 ft and 1000 ft showed the highest number of sea salt particles and the samples collected at higher altitudes (> 4000 ft) showed the highest concentrations of clay material. HYSPLIT back trajectories for all samples showed that the low altitude samples initiated in the free troposphere in the Atlantic Ocean, which may account for the high sea salt content and that the source of the high altitude samples was closer to the Saharan - Sahel desert region and, therefore, these samples possibly had the influence of African dust. Size distribution results for quartz and unreacted sea-salt aerosols collected on the Giant Nuclei Impactor showed that sample RF08 - 12:05 UTM (300 ft) had the largest size value (mean = 2.936 μm) than all the other samples. Additional information was also obtained from the Wyoming Inlet present at the C - 130 aircraft which showed that size distribution results for all particles were smaller in

  11. LOAC (Light Optical Particle Counter): a new small aerosol counter with particle characterization capabilities for surface and airborne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Berthet, Gwenael; Jégou, Fabrice; Jeannot, Matthieu; Jourdain, Line; Dulac, François; Mallet, Marc; Dupont, Jean-Charles; Thaury, Claire; Tonnelier, Thierry; Verdier, Nicolas; Charpentier, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    The determination of the size distribution of tropospheric and stratospheric aerosols with conventional optical counters is difficult when different natures of particles are present (droplets, soot, mineral dust, secondary organic or mineral particles...). Also, a light and cheap aerosol counter that can be used at ground, onboard drones or launched under all kinds of atmospheric balloons can be very useful during specific events as volcanic plumes, desert dust transport or local pollution episodes. These goals can be achieved thanks to a new generation of aerosol counter, called LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter). The instrument was developed in the frame of a cooperation between French scientific laboratories (CNRS), the Environnement-SA and MeteoModem companies and the French Space Agency (CNES). LOAC is a small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams, having a low electrical power consumption. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles. The first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.3-100 micrometerers. At such an angle close to forward scattering, the signal is much more intense and the measurements are the least sensitive to the particle nature. The second angle is at 60°, where the scattered light is strongly dependent on the particle refractive index and thus on the nature of the aerosols. The ratio of the measurements at the two angles is used to discriminate between the different types of particles dominating the nature of the aerosol particles in the different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, soil dust and soot. Since 2011, we have operated LOAC in various environments (Arctic, Mediterranean, urban and peri-urban…) under different kinds of balloons including zero pressure stratospheric, tethered, drifting tropospheric, and meteorological sounding balloons. For the last case, the total weight of the gondola

  12. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R; Martinez, Andrew S; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L; Wingen, Lisa M; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R; Gerber, R Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J

    2015-11-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine-California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs. PMID:26483454

  13. The future of airborne sulfur-containing particles in the absence of fossil fuel sulfur dioxide emissions

    PubMed Central

    Perraud, Véronique; Horne, Jeremy R.; Martinez, Andrew S.; Kalinowski, Jaroslaw; Meinardi, Simone; Dawson, Matthew L.; Wingen, Lisa M.; Dabdub, Donald; Blake, Donald R.; Gerber, R. Benny; Finlayson-Pitts, Barbara J.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfuric acid (H2SO4), formed from oxidation of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emitted during fossil fuel combustion, is a major precursor of new airborne particles, which have well-documented detrimental effects on health, air quality, and climate. Another precursor is methanesulfonic acid (MSA), produced simultaneously with SO2 during the atmospheric oxidation of organosulfur compounds (OSCs), such as dimethyl sulfide. In the present work, a multidisciplinary approach is used to examine how contributions of H2SO4 and MSA to particle formation will change in a large coastal urban area as anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions of SO2 decline. The 3-dimensional University of California Irvine–California Institute of Technology airshed model is used to compare atmospheric concentrations of gas phase MSA, H2SO4, and SO2 under current emissions of fossil fuel-associated SO2 and a best-case futuristic scenario with zero fossil fuel sulfur emissions. Model additions include results from (i) quantum chemical calculations that clarify the previously uncertain gas phase mechanism of formation of MSA and (ii) a combination of published and experimental estimates of OSC emissions, such as those from marine, agricultural, and urban processes, which include pet waste and human breath. Results show that in the zero anthropogenic SO2 emissions case, particle formation potential from H2SO4 will drop by about two orders of magnitude compared with the current situation. However, particles will continue to be generated from the oxidation of natural and anthropogenic sources of OSCs, with contributions from MSA and H2SO4 of a similar order of magnitude. This could be particularly important in agricultural areas where there are significant sources of OSCs. PMID:26483454

  14. Measurements of Br/Pb Ratios in Airborne Particles from Car Exhaust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Öblad, M.; Selin, E.

    1985-10-01

    Concentrations of particulate bromine and lead have been measured during one summer and one winter period. The measurements were made simultaneously in five sites in a city on the Swedish west coast. A rural site about 60 km from the city was used to measure the background aerosol. Aerosol sampling was made with six dichotomous virtual impactors, which fractionate the aerosol into two modes, one fine particle mode (aerodynamic diameter, a.d. < 3.5 μm) and one coarse particle mode (3.5 μm < a.d. < 18 μm). The aerosol was collected onto thin teflon filters. Element concentrations were obtained by Energy Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence Analysis. The element concentrations were related to air mass trajectories. The Br/Pb ratio proved to be the same on a given date for the city sites and the background site. A dependence on the air mass history was found, suggesting that it is the quality of the air basin in the region that influences the Br/Pb ratio even for fresh car exhaust. The Br/Pb ratio was the same for fine and coarse particles, indicating that the ratio is determined before coagulation with larger particles occur. The ratios between coarse and fine particles containing lead and bromine respectively were also studied. The results suggest that lead and bromine are actually attached to the same particles.

  15. Conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system for fluorescence measurements of individual airborne biological particles.

    PubMed

    Nachman, P; Chen, G; Pinnick, R G; Hill, S C; Chang, R K; Mayo, M W; Fernandez, G L

    1996-03-01

    We report the design and operation of a prototype conditional-sampling spectrograph detection system that can record the fluorescence spectra of individual, micrometer-sized aerosols as they traverse an intense 488-nm intracavity laser beam. The instrument's image-intensified CCD detector is gated by elastic scattering or by undispersed fluorescence from particles that enter the spectrograph's field of view. It records spectra only from particles with preselected scattering-fluorescence levels (a fiber-optic-photomultiplier subsystem provides the gating signal). This conditional-sampling procedure reduces data-handling rates and increases the signal-to-noise ratio by restricting the system's exposures to brief periods when aerosols traverse the beam. We demonstrate these advantages by reliably capturing spectra from individual fluorescent microspheres dispersed in an airstream. The conditional-sampling procedure also permits some discrimination among different types of particles, so that spectra may be recorded from the few interesting particles present in a cloud of background aerosol. We demonstrate such discrimination by measuring spectra from selected fluorescent microspheres in a mixture of two types of microspheres, and from bacterial spores in a mixture of spores and nonfluorescent kaolin particles. PMID:21085216

  16. Particle size distribution of airborne Aspergillus fumigatus spores emitted from compost using membrane filtration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deacon, L. J.; Pankhurst, L. J.; Drew, G. H.; Hayes, E. T.; Jackson, S.; Longhurst, P. J.; Longhurst, J. W. S.; Liu, J.; Pollard, S. J. T.; Tyrrel, S. F.

    Information on the particle size distribution of bioaerosols emitted from open air composting operations is valuable in evaluating potential health impacts and is a requirement for improved dispersion simulation modelling. The membrane filter method was used to study the particle size distribution of Aspergillus fumigatus spores in air 50 m downwind of a green waste compost screening operation at a commercial facility. The highest concentrations (approximately 8 × 10 4 CFU m -3) of culturable spores were found on filters with pore diameters in the range 1-2 μm which suggests that the majority of spores are emitted as single cells. The findings were compared to published data collected using an Andersen sampler. Results were significantly correlated ( p < 0.01) indicating that the two methods are directly comparable across all particles sizes for Aspergillus spores.

  17. Characterization of airborne individual particles collected in an urban area, a satellite city and a clean air area in Beijing, 2001

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zongbo; Shao, Longyi; Jones, T. P.; Whittaker, A. G.; Lu, Senlin; Bérubé, K. A.; He, Taoe; Richards, R. J.

    Collection campaigns for PM 10 and PM 2.5 have been conducted in a northwestern Beijing urban area in monthly periods over 2001, with 7 days collection per month. The samples were also collected simultaneously in a satellite city, Nankou, and a clean air area near the Ming Tombs Reservoir (MTR) over the domestic heating (March) and non-heating (July/August) periods in 2001 (both for one week). To assist the analysis, three types of 'source' particulate matter (PM) samples were taken. These consisted of coal combustion ash collected on top of a coke oven; dust storm particles collected during dust storm periods; and roadside PM 10 collected on a major road in Beijing. Monitoring results reveal that, in the urban area, particle mass levels were higher in winter than in other seasons. The 1-week/month average PM 10 mass levels were over 250 μg m -3 in winter. The particle mass levels in the satellite city were slightly lower than those at the urban site, and the lowest mass levels occurred at the MTR site. The morphology and chemical composition of individual airborne particles were determined by scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis was employed to study the number-size distributions. The number-size distributions of mineral particles showed that those in the Asia-Dust storm (ADS) collections are mostly coarser than 1 μm, while mineral particles of the non-ADS collections are predominately finer than 1 μm. The particles in the respirable (<2.5 μm) fraction accounted for 99% of the total particles in airborne PM samples. Soot aggregates were generally the most abundant components in airborne PM samples at all three sites. The fly ash (spherical) particles at the MTR site were significantly enriched over the heating period, indicating a domestic coal-burning source.

  18. Automated classification of single airborne particles from two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns by non-linear filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Pan, Yong-Le; Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Casati, Caterina; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Chang, Richard K.; Videen, Gorden W.

    2013-12-01

    Measurement of two-dimensional angle-resolved optical scattering (TAOS) patterns is an attractive technique for detecting and characterizing micron-sized airborne particles. In general, the interpretation of these patterns and the retrieval of the particle refractive index, shape or size alone, are difficult problems. By reformulating the problem in statistical learning terms, a solution is proposed herewith: rather than identifying airborne particles from their scattering patterns, TAOS patterns themselves are classified through a learning machine, where feature extraction interacts with multivariate statistical analysis. Feature extraction relies on spectrum enhancement, which includes the discrete cosine FOURIER transform and non-linear operations. Multivariate statistical analysis includes computation of the principal components and supervised training, based on the maximization of a suitable figure of merit. All algorithms have been combined together to analyze TAOS patterns, organize feature vectors, design classification experiments, carry out supervised training, assign unknown patterns to classes, and fuse information from different training and recognition experiments. The algorithms have been tested on a data set with more than 3000 TAOS patterns. The parameters that control the algorithms at different stages have been allowed to vary within suitable bounds and are optimized to some extent. Classification has been targeted at discriminating aerosolized Bacillus subtilis particles, a simulant of anthrax, from atmospheric aerosol particles and interfering particles, like diesel soot. By assuming that all training and recognition patterns come from the respective reference materials only, the most satisfactory classification result corresponds to 20% false negatives from B. subtilis particles and <11% false positives from all other aerosol particles. The most effective operations have consisted of thresholding TAOS patterns in order to reject defective ones

  19. Effect of atmospheric electricity on dry deposition of airborne particles from atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tammet, H.; Kimmel, V.; Israelsson, S.

    The electric mechanism of dry deposition is well known in the case of unattached radon daughter clusters that are unipolar charged and of high mobility. The problematic role of the electric forces in deposition of aerosol particles is theoretically examined by comparing the fluxes of particles carried by different deposition mechanisms in a model situation. The electric mechanism of deposition appears essential for particles of diameter 10-200 nm in conditions of low wind speed. The electric flux of fine particles can be dominant on the tips of leaves and needles even in a moderate atmospheric electric field of a few hundred V m -1 measured over the plane ground surface. The electric deposition is enhanced under thunderclouds and high voltage power lines. Strong wind suppresses the relative role of the electric deposition when compared with aerodynamic deposition. When compared with diffusion deposition the electric deposition appears less uniform: the precipitation particulate matter on the tips of leaves and especially on needles of top branches of conifer trees is much more intensive than on the ground surface and electrically shielded surfaces of plants. The knowledge of deposition geometry could improve our understanding of air pollution damage to plants.

  20. Personal exposure to airborne ultrafine particles in the urban area of Milan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, A.; Garramone, G.; Taronna, M.; Peruzzo, C.; Cavallo, D. M.

    2009-02-01

    The relevance of health effects related to ultrafine particles (UFPs; aerodynamic diameter < 100 nm) can be better evaluated using high-resolution strategies for measuring particle number concentrations. In this study, two different portable Condensation Particle Counters (CPCs) were used to measure personal exposure to UFPs in the central area of Milan for one week period during spring, with three sampling sessions per day. Experimental data were continuously collected along an established urban pathway, moving afoot or by different private and public means of transport. Correlation analysis between data measured by two CPCs was performed and general results showed a good agreement, especially at concentrations lower than 2×105 particles /cm3. UFPs measures were divided on the basis of crossed environments or micro-environments, days of the week and day time (hours). The highest measured mean concentrations and data variability were observed during walking time and moving on motorized vehicles (bus and car), indicating that the highest exposure to UFPs can be reached near motorized traffic. The lowest exposures were observed in green areas and in office microenvironments. An appreciable difference between working and non-working days was observed. Concentration patterns and variation by days of the week and time periods appears related to time trends in traffic intensity.

  1. Heterogeneous reaction of N2O5 with airborne TiO2 particles and the implication for stratospheric particle injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Mingjin; Abraham, Luke; Braesicke, Peter; Cox, Tony; McGregor, James; Pope, Francis; Pyle, John; Rkiouak, Laylla; Telford, Paul; Watson, Matt; Kalberer, Markus

    2014-05-01

    Injection of aerosol particles (or their precursors) into the stratosphere to scatter solar radiation back into space, has been suggested as a solar-radiation management (SRM) scheme for the mitigation for global warming. TiO2 has recently been highlighted as a possible candidate aerosol because of its high light scattering ability with a refractive index of 2.5 (Pope et al. 2012). The impact of particles injection on stratospheric ozone requires systematical assessment via laboratory and modelling studies. In this work, the heterogeneous reaction of airborne sub-micrometre TiO2 particles with N2O5 has been investigated at room temperature and different relative humidities (RH), using an atmospheric pressure aerosol flow tube. The uptake coefficient of N2O5 onto TiO2, γ(N2O5), was determined to be ~1.0×10-3 at low RH, and increase to ~3×10-3 at 60% RH. The dependence of γ(N2O5) on RH can be explained by the water adsorption isotherm of TiO2 particles. In addition, the uptake of N2O5 onto TiO2 aerosol particles has been included in the UKCA chemistry-climate model to assess the effect of N2O5 uptake onto TiO2 particles on the stratospheric composition. We construct a case study based on the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, comparing the effects of TiO2 to those from the volcanic sulfate and to the situation with only background amount of aerosol. The changes in reactive nitrogen species and ozone due to the heterogeneous reaction of TiO2 with N2O5 are assessed relative to sulfate aerosol impacts. Pope, F. D., Braesicke, P., Grainger, R. G., Kalberer, M., Watson, I. M., Davidson, P. J., and Cox, R. A.: Stratospheric aerosol particles and solar-radiation management, Nature Clim. Change, 2, 713-719, 2012

  2. Airborne minerals and related aerosol particles: Effects on climate and the environment

    PubMed Central

    Buseck, Peter R.; Pósfai, Mihály

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the troposphere and exert an important influence on global climate and the environment. They affect climate through scattering, transmission, and absorption of radiation as well as by acting as nuclei for cloud formation. A significant fraction of the aerosol particle burden consists of minerals, and most of the remainder— whether natural or anthropogenic—consists of materials that can be studied by the same methods as are used for fine-grained minerals. Our emphasis is on the study and character of the individual particles. Sulfate particles are the main cooling agents among aerosols; we found that in the remote oceanic atmosphere a significant fraction is aggregated with soot, a material that can diminish the cooling effect of sulfate. Our results suggest oxidization of SO2 may have occurred on soot surfaces, implying that even in the remote marine troposphere soot provided nuclei for heterogeneous sulfate formation. Sea salt is the dominant aerosol species (by mass) above the oceans. In addition to being important light scatterers and contributors to cloud condensation nuclei, sea-salt particles also provide large surface areas for heterogeneous atmospheric reactions. Minerals comprise the dominant mass fraction of the atmospheric aerosol burden. As all geologists know, they are a highly heterogeneous mixture. However, among atmospheric scientists they are commonly treated as a fairly uniform group, and one whose interaction with radiation is widely assumed to be unpredictable. Given their abundances, large total surface areas, and reactivities, their role in influencing climate will require increased attention as climate models are refined. PMID:10097046

  3. Measurement of Soluble and Total Hexavalent Chromium in the Ambient Airborne Particles in New Jersey

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lihui; Yu, Chang Ho; Hopke, Philip K.; Lioy, Paul J.; Buckley, Brian T.; Shin, Jin Young; Fan, Zhihua (Tina)

    2015-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) in ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) is a known pulmonary carcinogen and may have both soluble and insoluble forms. The sum of the two forms is defined as total Cr(VI). Currently, there were no methods suitable for large-scale monitoring of total Cr(VI) in ambient PM. This study developed a method to measure total Cr(VI) in ambient PM. This method includes PM collection using a Teflon filter, microwave extraction with 3% Na2CO3-2% NaOH at 95°C for 60 minutes, and Cr(VI) analysis by 1,5-diphenylcarbazide colorimetry at 540 nm. The recoveries of total Cr(VI) were 119.5 ± 10.4% and 106.3 ± 16.7% for the Cr(VI)-certified reference materials, SQC 012 and SRM 2700, respectively. Total Cr(VI) in the reference urban PM (NIST 1648a) was 26.0 ± 3.1 mg/kg (%CV = 11.9%) determined by this method. The method detection limit was 0.33 ng/m3. This method and the one previously developed to measure ambient Cr(VI), which is soluble in pH ~9.0 aqueous solution, were applied to measure Cr(VI) in ambient PM10 collected from three urban areas and one suburban area in New Jersey. The total Cr(VI) concentrations were 1.05–1.41 ng/m3 in the winter and 0.99–1.56 ng/m3 in the summer. The soluble Cr(VI) concentrations were 0.03–0.19 ng/m3 in the winter and 0.12–0.37 ng/m3 in the summer. The summer mean ratios of soluble to total Cr(VI) were 14.3–43.7%, significantly higher than 4.2–14.4% in the winter. The winter concentrations of soluble and total Cr(VI) in the suburban area were significantly lower than in the three urban areas. The results suggested that formation of Cr(VI) via atmospheric chemistry may contribute to the higher soluble Cr(VI) concentrations in the summer. PMID:26120324

  4. TOF-SIMS measurements for toxic air pollutants adsorbed on the surface of airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiyasu, Bunbunoshin; Hoshi, Takahiro; Owari, Masanori; Nihei, Yoshimasa

    2003-01-01

    Three kinds of particulate matter were collected: diesel and gasoline exhaust particles emitted directly from exhaust nozzle, and suspended particulate matter (SPM) near the traffic route. Soxhlet extraction was performed on each sample. By gas-chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) analysis of these extracts, di-ethyl phthalate and di- n-butyl phthalate were detected from the extract of SPM and diesel exhaust particles (DEPs). Because these phthalates were sometimes suspected as contamination, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements were also performed on the samples collected at the same environment. By comparing obtained spectra, it is clear that these environmental endocrine disrupters (EEDs) were adsorbed on DEP surface. Thus, we concluded that the combination of conventional method and TOF-SIMS measurement is one of the most powerful techniques for analyzing the toxic air pollutants adsorbed on SPM surface.

  5. Mutagenicity of fine airborne particles: diurnal variation in community air determined by a Salmonella micro preincubation (microsuspension) procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Kado, N.Y.; Guirguis, G.N.; Flessel, C.P.; Chan, R.C.; Chang, K.I.; Wesolowski, J.J.

    1986-01-01

    A simple modification of the Salmonella liquid incubation assay previously developed for detecting mutagens in urine was used to determine mutagenic activity of airborne particulate matter. The modification consists of adding ten times more bacteria and five to ten times less metabolic enzymes compared to the plate incorporation method. The mixture volume is approximately 0.2 ml, and the mixture is incubated for 90 min before pouring it according to the standard protocol. The modified procedure was approximately ten times more sensitive than the standard plate incorporation test for detecting mutagens in air particulate extracts and approximately ten to 31 times more sensitive for the chemical mutagens 2-nitrofluorene, 4-nitroquinoline-N-oxide, 2-aminofluorene, and benzo(a)pyrene in bacterial strain TA98. Mutagenic activity was associated exclusively with fine particles (aerodynamic diameters of less than 2.5 ..mu..m). Diurnal patterns of mutagenic activity were investigated by measuring filter extracts from 2-hr samples collected in three San Francisco Bay Area cities during the summer or fall of 1982. Four criteria pollutants - lead, nitrogen dioxide, ozone, and sulfur dioxide - were simultaneously sampled at one location.

  6. Use of micro-XANES to speciate chromium in airborne fine particles in the Sacramento Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Michelle L. Werner; Peter S. Nico; Matthew A. Marcus; Cort Anastasio

    2007-07-15

    While particulate matter (PM) in the atmosphere can lead to a wide array of negative health effects, the cause of toxicity is largely unknown. One aspect of PM that likely affects health is the chemical composition, in particular the transition metals within the particles. Chromium is one transition metal of interest due to its two major oxidation states, with Cr(III) being much less toxic compared to Cr(VI). Using microfocused X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES), we analyzed the Cr speciation in fine particles (diameters {le} 2.5 {mu}m) collected at three sites in the Sacramento Valley of northern California: Sacramento, a large urban area, Davis, a small city, and Placerville, a rural area. These are several major stationary sources of Cr within 24 km of the site including chrome-plating plants, power plants and incinerators. The microfocused X-ray beam enables us to look at very small areas on the filter with a resolution of typically 5-7 micrometers. With XANES we are able to not only distinguish between Cr(VI) and Cr(III), but also to identify different types of Cr(III) and more reduced Cr species. At all of our sampling sites the main Cr species were Cr(III), with Cr(OH){sub 3} or a Cr-Fe, chromite-like, phase being the dominant species. Cr(VI)-containing particles were found only in the most urban site. All three sites contained some reduced Cr species, either Cr(0) or Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}, although these were minor components. This work demonstrates that micro-XANES can be used as a minimally invasive analytical tool to investigate the composition of ambient PM. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  7. 290 and 340 nm UV LED arrays for fluorescence detection from single airborne particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davitt, Kristina; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Patterson, William R., III; Nurmikko, Arto V.; Gherasimova, Maria; Han, Jung; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard K.

    2005-11-01

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem. Optical engineering strategies are employed which take advantage of the size and versatility of light-emitting diodes to develop a truly compact fluorescence detector.

  8. 290 and 340 nm UV LED arrays for fluorescence detection from single airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Davitt, Kristina; Song, Yoon-Kyu; Patterson Iii, William; Nurmikko, Arto; Gherasimova, Maria; Han, Jung; Pan, Yong-Le; Chang, Richard

    2005-11-14

    We demonstrate a compact system, incorporating a 32-element linear array of ultraviolet (290 nm and 340 nm) light-emitting diodes (LEDs) and a multi-anode photomultiplier tube, to the in-flight fluorescence detection of aerosolized particles, here containing the biological molecules tryptophan and NADH. This system illustrates substantial advances in the growth and fabrication of new semiconductor UV light emitting devices and an evolution in packaging details for LEDs tailored to the bio-aerosol warning problem. Optical engineering strategies are employed which take advantage of the size and versatility of light-emitting diodes to develop a truly compact fluorescence detector. PMID:19503158

  9. Summertime ozone and airborne particle concentrations measured on the Juneau Icefield (58°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J.; Katz, J. D.; Redell, K.; Dittrich, T.

    2010-12-01

    The Juneau Icefield Research Program has facilitated long-term research on the remote subarctic and mountain environment since 1946. In summer 2010, a pilot air quality study was conducted at Camp 18 on the Juneau Icefield (58°36'N 134°30'W). Ozone mixing ratio and aerosol particle size distribution were measured on a remote glacier plateau, with coincident monitoring of wind speed and direction from August 4-11, 2010. Correlations between these air pollution indicators and airmass source direction are explored to address the broader question of long-range transport of pollution.

  10. Concentration and particle size of airborne toxic algae (brevetoxin) derived from ocean red tide events.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yung Sung; McDonald, Jacob D; Kracko, Dean; Irvin, C Mitch; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Michael S; Bourdelaisa, Andrea; Naar, Jerome; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-15

    Red tides in the Gulf of Mexico are formed by blooms of the dinoflagellate Karenia brevis, which produces brevetoxins (PbTx). Brevetoxins can be transferred from water to air in the wind-powered whitecapped waves during red tide episodes. Inhalation exposure to marine aerosol containing PbTx causes respiratory problems. A liquid chromatograph/ tandem mass spectrometric method was developed for the detection and quantitation of several PbTxs in ambient samples collected during red tide events. This method was complemented by a previously developed antibody assay that analyzes the entire class of PbTx compounds. The method showed good linearity, accuracy, and reproducibility, allowing quantitation of PbTx compounds in the 10 pg/m3 range. Air concentrations of PbTxs and brevenal for individual samples ranged from 0.01 to 80 ng/m3. The particle size showed a single mode with a mass median diameter between 6 and 10 microm, which was consistent for all of the PbTx species that were measured. Our results imply that individual PbTxs were from the same marine aerosol or from marine aerosol that was produced from the same process. The particle size indicated the likelihood of high deposition efficiency in the respiratory tract with the majority of aerosol deposited in the upper airways and small but not insignificant deposition in the lower airways. PMID:15954221

  11. Airborne particulate matter and human health: toxicological assessment and importance of size and composition of particles for oxidative damage and carcinogenic mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Fiotakis, Konstantinos; Vlachogianni, Thomais

    2008-01-01

    Air pollution has been considered a hazard to human health. In the past decades, many studies highlighted the role of ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) as an important environmental pollutant for many different cardiopulmonary diseases and lung cancer. Numerous epidemiological studies in the past 30 years found a strong exposure-response relationship between PM for short-term effects (premature mortality, hospital admissions) and long-term or cumulative health effects (morbidity, lung cancer, cardiovascular and cardiopulmonary diseases, etc). Current research on airborne particle-induced health effects investigates the critical characteristics of particulate matter that determine their biological effects. Several independent groups of investigators have shown that the size of the airborne particles and their surface area determine the potential to elicit inflammatory injury, oxidative damage, and other biological effects. These effects are stronger for fine and ultrafine particles because they can penetrate deeper into the airways of the respiratory tract and can reach the alveoli in which 50% are retained in the lung parenchyma. Composition of the PM varies greatly and depends on many factors. The major components of PM are transition metals, ions (sulfate, nitrate), organic compound, quinoid stable radicals of carbonaceous material, minerals, reactive gases, and materials of biologic origin. Results from toxicological research have shown that PM have several mechanisms of adverse cellular effects, such as cytotoxicity through oxidative stress mechanisms, oxygen-free radical-generating activity, DNA oxidative damage, mutagenicity, and stimulation of proinflammatory factors. In this review, the results of the most recent epidemiological and toxicological studies are summarized. In general, the evaluation of most of these studies shows that the smaller the size of PM the higher the toxicity through mechanisms of oxidative stress and inflammation. Some studies

  12. Acute health impacts of airborne particles estimated from satellite remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Mu; Pan, Xiaochuan; Shi, Jing; Chen, Feng; He, Kebin; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to monitor air quality from space at global, continental, national and regional scales. Most current research focused on developing empirical models using ground measurements of the ambient particulate. However, the application of satellite-based exposure assessment in environmental health is still limited, especially for acute effects, because the development of satellite PM(2.5) model depends on the availability of ground measurements. We tested the hypothesis that MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) exposure estimates, obtained from NASA satellites, are directly associated with daily health outcomes. Three independent healthcare databases were used: unscheduled outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and mortality collected in Beijing metropolitan area, China during 2006. We use generalized linear models to compare the short-term effects of air pollution assessed by ground monitoring (PM(10)) with adjustment of absolute humidity (AH) and AH-calibrated AOD. Across all databases we found that both AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were consistently associated with elevated daily events on the current day and/or lag days for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, and COPD. The relative risks estimated by AH-calibrated AOD and PM(10) (adjusted by AH) were similar. Additionally, compared to ground PM(10), we found that AH-calibrated AOD had narrower confidence intervals for all models and was more robust in estimating the current day and lag day effects. Our preliminary findings suggested that, with proper adjustment of meteorological factors, satellite AOD can be used directly to estimate the acute health impacts of ambient particles without prior calibrating to the sparse ground monitoring networks. PMID:23220016

  13. Acute health impacts of airborne particles estimated from satellite remote sensing✩

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhaoxi; Liu, Yang; Hu, Mu; Pan, Xiaochuan; Shi, Jing; Chen, Feng; He, Kebin; Koutrakis, Petros; Christiani, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Satellite-based remote sensing provides a unique opportunity to monitor air quality from space at global, continental, national and regional scales. Most current research focused on developing empirical models using ground measurements of the ambient particulate. However, the application of satellite-based exposure assessment in environmental health is still limited, especially for acute effects, because the development of satellite PM2.5 model depends on the availability of ground measurements. We tested the hypothesis that MODIS AOD (aerosol optical depth) exposure estimates, obtained from NASA satellites, are directly associated with daily health outcomes. Three independent healthcare databases were used: unscheduled outpatient visits, hospital admissions, and mortality collected in Beijing metropolitan area, China during 2006. We use generalized linear models to compare the short-term effects of air pollution assessed by ground monitoring (PM10) with adjustment of absolute humidity (AH) and AH-calibrated AOD. Across all databases we found that both AH-calibrated AOD and PM10 (adjusted by AH) were consistently associated with elevated daily events on the current day and/or lag days for cardiovascular diseases, ischemic heart diseases, and COPD. The relative risks estimated by AH-calibrated AOD and PM10 (adjusted by AH) were similar. Additionally, compared to ground PM10, we found that AH-calibrated AOD had narrower confidence intervals for all models and was more robust in estimating the current day and lag day effects. Our preliminary findings suggested that, with proper adjustment of meteorological factors, satellite AOD can be used directly to estimate the acute health impacts of ambient particles without prior calibrating to the sparse ground monitoring networks. PMID:23220016

  14. Indoor-outdoor relationships of airborne particles and nitrogen dioxide inside Parisian buses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molle, Romain; Mazoué, Sophie; Géhin, Évelyne; Ionescu, Anda

    2013-04-01

    This study evaluated passengers' exposure to traffic air pollution inside the articulated buses of the line 91 in Paris during 10 working days in May, 2010. Twenty articulated buses were studied on 32 routes in order to determine the influence of the sampling position on the pollutant concentrations. This parameter is still poorly known for the rigid buses and is even less known for the articulated ones. However this parameter must be studied for articulated buses because the greater length may cause a pollutant concentration gradient in the cabin. Portable devices were used to measure pollutants in the presence of passengers from 8 a.m. to 9 a.m. and from 4 p.m. to 5 p.m., time periods corresponding to the peak traffic and travellers. PM2.5 mass concentration, particle number concentration between 0.3 and 20 μm and nitrogen dioxide concentration were simultaneously measured on three positions inside the buses (front, middle and rear) in order to study the spatial distribution of these compounds. These measurements inside the buses were compared to the outdoor concentrations at the same moment of the day provided by the Parisian air quality monitoring network; they were also compared to the results of a previous monitoring campaign performed in 2008. The results obtained during the 2010 campaign revealed that in-cabin NO2 mean concentrations were 1.5-3.5 times higher than the outside concentration levels; a maximum concentration of 234 ± 40 μg m-3 was found in the rear position (location of the engine and exhaust gas). Mean in-cabin PM2.5 mass concentrations varied from one week to another one, but they were globally the same at the three positions inside the instrumented buses. In order to determine the impact of outdoor levels, correlations have been calculated between the results measured inside the buses and those measured by the outdoor air monitoring stations. The highest Pearson correlation coefficient was 0.29 for NO2 data whereas the highest Pearson

  15. Resolving Organized Aerosol Structures (Rolls and Layers) with Airborne Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) During MILAGRO/INTEX Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapustin, V.; Clarke, A.; Zhou, J.; Howell, S.; Shinozuka, Y.; Brekhovskikh, V.; McNaughton, C.

    2007-12-01

    The Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research [http://www.soest.hawaii.edu/HIGEAR] deployed a wide range of aerosol instrumentation aboard the C-130 and the NASA DC-8 as part of MILAGRO/INTEX. These were designed to provide rapid information on aerosol composition, state of mixing (internal or external), spectral optical properties (scattering and absorption), the humidity dependence of light scattering-f(RH), and the role of condensed species in changing the absorption properties of black carbon (BC) and inferred properties of organic carbon (OC). These measurements included size distributions from about 7 nm up to about 10,000 nm and their volatility at 150, 300 and 400 C; size selected response to heating (volatility) to resolve the state of mixing of the aerosol; continuous measurements of the light scattering and absorption at 3 wavelengths; measurements of the f(RH). We also flew the first airborne deployment of the new Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS, TSI Inc.) that provided information on rapid (1Hz) size variations in the Aitken mode. This revealed small scale structure of the aerosol and allowed us to examine size distributions varying over space and time associated with mixing processes previously unresolved etc. Rapid measurements during profiles also revealed variations in size over shallow layers. Other dynamic processes included rapid size distribution measurements within orographically induced aerosol layers and size distribution evolution of the nanoparticles formed by nucleation (C-130 flights 5, 6 and 9). Evidence for fluctuations induced by underlying changes in topography was also detected. These measurements also frequently revealed the aerosol variability in the presence of boundary layer rolls aligned along the wind in the Marine Boundary Layer (Gulf region) both with and without visible cloud streets (DC-8 flight 4 and C-130 flight 7). This organized convection over 1-2 km scales influences the mixing processes (entrainment, RH

  16. Measurements of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in airborne particles from the metropolitan area of São Paulo City, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasconcellos, Pérola C.; Zacarias, Davi; Pires, Maria A. F.; Pool, Cristina S.; Carvalho, Lilian R. F.

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from phenanthrene to benzo[g,h,i]perylene in airborne particles were measured in the winter of 2000 at three different sites within the metropolitan area of São Paulo City (MASP), Brazil. It is one of the largest metropolitan areas in the world and has an unconventional mixture of vehicle types, in which a variety of gasoline blends, including oxygenated ones, are used. In this study, occurrence of PAH, meteorological conditions and inter and intrasite comparisons are presented. Overall, the results revealed low PAH levels due to rainfall episodes during the sampling period. Samples collected in the urban site presented the highest PAH concentrations (av. 3.10 ng m -3) when compared to those collected in the urban site with dense vegetation (av. 2.73 ng m -3) and in the forest area (av. 1.92 ng m -3). PAH measurements in tunnels with different types of vehicles were performed in order to suggest possible tracers of the vehicular emissions in São Paulo. Pyrene followed by chrysene and fluoranthene were emitted mainly from gasohol vehicular motor exhausts, whereas chrysene, pyrene and benzo[a]anthracene were emitted mainly from gasohol and diesel vehicular motor exhausts. Some characteristic ratios from the tunnel measurements were used to identify vehicular sources in the atmosphere of the MASP. Although it is known that losses can occur both by evaporation and sublimation during sampling, measurements of higher molecular weight PAH compounds were taken into consideration due to their high recovery efficiency.

  17. Measurement of airborne gunshot particles in a ballistics laboratory by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Ernesto; Sarkis, Jorge E Souza; Viebig, Sônia; Saldiva, Paulo

    2012-01-10

    The present study aimed determines lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and barium (Ba) as the major elements present in GSR in the environmental air of the Ballistics Laboratory of the São Paulo Criminalistics Institute (I.C.-S.P.), São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Micro environmental monitors (mini samplers) were located at selected places. The PM(2.5) fraction of this airborne was collected in, previously weighted filters, and analyzed by sector field inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (SF-HR-ICP-MS). The higher values of the airborne lead, antimony and barium, were found at the firing range (lead (Pb): 58.9 μg/m(3); barium (Ba): 6.9 μg/m(3); antimony (Sb): 7.3 μg/m(3)). The mean value of the airborne in this room during 6 monitored days was Pb: 23.1 μg/m(3); Ba: 2.2 μg/m(3); Sb: 1.5 μg/m(3). In the water tank room, the air did not show levels above the limits of concern. In general the airborne lead changed from day to day, but the barium and antimony remained constant. Despite of that, the obtained values suggest that the workers may be exposed to airborne lead concentration that can result in an unhealthy environment and could increase the risk of chronic intoxication. PMID:21831549

  18. Commuting-Adjusted Short-Term Health Impact Assessment of Airborne Fine Particles with Uncertainty Quantification via Monte Carlo Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Grisotto, Laura; Catelan, Dolores; Consonni, Dario; Bertazzi, Pier Alberto; Biggeri, Annibale

    2014-01-01

    Background: Exposure to air pollution is associated with a short-term increase in mortality, and this field has begun to focus on health impact assessment. Objectives: Our aim was to estimate the impact of PM10 on mortality within 2 days from the exposure in the Italian region of Lombardy for the year 2007, at the municipality level, examining exposure entailed by daily intermunicipality commuting and accounting for uncertainty propagation. Methods: We combined data from different sources to derive probabilistic distributions for all input quantities used to calculate attributable deaths (mortality rates, PM10 concentrations, estimated PM10 effects, and commuting flows) and applied a Monte Carlo procedure to propagate uncertainty and sample the distribution of attributable deaths for each municipality. Results: We estimated that annual average PM10 concentrations above the World Health Organization-recommended threshold of 20 μg/m3 were responsible for 865 short-term deaths (80% credibility interval: 475, 1,401), 26% of which were attributable to PM10 above the European Union limit of 40 μg/m3. Reducing annual average PM10 concentrations > 20 μg/m3 by 20% would have reduced the number of attributable deaths by 36%. The largest estimated impacts were along the basin of the Po River and in the largest cities. Commuting contributed to the spatial distribution of the estimated impact. Conclusions: Our estimates, which incorporated uncertainty quantification, indicate that the short-term impact of PM10 on mortality in Lombardy in 2007 was notable, and that reduction in air pollution would have had a substantial beneficial effect on population health. Using commuting data helped to identify critical areas for prioritizing intervention. Citation: Baccini M, Grisotto L, Catelan D, Consonni D, Bertazzi PA, Biggeri A. 2015. Commuting-adjusted short-term health impact assessment of airborne fine particles with uncertainty quantification via Monte Carlo simulation. Environ

  19. [Comparing Cell Toxicity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Exposure to Airborne PM2.5 from Beijing and Inert Particle SiO2].

    PubMed

    Liu, Meng-jiao; Huang, Yi; Wen, Hang; Qiu, Guo-yu

    2015-11-01

    To figure out the main factor of PM2.5 toxicity to cell, this study compared the cell toxicity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe), a model organism, exposed to inert ultrafine SiO2 particles, a model particle, and airborne PM2.5 collected from campus of Peking University Beijing China. Using ultraviolet spectrophotometry to measure cell proliferation ratio, and environmental scanning microscope to observe the particle adhesion on the cell surface, and detecting cellular ROS generation with DHE fluorescent dye chromogenic method, and using single cell gel electrophoresis to test cell DNA damage, the experiment results indicated that the ultrafine SiO2 particles (< 60 nm) could inhibit the cell proliferation of S. pombe, mainly through adsorbing onto the cell surface to change the permeability of the cell wall; but it could not induce cells to generate ROS to cause the oxidative damage. PM2.5, the average particle size of which was larger than that of SiO2 particles, could cause oxidative damages to cells mainly by inducing cells to generate ROS, and damage DNA simultaneously. It might illustrate that there was no direct relationship between the toxicity of PM2.5 and its physical properties such as the particle size. PMID:26910977

  20. Experimental study of the response functions of direct-reading instruments measuring surface-area concentration of airborne nanostructured particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bau, Sébastien; Witschger, Olivier; Gensdarmes, François; Thomas, Dominique

    2009-05-01

    An increasing number of experimental and theoretical studies focus on airborne nanoparticles (NP) in relation with many aspects of risk assessment to move forward our understanding of the hazards, the actual exposures in the workplace, and the limits of engineering controls and personal protective equipment with regard to NP. As a consequence, generating airborne NP with controlled properties constitutes an important challenge. In parallel, toxicological studies have been carried out, and most of them support the concept that surface-area could be a relevant metric for characterizing exposure to airborne NP [1]. To provide NP surface-area concentration measurements, some direct-reading instruments have been designed, based on attachment rate of unipolar ions to NP by diffusion. However, very few information is available concerning the performances of these instruments and the parameters that could affect their responses. In this context, our work aims at characterizing the actual available instruments providing airborne NP surface-area concentration. The instruments (a- LQ1-DC, Matter Engineering; b-AeroTrak™ 9000, TSI; c- NSAM, TSI model 3550;) are thought to be relevant for further workplace exposure characterization and monitoring. To achieve our work, an experimental facility (named CAIMAN) was specially designed, built and characterized.

  1. Organic compounds present in airborne particles stimulate superoxide production and DNA fragmentation: role of NOX and xanthine oxidase in animal tissues.

    PubMed

    Busso, Iván Tavera; Silva, Guillermo Benjamín; Carreras, Hebe Alejandra

    2016-08-01

    Suspended particulate matter trigger the production of reactive oxygen species. However, most of the studies dealing with oxidative damage of airborne particles focus on the effects of individual compounds and not real mixtures. In order to study the enzymatic superoxide production resulting from the exposition to a complex mixture, we derived organic extracts from airborne particles collected daily in an urban area and exposed kidney, liver, and heart mammal tissues. After that, we measured DNA damage employing the comet assay. We observed that in every tissue, NADPH oxidase and xanthine oxidase were involved in O2 (-) production when they were exposed to the organic extracts, as the lucigenin's chemiluminescence decays when enzymes were inhibited. The same trend was observed with the percentage of cells with comets, since DNA damage was higher when they were exposed to same experimental conditions. Our data allow us to hypothesize that these enzymes play an important role in the oxidative stress produced by PAHs and that there is a mechanism involving them in the O2 (-)generation. PMID:27180836

  2. Airborne exposures to PAH and PM2.5 particles for road paving workers applying conventional asphalt and crumb rubber modified asphalt.

    PubMed

    Watts, R R; Wallingford, K M; Williams, R W; House, D E; Lewtas, J

    1998-01-01

    Personal exposure monitoring was conducted for road paving workers in three states. A research objective was to characterize and compare occupational exposures to fine respirable particles (< 2.5 microns) and particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for road paving workers applying conventional (petroleum derived) asphalt and asphalt containing crumb rubber from shredded tires. Workers not exposed to asphalt fume were also included for comparison (to support the biomarker component of this study). The rubber content of the crumb rubber modified (CRM) asphalt at the three study sites was 12, 15, and 20%. A comparison of some specific job categories from two sites indicates greater potential carcinogenic PAH exposures during CRM asphalt work, however, the site with the greatest overall exposures did not indicate any differences for specific jobs. A statistical analysis of means for fine particle, pyrene and total carcinogenic PAH personal exposure shows, with two exceptions, there were no differences in exposures for these three measurement variables. One site shows significantly elevated pyrene exposure for CRM asphalt workers and another site similarly shows greater carcinogenic PAH exposure for CRM asphalt workers. Conventional and CRM asphalt worker airborne exposures to the PAH carcinogen marker, BaP, were very low with concentrations comparable to ambient air in many cities. However, this study demonstrates that asphalt road paving workers are exposed to elevated airborne concentrations of a group of unknown compounds that likely consist of the carcinogenic PAHs benz(a)anthracene, chrysene and methylated derivatives of both. The research described in this article has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. PMID:9577752

  3. Airborne Coarse Mode Aerosol Measurements with the CAS-DPOL Instrument: Effects of Particle Shape and Refractive Index and Implications for Radiative Transfer Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Spanu, A.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.

    2015-12-01

    Each year huge amounts of mineral dust are mobilized in deserts and arid regions of the world and transported over large distances forming thick elevated aerosol layers with a substantial fraction of coarse mode particles. Optical properties of mineral dust, including the absorptive refractive index of some components, cause a significant effect on the atmospheric radiative energy balance from optical to infrared wavelengths. The aerosol characteristics, in particular its coarse mode size distribution, are modified during long-range transport by aging and deposition processes. This also affects the aerosol optical properties and therefore the effect on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties are essential to characterize those effects in order to be implemented in global climate models in parametrized form. However, in-situ measurements of airborne coarse mode aerosols such as mineral dust and volcanic ash are challenging and the measurements are usually affected by substantial uncertainties. In this work we use airborne measurements of mineral dust from our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL during SALTRACE 2013 to discuss the analysis of such data. We cover the effects of varying refractive index and particle shapes and develop recommendations for the configuration of the CAS-DPOL for aerosol studies. We also present an inversion method to derive coarse mode size distributions from light-scattering probes for mixtures of non-spherical, absorbing aerosols. The size distributions retrieved from the in-situ measurements are then validated using an independent analysis with a combination of sun-photometer and lidar data. We apply these methods to investigate the Saharan mineral dust particle size distributions measured on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and discuss the influence of aerosol aging on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. With this example we also assess how the uncertainties

  4. Measurement of airborne concentrations of tire and road wear particles in urban and rural areas of France, Japan, and the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panko, Julie M.; Chu, Jennifer; Kreider, Marisa L.; Unice, Ken M.

    2013-06-01

    In addition to industrial facilities, fuel combustion, forest fires and dust erosion, exhaust and non-exhaust vehicle emissions are an important source of ambient air respirable particulate matter (PM10). Non-exhaust vehicle emissions are formed from wear particles of vehicle components such as brakes, clutches, chassis and tires. Although the non-exhaust particles are relatively minor contributors to the overall ambient air particulate load, reliable exposure estimates are few. In this study, a global sampling program was conducted to quantify tire and road wear particles (TRWP) in the ambient air in order to understand potential human exposures and the overall contribution of these particles to the PM10. The sampling was conducted in Europe, the United States and Japan and the sampling locations were selected to represent a variety of settings including both rural and urban core; and within each residential, commercial and recreational receptors. The air samples were analyzed using validated chemical markers for rubber polymer based on a pyrolysis technique. Results indicated that TRWP concentrations in the PM10 fraction were low with averages ranging from 0.05 to 0.70 μg m-3, representing an average PM10 contribution of 0.84%. The TRWP concentration in air was associated with traffic load and population density, but the trend was not statistically significant. Further, significant differences across days were not observed. This study provides a robust dataset to understand potential human exposures to airborne TRWP.

  5. Vertical wind retrieved by airborne lidar and analysis of island induced gravity waves in combination with numerical models and in situ particle measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouza, Fernando; Reitebuch, Oliver; Jähn, Michael; Rahm, Stephan; Weinzierl, Bernadett

    2016-04-01

    This study presents the analysis of island induced gravity waves observed by an airborne Doppler wind lidar (DWL) during SALTRACE. First, the instrumental corrections required for the retrieval of high spatial resolution vertical wind measurements from an airborne DWL are presented and the measurement accuracy estimated by means of two different methods. The estimated systematic error is below -0.05 m s-1 for the selected case of study, while the random error lies between 0.1 and 0.16 m s-1 depending on the estimation method. Then, the presented method is applied to two measurement flights during which the presence of island induced gravity waves was detected. The first case corresponds to a research flight conducted on 17 June 2013 in the Cabo Verde islands region, while the second case corresponds to a measurement flight on 26 June 2013 in the Barbados region. The presence of trapped lee waves predicted by the calculated Scorer parameter profiles was confirmed by the lidar and in situ observations. The DWL measurements are used in combination with in situ wind and particle number density measurements, large-eddy simulations (LES), and wavelet analysis to determine the main characteristics of the observed island induced trapped waves.

  6. Airborne and groundbased measurements of ash particles on Iceland and over Germany during the Grímsvötn eruption May 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, A.; Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Palsson, A.; Moser, H. M.; Palsson, T.; von Löwis, S.; Fischer, C.

    2012-04-01

    The eruption of the Grimsvötn volcano in May 2010 posed with its ash plume a thread to the aviation in northern Europe. Because of ash plume forecasts of the VAAC London the airport of Keflavik in Iceland as well as airports in England, Scotland and Scandinavia were closed for some time, which caused the cancellation or change of about 500 flights in Europe. Even in Germany the airports of Bremen, Hamburg and Berlin were closed for several hours on 25 May 2011. During this eruption period in May 2011, a team of the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences, the University of Iceland, the University of Reykjavik and the IMO has performed airborne in-situ measurements over Iceland and Germany as well as ground based measurements in the south of Iceland. The ground based measurements were performed continuously during the whole eruption period at two significant positions (Skogar and Hvollsvöllur) with optical particle counters (OPCs). The measurement method was based on measuring the airborne concentrations of the classic aerosol components (PM10, PM2.5 and PM1) and TSP (total suspended particles) every 6 seconds. Additional measurement flights on Iceland were started already one day after the beginning of the eruption (twelve in-situ measurement flights) and marked the spatial and temporal spread of volcanic ash in the atmosphere. For the flights light slow flying piston engine powered airplanes where used. The flights over Iceland focused on the western part of Iceland in the region of Reykjavik and Keflavik and over the international airport in Keflavik and were mostly coordinated by ISAVIA. The measurement flights helped to keep Keflavik International Airport open for many additional hours despite of adverse predictions by the London VAAC model, because it was possible to observe the particle concentration on-line during the flights. In Germany a measurement flight was performed on 25 May 2012 over the northern part of Germany where the volcanic ash cloud was

  7. Characterization of Fine Airborne Particulate Collected in Tokyo and Major Atmospheric Emission Sources by Using Single Particle Measurement of SEM-EDX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, K.; Iijima, A.; Furuta, N.

    2008-12-01

    In our long-term monitoring of size-classified Airborne Particulate Matter (APM) in Tokyo since 1995, it had been demonstrated that toxic elements such as As, Se, Cd, Sb and Pb were extremely enriched in fine APM (PM2.5). However, in that study, total sampled APM on a filter was digested with acids, and thus only averaged elemental composition in fine APM could be obtained. One of the effective methods to determine the origin of APM is single particle measurement by using SEM-EDX. By using characteristic shapes observed by SEM and marker elements contained in APM measured by EDX, detailed information for source identification can be obtained. In this study, fine APM (PM2.5) was collected at various locations such as roadside, diesel vehicle exhaust, a heavy oil combustion plant and a waste incineration plant as well as ambient atmosphere in Tokyo, and characteristics of fine particles that will be utilized for identification of emission sources are elucidated. Fine particles can be classified into 3 main characteristic shape groups; edge-shaped, cotton-like and spherical. Shape of particles collected in a heavy oil combustion plant and a waste incineration plant was mostly spherical, and these particles may be associated with thermal process. Diesel exhaust particles were predominantly cotton-like which may consist of coagulated nano-sized particles. Most of brake abrasion dusts were edge-shaped, which may be associated with mechanical abrasion of brake pads. In the elemental analysis of fine particles, high concentrations of Sb, Cu, Ti and Ba were detected in brake abrasion dusts. Since these elements are major constituents of brake pads, these can be used for marker elements of brake abrasion dusts. High concentration of C was detected in diesel exhaust particles and oil combustion particles, and thus C can be used for marker elements of their origin. Furthermore, high concentrations of C, Ca and K were detected in fly ash from a waste incineration plant, which

  8. Mutagenicity and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons associated with extractable organic matter from airborne particles ⩽10 μm in southwest Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Amador-Muñoz, Omar; Waliszewski, Stefan; Hernández-Mena, Leonel; Munive-Colín, Zenaida; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Bravo-Cabrera, José Luis; Frías-Villegas, Alejandro

    A year-long sampling and analysis of 24 h airborne particles equal to or less than 10 μm (PM 10) was conducted in Southwest (SW) Mexico City in 1998. The amount of airborne PM 10 and its extractable organic matter (EOM) were highly correlated. The year 1998 was particularly dry with many fires, and higher values of PM 10 and EOM were obtained in the fire period (February-May) compared to the without fire period (January, June-December). The indirect-acting mutagenicity ( Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 with mammalian metabolic activation, S9) did not correlate with the monthly concentrations of PM 10 and EOM, while the direct-acting mutagenicity (strains TA98 and YG1021, without mammalian metabolic activation) did correlate. The highest monthly mutagenic potency of TA98+S9 and of TA98-S9 were registered in May which correspond to the fire period, while for YG1021 the highest was in December, a without fire month. The highest TA98+S9/TA98-S9 ratios appeared from April to September (with the exception of June), indicating that emission of the direct mutagens occurred in the rest of the year (the coldest months), and December showed the highest mutagenicity of YG1021. The correlation of this mutagenicity with the number of ground-based inversions indicated a greater emissions of nitroarenes in the coldest months emitted mainly by vehicular traffic as shown by the correlation between YG1021 with CO and with NO 2. We did not find a correlation in the EOM of the complex mixtures between TA98+S9 and the total concentration of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) nor between TA98+S9 and specific PAH. The analysis by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry indicated the presence of retene, a PAH found in the fire period and considered a softwood burning marker. The concentrations of fluoranthene and benz[ a]anthracene correlated with that of retene and with the burned area; they were the only PAH that presented significant differences between the periods with fire and

  9. Comparison of physicochemical properties between fine (PM2.5) and coarse airborne particles at cold season in Korea.

    PubMed

    Choung, Sungwook; Oh, Jungsun; Han, Weon Shik; Chon, Chul-Min; Kwon, Youngsang; Kim, Do Yeon; Shin, Woosik

    2016-01-15

    Although it has been well-known that atmospheric aerosols affect negatively the local air quality, human health, and climate changes, the chemical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols are not fully understood yet. This study experimentally measured the physiochemical characteristics of fine and coarse aerosol particles at the suburban area to evaluate relative contribution to environmental pollution in consecutive seasons of autumn and winter, 2014-2015, using XRD, SEM-EDX, XNI, ICP-MS, and TOF-SIMS. For these experimental works, the fine and coarse aerosols were collected by the high volume air sampler for 7 days each season. The fine particles contain approximately 10 μg m(-3) of carbonaceous aerosols consisting of 90% organic and 10% elemental carbon. The spherical-shape carbonaceous particles were observed for the coarse samples as well. Interestingly, the coarse particles in winter showed the increased frequency of carbon-rich particles with high contents of heavy metals. These results suggest that, for the cold season, the coarse particles could contribute relatively more to the conveyance of toxic contaminants compared to the fine particles in the study area. However, the fine particles showed acidic properties so that their deposition to surface may cause facilitate the increase of mobility for toxic heavy metals in soil and groundwater environments. The fine and coarse particulate matters, therefore, should be monitored separately with temporal variation to evaluate the impact of atmospheric aerosols to environmental pollution and human health. PMID:26476059

  10. Optical pulling of airborne absorbing particles and smut spores over a meter-scale distance with negative photophoretic force

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Jinda; Hart, Adam G.; Li, Yong-qing

    2015-04-27

    We demonstrate optical pulling of single light-absorbing particles and smut spores in air over a meter-scale distance using a single collimated laser beam based on negative photophoretic force. The micron-sized particles are pulled towards the light source at a constant speed of 1–10 cm/s in the optical pulling pipeline while undergoing transverse rotation at 0.2–10 kHz. The pulled particles can be manipulated and precisely positioned on the entrance window with an accuracy of ∼20 μm, and their chemical compositions can be characterized with micro-Raman spectroscopy.

  11. Airborne measurements of new particle formation in the free troposphere above the Mediterranean Sea during the HYMEX campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, C.; Sellegri, K.; Freney, E.; Dupuy, R.; Colomb, A.; Pichon, J.-M.; Ribeiro, M.; Bourianne, T.; Burnet, F.; Schwarzenboeck, A.

    2015-09-01

    While atmospheric new particle formation (NPF) has been observed in various environments and was found to contribute significantly to the total aerosol particle concentration, the production of new particles over open seas is poorly documented in the literature. Nucleation events were detected and analysed over the Mediterranean Sea using two condensation particle counters and a scanning mobility particle sizer on board the ATR-42 research aircraft during flights conducted between 11 September and 4 November 2012 in the framework of the HYMEX (HYdrological cycle in Mediterranean EXperiment) project. The main purpose of the present work was to characterize the spatial extent of the NPF process, both horizontally and vertically. Our findings show that nucleation is occurring over large areas above the Mediterranean Sea in all air mass types. Maximum concentrations of particles in the size range 5-10 nm (N5-10) do not systematically coincide with lower fetches (time spent by the air mass over the sea before sampling), and significant N5-10 values are found for fetches between 0 and 60 h depending on the air mass type. These observations suggest that nucleation events could be more influenced by local precursors originating from emission processes occurring above the sea, rather than linked to synoptic history. Vertical soundings were performed, giving the opportunity to examine profiles of the N5-10 concentration and to analyse the vertical extent of NPF. Our observations demonstrate that the process could be favoured above 1000 m, i.e. frequently in the free troposphere, and more especially between 2000 and 3000 m, where the NPF frequency is close to 50 %. This vertical distribution of NPF might be favoured by the gradients of several atmospheric parameters, together with the mixing of two air parcels, which could also explain the occurrence of the process at preferential altitudes. In addition, increased condensation sinks collocated with high concentrations of

  12. Performance of a scanning mobility particle sizer in measuring diverse types of airborne nanoparticles: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes, welding fumes, and titanium dioxide spray.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bean T; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the "gold standard" for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing "monodisperse" aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in some test

  13. Performance of a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer in Measuring Diverse Types of Airborne Nanoparticles: Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, Welding Fumes, and Titanium Dioxide Spray

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bean T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Cumpston, Amy; Cumpston, Jared; Friend, Sherri; Stone, Samuel; Keane, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Direct-reading instruments have been widely used for characterizing airborne nanoparticles in inhalation toxicology and industrial hygiene studies for exposure/risk assessments. Instruments using electrical mobility sizing followed by optical counting, e.g., scanning or sequential mobility particle spectrometers (SMPS), have been considered as the “gold standard” for characterizing nanoparticles. An SMPS has the advantage of rapid response and has been widely used, but there is little information on its performance in assessing the full spectrum of nanoparticles encountered in the workplace. In this study, an SMPS was evaluated for its effectiveness in producing “monodisperse” aerosol and its adequacy in characterizing overall particle size distribution using three test aerosols, each mimicking a unique class of real-life nanoparticles: singlets of nearly spherical titanium dioxide (TiO2), agglomerates of fiber-like multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), and aggregates that constitutes welding fume (WF). These aerosols were analyzed by SMPS, cascade impactor, and by counting and sizing of discrete particles by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The effectiveness of the SMPS to produce classified particles (fixed voltage mode) was assessed by examination of the resulting geometric standard deviation (GSD) from the impactor measurement. Results indicated that SMPS performed reasonably well for TiO2 (GSD = 1.3), but not for MWCNT and WF as evidenced by the large GSD values of 1.8 and 1.5, respectively. For overall characterization, results from SMPS (scanning voltage mode) exhibited particle-dependent discrepancies in the size distribution and total number concentration compared to those from microscopic analysis. Further investigation showed that use of a single-stage impactor at the SMPS inlet could distort the size distribution and underestimate the concentration as shown by the SMPS, whereas the presence of vapor molecules or atom clusters in

  14. Thymus-directed immunotoxicity of airborne dust particles from Upper Silesia (Poland) under acute extrapulmonary studies in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlowska, E.; Krzystniak, K.; Drela, N.

    1996-12-27

    Industrial air pollutants from Upper Silesia, Poland, contain over 250 polycyclic and heterocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals, including mutagenic and carcinogenic chemicals that have been shown to from DNA adducts. Over 4 million habitants of Silesia are permanently exposed to the industrial pollution by pulmonary and dermal routes and by contaminated food and water. These chemicals, when examined separately in animals models, were proven immunotoxic. We studied the extrapulmonary immunotoxic potential of a typical mixture of Silesian filter-suspended matter from a selected area, over a specific season and time period. Early changes in the immune system were analyzed in BALB/c mice exposed ip to acute doses of 20-330 mg dust mixture/kg body weight (0.06-1.0 LD50). No major changes were noted for weight and the cellularity of spleen, liver and kidneys. However, dramatic decrease in thymus weight index and thymocyte cell count were noted as early as 24-72 h postexposure, which correlated with almost complete depletion of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} thymocytes. Changes in spleen were less profound; however, increased depletion of B cells over T cells was noted at high doses of the suspended matter. Exposure to the airborne dust also decreased cytokine production by spleen cells, such as interferon-{gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) and tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}). Overall, a single exposure to Silesian dust, even at the relatively low 0.06 LD50 dose, affected lymphokine production, suppressed B-cell proliferative response, and depleted thymuses of immature, double-positive CD4{sup +}CD8{sup +} cells. A chemical synergism is suspected. To our knowledge, none of the known components of Silesian suspended matter, when examined as a single chemical, was shown to exert such a profound biological effect. 32 refs., 5 figs.

  15. Airborne and ground-based measurements of the trace gases and particles emitted from prescribed fires in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Burling, Ian; Yokelson, Robert J.; Akagi, Sheryl; Urbanski, Shawn; Wold, Cyle E.; Griffith, David WT; Johnson, Timothy J.; Reardon, James; Weise, David

    2011-12-07

    We measured the emission factors for 19 trace gas species and particulate matter (PM2.5) from 14 prescribed fires in chaparral and oak savanna in the southwestern US, as well as pine forest understory in the southeastern US and Sierra Nevada mountains of California. These are likely the most extensive emission factor field measurements for temperate biomass burning to date and the only published emission factors for temperate oak savanna fuels. This study helps close the gap in emissions data available for temperate zone fires relative to tropical biomass burning. We present the first field measurements of the biomass burning emissions of glycolaldehyde, a possible precursor for aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol formation. We also measured the emissions of phenol, another aqueous phase secondary organic aerosol precursor. Our data confirm previous suggestions that urban deposition can impact the NOx emission factors and thus subsequent plume chemistry. For two fires, we measured the emissions in the convective smoke plume from our airborne platform at the same time the unlofted residual smoldering combustion emissions were measured with our ground-based platform after the flame front passed through. The smoke from residual smoldering combustion was characterized by emission factors for hydrocarbon and oxygenated organic species that were up to ten times higher than in the lofted plume, including significant 1,3-butadiene and isoprene concentrations which were not observed in the lofted plume. This should be considered in modeling the air quality impacts of smoke that disperses at ground level, and we show that the normally-ignored unlofted emissions can also significantly impact estimates of total emissions. Preliminary evidence of large emissions of monoterpenes was seen in the residual smoldering spectra, but we have not yet quantified these emissions. These data should lead to an improved capacity to model the impacts of biomass burning in similar

  16. Health effects of airborne particulate matter: do we know enough to consider regulating specific particle types or sources?

    PubMed

    Grahame, Thomas J; Schlesinger, Richard B

    2007-05-01

    Researchers and regulators have often considered preferentially regulating the types of ambient airborne particulate matter (PM) most relevant to human health effects. While few would argue the inherent merits of such a policy, many believe there may not yet be enough information to differentially regulate PM species. New evidence, using increasingly sophisticated methodologies, has become available in the last several years, allowing more accurate assessment of exposure and resultant associations with specific types of PM, or PM derived from different sources. Such new studies may also allow differentiation of effects from different chemical components in the same study against the same health endpoints. This article considers whether this new evidence might be adequate to allow us to "speciate" PM types or sources by severity of health effects. We address this issue with respect to two widespread sources of PM, emissions from motor vehicles and coal-fired power plants. Emissions from less widespread sources, residual oil and steel/coking facilities, are also discussed in order to illustrate how health effects associated with such emissions might instead be associated with more widespread sources when accurate exposure information is unavailable. Based upon evaluation of studies and methodologies which appear to contain the most accurate information on exposure and response to important emissions, including variable local emissions, it is concluded that public health will likely be better protected by reduction of various vehicular emissions than by continued regulation of the total mass of fine PM (PM <2.5 microm, or PM2.5) as if all PM in this mode is equitoxic. However, the knowledge base is incomplete. Important remaining research questions are identified. PMID:17497526

  17. Multi-criteria ranking and receptor modelling of airborne fine particles at three sites in the Pearl River Delta region of China.

    PubMed

    Friend, Adrian J; Ayoko, Godwin A; Guo, Hai

    2011-01-15

    The multi-criteria decision making methods, Preference Ranking Organization METHods for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) and Graphical Analysis for Interactive Assistance (GAIA), and the two-way Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model were applied to airborne fine particle compositional data collected at three sites in Hong Kong during two monitoring campaigns held from November 2000 to October 2001 and November 2004 to October 2005. PROMETHEE/GAIA indicated that the three sites were worse during the later monitoring campaign, and that the order of the air quality at the sites during each campaign was: rural site>urban site>roadside site. The PMF analysis on the other hand, identified 6 common sources at all of the sites (diesel vehicle, fresh sea salt, secondary sulphate, soil, aged sea salt and oil combustion) which accounted for approximately 68.8±8.7% of the fine particle mass at the sites. In addition, road dust, gasoline vehicle, biomass burning, secondary nitrate, and metal processing were identified at some of the sites. Secondary sulphate was found to be the highest contributor to the fine particle mass at the rural and urban sites with vehicle emission as a high contributor to the roadside site. The PMF results are broadly similar to those obtained in a previous analysis by PCA/APCS. However, the PMF analysis resolved more factors at each site than the PCA/APCS. In addition, the study demonstrated that combined results from multi-criteria decision making analysis and receptor modelling can provide more detailed information that can be used to formulate the scientific basis for mitigating air pollution in the region. PMID:21146196

  18. TRENDS OF POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON LEVELS AND MUTAGENICITY IN SANTIAGO'S INHALABLE AIRBORNE PARTICLES IN THE PERIOD 1992-1996.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Trends of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) for 1992-1996 (cold season) and their mutagenic activity were investigated in organic extracts from the Santiago. Chile. inhalable particles (PM10). The highest PAH concentrations were observed in 1992 and decline...

  19. Exposure to Airborne Particles and Volatile Organic Compounds from Polyurethane Molding, Spray Painting, Lacquering, and Gluing in a Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Mølgaard, Bjarke; Viitanen, Anna-Kaisa; Kangas, Anneli; Huhtiniemi, Marika; Larsen, Søren Thor; Vanhala, Esa; Hussein, Tareq; Boor, Brandon E.; Hämeri, Kaarle; Koivisto, Antti Joonas

    2015-01-01

    Due to the health risk related to occupational air pollution exposure, we assessed concentrations and identified sources of particles and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in a handcraft workshop producing fishing lures. The work processes in the site included polyurethane molding, spray painting, lacquering, and gluing. We measured total VOC (TVOC) concentrations and particle size distributions at three locations representing the various phases of the manufacturing and assembly process. The mean working-hour TVOC concentrations in three locations studied were 41, 37, and 24 ppm according to photo-ionization detector measurements. The mean working-hour particle number concentration varied between locations from 3000 to 36,000 cm−3. Analysis of temporal and spatial variations of TVOC concentrations revealed that there were at least four substantial VOC sources: spray gluing, mold-release agent spraying, continuous evaporation from various lacquer and paint containers, and either spray painting or lacquering (probably both). The mold-release agent spray was indirectly also a major source of ultrafine particles. The workers’ exposure can be reduced by improving the local exhaust ventilation at the known sources and by increasing the ventilation rate in the area with the continuous source. PMID:25849539

  20. Characterization of Size-Fractionated Airborne Particles Inside an Electronic Waste Recycling Facility and Acute Toxicity Testing in Mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong Ho; Wyrzykowska-Ceradini, Barbara; Touati, Abderrahmane; Krantz, Q Todd; Dye, Janice A; Linak, William P; Gullett, Brian; Gilmour, M Ian

    2015-10-01

    Disposal of electronic waste (e-waste) in landfills, incinerators, or at rudimentary recycling sites can lead to the release of toxic chemicals into the environment and increased health risks. Developing e-waste recycling technologies at commercial facilities can reduce the release of toxic chemicals and efficiently recover valuable materials. While these e-waste operations represent a vast improvement over previous approaches, little is known about environmental releases, workplace exposures, and potential health impacts. In this study, airborne particulate matter (PM) was measured at various locations within a modern U.S.-based e-waste recycling facility that utilized mechanical processing. In addition, composite size fractionated PM (coarse, fine and ultrafine) samples were collected, extracted, chemically analyzed, and given by oropharyngeal aspiration to mice or cultured with lung slices for lung toxicity tests. Indoor total PM concentrations measured during the study ranged from 220 to 1200 μg/m(3). In general, the coarse PM (2.5-10 μm) was 3-4 times more abundant than fine/ultrafine PM (<2.5 μm). The coarse PM contained higher levels of Ni, Pb, and Zn (up to 6.8 times) compared to the fine (0.1-2.5 μm) and ultrafine (<0.1 μm) PM. Compared to coarse PM measurements from a regional near-roadway study, Pb and Ni were enriched 170 and 20 times, respectively, in the indoor PM, with other significant enrichments (>10 times) observed for Zn and Sb, modest enrichments (>5 times) for Cu and Sr, and minor enrichments (>2 times) for Cr, Cd, Mn, Ca, Fe, and Ba. Negligible enrichment (<2 times) or depletion (<1 time) were observed for Al, Mg, Ti, Si, and V. The coarse PM fraction elicited significant pro-inflammatory responses in the mouse lung at 24 h postexposure compared to the fine and ultrafine PM, and similar toxicity outcomes were observed in the lung slice model. We conclude that exposure to coarse PM from the facility caused substantial inflammation in the

  1. Real-time detection and characterization of individual flowing airborne biological particles: fluorescence spectra and elastic scattering measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yongle; Holler, Stephen; Chang, Richard K.; Hill, Steven C.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Niles, Stanley; Bottiger, Jerold R.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-11-01

    Real-time methods which is reagentless and could detect and partially characterize bioaerosols are of current interest. We present a technique for real-time measurement of UV-excited fluorescence spectra and two-dimensional angular optical scattering (TAOS) from individual flowing biological aerosol particles. The fluorescence spectra have been observed from more than 20 samples including Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Erwinia herbicola, allergens, dust, and smoke. The S/N and resolution of the spectra are sufficient for observing small lineshape differences among the same type of bioaerosol prepared under different conditions. The additional information from TAOS regarding particle size, shape, and granularity has the potential of aiding in distinguishing bacterial aerosols from other aerosols, such as diesel and cigarette smoke.

  2. Study of chemical composition and morphology of airborne particles in Chandigarh, India using EDXRF and SEM techniques.

    PubMed

    Sharma, S G; Srinivas, M S N

    2009-03-01

    The elemental composition and morphology of aerosols, collected from March 95 to February 96 and March 96 to August 96 respectively in the city of Chandigarh, India is determined using Energy Dispersive X-ray fluorescence and scanning electron microscopic techniques. The elemental concentration levels are found to be higher by a factor of 2-7 in the spring season as compared to the rainy season. The concentration of spherical and non-spherical (i.e. elongated) aerosols is more in the spring season and is reduced drastically in the rainy season due to the prominent wash out effect of rains. More accurate particle classification and source identification is obtained when based on combination of chemical composition and particle morphology. Possible sources identified from this analysis are soil dust, Industrial activity, Agricultural and Garbage burning, Maritime aerosols and Automobile exhaust. PMID:18418721

  3. Size fractionation in mercury-bearing airborne particles (HgPM 10) at Almadén, Spain: Implications for inhalation hazards around old mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, Teresa; Higueras, Pablo; Jones, Tim; McDonald, Iain; Gibbons, Wes

    Almadén has a >2000y mining history and an unprecedented legacy of mercury contamination. Resuspended airborne particles were extracted from mine waste (Las Cuevas), retort site soil (Almadenejos), and urban car park dust (Almadén), separated into fine (PM 10) and coarse (PM >10 μm ) fractions, analysed for mercury using ICP-MS, and individual HgPM characterised using SEM. Cold extractable mercury concentrations in PM 10 range from 100 to 150 μg g -1 (car parks), to nearly 6000 μg g -1 (mine waste), reaching a world record of 95,000 μg g -1 above the abandoned retort at Almadenejos where ultrafine HgPM have pervaded the brickwork and soil and entered the food chain: edible wild asparagus stem material from here contains 35-65 μg g -1 Hg, and pig hair from animals living, inhaling and ingesting HgPM 10 at the site yielded 8-10 μg g -1. The PM 10 fraction (dusts easily wind transported and deeply inhaled) contains much more mercury than the coarser fraction. The contribution of HgPM 10 to ecosystem contamination and potential human health effects around old mercury mines has been underestimated.

  4. Fourth Airborne Geoscience Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The focus of the workshop was on how the airborne community can assist in achieving the goals of the Global Change Research Program. The many activities that employ airborne platforms and sensors were discussed: platforms and instrument development; airborne oceanography; lidar research; SAR measurements; Doppler radar; laser measurements; cloud physics; airborne experiments; airborne microwave measurements; and airborne data collection.

  5. Airborne particulate matter in spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Acceptability limits and sampling and monitoring strategies for airborne particles in spacecraft were considered. Based on instances of eye and respiratory tract irritation reported by Shuttle flight crews, the following acceptability limits for airborne particles were recommended: for flights of 1 week or less duration (1 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in aerodynamic diameter (AD) plus 1 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD); and for flights greater than 1 week and up to 6 months in duration (0.2 mg/cu m for particles less than 10 microns in AD plus 0.2 mg/cu m for particles 10 to 100 microns in AD. These numerical limits were recommended to aid in spacecraft atmosphere design which should aim at particulate levels that are a low as reasonably achievable. Sampling of spacecraft atmospheres for particles should include size-fractionated samples of 0 to 10, 10 to 100, and greater than 100 micron particles for mass concentration measurement and elementary chemical analysis by nondestructive analysis techniques. Morphological and chemical analyses of single particles should also be made to aid in identifying airborne particulate sources. Air cleaning systems based on inertial collection principles and fine particle collection devices based on electrostatic precipitation and filtration should be considered for incorporation into spacecraft air circulation systems. It was also recommended that research be carried out in space in the areas of health effects and particle characterization.

  6. Immunodetection and quantification of airborne (1–3)-β-D-glucan-carrying particles with the halogen immunoassay

    PubMed Central

    Rivera-Mariani, Félix E.; Mihalic, Jana N.; Rule, Ana M.; Breysse, Patrick N.

    2013-01-01

    Fungal cell wall components, such as (1–3)-β-D-glucan, are known to be capable of activating the innate immune system and pose a respiratory health risk in different environments. Mass-based non-viable techniques commonly used for assessment of fungal exposures could be β-D-glucan-specific, but are limited to analysis of liquid extracts. The variable solubility of different β-D-glucans may underestimate β-D-glucan exposure and long sampling times required for mass-based methods make assessing short-term exposures difficult. In this study, we evaluated the utility of the halogen immunoassay (HIA), an immunoblotting technique previously used for allergens, to immunodetect and quantify β-D-glucan-carrying particles (BGCPs). The HIA was able to detect BGCPs without background staining when β-D-glucan standards and air samples collected at a poultry house during short sampling periods were evaluated. The image analysis protocol previously developed by our group for mouse allergen allowed simultaneous immunodetection and quantification of β-D-glucan-containing particles. Our results suggest that the HIA holds promise for quantifying β-D-glucan exposures. To our knowledge, this is the first time in which the HIA was used for non-allergenic compounds of microbial or fungal origins. PMID:23201385

  7. Airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-06-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  8. Study on size distributions of airborne particles by aircraft observation in spring over eastern coastal areas of China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Liu, Hongjie; Yue, Xin; Li, Hong; Chen, Jianhua; Tang, Dagang

    2005-06-01

    The authors studied the size distributions of particles at an altitude of 2000 m by aircraft observation over eastern costal areas of China from Zhuhai, Guangdong to Dalian, Liaoning (0.47 30 μm, 57 channels, including number concentration distribution, surface area concentration distribution and mass concentration distribution). In these cities, the average daily concentrations of PM10 are very high. They are among the most heavily polluted cities in China. The main pollution sources are anthropogenic activities such as wood, coal and oil burning. The observed size distributions show a broad spectrum and unique multi-peak characteristics, indicating no significant impacts of individual sources from urban areas. These results are far different from the distribution type at ground level. It may reflect the comprehensive effect of the regional pollution characteristics. Monitoring results over big cities could to some extent reflect their pollution characteristics.

  9. Airborne concentrations of PM(2.5) and diesel exhaust particles on Harlem sidewalks: a community-based pilot study.

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, P L; Aggarwal, M; Northridge, M E; Janssen, N A; Shepard, P

    2000-01-01

    Residents of the dense urban core neighborhoods of New York City (NYC) have expressed increasing concern about the potential human health impacts of diesel vehicle emissions. We measured concentrations of particulate matter [less than/equal to] 2.5 micro in aerodynamic diameter (PM(2.5)) and diesel exhaust particles (DEP) on sidewalks in Harlem, NYC, and tested whether spatial variations in concentrations were related to local diesel traffic density. Eight-hour (1000-1800 hr) air samples for PM(2.5 )and elemental carbon (EC) were collected for 5 days in July 1996 on sidewalks adjacent to four geographically distinct Harlem intersections. Samples were taken using portable monitors worn by study staff. Simultaneous traffic counts for diesel trucks, buses, cars, and pedestrians were carried out at each intersection on [Greater/equal to] 2 of the 5 sampling days. Eight-hour diesel vehicle counts ranged from 61 to 2,467 across the four sites. Mean concentrations of PM(2.5) exhibited only modest site-to-site variation (37-47 microg/m(3)), reflecting the importance of broader regional sources of PM(2.5). In contrast, EC concentrations varied 4-fold across sites (from 1.5 to 6 microg/m(3)), and were associated with bus and truck counts on adjacent streets and, at one site, with the presence of a bus depot. A high correlation (r = 0.95) was observed between EC concentrations measured analytically and a blackness measurement based on PM(2.5) filter reflectance, suggesting the utility of the latter as a surrogate measure of DEP in future community-based studies. These results show that local diesel sources in Harlem create spatial variations in sidewalk concentrations of DEP. The study also demonstrates the feasibility of a new paradigm for community-based research involving full and active partnership between academic scientists and community-based organizations. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:10706526

  10. SOURCES OF HUMAN EXPOSURE TO AIRBORNE PAH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Personal exposures to airborne particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were studied in several populations in the US, Japan, and Czech Republic. Personal exposure monitors, developed for human exposure biomonitoring studies were used to collect fine particles (<_ 1....

  11. THE BIMODAL DISTRIBUTION: DEVELOPMENT OF THE CONCEPT OF FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES AS SEPARATE AND DISTINCT COMPONENTS OF AIRBORNE PARTICULATE MATTER

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the early 1970s, it was understood that combustion particles were formed mostly in sizes below 1 um diameter, and windblown dust was suspended in sizes mostly above 1 um diameter. However, particle size distribution was thought of as a single mode. Particles were thought to f...

  12. Liver, lung and kidney homogenates used as an activation system in mutagenicity studies of airborne particles and of expectorate and urine samples from exposed workers in a coke plant.

    PubMed

    Krøkje, A; Schmid, R; Zahlsen, K

    1991-01-01

    A comparison was made between lung and kidney homogenates on the one hand and liver S9 from rats on the other hand in order to compare their ability to activate promutagens. The Salmonella reversion assay was used on extracts of airborne particles from the top of coke oven batteries, and of expectorate and urine samples from exposed workers in the same coke plant. The contents of benzo[a]anthracene and benzo[a]pyrene in the different test solutions were measured by high-resolution gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Both mutagens were detected in the filter extract and in the expectorates from the exposed workers but not in the expectorates from the control groups or in the urine samples. The liver S9 gave significantly higher mutagenicity than lung and kidney activation with both filter samples and expectorate and urine samples. PMID:1988823

  13. Airborne in-situ investigations of the Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash plume on Iceland and over north-western Germany with light aircrafts and optical particle counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, K.; Eliasson, J.; Vogel, A.; Fischer, C.; Pohl, T.; van Haren, G.; Meier, M.; Grobéty, B.; Dahmann, D.

    2012-03-01

    During the time period of the eruption of the Icelandic volcano Eyjafjallajökull in April/May 2010 the Duesseldorf University of Applied Sciences has performed 14 research flights in situations with and without the volcanic ash plume over Germany. In parallel to the research flights in Germany three measurement flights have been performed by the University of Iceland in May 2010 over the western part of Iceland. During two of these flights the outskirts of the eruption plume were entered directly, delivering most direct measurements within the eruption plume during this eruptive event. For all the measurement flights reported here, light durable piston-motor driven aircrafts were used, which were equipped with optical particle counters for in-situ measurements. Real-time monitoring of the particle concentrations was possible during the flights. As different types of optical particle counters have been used in Iceland and Germany, the optical particle counters have been re-calibrated after the flights to the same standard using gravimetric reference methods and original Eyjafjallajökull volcanic ash samples. In-situ measurement results with high spatial resolution, directly from the eruption plume in Iceland as well as from the dispersed and several days old plume over Germany, are therefore presented here for the first time. They are normalized to the same ash concentration calibration standard. Moreover, airborne particles could be sampled directly out of the eruption plume in Iceland as well as during the flights over Germany. During the research flights over Iceland from 9 May 2011 to 11 May 2011 the ash emitted from the vent of the volcano turned out to be concentrated in a narrow well-defined plume of about 10 km width at a distance of 45-60 km away from the vent. Outside this plume the airborne ash concentrations could be proved to be below 50 μg m -3 over western Iceland. However, by entering the outskirts of the plume directly the research aircraft could

  14. Airborne Single Particle Mass Spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and New Software for Data Visualization and Analysis in a Geo-Spatial Context

    SciTech Connect

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, D.; Wilson, Jacqueline M.; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles - two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol’s optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present miniSPLAT, our new aircraft compatible single particle mass spectrometer, that measures in-situ and in real-time size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. miniSPLAT operates in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. When compared to our previous instrument, SPLAT II, miniSPLAT has been significantly reduced in size, weight, and power consumption without loss in performance. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle composition and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  15. Airborne single particle mass spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and new software for data visualization and analysis in a geo-spatial context.

    PubMed

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles-two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol's optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present our aircraft-compatible single particle mass spectrometers, SPLAT II and its new, miniaturized version, miniSPLAT that measure in-situ and in real-time the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. Although miniSPLAT's size, weight, and power consumption are significantly smaller, its performance is on par with SPLAT II. Both instruments operate in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle compositions and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei. PMID:25563475

  16. Airborne Single Particle Mass Spectrometers (SPLAT II & miniSPLAT) and New Software for Data Visualization and Analysis in a Geo-Spatial Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Imre, Dan; Wilson, Jacqueline; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jun; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the effect of aerosols on climate requires knowledge of the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles—two fundamental properties that determine an aerosol's optical properties and ability to serve as cloud condensation or ice nuclei. Here we present our aircraft-compatible single particle mass spectrometers, SPLAT II and its new, miniaturized version, miniSPLAT that measure in-situ and in real-time the size and chemical composition of individual aerosol particles with extremely high sensitivity, temporal resolution, and sizing precision on the order of a monolayer. Although miniSPLAT's size, weight, and power consumption are significantly smaller, its performance is on par with SPLAT II. Both instruments operate in dual data acquisition mode to measure, in addition to single particle size and composition, particle number concentrations, size distributions, density, and asphericity with high temporal resolution. We also present ND-Scope, our newly developed interactive visual analytics software package. ND-Scope is designed to explore and visualize the vast amount of complex, multidimensional data acquired by our single particle mass spectrometers, along with other aerosol and cloud characterization instruments on-board aircraft. We demonstrate that ND-Scope makes it possible to visualize the relationships between different observables and to view the data in a geo-spatial context, using the interactive and fully coupled Google Earth and Parallel Coordinates displays. Here we illustrate the utility of ND-Scope to visualize the spatial distribution of atmospheric particles of different compositions, and explore the relationship between individual particle compositions and their activity as cloud condensation nuclei.

  17. Biomass burning layers measured with an airborne Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) during the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimerl, K.; Weinzierl, B.; Minikin, A.; Sauer, D. N.; Fütterer, D.; Lichtenstern, M.; Schlager, H.; Schwarz, J. P.; Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Fahey, D. W.; Huntrieser, H.

    2013-12-01

    The 2012 wildfire season in the U.S. was one of the worst in the past decade. Coinciding with the period of intense wildfires in the western U.S., the Deep Convective Clouds and Chemistry (DC3) experiment took place in the central U.S. in May and June of 2012. Although the main goal of this experiment was to characterize chemical processes in and around thunderstorms, biomass burning plumes from wildfires were also measured during almost every flight. Measurements were performed with three different research aircraft (NCAR GV, NASA DC8 and DLR Falcon 20E), accompanied by ground based measurements with radars and radiosondes, and measurements of meteorological parameters and lightning. The instrumentation aboard the DLR Falcon included measurements of the trace gases NO, CO, O3, CO2, CH4, SO2, volatile organic compounds, and a variety of aerosol microphysical parameters. To cover a wide range of aerosol particle sizes, the DLR Falcon payload included optical particle counters (UHSAS-A, FSSP-300, FSSP-100, PCASP-100X/SPP-200 and Sky-OPC 1.129), a multi-channel CPC system for measuring total and non-volatile particle concentrations and, for absorbing particles, a three-wavelength PSAP and a Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2). We will focus on the latter in this presentation. The SP2 measures both the mass of refractory black carbon (rBC) particles as well as their optical size, providing information about the mixing state of particles in the biomass burning layers. Most biomass burning layers were found between 3 and 8 km altitude. We will discuss measurements of plumes originating from New Mexico wildfires (Little Bear wildfire on June 11th of 2012 and Whitewater-Baldy wildfire on May 29th and 30th of 2012). Peaks of the rBC mass concentration in the plumes were as high as 2μg/m3, the fraction of rBC particles with thick coatings was higher than what is usually found in the boundary layer. During the Falcon transfer flights from Germany to the U.S. and back

  18. BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry: Reagentless Detection of Individual Airborne Spores and Other Bioagent Particles Based on Laser Desorption/Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, P T

    2004-07-20

    Better devices are needed for the detection of aerosolized biological warfare agents. Advances in the ongoing development of one such device, the BioAerosol Mass Spectrometry (BAMS) system, are described here in detail. The system samples individual, micrometer-sized particles directly from the air and analyzes them in real-time without sample preparation or use of reagents. At the core of the BAMS system is a dual-polarity, single-particle mass spectrometer with a laser based desorption and ionization (DI) system. The mass spectra produced by early proof-of-concept instruments were highly variable and contained limited information to differentiate certain types of similar biological particles. The investigation of this variability and subsequent changes to the DI laser system are described. The modifications have reduced the observed variability and thereby increased the usable information content in the spectra. These improvements would have little value without software to analyze and identify the mass spectra. Important improvements have been made to the algorithms that initially processed and analyzed the data. Single particles can be identified with an impressive level of accuracy, but to obtain significant reductions in the overall false alarm rate of the BAMS instrument, alarm decisions must be made dynamically on the basis of multiple analyzed particles. A statistical model has been developed to make these decisions and the resulting performance of a hypothetical BAMS system is quantitatively predicted. The predictions indicate that a BAMS system, with reasonably attainable characteristics, can operate with a very low false alarm rate (orders of magnitude lower than some currently fielded biodetectors) while still being sensitive to small concentrations of biological particles in a large range of environments. Proof-of-concept instruments, incorporating some of the modifications described here, have already performed well in independent testing.

  19. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bressel, C.; Itzkan, I.; Nunes, J. E.; Hoge, F.

    1977-01-01

    The characteristics of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) are given. The AOL system is described and its potential for various measurement applications including bathymetry and fluorosensing is discussed.

  20. Airborne Laser Polar Nephelometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grams, Gerald W.

    1973-01-01

    A polar nephelometer has been developed at NCAR to measure the angular variation of the intensity of light scattered by air molecules and particles. The system has been designed for airborne measurements using outside air ducted through a 5-cm diameter airflow tube; the sample volume is that which is common to the intersection of a collimated source beam and the detector field of view within the airflow tube. The source is a linearly polarized helium-neon laser beam. The optical system defines a collimated field-of-view (0.5deg half-angle) through a series of diaphragms located behind a I72-mm focal length objective lens. A photomultiplier tube is located immediately behind an aperture in the focal plane of the objective lens. The laser beam is mechanically chopped (on-off) at a rate of 5 Hz; a two-channel pulse counter, synchronized to the laser output, measures the photomultiplier pulse rate with the light beam both on and off. The difference in these measured pulse rates is directly proportional to the intensity of the scattered light from the volume common to the intersection of the laser beam and the detector field-of-view. Measurements can be made at scattering angles from 15deg to 165deg with reference to the direction of propagation of the light beam. Intermediate angles are obtained by selecting the angular increments desired between these extreme angles (any multiple of 0.1deg can be selected for the angular increment; 5deg is used in normal operation). Pulses provided by digital circuits control a stepping motor which sequentially rotates the detector by pre-selected angular increments. The synchronous photon-counting system automatically begins measurement of the scattered-light intensity immediately after the rotation to a new angle has been completed. The instrument has been flown on the NASA Convair 990 airborne laboratory to obtain data on the complex index of refraction of atmospheric aerosols. A particle impaction device is operated simultaneously

  1. Molecular composition and size distribution of sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids in airborne particles during a severe urban haze event caused by wheat straw burning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Gehui; Chen, Chunlei; Li, Jianjun; Zhou, Bianhong; Xie, Mingjie; Hu, Shuyuan; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Chen, Yan

    2011-05-01

    Molecular compositions and size distributions of water-soluble organic compounds (WSOC, i.e., sugars, sugar-alcohols and carboxylic acids) in particles from urban air of Nanjing, China during a severe haze event caused by field burning of wheat straw were characterized and compared with those in the summer and autumn non-haze periods. During the haze event levoglucosan (4030 ng m -3) was the most abundant compound among the measured WSOC, followed by succinic acid, malic acid, glycerol, arabitol and glucose, being different from those in the non-haze samples, in which sucrose or azelaic acid showed a second highest concentration, although levoglucosan was the highest. The measured WSOC in the haze event were 2-20 times more than those in the non-hazy days. Size distribution results showed that there was no significant change in the compound peaks in coarse mode (>2.1 μm) with respect to the haze and non-haze samples, but a large difference in the fine fraction (<2.1 μm) was found with a sharp increase during the hazy days mostly due to the increased emissions of wheat straw burning. Molecular compositions of organic compounds in the fresh smoke particles from wheat straw burning demonstrate that sharply increased concentrations of glycerol and succinic and malic acids in the fine particles during the haze event were mainly derived from the field burning of wheat straw, although the sources of glucose and related sugar-alcohols whose concentrations significantly increased in the fine haze samples are unclear. Compared to that in the fresh smoke particles of wheat straw burning an increase in relative abundance of succinic acid to levoglucosan during the haze event suggests a significant production of secondary organic aerosols during transport of the smoke plumes.

  2. Black Carbon as an Additional Indicator of the Adverse Health Effects of Airborne Particles Compared with PM10 and PM2.5

    PubMed Central

    Hoek, Gerard; Simic-Lawson, Milena; Fischer, Paul; van Bree, Leendert; ten Brink, Harry; Keuken, Menno; Atkinson, Richard W.; Anderson, H. Ross; Brunekreef, Bert; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Current air quality standards for particulate matter (PM) use the PM mass concentration [PM with aerodynamic diameters ≤ 10 μm (PM10) or ≤ 2.5 μm (PM2.5)] as a metric. It has been suggested that particles from combustion sources are more relevant to human health than are particles from other sources, but the impact of policies directed at reducing PM from combustion processes is usually relatively small when effects are estimated for a reduction in the total mass concentration. Objectives: We evaluated the value of black carbon particles (BCP) as an additional indicator in air quality management. Methods: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis of health effects of BCP compared with PM mass based on data from time-series studies and cohort studies that measured both exposures. We compared the potential health benefits of a hypothetical traffic abatement measure, using near-roadway concentration increments of BCP and PM2.5 based on data from prior studies. Results: Estimated health effects of a 1-μg/m3 increase in exposure were greater for BCP than for PM10 or PM2.5, but estimated effects of an interquartile range increase were similar. Two-pollutant models in time-series studies suggested that the effect of BCP was more robust than the effect of PM mass. The estimated increase in life expectancy associated with a hypothetical traffic abatement measure was four to nine times higher when expressed in BCP compared with an equivalent change in PM2.5 mass. Conclusion: BCP is a valuable additional air quality indicator to evaluate the health risks of air quality dominated by primary combustion particles. PMID:21810552

  3. Approaches to detection of airborne biological agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, An-Cheng; Tabacco, Mary Beth

    2009-05-01

    Three approaches to detection of biological agents based on biological processes will be presented. The first example demonstrates the use of dendrimers to deliver a membrane-impermeable fluorescent dye into live bacteria, similar to viral infection and delivery of DNA/RNA into a bacterial cell. The second example mimics collection and capture of airborne biological particles by the respiratory mucosa through the use of a hygroscopic sensing membrane. The third example is based on the use of multiple fluorescent probes with diverse functionalities to detect airborne biological agents in a manner similar to the olfactory receptors in the nasal tract.

  4. Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick Treado; Oksana Klueva; Jeffrey Beckstead

    2008-12-31

    Aerosol threat detection requires the ability to discern between threat agents and ambient background particulate matter (PM) encountered in the environment. To date, Raman imaging technology has been demonstrated as an effective strategy for the assessment of threat agents in the presence of specific, complex backgrounds. Expanding our understanding of the composition of ambient particulate matter background will improve the overall performance of Raman Chemical Imaging (RCI) detection strategies for the autonomous detection of airborne chemical and biological hazards. Improving RCI detection performance is strategic due to its potential to become a widely exploited detection approach by several U.S. government agencies. To improve the understanding of the ambient PM background with subsequent improvement in Raman threat detection capability, ChemImage undertook the Airborne Particulate Threat Assessment (APTA) Project in 2005-2008 through a collaborative effort with the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-05NT42594. During Phase 1 of the program, a novel PM classification based on molecular composition was developed based on a comprehensive review of the scientific literature. In addition, testing protocols were developed for ambient PM characterization. A signature database was developed based on a variety of microanalytical techniques, including scanning electron microscopy, FT-IR microspectroscopy, optical microscopy, fluorescence and Raman chemical imaging techniques. An automated particle integrated collector and detector (APICD) prototype was developed for automated collection, deposition and detection of biothreat agents in background PM. During Phase 2 of the program, ChemImage continued to refine the understanding of ambient background composition. Additionally, ChemImage enhanced the APICD to provide improved autonomy, sensitivity and specificity. Deliverables included a Final Report detailing our

  5. Promoting Smoke-Free Homes: A Novel Behavioral Intervention Using Real-Time Audio-Visual Feedback on Airborne Particle Levels

    PubMed Central

    Klepeis, Neil E.; Hughes, Suzanne C.; Edwards, Rufus D.; Allen, Tracy; Johnson, Michael; Chowdhury, Zohir; Smith, Kirk R.; Boman-Davis, Marie; Bellettiere, John; Hovell, Melbourne F.

    2013-01-01

    Interventions are needed to protect the health of children who live with smokers. We pilot-tested a real-time intervention for promoting behavior change in homes that reduces second hand tobacco smoke (SHS) levels. The intervention uses a monitor and feedback system to provide immediate auditory and visual signals triggered at defined thresholds of fine particle concentration. Dynamic graphs of real-time particle levels are also shown on a computer screen. We experimentally evaluated the system, field-tested it in homes with smokers, and conducted focus groups to obtain general opinions. Laboratory tests of the monitor demonstrated SHS sensitivity, stability, precision equivalent to at least 1 µg/m3, and low noise. A linear relationship (R2 = 0.98) was observed between the monitor and average SHS mass concentrations up to 150 µg/m3. Focus groups and interviews with intervention participants showed in-home use to be acceptable and feasible. The intervention was evaluated in 3 homes with combined baseline and intervention periods lasting 9 to 15 full days. Two families modified their behavior by opening windows or doors, smoking outdoors, or smoking less. We observed evidence of lower SHS levels in these homes. The remaining household voiced reluctance to changing their smoking activity and did not exhibit lower SHS levels in main smoking areas or clear behavior change; however, family members expressed receptivity to smoking outdoors. This study established the feasibility of the real-time intervention, laying the groundwork for controlled trials with larger sample sizes. Visual and auditory cues may prompt family members to take immediate action to reduce SHS levels. Dynamic graphs of SHS levels may help families make decisions about specific mitigation approaches. PMID:24009742

  6. Airborne gravity is here

    SciTech Connect

    Hammer, S.

    1982-01-11

    After 20 years of development efforts, the airborne gravity survey has finally become a practical exploration method. Besides gravity data, the airborne survey can also collect simultaneous, continuous records of high-precision magneticfield data as well as terrain clearance; these provide a topographic contour map useful in calculating terrain conditions and in subsequent planning and engineering. Compared with a seismic survey, the airborne gravity method can cover the same area much more quickly and cheaply; a seismograph could then detail the interesting spots.

  7. Toolsets for Airborne Data

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2015-04-02

    article title:  Toolsets for Airborne Data     View larger image The ... limit of detection values. Prior to accessing the TAD Web Application ( https://tad.larc.nasa.gov ) for the first time, users must ...

  8. The airborne laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven; Schall, Harold; Shattuck, Paul

    2007-05-01

    The Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the current program status.

  9. Levels, indoor-outdoor relationships and exposure risks of airborne particle-associated perchlorate and chlorate in two urban areas in Eastern Asia.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lan; Yang, Lingxiao; Chen, Jianmin; Toda, Kei; Wang, Xinfeng; Zhang, Junmei; Yamasaki, Dai; Nakamura, Yukihide; Sui, Xiao; Zheng, Longfei; Wen, Liang; Xu, Caihong; Wang, Wenxing

    2015-09-01

    Indoor and outdoor concentrations of PM2.5-associated perchlorate (ClO4(-)) and chlorate (ClO3(-)) were investigated in Jinan, China, and size-resolved perchlorate and chlorate were studied in Kumamoto, Japan. The average outdoor PM2.5-associated concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate were 4.18 ng m(-3) and 2.82 ng m(-3), respectively, in Jinan. Perchlorate and chlorate were mainly distributed in fine particles, and their approximate PM2.5-associated concentrations were 0.04 ng m(-3) and 4.14 ng m(-3), respectively, in Kumamoto. The ratios of ClO3(-)/ClO4(-) ranged from 18.72 to 360.22 in Kumamoto and from 0.03 to 7.45 in Jinan. The highest concentration of perchlorate (173.76 ng m(-3)) was observed on Spring Festival Eve. This finding and the significant correlation between perchlorate and fireworks-related components (Cl(-) and K(+)) indicated that the fireworks display was a significant source of perchlorate in Jinan. The indoor concentrations of perchlorate and chlorate in Jinan were 3.54 ng m(-3) (range, 0.14-125.14 ng m(-3)) and 0.94 ng m(-3) (range, 0.10-1.80 ng m(-3)), respectively. In the absence of an indoor source of perchlorate, the occurrence of indoor concentrations higher than those found outdoors was a common effect of individual fireworks displays near the sampling sites, coupled with meteorological influences and poor indoor diffusion conditions. The exposure risks of perchlorate and chlorate indoors indicated that the potential risk of perchlorate exposure to children during fireworks displays is deserving of concern. PMID:25898387

  10. Atmospheric particle sampler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, C. G.; Stephens, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    Positive and/or negative pressure is used to trap airborne particles against a filter. Positive pressure is provided by low molecular weight gas (He or H) to achieve high particle velocity and high capture percentage. Trapped particles are examined under electron microscope.

  11. Control of airborne fungal spores in a university hospital

    SciTech Connect

    Streifel, A.J.; Vesley, D. ); Rhame, F.S. ); Murray, B. )

    1989-01-01

    A new university hospital was designed to maximize the air quality protection of severely compromised patients undergoing transplantation or treatment for malignant disorders. The entire hospital was designed as a sealed building with two filter systems having >95% efficiencies for 1.0 {mu}m particles. Controlled airflow and isolation of the most severely compromised patients were also design features. Air quality monitoring of particles and airborne fungi demonstrate effective control in the patient environment. The results show the areas with the greatest control of personnel and air changes have the lowest airborne concentrations of fungi and the smallest particles. Larger indoor airborne particle ranking indicate highest levels depending on local human activity, air changes rates, or filtration efficiency.

  12. The Airborne Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberson, Steven E.

    2002-09-01

    The US Air Force Airborne Laser (ABL) is an airborne, megawatt-class laser system with a state-of-the-art atmospheric compensation system to destroy enemy ballistic missiles at long ranges. This system will provide both deterrence and defense against the use of such weapons during conflicts. This paper provides an overview of the ABL weapon system including: the notional operational concept, the development approach and schedule, the overall aircraft configuration, the technologies being incorporated in the ABL, and the risk reduction approach being utilized to ensure program success.

  13. Airborne oceanographic lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Specifications and preliminary design of an Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL) system, which is to be constructed for installation and used on a NASA Wallops Flight Center (WFC) C-54 research aircraft, are reported. The AOL system is to provide an airborne facility for use by various government agencies to demonstrate the utility and practicality of hardware of this type in the wide area collection of oceanographic data on an operational basis. System measurement and performance requirements are presented, followed by a description of the conceptual system approach and the considerations attendant to its development. System performance calculations are addressed, and the system specifications and preliminary design are presented and discussed.

  14. DO AIRBORNE PARTICLES INDUCE HERITABLE MUTATIONS?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Urban air is contaminated by gaseous and particulate emissions from a variety of sources, including industrial, vehicular, power generation, and natural. These emissions, as well as their atmospheric transformation products, damage ecological systems and causes adverse effects on...

  15. NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar July 1991 Data from the 1991 NASA Langley Airborne Lidar flights following the eruption of Pinatubo in July ... and Osborn [1992a, 1992b]. Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  16. NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-05-26

    NASA Airborne Lidar May 1992 An airborne Nd:YAG (532 nm) lidar was operated by the NASA Langley Research Center about a year following the June 1991 eruption of ... Osborn [1992a, 1992b].  Project Title:  NASA Airborne Lidar Discipline:  Field Campaigns ...

  17. Airborne antenna pattern calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knerr, T. J.; Schaffner, P. R.; Mielke, R. R.; Gilreath, M. C.

    1980-01-01

    A procedure for numerically calculating radiation patterns of fuselage-mounted airborne antennas using the Volumetric Pattern Analysis Program is presented. Special attention is given to aircraft modeling. An actual case study involving a large commercial aircraft is included to illustrate the analysis procedure.

  18. Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gabriel, F. C.; Markle, D. A.

    1969-01-01

    Airborne Fraunhofer Line Discriminator enables prospecting for fluorescent materials, hydrography with fluorescent dyes, and plant studies based on fluorescence of chlorophyll. Optical unit design is the coincidence of Fraunhofer lines in the solar spectrum occurring at the characteristic wavelengths of some fluorescent materials.

  19. Airborne Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA imaging technology has provided the basis for a commercial agricultural reconnaissance service. AG-RECON furnishes information from airborne sensors, aerial photographs and satellite and ground databases to farmers, foresters, geologists, etc. This service produces color "maps" of Earth conditions, which enable clients to detect crop color changes or temperature changes that may indicate fire damage or pest stress problems.

  20. Recognizing Airborne Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneider, Christian M.

    1990-01-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems in older buildings often do not adequately handle air-borne contaminants. Outlines a three-stage Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) assessment and describes a case in point at a Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, school. (MLF)

  1. International Symposium on Airborne Geophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogi, Toru; Ito, Hisatoshi; Kaieda, Hideshi; Kusunoki, Kenichiro; Saltus, Richard W.; Fitterman, David V.; Okuma, Shigeo; Nakatsuka, Tadashi

    2006-05-01

    Airborne geophysics can be defined as the measurement of Earth properties from sensors in the sky. The airborne measurement platform is usually a traditional fixed-wing airplane or helicopter, but could also include lighter-than-air craft, unmanned drones, or other specialty craft. The earliest history of airborne geophysics includes kite and hot-air balloon experiments. However, modern airborne geophysics dates from the mid-1940s when military submarine-hunting magnetometers were first used to map variations in the Earth's magnetic field. The current gamut of airborne geophysical techniques spans a broad range, including potential fields (both gravity and magnetics), electromagnetics (EM), radiometrics, spectral imaging, and thermal imaging.

  2. Determination of airborne nanoparticles from welding operations.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João Fernando Pereira; Albuquerque, Paula Cristina Silva; Miranda, Rosa Maria Mendes; Vieira, Maria Teresa Freire

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the levels of airborne ultrafine particles emitted in welding processes (tungsten inert gas [TIG], metal active gas [MAG] of carbon steel, and friction stir welding [FSW] of aluminum) in terms of deposited area in pulmonary alveolar tract using a nanoparticle surface area monitor (NSAM) analyzer. The obtained results showed the dependence of process parameters on emitted ultrafine particles and demonstrated the presence of ultrafine particles compared to background levels. Data indicated that the process that resulted in the lowest levels of alveolar deposited surface area (ADSA) was FSW, followed by TIG and MAG. However, all tested processes resulted in significant concentrations of ultrafine particles being deposited in humans lungs of exposed workers. PMID:22788362

  3. Characterisation of particulate matter on airborne pollen grains.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Helena; Guimarães, Fernanda; Duque, Laura; Noronha, Fernando; Abreu, Ilda

    2015-11-01

    A characterization of the physical-chemical composition of the atmospheric PM adsorbed to airborne pollen was performed. Airborne pollen was sampled using a Hirst-type volumetric spore sampler and observed using a Field Emission Electron Probe Microanalyser for PM analysis. A secondary electron image was taken of each pollen grain and EDS spectra were obtained for individually adsorbed particles. All images were analysed and the size parameters of the particles adsorbed to pollen was determined. The measured particles' equivalent diameter varied between 0.1 and 25.8 μm, mostly in the fine fraction. The dominant particulates identified were Si-rich, Organic-rich, SO-rich, Metals & Oxides and Cl-rich. Significant daily differences were observed in the physical-chemical characteristics of particles adsorbed to the airborne pollen wall. These differences were correlated with weather parameters and atmospheric PM concentration. Airborne pollen has the ability to adsorb fine particles that may enhance its allergenicity. PMID:26141127

  4. [Air-borne disease].

    PubMed

    Lameiro Vilariño, Carmen; del Campo Pérez, Victor M; Alonso Bürger, Susana; Felpeto Nodar, Irene; Guimarey Pérez, Rosa; Pérez Alvarellos, Alberto

    2003-11-01

    Respiratory protection is a factor which worries nursing professionals who take care of patients susceptible of transmitting microorganisms through the air more as every day passes. This type of protection covers the use of surgical or hygienic masks against the transmission of infection by airborne drops to the use of highly effective masks or respirators against the transmission of airborne diseases such as tuberculosis or SARS, a recently discovered disease. The adequate choice of this protective device and its correct use are fundamental in order to have an effective protection for exposed personnel. The authors summarize the main protective respiratory devices used by health workers, their characteristics and degree of effectiveness, as well as the circumstances under which each device is indicated for use. PMID:14705591

  5. Airborne forest fire research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattingly, G. S.

    1974-01-01

    The research relating to airborne fire fighting systems is reviewed to provide NASA/Langley Research Center with current information on the use of aircraft in forest fire operations, and to identify research requirements for future operations. A literature survey, interview of forest fire service personnel, analysis and synthesis of data from research reports and independent conclusions, and recommendations for future NASA-LRC programs are included.

  6. MLS airborne antenna research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, C. L.; Burnside, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    The geometrical theory of diffraction was used to analyze the elevation plane pattern of on-aircraft antennas. The radiation patterns for basic elements (infinitesimal dipole, circumferential and axial slot) mounted on fuselage of various aircrafts with or without radome included were calculated and compared well with experimental results. Error phase plots were also presented. The effects of radiation patterns and error phase plots on the polarization selection for the MLS airborne antenna are discussed.

  7. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  8. Airborne wireless communication systems, airborne communication methods, and communication methods

    DOEpatents

    Deaton, Juan D.; Schmitt, Michael J.; Jones, Warren F.

    2011-12-13

    An airborne wireless communication system includes circuitry configured to access information describing a configuration of a terrestrial wireless communication base station that has become disabled. The terrestrial base station is configured to implement wireless communication between wireless devices located within a geographical area and a network when the terrestrial base station is not disabled. The circuitry is further configured, based on the information, to configure the airborne station to have the configuration of the terrestrial base station. An airborne communication method includes answering a 911 call from a terrestrial cellular wireless phone using an airborne wireless communication system.

  9. Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.

    1998-01-01

    This is the final technical report for NASA-Ames grant NAG2-1068 to Caltech, entitled "Airborne Submillimeter Spectroscopy", which extended over the period May 1, 1996 through January 31, 1998. The grant was funded by the NASA airborne astronomy program, during a period of time after the Kuiper Airborne Observatory was no longer operational. Instead. this funding program was intended to help develop instrument concepts and technology for the upcoming SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy) project. SOFIA, which is funded by NASA and is now being carried out by a consortium lead by USRA (Universities Space Research Association), will be a 747 aircraft carrying a 2.5 meter diameter telescope. The purpose of our grant was to fund the ongoing development of sensitive heterodyne receivers for the submillimeter band (500-1200 GHz), using sensitive superconducting (SIS) detectors. In 1997 July we submitted a proposal to USRA to construct a heterodyne instrument for SOFIA. Our proposal was successful [1], and we are now continuing our airborne astronomy effort with funding from USRA. A secondary purpose of the NAG2-1068 grant was to continue the anaIN'sis of astronomical data collected with an earlier instrument which was flown on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO). The KAO instrument and the astronomical studies which were carried out with it were supported primarily under another grant, NAG2-744, which extended over October 1, 1991 through Januarv 31, 1997. For a complete description of the astronomical data and its anailysis, we refer the reader to the final technical report for NAG2-744, which was submitted to NASA on December 1. 1997. Here we report on the SIS detector development effort for SOFIA carried out under NAG2-1068. The main result of this effort has been the demonstration of SIS mixers using a new superconducting material niobium titanium nitride (NbTiN), which promises to deliver dramatic improvements in sensitivity in the 700

  10. Airborne particulate matter and spacecraft internal environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Benjamin Y. H.; Rubow, Kenneth L.; Mcmurry, Peter H.; Kotz, Thomas J.; Russo, Dane

    1991-01-01

    Instrumentation, consisting of a Shuttle Particle Sampler (SPS) and a Shuttle Particle Monitor (SPM), has been developed to characterize the airborne particulate matter in the Space Shuttle cabin during orbital flight. The SPS size selectively collects particles in four size fractions (0-2.5, 2.5-10, 10-100, and greater than 100 microns) which are analyzed postflight for mass concentration and size distribution, elemental composition, and morphology. The SPM provides a continuous record of particle concentration through photometric light scattering. Measurements were performed onboard Columbia, OV-102, during the flight of STS-32 in January 1990. No significant changes were observed in the particle mass concentration, size distribution, or chemical composition in samples collected during flight-day 2 and flight-day 7. The total mass concentration was 56 microg/cu cm with approximately half of the particles larger than 100 microns. Elemental analysis showed that roughly 70 percent of the particles larger than 2.5 microns were carbonaceous with small amounts of other elements present. The SPM showed no temporal or spatial variation in particle mass concentration during the mission.