Science.gov

Sample records for airport safety area

  1. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  2. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  3. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  4. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of...

  5. 40 CFR 258.10 - Airport safety.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Airport safety. 258.10 Section 258.10 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES CRITERIA FOR MUNICIPAL SOLID WASTE LANDFILLS Location Restrictions § 258.10 Airport safety. (a) Owners or operators of new MSWLF units, existing MSWLF units,...

  6. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  7. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  8. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  9. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  10. 14 CFR 153.5 - Aviation safety inspector airport access.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Aviation safety inspector airport access. 153.5 Section 153.5 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS AIRPORT OPERATIONS Aviation Safety Inspector Access § 153.5 Aviation...

  11. 78 FR 3311 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-16

    ...) on Safety Enhancements Part 139, Certification of Airports (76 FR 5510). In the NPRM, the FAA... period until May 13, 2011, (76 FR 20570) because we learned that a number of airport operators were not... again reopened the comment period until July 5, 2011, (76 FR 32105) because several industry...

  12. Airport ramp safety and crew performance issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlin, Roy; Drew, Charles; Patten, Marcia; Matchette, Robert

    1995-01-01

    This study examined 182 ramp operations incident reports from the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) database, to determine which factors influence ramp operation incidents. It was found that incidents occurred more often during aircraft arrival operations than during departure operations; incidents occurred most often at the gate stop area, less so at the gate entry/exit areas, and least on the ramp fringe areas; and reporters cited fewer incidents when more ground crew were present. The authors offer suggestions for both airline management and flight crews to reduce the rate of ramp incidents.

  13. Flight Demonstration of Integrated Airport Surface Technologies for Increased Capacity and Safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.; Wills, Robert W.; Smith, Kathryn A.; Shipman, Floyd S.; Bryant, Wayne H.; Eckhardt, Dave E., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity and safety issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration presented an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning system (DGPS) receiver, a high speed very high frequency (VHF) data link, an Airport Surface Detection Equipment (ASDE-3) radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on an AMASS display. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with test results.

  14. Lightning Impacts on Airports - Challenges of Balancing Safety & Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Matthias; Deierling, Wiebke; Nelson, Eric; Stone, Ken

    2013-04-01

    Thunderstorms and lightning pose a safety risk to personnel working outdoors, such as people maintaining airport grounds (e.g., mowing grass or repairing runway lighting) or servicing aircraft on ramps (handling baggage, food service, refueling, tugging and guiding aircraft from/to gates, etc.). Since lightning strikes can cause serious injuries or death, it is important to provide timely alerts to airport personnel so that they can get to safety when lightning is imminent. This presentation discusses the challenges and uncertainties involved in using lightning information and stakeholder procedures to ensure safety of outdoor personnel while keeping ramp operations as efficient as possible considering thunderstorm impacts. The findings presented are based on extensive observations of airline operators under thunderstorm impacts. These observations reveal a complex picture with substantial uncertainties related to the (1) source of lightning information (e.g., sensor type, network, data processing) used to base ramp closure decisions on, (2) uncertainties involved in the safety procedures employed by various stakeholders across the aviation industry (yielding notably different rules being applied by multiple airlines even at a single airport), and (3) human factors issues related to the use of decision support tools and the implementation of safety procedures. This research is supported by the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The views expressed are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official policy or position of the FAA.

  15. Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery of Airports and Surrounding Areas: Denver Stapleton International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    This is the third in a series of three reports which address the statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport using a set of parameters which closely match those which are anticipated to be utilized by an aircraft on approach to an airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. Scenes of 13 x 10 km were imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-, VV-, and HV-polarizations, and contain airport grounds and facilities (up to 14 percent), cultural areas (more than 50 percent), and rural areas (up to 6 percent). Incidence angles range from 40 to 84 deg. At the largest depression angles the distributed targets, such as forest, fields, water, and residential, rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. From 30 to 80 percent of an image had scattering coefficients less than -20 dB. About 1 to 10 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, and from 0 to 1 percent above 10 dB. In examining the average backscatter coefficients at large angles, the clutter types cluster according to the following groups: (1) terminals (-3 dB), (2) city and industrial (-7 dB), (3) warehouse (-10 dB), (4) urban and residential (-14 dB), and (5) grass (-24 dB).

  16. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Philadelphia Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.

    1990-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data were collected at the Philadelphia Airport. These data and the results of the clutter study are described. This 13 km x 10 km scene was imaged at 9.38 GHz and HH-polarization and contained airport grounds and facilities (6 percent), industrial (14 percent), residential (14 percent), fields (10 percent), forest (8 percent), and water (33 percent). Incidence angles ranged from 40 to 84 deg. Even at the smallest incidence angles, the distributed targets such as forest, fields, water, and residential rarely had mean scattering coefficients greater than -10 dB. Eighty-seven percent of the image had scattering coefficients less than -17.5 dB. About 1 percent of the scattering coefficients exceeded 0 dB, with about 0.1 percent above 10 dB. Sources which produced the largest cross sections were largely confined to the airport grounds and areas highly industrialized. The largest cross sections were produced by observing broadside large buildings surrounded by smooth surfaces.

  17. Planning for airport access: An analysis of the San Francisco Bay area. The setting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The regional setting for the three San Franscisco Bay area airports is described. The general role of the airports in the national air transportation system, the demand for air transportation, and the relationship of airport location to the demand for air transportation are examined. The problem of airport access is also considered. Various access modes, their destination, frequency, and cost are presented.

  18. Clutter modeling of the Denver Airport and surrounding areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrah, Steven D.; Delmore, Victor E.; Onstott, Robert G.

    1991-01-01

    To accurately simulate and evaluate an airborne Doppler radar as a wind shear detection and avoidance sensor, the ground clutter surrounding a typical airport must be quantified. To do this, an imaging airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) was employed to investigate and map the normalized radar cross sections (NRCS) of the ground terrain surrounding the Denver Stapleton Airport during November of 1988. Images of the Stapleton ground clutter scene were obtained at a variety of aspect and elevation angles (extending to near-grazing) at both HH and VV polarizations. Presented here, in viewgraph form with commentary, are the method of data collection, the specific observations obtained of the Denver area, a summary of the quantitative analysis performed on the SAR images to date, and the statistical modeling of several of the more interesting stationary targets in the SAR database. Additionally, the accompanying moving target database, containing NRCS and velocity information, is described.

  19. 76 FR 4575 - Safety Zone; Repair of High Voltage Transmission Lines to Logan International Airport, Saugus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). ] Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... to Logan International Airport, Saugus River, Saugus, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... of high voltage transmission lines to Logan Airport. This safety zone is required to provide for...

  20. Airport noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendley, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of airport noise at several airports and air bases is detailed. Community reactions to the noise, steps taken to reduce jet engine noise, and the effect of airport use restrictions and curfews on air transportation are discussed. The adverse effect of changes in allowable operational noise on airport safety and altenative means for reducing noise pollution are considered. Community-airport relations and public relations are discussed.

  1. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near...

  2. Airport Choice in Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area: An Application of the Conditional Logit Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreno, Marcelo Baena; Muller, Carlos

    2003-01-01

    Using the conditional LOGIT model, this paper addresses the airport choice in the Sao Paulo Metropolitan Area. In this region, Guarulhos International Airport (GRU) and Congonhas Airport (CGH) compete for passengers flying to several domestic destinations. The airport choice is believed to be a result of the tradeoff passengers perform considering airport access characteristics, airline level of service characteristics and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. It was found that access time to the airports better explain the airport choice than access distance, whereas direct flight frequencies gives better explanation to the airport choice than the indirect (connections and stops) and total (direct plus indirect) flight frequencies. Out of 15 tested variables, passenger experience with the analyzed airports was the variable that best explained the airport choice in the region. Model specifications considering 1, 2 or 3 variables were tested. The model specification most adjusted to the observed data considered access time, direct flight frequencies in the travel period (morning or afternoon peak) and passenger experience with the analyzed airports. The influence of these variables was therefore analyzed across market segments according to departure airport and flight duration criteria. The choice of GRU (located neighboring Sao Paulo city) is not well explained by the rationality of access time economy and the increase of the supply of direct flight frequencies, while the choice of CGH (located inside Sao Paulo city) is. Access time was found to be more important to passengers flying shorter distances while direct flight frequencies in the travel period were more significant to those flying longer distances. Keywords: Airport choice, Multiple airport region, Conditional LOGIT model, Access time, Flight frequencies, Passenger experience with the analyzed airports, Transportation planning

  3. 75 FR 62008 - Safety Management System for Certificated Airports

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... complete Privacy Act Statement in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-78) or you... commensurate with its class of Airport Operating Certificate (AOC). DATES: Send your comments on or before... development at smaller airports with a Class II, III, or IV AOC.\\9\\ \\9\\ For definitions of classes of...

  4. Reaction to aircraft noise in residential areas around Australian airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullen, R. B.; Hede, A. J.; Kyriacos, E.

    1986-07-01

    A large-scale study of community reaction to aircraft noise was conducted around five Australian airports, involving interviews with over 3500 residents and the use of intensive and detailed noise measurement data. The major purpose of the study was to produce a valid and reliable dose/response relationship which could serve as a guide for planners, airport authorities, and regulatory authorities. Features of the study include assessment of noise exposure by using measurement-based corrections to standard noise level figures for each aircraft type, and the use of a complex scale for assessment of noise reaction (although simpler measures are included for comparison with previous studies). Much of the dose/response analysis involves binary dependent variables, and probit analysis is used in this case in preference to standard regression analysis. A dose/response function is found which predicts the proportion of residents in an area whose reaction exceeds a defined threshold with a standard error of 4·6 dB. Approximately half this error can be explained by error in the measured variables, the rest being due to real inter-area differences in noise reaction. The only personal characteristic which can unambiguously be shown to substantially affect noise reaction is sensitivity to noise in general, which explains about 11% of the variance in measured individual noise reaction compared with about 13% for noise exposure.

  5. An airport occupational health and safety management system from the OHSAS 18001 perspective.

    PubMed

    Dejanović, Dejana; Heleta, Milenko

    2016-09-01

    Occupational health and safety represents a set of technical, medical, legal, psychological, pedagogical and other measures with the aim to detect and eliminate hazards that threaten the lives and health of employees. These measures should be applied in a systematic way. Therefore, the aim of this study is to review occupational health and safety legislation in Serbia and the requirements that airports should fulfill for Occupational Health and Safety Assessment Series certification. Analyzing the specificity of airport activities and injuries as their outcomes, the article also proposes preventive measures for the health and safety of employees. Furthermore, the airport activities which are the most important from the standpoint of risks are defined, as the goals for occupational health and safety performance improvement. PMID:27141972

  6. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  7. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  8. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  9. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification of land uses in airport... RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  10. Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matolak, David W.

    2007-01-01

    In this project final report, entitled "Wireless Channel Characterization in the 5 GHz Microwave Landing System Extension Band for Airport Surface Areas," we provide a detailed description and model representation for the wireless channel in the airport surface environment in this band. In this executive summary, we review report contents, describe the achieved objectives and major findings, and highlight significant conclusions and recommendations.

  11. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  12. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND...

  13. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND...

  14. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRPORTS NOTICE AND APPROVAL OF AIRPORT NOISE AND...

  15. 19 CFR Appendix A to Part 113 - Airport Customs Security Area Bond

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Airport Customs Security Area Bond A Appendix A to Part 113 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Pt. 113, App. A Appendix A to Part 113—Airport Customs Security...

  16. Airport Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2011 Photo courtesy of Dan Paluska/Flickr Denver Airport Security Screening Introduction With air travel regaining popularity and increased secu- rity measures, airport security screening has become an area of interest for ...

  17. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  18. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  19. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  20. 33 CFR 162.20 - Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. 162.20 Section 162.20 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.20 Flushing Bay near La Guardia Airport, Flushing, N.Y.; restricted area. (a... side of the extended center line of Runway No. 13-31 at La Guardia Airport. (b) The regulations....

  1. 75 FR 19422 - Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San... as the Airport Mesa/Carrizo Creek shooting area located in eastern San Diego County, California. The... along the top of Airport Mesa. DATES: The closure order is effective as of September 23, 2009...

  2. 75 FR 76928 - Safety Management System for Certificated Airports; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-10

    ... Statement can be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as... ``Safety Management System for Certificated Airports'' (75 FR 62008). Comments to that document were to be..._policies or 3. Accessing the Government Printing Office's Web page at...

  3. 77 FR 68813 - Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San Diego County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Closure of Airport Mesa/Carizzo Creek Shooting Area in Eastern San... Land Management (BLM) has closed approximately 210 acres of public land described as the Airport Mesa... Airport Mesa. DATES: The closure order is effective as of June 19, 2012, until June 19, 2014. FOR...

  4. 78 FR 48044 - Safety Zone; San Diego International Airport Terminal Two West Grand Opening Fireworks; San Diego...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; San Diego International Airport Terminal... support of a fireworks display for the Grand Opening of Lindbergh Airport Terminal Two West on August...

  5. Assessing coastal flood risk and sea level rise impacts at New York City area airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohman, K. A.; Kimball, N.; Osler, M.; Eberbach, S.

    2014-12-01

    Flood risk and sea level rise impacts were assessed for the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey (PANYNJ) at four airports in the New York City area. These airports included John F. Kennedy International, LaGuardia, Newark International, and Teterboro Airports. Quantifying both present day and future flood risk due to climate change and developing flood mitigation alternatives is crucial for the continued operation of these airports. During Hurricane Sandy in October 2012 all four airports were forced to shut down, in part due to coastal flooding. Future climate change and sea level rise effects may result in more frequent shutdowns and disruptions in travel to and from these busy airports. The study examined the effects of the 1%-annual-chance coastal flooding event for present day existing conditions and six different sea level rise scenarios at each airport. Storm surge model outputs from the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) provided the present day storm surge conditions. 50th and 90thpercentile sea level rise projections from the New York Panel on Climate Change (NPCC) 2013 report were incorporated into storm surge results using linear superposition methods. These projections were evaluated for future years 2025, 2035, and 2055. In addition to the linear superposition approach for storm surge at airports where waves are a potential hazard, one dimensional wave modeling was performed to get the total water level results. Flood hazard and flood depth maps were created based on these results. In addition to assessing overall flooding at each airport, major at-risk infrastructure critical to the continued operation of the airport was identified and a detailed flood vulnerability assessment was performed. This assessment quantified flood impacts in terms of potential critical infrastructure inundation and developed mitigation alternatives to adapt to coastal flooding and future sea level changes. Results from this project are advancing the PANYNJ

  6. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability on or Near the Airport Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, David F.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2009-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. In this report, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS). CAAT research is conducted jointly under NASA's Airspace Systems Program, Airportal Project and the Aviation Safety Program, Integrated Intelligent Flight Deck Project.

  7. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-94

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, D.V.; Lilly, M.R.

    1995-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 52 sites from 1990 to 1994 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water elevations were measured in 32 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1994, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area.

  8. 14 CFR 161.11 - Identification of land uses in airport noise study area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... prescribed under appendix A of 14 CFR part 150. Determination of land use must be based on professional... noise study area. 161.11 Section 161.11 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... RESTRICTIONS General Provisions § 161.11 Identification of land uses in airport noise study area. For...

  9. Planning for airport access: An analysis of the San Francisco Bay area. Technological options

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Current transportation technology and expected technological trends are reviewed. These technologies are assessed within the framework of the airport access system in the San Francisco Bay area. Four types of technological options are considered: (1) automotive systems, (2) commuter air systems, (3) automated guideways, and (4) water systems.

  10. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  11. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION SECURITY AIRCRAFT OPERATOR SECURITY:...

  12. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  13. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  14. 49 CFR 1544.231 - Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Airport-approved and exclusive area personnel identification systems. 1544.231 Section 1544.231 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) TRANSPORTATION SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY CIVIL AVIATION...

  15. The effect of airplane noise on the inhabitants of areas near Okecie Airport in Warsaw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koszarny, Z.; Maziarka, S.; Szata, W.

    1981-01-01

    The state of health and noise annoyance among persons living in areas near Okecie airport exposed to various intensities of noise was evaluated. Very high annoyance effects of airplane noise of intensities over 100 dB (A) were established. A connection between the airplane noise and certain ailments complained about by the inhabitants was demonstrated.

  16. CONNECTICUT AIRPORTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a 1:24,000-scale datalayer that includes all of the airports that appear on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) 7½ minute topographic quadrangle maps that cover the State of Connecticut. It includes the perimeter of airport, heliport, and seaplane landing areas as depicted...

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Tucson International Airport Area (volume 1 and 2), Tucson, AZ, September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1998-01-01

    This Record of Decision (ROD) addresses the contamination at the Tucson International Airport Property (hereafter referred to as the `Airport Property`), Burr-Brown Corporation property (Burr-Brown Property) and the former West-Cap Arizona Company property (former West-Cap Property) located within the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site in Tucson, Arizona (TIAA Site). This ROD addresses soils and shallow groundwater contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs), soil and sludges contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and closure of the Tucson Airport Authority Landfill (TAA Landfill).

  18. Terminal Area Productivity Airport Wind Analysis and Chicago O'Hare Model Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemm, Robert; Shapiro, Gerald

    1998-01-01

    This paper describes two results from a continuing effort to provide accurate cost-benefit analyses of the NASA Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) program technologies. Previous tasks have developed airport capacity and delay models and completed preliminary cost benefit estimates for TAP technologies at 10 U.S. airports. This task covers two improvements to the capacity and delay models. The first improvement is the completion of a detailed model set for the Chicago O'Hare (ORD) airport. Previous analyses used a more general model to estimate the benefits for ORD. This paper contains a description of the model details with results corresponding to current conditions. The second improvement is the development of specific wind speed and direction criteria for use in the delay models to predict when the Aircraft Vortex Spacing System (AVOSS) will allow use of reduced landing separations. This paper includes a description of the criteria and an estimate of AVOSS utility for 10 airports based on analysis of 35 years of weather data.

  19. FAA Airport Design Competition for Universities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandy, Mary

    2008-01-01

    Raise awareness of the importance of airports to the National Airspace System infrastructure. Increase the involvement of the academic community in addressing airport operations and infrastructure issues and needs. Engage U.S. students in the conceptualization of applications, systems and equipment capable of addressing related challenges in a robust, reliable and comprehensive manner. Encourage U.S. undergraduate and graduate students to contribute innovative ideas and solutions to airport and runway safety issues. Provide the framework and incentives for quality educational experiences for university students. d Develop an awareness of and an interest in airports as a vital and interesting area for engineering and technology careers.

  20. Tailored fog climatology for Amsterdam Airport Schiphol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leander, R.

    2010-07-01

    Like many airports, Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is vulnerable to climate change. The airport is situated in a complex and fragile urban area where fundamental changes take place in design and use of the region. To maintain its competitive position, the airport is beginning to respond to changes in weather and climate by formulating adaptation strategies, based on tailored climate information. The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), Amsterdam Airport Schiphol (AAS) and Air Trafic Control the Netherlands (LVNL) are working together to provide just that type of information. Due to safety regulations, reduced horizontal visibility on airports can have an immediate impact on the availability of runways and hence the airport capacity. Fog is therefore one of the most relevant meteorological phenomena to airport operations. A study has started in which the statistics of fog occurrence and visibility at Amsterdam Airport are assessed. The aim is describing the current climate (from 1970 onward) as well as making projections into the future (up to 2040). For the latter, the identification and attribution of trends is relevant. Another point of interrest is the spatial pattern of fog potential over the airport, in particular the related questions whether some runways are more prone to fog occurrence than others and whether these runways require a separate forecast. To answer these questions it is crucial to distinguish between large-scale and local influences. The preliminary results of this study are presented here.

  1. 76 FR 12300 - Safety Management System for Certificated Airports; Extension of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... Certificated Airports'' (75 FR 62008). Comments to that document were to be received on or before January 5... (75 FR 76928). By comments posted to the docket on February 17, 2011, Airport Council International....gpoaccess.gov/fr/index.html . Copies may also be obtained by sending a request to the Federal...

  2. 76 FR 19698 - Safety Zone; Repair of High Voltage Transmission Lines to Logan International Airport, Saugus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-08

    ... Logan International Airport, Saugus River, Saugus, Massachusetts, in the Federal Register (76 FR 4575... repairs. National Grid, the transmission line repair company has not specified the exact date repairs will... Logan International Airport, Saugus River, Saugus, Massachusetts, in the Federal Register (76 FR...

  3. Manufacturing Accomplices: ICT Use in Securing the Safety State at Airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Østerlie, Thomas; Asak, Ole Martin; Pettersen, Ole Georg; Tronhus, Håvard

    Based on a study of ICT use at an airport security checkpoint, this paper explores a possible explanation to the paradox that travelers find existing airport security measures inadequate while at the same time believing air travel to be sufficiently secure. We pursue this explanation by showing that, for the security checkpoint to function properly in relation to the overall function of the airport, travelers have to be enrolled in a particular program of action. They are then locked into this program through sanctions. Travelers are forced into participating in a system many of them find ethically and morally objectionable. Yet, active participation makes it difficult for them to object to the moral and ethical issues of their actions without damning themselves. Our explanation of the security paradox is, therefore, that while travelers remain critical of airport security, they avoid damning themselves by criticizing the system in terms of its own logic. They have been made accomplices.

  4. 76 FR 15028 - Airport Improvement Program (AIP): Interim Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... Improvement Program (AIP): Policy Regarding Access to Airports From Residential Property (75 FR 54946..., Safety Management System for Certificated Airports (75 FR 62008, October 7, 2010). However, the...

  5. C-Band Airport Surface Communications System Engineering-Initial High-Level Safety Risk Assessment and Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelkin, Natalie; Henriksen, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    This document is being provided as part of ITT's NASA Glenn Research Center Aerospace Communication Systems Technical Support (ACSTS) contract: "New ATM Requirements--Future Communications, C-Band and L-Band Communications Standard Development." ITT has completed a safety hazard analysis providing a preliminary safety assessment for the proposed C-band (5091- to 5150-MHz) airport surface communication system. The assessment was performed following the guidelines outlined in the Federal Aviation Administration Safety Risk Management Guidance for System Acquisitions document. The safety analysis did not identify any hazards with an unacceptable risk, though a number of hazards with a medium risk were documented. This effort represents an initial high-level safety hazard analysis and notes the triggers for risk reassessment. A detailed safety hazards analysis is recommended as a follow-on activity to assess particular components of the C-band communication system after the profile is finalized and system rollout timing is determined. A security risk assessment has been performed by NASA as a parallel activity. While safety analysis is concerned with a prevention of accidental errors and failures, the security threat analysis focuses on deliberate attacks. Both processes identify the events that affect operation of the system; and from a safety perspective the security threats may present safety risks.

  6. 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R.D.

    2000-03-15

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area Technical Safety Requirements define administrative controls and design features required to ensure safe operation during receipt and storage of canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. This document is based on the 200 Area Interim Storage Area, Annex D, Final Safety Analysis Report which contains information specific to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area.

  7. 76 FR 20570 - Safety Enhancements, Certification of Airports; Reopening of Comment Period

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... period. DATES: The comment period for the NPRM published on February 1, 2011, (76 FR 5510) closed on... be found in the Federal Register published on April 11, 2000 (65 FR 19477-19478), as well as at http... of Airports'' [76 FR 5510]. Comments to that document were to be received on or before April 4,...

  8. Ranging airport pseudolite for local area augmentation using the global positioning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartone, Chris Gregory

    The Local Area Augmentation System (LAAS) is being developed to support precision approach and landing operations in and about the local area surrounding an airport. The LAAS Program is currently under development by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) with Minimum Aviation System Performance Standards for the LAAS being developed by RTCA, Incorporated. The LAAS uses differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) and includes one or more airport pseudolites (APL) to increase the availability for certain installations. This dissertation addresses the addition of a differentially corrected, ranging APL into a LAAS. Prior to this work, no ranging APL has been integrated into a prototype LAAS and demonstrated in a real-time flight environment showing that an increase in LAAS availability is feasible. The APL requirements resulted in a prototype APL transmitting and receiving subsystem with a coarse-acquisition (C/A) code format that could be operated at any frequency within the L1± 10.0 MHz band. To investigate the major APL error the developmental approach was performed in two phases. Phase I implemented an APL operating at a center frequency off-L1 and concentrated on multipath limiting. The Phase II on-L1 APL architecture implemented a unique pulsing, automatic gain control (AGC) and GPS Blanker technique in the common reception path to maximize APL signal tracking and minimize electromagnetic interference to DGPS. To minimize ground multipath for the APL geometry, which is more severe than for GPS, a multipath limiting antenna (MLA) was designed, fabricated, and tested within a 4-month period. The implementation of this MLA concept was a first for APL applications and also contributed to the successful multipath limiting of ground multipath at the DGPS LAAS Ground Station. This effort successfully demonstrated that ground multipath can be limited (with low variance and no long-term bias) for the APL geometry and that suitable precision approach performance

  9. Planning for airport access: An analysis of the San Francisco Bay area. Introduction and conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The problems of airport access are examined and recommendations are made based on current transportation availability, public costs, and future transportation demand. Major conclusions presented include: (1) access must be considered in the contex of the overall urban transportation system, (2) expensive and inflexible travel modes designed primarily for airport access are not justifiable, (3) VTOL and STOL are presently too expensive for large-scale commercial use, and (4) the automobile will continue to be the predominant access mode in the future.

  10. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Litchfield Airport Area, Goodyear, AZ (Second remedial action), September 1989. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-09-26

    The Litchfield Airport site, also known as the Phoenix-Goodyear Airport Area site, covers approximately 35 square miles and, except for the airport, is almost entirely in the city of Goodyear. The surrounding area is primarily agricultural, however, residential development is anticipated in the near future. A ground water divide running under the area effectively divides the site into a northern and southern area. Between 1981 and 1983, the State discovered that the ground water was contaminated with solvents, metals, and VOCs. A 1987 Record of Decision (ROD) addressed ground water in an area of the southern portion of the site contaminated with VOCs. The ROD addresses soil (vadose zone) and ground water remediation for the remainder of the site, with the exception of chromium-contaminated soil in the sludge drying beds at the former GAC facility. The primary contaminants of concern affecting the soil and ground water are VOCs including TCE, toluene, and xylenes; and metals including arsenic, chromium, and lead.

  11. Ground-water and surface-water elevations in the Fairbanks International Airport area, Alaska, 1990-96, and selected geohydrologic report references

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Claar, David V.; Lilly, Michael R.

    1997-01-01

    Ground-water and surface-water elevation data were collected at 61 sites from 1990 to 1996 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Alaska Department of Transportation and Public Facilities, Fairbanks International Airport. Water-surface elevations were measured in 41 ground-water observation wells and at 20 surface-water sites to help characterize the geohydrology of the Fairbanks International Airport area. From 1990 to 1993, data were collected in the vicinity of the former fire-training area at the airport. From 1993 to 1996, the data-collection area was expanded to include the entire airport area. The total number of data-collection sites varied each year because of changing project objectives and increased understanding of the geohydrology in the area.

  12. Assessing the Impacts of Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport on Particulate Matter and Ozone in Atlanta Metropolitan Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unal, Alper; Odman, M. Talat; Russell, Armistead G.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine, through modeling, the impact of aircraft emissions on regional air quality, especially in regard to fine particulate matter (PM(2.5)) as well as ozone and other pollutants. For this, we focused on Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport which is the busiest airport in the world based on passenger traffic (AIC, 2003). Hartsfield-Jackson serves the metropolitan Atlanta area where air quality does not meet national standards. Emissions from mobile and industrial sources (including several large electric power generating utilities) are the major contributors to the area's air pollution. In this study, we assessed the impact of Hartsfield-Jackson Airport on air quality around Atlanta, Georgia, and compared it to the impacts of other emission sources in the area. The assessment was built upon other, related air quality studies involving both field and modeling components. To achieve the objectives, first a detailed inventory was developed for aircraft and other emissions at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. Then, air quality simulations were performed to relate these emissions to regional air quality around Atlanta. The Community Multiscale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) was used as the modeling platform. The period of August 11-20 2000 was selected as the episode to be modeled in this study. Prior modeling of this episode during the Fall Line Air Quality Study (FAQS) and availability of additional PM(2.5) measurements for evaluation played a major role in this selection. Meteorological data for this episode as well as emission data for sources other than aircrafts were already available from FAQS.

  13. 76 FR 77383 - Amendment of Class C Airspace; Palm Beach International Airport, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ...This action modifies the Palm Beach International Airport, FL, Class C airspace area by raising the floor of Class C airspace over Palm Beach County Park Airport. The FAA is taking this action to enhance safety and increase the efficiency of air traffic operations in the Palm Beach, FL, terminal...

  14. When day is done and shadows fall, we miss the airport most of all. [visual accommodation and aircraft flight safety

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roscoe, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    Both the effectiveness of pilot training and the safety of flight can be influenced by the distribution of texture in the visual scene, the distance to which the eyes accommodate, and the associated shifts in the apparent size and distance of objects in central and peripheral vision. Studies reviewed and original results presented indicate that these factors are involved in various misjudgments and illusions experienced by pilots: (1) when searching for other airborne traffic or targets, (2) when making approaches to airports over water at night, (3) when breaking out of low clouds on a final approach to a landing by reference to head-up or head-down displays, and (4) when practicing simulated approaches and landings or air-to-surface weapon deliveries by reference to synthetically generated visual systems.

  15. 14 CFR 139.309 - Safety areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safety areas. 139.309 Section 139.309... Operations § 139.309 Safety areas. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must provide and maintain, for each runway and taxiway that is available for air carrier use, a...

  16. 14 CFR 139.309 - Safety areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safety areas. 139.309 Section 139.309... Operations § 139.309 Safety areas. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must provide and maintain, for each runway and taxiway that is available for air carrier use, a...

  17. 14 CFR 139.309 - Safety areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safety areas. 139.309 Section 139.309... Operations § 139.309 Safety areas. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must provide and maintain, for each runway and taxiway that is available for air carrier use, a...

  18. 14 CFR 139.309 - Safety areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safety areas. 139.309 Section 139.309... Operations § 139.309 Safety areas. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must provide and maintain, for each runway and taxiway that is available for air carrier use, a...

  19. 14 CFR 139.309 - Safety areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safety areas. 139.309 Section 139.309... Operations § 139.309 Safety areas. (a) In a manner authorized by the Administrator, each certificate holder must provide and maintain, for each runway and taxiway that is available for air carrier use, a...

  20. Progress on the Development of Future Airport Surface Wireless Communications Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerczewski, Robert J.; Budinger, James M.; Brooks, David E.; Franklin, Morgan; DeHart, Steve; Dimond, Robert P.; Borden, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Continuing advances in airport surface management and improvements in airport surface safety are required to enable future growth in air traffic throughout the airspace, as airport arrival and departure delays create a major system bottleneck. These airport management and safety advances will be built upon improved communications, navigation, surveillance, and weather sensing, creating an information environment supporting system automation. The efficient movement of the digital data generated from these systems requires an underlying communications network infrastructure to connect data sources with the intended users with the required quality of service. Current airport surface communications consists primarily of buried copper or fiber cable. Safety related communications with mobile airport surface assets occurs over 25 kHz VHF voice and data channels. The available VHF spectrum, already congested in many areas, will be insufficient to support future data traffic requirements. Therefore, a broadband wireless airport surface communications network is considered a requirement for the future airport component of the air transportation system. Progress has been made on defining the technology and frequency spectrum for the airport surface wireless communications network. The development of a test and demonstration facility and the definition of required testing and standards development are now underway. This paper will review the progress and planned future work.

  1. The Joint Airport Weather Studies Project - Current analysis highlights in the aviation safety context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J.

    1984-01-01

    The principal objective of the Joint Airport Weather Studies Project was to obtain high-resolution velocity, turbulence, and thermodynamic data on a convective outflow called a microburst, an intense downdraft and resulting horizontal outflow near the surface. Data collection occurred during the summer of 1982 near Denver, CO. Data sensors included three pulsed-microwave Doppler and two pulsed CO2 lidar radars, along with 27 Portable Automated Mesonet surface weather stations, the FAA's low-level-wind-shear alert system (LLWSAS), and five instrumented research aircraft. Convective storms occurred on 75 of 91 operational days, with Doppler data being collected on at least 70 microbursts. Analyses reported included a thorough examination of microburst-climatology statistics, the capability of the LLWSAS to detect adequately and accurately the presence of low-altitude wind shear danger to aircraft, the capability of a terminal Doppler radar system development to provide improved wind-shear detection and warning, and progress toward improved wind-shear training for pilots.

  2. Nuclear criticality safety: 300 Area

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-31

    This Standard applies to the receipt, processing, storage, and shipment of fissionable material in the 300 Area and in any other facility under the control of the Reactor Materials Project Management Team (PMT). The objective is to establish practices and process conditions for the storage and handling of fissionable material that prevent the accidental assembly of a critical mass and that comply with DOE Orders as well as accepted industry practice.

  3. Synthetic aperture radar imagery of airports and surrounding areas: Study of clutter at grazing angles and their polarimetric properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Robert G.; Gineris, Denise J.; Clinthorne, James T.

    1991-01-01

    The statistical description of ground clutter at an airport and in the surrounding area is addressed. These data are being utilized in a program to detect microbursts. Synthetic aperture radar data were collected at the Denver Stapleton Airport. Mountain terrain data were examined to determine if they may potentially contribute to range ambiguity problems and degrade microburst detection. Results suggest that mountain clutter may not present a special problem source. The examination of clutter at small grazing angles was continued by examining data collected at especially low altitudes. Cultural objects such as buildings produce strong sources of backscatter at angles of about 85 deg, with responses of 30 dB to 60 dB above the background. Otherwise there are a few sources which produce significant scatter. The polarization properties of hydrospheres and clutter were examined with the intent of determining the optimum polarization. This polarization was determined to be dependent upon the ratio of VV and HH polarizations of both rain and ground clutter.

  4. 76 FR 26183 - Safety Zone; Repair of High Voltage Transmission Lines to Logan International Airport, Saugus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... FR 4575-4577). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and none was held. On April 8, 2011, we published a final rule (FR) of the same in the Federal Register (76 FR 19698-19701). In the final rule, the safety zone has an effective date beginning on May 9,...

  5. ICAO's anti-SARS airport activities.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, Silvio; Curdt-Christiansen, Claus M

    2003-11-01

    To prevent SARS from spreading through air travel and in order to rebuild the confidence of the traveling public in the safety of air travel, ICAO has set up an "Anti-SARS Airport Evaluation Project." The first phase of this project was to develop a set of protective measures for international airports in affected areas to adopt and implement and then to send out, on the request of Contracting States, a team of inspectors to evaluate and assess airports and issue a "statement of evaluation" that the airport inspected complies with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. In cooperation with the World Health Organization (WHO), the first part of phase 1 was completed in early June this year, and the second part of phase 1 followed soon after. By mid-July, five international airports in Southeast Asia had been inspected and found to be in full compliance with the ICAO anti-SARS protective measures. The success of this ICAO project is believed to have contributed significantly to the recovery of international air travel and related industries now taking place. Phase 2 of the project is now being developed. It is aimed at preventing a resurgence of SARS, but it also contains elements to make the methodology developed applicable to future outbreaks of any other communicable disease in which the mode of transmission could involve aviation and/or the need to prevent the spread of the disease by air travel. PMID:14620481

  6. 76 FR 27743 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Environmental Assessment for a Proposed Airport Traffic Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-12

    ... visibility and improve safety of airport movement areas, have the capability to meet existing and future...-day public comment period at the following libraries: Champaign Public Library, 200 W Green...

  7. Carlsbad Area Office vehicle safety program

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    The Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) Vehicle Safety Program (VSP) establishes the minimum requirements for CAO personnel to safely operate government vehicles and provides direction to effectively reduce the number of vehicle accidents, reduce the severity of vehicle accidents, and minimize vehicular property damage. This Program covers the operations of Government Services Administration (GSA) vehicles, rental or leased vehicles, and special purpose vehicles used at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in the performance of work. Additionally, this Program encourages CAO employees to use safe driving habits while operating their privately owned vehicles, motorcycles, or bicycles, or, as pedestrians, to be aware of the hazards associated with traffic in and around CAO facilities. Vehicle safety is a shared responsibility in this organization. At anytime a CAO employee witnesses an unsafe act relating to the operation of a motor vehicle, it is their responsibility to notify their Team Leader (TL) or Assistant Manager (AM), or contact the CAO Safety and Occupational Health Manager (SOHM). Employees are encouraged to participate in the Carlsbad Area Office Federal Employees Safety Committee (FESC) activities and goals in order to address vehicle safety concerns. The FESC is designed to be a forum for all federal employees to improve the health and safety of the organization. The VSP is an effective method of ensuring the health and safety of CAO employees during the operation of government vehicles. The human resources of the CAO are the most valuable assets of this organization and any lost manhours are difficult to replace. Safe driving habits and defensive driving methods should always be practiced to preserve the health and safety of all employees.

  8. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Safety rest areas. 752.5 Section 752.5 Highways FEDERAL... DEVELOPMENT § 752.5 Safety rest areas. (a) Safety rest areas should provide facilities reasonably necessary... may be provided in conjunction with a safety rest area at such locations where accommodations...

  9. Concentration of 1,4-Dioxane in Wells Sampled During 2002-2009 in the Vicinity of the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2010-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area as a Superfund Site in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified and cleanup activities were begun in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project (TARP) area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TARP area, in some cases exceeding the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) drinking water advisory level of 3 ?g/L.

  10. Superfund record of decision (EPA Region 2): Federal Aviation Administration Technical Center (Area B Navy Fire Test Facility), Atlantic County, Atlantic City International Airport, NJ, September 20, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-10-01

    This decision document presents the selected remedial action for Area B, the Navy Fire Test Facility, at the FAA Technical Center, Atlantic City Internatioal Airport, New Jersey. The selected remedy for Area B includes: Installation of additional monitoring wells; Continued ground water and surface water monitoring; Installation and operation of air sparging wells, vapor extraction wells and monitoring probes; On-site vapor treatment (if necessary); and Five year reviews.

  11. Integrated Airport Surface Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koczo, S.

    1998-01-01

    The current air traffic environment in airport terminal areas experiences substantial delays when weather conditions deteriorate to Instrument Meteorological Conditions (IMC). Research activity at NASA has culminated in the development, flight test and demonstration of a prototype Low Visibility Landing and Surface Operations (LVLASO) system. A NASA led industry team and the FAA developed the system which integrated airport surface surveillance systems, aeronautical data links, DGPS navigation, automation systems, and controller and flight deck displays. The LVLASO system was demonstrated at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport using a Boeing 757-200 aircraft during August, 1997. This report documents the contractors role in this testing particularly in the area of data link and DGPS navigation.

  12. Initial Concept for Terminal Area Conflict Detection, Alerting, and Resolution Capability On or Near the Airport Surface, Version 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.; Jones, Denise R.

    2013-01-01

    The Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) concept for 2025 envisions the movement of large numbers of people and goods in a safe, efficient, and reliable manner. The NextGen will remove many of the constraints in the current air transportation system, support a wider range of operations, and deliver an overall system capacity up to 3 times that of current operating levels. In order to achieve the NextGen vision, research is necessary in the areas of surface traffic optimization, maximum runway capacity, reduced runway occupancy time, simultaneous single runway operations, and terminal area conflict prevention, among others. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is conducting Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) research to develop technologies, data, and guidelines to enable Conflict Detection and Resolution (CD&R) in the Airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (ATMA) under current and emerging NextGen operating concepts. The term ATMA was created to reflect the fact that the CD&R concept area of operation is focused near the airport within the terminal maneuvering area. In the following, an initial concept for an aircraft-based method for CD&R in the ATMA is presented. This method is based upon previous NASA work in CD&R for runway incursion prevention, the Runway Incursion Prevention System (RIPS).

  13. A Terminal Area Analysis of Continuous Ascent Departure Fuel Use at Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roach, Keenan; Robinson, John E., III

    2010-01-01

    Aircraft departing from the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW) encounter vertical restrictions that prevent continuous ascent operations. The result of these restrictions are temporary level-offs at 10,000 feet. A combination of flow direction, specific Area Navigation (RNAV) route geometry, and arrival streams have been found to be the biggest factors in the duration and frequency of a temporary level-offs. In total, 20% of DFW departures are affected by these level-offs, which have an average duration of just over 100 seconds. The use of continuous descent approaches at DFW are shown to lessen the impact arrivals have on the departures and allow more continuous ascents. The fuel used in a continuous ascent and an ascent with a temporary level-off have been calculated using a fuel burn rate model created from a combination of actual aircraft track data, aircraft manufacturer flight operations manuals, and Eurocontrol's Base of Aircraft Data (BADA) simulation tool. This model represents the average aggregate burn rates for the current fleet mix at DFW. Continuous ascents would save approximately seven gallons of fuel out of 450 gallons used to climb to a cruise altitude of 31,000ft per departure.

  14. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 9): Tucson International Airport Area, Operable Unit 3 (AFP 44), Tucson, AZ, September 28, 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1999-05-01

    Air Force Plant 44 (AFP 44) is located within the Tucson International Airport Area Superfund Site, Tucson, Arizona, and is identified as such on the National Priorities List. The Air Force has decided that excavation and offsite disposal in a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Class I landfill with solidification/stabilization (S/S) is the preferred remedy for excavated metals-contaminated materials under CERCLA for these three specific sites and sources.

  15. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2001-07-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the remediation activities performed and the results of verification sampling conducted at Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box. The CAU is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). The CAU is located in Area 22 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) (Figure 1) and consists of the following Corrective Action Sites (CASs): 22-03-01- Sewage Lagoon (CAU 230); and 22-99-01- Strainer Box (CAU 320). Included with CAS 22-99-01 is a buried Imhoff tank and a sludge bed. These CAUs will be collectively referred to in this plan as the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. Site characterization activities were done during September 1999. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization presented in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) indicated that only the sludge bed (CAS 22-99-01) contained constituents of concern (COC) above action levels and required remediation (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOE/NV], 2000a).

  16. Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

    1991-07-01

    The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

  17. Prediction of Weather Impacted Airport Capacity using Ensemble Learning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Yao Xun

    2011-01-01

    Ensemble learning with the Bagging Decision Tree (BDT) model was used to assess the impact of weather on airport capacities at selected high-demand airports in the United States. The ensemble bagging decision tree models were developed and validated using the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation System Performance Metrics (ASPM) data and weather forecast at these airports. The study examines the performance of BDT, along with traditional single Support Vector Machines (SVM), for airport runway configuration selection and airport arrival rates (AAR) prediction during weather impacts. Testing of these models was accomplished using observed weather, weather forecast, and airport operation information at the chosen airports. The experimental results show that ensemble methods are more accurate than a single SVM classifier. The airport capacity ensemble method presented here can be used as a decision support model that supports air traffic flow management to meet the weather impacted airport capacity in order to reduce costs and increase safety.

  18. Parametric Modeling of the Safety Effects of NextGen Terminal Maneuvering Area Conflict Scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, William H.; Waldron, Timothy P.; Stroiney, Steven R.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work was to analytically identify and quantify the issues, challenges, technical hurdles, and pilot-vehicle interface issues associated with conflict detection and resolution (CD&R)in emerging operational concepts for a NextGen terminal aneuvering area, including surface operations. To this end, the work entailed analytical and trade studies focused on modeling the achievable safety benefits of different CD&R strategies and concepts in the current and future airport environment. In addition, crew-vehicle interface and pilot performance enhancements and potential issues were analyzed based on review of envisioned NextGen operations, expected equipage advances, and human factors expertise. The results of perturbation analysis, which quantify the high-level performance impact of changes to key parameters such as median response time and surveillance position error, show that the analytical model developed could be useful in making technology investment decisions.

  19. Supersonics--Airport Noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2007-01-01

    At this, the first year-end meeting of the Fundamental Aeronautics Program, an overview of the Airport Noise discipline of the Supersonics Project leads the presentation of technical plans and achievements in this area of the Project. The overview starts by defining the Technical Challenges targeted by Airport Noise efforts, and the Approaches planned to meet these challenges. These are fleshed out in Elements, namely Prediction, Diagnostics, and Engineering, and broken down into Tasks. The Tasks level is where individual researchers' work is defined and from whence the technical presentations to follow this presentation come. This overview also presents the Milestones accomplished to date and to be completed in the next year. Finally, the NASA Research Announcement cooperative agreement activities are covered and tied to the Tasks and Milestones.

  20. Important Content Areas for Community College Safety Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Shawn

    2003-01-01

    Discusses a study that began the process of developing a curriculum for a two-year degree in safety. Reports that two groups of safety professionals ranked the importance of content areas that might be included in the degree program--communication skills, safety management skills, and regulatory compliance were found to have the highest mean…

  1. Whiffing the Airport Interview

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williamson, David

    2008-01-01

    An airport interview is an initial interview for a senior administrative position conducted at an airport hotel not too far from the campus in question. Meeting at an airport enables a search committee to interview a large number of candidates in a short period of time with a degree of confidentiality. At the conclusion of the airport interviews,…

  2. Achieving Recognition as a World Class Airport through Education and Training. Sorenson Best Paper Award Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2003-01-01

    The International Civil Aviation Organization has standards for airport certification that require education and training of personnel. The American Association of Airport Executives offers accreditation and certification in airport operations and safety that can meet the needs of world-class airports. (Contains 18 references.) (SK)

  3. 78 FR 76382 - Notice of Cancellation of Environmental Impact Statement for the Norfolk International Airport...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-17

    ...) and hold a Public Scoping Meeting at Norfolk International Airport (Volume 66, Number 125, FR 34508..., runway safety area construction, new airfield lighting, improvements to existing lighting, relocation of the VORTAC facility, installation of a Medium Intensity Approach Lighting System with Runway...

  4. 33 CFR 165.T01-0992 - Safety Zone; repair of high voltage transmission lines to Logan International Airport; Saugus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... COTP Boston, or his designated on-scene representative. (2) This safety zone is closed to all vessel traffic, except as may be permitted by the COTP Boston or the designated on-scene representative. (3) The “on-scene representative” of the Captain of the Port Boston is any Coast Guard commissioned,...

  5. Guidelines to improve airport preparedness against chemical and biological terrorism.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Donna M.; Price, Phillip N.; Gordon, Susanna P.; Gadgil, Ashok

    2005-05-01

    Guidelines to Improve Airport Preparedness Against Chemical and Biological Terrorism is a 100-page document that makes concrete recommendations on improving security and assessing vulnerable areas and helps its readers understand the nature of chemical and biological attacks. The report has been turned over to Airports Council International (ACI) and the American Association of Airport Executives (AAAE), two organizations that together represent the interests of thousands of airport personnel and facilities in the U.S. and around the world.

  6. Flight demonstration of integrated airport surface automation concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1995-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted to address airport surface movement area capacity issues by providing pilots with enhanced situational awareness information. The demonstration showed an integration of several technologies to government and industry representatives. These technologies consisted of an electronic moving map display in the cockpit, a Differential Global Positioning System (DGPS) receiver, a high speed VHF data link, an ASDE-3 radar, and the Airport Movement Area Safety System (AMASS). Aircraft identification was presented to an air traffic controller on AMASS. The onboard electronic map included the display of taxi routes, hold instructions, and clearances, which were sent to the aircraft via data link by the controller. The map also displayed the positions of other traffic and warning information, which were sent to the aircraft automatically from the ASDE-3/AMASS system. This paper describes the flight demonstration in detail, along with preliminary results.

  7. ILO activities in the area of chemical safety.

    PubMed

    Obadia, Isaac

    2003-08-21

    The ILO has been active in the area of safety in the use of chemicals at work since the year of its creation in 1919, including the development of international treaties and other technical instruments, the provision of technical assistance to its member States, and the development of chemical safety information systems. The two key ILO standards in this area are the Conventions on safety in the use of chemicals at work (No. 170, 1990), and the Prevention of Major Industrial Accidents (No. 174, 1993). The ILO Programme on occupational safety, health and environment (Safe Work) is currently responsible for ILO chemical safety activities. In the past two decades, most of ILO work in this area has been carried out within the context of inter-agency collaboration frameworks linking the ILO, WHO, UNEP, FAO, UNIDO, UNITAR, and the OECD, including the International Programme on Chemical Safety (IPCS), the Inter-Organisation Programme for the Sound Management of Chemicals (IOMC), and the Intergovernmental Forum on Chemical Safety (IFCS). Apart from the regular development, updating and dissemination of chemical safety information data bases such as the IPCS International Chemical Cards, the elaboration of a Globally harmonized system for the classification and labelling of Chemicals (GHS) has been the most outstanding achievement of this international collaboration on chemical safety. PMID:12909402

  8. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf, AFB, Alaska. Final engineering evaluation/cost analysis, million gallon hill source area of the West Unit, Galena Airport, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-05

    This decision document presents the selected removal action for the Million Gallon Hill source area of the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) site ST009, otherwise known as the West Unit at Galena Airport, Alaska. The information from the RI Report is summarized, along with an analysis of potential removal action alternatives in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA).

  9. Sustainable stormwater management at Fornebu--from an airport to an industrial and residential area of the city of Oslo, Norway.

    PubMed

    Astebøl, Svein Ole; Hvitved-Jacobsen, Thorkild; Simonsen, Oyvind

    2004-12-01

    The Oslo Airport at Fornebu was closed in 1998 after 60 years of operation. An area of 3.1 km(2) was made available for one of Norway's biggest property development projects. Plans include 6000 residences and 20,000 workplaces. Fornebu is situated on a peninsula in the Oslo Fjord just outside the city of Oslo and is regarded as a very attractive area for both urbanisation and recreation. The residential area located centrally at Fornebu surrounds a centrally located park area. In the planning process, there was an expressed interest in using water as a life-giving element within the vegetation structure of the park. In Norway, stormwater in urban areas has traditionally been collected and transported in pipe systems to adjacent watercourses. However, there is an increasing interest in alternative "green" solutions for the management of stormwater. The paper presents a concept for sustainable stormwater management at Fornebu. A main objective is to improve the recreational and ecological value of stormwater while achieving a cost-effective solution. This objective is reached by replacing conventional urban drainage pipes with swales, filter strips, wetlands and ponds as collection, storage and treatment systems designed for natural processes. The paper thereby addresses integrated systems for stormwater management by approaching nature's way and sustainable development principles. PMID:15504511

  10. Corrective Action Plan for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    D. S. Tobiason

    2000-09-01

    The purpose of this Corrective Action Plan (CAP) is to provide the strategy and methodology to close the Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site. The CAU will be closed following state and federal regulations and the FFACO (1996). Site characterization was done during September 1999, Soil samples were collected using a direct-push method and a backhoe. Soil samples were collected from the sludge bed, sewage lagoons, strainer box, and Imhoff tank areas. Characterization of the manholes associated with the septic system leading to the Imhoff tank was done during March 2000. The results of the characterization were reported in the Corrective Action Decision Document (CADD) (DOE/NV, 2000). Soil sample results indicated that the only constituent of concern (COC) detected above Preliminary Action Levels (PALs) was total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) as diesel-range organics. This COC was detected in three samples from the sludge bed at concentrations up to 580 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg). This exceeds the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) regulatory action level for TPH of 100 mg/kg (Nevada Administrative Code, 1996). Excavation of the area during characterization uncovered asphalt debris, four safety poles, and strands of barbed wire. The TPH-impacted soil and debris will be removed and disposed in the NTS Area 6 Hydrocarbon Landfill.

  11. Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) New R&D Simulator for Airport Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorighi, Nancy S.

    1997-01-01

    A new simulator, the Surface Development and Test Facility (SDTF) is under construction at the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. Jointly funded by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NASA, the SDTF will be a testbed for airport surface automation technologies of the future. The SDTF will be operational in the third quarter of 1998. The SDTF will combine a virtual tower with simulated ground operations to allow evaluation of new technologies for safety, effectiveness, reliability, and cost benefit. The full-scale level V tower will provide a seamless 360 degree high resolution out-the-window view, and a full complement of ATC (air traffic control) controller positions. The imaging system will be generated by two fully-configured Silicon Graphics Onyx Infinite Reality computers, and will support surface movement of up to 200 aircraft and ground vehicles. The controller positions, displays and consoles can be completely reconfigured to match the unique layout of any individual airport tower. Dedicated areas will accommodate pseudo-airport ramp controllers, pseudo-airport operators, and pseudo-pilots. Up to 33 total personnel positions will be able to participate in simultaneous operational scenarios. A realistic voice communication infrastructure will emulate the intercom and telephone communications of a real airport tower. Multi-channel audio and video recording and a sophisticated data acquisition system will support a wide variety of research and development areas, such as evaluation of automation tools for surface operations, human factors studies, integration of terminal area and airport technologies, and studies of potential airport physical and procedural modifications.

  12. A review of smoking policies in airports around the world

    PubMed Central

    Stillman, Frances A; Soong, Andrea; Kleb, Cerise; Grant, Ashley; Navas-Acien, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Objective To review smoking policies of major international airports, to compare these policies with corresponding incountry tobacco control legislation and to identify areas of improvement for advancing smoke-free policy in airports. Methods We reviewed smoking policies of 34 major international airports in five world regions, and collected data on current national and subnational legislation on smoke-free indoor places in the corresponding airport locations. We then compared airport smoking policies with local legislation. Additionally, we collected anecdotal information concerning smoking rules and practices in specific airports from an online traveller website. Results We found that 52.9% of the airports reviewed had indoor smoking rooms or smoking areas; smoking policy was unknown or unstated for two airports. 55.9% of the airports were located in countries where national legislation allowed designated smoking rooms and areas, while 35.3% were in smoke-free countries. Subnational legislation restricted smoking in 60% of the airport locations, while 40% were smoke-free. 71.4% of the airport locations had subnational legislation that allowed smoke-free laws to be more stringent than at the national level, but only half of these places had enacted such laws. Conclusions Despite the increasing presence of smoke-free places and legal capacity to enact stricter legislation at the local level, airports represent a public and occupational space that is often overlooked in national or subnational smoke-free policies. Secondhand smoke exposure in airports can be reduced among travellers and workers by implementing and enforcing smoke-free policies in airports. Additionally, existing information on smoke-free legislation lacks consistent terminology and definitions, which are needed to inform future tobacco control policy within airports and in the law. PMID:24638966

  13. Productivity Analysis of Public and Private Airports: A Causal Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasigh, Bijan; Gorjidooz, Javad

    2007-01-01

    Around the world, airports are being viewed as enterprises, rather than public services, which are expected to be managed efficiently and provide passengers with courteous customer services. Governments are, increasingly, turning to the private sectors for their efficiency in managing the operation, financing, and development, as well as providing security for airports. Operational and financial performance evaluation has become increasingly important to airport operators due to recent trends in airport privatization. Assessing performance allows the airport operators to plan for human resources and capital investment as efficiently as possible. Productivity measurements may be used as comparisons and guidelines in strategic planning, in the internal analysis of operational efficiency and effectiveness, and in assessing the competitive position of an airport in transportation industry. The primary purpose of this paper is to investigate the operational and financial efficiencies of 22 major airports in the United States and Europe. These airports are divided into three groups based on private ownership (7 British Airport Authority airports), public ownership (8 major United States airports), and a mix of private and public ownership (7 major European Union airports. The detail ownership structures of these airports are presented in Appendix A. Total factor productivity (TFP) model was utilized to measure airport performance in terms of financial and operational efficiencies and to develop a benchmarking tool to identify the areas of strength and weakness. A regression model was then employed to measure the relationship between TFP and ownership structure. Finally a Granger causality test was performed to determine whether ownership structure is a Granger cause of TFP. The results of the analysis presented in this paper demonstrate that there is not a significant relationship between airport TFP and ownership structure. Airport productivity and efficiency is

  14. NCRP Program Area Committee 2: Operational Radiation Safety.

    PubMed

    Goldin, Eric M; Pryor, Kathryn H

    2016-02-01

    Program Area Committee 2 of the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements provides guidance for radiation safety in occupational settings in a variety of industries and activities. The Committee completed three reports in recent years covering recommendations for the development and administration of radiation safety programs for smaller educational institutions, requirements for self-assessment programs that improve radiation safety and identify and correct deficiencies, and a comprehensive process for effective investigation of radiological incidents. Ongoing work includes a report on sealed radioactive source controls and oversight of a report on radioactive nanomaterials focusing on gaps within current radiation safety programs. Future efforts may deal with operational radiation safety programs in fields such as the safe use of handheld and portable x-ray fluorescence analyzers, occupational airborne radioactive contamination, unsealed radioactive sources, or industrial accelerators. PMID:26717157

  15. A novel wireless local positioning system for airport (indoor) security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zekavat, Seyed A.; Tong, Hui; Tan, Jindong

    2004-09-01

    A novel wireless local positioning system (WLPS) for airport (or indoor) security is introduced. This system is used by airport (indoor) security guards to locate all of, or a group of airport employees or passengers within the airport area. WLPS consists of two main parts: (1) a base station that is carried by security personnel; hence, introducing dynamic base station (DBS), and (2) a transponder (TRX) that is mounted on all people (including security personnel) present at the airport; thus, introducing them as active targets. In this paper, we (a) draw a futuristic view of the airport security systems, and the flow of information at the airports, (b) investigate the techniques of extending WLPS coverage area beyond the line-of-sight (LoS), and (c) study the performance of this system via standard transceivers, and direct sequence code division multiple access (DS-CDMA) systems with and without antenna arrays and conventional beamforming (BF).

  16. Results of the Analyses for 1,4-Dioxane of Groundwater Samples Collected in the Tucson Airport Remediation Project Area, South-Central Arizona, 2006-2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tillman, Fred D

    2009-01-01

    Extensive groundwater contamination resulting from industrial activities led to the listing of the Tucson International Airport Area (TIAA) as a Superfund Site by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) in 1983. Early investigations revealed elevated levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), including the chlorinated solvents trichloroethylene and perchloroethylene, in wells in the area. Several responsible parties were identified, and cleanup activities were initiated in the late 1980s using technology designed for removal of VOCs. In 2002, the compound 1,4-dioxane was discovered in wells in the TIAA area. Since then, 1,4-dioxane has been detected throughout the TIAA area at levels exceeding the USEPA Drinking Water Health Advisory value of 3 micrograms per liter (ug/L; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 2006). Chemical properties of 1,4-dioxane make it relatively unaffected by the treatment technologies employed in the TIAA area. In 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona Water Science Center, in cooperation with the U.S. Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment, began an investigation into the extent of groundwater contamination by 1,4-dioxane in the area. Five rounds of groundwater sampling in the TIAA area have been completed by the USGS since that time, yielding a total of 210 samples. Results from these analyses indicate less than reportable concentrations of 1,4-dioxane in 30 percent of the samples, with 46 percent of the samples having concentrations at or above the USEPA Drinking Water Health Advisory level.

  17. The ATC evaluation of the prototype Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP) at Orlando International Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Radame

    1993-03-01

    The Airport Surveillance Radar Wind Shear Processor (ASR-WSP), also known as Airport Surveillance Radar-9 (ASR-9) modification for low altitude wind shear detection, is a production ASR-9 with an expanded weather channel for added processing capabilities. The primary mission of the ASR-WSP is to enhance the safety of air travel through the timely detection and reporting of hazardous wind shear in and near the terminal approach and departure zones of the airport. It will also improve the management of air traffic (AT) in the terminal area through the forecast of precipitation, and ultimately the detection of other hazardous weather phenomena. The ASR-WSP may be used as a stand-alone system at airports without a Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) or Enhanced-Low Level Wind Shear Alert System (E-LLWAS), or in an integrated mode with either or both the TDWR and E-LLWAS. An operational evaluation of a prototype ASR-WSP, developed by Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Laboratories (MIT/LL), was conducted at the Orlando International Airport (MCO) in Orlando, Florida, during the period 29 Jun. to 31 Aug. 1992. The objective of the evaluation was to obtain Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) air traffic controller reaction to the prototype ASR-WSP weather data and display equipment. The following are highlights of the evaluation: (1) the ASW-WSP is very useful when making runway configuration changes; (2) the ASR-WSP is not perceived to be as accurate as the prototype TDWR; (3) the gust front prediction feature is not reliable; and (4) the information provided on both the RDT and the GSD is very useful.

  18. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Final baseline risk assessment for the Fire Protection Training Area, Pol Area, and the west unit source areas of Galena Airport, Alaska. Volume 1. Text

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    The U.S. Air Force (USAF), under the Installation Restoration Program (IRP), has conducted a remedial investigation (RI) at Galena Airport (formerly Galena Air Force Station). Within the framework of the IRP, the objective of the RI is to evaluate past hazardous waste disposal and spill sites at Galena Airport. The RI determines the nature and extent of possible contamination, identifies site physical characteristics that may affect contaminant distribution, and defines possible migration pathways.

  19. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Simulation Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Shelton, Kevin J.; Bailey, Randall E.; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2010-01-01

    A Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the airport Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate pilot reaction to conflict events in the TMA near the airport, different alert timings for various scenarios, alerting display concepts, and directive alerting concepts. This paper gives an overview of the conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) concept, simulation study, and test results

  20. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... such food, drink, or other articles as the State determines are appropriate and desirable, except that... of the safety rest area. (e) The scenic quality of the site, its accessibility and adaptability, and... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND...

  1. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... such food, drink, or other articles as the State determines are appropriate and desirable, except that... of the safety rest area. (e) The scenic quality of the site, its accessibility and adaptability, and... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND...

  2. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... such food, drink, or other articles as the State determines are appropriate and desirable, except that... of the safety rest area. (e) The scenic quality of the site, its accessibility and adaptability, and... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND...

  3. 23 CFR 752.5 - Safety rest areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... such food, drink, or other articles as the State determines are appropriate and desirable, except that... of the safety rest area. (e) The scenic quality of the site, its accessibility and adaptability, and... HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ENVIRONMENT LANDSCAPE AND...

  4. Flight Testing of an Airport Surface Guidance, Navigation, and Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; Jones, Denise R.

    1998-01-01

    This document describes operations associated with a set of flight experiments and demonstrations using a Boeing-757-200 (B-757) research aircraft as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. To support this experiment, the B-757 performed flight and taxi operations at the Hartsfield-Atlanta International Airport (ATL) in Atlanta, GA. The B-757 was equipped with experimental displays that were designed to provide flight crews with sufficient information to enable safe, expedient surface operations in any weather condition down to a runway visual range (RVR) of 300 feet. In addition to flight deck displays and supporting equipment onboard the B-757, there was also a ground-based component of the system that provided for ground controller inputs and surveillance of airport surface movements. The integrated ground and airborne components resulted in a system that has the potential to significantly improve the safety and efficiency of airport surface movements particularly as weather conditions deteriorate. Several advanced technologies were employed to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate flight simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. Results show that while the maturity of some of the technologies does not permit immediate implementation, the operational concept is valid and the performance is more than adequate in many areas.

  5. 33 CFR 150.905 - Why are safety zones, no anchoring areas, and areas to be avoided established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Why are safety zones, no anchoring areas, and areas to be avoided established? 150.905 Section 150.905 Navigation and Navigable...: OPERATIONS Safety Zones, No Anchoring Areas, and Areas To Be Avoided § 150.905 Why are safety zones,...

  6. 33 CFR 150.905 - Why are safety zones, no anchoring areas, and areas to be avoided established?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Why are safety zones, no anchoring areas, and areas to be avoided established? 150.905 Section 150.905 Navigation and Navigable...: OPERATIONS Safety Zones, No Anchoring Areas, and Areas To Be Avoided § 150.905 Why are safety zones,...

  7. Alaska Humans Factors Safety Study: The Southern Coastal Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappell, Sheryl L.; Reynard, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At the request of the Alaska Air Carriers Association, researchers from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, at NASA Ames Research Center, conducted a study on aspects of safety in Alaskan Part 135 air taxi operations. An interview form on human factors safety issues was created by a representative team from the FAA-Alaska, NTSB-Alaska, NASA-ASRS, and representatives of the Alaska Air Carriers Association which was subsequently used in the interviews of pilots and managers. Because of the climate and operational differences, the study was broken into two geographical areas, the southern coastal areas and the northern portion of the state. This presentation addresses the southern coastal areas, specifically: Anchorage, Dillingham, King Salmon, Kodiak, Cold Bay, Juneau, and Ketchikan. The interview questions dealt with many of the potential pressures on pilots and managers associated with the daily air taxi operations in Alaska. The impact of the environmental factors such as the lack of available communication, navigation and weather information systems was evaluated. The results of this study will be used by government and industry working in Alaska. These findings will contribute important information on specific Alaska safety issues for eventual incorporation into training materials and policies that will help to assure the safe conduct of air taxi flights in Alaska.

  8. Alaska Humans Factors Safety Study: The Northern Area

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda; Reynard, William (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    At the request of the Alaska Air Carriers Association, researchers from the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System, at NASA Ames Research Center, conducted a study on aspects of safety in Alaskan Part 135 air taxi operations. An interview form on human factors safety issues was created by a representative team from the FAA-Alaska, NTSB-Alaska, NASAASRS, and representatives of the Alaska Air Carriers Association which was subsequently used in the interviews of pilots and managers. Because of the climate and operational differences, the study was broken into two geographical areas, the southern coastal areas and the northern portion of the state. This presentation addresses the northern area, specifically: Bethel, Fairbanks, Nome, Kotzebue, and Barrow. The interview questions dealt with many of the potential pressures on pilots and managers associated with the daily air taxi operations in Alaska. The impact of the environmental factors such as the lack of available communication, navigation and weather information systems was evaluated. The results of this study will be used by government and industry working in Alaska. These findings will contribute important information on specific Alaska safety issues for eventual incorporation into training materials and policies that will help to assure the safe conduct of air taxi flights in Alaska.

  9. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Wit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure. This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  10. Benchmark Airport Charges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deWit, A.; Cohn, N.

    1999-01-01

    The Netherlands Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) commissioned Hague Consulting Group (HCG) to complete a benchmark study of airport charges at twenty eight airports in Europe and around the world, based on 1996 charges. This study followed previous DGCA research on the topic but included more airports in much more detail. The main purpose of this new benchmark study was to provide insight into the levels and types of airport charges worldwide and into recent changes in airport charge policy and structure, This paper describes the 1996 analysis. It is intended that this work be repeated every year in order to follow developing trends and provide the most up-to-date information possible.

  11. Surface Movement Incidents Reported to the NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Linda J.; Hubener, Simone

    1997-01-01

    Increasing numbers of aircraft are operating on the surface of airports throughout the world. Airport operations are forecast to grow by more that 50%, by the year 2005. Airport surface movement traffic would therefore be expected to become increasingly congested. Safety of these surface operations will become a focus as airport capacity planning efforts proceed toward the future. Several past events highlight the prevailing risks experienced while moving aircraft during ground operations on runways, taxiways, and other areas at terminal, gates, and ramps. The 1994 St. Louis accident between a taxiing Cessna crossing an active runway and colliding with a landing MD-80 emphasizes the importance of a fail-safe system for airport operations. The following study explores reports of incidents occurring on an airport surface that did not escalate to an accident event. The Aviation Safety Reporting System has collected data on surface movement incidents since 1976. This study sampled the reporting data from June, 1993 through June, 1994. The coding of the data was accomplished in several categories. The categories include location of airport, phase of ground operation, weather /lighting conditions, ground conflicts, flight crew characteristics, human factor considerations, and airport environment. These comparisons and distributions of variables contributing to surface movement incidents can be invaluable to future airport planning, accident prevention efforts, and system-wide improvements.

  12. Thermal area effectiveness for future aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Happ, W. W.

    1975-01-01

    Problem areas in airport planning, design, and operations identified by a decision matrix developed to display various airport functions interfaced with facilities and an extensive literature survey were investigated. Areas considered include: site selection and growth potential; emissions and noise control/containment for airports; financial and legal aspects of airport planning, contruction, and operation; intra-airport transportation and other passenger flow facilitators; simulation and modeling for airports; guidelines for airport multimodal access planning. Results are summarized and a bibliography is included.

  13. Annoyance from light aircraft investigation carried out around four airports near Paris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    An opinion survey was carried out on residents living near four airports in the Paris, France area. An evaluation of their responses concerning noise pollution and possible expansion of airport activity is presented.

  14. Role of helicopters in airport access

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dajani, J. S.; Snyder, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    The paper briefly reviews the role of helicopter systems in the provision of airport access services and evaluates the potential for the future development of such services in major metropolitan areas in the United States. The evaluation is based on a computer simulation of potential helicopter system proposed for 20 metropolitan areas. The simulation provides two indicators that are used to gage the extent of the feasibility of developing successful systems in these areas: (1) the cost per seat mile, and (2) the break-even number of passengers, expressed as a percentage of total air travelers. It is found that a few metropolitan areas presently have the potential of marginally supporting intra-urban helicopter airport access service. The access systems offer a viable alternative for air passengers placing a high value on their time, and provides the opportunity for better integrating the air transportation service of multiple airports in a given urban region.

  15. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the... Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis § 63.112 Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area. The preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area...

  16. 10 CFR 63.112 - Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the... Criteria Preclosure Safety Analysis § 63.112 Requirements for preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area. The preclosure safety analysis of the geologic repository operations area...

  17. Art at the Airport: An Exploration of New Art Worlds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szekely, Ilona

    2012-01-01

    Many airports have transformed empty waiting spaces into mini malls, children's play areas, and displays of beautiful art, making a long wait a bit more pleasant. For the modern airport, showcasing art has become an important component, with perks including a built-in global audience, as well as the vast spaces of modern architecture. For the art…

  18. Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site Safety Assessment Document

    SciTech Connect

    Horton, K.K.; Kendall, E.W.; Brown, J.J.

    1980-02-01

    The Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Safety Assessment Document evaluates site characteristics, facilities and operating practices which contribute to the safe handling and storage/disposal of radioactive wastes at the Nevada Test Site. Physical geography, cultural factors, climate and meteorology, geology, hydrology (with emphasis on radionuclide migration), ecology, natural phenomena, and natural resources are discussed and determined to be suitable for effective containment of radionuclides. Also considered, as a separate section, are facilities and operating practices such as monitoring; storage/disposal criteria; site maintenance, equipment, and support; transportation and waste handling; and others which are adequate for the safe handling and storage/disposal of radioactive wastes. In conclusion, the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site is suitable for radioactive waste handling and storage/disposal for a maximum of twenty more years at the present rate of utilization.

  19. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320: Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. 0

    SciTech Connect

    U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  20. Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 230: Area 22 Sewage Lagoons and Corrective Action Unit 320. Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Appenzeller, Janet

    2000-04-20

    This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 230, Area 22 Sewage Lagoons, and CAU 320, Area 22 Desert Rock Airport Strainer Box, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Referred to as CAU 230/320, both CAUs are located at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and comprise two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), 22-03-01 (Sewage Lagoons) and 22-99-01 (Strainer Box). The Area 22 Sewage Lagoons site also includes a buried Imhoff Tank, sludge bed, and associated sewer piping. A September 1999 corrective action investigation identified the only contaminant of concern above preliminary action levels at this CAU (i.e., total petroleum hydrocarbons as diesel-range organics). During this same investigation, three Corrective Action Objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate exposure to subsurface debris and contaminated soil. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations in Area 22 of the NTS, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action, Alternative 2 - Closure in Place with Administrative Controls, and Alternative 3 - Excavation and Removal. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors. Alternative 3 was chosen on technical merit as the preferred alternative for CAU 230/320. This alternative was judged to meet all applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site and will eliminate potential future exposure pathways to the buried debris and contaminated soils at both of the CASs within Area 22.

  1. 30 CFR 75.1903 - Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Underground diesel fuel storage facilities and areas; construction and safety precautions. 75.1903 Section 75.1903 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Diesel-Powered Equipment...

  2. United States Air Force 611th Civil Engineer Squadron, Elmendorf AFB, Alaska. Final engineering evaluation/cost analysis: Petroleum, oil, and lubricants area, Galena Airport, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-05

    This decision document presents the selected removal action for the Installation Restoration Program (IRP) site ST005, otherwise known as the POL Tank Farm, at Galena Airport, Alaska. This decision is based on the administrative record for this site, specifically the draft Remedial Investigation Report (March 1995) and the Treatability Study Report (January 1995) (PB95-225314). The information from these documents is summarized, along with an analysis of potential removal action alternatives in the Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA).

  3. Miami International Airport stormwater NPDES plan

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, A.I.; Goldman, J.Z.; Schmidt, M.F.; Clark, E.E.

    1994-12-31

    Miami International Airport (MIA) is endeavoring to essentially double its traffic volume by the turn of the century. This is a great challenge since the site is already highly developed. Space, safety and other constraints make it difficult to implement conventional detention/retention stormwater practices. Other practices were evaluated to control stormwater quantity/quality, since some of the downstream bodies of water are flood-prone or environmentally sensitive.

  4. Worker Health and Safety: An Area of Conflicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashford, Nicholas A.

    1975-01-01

    The article outlines four basic conflicts concerning occupational health and safety, discusses the nature and dimensions of health and safety problems, examines the generation of information and its diffusion, and deals briefly with some economic issues. (Author)

  5. Annex D-200 Area Interim Storage Area Final Safety Analysis Report [FSAR] [Section 1 & 2

    SciTech Connect

    CARRELL, R D

    2002-07-16

    The 200 Area Interim Storage Area (200 Area ISA) at the Hanford Site provides for the interim storage of non-defense reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF) housed in aboveground dry cask storage systems. The 200 Area ISA is a relatively simple facility consisting of a boundary fence with gates, perimeter lighting, and concrete and gravel pads on which to place the dry storage casks. The fence supports safeguards and security and establishes a radiation protection buffer zone. The 200 Area ISA is nominally 200,000 ft{sup 2} and is located west of the Canister Storage Building (CSB). Interim storage at the 200 Area ISA is intended for a period of up to 40 years until the materials are shipped off-site to a disposal facility. This Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR) does not address removal from storage or shipment from the 200 Area ISA. Three different SNF types contained in three different dry cask storage systems are to be stored at the 200 Area ISA, as follows: (1) Fast Flux Test Facility Fuel--Fifty-three interim storage casks (ISC), each holding a core component container (CCC), will be used to store the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) SNF currently in the 400 Area. (2) Neutron Radiography Facility (NRF) TRIGA'--One Rad-Vault' container will store two DOT-6M3 containers and six NRF TRIGA casks currently stored in the 400 Area. (3) Commercial Light Water Reactor Fuel--Six International Standards Organization (ISO) containers, each holding a NAC-I cask4 with an inner commercial light water reactor (LWR) canister, will be used for commercial LWR SNF from the 300 Area. An aboveground dry cask storage location is necessary for the spent fuel because the current storage facilities are being shut down and deactivated. The spent fuel is being transferred to interim storage because there is no permanent repository storage currently available.

  6. 10 CFR Appendix A to Part 851 - Worker Safety and Health Functional Areas

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Worker Safety and Health Functional Areas A Appendix A to Part 851 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKER SAFETY AND HEALTH PROGRAM Pt. 851, App. A Appendix A to Part 851—Worker Safety and Health Functional Areas This appendix establishes the mandatory requirements for implementing the applicable...

  7. 36 CFR 13.912 - Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... firearm safety zone. 13.912 Section 13.912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve General Provisions § 13.912 Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone. What is prohibited? No one may fire a gun during the summer season in or across the Kantishna area firearm safety...

  8. 36 CFR 13.912 - Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... firearm safety zone. 13.912 Section 13.912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve General Provisions § 13.912 Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone. What is prohibited? No one may fire a gun during the summer season in or across the Kantishna area firearm safety...

  9. 36 CFR 13.912 - Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... firearm safety zone. 13.912 Section 13.912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve General Provisions § 13.912 Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone. What is prohibited? No one may fire a gun during the summer season in or across the Kantishna area firearm safety...

  10. 36 CFR 13.912 - Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... firearm safety zone. 13.912 Section 13.912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve General Provisions § 13.912 Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone. What is prohibited? No one may fire a gun during the summer season in or across the Kantishna area firearm safety...

  11. 36 CFR 13.912 - Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... firearm safety zone. 13.912 Section 13.912 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE... Preserve General Provisions § 13.912 Kantishna area summer season firearm safety zone. What is prohibited? No one may fire a gun during the summer season in or across the Kantishna area firearm safety...

  12. Airport Surface Movement Technologies: Atlanta Demonstrations Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Young, Steven D.

    1997-01-01

    A flight demonstration was conducted in August 1997 at the Hartsfield Atlanta (ATL) International Airport as part of low visibility landing and surface operations (LVLASO) research activities. This research was aimed at investigating technology to improve the safety and efficiency of aircraft movements on the surface during the operational phases of roll-out, turnoff, and taxi in any weather condition down to a runway visual range of 300 feet. The system tested at ATL was composed of airborne and ground-based components that were integrated to provide both the flight crew and controllers with supplemental information to enable safe, expedient surface operations. Experimental displays were installed on a Boeing 757-200 research aircraft in both headup and head-down formats. On the ground, an integrated system maintained surveillance of the airport surface and a controller interface provided routing and control instructions. While at ATL, the research aircraft performed a series of flight and taxi operations to show the validity of the operational concept at a major airport facility, to validate simulation findings, and to assess each of the individual technologies performance in an airport environment. The concept was demonstrated to over 100 visitors from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and the aviation community. This paper gives an overview of the LVLASO system and ATL test activities.

  13. Airport vulnerability assessment: an analytical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazarick, Richard T.

    1998-12-01

    The Airport Vulnerability Assessment Project (AVAP) is the direct result of congressional funding of recommendation 3.13 of the White House Commission on Aviation Safety and Security. This project takes a new approach to the assessment of U.S. commercial airports. AVAP uses automation, analytical methods and tools to evaluate vulnerability and risk, and to analyze cost/benefits in a more quantitative manner. This paper addresses both the process used to conduct this program, as well as a generalized look at the results, which have been achieved for the initial airport assessments. The process description covers the acquisition approach, the project structure, and a review of the various methodologies and tools being used by the sever performing organizations (Abacus Technology, Battelle, CTI, Lockwood Greene, Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center, SAIC, and Science & Engineering Associates). The tools described include ASSESS, SAM, RiskWatch, CASRAP, and AVAT. Included in the process is the utilization of an advisory panel made up predominantly of experts from the National Laboratories 9Sandia, Oak Ridge, Argonne and Brookhaven). The results portion addresses the findings and products resulting from the initial airport assessments. High level (unrestricted) summaries of the results are presented, along with initial trends in commonly recommended security improvements (countermeasures). Opportunities for the application of optics technology are identified.

  14. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papasin, Richard; Gawdiak, Yuri; Maluf, David A.; Leidich, Christopher; Tran, Peter B.

    2001-01-01

    Remote Tower Sensor Systems (RTSS) are proof-of-concept prototypes being developed by NASA/Ames Research Center (NASA/ARC) with collaboration with the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and NOAA (National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration). RTSS began with the deployment of an Airport Approach Zone Camera System that includes real-time weather observations at San Francisco International Airport. The goal of this research is to develop, deploy, and demonstrate remotely operated cameras and sensors at several major airport hubs and un-towered airports. RTSS can provide real-time weather observations of airport approach zone. RTSS will integrate and test airport sensor packages that will allow remote access to realtime airport conditions and aircraft status.

  15. Research Of Airborne Precision Spacing to Improve Airport Arrival Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmore, Bryan E.; Baxley, Brian T.; Murdoch, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-01

    In September 2004, the European Organization for the Safety of Air Navigation (EUROCONTROL) and the United States Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) signed a Memorandum of Cooperation to mutually develop, modify, test, and evaluate systems, procedures, facilities, and devices to meet the need for safe and efficient air navigation and air traffic control in the future. In the United States and Europe, these efforts are defined within the architectures of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) Program and Single European Sky Air Traffic Management Research (SESAR) Program respectively. Both programs have identified Airborne Spacing as a critical component, with Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcast (ADS-B) as a key enabler. Increased interest in reducing airport community noise and the escalating cost of aviation fuel has led to the use of Continuous Descent Arrival (CDA) procedures to reduce noise, emissions, and fuel usage compared to current procedures. To provide these operational enhancements, arrival flight paths into terminal areas are planned around continuous vertical descents that are closer to an optimum trajectory than those in use today. The profiles are designed to be near-idle descents from cruise altitude to the Final Approach Fix (FAF) and are typically without any level segments. By staying higher and faster than conventional arrivals, CDAs also save flight time for the aircraft operator. The drawback is that the variation of optimized trajectories for different types and weights of aircraft requires the Air Traffic Controller to provide more airspace around an aircraft on a CDA than on a conventional arrival procedure. This additional space decreases the throughput rate of the destination airport. Airborne self-spacing concepts have been developed to increase the throughput at high-demand airports by managing the inter-arrival spacing to be more precise and consistent using on-board guidance. It has been proposed that the

  16. Planning for New Primary Airports in the United States: A Survey of Metropolitan Planning Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NewMeyer, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Airport congestion at primary airports in major metropolitan areas was analyzed in a report prepared by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in 1990. Taking the top twenty-three most congested airports from this study, a questionnaire was prepared and sent to the metropolitan planning organizations (MPOS) for twenty of the twenty-three metropolitan areas represented in the TRB study. The questionnaire focused on the role of the MPOs in planning for new primary airports in the United States, including questions about the status of the most recent MPO airport system plan, whether or not the latest plan recommends a new primary airport, and whether or not any other entities in the MPO areas are recommending new primary airports. The results indicated that 44.4 percent of the eighteen respondent MPOs have airport system plans that are five years old or older. Also, only two of the respondent MPOs have recommended a new primary airport in their latest regional airport system plan and only one of these two is a common recommendation in the Federal Aviation Administration's National Plan of Integrated Airport System.

  17. Planning for New Primary Airports in the United States: A Survey of Metropolitan Planning Organizations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NewMyer, David A.

    1999-01-01

    Airport congestion at primary airports in major metropolitan areas was analyzed in a report prepared by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) in 1990. Taking the top twenty-three most congested airports from this study, a questionnaire was prepared and sent to the metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) for twenty of the twenty-three metropolitan areas represented in the TRB study, The questionnaire focused on the role of the MPOs in planning for new primary airports in the United States, including questions about the status of the most recent MPO airport system plan, whether or not the latest plan recommends a new primary airport, and whether or not any other entities in the MPO areas are recommending new primary airports. The results indicated that 44.4 percent of the eighteen respondent MPOs have airport system plans that are five years old or older. Also, only two of the respondent MPOs have recommended a new primary airport in their latest regional airport system plan and only one of these two is a common recommendation in the Federal Aviation Administration's National Plan of Integrated Airport System.

  18. Airport cleanup rises above problems

    SciTech Connect

    Pressly, N.; Lucas, B.; Frumer, B.; Roth, R.

    1996-07-01

    Engineers used a treatment combination to improve the in-situ bioremediation system`s efficiency in removing underground fuel leaks at JFK Airport. John F. Kennedy International Airport, in New York City, on Jamaica Bay, has an above-ground storage capacity of about 32 million gallons of jet fuel, which flow through about 50 miles of high-pressure underground pipe to the central terminal area. EAch terminal`s fuel hydrant system was the major source os subsurface contamination at the site. The site is covered by 1 to 1.5 feet of reinforced concrete pavement. Liquid phase jet fuel (free product) was measured on the water table with true thickness ranging from less than 1 inch to 1 foot. After analysis of core samples, contamination was found adsorbed to the soil with maximum levels at the water table. This article describes the clean up, covering the following topics: microbial conditions during system operation; above-ground treatment challenges: free product emulsification, presence of biomass; evaluation of enhancements: dissolved air floatation, coagulation and flocculation, retention time adjustments; conclusions.

  19. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... fluid-handling areas? 250.459 Section 250.459 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.459 What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas? You must classify drilling fluid-handling areas according...

  20. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fluid-handling areas? 250.459 Section 250.459 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.459 What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas? You must classify drilling fluid-handling areas according...

  1. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... fluid-handling areas? 250.459 Section 250.459 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL... SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.459 What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas? You must classify drilling fluid-handling areas according...

  2. Airport Simulations Using Distributed Computational Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDermott, William J.; Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Tran, Peter; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Virtual National Airspace Simulation (VNAS) will improve the safety of Air Transportation. In 2001, using simulation and information management software running over a distributed network of super-computers, researchers at NASA Ames, Glenn, and Langley Research Centers developed a working prototype of a virtual airspace. This VNAS prototype modeled daily operations of the Atlanta airport by integrating measured operational data and simulation data on up to 2,000 flights a day. The concepts and architecture developed by NASA for this prototype are integral to the National Airspace Simulation to support the development of strategies improving aviation safety, identifying precursors to component failure.

  3. 75 FR 39614 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Modesto City-County Airport, Modesto, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-09

    ...-County Airport study contains a proposed noise compatibility program comprised of actions designed for... Ceres, and Stanislaus County General Plans; Consistently designate the area northwest of the...

  4. Roadway safety in rural and small urbanized areas.

    PubMed

    Ossenbruggen, P J; Pendharkar, J; Ivan, J

    2001-07-01

    Police Accident Reports (PAR) reveal that in a 5-year period between 1993 and 1997, there were 892 crashes at 87 two lane, undivided roadway sites in Strafford County, NH, a county consisting of suburban and rural communities. The purpose of this paper is to describe: (1) logistic regression model building efforts to identify statistically significant factors that predict the probabilities of crashes and injury crashes; and (2) to use these models to perform a risk assessment of the study region. The models are functions of factors that describe a site by its land use activity, roadside design, use of traffic control devices and traffic exposure. Comparative risk assessment results show village sites to be less hazardous than residential and shopping sites. Residential and shopping sites, which are distinctly different from village sites, reside in single-purpose, land-use zones consisting mostly of single-family dwelling units and roadside shopping units with ample off-street parking. Village sites reside in multi-purpose, land-use zones permitting a combination of activities found in residential, shopping and commercial areas. They are pedestrian friendly, that is, have sidewalks and crosswalks, permit onstreet parking, have speed limits and other amenities that promote walking. Adjusted odds ratios and other comparative risk measures are used to explain why one site is more hazardous than another one. For example, the probability of a crash is two times more likely at a site without a sidewalk than at a site with one. The implications on roadway design to improve safety are discussed. PMID:11426679

  5. Safety First Checklist: Audit & Inspection Program for Children's Play Areas. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, Sally; Goltsman, Susan M.

    A playground safety checklist provides an up-to-date play area inspection system based on standards from the American Society for Testing and Materials' F 1487-95 and the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's Handbook for Public Playground Safety (1994). Guidelines address "public" playground equipment installed in parks, schools, childcare…

  6. Study Results on Knowledge Requirements for Entry-Level Airport Operations and Management Personnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilty, Stephen M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper identifies important topical knowledge areas required of individuals employed in airport operations and management positions. A total of 116 airport managers and airfield operations personnel responded to a survey that sought to identify the importance of various subject matter for entry level airport operations personnel. The results from this study add to the body of research on aviation management curriculum development and can be used to better develop university curriculum and supplemental training focused on airport management and operations. Recommendations are made for specialized airport courses within aviation management programs. Further, this study identifies for job seekers or individuals employed in entry level positions those knowledge requirements deemed important by airport managers and operations personnel at different sized airports.

  7. Social safety, self-rated general health and physical activity: changes in area crime, area safety feelings and the role of social cohesion.

    PubMed

    Ruijsbroek, Annemarie; Droomers, Mariël; Groenewegen, Peter P; Hardyns, Wim; Stronks, Karien

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether changes over time in reported area crime and perceived area safety were related to self-rated general health and physical activity (PA), in order to provide support for a causal relationship between social safety and health. Additionally, we investigated whether social cohesion protects the residents against the negative impact of unsafe areas on health and PA. Multilevel logistic regression analyses were performed on Dutch survey data, including 47,926 respondents living in 2974 areas. An increase in area level unsafety feelings between 2009 and 2011 was associated with more people reporting poor general health in 2012 in that area, but was not related to PA. Changes in reported area crime were not related to either poor general health or PA. The social cohesion in the area did not modify the effect of changes in social safety on health and PA. The results suggest that tackling feelings of unsafety in an area might contribute to the better general health of the residents. Because changes in area social safety were not associated with PA, we found no leads that such health benefits were achieved through an increase in physical activity. PMID:25463916

  8. 76 FR 39150 - Updated Noise Exposure Map Notice for Indianapolis International Airport; Indianapolis, Indiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its determination that the updated noise exposure maps submitted by the Indianapolis Airport Authority for the Indianapolis International Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act) and 14 CFR part 150 are in compliance with applicable...

  9. 78 FR 7476 - Airport Improvement Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Improvement Program AGENCY: Department of Transportation, Federal Aviation Administration. ACTION: Invitation to comment on draft FAA Order 5100-38, Airport Improvement...-38D, Airport Improvement Program Handbook. When finalized, this Order will replace Order...

  10. Coarse-to-fine wavelet-based airport detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Wang, Shuigen; Pang, Zhaofeng; Zhao, Baojun

    2015-10-01

    Airport detection on optical remote sensing images has attracted great interest in the applications of military optics scout and traffic control. However, most of the popular techniques for airport detection from optical remote sensing images have three weaknesses: 1) Due to the characteristics of optical images, the detection results are often affected by imaging conditions, like weather situation and imaging distortion; and 2) optical images contain comprehensive information of targets, so that it is difficult for extracting robust features (e.g., intensity and textural information) to represent airport area; 3) the high resolution results in large data volume, which makes real-time processing limited. Most of the previous works mainly focus on solving one of those problems, and thus, the previous methods cannot achieve the balance of performance and complexity. In this paper, we propose a novel coarse-to-fine airport detection framework to solve aforementioned three issues using wavelet coefficients. The framework includes two stages: 1) an efficient wavelet-based feature extraction is adopted for multi-scale textural feature representation, and support vector machine(SVM) is exploited for classifying and coarsely deciding airport candidate region; and then 2) refined line segment detection is used to obtain runway and landing field of airport. Finally, airport recognition is achieved by applying the fine runway positioning to the candidate regions. Experimental results show that the proposed approach outperforms the existing algorithms in terms of detection accuracy and processing efficiency.

  11. 76 FR 19515 - Public Notice for a Change in Use of Aeronautical Property at Bradford Regional Airport (BFD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-07

    ... Township, McKean County, PA. The property is currently depicted on the Airport Layout Plan of record as... area as land available for non-aeronautical use on the Airport Layout Plan (ALP). Documents reflecting... on the approved Bradford Airport Layout Plan (ALP). There is to be no sale or transfer of...

  12. Integration of seawater and grey water reuse to maximize alternative water resource for coastal areas: the case of the Hong Kong International Airport.

    PubMed

    Leung, R W K; Li, D C H; Yu, W K; Chui, H K; Lee, T O; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Chen, G H

    2012-01-01

    Development, population growth and climate change have pressurized water stress in the world. Being an urbanized coastal city, Hong Kong has adopted a dual water supply system since the 1950s for seawater toilet flushing for 80% of its 7 million inhabitants. Despite its success in saving 750,000 m(3)/day of freshwater, the saline sewage (consisting of about 20-30% of seawater) appears to have sacrificed the urban water cycle in terms of wastewater reuse and recycling. Can seawater toilet flushing be applied without affecting the urban water cycle with respect to sustainable water resource management? To address this issue, we examined the entire urban water cycle and developed an innovative water resource management system by integrating freshwater, seawater and reclaimed grey water into a sustainable, low-freshwater demand, low-energy consumption, and low-cost triple water supply (TWS) system. The applicability of this novel system has been demonstrated at the Hong Kong International Airport which reduced 52% of its freshwater demand. PMID:22258669

  13. Early Childhood Safety Checklist #3: Kitchen and Food Preparation and Storage Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aronson, Susan S.

    1994-01-01

    This checklist of 24 specific health and safety concerns dealing with kitchen and food preparation storage areas can be used by day-care staff to identify and correct hazardous conditions. Areas of concern include hand washing, refrigeration, cooking, trash disposal, cleanliness, fire safety, burn hazards, and adult supervision. (MDM)

  14. Improved low visibility forecasts at Amsterdam Airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wijngaard, J.; Vogelezang, D.; Maat, N.; van Bruggen, H.

    2009-09-01

    Accurate, reliable and unambiguous information concerning the actual and expected (low) visibility conditions at Amsterdam Airport Schiphol is very important for the available operational flow capacity. Therefore visibility forecast errors can have a negative impact on safety and operational expenses. KNMI has performed an update of the visibility forecast system in close collaboration with the main users of the forecasts (Air Traffic Control, the airport authorities and KLM airlines). This automatic forecasting system consists of a Numerical Weather Prediction Model (Hirlam) with a statistical post processing module on top of it. Output of both components is supplied to a human forecaster who issues a special probabilistic forecast bulletin. This bulletin is tailored to the specific requirements of the airport community. The improvements made to the forecast system are twofold: 1) In addition to the Meteorological Optical Range (MOR) values, RVR (Runway Visual Range) is forecasted. Since RVR depends on both MOR and the local Background Luminance, a (deterministic) statistical forecast for the latter has been developed. 2) Another improvement was achieved by calculating joint probabilities for specific combinations of visibility and cloud base height for thresholds which have direct impact on the flow capacity at the airport. The development of this new visibility forecast will be presented briefly. Also a few verification results will be shown to demonstrate the improvements made. Finally, the importance of explaining the user the use of the forecast information, in relation to their decision making process, will be discussed. For that reason, a simple guideline model to make a cost-optimal choice will be introduced.

  15. Airport Pricing Strategies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pels, Eric; Verhoef, Erik T.

    2003-01-01

    Conventional economic wisdom suggests that congestion pricing would be an appropriate response to cope with the growing congestion levels currently experienced at many airports. Several characteristics of aviation markets, however, may make naive congestion prices equal to the value of marginal travel delays a non-optimal response. This paper has developed a model of airport pricing that captures a number of these features. The model in particular reflects that airlines typically have market power and are engaged in oligopolistic competition at different sub-markets; that part of external travel delays that aircraft impose are internal to an operator and hence should not be accounted for in congestion tolls. We presented an analytical treatment for a simple bi-nodal symmetric network, which through the use of 'hyper-networks' would be readily applicable to dynamic problems (in discrete time) such as peak - off-peak differences, and some numerical exercises for the same symmetric network, which was only designed to illustrate the possible comparative static impacts of tolling, in addition to marginal equilibrium conditions as could be derived for the general model specification. Some main conclusions are that second-best optimal tolls are typically lower than what would be suggested by congestion costs alone and may even be negative, and that the toll as derived by Brueckner (2002) may not lead to an increase in total welfare. While Brueckner (2002) has made clear that congestion tolls on airports may be smaller than expected when congestion costs among aircraft are internal for a firm, our analysis adds to this that a further downward adjustment may be in order due to market power. The presence of market power (which causes prices to exceed marginal costs) may cause the pure congestion toll to be suboptimal, because the resulting decrease in demand is too high (the pure congestion tall does not take into account the decrease in consumer surplus). The various

  16. Noise zoning around airports in the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evers, F. W. R.

    1980-01-01

    The situation in the Netherlands with respect to noise abatement is dominated by a steadily increasing activity both at the political and the administrative level. A new law with respect to the designation of noise zones around existing and future airports and military airfields was enacted on 1 October 1978. A comprehensive new noise nuisance act was signed by the Queen on 16 February 1979. Both laws were accepted by Parliament unanimously. This article describes the new regulations with respect to noise zoning around airports. To maintain the habitability of the environment around airports, a demarcation will be made between the interest of the people living there and those of aviation. A noise zone will be designated outside which the noise load from aircraft movements may not exceed a fixed maximum. Within this area, where a noise load above the fixed maximum is allowed, planning and building design measures will have to be taken. Although the exclusion of new housing within the noise zone is an essential element, the area will be used for other purposes by exchanging previously intended developments with those from areas outside the zone. The Minister in charge of physical planning will issue directives concerning the contents of local development plans and will indicate how such plans, once amended, should be put into effect. Termination of the use or habitation of existing buildings is possible as well as soundproofing of buildings. The costs of measures taken to prevent undesirable new developments and measures taken to improve the existing state of affairs are borne by the central government. But a charge has to be paid by the users of the airports to defray the costs.

  17. Some New Caves under Airport in Dubrovnik

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garasic, Mladen; Garasic, Davor

    2013-04-01

    Till today six speleological sites are known to exist at the premises of the Dubrovnik Airport in Croatia. This is a highly weathered area that has been in the focus of attention of speleologists ever since the airport was built in 1961/62. Two vertical caves measuring 31 m and 10.5 m in depth were discovered at that time. These two caves are now situated right underneath the new control tower of the Dubrovnik Airport. A tunnel entrance to the cave that has been known to local population for a long time is situated in the immediate vicinity of the control tower. In late 1950's the entrance to the cave was closed with concrete because of a military airport construction, but a tunnel was built so as to enable access to the cave. The cave is about 200 meters long and it fully occupies the space underneath the concrete runways of the Dubrovnik Airport. Thanks to efforts made by speleologists in 2006-2010 the cave was adapted to enable tourist visits, and it is now the world's only tourist cave underneath an operating airport. During apron extension activities in May 2012, three additional speleological sites were discovered and examined, together with other previously discovered caves, from the standpoint of geophysics, geology and speleology. Results of exploration shows that there are several faults zones in karstified limestones. The water flow in the caverns varies depending on climatic conditions on the ground surface. Water reaches the caverns via joints directly from the ground surface (to a lesser extent) or in deeper parts via joints and paraclases from other parts of Cretaceous carbonate formations (in most cases). The weathering zone depth in the area of these speleological features, are estimated at 300 to 500 meters (included under sea levels) , and the zone of vertical circulation varies from 50 to 150 m. It is followed by the zone of horizontal circulation in which the ground water is carried via Cretaceous limestones toward submarine springs in the

  18. The systems approach to airport security: The FAA (Federal Aviation Administration)/BWI (Baltimore-Washington International) Airport demonstration project

    SciTech Connect

    Caskey, D.L.; Olascoaga, M.T.

    1990-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in designing, installing and evaluating security systems for various applications during the past 15 years. A systems approach to security that evolved from this experience was applied to aviation security for the Federal Aviation Administration. A general systems study of aviation security in the United States was concluded in 1987. One result of the study was a recommendation that an enhanced security system concept designed to meet specified objectives be demonstrated at an operational airport. Baltimore-Washington International Airport was selected as the site for the demonstration project which began in 1988 and will be completed in 1992. This article introduced the systems approach to airport security and discussed its application at Baltimore-Washington International Airport. Examples of design features that could be included in an enhanced security concept also were presented, including details of the proposed Ramps Area Intrusion Detection System (RAIDS).

  19. The Airport Gate Assignment Problem: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Ghaleb, Mageed A.; Salem, Ahmed M.

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  20. The airport gate assignment problem: a survey.

    PubMed

    Bouras, Abdelghani; Ghaleb, Mageed A; Suryahatmaja, Umar S; Salem, Ahmed M

    2014-01-01

    The airport gate assignment problem (AGAP) is one of the most important problems operations managers face daily. Many researches have been done to solve this problem and tackle its complexity. The objective of the task is assigning each flight (aircraft) to an available gate while maximizing both conveniences to passengers and the operational efficiency of airport. This objective requires a solution that provides the ability to change and update the gate assignment data on a real time basis. In this paper, we survey the state of the art of these problems and the various methods to obtain the solution. Our survey covers both theoretical and real AGAP with the description of mathematical formulations and resolution methods such as exact algorithms, heuristic algorithms, and metaheuristic algorithms. We also provide a research trend that can inspire researchers about new problems in this area. PMID:25506074

  1. Airport Careers. Aviation Careers Series. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaharevitz, Walter

    This booklet, one in a series on aviation careers, outlines the variety of careers available in airports. The first part of the booklet provides general information about careers at airports, while the main part of the booklet outlines the following nine job categories: airport director, assistant airport director, engineers, support personnel,…

  2. Auctioning Airport Slots?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruyer, Nicolas; Lenoir, Nathalie

    2003-01-01

    The current allocation of slots on congested European airports constitutes an obstacle to the effective liberalisation of air transportation undertaken in Europe. With a view to favouring effluent slot utilisation and competition, as is the goal of the Euopean commission, we propose to use a market mechanism, based on temporary" utilisation licences. In order to allocate those licences, we propose and describe an iterated combinatorial auction mechanism where a percentage of licences would be reallocated each season. A secondary market would also be set up in order to reallocate slots during a season. Since a combinatorial auction involve a complex optimisation procedure, we describe how it can be made to work in the case of auctions.

  3. 78 FR 8027 - Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone around vessels involved in Coast Guard training exercises in Hood Canal, WA. This...

  4. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... fluid-handling areas? 250.459 Section 250.459 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT... Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.459 What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas? You must classify drilling fluid-handling areas according to API RP...

  5. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria.

    PubMed

    Domanović, D; Kitchen, A; Politis, C; Panagiotopoulos, T; Bluemel, J; Van Bortel, W; Overbosch, D; Lieshout-Krikke, R; Fabra, C; Facco, G; Zeller, H

    2016-06-01

    An outbreak of locally acquired Plasmodium vivax malaria in Greece started in 2009 and peaked in 2011. Targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing transmission of malaria raised questions of how to define spatial boundaries of such an area and when to trigger any specific blood safety measures, including whether and which blood donation screening strategy to apply. To provide scientific advice the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) organised expert meetings in 2013. The outcomes of these consultations are expert opinions covering spatial targeting of blood safety measures to affected areas with ongoing local transmission of malaria and blood donation screening strategy for evidence of malaria infection in these areas. Opinions could help EU national blood safety authorities in developing a preventive strategy during malaria outbreaks. PMID:27238883

  6. Changing culture in interventional areas to promote patient safety.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Terry

    2011-03-01

    During the past decade, physicians have begun to perform an increasing number of interventional procedures in various locations outside the traditional OR. Changes in technology and practice have generated the need for a paradigm shift about perioperative practice because these interventional areas have become perioperative centers of care in which patients undergo operative and other invasive procedures. Physicians, nursing staff members, support staff members, and administrators in these interventional areas must consider perioperative practice standards, institutional policies, state practice acts, and regulatory and accreditation requirements when creating policies and procedures. Personnel must be familiar with AORN standards and recommended practices and understand the perioperative practice guidelines related to nurse staffing in invasive procedure areas. Advanced practice nurses and other leaders must use evidence-based research as the basis for policy and procedure changes. PMID:21353807

  7. 78 FR 40396 - Safety Zone; America's Cup Safety Zone and No Loitering Area, San Francisco, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... 51 W; 37 49 17 N, 122 23 51 W; thence back to the point of origin (NAD 83) and the no loitering area... no loitering area is open to all traffic for transitory purposes only. D. Regulatory Analyses We...; 37 49'17'' N, 122 23'51'' W; thence back to the point of origin (NAD 83). The no loitering area...

  8. [Ecologic safety problems on industrial enterprises of Kolsky Transpolar area].

    PubMed

    Kizeev, A N; Karnachev, I P; Zhirov, V K; Zagvozdina, O I; Nikanov, A N

    2010-01-01

    The authors presented results of ecologic and hygienic studies conducted in Kolsky nuclear power station area (Murmansk region). The studies found a trend to accumulation of summarized specific radioactivity and radionuclides of various origin in natural objects (woody plants, snow). Threshold concentrations of radionuclides in the studied objects appeared to be within the limits of normal radiation background. PMID:20560495

  9. Airport surface operations requirements analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groce, John L.; Vonbokern, Greg J.; Wray, Rick L.

    1993-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Airport Surface Operations Requirements Analysis (ASORA) study. This study was conducted in response to task 24 of NASA Contract NAS1-18027. This study is part of NASA LaRC's Low Visibility Surface Operations program, which is designed to eliminate the constraints on all-weather arrival/departure operations due to the airport/aircraft ground system. The goal of this program is to provide the capability for safe and efficient aircraft operations on the airport surface during low visibility conditions down to zero. The ASORA study objectives were to (1) develop requirements for operation on the airport surface in visibilities down to zero; (2) survey and evaluate likely technologies; (3) develop candidate concepts to meet the requirements; and (4) select the most suitable concept based on cost/benefit factors.

  10. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert at Irkutsk airport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazlova, Tatiana; Bocharnikov, Nikolai; Solonin, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    Airport operations are significantly impacted by low visibility concerned with fog. Generation of accurate and timely nowcast products is a basis of early warning automated system providing information about significant weather conditions for decision-makers. Nowcasting system MeteoExpert has been developed that provides aviation forecasters with 0-6 hour nowcasts of the weather conditions including fog and low visibility. The system has been put into operation at the airport Irkutsk since August 2014. Aim is to increase an accuracy of fog forecasts, contributing to the airport safety, efficiency and capacity improvement. Designed for operational use numerical model of atmospheric boundary layer runs with a 10-minute update cycle. An important component of the system is the use of AWOS at the airdrome and three additional automatic weather stations at fogging sites in the vicinity of the airdrome. Nowcasts are visualized on a screen of forecaster's workstation and dedicated website. Nowcasts have been verified against actual observations.

  11. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  12. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel. Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, are also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/integraal Luchthaven Competitie Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  13. Airport expansion requires major wetlands mitigation project

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the steps taken to mitigate the impact to existing wetlands by creating new wetlands in an airport expansion project. The project addressed maintaining suitable amounts of wetlands to accommodate peak waterfowl populations, moving of high voltage power transmission towers, and maintaining agricultural and hunting interests. This project involved recreating of open water areas, marsh habitat, mud flat habitat, saline meadow habitat, maintaining two existing wetlands in the area of the new wetlands without disturbing them, and improving upland habitat surrounding the new wetlands.

  14. Airport Surface Network Architecture Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Thanh C.; Eddy, Wesley M.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Lawas-Grodek, Fran; Ellis, Brenda L.

    2006-01-01

    Currently, airport surface communications are fragmented across multiple types of systems. These communication systems for airport operations at most airports today are based dedicated and separate architectures that cannot support system-wide interoperability and information sharing. The requirements placed upon the Communications, Navigation, and Surveillance (CNS) systems in airports are rapidly growing and integration is urgently needed if the future vision of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NGATS) 2025 concept are to be realized. To address this and other problems such as airport surface congestion, the Space Based Technologies Project s Surface ICNS Network Architecture team at NASA Glenn Research Center has assessed airport surface communications requirements, analyzed existing and future surface applications, and defined a set of architecture functions that will help design a scalable, reliable and flexible surface network architecture to meet the current and future needs of airport operations. This paper describes the systems approach or methodology to networking that was employed to assess airport surface communications requirements, analyze applications, and to define the surface network architecture functions as the building blocks or components of the network. The systems approach used for defining these functions is relatively new to networking. It is viewing the surface network, along with its environment (everything that the surface network interacts with or impacts), as a system. Associated with this system are sets of services that are offered by the network to the rest of the system. Therefore, the surface network is considered as part of the larger system (such as the NAS), with interactions and dependencies between the surface network and its users, applications, and devices. The surface network architecture includes components such as addressing/routing, network management, network

  15. Airport Remote Tower Sensor Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maluf, David A.; Gawdiak, Yuri; Leidichj, Christopher; Papasin, Richard; Tran, Peter B.; Bass, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Networks of video cameras, meteorological sensors, and ancillary electronic equipment are under development in collaboration among NASA Ames Research Center, the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These networks are to be established at and near airports to provide real-time information on local weather conditions that affect aircraft approaches and landings. The prototype network is an airport-approach-zone camera system (AAZCS), which has been deployed at San Francisco International Airport (SFO) and San Carlos Airport (SQL). The AAZCS includes remotely controlled color video cameras located on top of SFO and SQL air-traffic control towers. The cameras are controlled by the NOAA Center Weather Service Unit located at the Oakland Air Route Traffic Control Center and are accessible via a secure Web site. The AAZCS cameras can be zoomed and can be panned and tilted to cover a field of view 220 wide. The NOAA observer can see the sky condition as it is changing, thereby making possible a real-time evaluation of the conditions along the approach zones of SFO and SQL. The next-generation network, denoted a remote tower sensor system (RTSS), will soon be deployed at the Half Moon Bay Airport and a version of it will eventually be deployed at Los Angeles International Airport. In addition to remote control of video cameras via secure Web links, the RTSS offers realtime weather observations, remote sensing, portability, and a capability for deployment at remote and uninhabited sites. The RTSS can be used at airports that lack control towers, as well as at major airport hubs, to provide synthetic augmentation of vision for both local and remote operations under what would otherwise be conditions of low or even zero visibility.

  16. 33 CFR 150.380 - Under what circumstances may vessels operate within the safety zone or area to be avoided?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vessels operate within the safety zone or area to be avoided? 150.380 Section 150.380 Navigation and...: OPERATIONS Vessel Navigation § 150.380 Under what circumstances may vessels operate within the safety zone or area to be avoided? (a) Table 150.380(a) of this section lists both the areas within a safety...

  17. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports....

  18. 14 CFR 93.69 - Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports. 93.69 Section 93.69 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION... Anchorage, Alaska, Terminal Area § 93.69 Special requirements, Lake Campbell and Sixmile Lake Airports....

  19. 30 CFR 250.459 - What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... fluid-handling areas? 250.459 Section 250.459 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT... OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Oil and Gas Drilling Operations Drilling Fluid Requirements § 250.459 What are the safety requirements for drilling fluid-handling areas? You must classify drilling...

  20. Surveillance of ground vehicles for airport security

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Shen, Dan; Ling, Haibin; Chen, Genshe

    2014-06-01

    Future surveillance systems will work in complex and cluttered environments which require systems engineering solutions for such applications such as airport ground surface management. In this paper, we highlight the use of a L1 video tracker for monitoring activities at an airport. We present methods of information fusion, entity detection, and activity analysis using airport videos for runway detection and airport terminal events. For coordinated airport security, automated ground surveillance enhances efficient and safe maneuvers for aircraft, unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) operating within airport environments.

  1. Precise Ortho Imagery as the Source for Authoritative Airport Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, H.; Hummel, P.

    2016-06-01

    As the aviation industry moves from paper maps and charts to the digital cockpit and electronic flight bag, producers of these products need current and accurate data to ensure flight safety. FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and ICAO (International Civil Aviation Organization) require certified suppliers to follow a defined protocol to produce authoritative map data for the aerodrome. Typical airport maps have been produced to meet 5 m accuracy requirements. The new digital aviation world is moving to 1 m accuracy maps to provide better situational awareness on the aerodrome. The commercial availability of 0.5 m satellite imagery combined with accurate ground control is enabling the production of avionics certified .85 m orthophotos of airports around the globe. CompassData maintains an archive of over 400+ airports as source data to support producers of 1 m certified Aerodrome Mapping Database (AMDB) critical to flight safety and automated situational awareness. CompassData is a DO200A certified supplier of authoritative orthoimagery and attendees will learn how to utilize current airport imagery to build digital aviation mapping products.

  2. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

    2000-08-01

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  3. Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area

    SciTech Connect

    Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

    2000-08-31

    A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

  4. Operational Safety Requirements and Operating Specification Documentation compliance instrumentation matrices: 200 East Area Tank Farms

    SciTech Connect

    Story, D.R.

    1995-03-01

    This document contains information about matrices complied of instrumentation used to comply with the existing Operational Safety Requirements from Safety Analysis Reports and Operating, Specification Documentation requirements for 200 East Area Tank Farms. These matrices contain the primary instrumentation needed to comply with each OSR and/or OSD requirement as well as any backup instrumentation that may be used should the primary device be out of service. The referenced matrices are provided as attachments to this document.

  5. Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic Concept Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Denise R.; Prinzel, Lawrence J., III; Otero, Sharon D.; Barker, Glover D.

    2009-01-01

    An initial Collision Avoidance for Airport Traffic (CAAT) concept for the Terminal Maneuvering Area (TMA) was evaluated in a simulation study at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center. CAAT is being designed to enhance surface situation awareness and provide cockpit alerts of potential conflicts during runway, taxi, and low altitude air-to-air operations. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the initial concept for an aircraft-based method of conflict detection and resolution (CD&R) in the TMA focusing on conflict detection algorithms and alerting display concepts. This paper gives an overview of the CD&R concept, simulation study, and test results.

  6. 77 FR 4394 - Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Release of Airport Property: Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL AGENCY... provides notice of intent to release certain airport properties 12.4 acres at the Orlando Executive Airport, Orlando, FL from the conditions, release certain properties from all terms, conditions, reservations...

  7. Evolution of Chinese airport network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Cao, Xian-Bin; Du, Wen-Bo; Cai, Kai-Quan

    2010-09-01

    With the rapid development of the economy and the accelerated globalization process, the aviation industry plays a more and more critical role in today’s world, in both developed and developing countries. As the infrastructure of aviation industry, the airport network is one of the most important indicators of economic growth. In this paper, we investigate the evolution of the Chinese airport network (CAN) via complex network theory. It is found that although the topology of CAN has remained steady during the past few years, there are many dynamic switchings inside the network, which have changed the relative importance of airports and airlines. Moreover, we investigate the evolution of traffic flow (passengers and cargoes) on CAN. It is found that the traffic continues to grow in an exponential form and has evident seasonal fluctuations. We also found that cargo traffic and passenger traffic are positively related but the correlations are quite different for different kinds of cities.

  8. Denver airport pumping systems achieve optimal [Delta] T's

    SciTech Connect

    Mannion, G.F.; Krist, G.D. )

    1994-07-01

    This article describes how the pumping and generating systems at the new Denver Airport operate efficiently with the user loops in the buildings producing design temperature rise at all load levels. Fifteen miles east of Denver's Stapleton International Airport lies the newly completed Denver International Airport (DIA)--the world's largest and most high-tech airport. Besides being one of the largest construction projects in the works, it has many of the latest technical innovations available. Of particular interest to the HVAC industry is the design of the heating and cooling water systems. These systems provide environmental cooling and heating water to the three concourses, the airport office building, and the main terminal. The mechanical engineers for the project were all from the Denver area. The central plant design was the work of Behrent Engineering Co.; the three concourses were designed by Swanson-Rink Associates; and the main terminal and administrative office building were designed by Abeyta Engineering Consultants. The overall system concept was developed during the initial design phase by engineers from these firms, members of the DIA staff, and application engineers from several manufacturers.

  9. Implementing Solar Technologies at Airports

    SciTech Connect

    Kandt, A.; Romero, R.

    2014-07-01

    Federal agencies, such as the Department of Defense and Department of Homeland Security, as well as numerous private entities are actively pursuing the installation of solar technologies to help reduce fossil fuel energy use and associated emissions, meet sustainability goals, and create more robust or reliable operations. One potential approach identified for siting solar technologies is the installation of solar energy technologies at airports and airfields, which present a significant opportunity for hosting solar technologies due to large amounts of open land. This report focuses largely on the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA's) policies toward siting solar technologies at airports.

  10. Noise monitoring in airport communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, W. K.

    Current noise monitoring practices at airports are surveyed, with emphasis placed on extent, implementation, and rationale. It is noted that contemporary aircraft monitoring systems can perform a wide variety of functions in support of an airport noise abatement program. In establishing a system, the importance of developing the program before locating the stations and specifying functions is stressed. Among the basic design considerations are the location and type of the central station, the number and locations of the remote stations, the type of data output, the amount of data to be stored, and the operating costs.

  11. 75 FR 64393 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Chicago Executive Airport, Prospect Heights and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its findings on the noise compatibility program (NCP) submitted by the Chicago Executive Airport Board of Directors for Chicago Executive Airport under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47501 et seq. (the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act, herein referred to as ``the Act'') and 14 CFR part 150. On March 1, 2010, the FAA determined that the......

  12. Planning, Management, and Economics of Airport Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiley, J.

    1972-01-01

    An overview of the role of the airport in the transportation complex and in the community is presented. The establishment of the airport including its requirements in regional planning and the operation of the airport as a social and economic force are discussed.

  13. 75 FR 39090 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... procedures to be used in applications for exemption under the Airport Privatization Pilot Program (62 FR... Federal Aviation Administration Airport Privatization Pilot Program AGENCY: Federal Aviation... application for participation in the airport privatization pilot program received under 49 U.S.C....

  14. Developing a health and safety plan for hazardous field work in remote areas.

    PubMed

    Gochfeld, Michael; Volz, Conrad D; Burger, Joanna; Jewett, Stephen; Powers, Charles W; Friedlander, Barry

    2006-12-01

    Developing health and safety plans (HASPs) is a common feature of occupational safety and health for many workplaces. Formal HASPs are a requirement for hazardous waste work, requiring the anticipation and identification of hazards and embodying the training, equipping, and evaluation of workers. Aside from OSHA, there are relatively few manuals or examples and virtually no papers that provide practical guidance in what a HASP should cover or how to create and implement one. Moreover, existing guidance refers to spatially circumscribed worksites. This article details development of a HASP to cover field researchers and ship personnel conducting scientific research in a remote area of the world (Amchitka Island in the western Aleutians), hundreds of kilometers from the nearest emergency room. It required characterizing the kinds of work to be performed and anticipating the hazards that could be encountered. It illustrates the meshing of a general HASP with a ship safety plan, a dive safety plan, and specialized topics, including stop-work authority, rock climbing, firearms, vehicle safety, and communication strategy. Remote area operations are a growing challenge facing the profession. An expedition of this sort requires extensive planning and experienced safety personnel and cannot rely on luck to ensure the safe return of participants. PMID:17050349

  15. Target detection using radar images of an airport surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Hayden B.; Wyschogrod, Daniel; Harman, William H.; Sasiela, Richard J.; Bush, Richard W.

    1994-07-01

    Automation aids which increase the efficiency of the controller and enhance safety are being sought by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). This paper describes the target detection algorithms developed by the MIT Lincoln Laboratory as part of the airport surface traffic automation (ASTA) and runway surface safety light system (RSLS) programs sponsored by the FAA that were demonstrated at Logan International Airport in Boston, Mass. from September 1992 through December 1993. A companion paper to this conference describes the ASTA and RSLS system demonstration. Another companion paper describes the tracking algorithms. Real-time, parallel processing implementations of these surveillance algorithms are written in C++ on a Silicon Graphics Inc. Unix multiprocessor. The heavy reliance on commercial hardware, standard operating systems, object oriented design, and high-level computer languages allows a rapid transition from a research environment to a production environment.

  16. Safety plan for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval system equipment development area

    SciTech Connect

    Haney, T.J.; Jessmore, J.J.

    1995-07-01

    This plan establishes guidelines to minimize safety risks for the cooperative telerobotic retrieval project at the North Boulevard Annex (NBA). This plan has the dual purpose of minimizing safety risks to workers and visitors and of securing sensitive equipment from inadvertent damage by nonqualified personnel. This goal will be accomplished through physical control of work zones and through assigned responsibilities for project personnel. The scope of this plan is limited to establishing the working zone boundaries and entry requirements, and assigning responsibilities for project personnel. This plan does not supersede current safety organization responsibilities for the Landfill Stabilization Focus Area Transuranic (LSFA TRU) Arid outlined in the Environment, Safety, Health, and Quality Plan for the Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration Program; Tenant Manual; Idaho Falls Building Emergency Control Plan;; applicable Company Procedures; the attached Interface Agreement (Appendix A).

  17. Perceived safety of area of residence and exercise: a pan-European study.

    PubMed

    Shenassa, Edmond D; Liebhaber, Allison; Ezeamama, Amara

    2006-06-01

    The authors examined the association between perceived safety of neighborhood and likelihood of exercise among adult residents of eight European cities. Data were collected by a survey of neighborhood, housing, and health conducted by the World Health Organization in 2002 and 2003. Baseline category logistic regression models were fit to estimate the association between perceived safety and exercise, accounting for demographic and place-of-residence characteristics. Among women, perception of safety was associated with a 22% (95% confidence interval: 1.00, 1.54) and a 40% (95% confidence interval: 1.03, 1.91) elevation in the odds of occasional and frequent exercise, respectively. Among men, perception of safety was associated with a 39% elevation in the odds of occasional exercise, but there was no association with frequent exercise. If these findings were replicated, they would suggest that health promotion efforts could target residential areas without the need to identify specific persons. PMID:16571742

  18. Technology and politics: The regional airport experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Starling, J. D.; Brown, J.; Gerhardt, J. M.; Dominus, M. I.

    1976-01-01

    The findings of a comparative study of the following six regional airports were presented: Dallas/Fort Worth, Kansas City, Washington, D.C., Montreal, Tampa, and St. Louis. Each case was approached as a unique historical entity, in order to investigate common elements such as: the use of predictive models in planning, the role of symbolism to heighten dramatic effects, the roles of community and professional elites, and design flexibility. Some of the factors considered were: site selection, consolidation of airline service, accessibility, land availability and cost, safety, nuisance, and pollution constraints, economic growth, expectation of regional growth, the demand forecasting conundrum, and design decisions. The hypotheses developed include the following: the effect of political, social, and economic conflicts, the stress on large capacity and dramatic, high-technology design, projections of rapid growth to explain the need for large capital outlays.

  19. Supersonics Project - Airport Noise Tech Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bridges, James

    2010-01-01

    The Airport Noise Tech Challenge research effort under the Supersonics Project is reviewed. While the goal of "Improved supersonic jet noise models validated on innovative nozzle concepts" remains the same, the success of the research effort has caused the thrust of the research to be modified going forward in time. The main activities from FY06-10 focused on development and validation of jet noise prediction codes. This required innovative diagnostic techniques to be developed and deployed, extensive jet noise and flow databases to be created, and computational tools to be developed and validated. Furthermore, in FY09-10 systems studies commissioned by the Supersonics Project showed that viable supersonic aircraft were within reach using variable cycle engine architectures if exhaust nozzle technology could provide 3-5dB of suppression. The Project then began to focus on integrating the technologies being developed in its Tech Challenge areas to bring about successful system designs. Consequently, the Airport Noise Tech Challenge area has shifted efforts from developing jet noise prediction codes to using them to develop low-noise nozzle concepts for integration into supersonic aircraft. The new plan of research is briefly presented by technology and timelines.

  20. 33 CFR 165.1339 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... flying the Coast Guard Ensign. (b) Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations in 33 CFR Part... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. 165.1339 Section 165.1339 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1339 - Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... flying the Coast Guard Ensign. (b) Regulations. In accordance with the general regulations in 33 CFR Part... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Safety Zone; Coast Guard Exercise Area, Hood Canal, Washington. 165.1339 Section 165.1339 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST...

  2. Criticality safety evaluation for Portsmouth X-345 High-Enriched-Uranium storage area

    SciTech Connect

    Koponen, B.L.

    1993-09-20

    This report evaluates nuclear criticality safety for the High-Enriched Uranium storage area of the X-345 building of the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. The effects of loss of moderation or mass control are examined for storage units in or out of the storage receptacles. Recommendations are made for decreasing criticality hazards under some conditions of storage or handling considered to be hazardous.

  3. 75 FR 16370 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety Zones, Security Zones; Deepwater Ports in Boston Captain of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ..., 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public....O. 12777, sec. 2; E.O. 13286, sec. 34, 68 FR 10619; Department of Homeland Security Delegation No... regulated navigation areas (RNAs) and safety and security zones for deepwater liquefied natural gas...

  4. English for Airport Ground Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cutting, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article describes part of a European Commission Leonardo project that aimed to design a multimedia course for English language learners seeking work as ground staff in European airports. The structural-functional analysis of the dialogues written from the course showed that, across the four trades explored (security guards, ground handlers,…

  5. Airport Surface Delays and Causes: A Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, David K.; Goldberg, Jay; Tang, Tammy

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes FAA Program Analysis and Operations Research Service (ASD-400)/Lockheed Martin activities and findings related to airport surface delays and causes, in support of NASA Langley Research Center's Terminal Area Productivity (TAP) Program. The activities described in this report were initiated in June 1995. A preliminary report was published on September 30, 1995. The final report incorporates data collection forms filled out by traffic managers, other FAA staff, and an airline for the New York City area, some updates, data previously requested from various sources to support this analysis, and further quantification and documentation than in the preliminary report. This final report is based on data available as of April 12, 1996. This report incorporates data obtained from review and analysis of data bases and literature, discussions/interviews with engineers, air-traffic staff, other FAA technical personnel, and airline staff, site visits, and a survey on surface delays and causes. It includes analysis of delay statistics; preliminary findings and conclusions on surface movement, surface delay sources and causes, runway occupancy time (ROT), and airport characteristics impacting surface operations and delays; and site-specific data on the New York City area airports, which are the focus airports for this report.

  6. Integrating small mammal community variables into aircraft-wildlife collision management plans at Namibian airports.

    PubMed

    Hauptfleisch, Morgan L; Avenant, Nico L

    2015-11-01

    Understanding ecosystems within and around airports can help to determine the causes and possible mitigation measures for collisions between aircraft and wildlife. Small mammal communities are an important component of the semi-arid savanna ecosystems of Namibia, its productivity and its ecosystem integrity. They are also a major direct attractant for raptors at airports. The present study compared the abundance and diversity of small mammals between Namibia's 2 main airport properties (Hosea Kutako International Airport and Eros Airport), and among areas of land used for various purposes surrounding the airports. A total of 2150 small mammals (3 orders, 11 species) were captured over 4 trapping seasons. Small mammal abundance was significantly higher at the end of the growing season than during the non-growing season. The grass mowing regimen in current management plans at the airports resulted in a significant reduction of small mammal abundance at Hosea Kutako during the non-growing season only, thus indicating that annual mowing is effective but insufficient to reduce the overall abundance of mammal prey species for raptors. Small mammal numbers were significantly higher at Hosea Kutako Airport compared to the cattle and game farming land surrounding the airport, while no differences in small mammal densities or diversity were found for areas with different land uses at and surrounding Eros. The study suggests that the fence around Hosea Kutako provides a refuge for small mammals, resulting in higher densities. It also indicates that different surrounding land use practices result in altered ecosystem function and productivity, an important consideration when identifying wildlife attractants at airports. PMID:26331534

  7. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  8. 19 CFR 122.153 - Limitations on airport of entry or departure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Airport. Baltimore, Maryland Baltimore/Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport. Chicago... International Airport. Houston, Texas George Bush Intercontinental Airport. Jamaica, New York John F....

  9. INPRO Assessment of an INS in the Area of Safety of Fuel Cycle Installations

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, B.; Busurin, Y.; Depisch, F.

    2006-07-01

    INPRO has defined requirements organized in a hierarchy of Basic Principles, User Requirements and Criteria (consisting of an indicator and an acceptance limit) to be met by innovative nuclear reactor systems (INS) in six areas, namely: economics, safety, waste management, environment, proliferation resistance, and infrastructure. If an INS meets all requirements in all areas it represents a sustainable system for the supply of energy, capable of making a significant contribution to meeting the energy needs of the 21. century. Draft manuals have been developed, for each INPRO area, to provide guidance for performing an assessment of whether an INS meets the INPRO requirements in a given area. The manuals set out the information that needs to be assembled to perform an assessment and provide guidance on selecting the acceptance limits and, for a given INS, for determining the value of the indicators for comparison with the associated acceptance limits. Each manual also includes an example of a specific assessment to illustrate the guidance. This paper discusses the manual for performing an INPRO assessment in the area of safety of fuel cycle installations. The example, chosen solely for the purpose of illustrating the INPRO methodology, describes an assessment of an MOX fuel fabrication plant based on sol-gel technology and illustrates an assessment performed for an INS at an early stage of development. The safety issues and the assessment steps are presented in detail in the paper. (authors)

  10. Investigation of the impact of low cost traffic engineering measures on road safety in urban areas.

    PubMed

    Yannis, George; Kondyli, Alexandra; Georgopoulou, Xenia

    2014-01-01

    This paper investigates the impact of low cost traffic engineering measures (LCTEMs) on the improvement of road safety in urban areas. A number of such measures were considered, such as speed humps, woonerfs, raised intersections and other traffic calming measures, which have been implemented on one-way, one-lane roads in the Municipality of Neo Psychiko in the Greater Athens Area. Data were analysed using the before-and-after safety analysis methodology with large control group. The selected control group comprised of two Municipalities in the Athens Greater Area, which present similar road network and land use characteristics with the area considered. The application of the methodology showed that the total number of crashes presented a statistically significant reduction, which can be possibly attributed to the introduction of LCTEMs. This reduction concerns passenger cars and single-vehicle crashes and is possibly due to the behavioural improvement of drivers of 25 years old or more. The results of this research are very useful for the identification of the appropriate low cost traffic engineering countermeasures for road safety problems in urban areas. PMID:23651448

  11. 14 CFR 437.31 - Verification of operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... and key flight-safety event limitations. 437.31 Section 437.31 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations. (a) An applicant must identify, describe... requirements of § 437.59 to conduct any key flight-safety event so that the reusable suborbital...

  12. 14 CFR 437.31 - Verification of operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... and key flight-safety event limitations. 437.31 Section 437.31 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations. (a) An applicant must identify, describe... requirements of § 437.59 to conduct any key flight-safety event so that the reusable suborbital...

  13. 14 CFR 437.31 - Verification of operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and key flight-safety event limitations. 437.31 Section 437.31 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE... operating area containment and key flight-safety event limitations. (a) An applicant must identify, describe... requirements of § 437.59 to conduct any key flight-safety event so that the reusable suborbital...

  14. Safety analysis--200 Area Savannah River Site: Separations Area operations Building 211-H Outside Facilities. Supplement 11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-01-01

    The H-Area Outside Facilities are located in the 200-H Separations Area and are comprised of a number of processes, utilities, and services that support the separations function. Included are enriched uranium loadout, bulk chemical storage, water handling, acid recovery, general purpose evaporation, and segregated solvent facilities. In addition, services for water, electricity, and steam are provided. This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) documents an analysis of the H-Area Outside Facilities and is one of a series of documents for the Separations Area as specified in the SR Implementation Plan for DOE order 5481.1A. The primary purpose of the analysis was to demonstrate that the facility can be operated without undue risk to onsite or offsite populations, to the environment, and to operating personnel. In this report, risks are defined as the expected frequencies of accidents, multiplied by the resulting radiological consequences in person-rem. Following the summary description of facility and operations is the site evaluation including the unique features of the H-Area Outside Facilities. The facility and process design are described in Chapter 3.0 and a description of operations and their impact is given in Chapter 4.0. The accident analysis in Chapter 5.0 is followed by a list of safety related structures and systems (Chapter 6.0) and a description of the Quality Assurance program (Chapter 7.0). The accident analysis in this report focuses on estimating the risk from accidents as a result of operation of the facilities. The operations were evaluated on the basis of three considerations: potential radiological hazards, potential chemical toxicity hazards, and potential conditions uniquely different from normal industrial practice.

  15. Tephra fallout hazards at Quito International Airport (Ecuador)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volentik, Alain C. M.; Houghton, Bruce F.

    2015-06-01

    accumulations of 1 cm or greater, and the probability of tephra accumulation reaching 1 mm at UIO is 3.8-8.2 and 0.2 %, respectively. Our results show that the probabilities of tephra accumulation are mostly reduced at the new airport site with respect to OUIO (except for Reventador). The use of our probabilistic approach is not restricted to UIO, but it can certainly be applied to quantify tephra fall hazards at other airports worldwide, especially those identified as being potentially affected by future volcanic eruptions (e.g., Catania, Italy; Anchorage, USA; Kokopo, Papua New Guinea). Finally, the probabilistic method presented here can also be applied to other critical facilities (e.g., nuclear power plants) or to urban areas.

  16. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 97-0115-2718, Northwest Airlines, Wayne County Airport

    SciTech Connect

    Roegner, K.C.; Baron, S.

    1998-12-01

    On February 21, 1997, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) received a request from Northwest Airlines (NWA) customer service agents (CSAs) to investigate ongoing health complaints among NWA employees at Wayne County Airport in Detroit, Michigan. Employees expressed concern that certain symptoms such as difficulty breathing, headache, fatigue, nausea, and miscarriages may be related to the indoor environmental quality (IEQ) at the airport. The requesters identified several agents of concern including malodorous sewer gas, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and glycols. In response to the request, NIOSH investigators reviewed the results of previous IEQ investigations conducted at the airport and visited the airport on February 9-10, 1998. NIOSH investigators focused on those agents which were of the greatest concern to employees and to which exposure seemed plausible. These included measurements of CO and odors. NIOSH also sought to better understand the types and patterns of symptoms experienced by CSAs.

  17. LH2 airport requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, G. D. (Editor)

    1976-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of the facilities and equipment which will be required at a representative airport is provided so liquid hydrogen LH2 can be used as fuel in long range transport aircraft in 1995-2000. A complete facility was conceptually designed, sized to meet the projected air traffic requirement. The facility includes the liquefaction plant, LH2, storage capability, and LH2 fuel handling system. The requirements for ground support and maintenance for the LH2 fueled aircraft were analyzed. An estimate was made of capital and operating costs which might be expected for the facility. Recommendations were made for design modifications to the reference aircraft, reflecting results of the analysis of airport fuel handling requirements, and for a program of additional technology development for air terminal related items.

  18. 33 CFR 165.117 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District. 165.117 Section 165.117 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.117 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and...

  19. 33 CFR 165.117 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District. 165.117 Section 165.117 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.117 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and...

  20. 33 CFR 165.117 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District. 165.117 Section 165.117 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.117 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and...

  1. 33 CFR 165.117 - Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Safety and Security Zones: Deepwater Ports, First Coast Guard District. 165.117 Section 165.117 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS... Limited Access Areas First Coast Guard District § 165.117 Regulated Navigation Areas, Safety and...

  2. 33 CFR 165.T09-1080 - Safety Zone and Regulated Navigation Area, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Safety Zone and Regulated Navigation Area, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL. 165.T09-1080 Section 165.T09-1080 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND...

  3. 75 FR 36288 - Amended Safety Zone and Regulated Navigation Area, Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, IL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ...The Coast Guard is revising its safety zone and Regulated Navigation Area (RNA) on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Romeoville, IL. This revised temporary interim rule reduces the areas covered by the safety zone and RNA, and places additional restrictions on vessels that may transit the...

  4. 14 CFR 152.109 - Project eligibility: Airport planning.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Project eligibility: Airport planning. 152....109 Project eligibility: Airport planning. (a) Airport master planning. A proposed project for airport master planning is not approved unless— (1) The location of the existing or proposed airport is...

  5. Teaching at Logan International Airport

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Steffen

    2005-01-01

    Although Terminal C at Logan airport does not look like a classroom, for about fifty minutes on this author's way back from Boston it was for him. Like many public spaces, Logan now has a very robust Wi-Fi wireless network and this enabled him to take advantage of a departure delay to "teach" his class. In 1970 when the author started teaching,…

  6. Guides for estimating consequences in 200 Area systems and safety analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoddard, D.H.

    1982-08-31

    Safety analysts must approximate consequences from the occurrence of accidents where detailed calculations are not justified or specific data are not available. This memorandum describes recommended guides for use in estimating consequences from a range of accidents. The guides are described in words, and in diagrammatic form in figures or in tables. The guides were selected by engineering judgement after many reviews of the operating facility history recorded in the 200 Area Fault Tree Data Banks.

  7. 78 FR 22024 - Request To Release Airport Property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL), Oakley, Kansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-12

    ...), Oakley, Kansas, under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. 47107(h)(2). DATES: Comments must be received on or... 2.5 acres of airport property at the Oakley Municipal Airport (OEL) under the provisions of 49...

  8. Airport noise complaint patterns and interviews of frequent complainers at two major air carrier airports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaggers, Nicholas; Eiff, Gary

    2005-09-01

    The complex and highly sensitive topic of aircraft noise and population annoyance continues to be a major inhibitor to airport development plans. The projected growth of air travel necessitates expanded capacity at many existing airports and the development and construction of new airports in order to accommodate burgeoning traveler needs. Concerns by citizens near major airports about their economic, health, and social welfare continue to generate community and individual declarations of annoyance and concern which threaten timely solutions to airport expansion plans. A deeper understanding of the nature of these concerns is important to more effectively cope with airport expansion concerns among adjacent communities and surrounding neighbors. This study analyzed existing noise complaints registered at Denver International Airport (DEN) and Fort Lauderdale/Hollywood International Airport (FLL) in an attempt to gain greater understanding of noise complaint drivers and public annoyance. Interviews of frequent complainers were utilized in order to gain richer data concerning individual annoyance issues.

  9. Safety Analyses at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Test Reactor Area - Past to Present

    SciTech Connect

    Ambrosek, Richard Garry; Ingram, Frederick William

    1999-11-01

    Test reactors are unique in that the core configuration may change with each operating interval. The process of safety analyses for test reactors at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Test Reactor Area has evolved as the computing capabilities, software, and regulatory requirements have changed. The evaluations for experiments and the reactor have moved from measurements in a set configuration and then application to other configurations with a relatively large error to modeling in three-dimensions and explicit analyses for each experiment and operating interval. This evolution is briefly discussed for the Test Reactor Area.

  10. 14 CFR 93.343 - Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... in 49 CFR part 1562, subpart A; (2) Before departing, the pilot files an IFR or DC FRZ or DC SFRA... from College Park Airport, Potomac Airfield, or Washington Executive/Hyde Field Airport. 93.343 Section... Special Flight Rules Area § 93.343 Requirements for aircraft operations to or from College Park...