Science.gov

Sample records for airflow perturbation device

  1. Test-Retest Reliability of Respiratory Resistance Measured with the Airflow Perturbation Device

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallena, Sally K.; Solomon, Nancy Pearl; Johnson, Arthur T.; Vossoughi, Jafar; Tian, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors aimed to determine reliability of the airflow perturbation device (APD) to measure respiratory resistance within and across sessions during resting tidal (RTB) and postexercise breathing in healthy athletes, and during RTB across trials within a session in athletes with paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM)…

  2. Comparison of Respiratory Resistance Measurements Made with an Airflow Perturbation Device with Those from Impulse Oscillometry

    PubMed Central

    Pan, J.; Saltos, A.; Smith, D.; Johnson, A.; Vossoughi, J.

    2013-01-01

    The airflow perturbation device (APD) has been developed as a portable, easy to use, and a rapid response instrument for measuring respiratory resistance in humans. However, the APD has limited data validating it against the established techniques. This study used a mechanical system to simulate the normal range of human breathing to validate the APD with the clinically accepted impulse oscillometry (IOS) technique. The validation system consisted of a sinusoidal flow generator with ten standardized resistance configurations that were shown to represent a total range of resistances from 0.12 to 0.95 kPa·L−1·s (1.2–9.7 cm H2O·L−1·s). Impulse oscillometry measurements and APD measurements of the mechanical system were recorded and compared at a constant airflow of 0.15 L·s−1. Both the IOS and APD measurments were accurate in assessing nominal resistance. In addition, a strong linear relationship was observed between APD measurements and IOS measurements (R2 = 0.999). A second series of measurements was made on ten human volunteers with external resistors added in their respiratory flow paths. Once calibrated with the mechanical system, the APD gave respiratory resistance measurements within 5% of IOS measurements. Because of their comparability to IOS measurements, APD measurements are shown to be valid representations of respiratory resistance. PMID:27006908

  3. Airflow resistance of airflow-regulating devices described by independent coefficients.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, G J; Geertsema, A A; Schutte, H K

    2001-07-01

    Rehabilitation after laryngectomy includes more and more the use of airflow-regulating devices such as shunt valves (SVs), tracheostoma valves (TSVs), and heat and moisture exchange (HME) filters. In determining the quality of those devices, airflow resistance is a very important factor. It is currently defined as pressure drop divided by airflow. However, for most applications, this definition does not result in a pressure- and airflow-independent parameter. Therefore, a new set of parameters is defined and applied to pressure-airflow curves of airflow-regulating devices. Pressure drop over TSVs and HME filters appears to have a squared relationship with flow. In SVs, it has a linear relationship. The new set of parameters describes the pressure-airflow relationship properly for all considered devices. In conclusion, theoretical predictions of flow mechanics appear to be valid for SVs, TSVs, and HME filters. Only 2 coefficients are necessary to describe the pressure-flow characteristics of these airflow-regulating devices, independent of pressure drop over and flow through the device. PMID:11465823

  4. Development of an ultrasonic airflow measurement device for ducted air.

    PubMed

    Raine, Andrew B; Aslam, Nauman; Underwood, Christopher P; Danaher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS) when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a "V" shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC) and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers. PMID:25954952

  5. Development of an Ultrasonic Airflow Measurement Device for Ducted Air

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Andrew B.; Aslam, Nauman; Underwood, Christopher P.; Danaher, Sean

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an in-duct ultrasonic airflow measurement device has been designed, developed and tested. The airflow measurement results for a small range of airflow velocities and temperatures show that the accuracy was better than 3.5% root mean square (RMS) when it was tested within a round or square duct compared to the in-line Venturi tube airflow meter used for reference. This proof of concept device has provided evidence that with further development it could be a low-cost alternative to pressure differential devices such as the orifice plate airflow meter for monitoring energy efficiency performance and reliability of ventilation systems. The design uses a number of techniques and design choices to provide solutions to lower the implementation cost of the device compared to traditional airflow meters. The design choices that were found to work well are the single sided transducer arrangement for a “V” shaped reflective path and the use of square wave transmitter pulses ending with the necessary 180° phase changed pulse train to suppress transducer ringing. The device is also designed so that it does not have to rely on high-speed analogue to digital converters (ADC) and intensive digital signal processing, so could be implemented using voltage comparators and low-cost microcontrollers. PMID:25954952

  6. Effect of a novel temperature-controlled laminar airflow device on personal breathing zone aeroallergen exposure.

    PubMed

    Gore, R B; Boyle, R J; Gore, C; Custovic, A; Hanna, H; Svensson, P; Warner, J O

    2015-02-01

    Temperature-controlled laminar airflow improves symptoms in atopic asthmatics, but its effects on personal allergen exposure are unknown. We aimed to evaluate its effects on personal cat allergen and particulate exposures in a simulated bedroom environment. Five healthy volunteers lay under an active and an inactive temperature-controlled laminar airflow device for 175 min, in a simulated bedroom containing bedding from a cat owner. Total airborne particles (≥0.5 - ≥10 μm diameter) were quantified with a laser particle counter. Airborne allergen was sampled with Institute of Occupational Medicine filters. Inhaled exposure was sampled with nasal air samplers. Allergen-containing particles were quantified by immunoassay. Treatment reduced total airborne particles (>0.5 μm diameter) by >99% (P < 0.001) and reduced airborne allergen concentration within the breathing zone (ratio of median counts = 30, P = 0.043). Treatment reduced inhaled allergen (ratio of median counts = 7, P = 0.043). Treatment was not associated with a change in airborne allergen concentration outside of the breathing zone (P = 0.160). Temperature-controlled laminar airflow treatment of individuals in an allergen-rich experimental environment results in significant reductions in breathing zone allergenic and non-allergenic particle exposure, and in inhaled cat allergen exposure. These findings may explain the clinical benefits of temperature-controlled laminar airflow. PMID:24750266

  7. Do forced air patient-warming devices disrupt unidirectional downward airflow?

    PubMed

    Legg, A J; Cannon, T; Hamer, A J

    2012-02-01

    Patient warming significantly decreases the risk of surgical site infection. Recently there have been concerns that forced air warming may interfere with unidirectional airflow, potentially posing an increased risk of infection. Our null hypothesis was that forced air and radiant warming devices do not increase the temperature and the number of particles over the surgical site when compared with no warming device. A forced air warming device was compared with a radiant warming device and no warming device as a control. The temperature and number of particles were measured over the surgical site. The theatre was prepared as for a routine lower-limb arthroplasty operation, and the same volunteer was used throughout the study. Forced air warming resulted in a significant mean increase in the temperature (1.1°C vs 0.4°C, p < 0.0001) and number of particles (1038.2 vs 274.8, p = 0.0087) over the surgical site when compared with radiant warming, which raises concern as bacteria are known to require particles for transport. PMID:22323696

  8. Airflow control system

    DOEpatents

    Motszko, Sean Ronald; McEnaney, Ryan Patrick; Brush, Jeffrey Alan; Zimmermann, Daniel E.

    2007-03-13

    A dual airflow control system for an environment having a first air zone and a second air zone. The system includes a first input device operable to generate a first input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the first zone and a second input device operable to generate a second input signal indicative of a desired airflow to the second zone. First and second flow regulators are configured to regulate airflow to the first and second zones, respectively, such that the first and second regulators selectively provide the airflow to each of the first and second zones based on the first and second input signals. A single actuator is associated with the first and second flow regulators. The actuator is operable to simultaneously actuate the first and second flow regulators based on an input from the first and second input devices to allow the desired airflows to the first and the second zones.

  9. Inspiratory muscle training in chronic airflow limitation: comparison of two different training loads with a threshold device.

    PubMed

    Lisboa, C; Muñoz, V; Beroiza, T; Leiva, A; Cruz, E

    1994-07-01

    The usefulness of inspiratory muscle training (IMT) in chronic airflow limitation (CAL) patients is a controversial issue, mainly due to differences in the training load. To further evaluate this aspect, we studied the effect of the magnitude of the load using a threshold pressure trainer. Ten CAL patients (5 males, 5 females) 67 +/- 2 yrs (mean +/- SEM) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) 36 +/- 2% pred, were trained for 30 min a day using a load of 30% of their maximal inspiratory mouth pressure (PImax) (Group 1). Another 10 CAL patients (5 males, 5 females), 73 +/- 2 yrs and FEV1 37 +/- 2% pred), were trained using only 12% of their PImax (Group 2). Training was assessed by PImax, inspiratory muscle power output (IMPO), sustainable inspiratory pressure (SIP), maximal inspiratory flow rate (VImax), pattern of breathing during loaded breathing, Mahler's dyspnoea score, and the 6 min walking distance (6MWD). After 5 weeks of training, Group 1 exhibited significant increments in: PImax (34 +/- 11%); IMPO (92 +/- 16%); SIP (36 +/- 9%); and VImax (34 +/- 13%). Dyspnoea was also reduced, and the 6MWD increased by 48 +/- 22 m. We observed no significant changes in Group 2. During loaded breathing, Group 1 showed a significant increment in tidal volume (VT) and mean inspiratory flow (VT/TI), and a reduction in inspiratory time (TI). In Group 2, VT and VT/TI also increased significantly, but the breathing frequency increased with a reduction of expiratory time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7925905

  10. Airflow resistance in soybean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenghe, R. N.; Nimkar, P. M.; Shirkole, S. S.; Shinde, K. J.

    2012-04-01

    Resistance of material to airflow is an important factor to consider in the design of a dryer or an aeration system. The airflow resistance of soybean was determined with the modified airflow resistance apparatus. It was found that pressure drop increased with increase in airflow rate, bulk density, bed depth and decreased with moisture content. Modified Shedd equation, Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation were examined for pressure drop prediction. Airflow resistance was accurately described by modified Shedd equation followed by Hukill and Ives equation and modified Ergun equation. The developed statistical model comprised of airflow rate, moisture content and bulk density could fit pressure drop data reasonably well.

  11. An Experimental Device for Generating High Frequency Perturbations in Supersonic Wind Tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melcher, Kevin J.; Ibrahim, Mounir B.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the analytical study of a device that has been proposed as a mechanism for generating gust-like perturbations in supersonic wind tunnels. The device is envisioned as a means to experimentally validate dynamic models and control systems designed for high-speed inlets. The proposed gust generator is composed of two flat trapezoidal plates that modify the properties of the flow ingested by the inlet. One plate may be oscillated to generate small perturbations in the flow. The other plate is held stationary to maintain a constant angle-of-attack. Using an idealized approach, design equations and performance maps for the new device were developed from the compressible flow relations. A two-dimensional CFD code was used to confirm the correctness of these results. The idealized approach was then used to design and evaluate a new gust generator for a 3.05-meter by 3.05-meter (10-foot by 10-foot) supersonic wind tunnel.

  12. Assessing multizone airflow software

    SciTech Connect

    Lorenzetti, D.M.

    2001-12-01

    Multizone models form the basis of most computer simulations of airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. In order to promote computational efficiency, some multizone simulation programs, such as COMIS and CONTAM, restrict the form that their flow models may take. While these tools allow scientists and engineers to explore a wide range of building airflow problems, increasingly their use has led to new questions not answerable by the current generation of programs. This paper, directed at software developers working on the next generation of building airflow models, identifies structural aspects of COMIS and related programs that prevent them from easily incorporating desirable new airflow models. The paper also suggests criteria for evaluating alternate simulation environments for future modeling efforts.

  13. Defining Airflow Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Eschenbacher, William L.

    2016-01-01

    Airflow obstruction has been defined using spirometric test results when the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) to forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio is below a fixed cutoff (<70%) or lower limits of normal (LLN) from reference equations that are based on values from a normal population. However, similar to other positive or abnormal diagnostic test results that are used to identify the presence of disease, perhaps airflow obstruction should be defined based on the values of FEV1/FVC for a population of individuals with known disease such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Unfortunately, we do not know such a distribution of values of FEV1/FVC for patients with COPD since there is no gold standard for this syndrome or condition. Yet, we have used this physiologic definition of airflow obstruction based on a normal population to identify patients with COPD. In addition, we have defined airflow obstruction as either being present or absent. Instead, we should use a different approach to define airflow obstruction based on the probability or likelihood that the airflow obstruction is present which in turn would give us the probability or likelihood of a disease state such as COPD. PMID:27239557

  14. An electromagnetic energy scavenger from direct airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong-Hyok; Ji, Chang-Hyeon; Galle, Preston; Herrault, Florian; Wu, Xiaosong; Lee, Jin-Ho; Choi, Chang-Auk; Allen, Mark G.

    2009-09-01

    This paper presents two types of electromagnetic power generators exploiting direct conversion of airflow into mechanical vibration: (1) a windbelt-based vibratory linear energy scavenger targeting strong airflows and (2) a Helmholtz-resonator-based generator capable of scavenging energy from weaker airflows, i.e. environmental airflows. Both devices consist of two tightly coupled parts: a mechanical resonator, which produces high-frequency mechanical oscillation from quasi-constant airflow, and a permanent magnet/coil system, which generates electrical power from the resonator's motion. The proposed energy scavengers obviate the typically required matching of the resonant frequencies of the scavenger and the ambient energy sources it taps. This enables a device that is simpler, smaller and higher-frequency than the previously reported resonant power generator. The windbelt-based energy scavenger demonstrated a peak-to-peak output voltage of 81 mV at 0.53 kHz, from an input pressure of 50 kPa. The Helmholtz-resonator-based energy scavenger achieved a peak-to-peak output voltage of 4 mV at 1.4 kHz, from an input pressure of 0.2 kPa, which is equivalent to 5 m s-1 (10 mph) of wind velocity.

  15. Vortex control for rotor blade devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenblatt, David (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    To control vortices originating at the tips of a rotor's blades rotating through the air at a revolution frequency f, separation control device(s) are actuated to periodically introduce perturbations into the airflow moving over the blades. The periodic introduction of perturbations is controlled in accordance with a periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 while the frequency of the perturbations so-introduced is designated as f.sub.e. Vortex control is achieved when the periodic modulating frequency of introduction f.sub.0 satisfies the relationship nf.ltoreq.f.sub.0.ltoreq.f.sub.e where n is the number of blades.

  16. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  17. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  18. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  19. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  20. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  1. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  2. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance shall...

  3. 42 CFR 84.153 - Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE... APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.153 Airflow resistance test, Type A and Type AE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements. (a) Airflow resistance will...

  4. Structure of the airflow above surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Marc; Veron, Fabrice

    2016-04-01

    Weather, climate and upper ocean patterns are controlled by the exchanges of momentum, heat, mass, and energy across the ocean surface. These fluxes are, in turn, influenced by the small-scale physics at the wavy air-sea interface. We present laboratory measurements of the fine-scale airflow structure above waves, achieved in over 15 different wind-wave conditions, with wave ages Cp/u* ranging from 1.4 to 66.7 (where Cp is the peak phase speed of the waves, and u* the air friction velocity). The experiments were performed in the large (42-m long) wind-wave-current tank at University of Delaware's Air-Sea Interaction laboratory (USA). A combined Particle Image Velocimetry and Laser Induced Fluorescence system was specifically developed for this study, and provided two-dimensional airflow velocity measurement as low as 100 um above the air-water interface. Starting at very low wind speeds (U10~2m/s), we directly observe coherent turbulent structures within the buffer and logarithmic layers of the airflow above the air-water interface, whereby low horizontal velocity air is ejected away from the surface, and higher velocity fluid is swept downward. Wave phase coherent quadrant analysis shows that such turbulent momentum flux events are wave-phase dependent. Airflow separation events are directly observed over young wind waves (Cp/u*<3.7) and counted using measured vorticity and surface viscous stress criteria. Detached high spanwise vorticity layers cause intense wave-coherent turbulence downwind of wave crests, as shown by wave-phase averaging of turbulent momentum fluxes. Mean wave-coherent airflow motions and fluxes also show strong phase-locked patterns, including a sheltering effect, upwind of wave crests over old mechanically generated swells (Cp/u*=31.7), and downwind of crests over young wind waves (Cp/u*=3.7). Over slightly older wind waves (Cp/u* = 6.5), the measured wave-induced airflow perturbations are qualitatively consistent with linear critical layer

  5. 42 CFR 84.1149 - Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and mist... RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Dust, Fume, and Mist; Pesticide; Paint Spray; Powered Air-Purifying High Efficiency Respirators and Combination Gas Masks § 84.1149 Airflow resistance tests; all dust, fume, and...

  6. Airflow models gaining clout

    SciTech Connect

    Post, N.M.

    1994-10-10

    Move over, mock-ups. So long, smoke bombs. Take a walk, wind tunnels. Computational fluid dynamics, a spaceage simulation technique, is gaining velocity in the building community. And the design of inner spaces may never be the same. CFD is an equation-intensive computer modeling method that can simulate transient and steady-state airflow patterns and temperature gradients, indoors or out. CFD is used to downsize heating, ventilating and air conditioning systems, locate air outlets, and in general, create spaces that offer creature comfort, provide quality air and use less energy. The method is good for new construction, retrofits and forensic work, for example to investigate a building fire or a contaminant. In a room, CFD helps engineers consider, over a period of time, the combined impacts of ventilation, size, shape, contents, weather, even fenestration. For its first decade or two, CFD stayed the near-exclusive domain of aerospace, defense and electronics. With few exceptions, the building community could not afford the supercomputers that were needed to run the tens of thousands of equations involved. However, in the past few years, thanks to the increasing power and decreasing cost of computers, CFD simulation became practical. Curtain wall designers are even using it, though not without some controversy. Indoor air quality specialists, smoke and fire-spread researchers, laboratory designers, energy engineers, code writers, architects, and plant and building engineers are uncharacteristically upbeat about the tool. {open_quotes}CFD modeling is so many light years ahead of design tools that exist,{close_quotes} says Mariano Rodriguez, director of research and development for architect The Hillier Group, Princeton, N.J. {open_quotes}It`s the next step up from a wind tunnel test, and you don`t need a $300,000 wind tunnel.{close_quotes}

  7. Resonant magnetic perturbations of edge-plasmas in toroidal confinement devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, T. E.

    2015-12-01

    Controlling the boundary layer in fusion-grade, high-performance, plasma discharges is essential for the successful development of toroidal magnetic confinement power generating systems. A promising approach for controlling the boundary plasma is based on the use of small, externally applied, edge resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields (δ b\\bot\\text{ext}≈ {{10}-4}\\to {{10}-3}~\\text{T} ). A long-term focus area in tokamak fusion research has been to find methods, involving the use of non-axisymmetric magnetic perturbations to reduce the intense particle and heat fluxes to the wall. Experimental RMP research has progressed from the early pioneering work on tokamaks with material limiters in the 1970s, to present day research in separatrix-limited tokamaks operated in high-confinement mode, which is primarily aimed at the mitigation of the intermittent fluxes due edge localized modes (ELMs). At the same time, theoretical research has evolved from analytical models to numerical simulations, including the full 3D complexities of the problem. Following the first demonstration of ELM suppression in the DIII-D tokamak during 2003, there has been a rapid worldwide growth in theoretical, numerical and experimental edge RMP research resulting in the addition of ELM control coils to the ITER baseline design (Loarte et al 2014 Nucl. Fusion 54 033007). This review provides an overview of edge RMP research including a summary of the early theoretical and numerical background along with recent experimental results on improved particle and energy confinement in tokamaks triggered by edge RMP fields. The topics covered make up the basic elements needed for developing a better understanding of 3D magnetic perturbation physics, which is required in order to utilize the full potential of edge RMP fields in fusion relevant high performance, H-mode, plasmas.

  8. Airflow studies in a forced ventilated chamber with low partitions

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, W.K.; Tsui, K.F.

    1995-12-31

    A climate chamber was used to study experimentally the airflow characteristics in a ventilated space with low partitions. Two types of commonly used air distribution devices were selected for the study--a ceiling diffuser and side grille systems. A total of 16 tests were performed using the two diffusers with partition heights varying up to 1.8 m (5.91 ft) above floor level. From the measured results, the thermal comfort indices were assessed. A stabilization effect of airflow was found when the partition height reached 1.8 m (5.91 ft). Local draft risk was located in the occupied zone. Also, the modified Archimedes number proposed by Jackman (1990) was used to describe the indoor airflow in the absence of a workable design guide for partitioned spaces.

  9. MICROPROCESSOR CONTROL OF ROTOGRAVURE AIRFLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report discusses the technical and economic viability of using micro-processor-based control technology to collect volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from a paper coating operation. The microprocessor-based control system monitors and controls both the airflow rate and...

  10. Airflow resistance of heat and moisture exchange filters with and without a tracheostoma valve.

    PubMed

    Verkerke, Gijsbertus Jacob; Geertsema, Albert Anne; Schutte, Harm K

    2002-04-01

    Rehabilitation of laryngectomees has been furthered by the introduction of heat and moisture exchange (HME) filters, placed over a tracheostoma or on a tracheostoma valve (TSV). The airflow resistance of HME filters is an important factor with regard to the comfort of the patient. The goal of this study was to determine the airflow resistance (defined as the pressure drop over the device divided by the squared airflow through the device) of 4 commercially available HME filters with and without a TSV. The pressure drop over and the airflow through the devices were measured in vitro. Distinct differences among the devices were found. The mean airflow resistance of the HME filters ranged from 135 to 346 Pa x s2/L2, that of TSVs was between 66 and 297 Pa x s2/L2, and that of the combination was between 263 and 454 Pa x s2/L2. The Stom-Vent 2 HME filter and the Adeva Window TSV with an Adeva filter had the lowest airflow resistance of the devices measured in this study. PMID:11991585

  11. Visual exploration of nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Zachow, Stefan; Muigg, Philipp; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Doleisch, Helmut; Hege, Hans-Christian

    2009-01-01

    Rhinologists are often faced with the challenge of assessing nasal breathing from a functional point of view to derive effective therapeutic interventions. While the complex nasal anatomy can be revealed by visual inspection and medical imaging, only vague information is available regarding the nasal airflow itself: Rhinomanometry delivers rather unspecific integral information on the pressure gradient as well as on total flow and nasal flow resistance. In this article we demonstrate how the understanding of physiological nasal breathing can be improved by simulating and visually analyzing nasal airflow, based on an anatomically correct model of the upper human respiratory tract. In particular we demonstrate how various Information Visualization (InfoVis) techniques, such as a highly scalable implementation of parallel coordinates, time series visualizations, as well as unstructured grid multi-volume rendering, all integrated within a multiple linked views framework, can be utilized to gain a deeper understanding of nasal breathing. Evaluation is accomplished by visual exploration of spatio-temporal airflow characteristics that include not only information on flow features but also on accompanying quantities such as temperature and humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first in-depth visual exploration of the physiological function of the nose over several simulated breathing cycles under consideration of a complete model of the nasal airways, realistic boundary conditions, and all physically relevant time-varying quantities. PMID:19834215

  12. 42 CFR 84.154 - Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE supplied-air respirators; minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type B and Type BE..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Supplied-Air Respirators § 84.154 Airflow resistance test;...

  13. Energy Harvesting from Human Motion Using Footstep-Induced Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, H.; Xu, R.; Seto, K.; Yeatman, E. M.; Kim, S. G.

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an unobtrusive in-shoe energy harvester converting foot-strike energy into electricity to power wearable or portable devices. An air-pumped turbine system is developed to address the issues of the limited vertical deformation of shoes and the low frequency of human motion that impede harvesting energy from this source. The air pump is employed to convert the vertical foot-strike motion into airflow. The generated airflow passes through the miniaturized wind turbine whose transduction is realized by an electromagnetic generator. Energy is extracted from the generator with a higher frequency than that of footsteps, boosting the output power of the device. The turbine casing is specifically designed to enable the device to operate continuously with airflow in both directions. A prototype was fabricated and then tested under different situations. A 6 mW peak power output was obtained with a 4.9 Ω load. The achievable power from this design was estimated theoretically for understanding and further improvement.

  14. Mechanical responses of rat vibrissae to airflow.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan S W; Graff, Matthew M; Hartmann, Mitra J Z

    2016-04-01

    The survival of many animals depends in part on their ability to sense the flow of the surrounding fluid medium. To date, however, little is known about how terrestrial mammals sense airflow direction or speed. The present work analyzes the mechanical response of isolated rat macrovibrissae (whiskers) to airflow to assess their viability as flow sensors. Results show that the whisker bends primarily in the direction of airflow and vibrates around a new average position at frequencies related to its resonant modes. The bending direction is not affected by airflow speed or by geometric properties of the whisker. In contrast, the bending magnitude increases strongly with airflow speed and with the ratio of the whisker's arc length to base diameter. To a much smaller degree, the bending magnitude also varies with the orientation of the whisker's intrinsic curvature relative to the direction of airflow. These results are used to predict the mechanical responses of vibrissae to airflow across the entire array, and to show that the rat could actively adjust the airflow data that the vibrissae acquire by changing the orientation of its whiskers. We suggest that, like the whiskers of pinnipeds, the macrovibrissae of terrestrial mammals are multimodal sensors - able to sense both airflow and touch - and that they may play a particularly important role in anemotaxis. PMID:27030774

  15. Airflow measurement inaccuracies in aerosol imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sirr, S.A.; Miltz-Miller, S.; Notman, D.N.; Boyle, M.J.; Boudreau, R.J.; Loken, M.K.

    1986-04-01

    Aerosol production using inclined compressed air tanks may be subject to error caused by airflow meter variability and by the degree of inclination of the air-flow meter. Since most of these tanks are used in an inclined position, it is important for clinicians to be aware of these errors.

  16. Airflow measurement inaccuracies in aerosol imaging.

    PubMed

    Sirr, S A; Miltz-Miller, S; Notman, D N; Boyle, M J; Boudreau, R J; Loken, M K

    1986-04-01

    Aerosol production using inclined compressed air tanks may be subject to error caused by airflow meter variability and by the degree of inclination of the air-flow meter. Since most of these tanks are used in an inclined position, it is important for clinicians to be aware of these errors. PMID:3952316

  17. Three-Dimensional Numerical Simulation of Airflow in Nasopharynx.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shome, Biswadip; Wang, Lian-Ping; Santare, Michael H.; Szeri, Andras Z.; Prasad, Ajay K.; Roberts, David

    1996-11-01

    A three-dimensional numerical simulation of airflow in nasopharynx (from the soft palate to the epiglottis) was conducted, using anatomically accurate model and finite element method, to study the influence of flow characteristics on obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The results showed that the pressure drop in the nasopharynx is in the range 200-500 Pa. Ten different nasopharynx geometries resulting from three OSA treatment therapies (CPAP, mandibular repositioning devices, and surgery) were compared. The results confirmed that the airflow in the nasopharynx lies in the transitional flow regime and thus, a subtle change in the morphology caused by these treatment therapies has a large effect on the airflow. The onset of turbulence can cause as much as 40% of increase in pressure drop. For the transitional flow regime, the k-ɛ turbulence model was found to be the most appropriate model, when compared to the mixing length and the k-ω model, as it correctly reproduces the limiting laminar behavior. In addition, the pressure drop increased approximately as the square of the volumetric flow rate. Supported by NIH.

  18. Airflow regulation in variable-speed systems for residential HVAC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Becerra, R.C.; Beifus, B.L.

    1996-11-01

    In the majority of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems, air is the final medium for adding or extracting heat from or to the space to be air conditioned. Air is heated by passing it over a heat transfer device called a coil, which is a heat exchanger with air on the outside and the primary heating/cooling medium (water, steam, electricity, refrigerant, etc.) on the inside. One of the major factors determining heat transfer is the airflow rate, which can be controlled by mechanical means or by controlling the speed of the fan. Centrifugal fans driven by single-speed induction motors traditionally have been used in the JVAC industry but have an airflow characteristic that depends on the static pressure seen by the system. Variable-speed systems are starting to emerge as a strong alternative to traditional systems because of their ability to match the demand of the air-conditioned space, resulting in higher efficiencies and higher comfort. System efficiency can be improved by constraining the range of airflows provided by the fan or blower system in response to system pressure, that is, by controlling the airflow over the heat exchanger. This paper presents a method to regulate airflow independent of the static pressure and without the need for airflow sensors.

  19. Airflow resistance of selected biomass materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, S.C.; Sumner, H.R.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure drop created when air was forced through beds of selected biomass materials was determined. Materials tested included peanut hulls, peanut hull pellets, maize cobs, and wood shavings, chips and bark. The data were presented as logarithmic plots and equations of pressure drop versus airflow. The airflow resistances of the biomass materials increased with an increase in bulk density and were found to be in the range between values for ear and shelled maize. 12 references.

  20. Measurement of airflow in residential furnaces

    SciTech Connect

    Biermayer, Peter J.; Lutz, James; Lekov, Alex

    2004-01-24

    In order to have a standard for furnaces that includes electricity consumption or for the efficiency of furnace blowers to be determined, it is necessary to determine the airflow of a furnace or furnace blower. This study focused on airflow testing, in order to determine if an existing test method for measuring blower airflow could be used to measure the airflow of a furnace, under conditions seen in actual installations and to collect data and insights into the operating characteristics of various types of furnace blowers, to use in the analysis of the electricity consumption of furnaces. Results of the measured airflow on furnaces with three types of blower and motor combinations are presented in the report. These included: (1) a forward-curved blower wheel with a typical permanent split capacitor (PSC) motor, (2) a forward-curved blower wheel with an electronically-commutated motor (ECM), and (3) a prototype blower, consisting of a backward-inclined blower wheel matched to an ECM motor prototype, which is being developed as an energy-saving alternative to conventional furnace blowers. The testing provided data on power consumption, static and total pressure, and blower speed.

  1. Evaluation of different airflow sensors at the WIPP facility

    SciTech Connect

    McDaniel, K.; Duckworth, I.J.; Prosser, B.S.

    1999-07-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is an US Department of Energy underground disposal facility designed to permanently and safely isolate US defense-generated transuranic radioactive waste. The underground ventilation system is engineered to minimize the release of radioactive contamination to the environment in the event of an accident. During 1994 an extensive ventilation remote monitoring and control system was installed. It consists of fifteen air velocity sensors, eight differential pressure stations, automated control features on key underground air regulators, and eight psychrometric stations. The airflow monitoring component of the system has been a problem since the original installation. Due to the WIPP's variable airflow capabilities, the air velocity sensors required extensive and time-consuming re-calibration to make the sensors read out volumetric flow, rather than the point or line values, which they were factory calibrated for. Problems with the hardware made the process difficult. Furthermore, once re-calibrated the durability and reliability of the units were inconsistent, and often unacceptable. Two new types of airflow sensors were tested; one or both of which will ultimately replace the old units. The tested sensors were an ultrasonic-type device (FloSonic), and a warm body, mass flow unit (Airboss*200W) (a re-engineered version of the previous units). Recommendations were made regarding which type of sensor to install at specific locations. These decisions were based on the conditions at each sensor location and the relative strengths of the two sensor types. Installation, field calibration methodology, test procedures, main results and recommendations are discussed.

  2. AIRFLOW CHARACTERISTICS IN A BABOON NASAL PASSAGE CAST

    EPA Science Inventory

    Airflow patterns in the nasal Passages influence the distribution of air-pollutant-induced lesions in the airway mucosa. ittle is known about airflow characteristics or the complex nasopharyngeal airway of man and experimental animals. irflow characteristics in the nasopharyngeal...

  3. Instrument Measures Airflow Friction Without Contact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monson, D. J.

    1983-01-01

    Dual beam laser interferometer determines airflow friction against body by measuring time-varying thickness of wind sheared oil film. Measurements yield skin friction between film and airstream. Errors from prerun oil flow, tunnel starting transients, and initial surface waves therefore eliminated.

  4. Forced-air patient warming blankets disrupt unidirectional airflow.

    PubMed

    Legg, A J; Hamer, A J

    2013-03-01

    We have recently shown that waste heat from forced-air warming blankets can increase the temperature and concentration of airborne particles over the surgical site. The mechanism for the increased concentration of particles and their site of origin remained unclear. We therefore attempted to visualise the airflow in theatre over a simulated total knee replacement using neutral-buoyancy helium bubbles. Particles were created using a Rocket PS23 smoke machine positioned below the operating table, a potential area of contamination. The same theatre set-up, warming devices and controls were used as in our previous study. This demonstrated that waste heat from the poorly insulated forced-air warming blanket increased the air temperature on the surgical side of the drape by > 5°C. This created convection currents that rose against the downward unidirectional airflow, causing turbulence over the patient. The convection currents increased the particle concentration 1000-fold (2 174 000 particles/m(3) for forced-air warming vs 1000 particles/m(3) for radiant warming and 2000 particles/m(3) for the control) by drawing potentially contaminated particles from below the operating table into the surgical site. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2013;95-B:407-10. PMID:23450029

  5. Hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies.

    PubMed

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  6. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  7. Detachment stabilization with n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field applied to the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, M.; Masuzaki, S.; Yamada, I.; Tamura, N.; Sato, K.; Goto, M.; Narushima, Y.; Akiyama, T.; Miyazawa, J.; Shoji, M.; Morita, S.; Peterson, B. J.; Funaba, H.; Ohyabu, N.; Narihara, K.; Morisaki, T.; Yamada, H.; Komori, A.; Feng, Y.; Reiter, D.

    2010-05-15

    It is found that the remnant island structure created by n/m=1/1 resonant magnetic perturbation field in the stochastic magnetic boundary of the Large Helical Device (LHD) [A. Komori et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104015 (2009)] has a stabilizing effect on formation of radiating plasma, realizing stably sustained divertor detachment operation with the core plasma being unaffected. The data from the several diagnostics, (profiles of electron temperature and density, radiation and temporal evolution of divertor particle flux) indicate selective cooling around X-point of the island and thus peaked radiation there, which is stabilized outside of the last closed flux surface throughout the detachment phase. The vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy measurements of high Z impurity (iron) emission shows significant decrease during the detachment, indicating core plasma decontamination. The results from the three-dimensional (3D) edge transport code, edge Monte Carlo 3D (EMC3) [Y. Feng et al., Contrib. Plasma Phys. 44, 57 (2004)]-EIRENE [D. Reiter et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 47, 172 (2005)] show similar tendency in the radiation pattern. The island size and its radial location are varied to investigate the magnetic topology effects on the detachment control. The divertor particle flux and neutral pressure exhibit intermittent oscillation as well as modification of recycling pattern during the detachment, which are found to reflect the island structure.

  8. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) investigation of impacts of an obstruction on airflow in underground mines

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, L.; Goodman, G.; Martikainen, A.

    2015-01-01

    Continuous airflow monitoring can improve the safety of the underground work force by ensuring the uninterrupted and controlled distribution of mine ventilation to all working areas. Air velocity measurements vary significantly and can change rapidly depending on the exact measurement location and, in particular, due to the presence of obstructions in the air stream. Air velocity must be measured at locations away from obstructions to avoid the vortices and eddies that can produce inaccurate readings. Further, an uninterrupted measurement path cannot always be guaranteed when using continuous airflow monitors due to the presence of nearby equipment, personnel, roof falls and rib rolls. Effective use of these devices requires selection of a minimum distance from an obstacle, such that an air velocity measurement can be made but not affected by the presence of that obstacle. This paper investigates the impacts of an obstruction on the behavior of downstream airflow using a numerical CFD model calibrated with experimental test results from underground testing. Factors including entry size, obstruction size and the inlet or incident velocity are examined for their effects on the distributions of airflow around an obstruction. A relationship is developed between the minimum measurement distance and the hydraulic diameters of the entry and the obstruction. A final analysis considers the impacts of continuous monitor location on the accuracy of velocity measurements and on the application of minimum measurement distance guidelines. PMID:26388684

  9. Considerations for efficient airflow design in cleanrooms

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2004-07-29

    A high-performance cleanroom should provide efficient energy performance in addition to effective contamination control. Energy-efficient designs can yield capital and operational cost savings, and can be part of a strategy to improve productivity in the cleanroom industry. Based upon in-situ measurement data from ISO Class 5 clean rooms, this article discusses key factors affecting cleanroom air system performance and benefits of efficient airflow design in clean rooms. Cleanroom HVAC systems used in the semiconductor, pharmaceutical, and healthcare industries are very energy intensive, requiring large volumes of cleaned air to remove or dilute contaminants for satisfactory operations. There is a tendency, however, to design excessive airflow rates into cleanroom HVAC systems, due to factors such as design conservatism, lack of thorough understanding of airflow requirements, concerns about cleanliness reliability, and potential design and operational liabilities. Energy use of cleanroom environmental systems varies with system type and design, cleanroom functions, and the control of critical parameters such as temperature and humidity. In particular, cleanroom cleanliness requirements specified by cleanliness class have an impact on overall energy use. A previous study covering Europe and the US reveals annual cleanroom electricity usage for cooling and fan energy varies significantly depending on cleanliness class, and may account for up to three-quarters of total annual operating costs. A study on a semiconductor cleanroom in Japan found air delivery systems account for more than 30% of total power consumption. It is evident that the main factors dictating cleanroom operation energy include airflow rates and HVAC system efficiency. Improving energy efficiency in clean rooms may potentially contribute to significant savings in the initial costs of the facilities as well as operation and maintenance costs. For example, energy consumption by a typical chip

  10. Airflow limitation is accompanied by diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Hellebrandová, L; Chlumský, J; Vostatek, P; Novák, D; Rýznarová, Z; Bunc, V

    2016-07-18

    Chronic airflow limitation, caused by chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or by asthma, is believed to change the shape and the position of the diaphragm due to an increase in lung volume. We have made a comparison of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of diaphragm in supine position with pulmonary functions, respiratory muscle function and exercise tolerance. We have studied the differences between patients with COPD, patients with asthma, and healthy subjects. Most interestingly we found the lung hyperinflation leads to the changes in diaphragmatic excursions during the breathing cycle, seen in the differences between the maximal expiratory diaphragm position (DPex) in patients with COPD and control group (p=0.0016). The magnitude of the diaphragmatic dysfunction was significantly related to the airflow limitation expressed by the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 s to slow vital capacity (FEV(1)/SVC), (%, p=0.0007); to the lung hyperinflation expressed as the ratio of the residual volume to total lung capacity (RV/TLC), (%, p=0.0018) and the extent of tidal volume constrain expressed as maximal tidal volume (V(Tmax)), ([l], p=0.0002); and the ratio of tidal volume to slow vital capacity (V(T)/SVC), (p=0.0038) during submaximal exercise. These results suggest that diaphragmatic movement fails to contribute sufficiently to the change in lung volume in emphysema. Tests of respiratory muscle function were related to the position of the diaphragm in deep expiration, e.g. neuromuscular coupling (P(0.1)/V(T)) (p=0.0232). The results have shown that the lung volumes determine the position of the diaphragm and function of the respiratory muscles. Chronic airflow limitation seems to change the position of the diaphragm, which thereafter influences inspiratory muscle function and exercise tolerance. There is an apparent relationship between the position of the diaphragm and the pulmonary functions and exercise tolerance. PMID:27070746

  11. Incidence of airflow limitation among employees in Norwegian smelters.

    PubMed

    Søyseth, Vidar; Johnsen, Helle Laier; Bugge, Merete Drevvatne; Hetland, Siri Merete; Kongerud, Johny

    2011-09-01

    We have investigated the association between the incidence of airflow limitation and occupational exposure. The employees (n = 3,924) were investigated annually during five years (n = 16,570) using spirometry. Exposure was classified using job category and a job exposure matrix. Airflow limitation was expressed using two indices: (i) as forced expiratory volume in one second/force vital capacity (FEV(1) /FVC) <0.7 and (ii) lower limit of normal (LLN). The incidence of airflow limitation was 21.2/1000 years(-1) and 15.1/1000 years(-1) using the fixed limit (0.7) and the LLN criterion, respectively. We found a dose-response relationship between the incidence of airflow limitation and tobacco consumption and with job-category in non-smokers. The associations between airflow limitation and covariates were independent of how airflow limitation was defined. The incidence of airflow limitation defined as FEV(l) /FVC <0.7 yielded higher incidence rates of airflow limitation than LLN. We found a significant association between the incidence of airflow limitation and occupational exposure in non-smokers. PMID:21360726

  12. Airflow elicits a spider's jump towards airborne prey. I. Airflow around a flying blowfly

    PubMed Central

    Klopsch, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.; Barth, Friedrich G.

    2012-01-01

    The hunting spider Cupiennius salei uses airflow generated by flying insects for the guidance of its prey-capture jump. We investigated the velocity field of the airflow generated by a freely flying blowfly close to the flow sensors on the spider's legs. It shows three characteristic phases (I–III). (I) When approaching, the blowfly induces an airflow signal near the spider with only little fluctuation (0.013 ± 0.006 m s−1) and a strength that increases nearly exponentially with time (maximum: 0.164 ± 0.051 m s−1 s.d.). The spider detects this flow while the fly is still 38.4 ± 5.6 mm away. The fluctuation of the airflow above the sensors increases linearly up to 0.037 m s−1 with the fly's altitude. Differences in the time of arrival and intensity of the fly signal at different legs probably inform the spider about the direction to the prey. (II) Phase II abruptly follows phase I with a much higher degree of fluctuation (fluctuation amplitudes: 0.114 ± 0.050 m s−1). It starts when the fly is directly above the sensor and corresponds to the time-dependent flow in the wake below and behind the fly. Its onset indicates to the spider that its prey is now within reach and triggers its jump. The spider derives information on the fly's position from the airflow characteristics, enabling it to properly time its jump. The horizontal velocity of the approaching fly is reflected by the time of arrival differences (ranging from 0.038 to 0.108 s) of the flow at different legs and the exponential velocity growth rate (16–79 s−1) during phase I. (III) The air flow velocity decays again after the fly has passed the spider. PMID:22572032

  13. Airflow elicits a spider's jump towards airborne prey. I. Airflow around a flying blowfly.

    PubMed

    Klopsch, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C; Barth, Friedrich G

    2012-10-01

    The hunting spider Cupiennius salei uses airflow generated by flying insects for the guidance of its prey-capture jump. We investigated the velocity field of the airflow generated by a freely flying blowfly close to the flow sensors on the spider's legs. It shows three characteristic phases (I-III). (I) When approaching, the blowfly induces an airflow signal near the spider with only little fluctuation (0.013 ± 0.006 m s(-1)) and a strength that increases nearly exponentially with time (maximum: 0.164 ± 0.051 m s(-1) s.d.). The spider detects this flow while the fly is still 38.4 ± 5.6 mm away. The fluctuation of the airflow above the sensors increases linearly up to 0.037 m s(-1) with the fly's altitude. Differences in the time of arrival and intensity of the fly signal at different legs probably inform the spider about the direction to the prey. (II) Phase II abruptly follows phase I with a much higher degree of fluctuation (fluctuation amplitudes: 0.114 ± 0.050 m s(-1)). It starts when the fly is directly above the sensor and corresponds to the time-dependent flow in the wake below and behind the fly. Its onset indicates to the spider that its prey is now within reach and triggers its jump. The spider derives information on the fly's position from the airflow characteristics, enabling it to properly time its jump. The horizontal velocity of the approaching fly is reflected by the time of arrival differences (ranging from 0.038 to 0.108 s) of the flow at different legs and the exponential velocity growth rate (16-79 s(-1)) during phase I. (III) The air flow velocity decays again after the fly has passed the spider. PMID:22572032

  14. Modeling the acoustical and airflow performance of natural ventilation inlet and outlet units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, David J.; Kang, Jian; Brocklesby, Martin

    2005-04-01

    One aspect of the trend towards designing green buildings has been the increasing use of natural ventilation for buildings which otherwise might have required mechanical ventilation or even full air conditioning. However, the pressure differentials available to drive the natural ventilation process are small and hence relatively large inlets and outlets with low resistance to flow are required. These apertures constitute significant acoustic weak points on building facades and hence need to be treated to reduce noise ingress. Although there are a number of natural ventilation units available they have frequently been designed from the application of simple principles without any attempt to optimise both their airflow and acoustical performance. In this paper the results of a series of computer modeling exercises are described using acoustic FEM and BEM plus Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which seeks to establish recommendations for the optimum design of natural ventilation inlet and outlet devices for both acoustical and airflow performance.

  15. PERTURBING LIGNIFICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Perturbing lignification is possible in multiple and diverse ways. Without obvious growth/development phenotypes, transgenic angiosperms can have lignin levels reduced to half the normal level, can have compositions ranging from very high-guaiacyl/low-syringyl to almost totally syringyl, and can eve...

  16. A miniature airflow energy harvester from piezoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, H.; Zhu, D.; White, N. M.; Beeby, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper describes design, simulation, fabrication, and testing of a miniature wind energy harvester based on a flapping cantilevered piezoelectric beam. The wind generator is based on oscillations of a cantilever that faces the direction of the airflow. The oscillation is amplified by interactions between an aerofoil attached on the cantilever and a bluff body placed in front of the aerofoil. A piezoelectric transducer with screen printed PZT materials is used to extract electrical energy. To achieve the optimum design of the harvester, both computational simulations and experiments have been carried out to investigate the structure. A prototype of the wind harvester, with the volume of 37.5 cm3 in total, was fabricated by thick-film screen printing technique. Wind tunnel test results are presented to determine the optimum structure and to characterize the performance of the harvester. The optimized device finally achieved a working wind speed range from 1.5 m/s to 8 m/s. The power output was ranging from 0.1 to 0.86 μW and the open-circuit output voltage was from 0.5 V to 1.32 V.

  17. Experimental evidence of condensation-driven airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunyard, P.; Hodnett, M.; Poveda, G.; Burgos Salcedo, J. D.; Peña, C.

    2015-10-01

    The dominant "convection" model of atmospheric circulation is based on the premise that hot air expands and rises, to be replaced by colder air, thereby creating horizontal surface winds. A recent theory put forward by Makarieva and Gorshkov (2007, 2013) maintains that the primary motive force of atmospheric circulation derives from the intense condensation and sharp pressure reduction that is associated with regions where a high rate of evapotranspiration from natural closed-canopy forests provides the "fuel" for cloud formation. The net result of the "biotic pump" theory is that moist air flows from ocean to land, drawn in by the pressure changes associated with a high rate of condensation. To test the physics underpinning the biotic pump theory, namely that condensation of water vapour, at a sufficiently high rate, results in an uni-directional airflow, a 5 m tall experimental apparatus was designed and built, in which a 20 m3 body of atmospheric air is enclosed inside an annular 14 m long space (a "square donut") around which it can circulate freely, allowing for rotary air flows. One vertical side of the apparatus contains some 17 m of copper refrigeration coils, which cause condensation. The apparatus contains a series of sensors measuring temperature, humidity and barometric pressure every five seconds, and air flow every second. The laws of Newtonian physics are used in calculating the rate of condensation inside the apparatus. The results of more than one hundred experiments show a highly significant correlation, with r2 > 0.9, of airflow and the rate of condensation. The rotary air flows created appear to be consistent both in direction and velocity with the biotic pump hypothesis, the critical factor being the rate change in the partial pressure of water vapour in the enclosed body of atmospheric air. Air density changes, in terms of kinetic energy, are found to be orders of magnitude smaller than the kinetic energy of partial pressure change. The

  18. The Evolution of Unidirectional Pulmonary Airflow.

    PubMed

    Farmer, C G

    2015-07-01

    Conventional wisdom holds that the avian respiratory system is unique because air flows in the same direction through most of the gas-exchange tubules during both phases of ventilation. However, recent studies showing that unidirectional airflow also exists in crocodilians and lizards raise questions about the true phylogenetic distribution of unidirectional airflow, the selective drivers of the trait, the date of origin, and the functional consequences of this phenomenon. These discoveries suggest unidirectional flow was present in the common diapsid ancestor and are inconsistent with the traditional paradigm that unidirectional flow is an adaptation for supporting high rates of gas exchange. Instead, these discoveries suggest it may serve functions such as decreasing the work of breathing, decreasing evaporative respiratory water loss, reducing rates of heat loss, and facilitating crypsis. The divergence in the design of the respiratory system between unidirectionally ventilated lungs and tidally ventilated lungs, such as those found in mammals, is very old, with a minimum date for the divergence in the Permian Period. From this foundation, the avian and mammalian lineages evolved very different respiratory systems. I suggest the difference in design is due to the same selective pressure, expanded aerobic capacity, acting under different environmental conditions. High levels of atmospheric oxygen of the Permian Period relaxed selection for a thin blood-gas barrier and may have resulted in the homogeneous, broncho-alveolar design, whereas the reduced oxygen of the Mesozoic selected for a heterogeneous lung with an extremely thin blood-gas barrier. These differences in lung design may explain the puzzling pattern of ecomorphological diversification of Mesozoic mammals: all were small animals that did not occupy niches requiring a great aerobic capacity. The broncho-alveolar lung and the hypoxia of the Mesozoic may have restricted these mammals from exploiting

  19. Numerical simulation of laboratory fume hood airflow performance

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkpatrick, A.T.; Reither, R.

    1998-12-31

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been used to predict airflow patterns in laboratory fume hoods. The simulation includes bypass fume hood primary operational features including the top and bottom bypasses, front airfoils, and rear-slotted baffles. All results were validated experimentally, and the simulation was found to adequately predict fume hood airflow patterns. The results indicate that fume hood flow patterns are highly dependent on inlet flow boundary conditions so that the computation must include the near field room airflow. Additionally, the study included the effects on the fume hood airflow of sash height changes, an operator positioned outside the fume hood, and equipment within the main fume hood chamber. It was shown that for conditions of a fully open sash height, a person in front of the fume hood, and an object inside the fume hood, the fume hood experiences a loss of containment of the flow.

  20. Cosmological Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lesgourges, J.

    2013-08-01

    We present a self-contained summary of the theory of linear cosmological perturbations. We emphasize the effect of the six parameters of the minimal cosmological model, first, on the spectrum of Cosmic Microwave Background temperature anisotropies, and second, on the linear matter power spectrum. We briefly review at the end the possible impact of a few non-minimal dark matter and dark energy models.

  1. Airflows generated by an impacting drop.

    PubMed

    Bischofberger, Irmgard; Ray, Bahni; Morris, Jeffrey F; Lee, Taehun; Nagel, Sidney R

    2016-03-28

    A drop impacting a solid surface with sufficient velocity will splash and emit many small droplets. However, lowering the ambient air pressure suppresses splashing completely. This effect, robustly found for different liquid and substrate properties, raises the fundamental question of how air affects a spreading drop. In a combined experimental and numerical study we characterize the flow of air induced by the drop after it hits the substrate, using a modified Schlieren optics technique combined with high-speed video imaging and Lattice-Boltzmann simulations. Our experiments reveal the emergence of air structures on different length scales. On large scales, the airflow induced in the drop's wake leads to vortex structures due to interaction with the substrate. On smaller scales, we visualize a ring structure above the outer edge of the spreading liquid generated by the spreading of the drop. Our simulations reveal the interaction between the wake vorticity and the flows originating from the rapidly escaping air from below the impacting drop. We show that the vorticity is governed by a balance between inertial and viscous forces in the air, and is unrelated to the splashing threshold. PMID:26809314

  2. Dynamics of airflow in a short inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Bates, A. J.; Doorly, D. J.; Cetto, R.; Calmet, H.; Gambaruto, A. M.; Tolley, N. S.; Houzeaux, G.; Schroter, R. C.

    2015-01-01

    During a rapid inhalation, such as a sniff, the flow in the airways accelerates and decays quickly. The consequences for flow development and convective transport of an inhaled gas were investigated in a subject geometry extending from the nose to the bronchi. The progress of flow transition and the advance of an inhaled non-absorbed gas were determined using highly resolved simulations of a sniff 0.5 s long, 1 l s−1 peak flow, 364 ml inhaled volume. In the nose, the distribution of airflow evolved through three phases: (i) an initial transient of about 50 ms, roughly the filling time for a nasal volume, (ii) quasi-equilibrium over the majority of the inhalation, and (iii) a terminating phase. Flow transition commenced in the supraglottic region within 20 ms, resulting in large-amplitude fluctuations persisting throughout the inhalation; in the nose, fluctuations that arose nearer peak flow were of much reduced intensity and diminished in the flow decay phase. Measures of gas concentration showed non-uniform build-up and wash-out of the inhaled gas in the nose. At the carina, the form of the temporal concentration profile reflected both shear dispersion and airway filling defects owing to recirculation regions. PMID:25551147

  3. Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Delp, Woody

    2002-10-01

    During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outside air into HVAC systems. This document describes one particular technology for measuring these airflows, a system and a related protocol developed to evaluate this and similar measurement technologies under conditions without wind, and the results of our evaluations. We conclude that the measurement technology evaluated can provide a reasonably accurate measurement of OA flow rate over a broad range of flow, without significantly increasing airflow resistance.

  4. Air monitoring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tissandier, Michael D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An air monitoring device (100) includes an outer casing (101) configured to receive an airflow (102) comprising particulate; a bore (103) located inside the outer casing (101); and a collection probe (104) located inside the outer casing (101), the collection probe (104) being configured such that there is a gap (105) between an exit of the bore (103) and an entrance of the collection probe (104), such that particulate in the airflow (102) having a diameter larger than a threshold flows through an interior of the collection probe (104).

  5. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y.

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min-1, which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response.

  6. Porous silver nanosheets: a novel sensing material for nanoscale and microscale airflow sensors.

    PubMed

    Marzbanrad, Ehsan; Zhao, Boxin; Zhou, Norman Y

    2015-11-01

    Fabrication of nanoscale and microscale machines and devices is one of the goals of nanotechnology. For this purpose, different materials, methods, and devices should be developed. Among them, various types of miniaturized sensors are required to build the nanoscale and microscale systems. In this research, we introduce a new nanoscale sensing material, silver nanosheets, for applications such as nanoscale and microscale gas flow sensors. The silver nanosheets were synthesized through the reduction of silver ions by ascorbic acid in the presence of poly(methacrylic acid) as a capping agent, followed by the growth of silver in the shape of hexagonal and triangular nanoplates, and self-assembly and nanojoining of these structural blocks. At the end of this process, the synthesized nanosheets were floated on the solution. Then, their electrical and thermal stability was demonstrated at 120 °C, and their atmospheric corrosion resistance was clarified at the same temperature range by thermogravimetric analysis. We employed the silver nanosheets in fabricating airflow sensors by scooping out the nanosheets by means of a sensor substrate, drying them at room temperature, and then annealing them at 300 °C for one hour. The fabricated sensors were tested for their ability to measure airflow in the range of 1 to 5 ml min(-1), which resulted in a linear response to the airflow with a response and recovery time around 2 s. Moreover, continuous dynamic testing demonstrated that the response of the sensors was stable and hence the sensors can be used for a long time without detectable drift in their response. PMID:26451714

  7. Importance of Airflow for Physiologic and Ergogenic Effects of Precooling

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Shawnda A.; Cheung, Stephen; Cotter, James D.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Cooling the body before exercise (precooling) has been studied as an ergogenic aid for many thermal conditions; however, airflow accompanying exercise is seldom reported. Objective: To determine whether the physiologic and ergogenic benefits of precooling before endurance exercise may be negated with semirealistic airflow in hot conditions. Design: Crossover study. Setting: Climate-controlled chamber in a research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Ten fit, healthy cyclists. Intervention(s): After a familiarization trial, participants completed 4 randomized, counterbalanced sessions consisting of no precooling versus precooling and no fan airflow versus airflow (~4.8 m/s) during exercise. Precooling was via chest-deep immersion (~24°C) for 1 hour or until core temperature dropped 0.5°C. Participants then cycled at 95% ventilatory threshold in a hot environment (temperature = 30°C, relative humidity = 50%) until volitional exhaustion, core temperature reached >39.5°C, or heart rate reached >95% of maximum. Main Outcome Measure(s): Thermal strain was assessed via core temperature (esophageal and rectal thermistors) and mean skin temperature (thermistors at 10 sites) and cardiovascular strain via heart rate and ratings of perceived exertion. Results: Endurance time (28 ± 12 minutes without precooling or airflow) increased by 30 ± 23 minutes with airflow (~109%; 95% confidence interval = 12, 45 minutes; P < .001) and by 16 ± 15 minutes with precooling (~61%; 95% confidence interval = 4, 25 minutes; P = .013), but it was not further extended when the strategies were combined (29 ± 21 minutes longer than control). During cycling without precooling or airflow, mean core and skin temperatures were higher than in all other trials. Precooling reduced heart rate by 7–11 beats/min during the first 5 minutes of exercise, but this attenuation ended by 15 minutes. Conclusions: Most laboratory-based precooling studies have (inadvertently) overestimated

  8. Minimum airflow reset of single-duct VAV terminal boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young-Hum

    Single duct Variable Air Volume (VAV) systems are currently the most widely used type of HVAC system in the United States. When installing such a system, it is critical to determine the minimum airflow set point of the terminal box, as an optimally selected set point will improve the level of thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) while at the same time lower overall energy costs. In principle, this minimum rate should be calculated according to the minimum ventilation requirement based on ASHRAE standard 62.1 and maximum heating load of the zone. Several factors must be carefully considered when calculating this minimum rate. Terminal boxes with conventional control sequences may result in occupant discomfort and energy waste. If the minimum rate of airflow is set too high, the AHUs will consume excess fan power, and the terminal boxes may cause significant simultaneous room heating and cooling. At the same time, a rate that is too low will result in poor air circulation and indoor air quality in the air-conditioned space. Currently, many scholars are investigating how to change the algorithm of the advanced VAV terminal box controller without retrofitting. Some of these controllers have been found to effectively improve thermal comfort, indoor air quality, and energy efficiency. However, minimum airflow set points have not yet been identified, nor has controller performance been verified in confirmed studies. In this study, control algorithms were developed that automatically identify and reset terminal box minimum airflow set points, thereby improving indoor air quality and thermal comfort levels, and reducing the overall rate of energy consumption. A theoretical analysis of the optimal minimum airflow and discharge air temperature was performed to identify the potential energy benefits of resetting the terminal box minimum airflow set points. Applicable control algorithms for calculating the ideal values for the minimum airflow reset were developed and

  9. Respiratory phase resetting and airflow changes induced by swallowing in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Paydarfar, D; Gilbert, R J; Poppel, C S; Nassab, P F

    1995-01-01

    timing of swallowing events, were not significantly altered by the phase in the respiratory cycle at which swallowing was exhibited. 6. To quantify the relationship between bolus flow and respiration, we determined the latencies between cessation of inspiratory airflow and arrival of the bolus at the larynx (alpha), and between laryngeal bolus departure and resumption of inspiratory airflow (delta). Both values were dependent upon the respiratory phase of swallowing. The lowest values for alpha and delta were found for early-inspiratory and late-expiratory swallows, respectively. 7. We conclude that swallowing causes respiratory phase resetting with a pattern that is characteristic of the strong perturbations of an attractor-cycle oscillator.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) Images Figure 4 PMID:7776238

  10. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Brad G; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P

    2006-08-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's guide, NUREG-1400, addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present detailed examples of the methodology used to conduct two qualitative airflow studies at different sites. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within a high-bay building for the purpose of determining appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an airflow study, the stagnant layer may not have been identified and could have resulted in placement of samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test. The methods described in this article can be applied at most facilities where determination of airflow patterns or the verification of suspected airflow patterns is required. PMID:16823267

  11. Resistance to forced airflow through layers of composting organic material.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Denis Leocádio; de Matos, Antonio Teixeira; Melo, Evandro de Castro

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to adjust equations to estimate the static pressure gradient of airflow through layers of organic residues submitted to two stages of biochemical degradation, and to evaluate the static pressure drop of airflow thought the material layer. Measurements of static pressure drop in the layers of sugarcane bagasse and coffee husks mixed with poultry litter on day 0 and after 30 days of composting were performed using a prototype with specific airflow rates ranging from 0.02 to 0.13 m(3) s(-1) m(-2). Static pressure gradient and specific airflow rate data were properly fit to the Shedd, Hukill & Ives and Ergun models, which may be used to predict the static pressure gradient of air to be blown through the organic residue layers. However, the Shedd model was that which best represented the phenomenon studied. The static pressure drop of airflow increased as a power of the material layer thickness and showed tendency for decreasing with the biochemical degradation time of the organic material. PMID:25536861

  12. Effect of Airflows on Repetitive Nanosecond Volume Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jingfeng; Wei, Liqiu; Huo, Yuxin; Song, Jian; Yu, Daren; Zhang, Chaohai

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric pressure discharges excited by repetitive nanosecond pulses have attracted significant attention for various applications. In this paper, a plate-plate discharge with airflows is excited by a repetitive nanosecond pulse generator. Under different experiment conditions, the applied voltages, discharge currents, and discharge images are recorded. The plasma images presented here indicate that the volume discharge modes vary with airflow speeds, and a diffuse and homogeneous volume discharge occurs at the speed of more than 35 m/s. The role of airflows provides different effects on the 2-stage pulse discharges. The 1st pulse currents nearly maintain consistency for different airflow speeds. However, the 2nd pulse current has a change trend of first decreasing and then rapidly increasing, and the value difference for 2nd pulse currents is about 20 A under different airflows. In addition, the experimental results are discussed according to the electrical parameters and discharge images. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 51006027, 51437002, and 51477035)

  13. Parallel Computation of Airflow in the Human Lung Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taehun; Tawhai, Merryn; Hoffman, Eric. A.

    2005-11-01

    Parallel computations of airflow in the human lung based on domain decomposition are performed. The realistic lung model is segmented and reconstructed from CT images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-04368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. Because of the large number of the airway generation and the sheer complexity of the geometry, massively parallel computation of pulmonary airflow is carried out. We present the parallel algorithm implemented in the custom-developed characteristic-Galerkin finite element method, evaluate the speed-up and scalability of the scheme, and estimate the computing resources needed to simulate the airflow in the conducting airways of the human lungs. It is found that the special tree-like geometry enables the inter-processor communications to occur among only three or four processors for optimal parallelization irrespective of the number of processors involved in the computation.

  14. Airflow Hazard Visualization for Helicopter Pilots: Flight Simulation Study Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.; Long, Kurtis R.

    2005-01-01

    Airflow hazards such as vortices or low level wind shear have been identified as a primary contributing factor in many helicopter accidents. US Navy ships generate airwakes over their decks, creating potentially hazardous conditions for shipboard rotorcraft launch and recovery. Recent sensor developments may enable the delivery of airwake data to the cockpit, where visualizing the hazard data may improve safety and possibly extend ship/helicopter operational envelopes. A prototype flight-deck airflow hazard visualization system was implemented on a high-fidelity rotorcraft flight dynamics simulator. Experienced helicopter pilots, including pilots from all five branches of the military, participated in a usability study of the system. Data was collected both objectively from the simulator and subjectively from post-test questionnaires. Results of the data analysis are presented, demonstrating a reduction in crash rate and other trends that illustrate the potential of airflow hazard visualization to improve flight safety.

  15. Unidirectional pulmonary airflow patterns in the savannah monitor lizard.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Emma R; Cieri, Robert L; Butler, James P; Farmer, C G

    2014-02-20

    The unidirectional airflow patterns in the lungs of birds have long been considered a unique and specialized trait associated with the oxygen demands of flying, their endothermic metabolism and unusual pulmonary architecture. However, the discovery of similar flow patterns in the lungs of crocodilians indicates that this character is probably ancestral for all archosaurs--the group that includes extant birds and crocodilians as well as their extinct relatives, such as pterosaurs and dinosaurs. Unidirectional flow in birds results from aerodynamic valves, rather than from sphincters or other physical mechanisms, and similar aerodynamic valves seem to be present in crocodilians. The anatomical and developmental similarities in the primary and secondary bronchi of birds and crocodilians suggest that these structures and airflow patterns may be homologous. The origin of this pattern is at least as old as the split between crocodilians and birds, which occurred in the Triassic period. Alternatively, this pattern of flow may be even older; this hypothesis can be tested by investigating patterns of airflow in members of the outgroup to birds and crocodilians, the Lepidosauromorpha (tuatara, lizards and snakes). Here we demonstrate region-specific unidirectional airflow in the lungs of the savannah monitor lizard (Varanus exanthematicus). The presence of unidirectional flow in the lungs of V. exanthematicus thus gives rise to two possible evolutionary scenarios: either unidirectional airflow evolved independently in archosaurs and monitor lizards, or these flow patterns are homologous in archosaurs and V. exanthematicus, having evolved only once in ancestral diapsids (the clade encompassing snakes, lizards, crocodilians and birds). If unidirectional airflow is plesiomorphic for Diapsida, this respiratory character can be reconstructed for extinct diapsids, and evolved in a small ectothermic tetrapod during the Palaeozoic era at least a hundred million years before the

  16. Perturbative fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Kopeliovich, B. Z.; Pirner, H.-J.; Potashnikova, I. K.; Schmidt, Ivan; Tarasov, A. V.

    2008-03-01

    The Berger model of perturbative fragmentation of quarks to pions is improved by providing an absolute normalization and keeping all terms in a (1-z) expansion, which makes the calculation valid at all values of fractional pion momentum z. We also replace the nonrelativistic wave function of a loosely bound pion by the more realistic procedure of projecting to the light-cone pion wave function, which in turn is taken from well known models. The full calculation does not confirm the (1-z){sup 2} behavior of the fragmentation function (FF) predicted in [E. L. Berger, Z. Phys. C 4, 289 (1980); Phys. Lett. 89B, 241 (1980] for z>0.5, and only works at very large z>0.95, where it is in reasonable agreement with phenomenological FFs. Otherwise, we observe quite a different z-dependence which grossly underestimates data at smaller z. The disagreement is reduced after the addition of pions from decays of light vector mesons, but still remains considerable. The process dependent higher twist terms are also calculated exactly and found to be important at large z and/or p{sub T}.

  17. Study of Airflow Out of the Mouth During Speech.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catford, J.C.; And Others

    Airflow outside the mouth is diagnostic of articulatory activities in the vocal tract, both total volume-velocity and the distribution of particle velocities over the flow-front being useful for this purpose. A system for recording and displaying both these types of information is described. This consists of a matrix of l6 hot-wire anemometer flow…

  18. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOEpatents

    Fasching, George E.

    1984-01-01

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  19. Airflow control system for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. A. (Inventor); Sanders, B. W.

    1974-01-01

    In addition to fixed and variable bleed devices provided for controlling the position of a terminal shock wave in a supersonic inlet, a plurality of free piston valves are disposed around the periphery of a cowling of a supersonic engine inlet. The free piston valves are disposed in dump passageways, each of which begin at a bleed port in the cowling that is located in the throat region of the inlet, where the diameter of the centerbody is near maximum, and terminates at an opening in the cowling adjacent a free piston valve. Each valve is controlled by reference pressure.

  20. [Mensurement of airflow resistance in neonatal prongs of nasal CPAP

    PubMed

    Sampietro, V I; Azevedo, M P; Resende, J G

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To measure airflow resistance in prongs of nasal CPAP, making use of different gas admission flow (GAF) in the ventilation circuit, in different internal diameters of the nasal prongs, besides verifying whether a GAF responding only to the demand of three times the minute-volume(MV) is enough to the circuit not to be cause of CO(2) retention. METHODOLOGY: Nasal prongs, assembled in the original circuits, were used, having their prongs kept open to the atmosphere. Pressure was read at a pressure monitor, in water centimeters, connected to the appropriate entrance of the circuit. A flowmeter balanced to the pressure was used, gauged at 50 psi, installed to the oxygen net of the Hospital, connected to the assessing set of the CPAP circuit. Initially, making use of the 8 l/min flow and keeping the exhaling set of the circuit closed, it was possible to eliminate the nasal prongs larger than two once the measured resistance was equal to zero. Having nasal parts number zero, 1 and 2 selected for this study, the system was then assembled as for the neonate: the inhaling set to the gas source and the exhaling set sunk into different depths in the water seal (2, 4, 6 and 8 centimeters). At the level of patient analysis, in order to assess the CO(2) retention, a mechanical pulmonary ventilation device was used as gas source and a nasal CPAP circuit was assembled to the device in adequate places. GAF values and FiO(2) were determined in the commands of the mechanical ventilation device. The assessment of gas concentration in the ventilation circuit was made while assisting two newborns. Gas samples were obtained within the ventilation circuit in the system assessing set (samples A), and right after the distal prong to the gas entrance (samples B). To determine MV the Tidal Volume (considered 10ml/kg) was multiplied by the respiratory frequency of the patient; GAF was three times MV. RESULTS: To a maximum GAF of 8 litres/min, only prongs sized zero, 1 and 2 showed

  1. Thermal Remote Anemometer Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Heath, D. Michele; Winfree, William P.; Miller, William E.; Welch, Christopher S.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal Remote Anemometer Device developed for remote, noncontacting, passive measurement of thermal properties of sample. Model heated locally by scanning laser beam and cooled by wind in tunnel. Thermal image of model analyzed to deduce pattern of airflow around model. For materials applications, system used for evaluation of thin films and determination of thermal diffusivity and adhesive-layer contact. For medical applications, measures perfusion through skin to characterize blood flow and used to determine viabilities of grafts and to characterize tissues.

  2. Underwing Compression Vortex-Attenuation Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    Underwing compression vortex-attenuation device designed to provide method for attenuating lift-induced vortex generated by wings of airplane. Includes compression panel attached to lower surface of wing, facing perpendicular to streamwise airflow. Concept effective on all types of aircraft. Causes increase in wing lift rather than reduction when deployed. Device of interest to aircraft designers and enhances air safety in general.

  3. Improved cooling of electromagnetics by directed airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fain, Adam Matthew

    The transformers in aircraft power conversion are often very heavy and represent a significant fuel or range penalty. Being thermally sized, improved cooling methods would allow downsizing and thereby reduced weight. Since the conductive paths in these metal "dense" devices are good, the controlling thermal resistance is typically the convective coefficient. The goal of this study was to optimize the convective air cooling across transformers by parametrically testing candidate shroud geometries to minimize average and hot spot surface temperatures with minimal fan power. A test set up was constructed that included a low velocity wind tunnel, fan, temperature and pressure sensors, DAQ system, and film heaters as well as the actual transformers. Experimental results from a low velocity wind tunnel were well predicted by CFD modeling, providing confidence in continued shroud development with only CFD or experimentally. Curved or bent types of shapes proved to be the most efficient shroud configurations in terms of maximizing heat transfer while reducing the energy requirement to achieve the desired level of cooling.

  4. Airflow and Particle Transport in the Human Respiratory System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleinstreuer, C.; Zhang, Z.

    2010-01-01

    Airflows in the nasal cavities and oral airways are rather complex, possibly featuring a transition to turbulent jet-like flow, recirculating flow, Dean's flow, vortical flows, large pressure drops, prevailing secondary flows, and merging streams in the case of exhalation. Such complex flows propagate subsequently into the tracheobronchial airways. The underlying assumptions for particle transport and deposition are that the aerosols are spherical, noninteracting, and monodisperse and deposit upon contact with the airway surface. Such dilute particle suspensions are typically modeled with the Euler-Lagrange approach for micron particles and in the Euler-Euler framework for nanoparticles. Micron particles deposit nonuniformly with very high concentrations at some local sites (e.g., carinal ridges of large bronchial airways). In contrast, nanomaterial almost coats the airway surfaces, which has implications of detrimental health effects in the case of inhaled toxic nanoparticles. Geometric airway features, as well as histories of airflow fields and particle distributions, may significantly affect particle deposition.

  5. Computational Investigation of Dynamic Glottal Aperture Effects on Respiratory Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xi, Jinxiang; Yan, Hong; Dong, Haibo

    2008-11-01

    The periodic movement of the glottal aperture (vocal folds) during tidal breathing has been long recognized as a factor in altering the airflow dynamics in the tracheobrnchial region. The potential influence from these altered flow structures on the transport and deposition of inhaled particles is not known. However, studies devoted to this dynamic physiological feature are scarce due to the complex anatomy in of the larynx and numerical challenges in simulating dynamic geometries. In this study, a high-fidelity immersed boundary solver is used to investigate this problem. A 3D human oral-larynx-lung model is firstly reconstructed from MRI data. The role of the vocal fold movement and associated airflow characteristics such as vortex shedding, Coanda effect etc. during inhalation and exhalation are then numerically studied.

  6. Efficient airflow design for cleanrooms improves business bottom lines

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Tengfang

    2003-01-05

    Based on a review of airflow design factors and in-situ energy measurements in ISO Cleanliness Class-5 cleanrooms, this paper addresses the importance of energy efficiency in airflow design and opportunities of cost savings in cleanroom practices. The paper discusses design factors that can long lastingly affect cleanroom system performance, and demonstrates benefits of energy efficient cleanroom design from viewpoints of environmental control and business operations. The paper suggests that a high performance cleanroom should not only be effective in contamination control, but also be efficient in energy and environmental performance. The paper also suggests that energy efficient design practice stands to bring in immediate capital cost savings and operation cost savings, and should be regarded by management as a strategy to improve business bottom lines.

  7. A model for simulating airflow and pollutant dispersion around buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, S T; Lee, R L

    1999-02-24

    A three-dimensional, numerical mode1 for simulating airflow and pollutant dispersion around buildings is described. The model is based on an innovative finite element approach and fully implicit time integration techniques. Linear and nonlinear eddy viscosity/diffusivity submodels are provided for turbulence parameterization. Mode1 predictions for the flow-field and dispersion patterns around a surface-mounted cube are compared with measured data from laboratory experiments.

  8. Airflow pattern complexity and airway obstruction in asthma.

    PubMed

    Veiga, Juliana; Lopes, Agnaldo J; Jansen, José M; Melo, Pedro L

    2011-08-01

    The scientific and clinical value of a measure of complexity is potentially enormous because complexity appears to be lost in the presence of illness. The authors examined the effect of elevated airway obstruction on the complexity of the airflow (Q) pattern of asthmatic patients analyzing the airflow approximate entropy (ApEnQ). This study involved 11 healthy controls, 11 asthmatics with normal spirometric exams, and 40 asthmatics with mild (14), moderate (14), and severe (12) airway obstructions. A significant (P < 0.02) reduction in the ApEnQ was observed in the asthmatic patients. This reduction was significantly correlated with spirometric indexes of airway obstruction [FEV(1) (%): R = 0.31, P = 0.013] and the total respiratory impedance (R = -0.39; P < 0.002). These results are in close agreement with pathophysiological fundamentals and suggest that the airflow pattern becomes less complex in asthmatic patients, which may reduce the adaptability of the respiratory system to perform the exercise that is associated with daily life activities. This analysis was able to identify respiratory changes in patients with mild obstruction with an adequate accuracy (83%). Higher accuracies were obtained in patients with moderate and severe obstructions. The analysis of airflow pattern complexity by the ApEnQ was able to provide new information concerning the changes associated with asthma. In addition, this analysis was also able to contribute to the detection of the adverse effects of asthma. Because these measurements are easy to perform, such a technique may represent an alternative and/or a complement to other conventional exams to help the clinical evaluations of asthmatic patients. PMID:21565988

  9. Air Trapping and Airflow Obstruction in Newborn Cystic Fibrosis Piglets

    PubMed Central

    Adam, Ryan J.; Michalski, Andrew S.; Bauer, Christian; Abou Alaiwa, Mahmoud H.; Gross, Thomas J.; Awadalla, Maged S.; Bouzek, Drake C.; Gansemer, Nicholas D.; Taft, Peter J.; Hoegger, Mark J.; Diwakar, Amit; Ochs, Matthias; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Beichel, Reinhard R.; Meyerholz, David K.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Air trapping and airflow obstruction are being increasingly identified in infants with cystic fibrosis. These findings are commonly attributed to airway infection, inflammation, and mucus buildup. Objectives: To learn if air trapping and airflow obstruction are present before the onset of airway infection and inflammation in cystic fibrosis. Methods: On the day they are born, piglets with cystic fibrosis lack airway infection and inflammation. Therefore, we used newborn wild-type piglets and piglets with cystic fibrosis to assess air trapping, airway size, and lung volume with inspiratory and expiratory X-ray computed tomography scans. Micro–computed tomography scanning was used to assess more distal airway sizes. Airway resistance was determined with a mechanical ventilator. Mean linear intercept and alveolar surface area were determined using stereologic methods. Measurements and Main Results: On the day they were born, piglets with cystic fibrosis exhibited air trapping more frequently than wild-type piglets (75% vs. 12.5%, respectively). Moreover, newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis had increased airway resistance that was accompanied by luminal size reduction in the trachea, mainstem bronchi, and proximal airways. In contrast, mean linear intercept length, alveolar surface area, and lung volume were similar between both genotypes. Conclusions: The presence of air trapping, airflow obstruction, and airway size reduction in newborn piglets with cystic fibrosis before the onset of airway infection, inflammation, and mucus accumulation indicates that cystic fibrosis impacts airway development. Our findings suggest that early airflow obstruction and air trapping in infants with cystic fibrosis might, in part, be caused by congenital airway abnormalities. PMID:24168209

  10. Field measurement of uncontrolled airflow and depressurization in restaurants

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, J.B.; Fairey, P.W.; Withers, C.R. Jr.; McKendry, B.B.; Moyer, N.A.

    1996-11-01

    Field investigations were done in seven restaurants (subsample of a study of 63 commercial buildings) to identify uncontrolled airflows and pressure imbalances. Testing included building airtightness tests, identification of building air barrier locations, duct system airtightness, characterization of pressure differentials, building airflow balance, and infiltration/ventilation rates. All restaurants were found to operate at negative pressures that ranged from {minus}0.003 in. w.c. ({minus}0.8 Pa) to {minus}0.173 in. w.c. ({minus}43 Pa) and averaged {minus}0.051 in. w.c. ({minus}12.7 Pa) under normal operation. The variables that affect depressurization are large exhaust fans, missing or undersized make up air, intermittent outdoor air caused by the cycling of air handlers, dirty outdoor air and make up air filters, and building airtightness. These uncontrolled airflows and pressure imbalances impact energy use, ventilation rates, sizing of heating and air-conditioning systems, indoor comfort, relative humidity, moisture damage to building materials, mold and mildew growth, operation of combustion equipment, and indoor air quality.

  11. Airflow Simulations around OA Intake Louver with Electronic Velocity Sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hwataik; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2009-04-01

    It is important to control outdoor airflow rates into HVAC systems in terms of energy conservation and healthy indoor environment. Technologies are being developed to measure outdoor air (OA) flow rates through OA intake louvers on a real time basis. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the airflow characteristics through an OA intake louver numerically in order to provide suggestions for sensor installations. Airflow patterns are simulated with and without electronic air velocity sensors within cylindrical probes installed between louver blades or at the downstream face of the louver. Numerical results show quite good agreements with experimental data, and provide insights regarding measurement system design. The simulations indicate that velocity profiles are more spatially uniform at the louver outlet relative to between louver blades, that pressure drops imposed by the sensor bars are smaller with sensor bars at the louver outlet, and that placement of the sensor bars between louver blades substantially increases air velocities inside the louver. These findings suggest there is an advantage to placing the sensor bars at the louver outlet face.

  12. Realistic glottal motion and airflow rate during human breathing.

    PubMed

    Scheinherr, Adam; Bailly, Lucie; Boiron, Olivier; Lagier, Aude; Legou, Thierry; Pichelin, Marine; Caillibotte, Georges; Giovanni, Antoine

    2015-09-01

    The glottal geometry is a key factor in the aerosol delivery efficiency for treatment of lung diseases. However, while glottal vibrations were extensively studied during human phonation, the realistic glottal motion during breathing is poorly understood. Therefore, most current studies assume an idealized steady glottis in the context of respiratory dynamics, and thus neglect the flow unsteadiness related to this motion. This is particularly important to assess the aerosol transport mechanisms in upper airways. This article presents a clinical study conducted on 20 volunteers, to examine the realistic glottal motion during several breathing tasks. Nasofibroscopy was used to investigate the glottal geometrical variations simultaneously with accurate airflow rate measurements. In total, 144 breathing sequences of 30s were recorded. Regarding the whole database, two cases of glottal time-variations were found: "static" or "dynamic" ones. Typically, the peak value of glottal area during slow breathing narrowed from 217 ± 54 mm(2) (mean ± STD) during inspiration, to 178 ± 35 mm(2) during expiration. Considering flow unsteadiness, it is shown that the harmonic approximation of the airflow rate underevaluates the inertial effects as compared to realistic patterns, especially at the onset of the breathing cycle. These measurements provide input data to conduct realistic numerical simulations of laryngeal airflow and particle deposition. PMID:26159687

  13. Airflow calibration of a bellmouth inlet for measurement of compressor airflow in turbine-powered propulsion simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. C.

    1985-01-01

    The development of turbine-powered propulsion simulators for high-speed wind tunnel models requires a bellmouth inlet which can accurately measure compressor-inlet airflow. A bellmouth inlet was instrumented with total pressure probes, static pressure probes, and thermocouples for airflow measurement. The bellmouth flowmeter against a critical venturi flowmeter was calibrated. The calibration was done at four inlet pressures ranging from 58 to 114 kPa. The bellmouth discharge coefficient varied as a function of bellmouth-throat Mach number. Over the range of Reynolds number and Mach number tested the Reynolds number was not a significant influence on the discharge coefficient. The overall accuracy of the bellmouth inlet as a flowmeter was estimated to be + or - 0.5% of the flowmeter reading.

  14. Integrative pathway genomics of lung function and airflow obstruction.

    PubMed

    Gharib, Sina A; Loth, Daan W; Soler Artigas, María; Birkland, Timothy P; Wilk, Jemma B; Wain, Louise V; Brody, Jennifer A; Obeidat, Ma'en; Hancock, Dana B; Tang, Wenbo; Rawal, Rajesh; Boezen, H Marike; Imboden, Medea; Huffman, Jennifer E; Lahousse, Lies; Alves, Alexessander C; Manichaikul, Ani; Hui, Jennie; Morrison, Alanna C; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Smith, Albert Vernon; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Surakka, Ida; Vitart, Veronique; Evans, David M; Strachan, David P; Deary, Ian J; Hofman, Albert; Gläser, Sven; Wilson, James F; North, Kari E; Zhao, Jing Hua; Heckbert, Susan R; Jarvis, Deborah L; Probst-Hensch, Nicole; Schulz, Holger; Barr, R Graham; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; O'Connor, George T; Kähönen, Mika; Cassano, Patricia A; Hysi, Pirro G; Dupuis, Josée; Hayward, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M; Hall, Ian P; Parks, William C; Tobin, Martin D; London, Stephanie J

    2015-12-01

    Chronic respiratory disorders are important contributors to the global burden of disease. Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of lung function measures have identified several trait-associated loci, but explain only a modest portion of the phenotypic variability. We postulated that integrating pathway-based methods with GWASs of pulmonary function and airflow obstruction would identify a broader repertoire of genes and processes influencing these traits. We performed two independent GWASs of lung function and applied gene set enrichment analysis to one of the studies and validated the results using the second GWAS. We identified 131 significantly enriched gene sets associated with lung function and clustered them into larger biological modules involved in diverse processes including development, immunity, cell signaling, proliferation and arachidonic acid. We found that enrichment of gene sets was not driven by GWAS-significant variants or loci, but instead by those with less stringent association P-values. Next, we applied pathway enrichment analysis to a meta-analyzed GWAS of airflow obstruction. We identified several biologic modules that functionally overlapped with those associated with pulmonary function. However, differences were also noted, including enrichment of extracellular matrix (ECM) processes specifically in the airflow obstruction study. Network analysis of the ECM module implicated a candidate gene, matrix metalloproteinase 10 (MMP10), as a putative disease target. We used a knockout mouse model to functionally validate MMP10's role in influencing lung's susceptibility to cigarette smoke-induced emphysema. By integrating pathway analysis with population-based genomics, we unraveled biologic processes underlying pulmonary function traits and identified a candidate gene for obstructive lung disease. PMID:26395457

  15. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, K.T.; Monticello, T.M. )

    1990-04-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. 61 references.

  16. Real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field by use of digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Jianglei; Wu, Bingjing; Chen, Xin; Liu, Junjiang; Wang, Jun; Zhao, Jianlin

    2013-04-01

    The measurement and analysis of airflow field is very important in fluid dynamics. For airflow, smoke particles can be added to visually observe the turbulence phenomena by particle tracking technology, but the effect of smoke particles to follow the high speed airflow will reduce the measurement accuracy. In recent years, with the advantage of non-contact, nondestructive, fast and full-field measurement, digital holography has been widely applied in many fields, such as deformation and vibration analysis, particle characterization, refractive index measurement, and so on. In this paper, we present a method to measure the airflow field by use of digital holography. A small wind tunnel model made of acrylic glass is built to control the velocity and direction of airflow. Different shapes of samples such as aircraft wing and cylinder are placed in the wind tunnel model to produce different forms of flow field. With a Mach-Zehnder interferometer setup, a series of digital holograms carrying the information of airflow filed distributions in different states are recorded by CCD camera and corresponding holographic images are numerically reconstructed from the holograms by computer. Then we can conveniently obtain the velocity or pressure information of the airflow deduced from the quantitative phase information of holographic images and visually display the airflow filed and its evolution in the form of a movie. The theory and experiment results show that digital holography is a robust and feasible approach for real-time visualization and analysis of airflow field.

  17. EFFECT OF AIRFLOW AND HEAT INPUT RATES ON DUCT EFFICIENCY.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDREWS,J.W.

    2003-05-28

    Reducing the airflow and heat input rates of a furnace that is connected to a duct system in thermal contact with unconditioned spaces can significantly reduce thermal distribution efficiency. This is a straightforward theoretical calculation based on the increased residence time of the air in the duct at the lower flow rate, which results in greater conduction losses. Experimental tests in an instrumented residential-size duct system have confirmed this prediction. Results are compared with the heat-loss algorithm in ASHRAE Standid 152P. The paper concludes with a discussion of possible remedies for this loss of efficiency in existing systems and optional design strategies in new construction.

  18. Vapor-Generator Wand Helps To Reveal Airflow Patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robelen, David B.

    1993-01-01

    In vapor-generator wand, liquid propylene glycol flows into electrically heated stainless-steel tube. Liquid boils in heated tube, and emerging vapor forms dense, smoke-like fog used to make airflow patterns visible. Built in variety of sizes, suitable for uses ranging from tabletop demonstrations to research in wind tunnels. For best viewing, plume illuminated by bright, focused incandescent spotlight at right angle to viewing direction. Viewing further enhanced by coating walls of test chamber with flat, dark color to minimize reflections and increase contrast.

  19. Evaluation of airflow patterns in 2706-T and 2706-TA

    SciTech Connect

    DEROSA, D.C.

    1999-08-26

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the adequacy of the current placement of fixed head air samplers and continuous air monitors (CAMs) in the 2706-T and 2706-TA Complex. The airflow study consisted of 6 configurations of facility HVAC and HEPA filtration equipment to determine impacts on CAM location. The results of this study provide recommendations based on guidance in DOE G 411.1-8 and NUREG-1400 for placement of fixed head air samplers or CAMS within 2706-T and 2706-TA.

  20. CFD modeling of pharmaceutical isolators with experimental verification of airflow.

    PubMed

    Nayan, N; Akay, H U; Walsh, M R; Bell, W V; Troyer, G L; Dukes, R E; Mohan, P

    2007-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models have been developed to predict the airflow in a transfer isolator using a commercial CFD code. In order to assess the ability of the CFD approach in predicting the flow inside an isolator, hot wire anemometry measurements and a novel experimental flow visualization technique consisting of helium-filled glycerin bubbles were used. The results obtained have been shown to agree well with the experiments and show that CFD can be used to model barrier systems and isolators with practical fidelity. This indicates that CFD can and should be used to support the design, testing, and operation of barrier systems and isolators. PMID:17933207

  1. Density perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Palenik, Mark C.; Dunlap, Brett I.

    2015-07-28

    Despite the fundamental importance of electron density in density functional theory, perturbations are still usually dealt with using Hartree-Fock-like orbital equations known as coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham (CPKS). As an alternative, we develop a perturbation theory that solves for the perturbed density directly, removing the need for CPKS. This replaces CPKS with a true Hohenberg-Kohn density perturbation theory. In CPKS, the perturbed density is found in the basis of products of occupied and virtual orbitals, which becomes ever more over-complete as the size of the orbital basis set increases. In our method, the perturbation to the density is expanded in terms of a series of density basis functions and found directly. It is possible to solve for the density in such a way that it makes the total energy stationary even if the density basis is incomplete.

  2. Mechanism of bronchodilator effect in chronic airflow limitation.

    PubMed Central

    Jaeschke, R; Guyatt, G H; Singer, J; Keller, J; Newhouse, M T

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the mechanisms through which two bronchodilators (theophylline and salbutamol) influence dyspnea during daily activities. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with chronic airflow limitation participated in a multiple crossover, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. The effect of theophylline and salbutamol, alone or combined, on pulmonary function and dyspnea during daily activities was examined. Correlations of changes in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) and maximum expiratory pressures (MIPs) (independent variables) and changes in dyspnea score during daily activities (dependent variable) were also examined. RESULTS: The two drugs proved to be beneficial the effects in general were additive rather than synergistic. The drugs improved the FEV1; theophylline significantly improved the MIPs. The correlation between the changes in FEV1 and those in dyspnea score, after adjustment for the changes in MIPs, was 0.55 (p less than 0.001). The correlation between the changes in MIPs and those in dyspnea score, after adjustment for the changes in FEV1, was 0.39 (p less than 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Changes in airway calibre and in respiratory muscle strength play an independent and important role in dyspnea during daily activities in patients with chronic airflow limitation. Changes in airway calibre may be of greater importance. PMID:1984814

  3. Inspirational airflow patterns in deviated noses: a numerical study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Hua; Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Kian Meng; Lee, Shu Jin; San, Lynette Teo Li; Wang, De Yun

    2013-01-01

    This study attempts to evaluate the effects of deviation of external nose to nasal airflow patterns. Four typical subjects were chosen for model reconstruction based on computed tomography images of undeviated, S-shaped deviated, C-shaped deviated and slanted deviated noses. To study the hypothetical influence of deviation of external nasal wall on nasal airflow (without internal blockage), the collapsed region along the turbinate was artificially reopened in all the three cases with deviated noses. Computational fluid dynamics simulations were carried out in models of undeviated, original deviated and reopened nasal cavities at both flow rates of 167 and 500 ml/s. The shape of the anterior nasal roof was found to be collapsed on one side of the nasal airways in all the deviated noses. High wall shear stress region was found around the collapsed anterior nasal roof. The nasal resistances in cavities with deviated noses were considerably larger than healthy nasal cavity. Patterns of path-line distribution and wall shear stress distribution were similar between original deviated and reopened models. In conclusion, the deviation of an external nose is associated with the collapse of one anterior nasal roof. The crooked external nose induced a larger nasal resistance compared to the undeviated case, while the internal blockage of the airway along the turbinates further increased it. PMID:22515677

  4. IEA BESTEST Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2011-11-01

    This paper documents a set of in-depth diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models that do not include the heat and mass transfer effects of airflow between zones. The multi-zone non-airflow test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST (Judkoff and Neymark 1995a).

  5. Estimating Engine Airflow in Gas-Turbine Powered Aircraft with Clean and Distorted Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. G.; Steenken, W. G.; Yuhas, A. J.

    1996-01-01

    The P404-GF-400 Powered F/A-18A High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV) was used to examine the impact of inlet-generated total-pressure distortion on estimating levels of engine airflow. Five airflow estimation methods were studied. The Reference Method was a fan corrected airflow to fan corrected speed calibration from an uninstalled engine test. In-flight airflow estimation methods utilized the average, or individual, inlet duct static- to total-pressure ratios, and the average fan-discharge static-pressure to average inlet total-pressure ratio. Correlations were established at low distortion conditions for each method relative to the Reference Method. A range of distorted inlet flow conditions were obtained from -10 deg. to +60 deg. angle of attack and -7 deg. to +11 deg. angle of sideslip. The individual inlet duct pressure ratio correlation resulted in a 2.3 percent airflow spread for all distorted flow levels with a bias error of -0.7 percent. The fan discharge pressure ratio correlation gave results with a 0.6 percent airflow spread with essentially no systematic error. Inlet-generated total-pressure distortion and turbulence had no significant impact on the P404-GE400 engine airflow pumping. Therefore, a speed-flow relationship may provide the best airflow estimate for a specific engine under all flight conditions.

  6. Energy savings from repair of uncontrolled airflow in 18 small commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Withers, C.R. Jr.; Cummings, J.B.; Fairey, P.W.; McKendry, B.B.; Moyer, N.A.

    1996-12-31

    Uncontrolled airflow, including duct leakage, pressure imbalances caused by closed interior doors, and exhaust/intake airflow imbalance, was characterized in 70 commercial buildings. In 18 of these buildings, uncontrolled airflows were repaired and energy savings from these repairs were monitored. In most buildings, the retrofit was duct repair. In other cases, outdoor airflow was reduced and return air transfers were provided. Cooling energy use was reduced by an average 15.1% in these 18 buildings. With an average repair cost of $455 and average cooling energy savings of $195 per year, uncontrolled airflow retrofits proved to be very cost-effective. Various factors indicate that greater energy savings could be achieved in the future.

  7. A Theoretical Study on Airflow Motive Force and Heat Transfer by the Water Spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuyuki

    On assuming the abscissa moving uniformly with the horizontal airflow in disregard of gravity, airflow motive force and heat transfer by the water spray have been easily analyzed theoretically. Here main results are as follows. The theoretical maximum airflow motive pressure is proportional to both the initial relative velocity of waterdrop and the relative water flow per unit cross-sectional area of the apparatus to the airflow or the moving abscissa but unrelated to the size of waterdrop. The airflow motive pressure approaches to the above maximum with an increase in the length of the apparatus. Making the waterdrop size smaller has an effect on the aparatus to get longer virtually. The initial velocity of waterdrop or the spraying nozzle pressure has little effect on the heat transfer between the air and the water.

  8. Differently patterned airflows induced by 1-kHz femtosecond laser filaments in a cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Haiyi; Liang, Hong; Liu, Yonghong; Ju, Jingjing; Wei, Yingxia; Wang, Cheng; Wang, Tiejun; Liu, Jiansheng; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin; Xu, Zhizhan

    2015-11-01

    Airflow induced by femtosecond laser (800 nm/1 kHz/25 fs) filamentation with different lengths was investigated in a laboratory cloud chamber. Various filament lengths were generated by adjusting laser energy and lens focal length. It was found that airflow patterns are closely related to filament intensity and length. Intense and long filaments are beneficial in updraft generation with large vortices above the filament, while intense and short filaments tend to promote the formation of well-contacted vortices below the filament. Differently patterned airflows induced elliptical snow piles with different masses. We simulated airflow in a cloud chamber numerically taking laser filaments as heat sources. The mechanisms of differently patterned airflow and snow formation induced by filaments were discussed.

  9. Volume Diffuse Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma Produced by Nanosecond High Voltage Pulse in Airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Haicheng; Gao, Wei; Fan, Zhihui; Liu, Yidi; Ren, Chunsheng

    2016-05-01

    Volume diffuse dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma is produced in subsonic airflow by nanosecond high-voltage pulse power supply with a plate-to-plate discharge cell at 6 mm air gap length. The discharge images, optical emission spectra (OES), the applied voltage and current waveforms of the discharge at the changed airflow rates are obtained. When airflow rate is increased, the transition of the discharge mode and the variations of discharge intensity, breakdown characteristics and the temperature of the discharge plasma are investigated. The results show that the discharge becomes more diffuse, discharge intensity is decreased accompanied by the increased breakdown voltage and time lag, and the temperature of the discharge plasma reduces when airflow of small velocity is introduced into the discharge gap. These phenomena are because that the airflow changes the spatial distribution of the heat and the space charge in the discharge gap. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 51437002)

  10. Automated Lattice Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Monahan, Christopher

    2014-11-01

    I review recent developments in automated lattice perturbation theory. Starting with an overview of lattice perturbation theory, I focus on the three automation packages currently "on the market": HiPPy/HPsrc, Pastor and PhySyCAl. I highlight some recent applications of these methods, particularly in B physics. In the final section I briefly discuss the related, but distinct, approach of numerical stochastic perturbation theory.

  11. Mushrooms use convectively created airflows to disperse their spores.

    PubMed

    Dressaire, Emilie; Yamada, Lisa; Song, Boya; Roper, Marcus

    2016-03-15

    Thousands of basidiomycete fungal species rely on mushroom spores to spread across landscapes. It has long been thought that spores depend on favorable winds for dispersal--that active control of spore dispersal by the parent fungus is limited to an impulse delivered to the spores to carry them clear of the gill surface. Here we show that evaporative cooling of the air surrounding the pileus creates convective airflows capable of carrying spores at speeds of centimeters per second. Convective cells can transport spores from gaps that may be only 1 cm high and lift spores 10 cm or more into the air. This work reveals how mushrooms tolerate and even benefit from crowding and explains their high water needs. PMID:26929324

  12. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees.

    PubMed

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium. PMID:27097104

  13. Airflow and optic flow mediate antennal positioning in flying honeybees

    PubMed Central

    Roy Khurana, Taruni; Sane, Sanjay P

    2016-01-01

    To maintain their speeds during navigation, insects rely on feedback from their visual and mechanosensory modalities. Although optic flow plays an essential role in speed determination, it is less reliable under conditions of low light or sparse landmarks. Under such conditions, insects rely on feedback from antennal mechanosensors but it is not clear how these inputs combine to elicit flight-related antennal behaviours. We here show that antennal movements of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, are governed by combined visual and antennal mechanosensory inputs. Frontal airflow, as experienced during forward flight, causes antennae to actively move forward as a sigmoidal function of absolute airspeed values. However, corresponding front-to-back optic flow causes antennae to move backward, as a linear function of relative optic flow, opposite the airspeed response. When combined, these inputs maintain antennal position in a state of dynamic equilibrium. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14449.001 PMID:27097104

  14. Indirect evaporative cooler with condensation of primary airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Vollebregt, H.J.M.; Jong, T. de

    1994-12-31

    In this paper a new application for indirect evaporative cooling is introduced. This cooling principle may be used to cool and dehumidify closed greenhouses. A prototype indirect evaporative cooler with a crossflow configuration was built and its performance was determined in an experimental facility. During tests under Dutch design conditions of the greenhouse and outside air, the plate temperature was less than the dew point of the greenhouse air, so condensation occurred. The rates of sensible and latent heat transferred from the greenhouse air by the prototype cooler were determined. Also, the influence of greenhouse and outside air conditions and airflow rates in the cooler on the enthalpy efficiency was studied. Although the amount of condensation in the prototype indirect evaporative cooler was large, the resulting climate in a closed greenhouse may be more humid than that in a conventional one.

  15. Effect of airflow on biodrying of gardening wastes in reactors.

    PubMed

    Colomer-Mendoza, F J; Herrera-Prats, L; Robles-Martínez, F; Gallardo-Izquierdo, A; Piña-Guzmán, A B

    2013-05-01

    Biodrying consists of reducing moisture by using the heat from aerobic bio-degradation. The parameters that control the process are: aeration, temperature during the process, initial moisture of biowaste, and temperature and relative humidity of the input air. Lawn mowing and garden waste from the gardens of the University Jaume I, Castellón (Spain) were used as a substrate. Biodrying was performed in 10 reactors with known air volumes from 0.88 to 6.42 L/(min x kg dry weight). To promote aeration, 5 of the reactors had 15% of a bulking agent added. The experiment lasted 20 days. After the experiments it was found that the bulking agent led to greater weight loss. However, the increased airflow rate was not linearly proportional to the weight loss. PMID:24218815

  16. The role of the olfactory recess in olfactory airflow.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Smith, Timothy D; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2014-05-15

    The olfactory recess - a blind pocket at the back of the nasal airway - is thought to play an important role in mammalian olfaction by sequestering air outside of the main airstream, thus giving odorants time to re-circulate. Several studies have shown that species with large olfactory recesses tend to have a well-developed sense of smell. However, no study has investigated how the size of the olfactory recess relates to air circulation near the olfactory epithelium. Here we used a computer model of the nasal cavity from a bat (Carollia perspicillata) to test the hypothesis that a larger olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow. We predicted that during inhalation, models with an enlarged olfactory recess would have slower rates of flow through the olfactory region (i.e. the olfactory recess plus airspace around the olfactory epithelium), while during exhalation these models would have little to no flow through the olfactory recess. To test these predictions, we experimentally modified the size of the olfactory recess while holding the rest of the morphology constant. During inhalation, we found that an enlarged olfactory recess resulted in lower rates of flow in the olfactory region. Upon exhalation, air flowed through the olfactory recess at a lower rate in the model with an enlarged olfactory recess. Taken together, these results indicate that an enlarged olfactory recess improves olfactory airflow during both inhalation and exhalation. These findings add to our growing understanding of how the morphology of the nasal cavity may relate to function in this understudied region of the skull. PMID:24577441

  17. Uninstrumented assembly airflow testing in the Annular Flow Distribution facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kielpinski, A.L.

    1992-02-01

    During the Emergency Cooling System phase of a postulated large-break loss of coolant accident (ECS-LOCA), air enters the primary loop and is pumped down the reactor assemblies. One of the experiments performed to support the analysis of this accident was the Annular Flow Distribution (AFD) experiment, conducted in a facility built for this purpose at Babcock and Wilcox Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. As part of this experiment, a large body of airflow data were acquired in a prototypical mockup of the Mark 22 reactor assembly. This assembly was known as the AFD (or the I-AFD here) reference assembly. The I-AFD assembly was fully prototypical, having been manufactured in SRS`s production fabrication facility. Similar Mark 22 mockup assemblies were tested in several test facilities in the SRS Heat Transfer Laboratory (HTL). Discrepancies were found. The present report documents further work done to address the discrepancy in airflow measurements between the AFD facility and HTL facilities. The primary purpose of this report is to disseminate the data from the U-AFD test, and to compare these test results to the I-AFD data and the U-AT data. A summary table of the test data and the B&W data transmittal letter are included as an attachment to this report. The full data transmittal volume from B&W (including time plots of the various instruments) is included as an appendix to this report. These data are further analyzed by comparing them to two other HTL tests, namely, SPRIHTE 1 and the Single Assembly Test Stand (SATS).

  18. Numerical simulation of airflow in the human nose.

    PubMed

    Weinhold, Ivo; Mlynski, Gunter

    2004-09-01

    Unobstructed air passageways as well as sufficient contact of the air stream with the mucous membrane are essential for the correct function of the nose. For that, local flow phenomena, which often cannot be captured by standard diagnostic methods, are important. We developed and validated a method for the numerical simulation of the nasal airflow. Two anatomically correct, transparent resin models of human nasal cavities, manufactured by a special casting technology, and the nasal cavities of two patients were reconstructed as Computer Aided Design models based on computed tomography (CT) scans. One of the nasal models and one clinical case represented a normal nasal anatomy, while the others were examples of pathological alterations. The velocity and pressure fields in these reconstructed cavities were calculated for the entire range of physiological nasal inspiration using commercially available computational fluid dynamics software. To validate the results rhinoresistometric data were measured and characteristic streamlines were videotaped for the resin models. The numerical results were in good agreement with the experimental data for the investigated cases. An example of a complex clinical case demonstrates the potential benefit of the developed simulation method for rhinosurgical planning. The results support the assumption that even under the specific conditions of the clinical practice the application of numerical simulation of nasal airflow phenomena may become realistic in the near future. However, important technical issues such as a completely automated reconstruction of the nasal cavity still need to be resolved before such simulations are efficient and cost effective enough to become a standard tool for the rhinologist. PMID:14652769

  19. Asthma, airflow limitation, and mortality risk in the general population

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shuang; Vasquez, Monica M; Halonen, Marilyn; Martinez, Fernando D; Guerra, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease co-exist in a significant proportion of patients. Whether asthma increases mortality risk among subjects with airflow limitation remains controversial. We used data from 2121 adult participants in the population-based TESAOD cohort. At enrollment (1972–73), participants completed questionnaires and lung function tests. Participants were categorized into four groups based on the combination of airflow limitation (AL: FEV1/FVC<70%) and physician-confirmed asthma at baseline. Vital status as of January 2011 was assessed through the National Death Index. Cox proportional hazards models were used to test differences in mortality risk across the four AL/Asthma groups. In multivariate Cox models, the AL+/Asthma+ group had a 114% increased mortality risk over the follow-up as compared with the AL-/Asthma- group (adjHR: 2.14, 1.64–2.79). The corresponding Hazard Ratios were 1.09 (0.89–1.34) and 1.34 (1.14–1.57) for the AL-/Asthma+ and AL+/Asthma- groups, respectively. Among subjects with AL, asthma was associated with increased mortality risk (1.58, 1.17–2.12). However, this increased risk was substantially reduced and no longer significant after further adjustment for baseline FEV1 levels. Similar results were obtained when AL was defined as FEV1/FVC

  20. Frame independent cosmological perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Prokopec, Tomislav; Weenink, Jan E-mail: j.g.weenink@uu.nl

    2013-09-01

    We compute the third order gauge invariant action for scalar-graviton interactions in the Jordan frame. We demonstrate that the gauge invariant action for scalar and tensor perturbations on one physical hypersurface only differs from that on another physical hypersurface via terms proportional to the equation of motion and boundary terms, such that the evolution of non-Gaussianity may be called unique. Moreover, we demonstrate that the gauge invariant curvature perturbation and graviton on uniform field hypersurfaces in the Jordan frame are equal to their counterparts in the Einstein frame. These frame independent perturbations are therefore particularly useful in relating results in different frames at the perturbative level. On the other hand, the field perturbation and graviton on uniform curvature hypersurfaces in the Jordan and Einstein frame are non-linearly related, as are their corresponding actions and n-point functions.

  1. Fault tolerant attitude control for small unmanned aircraft systems equipped with an airflow sensor array.

    PubMed

    Shen, H; Xu, Y; Dickinson, B T

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by sensing strategies observed in birds and bats, a new attitude control concept of directly using real-time pressure and shear stresses has recently been studied. It was shown that with an array of onboard airflow sensors, small unmanned aircraft systems can promptly respond to airflow changes and improve flight performances. In this paper, a mapping function is proposed to compute aerodynamic moments from the real-time pressure and shear data in a practical and computationally tractable formulation. Since many microscale airflow sensors are embedded on the small unmanned aircraft system surface, it is highly possible that certain sensors may fail. Here, an adaptive control system is developed that is robust to sensor failure as well as other numerical mismatches in calculating real-time aerodynamic moments. The advantages of the proposed method are shown in the following simulation cases: (i) feedback pressure and wall shear data from a distributed array of 45 airflow sensors; (ii) 50% failure of the symmetrically distributed airflow sensor array; and (iii) failure of all the airflow sensors on one wing. It is shown that even if 50% of the airflow sensors have failures, the aircraft is still stable and able to track the attitude commands. PMID:25405953

  2. The Impact of Smoking on Airflow Limitation in Subjects with History of Asthma and Inactive Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Baek, Seunghee; Kim, Hee Jin; Lee, Jae Seung; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Sang-Do; Lee, Sei Won

    2015-01-01

    Background Although smoking is the most important and modifiable cause of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), other risk factors including asthma and tuberculosis (TB) are also associated. It is common for COPD patients to have more than one of these risk factors. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of airflow limitation (FEV1/FVC<0.7) according to the risk factors and to investigate their impact and interaction in airflow limitation. Methods From the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey between 2008 and 2012, we analyzed participants over 40 years of age by spirometry, chest radiograph and questionnaire about asthma and smoking history. Results Of 12,631 participants, 1,548 (12.3%) had airflow limitation. The prevalence of airflow limitation in smokers (≥10 pack-year), asthmatics, and those with inactive TB was 23.9%, 32.1%, and 33.6%. The prevalence increased with the number of risk factors: 86.1% had airflow limitation if they had all three risk factors. Impacts of inactive TB and asthma on airflow limitation were equivalent to 47 and 69 pack-years of smoking, respectively. Airflow limitation resulted from lower levels of smoking in those with inactive TB and asthma. A potential interaction between smoking and inactive tuberculosis in the development of airflow limitation was identified (p = 0.054). Conclusions Asthma and inactive TB lesions increase susceptibility to smoking in the development of airflow limitation. People with these risk factors should be seen as a major target population for anti-smoking campaigns to prevent COPD. PMID:25915938

  3. Numerical investigation of airflow inside a 1-in hard disk drive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suriadi, M. A.; Tan, C. S.; Zhang, Q. D.; Yip, T. H.; Sundaravadivelu, K.

    2006-08-01

    The increasing application of the hard disk drive in consumer electronic devices has pushed the usage of the small form factor hard drives. At the same time, the data storage industry continues to enhance the capacity and performance of computer hard disk drive. The concerns of track mis-registration caused by various runout still remain with the form factor change. The objective of the current study is to numerically investigate the airflow characteristic inside a 1 in hard disk drive. The simulation model is constructed based on the currently available 1-in micro-drive in the market, with 3600 rpm disk rotation speed, thus the flow Reynolds number based on the disk tip radius is around 4.8×10 3. Two models with different actuator arm positions (outside and middle-disk) were studied. The simulation results show that the standard k-epsilon model used allows us to extract similar information and understanding as that from more developed numerical model. Good agreement in normalized velocity magnitude and flow pattern is observed between the numerical and experimental results. At different actuator arm positions, streamlines and velocity vectors plots show the effect of the actuator arm position to the flow pattern, especially around the arm. This arm position also affects the radial and tangential shear stress values over the disk, which may help to estimate the wind loss and power consumption.

  4. Care For Patients With Severe Chronic Airflow Obstruction And Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Pugsley, S. O.; Robinson, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The successful care of patients with disorders causing chronic airflow obstruction (CAO) and potential chronic respiratory failure and pulmonary heart disease (cor pulmonale) requires the following: 1. Recognize CAO as the cause of a patient's problem. 2. Describe and measure airflow obstruction and the individual's response to it. 3. Undertake therapeutic trials to maximize airflow. 4. Teach patients monitoring skills and interventions in order to prevent acute respiratory failure and hospital admission. 5. Maintain optimism and interest in the patient's chronic illness, appreciating its impact on the total person and his daily life. PMID:21297794

  5. Data Visualization of Invisible Airflow Hazards During Helicopter Takeoff and Landing Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with unseen airflow hazards near the ground such as vortices, downdrafts, wind shear, microbursts, or other turbulence. While such hazards frequently pose problems to fixed-wing airplanes, they are especially dangerous to helicopters, which often have to operate in confined spaces and under operationally stressful conditions. We are developing flight-deck visualizations of airflow hazards during helicopter takeoff and landing operations, and are evaluating their effectiveness with usability studies. Our hope is.that this work will lead to the production of an airflow hazard detection system for pilots that will save lives.

  6. The Perturbed Puma Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Shu-Jun; Liu, Qiu-Yu

    2012-04-01

    The puma model on the basis of the Lorentz and CPT violation may bring an economical interpretation to the conventional neutrinos oscillation and part of the anomalous oscillations. We study the effect of the perturbation to the puma model. In the case of the first-order perturbation which keeps the (23) interchange symmetry, the mixing matrix element Ue3 is always zero. The nonzero mixing matrix element Ue3 is obtained in the second-order perturbation that breaks the (23) interchange symmetry.

  7. Evaluation of commercially available techniques and development of simplified methods for measuring grille airflows in HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Iain S.; Wray, Craig P.; Guillot, Cyril; Masson, S.

    2003-08-01

    In this report, we discuss the accuracy of flow hoods for residential applications, based on laboratory tests and field studies. The results indicate that commercially available hoods are often inadequate to measure flows in residential systems, and that there can be a wide range of performance between different flow hoods. The errors are due to poor calibrations, sensitivity of existing hoods to grille flow non-uniformities, and flow changes from added flow resistance. We also evaluated several simple techniques for measuring register airflows that could be adopted by the HVAC industry and homeowners as simple diagnostics that are often as accurate as commercially available devices. Our test results also show that current calibration procedures for flow hoods do not account for field application problems. As a result, organizations such as ASHRAE or ASTM need to develop a new standard for flow hood calibration, along with a new measurement standard to address field use of flow hoods.

  8. Airflow and nanoparticle deposition in a 16-generation tracheobronchial airway model

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to achieve both manageable simulation and local accuracy of airflow and nanoparticle deposition in a representative human tracheobronchial (TB) region, the complex airway network was decomposed into adjustable triple-bifurcation units, spreading axially and laterally. Gi...

  9. Evaluation of circumferential airflow uniformity entering combustors from compressors. Volume 1: Discussion of data and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shadowen, J. H.; Egan, W. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    The compressor discharge airflow uniformity of two compressors from advanced engines, the J58 and F100/F401, was studied. Compressor discharge pressures and temperatures at up to 33 circumferential rake locations allowed the airflow distribution to be ascertained and computer plotted. Several flight conditions and compressor variables, i.e., inlet distortion, modified seals, etc., were analyzed. An unexpectedly high nonuniform airflow was found for both compressors. Circumferential airflow deviation differences of up to 52% from maximum to minimum were found for the J58, and up to 40% for the F100/F401. The effects of aerodynamic and thermal distortion were found to be additive. The data were analyzed for influence of exit guide vane wakes and found free of any effect. Data system errors were small in relation to the measured pressure and temperature variations.

  10. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  11. Modeling Airflow Using Subject-Specific 4DCT-Based Deformable Volumetric Lung Models

    PubMed Central

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun J.; Li, Zhiliang; Seyfi, Behnaz; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P.

    2012-01-01

    Lung radiotherapy is greatly benefitted when the tumor motion caused by breathing can be modeled. The aim of this paper is to present the importance of using anisotropic and subject-specific tissue elasticity for simulating the airflow inside the lungs. A computational-fluid-dynamics (CFD) based approach is presented to simulate airflow inside a subject-specific deformable lung for modeling lung tumor motion and the motion of the surrounding tissues during radiotherapy. A flow-structure interaction technique is employed that simultaneously models airflow and lung deformation. The lung is modeled as a poroelastic medium with subject-specific anisotropic poroelastic properties on a geometry, which was reconstructed from four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation for known airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effects of anisotropy are also presented on both the spatiotemporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:23365554

  12. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2006-07-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's NUREG-1400 addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present two detailed examples of the implementation of qualitative air flow studies at different scales using guidelines established by NUREG-1400. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within the transfer area of the 105 KE Basin, located on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The purpose of the study was to determine appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment in support of sludge water pumping activities. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an air flow study, the stagnant layer would not have been identified, and could have resulted in locating samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test.

  13. Air-flow separation over unsteady breaking wind waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saxena, Gaurav

    2005-11-01

    In air-sea interaction processes, when considering wind stress over small-scale breaking waves, there are few direct quantitative experimental investigations into the role of air-flow separation on the interfacial momentum flux. Reul et. al, (1999), found multiple coherent patches of vorticity downwind of the crest that were strongly influenced by the geometric characteristics of the breaker. However, their breakers were generated by dispersive focusing techniques and, therefore, independent of the wind stress. We present experimental results obtained with particle image velocimetry (PIV) where moderate to strong winds directly generate unsteady small-scale breaking waves, a scenario commonly found in the open ocean. Particular attention has been devoted to capturing the spatio-temporal evolution of the air-water interface. Specifically, texture segmentation algorithms typically used for face recognition (Grey Level Co-occurrence Matrix (GLCM) and the Cross-Diagonal Texture Matrix (CDTM)) have been combined to yield robust and accurate estimates of the instantaneous breaker geometry.

  14. Cigarette smoke potentiates asbestos-induced airflow abnormalities

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, J.L.; Tron, V.; Wiggs, B.; Churg, A.

    1988-01-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to both asbestos and cigarette smoke can produce worse parenchymal lung disease than exposure to asbestos alone. Using a guinea pig model of asbestos administration that produces primarily airway disease and associated airflow abnormalities, we showed previously that the combination of asbestos and smoke acts synergistically to produce more marked increases in tissue collagen, fibrosis of airway walls, and early interstitial fibrosis than are seen with asbestos alone. To investigate the functional effects of these morphological and biochemical abnormalities, pulmonary function tests for volumes and flows, including lung volumes, pressure-volume curves, and flow-volume curves, were performed. By themselves, both smoke and asbestos produced increases in total lung capacity (TLC), residual volume (RV), and functional residual capacity (FRC); the two agents together made all these changes worse than either one alone. Both smoking and asbestos moved the pressure-volume curve upward, and the effects of the two agents together were again greater than either alone. Similarly, both smoke and asbestos decreased flows, and the two agents produced more severe impairment than either one by itself. The changes in volumes, pressure-volume curve, and flows correlated with both increased thickness of small airway walls and increases in airspace size. These observations indicate that, at least in this guinea pig model, cigarette smoke can potentiate the functional consequences of asbestos exposure.

  15. Behavior of submicrometer particles in periodic alveolar airflows.

    PubMed

    Balik, G; Reis, A H; Aydin, M; Miguel, A F

    2008-04-01

    Here, we report a numerical experiment in which submicrometer particle entrainment in a periodic flow that matches those existing in the alveolus in the human lung was simulated for both sedentary and light activity. A spherical cavity with a prescribed velocity profile at the inlet was used to simulate the time-dependent periodical flow of air in the alveolus. Expansion and contraction of the alveolus were simulated by setting a conceptual permeable wall as the outer surface of the model and adjusting the boundary conditions in order to match the continuity of the flow. The simulations were conducted for breathing periods of 5 and 3 s, which match sedentary and light activity conditions, respectively, and the results were extrapolated to the real lung. It was found that, most of the particles mainly followed a straightforward path and reached the opposite side of the alveolar wall in both breathing conditions. The concentration patterns obtained are consistent with the fact that the flow within the alveolus is mainly diffusive and does not greatly depend on the flow velocity. It was found that the particles which are heavier than air move out of phase with the periodic airflow that crosses the alveolus entrance, and that these particles are significantly caught within the alveolus. Particle entrapment increases with breathing rate in accordance with experimental values and indicates that increase in breathing frequency in environments with high concentration of submicrometer particles has the consequence of increasing particle entrapment by several times with respect to normal breathing rate. PMID:18075755

  16. RANS and LES simulations of the airflow through nasal cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamberti, Giacomo

    2015-11-01

    The prediction of detailed flow patterns in nasal cavities using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can provide essential information on the potential relationship between patient-specific geometrical characteristics and health problems. The long-term goal of the OpenNOSE project is to develop a reliable open-source computational tool based on the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox that can assist surgeons in their daily practice. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of the turbulence model and boundary conditions on simulations of the airflow in nasal cavities. The geometry, including paranasal sinuses, was reconstructed from a carefully selected CT scan, and RANS and LES simulations were carried out for steady inspiration and expiration. At a flow rate near 20 l/min, the flow is laminar in most of the domain. During the inspiration phase, turbulence develops in nasopharynx and oropharynx regions; during the expiration phase, another vortical region is observed down the nostrils. A comparison between different boundary conditions suggests the use of a total pressure condition, or alternatively a uniform velocity, at the inlet and outlet. In future work the same geometry will be used for setting up a laboratory experiment, intended to cross-validate the numerical results.

  17. Oscillating and star-shaped drops levitated by an airflow.

    PubMed

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; Winkels, Koen G; Peters, Ivo R; Brunet, Philippe; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2013-08-01

    We investigate the spontaneous oscillations of drops levitated above an air cushion, eventually inducing a breaking of axisymmetry and the appearance of "star drops". This is strongly reminiscent of the Leidenfrost stars that are observed for drops floating above a hot substrate. The key advantage of this work is that we inject the airflow at a constant rate below the drop, thus eliminating thermal effects and allowing for a better control of the flow rate. We perform experiments with drops of different viscosities and observe stable states, oscillations, and chimney instabilities. We find that for a given drop size the instability appears above a critical flow rate, where the latter is largest for small drops. All these observations are reproduced by numerical simulations, where we treat the drop using potential flow and the gas as a viscous lubrication layer. Qualitatively, the onset of instability agrees with the experimental results, although the typical flow rates are too large by a factor 10. Our results demonstrate that thermal effects are not important for the formation of star drops and strongly suggest a purely hydrodynamic mechanism for the formation of Leidenfrost stars. PMID:24032934

  18. Evaluation of circumferential airflow uniformity entering combustors from compressors. Volume 2: Data supplement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shadowen, J. H.; Egan, W. J., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A study of the airflow uniformity leaving compressors and entering combustors was made using compressors from two advanced engines, the J58 and F100/F401. The data used in the analysis of each case is presented in tabular form and computer-generated profile plots. A plot of the square root of the dynamic pressure ratio, which is similar to airflow deviation, is also presented.

  19. Airflow in the Human Nasal Passage and Sinuses of Chronic Rhinosinusitis Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Haribalan; Jain, Ravi; Douglas, Richard G.; Tawhai, Merryn H.

    2016-01-01

    Endoscopic surgery is performed on patients with chronic inflammatory disease of the paranasal sinuses to improve sinus ventilation. Little is known about how sinus surgery affects sinonasal airflow. In this study nasal passage geometry was reconstructed from computed tomographic imaging from healthy normal, pre-operative, and post-operative subjects. Transient air flow through the nasal passage during calm breathing was simulated. Subject-specific differences in ventilation of the nasal passage were observed. Velocity magnitude at ostium was different between left and right airway. In FESS, airflow in post-surgical subjects, airflow at the maxillary sinus ostium was upto ten times higher during inspiration. In a Lothrop procedure, airflow at the frontal sinus ostium can be upto four times higher during inspiration. In both post-operative subjects, airflow at ostium was not quasi-steady. The subject-specific effect (of surgery) on sinonasal interaction evaluated through airflow simulations may have important consequences for pre- and post-surgical assessment and surgical planning, and design for improvement of the delivery efficiency of nasal therapeutics. PMID:27249219

  20. Investigation on side-spray fluidized bed granulation with swirling airflow.

    PubMed

    Wong, Poh Mun; Chan, Lai Wah; Heng, Paul Wan Sia

    2013-03-01

    Top-spray fluidized bed granulation with axial fluidization airflow from the bottom of the granulator is well-established in the pharmaceutical industry. The application of swirling airflow for fluidized bed granulation was more recently introduced. This study examined the effects of various process parameters on the granules produced by side-spray fluidized bed with swirling airflow using the central composite and Box-Behnken design of experiment. Influence of the amount of binder solution, spray rate, and distance between spray nozzle and powder bed were initially studied to establish operationally viable values for these parameters. This was followed by an in-depth investigation on the effects of inlet airflow rate, atomizing air pressure and distance between spray nozzle and powder bed on granule properties. It was found that the amount of binder solution had a positive correlation with granule size and percentage of lumps but a negative correlation with size distribution and Hausner ratio of the granules. Binder solution spray rate was also found to affect the granules size. High drug content uniformity was observed in all the batches of granules produced. Both inlet airflow rate and atomizing air pressure were found to correlate negatively with granule size and percentage of lumps but correlate positively with the size distribution of the granule produced. Percentage of fines was found to be significantly affected by inlet airflow rate. Distance between spray nozzle and powder bed generally affected the percentage of lumps. PMID:23263750

  1. The influence of nasal airflow on respiratory and olfactory epithelial distribution in felids.

    PubMed

    Pang, Benison; Yee, Karen K; Lischka, Fritz W; Rawson, Nancy E; Haskins, Mark E; Wysocki, Charles J; Craven, Brent A; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire

    2016-06-15

    The surface area of the maxilloturbinals and fronto-ethmoturbinals is commonly used as an osteological proxy for the respiratory and the olfactory epithelium, respectively. However, this assumption does not fully account for animals with short snouts in which these two turbinal structures significantly overlap, potentially placing fronto-ethmoturbinals in the path of respiratory airflow. In these species, it is possible that anterior fronto-ethmoturbinals are covered with non-sensory (respiratory) epithelium instead of olfactory epithelium. In this study, we analyzed the distribution of olfactory and non-sensory, respiratory epithelia on the turbinals of two domestic cats (Felis catus) and a bobcat (Lynx rufus). We also conducted a computational fluid dynamics simulation of nasal airflow in the bobcat to explore the relationship between epithelial distribution and airflow patterns. The results showed that a substantial amount of respiratory airflow passes over the anterior fronto-ethmoturbinals, and that contrary to what has been observed in caniform carnivorans, much of the anterior ethmoturbinals are covered by non-sensory epithelium. This confirms that in short-snouted felids, portions of the fronto-ethmoturbinals have been recruited for respiration, and that estimates of olfactory epithelial coverage based purely on fronto-ethmoturbinal surface area will be exaggerated. The correlation between the shape of the anterior fronto-ethmoturbinals and the direction of respiratory airflow suggests that in short-snouted species, CT data alone are useful in assessing airflow patterns and epithelium distribution on the turbinals. PMID:27045093

  2. Unidirectional pulmonary airflow in vertebrates: a review of structure, function, and evolution.

    PubMed

    Cieri, Robert L; Farmer, C G

    2016-07-01

    Mechanisms explaining unidirectional pulmonary airflow in birds, a condition where lung gases flow in a consistent direction during both inspiration and expiration in some parts of the lung, were suggested as early as the first part of the twentieth century and unidirectional pulmonary airflow has been discovered recently in crocodilians and squamates. Our knowledge of the functional anatomy, fluid dynamics, and significance of this trait is reviewed. The preponderance of the data indicates that unidirectional airflow is maintained by means of convective inertia in inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves in birds. The study of flow patterns in non-avian reptiles is just beginning, but inspiratory aerodynamic valving likely also plays an important role in controlling flow direction in these lungs. Although highly efficient counter and cross-current blood-gas exchange arrangements are possible in lungs with unidirectional airflow, very few experiments have investigated blood-gas exchange mechanisms in the bird lung and blood-gas arrangements in the lungs of non-avian reptiles are completely unknown. The presence of unidirectional airflow in non-volant ectotherms voids the traditional hypothesis that this trait evolved to supply the high aerobic demands of flight and endothermy, and there is a need for new scenarios in our understanding of lung evolution. The potential value of unidirectional pulmonary airflow for allowing economic lung gas mixing, facilitating lung gas washout, and providing for adequate gas exchange during hypoxic conditions is discussed. PMID:27062030

  3. An investigation on airflow in disordered nasal cavity and its corrected models by tomographic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. K.; Chung, S. K.

    2004-06-01

    Knowledge of airflow characteristics in nasal cavities is essential to understand the physiology and pathology aspects of nasal breathing. Several studies have utilized physical models of the healthy nasal cavity to investigate the relationship between nasal anatomy and airflow. Since the final goal of these works is their contribution to the diagnosis and treatment of nasal diseases, therefore, the next step in this topic must be followed by the studies for disordered nasal cavities. In this paper, airflows in normal and abnormal nasal cavities and surgically created models, which simulate surgical treatment, are investigated experimentally by PIV. High-resolution computerized tomogram data and careful manipulation of the model surface by the ear, nose and throat doctor provide more sophisticated nasal cavity models. The correlation based correction PIV algorithm with window offset is used for PIV flow analysis. Average and RMS distributions in sagittal and coronal sections are obtained for inspiratory and expiratory nasal airflows. Comparisons in nasal airflows for both normal and abnormal cases are also examined. Airflow characteristics that are related to the abnormalities in the nasal cavity are proposed. In the case of simulations of surgical operations, velocity and RMS distributions in coronal section change locally, this may cause some difficulties in physiologic functions of noses and may hurt mucosal surface.

  4. Chiral Perturbation Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    The era of high-precision lattice QCD has led to synergy between lattice computations and phenomenological input from chiral perturbation theory. We provide an introduction to chiral perturbation theory with a bent towards understanding properties of the nucleon and other low-lying baryons. Four main topics are the basis for this chapter. We begin with a discussion of broken symmetries and the procedure to construct the chiral Lagrangian. The second topic concerns specialized applications of chiral perturbation theory tailored to lattice QCD, such as partial quenching, lattice discretization, and finite-volume effects. We describe inclusion of the nucleon in chiral perturbation theory using a heavy-fermion Euclidean action. Issues of convergence are taken up as our final topic. We consider expansions in powers of the strange-quark mass, and the appearance of unphysical singularities in the heavy-particle formulation. Our aim is to guide lattice practitioners in understanding the predictions chiral perturbation theory makes for baryons, and show how the lattice will play a role in testing the rigor of the chiral expansion at physical values of the quark masses.

  5. Reducing Plasma Perturbations with Segmented Metal Shielding on Electrostatic Probes

    SciTech Connect

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch N.J.

    2002-10-02

    Electrostatic probes are widely used to measure spatial plasma parameters in the quasi-neutral plasma created in Hall thrusters and similar E x B electric discharge devices. Significant perturbations of the plasma, induced by such probes, can mask the actual physics involved in operation of these devices. In an attempt to reduce these perturbations in Hall thrusters, the perturbations were examined by varying the component material, penetration distance, and residence time of various probe designs. This study leads us to a conclusion that secondary electron emission from insulator ceramic tubes of the probe can affect local changes of the plasma parameters causing plasma perturbations. A probe design, which consists of a segmented metal shielding of the probe insulator, is suggested to reduce these perturbations. This new probe design can be useful for plasma applications in which the electron temperature is sufficient to produce secondary electron emission by interaction of plasma electrons with dielectric materials.

  6. Vortex perturbation dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Criminale, W. O.; Lasseigne, D. G.; Jackson, T. L.

    1995-01-01

    An initial value approach is used to examine the dynamics of perturbations introduced into a vortex under strain. Both the basic vortex considered and the perturbations are taken as fully three-dimensional. An explicit solution for the time evolution of the vorticity perturbations is given for arbitrary initial vorticity. Analytical solutions for the resulting velocity components are found when the initial vorticity is assumed to be localized. For more general initial vorticity distributions, the velocity components are determined numerically. It is found that the variation in the radial direction of the initial vorticity disturbance is the most important factor influencing the qualitative behavior of the solutions. Transient growth in the magnitude of the velocity components is found to be directly attributable to the compactness of the initial vorticity.

  7. Rain-induced subsurface airflow and Lisse effect

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guo, H.; Jiao, J.J.; Weeks, E.P.

    2008-01-01

    Water-level increase after rainfall is usually indicative of rainfall recharge to groundwater. This, however, may not be true if the Lisse effect occurs. This effect represents the water-level increase in a well driven by airflow induced by an advancing wetting front during highly intensive rains. The rainwater, which may behave like a low-permeability lid, seals the ground surface so that the air pressure beneath the wetting front is increased because of air compression due to downward movement of the wetting front. A rapid and substantial rise of the water level in the well screened below water table, which bears no relationship to groundwater recharge, can be induced when various factors such as soil properties and the rain-runoff condition combine favorably. A transient, three-dimensional and variably saturated flow model was employed to study the air and groundwater flows in the soil under rain conditions. The objectives of this paper are two-fold: to evaluate the reliability of the theory of the Lisse effect presented by Weeks to predict its magnitude in modeled situations that mimic the physical complexity of real aquifers, and to conduct parametric studies on the sensitivity of the water-level rise in the well to soil properties and the rain event. The simulation results reveal that the magnitude of the Lisse effect increases with the ponding depth. Soil permeability plays a key role in generating the Lisse effect. The water-level rise in the well is delayed relative to the air-pressure rise in the unsaturated zone when the soil permeability is low, and the maximum water-level rise is less than the maximum air pressure induced by rain infiltration. The simulation also explores the sensitivity of the Lisse effect to the van Genuchten parameters and the water table depth. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Intratracheal Bleomycin Causes Airway Remodeling and Airflow Obstruction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Polosukhin, Vasiliy V.; Degryse, Amber L.; Newcomb, Dawn C.; Jones, Brittany R.; Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae Woo; Loyd, James E.; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Lawson, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction In addition to parenchymal fibrosis, fibrotic remodeling of the distal airways has been reported in interstitial lung diseases. Mechanisms of airway wall remodeling, which occurs in a variety of chronic lung diseases, are not well defined and current animal models are limited. Methods We quantified airway remodeling in lung sections from subjects with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and controls. To investigate intratracheal bleomycin as a potential animal model for fibrotic airway remodeling, we evaluated lungs from C57BL/6 mice after bleomycin treatment by histologic scoring for fibrosis and peribronchial inflammation, morphometric evaluation of subepithelial connective tissue volume density, TUNEL assay, and immunohistochemistry for transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1), TGFβ2, and the fibroblast marker S100A4. Lung mechanics were determined at 3 weeks post-bleomycin. Results IPF lungs had small airway remodeling with increased bronchial wall thickness compared to controls. Similarly, bleomycin treated mice developed dose-dependent airway wall inflammation and fibrosis and greater airflow resistance after high dose bleomycin. Increased TUNEL+ bronchial epithelial cells and peribronchial inflammation were noted by 1 week, and expression of TGFβ1 and TGFβ2 and accumulation of S100A4+ fibroblasts correlated with airway remodeling in a bleomycin dose-dependent fashion. Conclusions IPF is characterized by small airway remodeling in addition to parenchymal fibrosis, a pattern also seen with intratracheal bleomycin. Bronchial remodeling from intratracheal bleomycin follows a cascade of events including epithelial cell injury, airway inflammation, pro-fibrotic cytokine expression, fibroblast accumulation, and peribronchial fibrosis. Thus, this model can be utilized to investigate mechanisms of airway remodeling. PMID:22394287

  9. Environmental Perturbations: Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Shore, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity currently affects about one third of the U.S. population, while another one third is overweight. The importance of obesity for certain conditions such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes is well appreciated. The effects of obesity on the respiratory system have received less attention and are the subject of this chapter. Obesity alters the static mechanic properties of the respiratory system leading to a reduction in the functional residual capacity (FRC) and the expiratory reserve volume (ERV). There is substantial variability in the effects of obesity on FRC and ERV, at least some of which is related to the location, rather than the total mass of adipose tissue. Obesity also results in airflow obstruction, which is only partially attributable to breathing at low lung volume, and can also promote airway hyperresponsiveness and asthma. Hypoxemia is common is obesity, and correlates well with FRC, as well as with measures of abdominal obesity. However, obese subjects are usually eucapnic, indicating that hypoventilation is not a common cause of their hypoxemia. Instead, hypoxemia results from ventilation perfusion mismatch caused by closure of dependent airways at FRC. Many obese subjects complain of dyspnea either at rest or during exertion, and the dyspnea score also correlates with reductions in FRC and ERV. Weight reduction should be encouraged in any symptomatic obese individual, since virtually all of the respiratory complications of obesity improve with even moderate weight loss. PMID:23737172

  10. Airflow Measurement of the Car HVAC Unit Using Hot-wire Anemometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fojtlín, Miloš; Planka, Michal; Fišer, Jan; Pokorný, Jan; Jícha, Miroslav

    2016-03-01

    Thermal environment in a vehicular cabin significantly influence drivers' fatigue and passengers' thermal comfort. This environment is traditionally managed by HVAC cabin system that distributes air and modifies its properties. In order to simulate cabin thermal behaviour, amount of the air led through car vents must be determined. The aim of this study was to develop methodology to measure airflow from the vents, and consequently calculate corresponding air distribution coefficients. Three climatic cases were selected to match European winter, summer, and spring / fall conditions. Experiments were conducted on a test vehicle in a climatic chamber. The car HVAC system was set to automatic control mode, and the measurements were executed after the system stabilisation—each case was independently measured three times. To be able to evaluate precision of the method, the airflow was determined at the system inlet (HVAC suction) and outlet (each vent), and the total airflow values were compared. The airflow was calculated by determining a mean value of the air velocity multiplied by an area of inlet / outlet cross-section. Hot-wire anemometry was involved to measure the air velocity. Regarding the summer case, total airflow entering the cabin was around 57 l s-1 with 60 % of the air entering the cabin through dashboard vents; no air was supplied to the feet compartment. The remaining cases had the same total airflow of around 42 l s-1, and the air distribution was focused mainly on feet and windows. The inlet and outlet airflow values show a good match with a maximum mass differential of 8.3 %.

  11. Cosmological perturbations in antigravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oltean, Marius; Brandenberger, Robert

    2014-10-01

    We compute the evolution of cosmological perturbations in a recently proposed Weyl-symmetric theory of two scalar fields with oppositely signed conformal couplings to Einstein gravity. It is motivated from the minimal conformal extension of the standard model, such that one of these scalar fields is the Higgs while the other is a new particle, the dilaton, introduced to make the Higgs mass conformally symmetric. At the background level, the theory admits novel geodesically complete cyclic cosmological solutions characterized by a brief period of repulsive gravity, or "antigravity," during each successive transition from a big crunch to a big bang. For simplicity, we consider scalar perturbations in the absence of anisotropies, with potential set to zero and without any radiation. We show that despite the necessarily wrong-signed kinetic term of the dilaton in the full action, these perturbations are neither ghostlike nor tachyonic in the limit of strongly repulsive gravity. On this basis, we argue—pending a future analysis of vector and tensor perturbations—that, with respect to perturbative stability, the cosmological solutions of this theory are viable.

  12. Qualitative Real-Time Schlieren and Shadowgraph Imaging of Human Exhaled Airflows: An Aid to Aerosol Infection Control

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Julian W.; Nicolle, Andre D. G.; Pantelic, Jovan; Jiang, Mingxiu; Sekhr, Chandra; Cheong, David K. W.; Tham, Kwok Wai

    2011-01-01

    Using a newly constructed airflow imaging system, airflow patterns were visualized that were associated with common, everyday respiratory activities (e.g. breathing, talking, laughing, whistling). The effectiveness of various interventions (e.g. putting hands and tissues across the mouth and nose) to reduce the potential transmission of airborne infection, whilst coughing and sneezing, were also investigated. From the digital video footage recorded, it was seen that both coughing and sneezing are relatively poorly contained by commonly used configurations of single-handed shielding maneuvers. Only some but not all of the forward momentum of the cough and sneeze puffs are curtailed with various hand techniques, and the remaining momentum is disseminated in a large puff in the immediate vicinity of the cougher, which may still act as a nearby source of infection. The use of a tissue (in this case, 4-ply, opened and ready in the hand) proved to be surprisingly effective, though the effectiveness of this depends on the tissue remaining intact and not ripping apart. Interestingly, the use of a novel ‘coughcatcher’ device appears to be relatively effective in containing coughs and sneezes. One aspect that became evident during the experimental procedures was that the effectiveness of all of these barrier interventions is very much dependent on the speed with which the user can put them into position to cover the mouth and nose effectively. From these qualitative schlieren and shadowgraph imaging experiments, it is clear that making some effort to contain one's cough or sneeze puffs is worthwhile. Obviously, there will be a large amount of variation between individuals in the exact hand or tissue (the most common methods) configuration used for this and other practical factors may hinder such maneuvers in daily life, for example, when carrying shopping bags or managing young children. PMID:21731730

  13. Development of hybrid particle tracking algorithms and their applications in airflow measurement within an aircraft cabin mock-up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei

    Obtaining reliable experimental airflow data within an indoor environment is a challenging task and critical in studying and solving indoor air quality problems. The Hybrid Particle Tracking Velocimetry (HPTV) system is aimed at fulfilling this need. It was developed based on existing Particle Tracking Velocimety (PTV) and Volumetric Particle Tracking Velocimetry (VPTV) techniques. The HPTV system requires three charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras to view the illuminated flow field and capture the trajectories of the seeded particles. By adopting the hybrid spatial matching and object tracking algorithms, this system can acquire the 3-Dimensional velocity components within a large volume with relatively high spatial and temporal resolution. Synthetic images were employed to validate the performance of three components of the system: image processing, camera calibration and 3D velocity reconstruction. These three components are also the main error sources. The accuracy of the whole algorithm was analyzed and discussed through a back projection approach. The results showed that the algorithms performed effectively and accurately. The reconstructed 3D trajectories and streaks agreed well with the simulated streamline of the particles. As an overall testing and application of the system, HPTV was applied to measure the airflow pattern within a full-scale, five-row section of a Boeing 767-300 aircraft cabin mockup. A complete experimental procedure was developed and strictly followed throughout the experiment. Both global flow field at the whole cabin scale and the local flow field at the breathing zone of one passenger were studied. Each test case was also simulated numerically using a commercial computational fluid dynamic (CFD) package. Through comparison between the results from the numerical simulation and the experimental measurement, the potential model validation capability of the system was demonstrated. Possible reasons explaining the difference between

  14. Mild Airflow Limitation during N2 Sleep Increases K-complex Frequency and Slows Electroencephalographic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Chinh D.; Wellman, Andrew; Jordan, Amy S.; Eckert, Danny J.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the effects of mild airflow limitation on K-complex frequency and morphology and electroencephalogram (EEG) spectral power. Methods: Transient reductions in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during stable N2 sleep were performed to induce mild airflow limitation in 20 patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and 10 healthy controls aged 44 ± 13 y. EEG at C3 and airflow were measured in 1-min windows to quantify K-complex properties and EEG spectral power immediately before and during transient reductions in CPAP. The frequency and morphology (amplitude and latency of P200, N550 and N900 components) of K-complexes and EEG spectral power were compared between conditions. Results: During mild airflow limitation (18% reduction in peak inspiratory airflow from baseline, 0.38 ± 0.11 versus 0.31 ± 0.1 L/sec) insufficient to cause American Academy of Sleep Medicine-defined cortical arousal, K-complex frequency (9.5 ± 4.5 versus 13.7 ± 6.4 per min, P < 0.01), N550 amplitude (25 ± 3 versus 27 ± 3 μV, P < 0.01) and EEG spectral power (delta: 147 ± 48 versus 230 ± 99 μV2, P < 0.01 and theta bands: 31 ± 14 versus 34 ± 13 μV2, P < 0.01) significantly increased whereas beta band power decreased (14 ± 5 versus 11 ± 4 μV2, P < 0.01) compared to the preceding non flow-limited period on CPAP. K-complex frequency, morphology, and timing did not differ between patients and controls. Conclusion: Mild airflow limitation increases K-complex frequency, N550 amplitude, and spectral power of delta and theta bands. In addition to providing mechanistic insight into the role of mild airflow limitation on K-complex characteristics and EEG activity, these findings may have important implications for respiratory conditions in which airflow limitation during sleep is common (e.g., snoring and OSA). Citation: Nguyen CD, Wellman A, Jordan AS, Eckert DJ. Mild airflow limitation during N2 sleep increases k-complex frequency and slows

  15. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T.; Chen, D.; Wang, P.H.; Chen, J.; Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  16. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, T; Chen, D; Wang, P H; Chen, J; Deng, J

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  17. Incidence of airflow limitation in subjects 65-100 years of age.

    PubMed

    Luoto, Johannes A; Elmståhl, Sölve; Wollmer, Per; Pihlsgård, Mats

    2016-02-01

    The true incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is largely unknown, because the few longitudinal studies performed have used diagnostic criteria no longer recommended by either the European Respiratory Society or the American Thoracic Society (ATS).We studied the incidence and significance of airflow limitation in a population-based geriatric sample using both an age-dependent predicted lower limit of normal (LLN) value and a fixed-ratio spirometric criterion.Out of 2025 subjects with acceptable spirometry at baseline, 984 subjects aged 65-100 years completed a 6-year follow-up visit. Smoking habits were registered at baseline. Exclusion criteria were non-acceptable spirometry performance according to ATS criteria and inability to communicate. Airflow limitation was defined both according to forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity ratio <0.7 and airflow limitation per 1000 person-years was 28.2 using a fixed ratio and 11.7 with LLN, corresponding to a 1.41-fold higher incidence rate using a fixed ratio. The incidence increased dramatically with age when using a fixed ratio, but less so when using LLN. In addition, a sex effect was observed with the LLN criterion. LLN airflow limitation was associated with increased 5-year mortality. Presence of fixed-ratio airflow limitation in individuals classified by LLN as non-obstructive was not associated with increased mortality. PMID:26677939

  18. Computer simulation of airflow through a multi-generation tracheobronchial conducting airway

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, B.; Cheng, Yung-Sung; Yeh, Hsu-Chi

    1995-12-01

    Knowledge of airflow patterns in the human lung is important for an analysis of lung diseases and drug delivery of aerosolized medicine for medical treatment. However, very little systematic information is available on the pattern of airflow in the lung and on how this pattern affects the deposition of toxicants in the lung, and the efficacy of aerosol drug therapy. Most previous studies have only considered the airflow through a single bifurcating airway. However, the flow in a network of more than one bifurcation is more complicated due to the effect of interrelated lung generations. Because of the variation of airway geometry and flow condition from generation to generation, a single bifurcating airway cannot be taken as a representative for the others in different generations. The flow in the network varies significantly with airway generations because of a redistribution of axial momentum by the secondary flow motions. The influence of the redistribution of flow is expected in every generation. Therefore, a systematic information of the airflow through a multi-generation tracheobronchial conducting airway is needed, and it becomes the purpose of this study. This study has provided information on airflow in a lung model which is necessary to the study of the deposition of toxicants and therapeutic aerosols.

  19. Tuberculosis associates with both airflow obstruction and low lung function: BOLD results

    PubMed Central

    Amaral, André F. S.; Coton, Sonia; Kato, Bernet; Tan, Wan C.; Studnicka, Michael; Janson, Christer; Gislason, Thorarinn; Mannino, David; Bateman, Eric D.; Buist, Sonia; Burney, Peter G. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background In small studies and cases series, a history of tuberculosis has been associated with both airflow obstruction, which is characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and restrictive patterns on spirometry. Objective To assess the association between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric abnormalities in adults. Methods The study was performed in adults, aged 40 and above, who took part in the multicentre cross-sectional, general population-based, Burden of Obstructive Lung Disease study, had provided acceptable post-bronchodilator spirometry measurements and information on a history of tuberculosis. The associations between a history of tuberculosis and airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction were assessed within each participating centre, and estimates combined using meta-analysis. These estimates were stratified by high and low/middle income countries, according to gross national income. Results A self-reported history of tuberculosis was associated with airflow obstruction (adjusted odds ratio = 2.51, 95% confidence interval 1.83-3.42) and spirometric restriction (adjusted odds ratio = 2.13, 95% confidence interval 1.42-3.19). Conclusion A history of tuberculosis was associated with both airflow obstruction and spirometric restriction, and should be considered as a potentially important cause of obstructive disease and low lung function, particularly where tuberculosis is common. PMID:26113680

  20. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kimbell, J.S.; Frank, D.O.; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G.J.M.; Rhee, J.S.

    2014-01-01

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning. PMID:24063885

  1. Liouvillian perturbations of black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Couch, W. E.; Holder, C. L.

    2007-10-01

    We apply the well-known Kovacic algorithm to find closed form, i.e., Liouvillian solutions, to the differential equations governing perturbations of black holes. Our analysis includes the full gravitational perturbations of Schwarzschild and Kerr, the full gravitational and electromagnetic perturbations of Reissner-Nordstrom, and specialized perturbations of the Kerr-Newman geometry. We also include the extreme geometries. We find all frequencies ω, in terms of black hole parameters and an integer n, which allow Liouvillian perturbations. We display many classes of black hole parameter values and their corresponding Liouvillian perturbations, including new closed-form perturbations of Kerr and Reissner-Nordstrom. We also prove that the only type 1 Liouvillian perturbations of Schwarzschild are the known algebraically special ones and that type 2 Liouvillian solutions do not exist for extreme geometries. In cases where we do not prove the existence or nonexistence of Liouvillian perturbations we obtain sequences of Diophantine equations on which decidability rests.

  2. Topology and perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manjavidze, J.

    2000-08-01

    This paper contains description of the fields nonlinear modes successive quantization scheme. It is shown that the path integrals for absorption part of amplitudes are defined on the Dirac (δ-like) functional measure. This permits arbitrary transformation of the functional integral variables. New form of the perturbation theory achieved by mapping the quantum dynamics in the space WG of the (action, angle)-type collective variables. It is shown that the transformed perturbation theory contributions are accumulated exactly on the boundary ∂WG. Abilities of the developed formalism are illustrated by the Coulomb problem. This model is solved in the WC=(angle, angular momentum, Runge-Lentz vector) space and the reason of its exact integrability is emptiness of ∂WC.

  3. Renormalized Lie perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Rosengaus, E.; Dewar, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    A Lie operator method for constructing action-angle transformations continuously connected to the identity is developed for area preserving mappings. By a simple change of variable from action to angular frequency a perturbation expansion is obtained in which the small denominators have been renormalized. The method is shown to lead to the same series as the Lagrangian perturbation method of Greene and Percival, which converges on KAM surfaces. The method is not superconvergent, but yields simple recursion relations which allow automatic algebraic manipulation techniques to be used to develop the series to high order. It is argued that the operator method can be justified by analytically continuing from the complex angular frequency plane onto the real line. The resulting picture is one where preserved primary KAM surfaces are continuously connected to one another.

  4. Intermolecular perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, I. C.; Hurst, G. J. B.; Stone, A. J.

    The new intermolecular perturbation theory described in the preceding papers is applied to some van der Waals molecules. HeBe is used as a test case, and the perturbation method converges well at interatomic distances down to about 4 a0, giving results in excellent agreement with supermolecule calculations. ArHF and ArHCl have been studied using large basis sets, and the results agree well with experimental data. The ArHX configuration is favoured over the ArXH configuration mainly because of larger polarization and charge-transfer contributions. In NeH2 the equilibrium geometry is determined by a delicate balance between opposing effects; with a double-zeta-polarization basis the correct configuration is predicted.

  5. Aspects of perturbative unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anselmi, Damiano

    2016-07-01

    We reconsider perturbative unitarity in quantum field theory and upgrade several arguments and results. The minimum assumptions that lead to the largest time equation, the cutting equations and the unitarity equation are identified. Using this knowledge and a special gauge, we give a new, simpler proof of perturbative unitarity in gauge theories and generalize it to quantum gravity, in four and higher dimensions. The special gauge interpolates between the Feynman gauge and the Coulomb gauge without double poles. When the Coulomb limit is approached, the unphysical particles drop out of the cuts and the cutting equations are consistently projected onto the physical subspace. The proof does not extend to nonlocal quantum field theories of gauge fields and gravity, whose unitarity remains uncertain.

  6. Airflow acceleration performance of asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge actuators at different exposed needle electrode heights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Liang; Yan, Hui-Jie; Qi, Xiao-Hua; Hua, Yue; Ren, Chun-Sheng

    2015-12-01

    The use of plasma, created by asymmetric surface dielectric barrier discharge (ASDBD), as aerodynamic actuators to control airflows, has been of widespread concern over the past decades. For the single ASDBD, the actuator performance is dependent on the geometry of actuator and the produced plasma. In this work, a new electrode configuration, i.e., a row of needle, is taken as an exposed electrode for the ASDBD plasma actuator, and the electrode height is adjustable. The effects of different electrode heights on the airflow acceleration behavior are experimentally investigated by measuring surface potential distribution, ionic wind velocity, and mean thrust force production. It is demonstrated that the airflow velocity and thrust force increase with the exposed electrode height and the best actuator performance can be obtained when the exposed electrode is adjusted to an appropriate height. The difference, as analyzed, is mainly due to the distinct plasma spatial distributions at different exposed electrode heights.

  7. Experimental investigation of effects of airflows on plasma-assisted combustion actuator characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xing-Jian; He, Li-Ming; Yu, Jin-Lu; Zhang, Hua-Lei

    2015-04-01

    The effects of the airflow on plasma-assisted combustion actuator (PACA) characteristics are studied in detail. The plasma is characterized electrically, as well as optically with a spectrometer. Our results show that the airflow has an obvious influence on the PACA characteristics. The breakdown voltage and vibrational temperature decrease, while the discharge power increases compared with the stationary airflow. The memory effect of metastable state species and the transportation characteristics of charged particles in microdischarge channel are the dominant causes for the variations of the breakdown voltage and discharge power, respectively, and the vibrational temperature calculated in this work can describe the electron energy of the dielectric barrier discharge plasma in PACA. These results offer new perspectives for the use of PACA in plasma-assisted combustion. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51436008, 50776100, and 51106179).

  8. Atomization of water jets and sheets in axial and swirling airflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1977-01-01

    Axial and swirling airflows were used to break up water jets and sheets into sprays of droplets to determine the overall effects of orifice diameter, weight flow of air, and the use of an air swirler on fineness of atomization as characterized by mean drop size. A scanning radiometer was used to determine the mean drop diameter of each spray. Swirling airflows were produced with an axial combustor, 70 deg blake angle, air swirling. Water jets were injected axially upstream, axially downstream and cross stream into the airflow. In addition, pressure atomizing fuel nozzles which produced a sheet and ligament type of breakup were investigated. Increasing the weight flow rate of air or the use of an air swirling markedly reduced the spray mean drop size.

  9. Dynamic Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Nasal Airflow Resistance during Nasal Allergen Provocation Test.

    PubMed

    Seppänen, Tiina M; Alho, Olli-Pekka; Seppänen, Tapio

    2016-01-01

    Allergic rhinitis is a major chronic respiratory disease and an immunoneuronal disorder. We aimed at providing further knowledge on the function of the neural system in nasal allergic reaction. Here, a method to assess simultaneously the nasal airflow resistance and the underlying function of autonomic nervous system (ANS) is presented and used during the nasal provocation of allergic and nonallergic subjects. Continuous nasal airflow resistance and spectral heart rate variability parameters show in detail the timing and intensity differences in subjects' reactions. After the provocation, the nasal airflow resistance of allergic subjects showed a positive trend, whereas LF/HF (Low Frequency/High Frequency) ratio and LF power showed a negative trend. This could imply a gradual sympathetic withdrawal in allergic subjects after the allergen provocation. The groups differed significantly by these physiological descriptors. The proposed method opens entirely new opportunities to research accurately concomitant changes in nasal breathing function and ANS. PMID:27196870

  10. [A nonlinear multi-compartment lung model for optimization of breathing airflow pattern].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongming; Gu, Lingyan; Chen, Fuhua

    2015-02-01

    It is difficult to select the appropriate ventilation mode in clinical mechanical ventilation. This paper presents a nonlinear multi-compartment lung model to solve the difficulty. The purpose is to optimize respiratory airflow patterns and get the minimum of the work of inspiratory phrase and lung volume acceleration, minimum of the elastic potential energy and rapidity of airflow rate changes of expiratory phrase. Sigmoidal function is used to smooth the respiratory function of nonlinear equations. The equations are established to solve nonlinear boundary conditions BVP, and finally the problem was solved with gradient descent method. Experimental results showed that lung volume and the rate of airflow after optimization had good sensitivity and convergence speed. The results provide a theoretical basis for the development of multivariable controller monitoring critically ill mechanically ventilated patients. PMID:25997262

  11. Competition between pressure effects and airflow influence for the performance of plasma actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Kriegseis, J.; Barckmann, K.; Grundmann, S.; Frey, J.; Tropea, C.

    2014-05-15

    The present work addresses the combined influence of pressure variations and different airflow velocities on the discharge intensity of plasma actuators. Power consumption, plasma length, and discharge capacitance were investigated systematically for varying pressure levels (p = 0.1–1 bar) and airflow velocities (U{sub ∞}=0−100 m/s) to characterize and quantify the favorable and adverse effects on the discharge intensity. In accordance with previous reports, an increasing plasma actuator discharge intensity is observed for decreasing pressure levels. At constant pressure levels, an adverse airflow influence on the electric actuator performance is demonstrated. Despite the improved discharge intensity at lower pressure levels, the seemingly improved performance of the plasma actuators is accompanied with a more pronounced drop of the relative performance. These findings demonstrate the dependency of the (kinematic and thermodynamic) environmental conditions on the electric performance of plasma actuators, which in turn affects the control authority of plasma actuators for flow control applications.

  12. Performance of Installed Cooking Exhaust Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, Brett C.; Delp, William W.; Apte, Michael G.; Price, Philip N.

    2011-11-01

    The performance metrics of airflow, sound, and combustion product capture efficiency (CE) were measured for a convenience sample of fifteen cooking exhaust devices, as installed in residences. Results were analyzed to quantify the impact of various device- and installation-dependent parameters on CE. Measured maximum airflows were 70% or lower than values noted on product literature for 10 of the devices. Above-the-cooktop devices with flat bottom surfaces (no capture hood) – including exhaust fan/microwave combination appliances – were found to have much lower CE at similar flow rates, compared to devices with capture hoods. For almost all exhaust devices and especially for rear-mounted downdraft exhaust and microwaves, CE was substantially higher for back compared with front burner use. Flow rate, and the extent to which the exhaust device extends over the burners that are in use, also had a large effect on CE. A flow rate of 95 liters per second (200 cubic feet per minute) was necessary, but not sufficient, to attain capture efficiency in excess of 75% for the front burners. A-weighted sound levels in kitchens exceeded 57 dB when operating at the highest fan setting for all 14 devices evaluated for sound performance.

  13. Controlling chaos in low and high dimensional systems with periodic parametric perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Mirus, K.A.; Sprott, J.C.

    1998-06-01

    The effect of applying a periodic perturbation to an accessible parameter of various chaotic systems is examined. Numerical results indicate that perturbation frequencies near the natural frequencies of the unstable periodic orbits of the chaotic systems can result in limit cycles for relatively small perturbations. Such perturbations can also control or significantly reduce the dimension of high-dimensional systems. Initial application to the control of fluctuations in a prototypical magnetic fusion plasma device will be reviewed.

  14. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats.

    PubMed

    Eiting, Thomas P; Perot, J Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R

    2015-02-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  15. What is normal nasal airflow? A computational study of 22 healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Kai; Jiang, Jianbo

    2014-01-01

    Objective Nasal airflow is essential for functioning of the human nose. Given individual variation in nasal anatomy, there is yet no consensus what constitutes normal nasal airflow patterns. We attempt to obtain such information that is essential to differentiate disease-related variations. Methods Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulated nasal airflow in 22 healthy subjects during resting breathing. Streamline patterns, airflow distributions, velocity profiles, pressure, wall stress, turbulence, and vortical flow characteristics under quasi-steady state were analyzed. Patency ratings, acoustically measured minimum cross-sectional area (MCA), and rhinomanometric nasal resistance (NR) were examined for potential correlations with morphological and airflow-related variables. Results Common features across subjects included: >50% total pressure-drop reached near the inferior turbinate head; wall shear stress, NR, turbulence energy, and vorticity were lower in the turbinate than in the nasal valve region. However, location of the major flow path and coronal velocity distributions varied greatly across individuals. Surprisingly, on average, more flow passed through the middle than the inferior meatus and correlated with better patency ratings (r=-0.65, p<0.01). This middle flow percentage combined with peak post-vestibule nasal heat loss and MCA accounted for >70% of the variance in subjective patency ratings and predicted patency categories with 86% success. Nasal index correlated with forming of the anterior dorsal vortex. Expected for resting breathing, the functional impact for local and total turbulence, vorticity, and helicity was limited. As validation, rhinomanometric NR significantly correlated with CFD simulations (r=0.53, p<0.01). Conclusion Significant variations of nasal airflow found among healthy subjects; Key features may have clinically relevant applications. PMID:24664528

  16. Analyzing airflow in static ice caves by using the calcFLOW method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Christiane; Meyer, Ulrich; Pflitsch, Andreas; Maggi, Valter

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present a method to detect airflow through ice caves and to quantify the corresponding airflow speeds by the use of temperature loggers. The time series of temperature observations at different loggers are cross-correlated. The time shift of best correlation corresponds to the travel time of the air and is used to derive the airflow speed between the loggers. We apply the method to test data observed inside Schellenberger Eishöhle (ice cave). The successful determination of airflow speeds depends on the existence of distinct temperature variations during the time span of interest. Moreover the airflow speed is assumed to be constant during the period used for the correlation analysis. Both requirements limit the applicability of the correlation analysis to determine instantaneous airflow speeds. Nevertheless the method is very helpful to characterize the general patterns of air movement and their slow temporal variations. The correlation analysis assumes a linear dependency between the correlated data. The good correlation we found for our test data confirms this assumption. We therefore in a second step estimate temperature biases and scale factors for the observed temperature variations by a least-squares adjustment. The observed phenomena, a warming and an attenuation of temperature variations, depending on the distance the air traveled inside the cave, are explained by a mixing of the inflowing air with the air inside the cave. Furthermore we test the significance of the determined parameters by a standard F test and study the sensitivity of the procedure to common manipulations of the original observations like smoothing. In the end we will give an outlook on possible applications and further development of this method.

  17. Influence of Airflow on Laboratory Storage of High Moisture Corn Stover

    SciTech Connect

    Lynn M. Wendt; Ian J. Bonner; Amber N. Hoover; Rachel M. Emerson; William A. Smith

    2014-04-01

    Storing high moisture biomass for bioenergy use is a reality in many areas of the country where wet harvest conditions and environmental factors prevent dry storage from being feasible. Aerobic storage of high moisture biomass leads to microbial degradation and self-heating, but oxygen limitation can aid in material preservation. To understand the influence of oxygen presence on high moisture biomass (50 %, wet basis), three airflow rates were tested on corn stover stored in laboratory reactors. Temperature, carbon dioxide production, dry matter loss, chemical composition, fungal abundance, pH, and organic acids were used to monitor the effects of airflow on storage conditions. The results of this work indicate that oxygen availability impacts both the duration of self-heating and the severity of dry matter loss. High airflow systems experienced the greatest initial rates of loss but a shortened microbially active period that limited total dry matter loss (19 %). Intermediate airflow had improved preservation in short-term storage compared to high airflow systems but accumulated the greatest dry matter loss over time (up to 27 %) as a result of an extended microbially active period. Low airflow systems displayed the best performance with the lowest rates of loss and total loss (10 %) in storage at 50 days. Total structural sugar levels of the stored material were preserved, although glucan enrichment and xylan loss were documented in the high and intermediate flow conditions. By understanding the role of oxygen availability on biomass storage performance, the requirements for high moisture storage solutions may begin to be experimentally defined.

  18. How much does nasal cavity morphology matter? Patterns and rates of olfactory airflow in phyllostomid bats

    PubMed Central

    Eiting, Thomas P.; Perot, J. Blair; Dumont, Elizabeth R.

    2015-01-01

    The morphology of the nasal cavity in mammals with a good sense of smell includes features that are thought to improve olfactory airflow, such as a dorsal conduit that delivers odours quickly to the olfactory mucosa, an enlarged olfactory recess at the back of the airway, and a clear separation of the olfactory and respiratory regions of the nose. The link between these features and having a good sense of smell has been established by functional examinations of a handful of distantly related mammalian species. In this paper, we provide the first detailed examination of olfactory airflow in a group of closely related species that nevertheless vary in their sense of smell. We study six species of phyllostomid bats that have different airway morphologies and foraging ecologies, which have been linked to differences in olfactory ability or reliance. We hypothesize that differences in morphology correlate with differences in the patterns and rates of airflow, which in turn are consistent with dietary differences. To compare species, we make qualitative and quantitative comparisons of the patterns and rates of airflow through the olfactory region during both inhalation and exhalation across the six species. Contrary to our expectations, we find no clear differences among species in either the patterns of airflow through the airway or in rates of flow through the olfactory region. By and large, olfactory airflow seems to be conserved across species, suggesting that morphological differences appear to be driven by other mechanical demands on the snout, such as breathing and feeding. Olfactory ability may depend on other aspects of the system, such as the neurobiological processing of odours that work within the existing morphology imposed by other functional demands on the nasal cavity. PMID:25520358

  19. The Granite Mountain Atmospheric Sciences Testbed (GMAST): A Facility for Long Term Complex Terrain Airflow Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zajic, D.; Pace, J. C.; Whiteman, C. D.; Hoch, S.

    2011-12-01

    This presentation describes a new facility at Dugway Proving Ground (DPG), Utah that can be used to study airflow over complex terrain, and to evaluate how airflow over a mountain barrier affects wind patterns over adjacent flatter terrain. DPG's primary mission is to conduct testing, training, and operational assessments of chemical and biological weapon systems. These operations require very precise weather forecasts. Most test operations at DPG are conducted on fairly flat test ranges having uniform surface cover, where airflow patterns are generally well-understood. However, the DPG test ranges are located alongside large, isolated mountains, most notably Granite Mountain, Camelback Mountain, and the Cedar Mountains. Airflows generated over, or influenced by, these mountains can affect wind patterns on the test ranges. The new facility, the Granite Mountain Atmospheric Sciences Testbed, or GMAST, is designed to facilitate studies of airflow interactions with topography. This facility will benefit DPG by improving understanding of how mountain airflows interact with the test range conditions. A core infrastructure of weather sensors around and on Granite Mountain has been developed including instrumented towers and remote sensors, along with automated data collection and archival systems. GMAST is expected to be in operation for a number of years and will provide a reference domain for mountain meteorology studies, with data useful for analysts, modelers and theoreticians. Visiting scientists are encouraged to collaborate with DPG personnel to utilize this valuable scientific resource and to add further equipment and scientific designs for both short-term and long-term atmospheric studies. Several of the upcoming MATERHORN (MountAin TERrain atmospHeric mOdeling and obseRvatioNs) project field tests will be conducted at DPG, giving an example of GMAST utilization and collaboration between DPG and visiting scientists.

  20. Asbestos exposure, cigarette smoking, and airflow limitation in long-term Canadian chrysotile miners and millers

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Boileau, R.; Peloquin, S.

    1987-01-01

    To investigate further the relationships of asbestos exposure, cigarette smoking, and airflow limitation, we have obtained detailed pulmonary function tests (PFT) in 331 long-term Canadian chrysotile workers, 34 of whom were lifetime nonsmokers. Three disease categories were defined on the bases of standard diagnostic criteria, gallium-67 lung uptake, and the lung pressure-volume curve. Category A was composed of workers without changes suggestive of alveolitis or asbestosis. There were eight nonsmokers (ns), among whom we found a statistically significant 30% reduction in airflow conductance (Gus) at low lung volume, which is consistent with the concept of an asbestos airway lesion. The 85 smokers (sm) of category A had reduction of Gus at both high and low lung volumes. Category B was composed of workers without asbestosis but with evidence of asbestos alveolitis. In the six ns, Gus was significantly reduced to 50% normal at low lung volume. The 59 sm had reduction of Gus at both high and low lung volumes but less severely than sm in category A. Category C was composed of workers with asbestosis. The 20 ns had restrictive pattern of lung function, and Gus was decreased to 39% normal at 50% TLC. The 153 sm in C had airflow reduction comparable to sm in B. We concluded that asbestos exposure, which leads to asbestos airway disease, asbestos peribronchiolar alveolitis, and asbestosis, causes airflow limitation at low lung volume but does not reduce the expiratory flow rates on the flow-volume curve in lifetime nonsmokers. In the smoking asbestos workers with alveolitis or asbestosis, the major component of airflow limitation is a smoking effect. In these smoking workers, rigidity of the lung lessens airflow obstruction associated with smoking at the expense of increased work of breathing.

  1. Analyzing airflow in static ice caves by using the calcFLOW method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, C.; Meyer, U.; Pflitsch, A.; Maggi, V.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we present a method to detect airflow through ice caves and to quantify the corresponding airflow speeds by the use of temperature loggers. The time series of temperature observations at different loggers are cross-correlated. The time shift of best correlation corresponds to the travel time of the air and is used to derive the airflow speed between the loggers. We apply the method to test data observed inside Schellenberger Eishöhle (ice cave). The successful determination of airflow speeds depends on the existence of distinct temperature variations during the time span of interest. Moreover the airflow speed is assumed to be constant during the period used for the correlation analysis. Both requirements limit the applicability of the correlation analysis to determine instantaneous airflow speeds. Nevertheless the method is very helpful to characterize the general patterns of air movement and their slow temporal variations. The correlation analysis assumes a linear dependency between the correlated data. The good correlation we found for our test data confirms this assumption. We therefore in a second step estimate temperature biases and scale factors for the observed temperature variations by a least squares adjustment. The observed phenomena, a warming and a damping of temperature variations depending on the distance the air traveled inside the cave, are explained by a mixing of the inflowing air with the air inside the cave. Furthermore we test the significance of the determined parameters by a standard F test and study the sensitivity of the procedure to common manipulations of the original observations like smoothing. In the end we will give an outlook on possible applications and further development of this method.

  2. Aerodynamic-wave break-up of liquid sheets in swirling airflows and combustor modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental mean drop diameter data were obtained for the atomization of liquid sheets injected axially downstream in high velocity swirling and nonswirling airflow. Conventional simplex pressure atomizing fuel nozzles and splash type fuel injectors were studied under simulated combustor inlet airflow conditions. A general empirical expression relating recirprocal mean drop diameter to airstream mass velocity was obtained and is presented. The finest degree of atomization, i.e., the highest value of the coefficient C, was obtained with swirl can combustor modules (C = 15) as compared with pressure atomizing nozzles (C = 12).

  3. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes.

    PubMed

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J R; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune's symmetry axis - that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  4. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected.

  5. Two-dimensional airflow modeling underpredicts the wind velocity over dunes

    PubMed Central

    Michelsen, Britt; Strobl, Severin; Parteli, Eric J. R.; Pöschel, Thorsten

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the average turbulent wind field over a barchan dune by means of Computational Fluid Dynamics. We find that the fractional speed-up ratio of the wind velocity over the three-dimensional barchan shape differs from the one obtained from two-dimensional calculations of the airflow over the longitudinal cut along the dune’s symmetry axis — that is, over the equivalent transverse dune of same size. This finding suggests that the modeling of the airflow over the central slice of barchan dunes is insufficient for the purpose of the quantitative description of barchan dune dynamics as three-dimensional flow effects cannot be neglected. PMID:26572966

  6. Research of Structure and Technology for the Micro-Machined Airflow Inclinometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Yu; Zhang, Fuxue

    This paper reported a sensing mechanism of carrier attitude angle with the micro-machined airflow inclinometer, it utilized fluid mechanics and related theories to design the sensitive structure, analyze and certify gas pendulum in a micro-structure hermetic chamber, We used computer aided design and simulation software MEMSPro to design sensing structure layout,and produced in MEMS processing methods. The Micro-machined airflow inclinometer installed on optical dividing head to test. Through the compensation, ± 45° can be realized Nonlinear 1% or less. The sensor has a strong anti-vibration and impact ability, a simple structure and low cost.

  7. A Comparative Study of Airflow and Odorant Deposition in the Mammalian Nasal Cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Joseph; Rumple, Christopher; Ranslow, Allison; Quigley, Andrew; Pang, Benison; Neuberger, Thomas; Krane, Michael; van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Craven, Brent

    2013-11-01

    The complex structure of the mammalian nasal cavity provides a tortuous airflow path and a large surface area for respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. Due to the small and contorted structure of the nasal turbinals, nasal anatomy and function remains poorly understood in most mammals. Here, we utilize high-resolution MRI scans to reconstruct anatomically-accurate models of the mammalian nasal cavity. These data are used to compare the form and function of the mammalian nose. High-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of nasal airflow and odorant deposition are presented and used to compare olfactory function across species (primate, rodent, canine, feline, ungulate).

  8. Automating the Solar DRYER—AIRFLOW Control Utilizing Pressure Diffrence Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luk, T. B.; Vakhguelt, A.

    2009-08-01

    The presence of a chimney in natural convective solar dryer has proven its benefit in accelerated transport of moist air from the drying compartment and thus shortening the drying time for intended crops. The experiment and simulation studies done by various parties have guaranteed increases in the airflow in relation to the physical height of chimney. A simple automated control system is proposed to assist the controls of airflow rate so that a near optimum mass flow rate could be achieved for the best possible dried product quality in the shortest possible drying period.

  9. 42 CFR 84.155 - Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and Type CE supplied-air respirator; minimum requirements. 84.155 Section... Respirators § 84.155 Airflow resistance test; Type C supplied-air respirator, continuous flow class and...

  10. Efficacy and safety of twice-daily glycopyrrolate in patients with stable, symptomatic COPD with moderate-to-severe airflow limitation: the GEM1 study

    PubMed Central

    LaForce, Craig; Feldman, Gregory; Spangenthal, Selwyn; Eckert, Joerg H; Henley, Michelle; Patalano, Francesco; D’Andrea, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to confirm the efficacy and safety of twice-daily glycopyrrolate 15.6 µg, a long-acting muscarinic antagonist, in patients with stable, symptomatic, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with moderate-to-severe airflow limitation. Methods The GEM1 study was a 12-week, multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled study that randomized patients with stable, symptomatic COPD with moderate-to-severe airflow limitation to twice-daily glycopyrrolate 15.6 µg or placebo (1:1) via the Neohaler® device. The primary objective was to demonstrate superiority of glycopyrrolate versus placebo in terms of forced expiratory volume in 1 second area under the curve between 0 and 12 hours post morning dose at week 12. Other outcomes included additional spirometric end points, transition dyspnea index, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire, COPD Assessment Test, rescue medication use, and symptoms reported by patients via electronic diary. Safety was also assessed during the study. Results Of the 441 patients randomized (glycopyrrolate, n=222; placebo, n=219), 96% of patients completed the planned treatment phase. Glycopyrrolate demonstrated statistically significant (P<0.001) improvements in lung function versus placebo. Glycopyrrolate showed statistically significant improvement in the transition dyspnea index focal score, St George’s Respiratory Questionnaire total score, COPD Assessment Test score, rescue medication use, and daily total symptom score versus placebo at week 12. Safety was comparable between the treatment groups. Conclusion Significant improvement in lung function, dyspnea, COPD symptoms, health status, and rescue medication use suggests that glycopyrrolate is a safe and effective treatment option as maintenance bronchodilator in patients with stable, symptomatic COPD with moderate-to-severe airflow limitation. PMID:27354782

  11. Baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherer, S.

    2012-03-01

    We provide a short introduction to the one-nucleon sector of chiral perturbation theory and address the issue of power counting and renormalization. We discuss the infrared regularization and the extended on-mass-shell scheme. Both allow for the inclusion of further degrees of freedom beyond pions and nucleons and the application to higher-loop calculations. As applications we consider the chiral expansion of the nucleon mass to order Script O(q6) and the inclusion of vector and axial-vector mesons in the calculation of nucleon form factors. Finally, we address the complex-mass scheme for describing unstable particles in effective field theory.

  12. Discrete reductive perturbation technique

    SciTech Connect

    Levi, Decio; Petrera, Matteo

    2006-04-15

    We expand a partial difference equation (P{delta}E) on multiple lattices and obtain the P{delta}E which governs its far field behavior. The perturbative-reductive approach is here performed on well-known nonlinear P{delta}Es, both integrable and nonintegrable. We study the cases of the lattice modified Korteweg-de Vries (mKdV) equation, the Hietarinta equation, the lattice Volterra-Kac-Van Moerbeke equation and a nonintegrable lattice KdV equation. Such reductions allow us to obtain many new P{delta}Es of the nonlinear Schroedinger type.

  13. Development of a perturbation generator for vortex stability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riester, J. E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    Theory predicts vortex instability when subjected to certain types of disturbances. It was desired to build a device which could introduce controlled velocity perturbations into a trailing line vortex in order to study the effects on stability. A perturbation generator was designed and manufactured which can be attached to the centerbody of an airfoil type vortex generator. Details of design tests and manufacturing of the perturbation generator are presented. The device produced controlled perturbation with frequencies in excess of 250 Hz. Preliminary testing and evaluation of the perturbation generator performance was conducted in a 4 inch cylindrical pipe. Observations of vortex shedding frequencies from a centerbody were measured. Further evaluation with the perturbation generator attached to the vortex generator in a 2 x 3 foot wind tunnel were also conducted. Hot-wire anemometry was used to confirm the perturbation generator's ability to introduce controlled frequency fluctuations. Comparison of the energy levels of the disturbances in the vortex core was made between locations 42 chord lengths and 15 chord lengths downstream.

  14. Concordance and Discriminatory Power of Cough Measurement Devices for Individuals With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnaby-Mann, Giselle; Pitts, Teresa; Davenport, Paul; Okun, Michael S.; Sapienza, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dysphagia and aspiration pneumonia are two causes of morbidity in Parkinson disease (PD). In PD, impaired airway clearance can lead to penetration of foreign material, resulting in a high prevalence of aspiration pneumonia and death. This study examines three different devices for measurement of peak airflow during voluntary cough in healthy control subjects and those with PD. Two simple and low-cost devices for measuring peak cough airflow were compared with the “gold standard” pneumotachograph. Methods: Thirty-five healthy control subjects and 35 individuals with PD produced voluntary cough at three perceived strengths (weak, moderate, and strong cough) for each of the three devices. Results: A significant difference in mean peak cough airflow was demonstrated for disease (F[1,56] = 4.0, P < .05) and sex (F[1,56] = 9.59, P < .003) across devices. The digital and analog meters were comparable to the gold standard demonstrating no significant difference (statistical) by device (digital vs analog) in receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Both devices were discriminative of the presence of PD. Conclusions: The analog and digital peak airflow meters are suitable alternatives to the gold standard pneumotachograph due to their low cost, portability, ease of use, and high sensitivity relative to normative peak cough airflows. Voluntary cough airflow measures may serve as a noninvasive means of screening for aspiration risk in target populations. Additionally, quantification of cough strength through use of predetermined limens for weak, moderate, and strong cough may assist clinicians in better describing and tracking cough strength as a contributing factor to aspiration risk. PMID:24264124

  15. Canonical floquet perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlen, David J.

    1992-12-01

    Classical Floquet theory is examined in order to generate a canonical transformation to modal variables for periodic system. This transformation is considered canonical if the periodic matrix of eigenvectors is symplectic at the initial time. Approaches for symplectic normalization of the eigenvectors had to be examined for each of the different Poincare eigenvalue cases. Particular attention was required in the degenerate case, which depended on the solution of a generalized eigenvector. Transformation techniques to ensure real modal variables and real periodic eigenvectors were also needed. Periodic trajectories in the restricted three-body case were then evaluated using the canonical Floquet solution. The system used for analyses is the Sun-Jupiter system. This system was especially useful since it contained two of the more difficult Poincare eigenvalue cases, the degenerate case and the imaginary eigenvalue case. The perturbation solution to the canonical modal variables was examined using both an expansion of the Hamiltonian and using a representation that was considered exact. Both methods compared quite well for small perturbations to the initial condition. As expected, the expansion solution failed first due to truncation after the third order term of the expansion.

  16. Experimental investigation of transient thermal behavior of an airship under different solar radiation and airflow conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, De-Fu; Xia, Xin-Lin; Sun, Chuang

    2014-03-01

    Knowledge of the thermal behavior of airships is crucial to the development of airship technology. An experiment apparatus is constructed to investigate the thermal response characteristics of airships, and the transient temperature distributions of both hull and inner gas are obtained under the irradiation of a solar simulator and various airflow conditions. In the course of the research, the transient temperature change of the experimental airship is measured for four airflow speeds of 0 m/s (natural convection), 3.26 m/s, 5.5 m/s and 7.0 m/s, and two incident solar radiation values of 842.4 W/m2 and 972.0 W/m2. The results show that solar irradiation has significant influence on the airship hull and inner gas temperatures even if the airship stays in a ground airflow environment where the heat transfer is dominated by radiation and convection. The airflow around the airship is conducive to reduce the hull temperature and temperature nonuniformity. Transient thermal response of airships rapidly varies with time under solar radiation conditions and the hull temperature remains approximately constant in ˜5-10 min. Finally, a transient thermal model of airship is developed and the model is validated through comparison with the experimental data.

  17. Atomization of water jets and sheets in axial and swirling airflows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingebo, R. D.

    1979-01-01

    Axial and swirling airflows were used to break up water jets and sheets into sprays of droplets to determine the overall effects of orifice diameter, weight flow of air, and the use of an air swirler on fineness of atomization as characterized by mean drop size. A scanning radiometer was used to determine the mean drop diameter of each spray. Swirling airflows were produced with an axial combustor, 70 deg blake angle, air swirling. Water jets were injected axially upstream, axially downstream and cross stream into the airflow. In addition, pressure atomizing fuel nozzles which produced a sheet and ligament type of breakup were investigated. Increasing the weight flow rate of air or the use of an air swirling markedly reduced the spray mean drop size. Test conditions included a water flow rate of 68.0 liter per hour and airflow rates (per unit area) of 3.7 to 25.7 g per square cm per sec, at 293 K and inlet-air static pressures of 1.01 x 10 to the 5th to 1.98 x 10 to the 5th N/sq m.

  18. Detection of Mouse Cough Based on Sound Monitoring and Respiratory Airflow Waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liyan; Lai, Kefang; Lomask, Joseph Mark; Jiang, Bert; Zhong, Nanshan

    2013-01-01

    Detection for cough in mice has never yielded clearly audible sounds, so there is still a great deal of debates as to whether mice can cough in response to tussive stimuli. Here we introduce an approach for detection of mouse cough based on sound monitoring and airflow signals. 40 Female BALB/c mice were pretreated with normal saline, codeine, capasazepine or desensitized with capsaicin. Single mouse was put in a plethysmograph, exposed to aerosolized 100 µmol/L capsaicin for 3 min, followed by continuous observation for 3 min. Airflow signals of total 6 min were recorded and analyzed to detect coughs. Simultaneously, mouse cough sounds were sensed by a mini-microphone, monitored manually by an operator. When manual and automatic detection coincided, the cough was positively identified. Sound and sound waveforms were also recorded and filtered for further analysis. Body movements were observed by operator. Manual versus automated counts were compared. Seven types of airflow signals were identified by integrating manual and automated monitoring. Observation of mouse movements and analysis of sound waveforms alone did not produce meaningful data. Mouse cough numbers decreased significantly after all above drugs treatment. The Bland-Altman and consistency analysis between automatic and manual counts was 0.968 and 0.956. The study suggests that the mouse is able to present with cough, which could be detected by sound monitoring and respiratory airflow waveform changes. PMID:23555643

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION, TEST REPORT OF CONTROL OF BIOAEROSOLS IN HVAC SYSTEMS, AIRFLOW PRODUCTS AFP30

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of the AFP30 air filter for dust and bioaerosol filtration manufactured by Airflow Products. The pressure drop across the filter was 62 Pa clean and 247 Pa dust loaded. The filtration effici...

  20. Citric acid cough threshold and airway responsiveness in asthmatic patients and smokers with chronic airflow obstruction.

    PubMed Central

    Auffarth, B; de Monchy, J G; van der Mark, T W; Postma, D S; Koëter, G H

    1991-01-01

    The relation between citric acid cough threshold and airway hyperresponsiveness was investigated in 11 non-smoking patients with allergic asthma (mean FEV1 94% predicted) and 25 non-atopic smokers with chronic airflow obstruction (mean FEV1 65% predicted). Cough threshold was determined on two occasions by administering doubling concentrations of citric acid. Seven of the 11 asthmatic subjects and 14 of 25 smokers with chronic airflow obstruction had a positive cough threshold on both test days. Cough threshold measurements were reproducible in both groups (standard deviation of duplicate measurements 1.2 doubling concentrations in asthma, 1.1 doubling concentrations in chronic airflow obstruction). Citric acid provocation did not cause bronchial obstruction in most patients, though four patients had a fall in FEV1 of more than 20% for a short time on one occasion only. No significant difference in cough threshold was found between the two patient groups despite differences in baseline FEV1 values. There was no significant correlation between cough threshold and the provocative concentration of histamine causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) histamine in either group. Thus sensory nerves can be activated with a tussive agent in patients with asthma and chronic airflow obstruction without causing bronchial smooth muscle contraction. PMID:1948792

  1. Measuring Airflow in Local Exhaust Ventilation Systems. Module 23. Vocational Education Training in Environmental Sciences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Consumer Dynamics Inc., Rockville, MD.

    This module, one of 25 on vocational education training for careers in environmental health occupations, contains self-instructional materials on measuring airflow in local exhaust ventilation systems. Following guidelines for students and instructors and an introduction that explains what the student will learn are three lessons: (1) naming each…

  2. Study on airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yuzhen; Hu, Xiaodong; Zhu, Linhang; Hu, Xudong; Jin, Yingzi

    2016-04-01

    The air-jet loom is widely used in the textile industry. The interaction mechanism of airflow and yarn is not clear in such a narrow flow channel, the gas consumption is relatively large, the yarn motion is unstable and the weft insertion is often interrupted during the operation. In order to study the characteristics of the semi-closed flow field in profiled dents, the momentum conservation equation is modified and the model parameters and boundary conditions are set. Compared with the different r, the ratio of profiled dent's thickness and gap, the results show that the smaller the r is, the smaller the velocity fluctuations of the airflow is. When the angle of profiled dents α is close to zero, the diffusion of the airflow will be less. The experiment is also conducted to verify the result of the simulation with a high-speed camera and pressure sensor in profiled dents. The airflow characteristics in the semi-closed irregular narrow flow channel in the paper would provide the theoretical basis for optimizing the weft insertion process of the air-jet loom.

  3. Cooling tower irrigator layout with allowances for non-uniformity of the airflow velocity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushnov, A. S.; Ryabushenko, A. S.

    2016-07-01

    This article covers the results of analysis of aerodynamic processes in the cooling tower irrigator and provides the approaches to optimal layout of preformed packing blocks (of the irrigator) developed based on these results. The analysis of the airflow velocity field in the cooling towers shows that the irrigation space can be broken down into the following zones: the peripheral zone of the cooling tower near the airblast windows, the zone near the cooling tower center, and the intermediate zone. Furthermore, the highest level of nonuniformity of the airflow velocity field in cooling towers is in the zone adjoining the tower's airblast windows. The proposed concept of the cooling tower irrigator's layout is made with allowances for the airflow velocity field characteristics in the cross-section of the irrigation space of the cooling tower. Based on this concept, we suggest that higher irrigator blocks should be placed in the zone of increased airflow consumption, which provides the possibility to enhance the hydraulic resistance and, respectively, decrease the gas flow velocity as well as to boost the efficiency of chilling the circulating water in the cooling tower. For this purpose, additional irrigator blocks can be of the same design as the main irrigator. As an option, it is possible to use blocks of the geometry and design other than the main irrigator block in the cooling tower.

  4. Airflow produced by dielectric barrier discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Motofumi; Yasui, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Kiyoshi

    2007-09-15

    We observed a novel type of airflow produced by an atmospheric rf discharge between asymmetric parallel rod electrodes. The electrodes were a bare metal rod 1 mm in diameter and a glass-coated metal rod 3.2 mm in diameter. The thrust, measured by a pendulum, increased with discharge input power.

  5. Dielectrokinetic chromatography devices

    DOEpatents

    Chirica, Gabriela S; Fiechtner, Gregory J; Singh, Anup K

    2014-12-16

    Disclosed herein are methods and devices for dielectrokinetic chromatography. As disclosed, the devices comprise microchannels having at least one perturber which produces a non-uniformity in a field spanning the width of the microchannel. The interaction of the field non-uniformity with a perturber produces a secondary flow which competes with a primary flow. By decreasing the size of the perturber the secondary flow becomes significant for particles/analytes in the nanometer-size range. Depending on the nature of a particle/analyte present in the fluid and its interaction with the primary flow and the secondary flow, the analyte may be retained or redirected. The composition of the primary flow can be varied to affect the magnitude of primary and/or secondary flows on the particles/analytes and thereby separate and concentrate it from other particles/analytes.

  6. Electrophoresis device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, P. H.; Snyder, R. S. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A device for separating cellular particles of a sample substance into fractionated streams of different cellular species includes a casing having a distribution chamber, a separation chamber, and a collection chamber. The electrode chambers are separated from the separation chamber interior by means of passages such that flow variations and membrane variations around the slotted portion of the electrode chamber do not enduce flow perturbations into the laminar buffer curtain flowing in the separation chamber. The cellular particles of the sample are separated under the influence of the electrical field and the separation chamber into streams of different cellular species. The streams of separated cells enter a partition array in the collection chamber where they are fractionated and collected.

  7. Usability Evaluation of a Flight-Deck Airflow Hazard Visualization System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aragon, Cecilia R.

    2004-01-01

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with unseen airflow hazards near the ground, such as vortices, downdrafts, low level wind shear, microbursts, or turbulence from surrounding vegetation or structures near the landing site. These hazards can be dangerous even to airliners; there have been hundreds of fatalities in the United States in the last two decades attributable to airliner encounters with microbursts and low level wind shear alone. However, helicopters are especially vulnerable to airflow hazards because they often have to operate in confined spaces and under operationally stressful conditions (such as emergency search and rescue, military or shipboard operations). Providing helicopter pilots with an augmented-reality display visualizing local airflow hazards may be of significant benefit. However, the form such a visualization might take, and whether it does indeed provide a benefit, had not been studied before our experiment. We recruited experienced military and civilian helicopter pilots for a preliminary usability study to evaluate a prototype augmented-reality visualization system. The study had two goals: first, to assess the efficacy of presenting airflow data in flight; and second, to obtain expert feedback on sample presentations of hazard indicators to refine our design choices. The study addressed the optimal way to provide critical safety information to the pilot, what level of detail to provide, whether to display specific aerodynamic causes or potential effects only, and how to safely and effectively shift the locus of attention during a high-workload task. Three-dimensional visual cues, with varying shape, color, transparency, texture, depth cueing, and use of motion, depicting regions of hazardous airflow, were developed and presented to the pilots. The study results indicated that such a visualization system could be of significant value in improving safety during critical takeoff and landing operations, and also

  8. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria.

    PubMed

    Schachner, Emma R; Hutchinson, John R; Farmer, Cg

    2013-01-01

    The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT) and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria. PMID:23638399

  9. Strongly coupled interaction between a ridge of fluid and an inviscid airflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, C.; Wilson, S. K.; Duffy, B. R.

    2015-07-01

    The behaviour of a steady thin sessile or pendent ridge of fluid on an inclined planar substrate which is strongly coupled to the external pressure gradient arising from an inviscid airflow parallel to the substrate far from the ridge is described. When the substrate is nearly horizontal, a very wide ridge can be supported against gravity by capillary and/or external pressure forces; otherwise, only a narrower (but still wide) ridge can be supported. Classical thin-aerofoil theory is adapted to obtain the governing singular integro-differential equation for the profile of the ridge in each case. Attention is focused mainly on the case of a very wide sessile ridge. The effect of strengthening the airflow is to push a pinned ridge down near to its edges and to pull it up near to its middle. At a critical airflow strength, the upslope contact angle reaches the receding contact angle at which the upslope contact line de-pins, and continuing to increase the airflow strength beyond this critical value results in the de-pinned ridge becoming narrower, thicker, and closer to being symmetric in the limit of a strong airflow. The effect of tilting the substrate is to skew a pinned ridge in the downslope direction. Depending on the values of the advancing and receding contact angles, the ridge may first de-pin at either the upslope or the downslope contact line but, in general, eventually both contact lines de-pin. The special cases in which only one of the contact lines de-pins are also considered. It is also shown that the behaviour of a very wide pendent ridge is qualitatively similar to that of a very wide sessile ridge, while the important qualitative difference between the behaviour of a very wide ridge and a narrower ridge is that, in general, for the latter one or both of the contact lines may never de-pin.

  10. Pulmonary anatomy in the Nile crocodile and the evolution of unidirectional airflow in Archosauria

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, John R.; Farmer, CG

    2013-01-01

    The lungs of birds have long been known to move air in only one direction during both inspiration and expiration through most of the tubular gas-exchanging bronchi (parabronchi). Recently a similar pattern of airflow has been observed in American alligators, a sister taxon to birds. The pattern of flow appears to be due to the arrangement of the primary and secondary bronchi, which, via their branching angles, generate inspiratory and expiratory aerodynamic valves. Both the anatomical similarity of the avian and alligator lung and the similarity in the patterns of airflow raise the possibility that these features are plesiomorphic for Archosauria and therefore did not evolve in response to selection for flapping flight or an endothermic metabolism, as has been generally assumed. To further test the hypothesis that unidirectional airflow is ancestral for Archosauria, we measured airflow in the lungs of the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus). As in birds and alligators, air flows cranially to caudally in the cervical ventral bronchus, and caudally to cranially in the dorsobronchi in the lungs of Nile crocodiles. We also visualized the gross anatomy of the primary, secondary and tertiary pulmonary bronchi of C. niloticus using computed tomography (CT) and microCT. The cervical ventral bronchus, cranial dorsobronchi and cranial medial bronchi display similar characteristics to their proposed homologues in the alligator, while there is considerable variation in the tertiary and caudal group bronchi. Our data indicate that the aspects of the crocodilian bronchial tree that maintain the aerodynamic valves and thus generate unidirectional airflow, are ancestral for Archosauria. PMID:23638399

  11. Improving aviation safety with information visualization: Airflow hazard display for helicopter pilots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aragon, Cecilia Rodriguez

    Many aircraft accidents each year are caused by encounters with airflow hazards near the ground, such as vortices or other turbulence. While such hazards frequently pose problems to fixed-wing aircraft, they are especially dangerous to helicopters, whose pilots often have to operate into confined areas or under operationally stressful conditions. Pilots are often unaware of these invisible hazards while simultaneously attending to other aspects of aircraft operation close to the ground. Recent advances in aviation sensor technology offer the potential for aircraft-based sensors that can gather large amounts of airflow velocity data in real time. This development is likely to lead to the production of onboard detection systems that can convey detailed, specific information about imminent airflow hazards to pilots. A user interface is required that can present extensive amounts of data to the pilot in a useful manner in real time, yet not distract from the pilot's primary task of flying the aircraft. In this dissertation, we address the question of how best to present safety-critical visual information to a cognitively overloaded user in real time. We designed an airflow hazard visualization system according to user-centered design principles, implemented the system in a high fidelity, aerodynamically realistic rotorcraft flight simulator, and evaluated it via usability studies with experienced military and civilian helicopter pilots. We gathered both subjective data from the pilots' evaluations of the visualizations, and objective data from the pilots' performance during the landing simulations. Our study demonstrated that information visualization of airflow hazards, when presented to helicopter pilots in the simulator, dramatically improved their ability to land safely under turbulent conditions. Although we focused on one particular aviation application, the results may be relevant to user interfaces and information visualization in other safety

  12. Pulmonary Artery Abnormalities in Ex-smokers with and without Airflow Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Lindenmaier, Tamas J; Kirby, Miranda; Paulin, Gregory; Mielniczuk, Lisa; Cunningham, Ian A; Mura, Marco; Licskai, Christopher; Parraga, Grace

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary vascular disease is a common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and an important risk factor for COPD exacerbations and death. We explored the relationship between pulmonary artery volumes measured using thoracic computed tomography (CT) and lung structure-function measured using spirometry, CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 124 ex-smokers with (n = 68) and without (n = 56) airflow obstruction, and a control group of 35 never-smokers. We observed significantly greater main (p = .01), right (p = .001) and total (p = .003) pulmonary artery volumes in ex-smokers with airflow obstruction as compared to ex-smokers without airflow obstruction. There were also significantly greater pulmonary artery volumes in both ex-smoker subgroups, compared to the never-smoker subgroup (p = .008). For all participants, there were significant correlations for pulmonary artery volumes with the ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 s to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), the diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide (DLCO%pred), airway count, MRI ventilation defect percent and MRI apparent diffusion coefficients. In ex-smokers, ventilation defect percent was significantly correlated with right (r = 0.27, p = .02) and total (r = 0.25, p = .03) pulmonary artery volumes. Multivariate zero-inflated Poisson regression analysis showed that FEV1%pred (p = .004), DLCO%pred (p = .03), the six minute walk distance (p = .04) and total pulmonary artery volume (p = .03) were significant predictors of acute exacerbations of COPD, while the number of previous exacerbations was not. In conclusion, pulmonary artery enlargement measured using thoracic CT was observed even in ex-smokers without airflow obstruction and was predictive of COPD exacerbations in ex-smokers with airflow obstruction. PMID:26606693

  13. Flatbands under correlated perturbations.

    PubMed

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy E_{FB}, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ∼1/ln(E-E_{FB}), (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at E_{FB}. Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions. PMID:25526142

  14. Flatbands under Correlated Perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodyfelt, Joshua D.; Leykam, Daniel; Danieli, Carlo; Yu, Xiaoquan; Flach, Sergej

    2014-12-01

    Flatband networks are characterized by the coexistence of dispersive and flatbands. Flatbands (FBs) are generated by compact localized eigenstates (CLSs) with local network symmetries, based on destructive interference. Correlated disorder and quasiperiodic potentials hybridize CLSs without additional renormalization, yet with surprising consequences: (i) states are expelled from the FB energy EFB, (ii) the localization length of eigenstates vanishes as ξ ˜1 /ln (E -EFB) , (iii) the density of states diverges logarithmically (particle-hole symmetry) and algebraically (no particle-hole symmetry), and (iv) mobility edge curves show algebraic singularities at EFB . Our analytical results are based on perturbative expansions of the CLSs and supported by numerical data in one and two lattice dimensions.

  15. Discrete Newtonian cosmology: perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, George F. R.; Gibbons, Gary W.

    2015-03-01

    In a previous paper (Gibbons and Ellis 2014 Discrete Newtonian cosmology Class. Quantum Grav. 31 025003), we showed how a finite system of discrete particles interacting with each other via Newtonian gravitational attraction would lead to precisely the same dynamical equations for homothetic motion as in the case of the pressure-free Friedmann-Lemaître-Robertson-Walker cosmological models of general relativity theory, provided the distribution of particles obeys the central configuration equation. In this paper we show that one can obtain perturbed such Newtonian solutions that give the same linearized structure growth equations as in the general relativity case. We also obtain the Dmitriev-Zel’dovich equations for subsystems in this discrete gravitational model, and show how it leads to the conclusion that voids have an apparent negative mass.

  16. Perturbed effects at radiation physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Külahcı, Fatih; Şen, Zekâi

    2013-09-01

    Perturbation methodology is applied in order to assess the linear attenuation coefficient, mass attenuation coefficient and cross-section behavior with random components in the basic variables such as the radiation amounts frequently used in the radiation physics and chemistry. Additionally, layer attenuation coefficient (LAC) and perturbed LAC (PLAC) are proposed for different contact materials. Perturbation methodology provides opportunity to obtain results with random deviations from the average behavior of each variable that enters the whole mathematical expression. The basic photon intensity variation expression as the inverse exponential power law (as Beer-Lambert's law) is adopted for perturbation method exposition. Perturbed results are presented not only in terms of the mean but additionally the standard deviation and the correlation coefficients. Such perturbation expressions provide one to assess small random variability in basic variables.

  17. Cosmological perturbations in massive bigravity

    SciTech Connect

    Lagos, Macarena; Ferreira, Pedro G. E-mail: p.ferreira1@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of classical scalar, vector and tensor cosmological perturbations in ghost-free massive bigravity. In particular, we find the full evolution equations and analytical solutions in a wide range of regimes. We show that there are viable cosmological backgrounds but, as has been found in the literature, these models generally have exponential instabilities in linear perturbation theory. However, it is possible to find stable scalar cosmological perturbations for a very particular choice of parameters. For this stable subclass of models we find that vector and tensor perturbations have growing solutions. We argue that special initial conditions are needed for tensor modes in order to have a viable model.

  18. Canonical density matrix perturbation theory.

    PubMed

    Niklasson, Anders M N; Cawkwell, M J; Rubensson, Emanuel H; Rudberg, Elias

    2015-12-01

    Density matrix perturbation theory [Niklasson and Challacombe, Phys. Rev. Lett. 92, 193001 (2004)] is generalized to canonical (NVT) free-energy ensembles in tight-binding, Hartree-Fock, or Kohn-Sham density-functional theory. The canonical density matrix perturbation theory can be used to calculate temperature-dependent response properties from the coupled perturbed self-consistent field equations as in density-functional perturbation theory. The method is well suited to take advantage of sparse matrix algebra to achieve linear scaling complexity in the computational cost as a function of system size for sufficiently large nonmetallic materials and metals at high temperatures. PMID:26764847

  19. Resumming the string perturbation series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Alba; Mariño, Marcos; Zakany, Szabolcs

    2015-05-01

    We use the AdS/CFT correspondence to study the resummation of a perturbative genus expansion appearing in the type II superstring dual of ABJM theory. Although the series is Borel summable, its Borel resummation does not agree with the exact non-perturbative answer due to the presence of complex instantons. The same type of behavior appears in the WKB quantization of the quartic oscillator in Quantum Mechanics, which we analyze in detail as a toy model for the string perturbation series. We conclude that, in these examples, Borel summability is not enough for extracting non-perturbative information, due to non-perturbative effects associated to complex instantons. We also analyze the resummation of the genus expansion for topological string theory on local , which is closely related to ABJM theory. In this case, the non-perturbative answer involves membrane instantons computed by the refined topological string, which are crucial to produce a well-defined result. We give evidence that the Borel resummation of the perturbative series requires such a non-perturbative sector.

  20. Underwing compression vortex attenuation device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James C., Jr. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A vortex attenuation device is presented which dissipates a lift-induced vortex generated by a lifting aircraft wing. The device consists of a positive pressure gradient producing means in the form of a compression panel attached to the lower surface of the wing and facing perpendicular to the airflow across the wing. The panel is located between the midpoint of the local wing cord and the trailing edge in the chord-wise direction and at a point which is approximately 55 percent of the wing span as measured from the fuselage center line in the spanwise direction. When deployed in flight, this panel produces a positive pressure gradient aligned with the final roll-up of the total vortex system which interrupts the axial flow in the vortex core and causes the vortex to collapse.

  1. Computing singularities of perturbation series

    SciTech Connect

    Kvaal, Simen; Jarlebring, Elias; Michiels, Wim

    2011-03-15

    Many properties of current ab initio approaches to the quantum many-body problem, both perturbational and otherwise, are related to the singularity structure of the Rayleigh-Schroedinger perturbation series. A numerical procedure is presented that in principle computes the complete set of singularities, including the dominant singularity which limits the radius of convergence. The method approximates the singularities as eigenvalues of a certain generalized eigenvalue equation which is solved using iterative techniques. It relies on computation of the action of the Hamiltonian matrix on a vector and does not rely on the terms in the perturbation series. The method can be useful for studying perturbation series of typical systems of moderate size, for fundamental development of resummation schemes, and for understanding the structure of singularities for typical systems. Some illustrative model problems are studied, including a helium-like model with {delta}-function interactions for which Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory is considered and the radius of convergence found.

  2. On dark energy isocurvature perturbation

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Zhang, Xinmin; Li, Mingzhe E-mail: limz@nju.edu.cn

    2011-06-01

    Determining the equation of state of dark energy with astronomical observations is crucially important to understand the nature of dark energy. In performing a likelihood analysis of the data, especially of the cosmic microwave background and large scale structure data the dark energy perturbations have to be taken into account both for theoretical consistency and for numerical accuracy. Usually, one assumes in the global fitting analysis that the dark energy perturbations are adiabatic. In this paper, we study the dark energy isocurvature perturbation analytically and discuss its implications for the cosmic microwave background radiation and large scale structure. Furthermore, with the current astronomical observational data and by employing Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, we perform a global analysis of cosmological parameters assuming general initial conditions for the dark energy perturbations. The results show that the dark energy isocurvature perturbations are very weakly constrained and that purely adiabatic initial conditions are consistent with the data.

  3. Numerical Modelling of Airflow and Temperature Distribution in a Living Room with Different Heat Exchange Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gendelis, S.; Jakovičs, A.

    2010-01-01

    Numerical mathematical modelling of the indoor thermal conditions and of the energy losses for separate rooms is an important part of the analysis of the heat-exchange balance and energy efficiency in buildings. The measurements of heat transfer coefficients for bounding structures, the air-tightness tests and thermographic diagnostics done for a building allow the influence of those factors to be predicted more correctly in developed numerical models. The temperature distribution and airflows in a typical room (along with the heat losses) were calculated for different heater locations and solar radiation (modelled as a heat source) through the window, as well as various pressure differences between the openings in opposite walls. The airflow velocities and indoor temperature, including its gradient, were also analysed as parameters of thermal comfort conditions. The results obtained show that all of the listed factors have an important influence on the formation of thermal comfort conditions and on the heat balance in a room.

  4. Study of airflow during respiratory cycle in semi-realistic model of human tracheobronchial tree

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elcner, Jakub; Zaremba, M.; Maly, M.; Jedelsky, J.; Lizal, F.; Jicha, M.

    2016-06-01

    This article deals with study of airflow under breathing process, which is characteristic by unsteady behavior. Simulations provided by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was compared with experiments performed on similar geometry of human upper airways. This geometry was represented by mouth cavity of realistic shape connected to an idealized tracheobronchial tree up to fourth generation of branching. Commercial CFD software Star-CCM+ was used to calculate airflow inside investigated geometry and method of Reynolds averaging of Navier-Stokes equations was used for subscribing the turbulent behavior through model geometry. Conditions corresponding to resting state were considered. Comparisons with experiments were provided on several points through trachea and bronchial tree and results with respect to inspiratory and respiratory part of breathing cycle was discussed.

  5. The coupling influence of airflow and temperature on the wall-wetted fuel film distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Yong-sheng; Deng, Kangyao; Li, Tao

    2010-02-15

    The coupling influence of airflow and temperature on the two-dimensional distribution of the film resulted from fuel spray impinging on a horizontal flat wall was studied with experiments. The horizontal airflow direction was perpendicular to the vertical axis of the injection spray. The results show that, as air velocity increases, the film shape turns from a circle to an oblong. As wall temperature increases, the film area shrinks. Film thickness decreases as wall temperature or air velocity increases. The boiling point of the fuel is an important temperature to affect the film area and the film thickness. Film center moves more far away in the downstream direction as air velocity increases. For a certain air velocity, film center moves less far away as wall temperature increases. (author)

  6. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of airflow inside lungs using heterogenous anisotropic lung tissue elastic properties.

    PubMed

    Ilegbusi, Olusegun; Li, Ziang; Min, Yugang; Meeks, Sanford; Kupelian, Patrick; Santhanam, Anand P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to model the airflow inside lungs during breathing and its fluid-structure interaction with the lung tissues and the lung tumor using subject-specific elastic properties. The fluid-structure interaction technique simultaneously simulates flow within the airway and anisotropic deformation of the lung lobes. The three-dimensional (3D) lung geometry is reconstructed from the end-expiration 3D CT scan datasets of humans with lung cancer. The lung is modeled as a poro-elastic medium with anisotropic elastic property (non-linear Young's modulus) obtained from inverse lung elastography of 4D CT scans for the same patients. The predicted results include the 3D anisotropic lung deformation along with the airflow pattern inside the lungs. The effect is also presented of anisotropic elasticity on both the spatio-temporal volumetric lung displacement and the regional lung hysteresis. PMID:22356987

  7. Airflow energy harvesters of metal-based PZT thin films by self-excited vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwa, E.; Tsujiura, Y.; Kurokawa, F.; Hida, H.; Kanno, I.

    2014-11-01

    We developed self-excited vibration energy harvesters of Pb(Zr,Ti)O3 (PZT) thin films using airflow. To enhance the self-excited vibration, we used 30-μm-thick stainless steel (SS304) foils as base cantilevers on which PZT thin films were deposited by rf-magnetron sputtering. To compensate for the initial bending of PZT/SS304 unimorph cantilever due to the thermal stress, we deposited counter PZT thin films on the back of the SS304 cantilever. We evaluated power-generation performance and vibration mode of the energy harvester in the airflow. When the angle of attack (AOA) was 20° to 30°, large vibration was generated at wind speeds over 8 m/s. By FFT analysis, we confirmed that stable self-excited vibration was generated. At the AOA of 30°, the output power reached 19 μW at wind speeds of 12 m/s.

  8. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  9. Influence of airflow rate and substrate nature on heterogeneous struvite precipitation.

    PubMed

    Saidou, H; Ben Moussa, S; Ben Amor, M

    2009-01-01

    In wastewater treatment plants a hard scale consisting of struvite crystals can be formed, in pipes and recirculation pumps, during anaerobic digestion of wastewater. This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of airflow rate and substrate nature on nucleation type, induction period and supersaturation coefficient during struvite precipitation. A crystallization reactor similar to that designed for calcium carbonate precipitation was used. The pH of synthetic wastewater solution was increased by air bubbling. Experimental results indicated that the airflow increased heterogeneous precipitation of struvite. The susceptibility to scale formation was more important on polyamide and polyvinyl chloride than on stainless steel. In all cases, X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy showed that the precipitated solid phase was solely struvite. No difference in crystal morphology was observed. However, at similar experimental conditions, the particle size of struvite was higher for stainless-steel material than that for plastic materials. PMID:19213469

  10. Stabilization of liquid hydrocarbon fuel combustion by using a programmable microwave discharge in a subsonic airflow

    SciTech Connect

    Kopyl, P. V.; Surkont, O. S.; Shibkov, V. M.; Shibkova, L. V.

    2012-06-15

    Under conditions of a programmable discharge (a surface microwave discharge combined with a dc discharge), plasma-enhanced combustion of alcohol injected into a subsonic (M = 0.3-0.9) airflow in the drop (spray) phase is stabilized. It is shown that the appearance of the discharge, its current-voltage characteristic, the emission spectrum, the total emission intensity, the heat flux, the electron density, the hydroxyl emission intensity, and the time dependences of the discharge current and especially discharge voltage change substantially during the transition from the airflow discharge to stabilized combustion of the liquid hydrocarbon fuel. After combustion stabilization, more than 80% of liquid alcohol can burn out, depending on the input power, and the flame temperature reaches {approx}2000 K.

  11. Methane emissions and airflow patterns along longwall faces and through bleeder ventilation systems

    PubMed Central

    Schatzel, Steven J.; Dougherty, Heather N.

    2015-01-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted an investigation of longwall face and bleeder ventilation systems using tracer gas experiments and computer network ventilation. The condition of gateroad entries, along with the caved material’s permeability and porosity changes as the longwall face advances, determine the resistance of the airflow pathways within the longwall’s worked-out area of the bleeder system. A series of field evaluations were conducted on a four-panel longwall district. Tracer gas was released at the mouth of the longwall section or on the longwall face and sampled at various locations in the gateroads inby the shield line. Measurements of arrival times and concentrations defined airflow/gas movements for the active/completed panels and the bleeder system, providing real field data to delineate these pathways. Results showed a sustained ability of the bleeder system to ventilate the longwall tailgate corner as the panels retreated. PMID:26925166

  12. Payload bay atmospheric vent airflow testing at the Vibration and Acoustic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, James D., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Several concerns related to venting the Space Shuttle Orbiter payload bay during launch led to laboratory experiments with a flight-type vent box installed in the wall of a subsonic wind tunnel. This report describes the test setups and procedures used to acquire data for characterization of airflow through the vent box and acoustic tones radiated from the vent-box cavity. A flexible boundary-layer spoiler which reduced the vent-tone amplitude is described.

  13. Development and verification of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics model of canine nasal airflow.

    PubMed

    Craven, Brent A; Paterson, Eric G; Settles, Gary S; Lawson, Michael J

    2009-09-01

    The canine nasal cavity contains a complex airway labyrinth, dedicated to respiratory air conditioning, filtering of inspired contaminants, and olfaction. The small and contorted anatomical structure of the nasal turbinates has, to date, precluded a proper study of nasal airflow in the dog. This study describes the development of a high-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the canine nasal airway from a three-dimensional reconstruction of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging scans of the canine anatomy. Unstructured hexahedral grids are generated, with large grid sizes ((10-100) x 10(6) computational cells) required to capture the details of the nasal airways. High-fidelity CFD solutions of the nasal airflow for steady inspiration and expiration are computed over a range of physiological airflow rates. A rigorous grid refinement study is performed, which also illustrates a methodology for verification of CFD calculations on complex unstructured grids in tortuous airways. In general, the qualitative characteristics of the computed solutions for the different grid resolutions are fairly well preserved. However, quantitative results such as the overall pressure drop and even the regional distribution of airflow in the nasal cavity are moderately grid dependent. These quantities tend to converge monotonically with grid refinement. Lastly, transient computations of canine sniffing were carried out as part of a time-step study, demonstrating that high temporal accuracy is achievable using small time steps consisting of 160 steps per sniff period. Here we demonstrate that acceptable numerical accuracy (between approximately 1% and 15%) is achievable with practical levels of grid resolution (approximately 100 x 10(6) computational cells). Given the popularity of CFD as a tool for studying flow in the upper airways of humans and animals, based on this work we recommend the necessity of a grid dependence study and quantification of numerical error when

  14. Risk factors for persistent airflow limitation: Analysis of 306 patients with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lingcheng; Gao, Shuncui; Zhu, Wei; Su, Jun

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : To determine the risk factors associated with persistent airflow limitation in patients with asthma. Method s: This study was designed and carried out in the department of respiratory medicine, fourth People’s Hospital of Jinan City, Shandong province, China between Jan 2012 and Dec 2012. Three hundred and six asthma patients participating in the study were divided into persistent airflow limitation group (PAFL) and no persistent airflow limitation group (NPAFL). The patients participated in pulmonary function tests and sputum induction examination. The clinical data including age, gender, onset age, disease course, smoking history, family history, regular corticosteroid inhalation, hospitalization history and presence of atopy were collected. Results : In 306 patients, 128 (40.5%) were included in PAFL group and 178(59.5%) in NPAFL group. Multivariate analysis demonstrated smoking (≥10 pack-years; OR, 7.1; 95% CI, 1.8 to 31.2), longer asthma duration (≥ 20years) (OR, 6.3; 95% CI, 1.7 to 28.5), absence of regular corticosteroid inhalation (OR, 3.5; 95% CI, 1.1 to 14.5) and neutrophil in induced sputum≥65% (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.0 to 2.8) were independent risk factors for PAFL. Conclusions : Smoking, longer asthma duration and increased neutrophil in induced sputum are risk factors for PAFL, while regular corticosteroid inhalation is protective factor. Smoking cessation and regular corticosteroid inhalation may play an important role in preventing the occurrence of persistent airflow limitation group (PAFL). PMID:25674145

  15. 3D airflow dynamics over transverse ridges Mpekweni, South Africa: implications for dune field migration behaviour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Derek; Cooper, Andrew; Green, Andrew; Beyers, Meiring; Wiles, Errol; Benallack, Keegan

    2016-04-01

    Un-vegetated dune fields provide excellent opportunities to examine airflow dynamics over various types and scales of dune landforms. The three dimensional surface over which lower boundary layers travel, help adjust surface airflow and consequently the aeolian response of the dunes themselves. The use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modelling in recent studies now enables investigation of the 3D behaviour of airflow over complex terrain, providing new insights into heterogeneous surface flow and aeolian response of dune surfaces on a large (dunefield) scale. Using a largely un-vegetated coastal dune field site at Mpekweni, Eastern Cape, South Africa, a detailed (0.1m gridded) terrestrial laser scanning survey was conducted to create a high resolution topographical surface. Using local wind flow measurements and local met station records as input, CFD modelling was performed for a number of scenarios involving variable direction and magnitude to examine surface flow patterns across multiple dune forms. Near surface acceleration, expansion and separation of airflow inducing convergence and divergence (steering) of flow velocity streamlines are investigated. Flow acceleration over dune crests/brink lines is a key parameter in driving dune migration and slip face dynamics. Dune aspect ratio (height to length) is also important in determining the degree of crestal flow acceleration, with an increase in flow associated with increasing aspect ratios. Variations in dune height appear to be the most important parameter in driving general flow acceleration. The results from the study provide new insights into dune migration behaviour at this site as well as surface flow behaviour across multiple dune configurations and length scales within un-vegetated dune fields.

  16. Air infiltration and interzonal airflow measurements in research houses: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nagda, N.L.

    1988-08-01

    Four different but complementary methods--the tracer gas dilution method, single tracer constant concentration, passive perfluorocarbon tracers (constant release), and constant release of multiple halocarbon tracers with real-time analysis--were used to obtain detailed information on air infiltration and interzonal airflow rates in two bilevel research houses. The study included measurements of seasonal variations and differences between the houses, one of which was retrofitted in a previous EPRI study to reduce the air leakage area. Measurements showed that there had been little change in whole house infiltration rates during the 4 years since the retrofit. Differences between the houses with respect to whole house air infiltration rates were primarily the result of differences in downstairs air infiltration rates between the two houses. Zone-specific measurements indicated that downstairs infiltration rates were three to nine times higher than upstairs; infiltration rates were 30 to 60 percent lower in the downstairs of the retrofitted house than in the other house. The impact of the retrofit was also reflected by lower rates of airflow from the garage into the downstairs and from the upstairs to the attic. Airflows between the upstairs and downstairs of the houses exhibited seasonal variation due to stack effect action and operation of the central heating and cooling systems. Short-term interzonal airflow rates were as much as an order of magnitude higher than week-long average rates. Results of measurements with the different methods are also compared and discussed as they relate to advantages, limitations, and applicability of the methods in utility-sponsored measurement programs. 30 refs., 22 figs., 16 tabs.

  17. Airflow elicits a spider's jump towards airborne prey. II. Flow characteristics guiding behaviour.

    PubMed

    Klopsch, Christian; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C; Barth, Friedrich G

    2013-05-01

    When hungry, the wandering spider Cupiennius salei is frequently seen to catch flying insect prey. The success of its remarkable prey-capture jump from its sitting plant into the air obviously depends on proper timing and sensory guidance. In this study, it is shown that particular features of the airflow generated by the insect suffice to guide the spider. Vision and the reception of substrate vibrations and airborne sound are not needed. The behavioural reactions of blinded spiders were examined by exposing them to natural and synthetic flows imitating the fly-generated flow or particular features of it. Thus, the different roles of the three phases previously identified in the fly-generated flow and described in the companion paper could be demonstrated. When exposing the spider to phase I flow only (exponentially increasing flow velocity with very little fluctuation and typical of the fly's approach), an orienting behaviour could be observed but a prey-capture jump never be elicited. Remarkably, the spider reacted to the onset of phase II (highly fluctuating flow) of a synthetically generated flow field with a jump as frequently as it did when exposed to natural fly-generated flows. In all cases using either natural or artificial flows, the spider's jump was triggered before its flow sensors were hit by phase III flow (steadily decreasing airflow velocity). Phase III may tell the spider that the prey has passed by already in case of no prey-capture reaction. Our study underlines the relevance of airflow in spider behaviour. It also reflects the sophisticated workings of their flow sensors (trichobothria) previously studied in detail. Presumably, the information contained in prey-generated airflows plays a similar role in many other arthropods. PMID:23427092

  18. Statistical anisotropy of the curvature perturbation from vector field perturbations

    SciTech Connect

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Karciauskas, Mindaugas; Lyth, David H.; Rodriguez, Yeinzon E-mail: m.karciauskas@lancaster.ac.uk E-mail: yeinzon.rodriguez@uan.edu.co

    2009-05-15

    The {delta}N formula for the primordial curvature perturbation {zeta} is extended to include vector as well as scalar fields. Formulas for the tree-level contributions to the spectrum and bispectrum of {zeta} are given, exhibiting statistical anisotropy. The one-loop contribution to the spectrum of {zeta} is also worked out. We then consider the generation of vector field perturbations from the vacuum, including the longitudinal component that will be present if there is no gauge invariance. Finally, the {delta}N formula is applied to the vector curvaton and vector inflation models with the tensor perturbation also evaluated in the latter case.

  19. Human-mediated dispersal of seeds by the airflow of vehicles.

    PubMed

    von der Lippe, Moritz; Bullock, James M; Kowarik, Ingo; Knopp, Tatjana; Wichmann, Matthias C; Wichmann, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Human-mediated dispersal is known as an important driver of long-distance dispersal for plants but underlying mechanisms have rarely been assessed. Road corridors function as routes of secondary dispersal for many plant species but the extent to which vehicles support this process remains unclear. In this paper we quantify dispersal distances and seed deposition of plant species moved over the ground by the slipstream of passing cars. We exposed marked seeds of four species on a section of road and drove a car along the road at a speed of 48 km/h. By tracking seeds we quantified movement parallel as well as lateral to the road, resulting dispersal kernels, and the effect of repeated vehicle passes. Median distances travelled by seeds along the road were about eight meters for species with wind dispersal morphologies and one meter for species without such adaptations. Airflow created by the car lifted seeds and resulted in longitudinal dispersal. Single seeds reached our maximum measuring distance of 45 m and for some species exceeded distances under primary dispersal. Mathematical models were fit to dispersal kernels. The incremental effect of passing vehicles on longitudinal dispersal decreased with increasing number of passes as seeds accumulated at road verges. We conclude that dispersal by vehicle airflow facilitates seed movement along roads and accumulation of seeds in roadside habitats. Dispersal by vehicle airflow can aid the spread of plant species and thus has wide implications for roadside ecology, invasion biology and nature conservation. PMID:23320077

  20. Hair sensor using a photoelectronic principle for sensing airflow and its direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Kuang-Yuh; Huang, Chien-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Many organisms have diverse hair cells to instantaneously perceive the change of surroundings so that they can keep away from threats. These organs can precisely detect the tiny variations of airflow, water flow, sound, or pressure, and also resolve their affecting directions. Through this brilliant inspiration by the insects' cilia, we decided to design and develop a hair sensor for detecting two-dimensional airflow and pressure waves by using photoelectronic principles. The hair sensor inherently consists of an artificial cilium supported by an elastic membrane. A light-emitting diode and a quadrant photodiode are used as the photoelectronic sensor. The airflow or pressure wave directly stimulates the cilium to sway, and this motion contributes to let the projected light beam shift over the quadrant photodiode, whose four photodiodes produce then corresponding output signals. Because of dynamic and high-sensitive properties of the photoelectronic sensor, the hair sensor we developed possesses a high measurement resolution to be able to detect very tiny stimulation and its affecting direction. According to its multifaceted characteristics and simple structure, the hair sensor can be applied in numerous potential application fields, such as intrusion alarm system, noise detection system, as well as a tactile sensor.

  1. Elasto-Aerodynamics-Driven Triboelectric Nanogenerator for Scavenging Air-Flow Energy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuhua; Mu, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Gu, Alex Yuandong; Wang, Zhong Lin; Yang, Ya

    2015-10-27

    Efficient scavenging the kinetic energy from air-flow represents a promising approach for obtaining clean, sustainable electricity. Here, we report an elasto-aerodynamics-driven triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) based on contact electrification. The reported TENG consists of a Kapton film with two Cu electrodes at each side, fixed on two ends in an acrylic fluid channel. The relationship between the TENG output power density and its fluid channel dimensions is systematically studied. TENG with a fluid channel size of 125 × 10 × 1.6 mm(3) delivers the maximum output power density of about 9 kW/m(3) under a loading resistance of 2.3 MΩ. Aero-elastic flutter effect explains the air-flow induced vibration of Kapton film well. The output power scales nearly linearly with parallel wiring of multiple TENGs. Connecting 10 TENGs in parallel gives an output power of 25 mW, which allows direct powering of a globe light. The TENG is also utilized to scavenge human breath induced air-flow energy to sustainably power a human body temperature sensor. PMID:26343789

  2. Large-eddy simulation of airflow and heat transfer in a general ward of hospital

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasan, Md. Farhad; Himika, Taasnim Ahmed; Molla, Md. Mamun

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, a very popular alternative computational technique, the Lattice Boltzmann Method (LBM) has been used for Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) of airflow and heat transfer in general ward of hospital. Different Reynolds numbers have been used to study the airflow pattern. In LES, Smagorinsky turbulence model has been considered and a discussion has been conducted in brief. A code validation has been performed comparing the present results with benchmark results for lid-driven cavity problem and the results are found to agree very well. LBM is demonstrated through simulation in forced convection inside hospital ward with six beds with a partition in the middle, which acted like a wall. Changes in average rate of heat transfer in terms of average Nusselt numbers have also been recorded in tabular format and necessary comparison has been showed. It was found that partition narrowed the path for airflow and once the air overcame this barrier, it got free space and turbulence appeared. For higher turbulence, the average rate of heat transfer increased and patients near the turbulence zone released maximum heat and felt more comfortable.

  3. Lung matrix metalloproteinase-9 correlates with cigarette smoking and obstruction of airflow.

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Jong; Oh, Yeon-Mok; Lee, Jae Cheol; Kim, Dong Gyu; Park, Myung Jae; Lee, Myung Goo; Hyun, In Gyu; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young-Soo; Jung, Ki-Suck

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for obstruction of airflow in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) or an imbalance between MMPs and their inhibitors, the tissue inhibitors of MMP (TIMPs), is considered to play a role in the pathogenesis of COPD. We investigated whether the MMPs expression or the imbalance between MMPs and TIMP-1 is associated with the amount of cigarette smoking and the FEV1 value, in the lung parenchyma of 26 subjects (6 non-smokers and 20 cigarette smokers). First, we performed zymographic analysis to identify the profile of the MMPs, which revealed gelatinolytic bands mainly equivalent to MMP-9 in the smokers. We then measured, using enzyme immunoassay, the concentrations of MMP-9 and its inhibitor, TIMP-1. Correlation analysis revealed that both the MMP-9 concentrations and the molar ratios of MMP-9 to TIMP-1 (MMP-9/TIMP-1) were correlated with the amount of cigarette smoking. Furthermore, MMP-9 concentrations were inversely correlated with FEV1. In conclusion, this study shows that MMP-9 expression in human lung parenchyma is associated with cigarette smoking and also with the obstruction of airflow, suggesting that MMP-9 may play a role in the pathogenesis of the cigarette smoke-induced obstruction of airflow known as the characteristic of COPD. PMID:14676438

  4. Rupatadine improves nasal symptoms, airflow and inflammation in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ciprandi, Giorgio; Cirillo, I

    2010-01-01

    Nasal obstruction is the main symptom in patients with allergic rhinitis and may be measured by rhinomanometry. Rupatadine is a new antihistamine with potential antiallergic activities. The aim of this pilot study is to evaluate nasal symptoms, nasal airflow and nasal mediators in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis, before and after treatment with rupatadine. Twenty patients with persistent allergic rhinitis were evaluated, 15 males and 5 females (mean age 35 +/- 9.1 years), all of whom received rupatadine (10 mg/daily) for 3 weeks. Nasal and ocular symptoms (measured by VAS), rhinomanometry, and nasal mediators (ECP and tryptase) were assessed in all subjects before and after treatment. Rupatadine treatment induced significant symptom relief (both nasal and ocular, respectively p=0.005 and p=0.0004), including obstruction (p=0.0015) and significant increase of nasal airflow (p=0.0025). Moreover, there was a significant difference of nasal mediators. In conclusion, this pilot study demonstrates the effectiveness of rupatadine treatment in: i) improving nasal and ocular symptoms, ii) increasing nasal airflow, iii) exerting antiallergic activity in patients with persistent allergic rhinitis. These positive results could explain the effectiveness of rupatadine in the treatment of persistent allergic rhinitis, as reported in a previous study Further controlled studies need to be conducted to confirm these preliminary findings. PMID:20487631

  5. On intra- and intersubject variabilities of airflow in the human lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jiwoong; Tawhai, Merryn H.; Hoffman, Eric A.; Lin, Ching-Long

    2009-10-01

    The effects of intra- and intersubject variabilities in airway geometry on airflow in the human lungs are investigated by large eddy simulation. The airway models of two human subjects consisting of extra- and intrathoracic airways are reconstructed from CT images. For intrasubject study, airflows at two inspiratory flow rates are simulated on the airway geometries of the same subject with four different levels of truncation. These airway models are the original complete geometry and three geometries obtained by truncating the original one at the subglottis, the supraglottis, and the laryngopharynx, respectively. A comparison of the airflows in the complete geometry model shows that the characteristics of the turbulent laryngeal jet in the trachea are similar regardless of Reynolds number in terms of mean velocities, turbulence statistics, coherent structures, and pressure distribution. The truncated airway models, however, do not produce the similar flow structures observed in the complete geometry. An improved inlet boundary condition is then proposed for the airway model truncated at the laryngopharynx to improve the accuracy of solution. The new boundary condition significantly improves the mean flow. The spectral analysis shows that turbulent characteristics are captured downstream away from the glottis. For intersubject study, although the overall flow characteristics are similar, two morphological factors are found to significantly affect the flows between subjects. These are the constriction ratio of the glottis with respect to the trachea and the curvature and shape of the airways.

  6. Comparison of Airflows in Weibel-based and CT-based Human Lung Geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ching-Long; Hoffman, Eric A.

    2004-11-01

    The need for patient specific lung geometry for study of pulmonary air flow and drug delivery has been emphasized recently due to the complexity of individual airway tree geometry. The objective of this paper is to assess the notion of patient specific geometry by comparing airflows in an idealized Weibel-based lung model and two realistic human lung geometries. The Weibel-based model is composed of cylinders of differing diameters for various branching and has been used extensively for modeling airflow in lungs. Here a 4-generation Weibel model is considered. The realistic lung geometries are segmented and reconstructured from computerized tomography (CT) images as part of an effort to build a normative atlas (NIH HL-04368) documenting airway geometry over 4 decades of age in healthy and disease-state adult humans. The custom developed Taylor-Galerkin finite element code, which solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations, is applied to simulate airflows in these lung geometries. The velocity wave form recorded from a mechanical ventilator is adopted as the inlet pulsatile boundary condition. At the outlets, both the pressure and outflow boundary conditions are applied and compared. The counter-rotating vortices are observed in the Weibel model during both the inspiratory and expiratory cycles, being consistent with previous studies. The flow structures in the CT-based models are much more complicated and counter-rotating vortices are only evident in some regions.

  7. Influence of room geometry and ventilation rate on airflow and aerosol dispersion: implications for worker protection.

    PubMed

    Whicker, Jeffrey J; Wasiolek, Piotr T; Tavani, Rebecca A

    2002-01-01

    Knowledge of dispersion rates and patterns of radioactive aerosols and gases through workrooms is critical for understanding human exposure and for developing strategies for worker protection. The dispersion within rooms can be influenced by complex interactions between numerous variables, but especially ventilation design and room furnishings. For this study, dependence of airflow and aerosol dispersion on workroom geometry (furnishings) and ventilation rate were studied in an experimental room that was designed to approximate a plutonium laboratory. Three different configurations of simulated gloveboxes and two ventilation rates (approximately 6 and 12 air exchanges per hour) were studied. A sonic anemometer was used to measure airflow parameters including all three components of air velocity vectors and turbulence intensity distributions at multiple locations and heights. Aerosol dispersion rates and patterns were measured by releasing aerosols multiple times from six different locations. Aerosol particle concentrations resolved in time and space were measured using 16 multiplexed laser particle counters. Comparisons were made of air velocities, turbulence, and aerosol transport across different ventilation rates and room configurations. A strong influence of ventilation rate on aerosol dispersion rates and air velocity was found, and changes in room geometry had significant effects on aerosol dispersion rates and patterns. These results are important with regards to constant evaluation of placement of air sampling equipment, benchmarking numerical models of room airflow, and design of ventilation and room layouts with consideration of worker safety. PMID:11768799

  8. Parametric study of the cyclic behaviour of a hygroscopic matrix in a desiccant airflow system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruivo, C. R.; Costa, J. J.; Figueiredo, A. R.

    2011-09-01

    The study of the transport phenomena in desiccant airflow systems has been addressed in numerous research works, some of them concerning combined processes of cooling, dehumidification and energy recovery. In this paper a detailed numerical model is used to simulate the behaviour of a parallel-plate channel, cyclically exposed to two airflows with different inlet conditions, the plate being composed by a substrate and a desiccant porous layer. The modelled channel is considered to be representative of a real channel of a hygroscopic matrix that is operating at steady state regime, like it occurs in desiccant or enthalpy rotors. The numerical results are treated in order to represent the global behaviour of the hygroscopic rotor under steady state conditions. Results of a parametric study are presented as maps of isovalues of the heat and mass transfer rates and of the outlet states of both airflows, considering channels of distinct wall thickness, of different thickness of the desiccant and the subtract layers, together with wide ranges of the rotation speed and of the wheel partition. The mapped results presented provide an overview of the operation characteristics of hygroscopic rotors, allowing a quick determination of the optimum range of values for relevant parameters, such as the rotation speed and the wheel partition. The model is thus an interesting tool for design and manufacture purposes of enthalpy and desiccant wheels.

  9. Association of incidental emphysema with annual lung function decline and future development of airflow limitation

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyeon-Kyoung; Jin, Kwang Nam; Kim, Deog Kyeom; Chung, Hee Soon; Lee, Chang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Emphysema is one of the prognostic factors for rapid lung function decline in patients with COPD, but the impact of incidentally detected emphysema on population without spirometric abnormalities has not been evaluated. This study aimed to determine whether emphysema detected upon computed tomography (CT) screening would accelerate the rate of lung function decline and influence the possibility of future development of airflow limitation in a population without spirometric abnormalities. Materials and methods Subjects who participated in a routine screening for health checkup and follow-up pulmonary function tests for at least 3 years between 2004 and 2010 were retrospectively enrolled. The percentage of low-attenuation area below −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA−950) was calculated automatically. A calculated value of %LAA−950 that exceeded 10% was defined as emphysema. Adjusted annual lung function decline was analyzed using random-slope, random-intercept mixed linear regression models. Results A total of 628 healthy subjects within the normal range of spriometric values were included. Multivariable analysis showed that the emphysema group exhibited a faster decline in forced vital capacity (−33.9 versus −18.8 mL/year; P=0.02). Emphysema was not associated with the development of airflow limitation during follow-up. Conclusion Incidental emphysema quantified using CT scan was significantly associated with a more rapid decline in forced vital capacity in the population with normative spirometric values. However, an association between emphysema and future development of airflow limitation was not observed. PMID:26893550

  10. SMA actuators for vibration control and experimental determination of model parameters dependent on ambient airflow velocity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Y.

    2016-05-01

    This article demonstrates the practical applicability of a method of modelling shape memory alloys (SMAs) as actuators. For this study, a pair of SMA wires was installed in an antagonistic manner to form an actuator, and a linear differential equation that describes the behaviour of the actuator’s generated force relative to its input voltage was derived for the limited range below the austenite onset temperature. In this range, hysteresis need not be considered, and the proposed SMA actuator can therefore be practically applied in linear control systems, which is significant because large deformations accompanied by hysteresis do not necessarily occur in most vibration control cases. When specific values of the parameters used in the differential equation were identified experimentally, it became clear that one of the parameters was dependent on ambient airflow velocity. The values of this dependent parameter were obtained using an additional SMA wire as a sensor. In these experiments, while the airflow distribution around the SMA wires was varied by changing the rotational speed of the fans in the wind tunnels, an input voltage was conveyed to the SMA actuator circuit, and the generated force was measured. In this way, the parameter dependent on airflow velocity was estimated in real time, and it was validated that the calculated force was consistent with the measured one.