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Sample records for akari nep-deep field

  1. Clustering of the AKARI NEP deep field 24 μm selected galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarz, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Małek, K.; Matsuhara, H.; White, G. J.; Pȩpiak, A.; Goto, T.; Wada, T.; Oyabu, S.; Takagi, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Pearson, C. P.; Hanami, H.; Ishigaki, T.; Malkan, M.

    2015-10-01

    Aims: We present a method of selection of 24 μm galaxies from the AKARI north ecliptic pole (NEP) deep field down to 150 μJy and measurements of their two-point correlation function. We aim to associate various 24 μm selected galaxy populations with present day galaxies and to investigate the impact of their environment on the direction of their subsequent evolution. Methods: We discuss using of Support Vector Machines (SVM) algorithm applied to infrared photometric data to perform star-galaxy separation, in which we achieve an accuracy higher than 80%. The photometric redshift information, obtained through the CIGALE code, is used to explore the redshift dependence of the correlation function parameter (r0) as well as the linear bias evolution. This parameter relates galaxy distribution to the one of the underlying dark matter. We connect the investigated sources to their potential local descendants through a simplified model of the clustering evolution without interactions. Results: We observe two different populations of star-forming galaxies, at zmed ~ 0.25, zmed ~ 0.9. Measurements of total infrared luminosities (LTIR) show that the sample at zmed ~ 0.25 is composed mostly of local star-forming galaxies, while the sample at zmed ~ 0.9 is composed of luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with LTIR ~ 1011.62 L⊙. We find that dark halo mass is not necessarily correlated with the LTIR: for subsamples with LTIR = 1011.15 L⊙ at zmed ~ 0.7 we observe a higher clustering length (r0 = 6.21 ± 0.78[ h-1Mpc ]) than for a subsample with mean LTIR = 1011.84 L⊙ at zmed ~ 1.1 (r0 = 5.86 ± 0.69h-1Mpc). We find that galaxies at zmed ~ 0.9 can be ancestors of present day L∗ early type galaxies, which exhibit a very high r0 ~ 8h-1 Mpc.

  2. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AKARI NEP Deep Survey revised catalog (Murata+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Malek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-09-01

    This is the revised catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep survey. The survey was carried out with the InfraRed Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI which has a comprehensive mid-IR wavelength coverage in nine photometric bands at 2-24 micron. For mid-IR source extraction we used a detection image while for near-IR source detection we used optical to near-IR ground-based catalogue which is based on CFHT/MegaCam z', CFHT/WIRCam Ks and Subaru/Scam z' band detection. Here we present an AKARI source with the identification from the ground-based catalogue. For objects with multiple counterparts, all of these were listed in the catalogue with an upper limit for the AKARI flux. The magnitudes are given in the AB system. (1 data file).

  3. OT2_sserje01_2: THE HERSCHEL-AKARI NEP DEEP SURVEY: the cosmological history of stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serjeant, S.

    2011-09-01

    We propose a far-IR and submm mapping survey of the premier AKARI deep field in the North Ecliptic Pole, in PACS/SPIRE parallel mode. This is the only major deep infrared field not yet covered by Herschel guaranteed or open time key projects. The outstanding and unparalleled continuous mid-IR photometric coverage from AKARI, far better than equivalent Spitzer surveys, enables a wide range of galaxy evolution diagnostics unachievable in any other survey field (including Herschel HerMES/PEP fields), by spanning the wavelengths of redshifted PAH and silicate features and the peak energy output of AGN dust tori. The investment by AKARI in the NEP represents ~10 percent of the entire pointed observations available throughout the lifetime of AKARI. Our proposal remedies the remarkable omission from Herschel's legacy surveys of the premier extragalactic deep field from another IR space telescope. We will simultaneously identify and find photometric redshifts for the Herschel point source population, make stacking analysis detections of the galaxies which dominate the submm extragalactic background light as a function of redshift, determine the bolometric power outputs of the galaxies that dominate the submm background, compare the UV/optical/mid-IR continuum/PAH/far-IR/submm/radio star formation rate estimator in the most comprehensive IR survey data set to date, and track the coupled stellar mass assembly and black hole accretion throughout most of the history of the Universe. In OT1 the HOTAC concluded "The science output from the proposed survey will be outstanding [...] The panel was convinced that these observations should be done" but it since became clear that priority 2 time is very unlikely to be executed, so we request reclassification to priority 1.

  4. Mid-infrared luminosity function of local star-forming galaxies in the North Ecliptic Pole-Wide survey field of AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Goto, Tomotsugu; Matsuhara, Hideo; Im, Myungshin; Shim, Hyunjin; Kim, Min Gyu; Lee, Myung Gyoon

    2015-12-01

    We present mid-infrared (MIR) luminosity functions (LFs) of local (z < 0.3) star-forming (SF) galaxies in the AKARI's North Ecliptic Pole (NEP)-Wide survey field. In order to derive more accurate LF, we used spectroscopic sample only. Based on the NEP-Wide point source catalogue containing a large number of infrared (IR) sources distributed over the wide (5.4 deg2) field, we incorporated the spectroscopic redshift (z) data for ˜1790 selected targets obtained by optical follow-up surveys with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra. The AKARI's continuous 2-24 μm wavelength coverage as well as photometric data from optical u* band to near-infrared H band with the spectroscopic redshifts for our sample galaxies enable us to derive accurate spectral energy distributions (SEDs) in the MIR. We carried out SED fit analysis and employed 1/Vmax method to derive the MIR (e.g. 8, 12, and 15 μm rest-frame) LFs. We fit our 8 μm LFs to the double power-law with the power index of α = 1.53 and β = 2.85 at the break luminosity 4.95 × 109 L⊙. We made extensive comparisons with various MIR LFs from several literatures. Our results for local galaxies from the NEP region are generally consistent with other works for different fields over wide luminosity ranges. The comparisons with the results from the NEP-Deep data as well as other LFs imply the luminosity evolution from higher redshifts towards the present epoch.

  5. AKARI Observation of the Sub-degree Scale Fluctuation of the Near-infrared Background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, H. J.; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsumoto, T.; Jeong, W.-S.; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Pyo, J.

    2015-07-01

    We report spatial fluctuation analysis of the sky brightness in the near-infrared from observations toward the north ecliptic pole (NEP) by the AKARI at 2.4 and 3.2 μm. As a follow-up study of our previous work on the Monitor field of AKARI, we used NEP deep survey data, which covered a circular area of about 0.4 square degrees, in order to extend fluctuation analysis at angular scales up to 1000″. We found residual fluctuation over the estimated shot noise at larger angles than the angular scale of the Monitor field. The excess fluctuation of the NEP deep field smoothly connects with that of the Monitor field at angular scales of a few hundred arcseconds and extends without any significant variation to larger angular scales up to 1000″. By comparing excess fluctuations at two wavelengths, we confirm a blue spectral feature similar to the result of the Monitor field. We find that the result of this study is consistent with Spitzer Space Telescope observations at 3.6 μm. The origin of the excess fluctuation in the near-infrared background remains to be determined, but we could exclude zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, and unresolved faint galaxies at low redshift based on the comparison with mid- and far-infrared brightness, ground-based near-infrared images.

  6. The first source counts at 18 μm from the AKARI NEP Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, Chris P.; Serjeant, S.; Oyabu, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Goto, T.; Takagi, T.; Lee, H. M.; Im, M.; Ohyama, Y.; Kim, S. J.; Murata, K.

    2014-10-01

    We present the first galaxy counts at 18 μm using the Japanese AKARI satellite's survey at the North Ecliptic Pole (NEP), produced from the images from the NEP-Deep and NEP-Wide surveys covering 0.6 and 5.8 deg2, respectively. We describe a procedure using a point source filtering algorithm to remove background structure and a minimum variance method for our source extraction and photometry that delivers the optimum signal to noise for our extracted sources, confirming this by comparison with standard photometry methods. The final source counts are complete and reliable over three orders of magnitude in flux density, resulting in sensitivities (80 per cent completeness) of 0.15 and 0.3 mJy for the NEP-Deep and NEP-Wide surveys, respectively, a factor of 1.3 deeper than previous catalogues constructed from this field. The differential source counts exhibit a characteristic upturn from Euclidean expectations at around a milliJansky and a corresponding evolutionary bump between 0.2-0.4 mJy consistent with previous mid-infrared surveys with ISO and Spitzer at 15 and 24 μm. We compare our results with galaxy evolution models confirming the striking divergence from the non-evolving scenario. The models and observations are in broad agreement implying that the source counts are consistent with a strongly evolving population of luminous infrared galaxies at redshifts higher than unity. Integrating our source counts down to the limit of the NEP survey at the 150 μJy level we calculate that AKARI has resolved approximately 55 per cent of the 18 μm cosmic infrared background relative to the predictions of contemporary source count models.

  7. J- AND H-BAND IMAGING OF AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yiseul; Im, Myungshin; Kang, Eugene; Lee, Hyung Mok; Matsuhara, Hideo E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2014-10-01

    We present the J- and H-band source catalog covering the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole field. Filling the gap between the optical data from other follow-up observations and mid-infrared (MIR) data from AKARI, our near-infrared (NIR) data provides contiguous wavelength coverage from optical to MIR. For the J- and H-band imaging, we used the FLoridA Multi-object Imaging Near-ir Grism Observational Spectrometer on the Kitt Peak National Observatory 2.1m telescope covering a 5.1 deg{sup 2} area down to a 5σ depth of ∼21.6 mag and ∼21.3 mag (AB) for the J and H bands with an astrometric accuracy of 0.''14 and 0.''17 for 1σ in R.A. and decl. directions, respectively. We detected 208,020 sources for the J band and 203,832 sources for the H band. This NIR data is being used for studies including the analysis of the physical properties of infrared sources such as stellar mass and photometric redshifts, and will be a valuable data set for various future missions.

  8. HECTOSPEC AND HYDRA SPECTRA OF INFRARED LUMINOUS SOURCES IN THE AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shim, Hyunjin; Im, Myungshin; Jeon, Yiseul; Kim, Seong Jin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Ko, Jongwan; Karouzos, Marios; Papovich, Casey; Willmer, Christopher; Weiner, Benjamin J.

    2013-08-15

    We present spectra of 1796 sources selected in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Wide Survey field, obtained with MMT/Hectospec and WIYN/Hydra, for which we measure 1645 redshifts. We complemented the generic flux-limited spectroscopic surveys at 11 {mu}m and 15 {mu}m, with additional sources selected based on the MIR and optical colors. In MMT/Hectospec observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% for objects with R < 21.5 mag. On the other hand, in WIYN/Hydra observations, the redshift identification rates are {approx}80% at R magnitudes brighter than 19 mag. The observed spectra were classified through the visual inspection or from the line diagnostics. We identified 1128 star-forming or absorption-line-dominated galaxies, 198 Type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs), 8 Type-2 AGNs, 121 Galactic stars, and 190 spectra in unknown category due to low signal-to-noise ratio. The spectra were flux-calibrated but to an accuracy of 0.1-0.18 dex for most of the targets and worse for the remainder. We derive star formation rates (SFRs) from the mid-infrared fluxes or from the optical emission lines, showing that our sample spans an SFR range of 0.1 to a few hundred M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. We find that the extinction inferred from the difference between the IR and optical SFR increases as the IR luminosity increases but with a large scatter.

  9. OPTICAL IMAGES AND SOURCE CATALOG OF AKARI NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE WIDE SURVEY FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Jeon, Yiseul; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Induk; Ibrahimov, Mansur; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.k

    2010-09-15

    We present the source catalog and the properties of the B-, R-, and I-band images obtained to support the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Wide (NEP-Wide) survey. The NEP-Wide is an AKARI infrared imaging survey of the north ecliptic pole covering a 5.8 deg{sup 2} area over 2.5-6 {mu}m wavelengths. The optical imaging data were obtained at the Maidanak Observatory in Uzbekistan using the Seoul National University 4k x 4k Camera on the 1.5 m telescope. These images cover 4.9 deg{sup 2} where no deep optical imaging data are available. Our B-, R-, and I-band data reach the depths of {approx}23.4, {approx}23.1, and {approx}22.3 mag (AB) at 5{sigma}, respectively. The source catalog contains 96,460 objects in the R band, and the astrometric accuracy is about 0.''15 at 1{sigma} in each R.A. and decl. direction. These photometric data will be useful for many studies including identification of optical counterparts of the infrared sources detected by AKARI, analysis of their spectral energy distributions from optical through infrared, and the selection of interesting objects to understand the obscured galaxy evolution.

  10. Dust attenuation up to z ≃ 2 in the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Oi, N.; Heinis, S.; Ciesla, L.; Burgarella, D.; Matsuhara, H.; Malek, K.; Goto, T.; Malkan, M.; Marchetti, L.; Ohyama, Y.; Pearson, C.; Serjeant, S.; Miyaji, T.; Krumpe, M.; Brunner, H.

    2015-05-01

    Aims: We aim to study the evolution of dust attenuation in galaxies selected in the infrared (IR) in the redshift range in which they are known to dominate the star formation activity in the universe. The comparison with other measurements of dust attenuation in samples selected using different criteria will give us a global picture of the attenuation at work in star-forming galaxies and its evolution with redshift. Methods: We selected galaxies in the mid-IR from the deep survey of the North Ecliptic Field performed by the AKARI satellite. Using multiple filters of IRC instrument, we selected more than 4000 galaxies from their rest-frame emission at 8 μm, from z ≃ 0.2 to ~2. We built spectral energy distributions from the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) to the far-IR by adding ancillary data in the optical-near IR and from GALEX and Herschel surveys. We fit spectral energy distributions with the physically-motivated code CIGALE. We test different templates for active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and recipes for dust attenuation and estimate stellar masses, star formation rates, amount of dust attenuation, and AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity. We discuss the uncertainties affecting these estimates on a subsample of galaxies with spectroscopic redshifts. We also define a subsample of galaxies with an IR luminosity close to the characteristic IR luminosity at each redshift and study the evolution of dust attenuation of this selection representative of the bulk of the IR emission. Results: The AGN contribution to the total IR luminosity is found to be on average approximately 10%, with a slight increase with redshift. The determination of AGN contribution does not depend significantly on the assumed AGN templates except for galaxies detected in X-ray. The choice of attenuation law has a marginal impact on the determination of stellar masses and star formation rates. Dust attenuation in galaxies dominating the IR luminosity function is found to increase from z = 0

  11. Stellar mass - Metallicity Relation for AKARI-FMOS Infrared Luminous Galaxies at z~0.9

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oi, Nagisa; Matsuhara, Hideo; Goto, Tomo; Pearson, Chris; Buat, Véronique; Malkan, Matthew A.

    2015-08-01

    Heavy elements are synthesized in stars and returned into the interstellar medium reflecting the result of the past star formation activity in a galaxy. Thus, the gas phase metallicity is a key parameter in understanding the processes of the formation and the evolution of a galaxy. Many investigations of stellar mass (M*) and gas phase metallicity (Z) relation (MZ relation), which is more massive galaxies tend to be more metal-rich, and a fundamental relation (FMR), whereby galaxies define a tight surface in the three-dimensional space of M*, Z, and Star Formation Rate (SFR) have done up to z~3.3. However, this relation only holds to ultraviolet, optical, or near-infrared selected star forming galaxies. Since most of star formation activities in galaxies at high-z universe are hidden by dust, to fully understand the MZ relation and its evolution, it is critical to study dusty galaxies.Here, we investigate the MZ relation and FMR for infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 discovered by AKARI NEP-Deep survey.We estimated the M* and Z from SED fitting using the AKARI NEP-Deep data with its follow-up multi-wavelength photometric data (from X-ray to FIR) and from Halpha-[NII] emission line ratio taken by Subaru/FMOS, respectively. We found that (1) the infrared bright galaxies at z~0.9 is already chemically evolved to the level of star-forming galaxies in the local universe, and (2) the metallicity of our sample is systematically larger than that of the FMR. The results suggest a possibility that metal was actively created in dusty galaxies up to z~1, then outflow blows out dust and gas, suddenly stopping the chemical evolution and star formation activity, and the galaxies end up being what they are today.

  12. The AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor young stellar object catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tóth, L. Viktor; Marton, Gábor; Zahorecz, Sarolta; Balázs, Lajos G.; Ueno, Munetaka; Tamura, Motohide; Kawamura, Akiko; Kiss, Zoltán T.; Kitamura, Yoshimi

    2014-02-01

    We demonstrate the use of the AKARI all-sky survey photometric data in the study of galactic star formation. Our aim was to select young stellar objects (YSOs) in the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) Bright Source Catalogue. We used AKARI/FIS and Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE) data to derive mid- and far-infrared colors of YSOs. Classification schemes based on quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA) have been given for YSOs and the training catalog for QDA was the whole-sky selection of previously known YSOs (i.e., listed in the SIMBAD database). A new catalog of AKARI FIS YSO candidates including 44001 sources has been prepared; the reliability of the classification is over 90%, as tested in comparison to known YSOs. As much as 76% of our YSO candidates are from previously uncatalogued types. The vast majority of these sources are Class I and II types according to the Lada classification. The distribution of AKARI FIS YSOs is well correlated with that of the galactic ISM; local over-densities were found on infrared loops and towards the cold clumps detected by Planck.

  13. AKARI Infrared Camera Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onaka, Takashi

    2015-08-01

    The Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) is one of the closest external galaxies to the Milky Way and has been playing a central role in various fields of modern astronomy and astrophysics. We conducted an unbiased near- to mid-infrared imaging and spectroscopic survey of the LMC with the infrared satellite AKARI. An area of about 10 square degrees of the LMC was observed by five imaging bands (each centered at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron) and the low-resolution slitless prism spectroscopy mode (2--5 micron, R~20) equipped with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. Based on the data obtained in the survey, we constructed the photometric and spectroscopic catalogues of point sources in the LMC. The photometric catalogue includes about 650,000, 90,000, 49,000, 17,000, 7,000 sources at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 micron, respectively (Ita et al. 2008, PASJ, 60, 435; Kato et al. 2012, AJ, 144, 179), while the spectroscopic catalogue includes 1,757 sources (Shimonishi et al. 2013, AJ, 145, 32). Both catalogs are publicly released and available through a website (AKARI Observers Page, http://www.ir.isas.ac.jp/AKARI/Observation/). The catalog includes various infrared sources such as young stellar objects, asymptotic giant branch stars, giants/supergiants, and many other cool or dust-enshrouded stars. A large number of near-infrared spectral data, coupled with complementary broadband photometric data, allow us to investigate infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their spectral energy distributions. Combined use of the present AKARI LMC catalogues with other infrared catalogues such as SAGE and HERITAGE possesses scientific potential that can be applied to various astronomical studies. In this presentation, we report the details of the AKARI photometric and spectroscopic catalogues of the LMC.

  14. AKARI: space infrared cooled telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Salama, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    AKARI, formerly known as ASTRO-F, is the second Japanese space mission to perform infrared astronomical observations. AKARI was launched on 21 February 2006 (UT) and brought into a sun-synchronous polar orbit at an altitude of 700 km by a JAXA M-V rocket. AKARI has a telescope with a primary-mirror aperture size of 685 mm together with two focal-plane instruments on board: the Infrared Camera (IRC), which covers the spectral range 2-26 μm and the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS), which operates in the range 50-180 μm. The telescope mirrors are made of sandwich-type silicon carbide, specially developed for AKARI. The focal-plane instruments and the telescope are cooled by a unique cryogenic system that kept the telescope at 6K for 550 days with 180 l super-fluid liquid Helium (LHe) with the help of mechanical coolers on board. Despite the small telescope size, the cold environment and the state-of-the-art detectors enable very sensitive observations at infrared wavelengths. To take advantage of the characteristics of the sun-synchronous polar orbit, AKARI performed an all-sky survey during the LHe holding period in four far-infrared bands with FIS and two mid-infrared bands with IRC, which surpasses the IRAS survey made in 1983 in sensitivity, spatial resolution, and spectral coverage. AKARI also made over 5,000 pointing observations at given targets in the sky for approximately 10 min each, for deep imaging and spectroscopy from 2 to 180 μm during the LHe holding period. The LHe ran out on 26 August 2007, since which date the telescope and instrument are still kept around 40K by the mechanical cooler on board, and near-infrared imaging and spectroscopic observations with IRC are now being continued in pointing mode.

  15. Post-AGB Stars in the AKARI Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siódmiak, N.; Cox, N.; Szczerba, R.; García-Lario, P.

    2009-12-01

    Obscured by their circumstellar dusty envelopes post-AGB stars emit a large fraction of their energy in the infrared and thus, infrared sky surveys like IRAS were essential for discoveries of post-AGBs in the past. Now, with the AKARI infrared sky survey we can extend our knowledge about the late stages of stellar evolution. The long-term goal of our work is to define new photometric criteria to distinguish new post-AGB candidates from the AKARI data. We have cross-correlated the Toruń catalogue of Galactic post-AGB and related objects with the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue (for simplicity, hereafter AKARI). The scientific and technical aspects of our work are presented here as well as our plans for the future. In particular, we found that only 9 post-AGB sources were detected in all four AKARI bands. The most famous objects like: Red Rectangle, Egg Nebula, Minkowski’s Footprint belong to this group. From the technical point of view we discuss positional accuracy by comparing (mostly) 2MASS coordinates of post-AGB objects with those given by AKARI; flux reliability by comparing IRAS 60 and 100 μm fluxes with those from AKARI -N65 and AKARI -90 bands, respectively; as well as completeness of the sample as a function of the IRAS fluxes.

  16. AKARI-CAS—Online Service for AKARI All-Sky Catalogues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamauchi, C.; Fujishima, S.; Ikeda, N.; Inada, K.; Katano, M.; Kataza, H.; Makiuti, S.; Matsuzaki, K.; Takita, S.; Yamamoto, Y.; Yamamura, I.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.

    2011-07-01

    The AKARI All-Sky Catalogues are an important infrared astronomical database for next-generation astronomy that take over the IRAS catalog. We have developed an online service, AKARI Catalogue Archive Server (AKARI-CAS), for astronomers. The service includes useful and attractive search tools and visual tools. One of the new features of AKARI-CAS is cached SIMBAD/NED entries, which can match AKARI catalogs with other catalogs stored in SIMBAD or NED. To allow advanced queries to the databases, direct input of SQL is also supported. In those queries, fast dynamic cross-identification between registered catalogs is a remarkable feature. In addition, multiwavelength quick-look images are displayed in the visualization tools, which will increase the value of the service. In the construction of our service, we considered a wide variety of astronomers' requirements. As a result of our discussion, we concluded that supporting users' SQL submissions is the best solution for the requirements. Therefore, we implemented an RDBMS layer so that it covered important facilities, including the whole processing of tables. We found that PostgreSQL is the best open-source RDBMS products for such purpose, and we wrote codes for both simple and advanced searches into the SQL stored functions. To implement such stored functions for fast radial search and cross-identification with minimum cost, we applied a simple technique that is not based on HTM or HEALPix. In contrast, the online application layer became compact and was written in simple procedural PHP codes. In total, our system realizes cost-effective maintenance and enhancements.

  17. AKARI MLHES Data Set Processing with FAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasino, Rachael; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei

    2012-10-01

    The AKARI MLHES (excavating Mass Loss History in Extended dust shells of Evolved Stars) data set is the largest collection of the most sensitive far-infrared images of the cold extended circumstellar dust shells of evolved stars and it is the key to understanding the dusty mass loss phase of stellar evolution. This data will be processed with a new imaging tool kit FAST (FIS-AKARI Slow-scan Tools). This program allows for an interactive assessment of the data quality and on-the-fly corrections to the time-series data on pixel-by-pixel bases in order to manually correct glitches that would have been missed in the automated process. These corrections include: eliminate bad on-sky calibration sequences, flag out cosmic-rays and their after-effect affected time-series readings from the data stream and remove real sources from local sky-flat frames, among other options. These extra processes result in better-calibrated noise reduced images and would be by far the best detection limit among all existing far-infrared data of extended evolved star dust-shells. Suggestions to improve to the GUI interface and problems with the data visualization were recorded and plan to be implemented in subsequent versions.

  18. Asteroid Catalog Using Akari: AKARI/IRC Mid-Infrared Asteroid Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Fumihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Müller, Thomas G.; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ishiguro, Masateru; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kataza, Hirokazu; Takita, Satoshi; Oyabu, Shinki; Ueno, Munetaka; Matsuhara, Hideo; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-10-01

    We present the results of an unbiased asteroid survey in the mid-infrared wavelength region with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI. About 20% of the point source events recorded in the AKARI All-Sky Survey observations are not used for the IRC Point Source Catalog (IRC-PSC) in its production process because of a lack of multiple detection by position. Asteroids, which are moving objects on the celestial sphere, remain in these ``residual events''. We identify asteroids out of the residual events by matching them with the positions of known asteroids. For the identified asteroids, we calculate the size and albedo based on the Standard Thermal Model. Finally we have a new brand of asteroid catalog, named the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA), which contains 5120 objects, about twice as many as the IRAS asteroid catalog. The catalog objects comprise 4953 main belt asteroids, 58 near-Earth asteroids, and 109 Jovian Trojan asteroids. The catalog is publicly available via the Internet.

  19. A catalogue of AKARI FIS BSC extragalactic objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Gabor; Toth, L. Viktor; Gyorgy Balazs, Lajos

    2015-08-01

    We combined photometric data of about 70 thousand point sources from the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor Bright Source Catalogue with AllWISE catalogue data to identify galaxies. We used Quadratic Discriminant Analysis (QDA) to classify our sources. The classification was based on a 6D parameter space that contained AKARI [F65/F90], [F90/F140], [F140/F160] and WISE W1-W2 colours along with WISE W1 magnitudes and AKARI [F140] flux values. Sources were classified into 3 main objects types: YSO candidates, evolved stars and galaxies. The training samples were SIMBAD entries of the input point sources wherever an associated SIMBAD object was found within a 30 arcsecond search radius. The QDA resulted more than 5000 AKARI galaxy candidate sources. The selection was tested cross-correlating our AKARI extragalactic catalogue with the Revised IRAS-FSC Redshift Catalogue (RIFSCz). A very good match was found. A further classification attempt was also made to differentiate between extragalactic subtypes using Support Vector Machines (SVMs). The results of the various methods showed that we can confidently separate cirrus dominated objects (type 1 of RIFSCz). Some of our “galaxy candidate” sources are associated with 2MASS extended objects, and listed in the NASA Extragalactic Database so far without clear proofs of their extragalactic nature. Examples will be presented in our poster. Finally other AKARI extragalactic catalogues will be also compared to our statistical selection.

  20. Ultraluminous infrared galaxies in the AKARI all-sky survey

    SciTech Connect

    Kilerci Eser, E.; Goto, T.; Doi, Y. E-mail: doi@ea.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2014-12-10

    We present a new catalog of 118 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) and one hyperluminous infrared galaxy (HLIRG) by cross-matching the AKARI all-sky survey with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 10 (SDSS DR10) and the final data release of the Two-Degree Field Galaxy Redshift Survey. Forty of the ULIRGs and one HLIRG are new identifications. We find that ULIRGs are interacting pair galaxies or ongoing or postmergers. This is consistent with the widely accepted view: ULIRGs are major mergers of disk galaxies. We confirm the previously known positive trend between the active galactic nucleus fraction and infrared luminosity. We show that ULIRGs have a large offset from the main sequence up to z ∼ 1; their offset from the z ∼ 2 'main sequence' is relatively smaller. We find a result consistent with the previous studies showing that, compared to local star-forming SDSS galaxies of similar mass, local ULIRGs have lower oxygen abundances. We demonstrate for the first time that ULIRGs follow the fundamental metallicity relation (FMR). The scatter of ULIRGs around the FMR (0.09 dex-0.5 dex) is comparable to the scatter of z ∼ 2-3 galaxies. We provide the largest local (0.050

  1. AKARI Observations of Minor Bodies in the Outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiguchi, T.; Ootsubo, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Usui, F.; Cruikshank, D. P.; Dalle Ore, C. M.; Müller, T. G.

    2012-05-01

    Akari (Astro-F) is an infrared satellite developed by JAXA. We performed Far-IR photometric observations of 4 centaurs, 12 TNOs with FIS, and Near-IR Spectroscopic observations of a naked cometary nucleus object, P/2006 HR30 in 2-5.5 um with the IRC.

  2. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-04-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyze zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring components based on the AKARI far-IR maps. In the maps, ± 1.4°, ± 2.1°, and ± 10° asteroidal dust-band structures are detected in the 65 μm and 90 μm bands. A possible ± 17° band may also have been detected. No evident dust-band structures are identified in either the 140 μm or the 160 μm bands. By subtracting the dust-band templates constructed in this paper, we can achieve a similar level of flux calibration of the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps in the |β| < 40° region to that in the region for |β| > 40°.

  3. AKARI far-infrared maps of the zodiacal dust bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Usui, Fumihiko; Arimatsu, Ko

    2016-06-01

    Zodiacal emission is thermal emission from interplanetary dust. Its contribution to the sky brightness is non-negligible in the region near the ecliptic plane, even in the far-infrared (far-IR) wavelength regime. We analyze zodiacal emission observed by the AKARI far-IR all-sky survey, which covers 97% of the entire sky at arcminute-scale resolution in four photometric bands, with central wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. AKARI detected small-scale structures in the zodiacal dust cloud, including the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring, at far-IR wavelengths. Although the smooth component of the zodiacal emission structure in the far-IR sky can be reproduced well by models based on existing far-IR observations, previous zodiacal emission models have discrepancies in the small-scale structures compared with observations. We investigate the geometry of the small-scale dust-band structures in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and construct template maps of the asteroidal dust bands and the circumsolar ring components based on the AKARI far-IR maps. In the maps, ± 1.4°, ± 2.1°, and ± 10° asteroidal dust-band structures are detected in the 65 μm and 90 μm bands. A possible ± 17° band may also have been detected. No evident dust-band structures are identified in either the 140 μm or the 160 μm bands. By subtracting the dust-band templates constructed in this paper, we can achieve a similar level of flux calibration of the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps in the |β| < 40° region to that in the region for |β| > 40°.

  4. Radio emission from dusty galaxies observed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepiak, A.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Jurusik, W.

    2014-10-01

    We probe radio-infrared correlation for two samples of extragalactic sources from the local Universe from the AKARI All-Sky Catalogue. The first, smaller sample (1053 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue, the AKARI IRC All-Sky Survey Point Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the mid- and far-infrared by AKARI, and at the 1.4 GHz radio frequency by NRAO. The second, larger sample (13,324 objects) was constructed by the cross-correlation of only the AKARI/FIS All-Sky Survey Bright Source Catalogue and the NRAO VLA Sky Survey, i.e. it consists of sources detected in the far-infrared and radio, without a condition to be detected in the mid-infrared. Additionally, all objects in both samples were identified as galaxies in the NED and/or SIMBAD databases, and a part of them is known to host active galactic nuclei (AGNs). For the present analysis, we have restricted our samples only to sources with known redshift z. In this paper, we analyse the far-infrared-radio correlation for both of these samples. We compare the ratio of infrared and radio emission from normal star-forming dusty galaxies and AGNs in both samples. For the smaller sample we obtained =2.14 for AGNs and =2.27 for normal galaxies, while for the larger sample =2.15 for AGNs and =2.22 for normal galaxies. An average value of the slope in both samples is ~2.2, which is consistent with the previous measurements from the literature.

  5. Search for Water in Outer Main Belt Based on AKARI Asteroid Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, Fumihiko

    2012-06-01

    We propose a program to search water ice on the surface of asteroids in the outer main belt regions, which have high albedo measured with AKARI. The distribution of water in the main belt provides important information to understanding of the formation and evolution of the solar system, because water is a good indicator of temperature in the early solar nebula. The existence of water ice is a hot topic in the solar system studies today. Water ice is recently found in the outer region of the main asteroid belt and some of them are linked to the main belt comets. Brand-new albedo data brought by AKARI opens the possibility of detection of water ice on the C-type asteroids. Here we propose to make the spectroscopic observations with the Subaru telescope in the near-infrared wavelengths to detect water ice on these high-albedo C-type asteroids. Thanks to a large aperture of Subaru telescope and a high altitude of Mauna Kea, it can be only possible to observe a weak signal of the existence of water on the surface of asteroids with a certain S/N. In addition, using the imaging data taken prior to IRCS spectroscopic mode, we intend to seek any comet-like activities by investigating diffuseness of the asteroids, which can be detected by comparing the observed point-spread functions with those of field stars.

  6. AKARI Mapping of an Externally Heated Pre-Stellar Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.; Stamatellos, D.

    2009-12-01

    We present observations of the L1155C pre-stellar core in the Cepheus molecular cloud, taken using the FIS instrument on the AKARI satellite. We compare these data to SCUBA and ISOPHOT data. All of the data show a relation between the position of the emission peak and wavelength, which we interpret as a temperature gradient. We fit modified blackbody curves to the spectral energy distributions at two positions in the core and find that the core is approximately 2 K warmer at one edge than in the centre. We carry out radiative transfer modelling and include the effects from the nearby A6V star BD+67 1263. We generate a good fit to the observed data at all wavelengths, and demonstrate that the appearance of the core at different wavelengths can be explained by the observed temperature gradient, caused by BD+67 1263. Our findings illustrate very clearly that the apparent morphology of a pre-stellar core can be highly dependent on the wavelength of the observation, and that temperature gradients must be taken into account before converting images into column density distributions. This is important to note when interpreting AKARI and Spitzer data and will also be significant for Herschel data.

  7. Cryogenic silicon carbide mirrors for infrared astronomical telescopes: lessons learnt from AKARI for SPICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Enya, Keigo; Nakagawa, Takao

    2013-09-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) has good thermal conductivity, high stiffness, and a relatively low specific density, all of which are advantageous to the application to telescopes operating at cryogenic temperatures. The first Japanese astronomical infrared space mission AKARI, which was launched in 2006 February and completed the second generation all-sky survey at 6 bands from mid- to far-infrared, employed a 700mm cryogenic telescope made of specially developed SiC. It was a sandwich-type of SiC composed of a lightweight porous core and a dense chemical vapor deposition (CVD) coat to decrease the specific density and facilitate machining for achieving the required surface figure accuracy. Measurements with an interferometer of 160-mm sample mirrors demonstrated that the AKARI mirror SiC had good thermal stability down to cryogenic temperatures (~6K), while the mirror support of the compact design became the primary source of the wave-front errors of the AKARI telescope. Taking the advantage of the heritage of the AKARI telescope development as well as ESA's Herschel telescope, we are planning the next infrared space mission SPICA (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) of a 3.2m cooled telescope in participation of ESA using SiC-based materials. In this presentation, we summarize the development of AKARI SiC telescope and present the development activities of the SPICA telescope from the point of view of SiC being as the mirror material for cryogenic space infrared telescopes.

  8. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE FLUCTUATION OF THE NEAR-INFRARED BACKGROUND

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, T.; Seo, H. J.; Lee, H. M.; Jeong, W.-S.; Pyo, J.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Oyabu, S.; Wada, T.

    2011-12-01

    We report a search for fluctuations of the sky brightness toward the north ecliptic pole with the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, at 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m. We obtained circular maps with 10' diameter fields of view, which clearly show a spatial structure on the scale of a few hundred arcseconds. A power spectrum analysis shows that there is a significant excess fluctuation at angular scales larger than 100'' that cannot be explained by zodiacal light, diffuse Galactic light, shot noise of faint galaxies, or clustering of low-redshift galaxies. These results are consistent with observations at 3.6 and 4.5 {mu}m by NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope. The fluctuating component observed at large angular scales has a blue stellar spectrum which is similar to that of the spectrum of the excess isotropic emission observed with the Infrared Telescope in Space. A significant spatial correlation between wavelength bands was found, and the slopes of the linear correlations are consistent with the spectrum of the excess fluctuation. These findings indicate that the detected fluctuation could be attributed to the first stars of the universe, i.e., Population III stars. The observed fluctuation provides an important constraint on the era of the first stars.

  9. AKARI view of star formation in NGC 1313

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Kaneda, H.; Onaka, T.

    2013-06-01

    Context. In the southwest region of NGC 1313, patchy star-forming regions are found. In the neighborhood, is a giant supershell with a diameter of 3.2 kpc. However, the direct association between star-forming regions and the giant supershell is still unclear. Aims: We investigate the relation between the surface densities of the gas (Σgas) and star formation rate (ΣSFR) within the disk of NGC 1313 to obtain the spatial distribution of the star formation efficiency (SFE). Methods: NGC 1313 was observed with the Infrared Camera (IRC) and Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard AKARI in ten bands at 3.2, 4.1, 7, 11, 15, 24, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm. With these AKARI ten-band images, we spectrally decomposed the stellar and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAHs) components in addition to the cold (~20 K) and warm (~60 K) dust emission components. The cold and warm dust components were converted into the gas mass and the SFR. Results: The SFE shows high values in the regions around the giant supershell, with the highest SFE in the galaxy in the southern spiral arm region. A similar trend can be seen in the spatial distribution of the PAH abundance relative to big grains. We find a power-law dependence of the star formation rate per unit area on the column density ΣSFR proportional to ΣgasN. From a region-by-region analysis, the power-law index N for the northern spiral arm is found to be N ≃ 2.0, which is observed on typical spiral arms, whereas those for the southern spiral arm and giant supershell regions have an index of N ~ 1.6. Conclusions: The PAH abundance and the SFE show anomalously high values in regions around the giant supershell. The enhanced PAH abundance can be caused by shattering of big grains through slow shocks (40 km s-1). The power-law index N = 1.62 ± 0.06 obtained in the giant supershell region can be accounted for by the star formation scenario with collect-and-collapse in the expanding giant supershell. These pieces of evidence strongly

  10. Clustering of far-infrared galaxies in the AKARI All-Sky Survey North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Solarz, A.; Rybka, P.; Suzuki, T. L.; Pȩpiak, A.; Oyabu, S.

    2013-10-01

    We present the measurements of the angular two-point correlation function for AKARI 90-μm point sources, detected outside the Milky Way plane and other regions characterized by high Galactic extinction in the northern Galactic hemisphere, and categorized as extragalactic sources according to our far-infrared-color based criterion. Together with our previous work (Pollo et al., 2013) this is the first measurement of the large-scale angular clustering of galaxies selected in the far-infrared after IRAS. We present the first attempt to estimate the spatial clustering properties of AKARI All-Sky galaxies and we conclude that they are mostly a very nearby ( z ≤ 0.1) population of moderately clustered galaxies. We measure their correlation length r 0 ~ 4.5 h -1 Mpc, which is consistent with the assumption that the FIS AKARI All-Sky surveys observes mostly a nearby star-forming population of galaxies.

  11. Planetary Nebulae from the AKARI Far-IR All-Sky Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Fullard, A.; Tomasino, R. L.

    2015-12-01

    The far-IR all-sky mapping data obtained by the AKARI Astronomical Satellite were released to the public in January 2015. These maps are expected to provide us with further insights into our understanding of the far-IR universe for the first time since IRAS, especially for extended objects. While the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps are calibrated against the diffuse background emission and a flux correction scheme for point sources is provided, it is not necessarily obvious how one flux-corrects extended sources. Here, we briefly summarize a new flux-correction method for extended objects detected in the AKARI far-IR all-sky maps and its application to planetary nebulae.

  12. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jong Chul; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Hwang, Ho Seong

    2012-09-01

    We present the AKARI near-infrared (NIR; 2.5-5 {mu}m) spectroscopic study of 36 (ultra)luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) at z = 0.01-0.4. We measure the NIR spectral features including the strengths of 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission and hydrogen recombination lines (Br{alpha} and Br{beta}), optical depths at 3.1 and 3.4 {mu}m, and NIR continuum slope. These spectral features are used to identify optically elusive, buried active galactic nuclei (AGNs). We find that half of the (U)LIRGs optically classified as non-Seyferts show AGN signatures in their NIR spectra. Using a combined sample of (U)LIRGs with NIR spectra in the literature, we measure the contribution of buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity from the spectral energy distribution fitting to the IRAS photometry. The contribution of these buried AGNs to the infrared luminosity is 5%-10%, smaller than the typical AGN contribution of (U)LIRGs including Seyfert galaxies (10%-40%). We show that NIR continuum slopes correlate well with WISE [3.4]-[4.6] colors, which would be useful for identifying a large number of buried AGNs using the WISE data.

  13. AKARI observations of the multiphase intergalactic medium of Stephan's Quintet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2012-08-01

    Stephan's Quintet (SQ, HCG92) is a well studied compact group of galaxies with a disturbed intergalactic medium (IGM). An ``intruder'' galaxy NGC 7318b is currently colliding with the IGM at a relative velocity of 1000 km s-1, causing a large-scale shock front. We observed SQ with the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard AKARI in four far-infrared (far-IR) bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160μm. The 160μm image clearly shows an additional peak of emission overlying structure extending in the North-South direction along the shock ridge seen in the 140μm band, and in H2 and X-ray emission. Whereas most of the far-IR emission in the shocked region is from cold dust (20 K), the [CII]158μm emission - whose luminosity is comparable to that of the warm H2 gas - can significantly contribute to the single peak emission in the 160μm band. We conclude that the [CII] line emission comes from the warm H2 gas in the shock. Our result represents the first detection of shock-excited [CII] line emission.

  14. The AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS): all-sky Diffuse Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komugi, Shinya; Doi, Yasuo; Hattori, Makoto; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Otsubo, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norio; Kato, Daisuke; Nakagawa, Takao

    2011-12-01

    The infrared astronomical satellite AKARI performed an all sky survey at six infrared bands. We report here on the calibration of the all-sky image data, observed in the four long wavelength bands with the FIS instrument (AKARI Far-infrared All Sky Survey : AFASS). The preliminary image attains a calibration uncertainty and sensitivity of better than ~ 30% and ~ 10 MJy str-1, respectively, for all four bands. The point spread function (PSF) is obtained via a stacking technique. The data are shown to be useful for exploring the internal structure and dust spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of nearby galaxies.

  15. AKARI All-Sky Far-Infrared Survey: Where to Look for AGB Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybka, P.; Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    We selected a sample of 5,176 far-infrared sources from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey. Searching public databases, we identified their counterparts observed at other wavelengths and derived a method to separate stars from galaxies. The sample of stars is dominated by AGB-related objects.

  16. Albedo distribution of main-belt asteroids based on IRAS, AKARI, and WISE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usui, F.; Hasegawa, S.; Ishiguro, M.; Mueller, T.; Ootsubo, T.

    2014-07-01

    survey of the entire sky. To date, there are two other infrared astronomical satellites dedicated to all-sky survey: the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI [2], and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE; [3]). Based on the all-sky survey data obtained by IRAS, AKARI, and WISE, the largest asteroid catalogs containing size and albedo data were constructed (e.g., [4--6] and their series of papers). The total number of asteroids with size and albedo measured by these three infrared surveyors is 138,285 (more than 20 % of currently known asteroids), and size and albedo measured by all three surveyors for 1,993 commonly detected asteroids are in good agreement (within ±10 % for diameter and ±22 % for albedo at 1σ deviation level) [7]. In addition, several outstanding works have provided the taxonomic classification of asteroids (e.g., [8--11]), based on ground-based spectroscopic observations in optical and near-infrared wavelengths. Along with these taxonomic classifications, size and albedo data also contribute to our understanding of asteroid compositions. In general, the albedo of C-type asteroids is considered as low and that of S-type asteroids is high (e.g., [12]). The relationship between taxonomic types and albedo is, however, complex and type determinations cannot be made on the basis of albedo values alone. Recently albedos of C- and S-type asteroids are found to vary widely, especially for sizes smaller than several tens of km [13]. In this talk, we present the details of a data compilation including size, albedo, and taxonomy of MBAs, and discuss the compositional distribution in the main belt regions. We found that the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is found to be nearly flat, in spite of albedo transition process like space weathering. In the total distribution, on the other hand, the mean albedo value gradually decreases with increasing the semimajor axis, presumably due to the compositional mixing of

  17. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies as seen from AKARI and GALEX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Yuan, F.-T.; Buat, V.; Burgarella, D.

    2013-03-01

    An accurate estimation of the star formation-related properties of galaxies is crucial for understanding the evolution of galaxies. In galaxies, ultraviolet (UV) light emitted by recently formed massive stars is attenuated by dust, which is also produced by star formation (SF) activity, and is re-emitted at mid- and far- infrared (IR) wavelengths. In this study, we investigate the star formation rate (SFR) and dust extinction using UV and IR data. We selected local galaxies which are detected at AKARI FIS 90 μm and matched the IRAS IIFSC z 60 μm select catalog. We measured FUV and NUV flux densities from GALEX images. We examined the SF and extinction of Local galaxies using four bands of AKARI. Then, we calculated FUV and total IR luminosities, and obtained the SF luminosity, L SF, the total luminosity related to star formation activity, and the SFR. We find that in most galaxies, L SF is dominated by L dust. We also find that galaxies with higher SF activity have a higher fraction of their SF hidden by dust. In fact, the SF of galaxies with SFRs > 20 M⊙ yr-1 is almost completely hidden by dust. Our results boast a significantly higher precision with respect to previously published works, due to the use of much larger object samples from the AKARI and GALEX all sky surveys.

  18. Near to Mid-Infrared Observations of Recent Supernovae with Infrared Camera (IRC) onboard AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Usui, F.; Kaneda, H.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabé, T.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Nozawa, T.; Nomoto, K.; Tanaka, M.; Tominaga, N.; Kozasa, T.

    2009-12-01

    We present our latest results on near- to mid-infrared observations of supernovae within one year after the explosion with Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. In this project, we aim to explore the dust formation scenario in the ejecta of core-collapse supernovae. So far, observations of several recent supernovae including SN2006jc and SN2008ax have been carried out as part of the Directors Time of AKARI. At the same time, we have set about the near-infrared slit-less spectroscopic observations of nearby galaxies with high supernovae frequency in preparation for a future supernova in the AKARI Phase-3 Open Time Program “Near-infrared Slit-less Spectroscopy of Nearby Galaxies; Waiting for Supernovae Momentarily (NEWSY)” (P.I. Sakon, I.). The obtained near- to mid-infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of early-time supernovae is quite valuable and unique to investigate the properties of dust formed around the massive star and will further deepen our knowledge on the origin of dust especially in the early universe.

  19. Modeling of the Zodiacal Emission for the AKARI/IRC Mid-infrared All-sky Diffuse Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, Toru; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Nakamichi, Keichiro; Takaba, Sachi; Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Pyo, Jeonghyun; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    The zodiacal emission, which is the thermal infrared (IR) emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) in our solar system, has been studied for a long time. Nevertheless, accurate modeling of the zodiacal emission has not been successful to reproduce the all-sky spatial distribution of the zodiacal emission, especially in the mid-IR where the zodiacal emission peaks. Therefore, we aim to improve the IPD cloud model based on Kelsall et al., using the AKARI 9 and 18 μm all-sky diffuse maps. By adopting a new fitting method based on the total brightness, we have succeeded in reducing the residual levels after subtraction of the zodiacal emission from the AKARI data and thus in improving the modeling of the zodiacal emission. Comparing the AKARI and the COBE data, we confirm that the changes from the previous model to our new model are mostly due to model improvements, but not temporal variations between the AKARI and the COBE epoch, except for the position of the Earth-trailing blob. Our results suggest that the size of the smooth cloud, a dominant component in the model, is about 10% more compact than previously thought, and that the dust sizes are not large enough to emit blackbody radiation in the mid-IR. Furthermore, we detect a significant isotropically distributed IPD component, owing to an accurate baseline measurement with AKARI.

  20. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC OBSERVATIONS OF INTERSTELLAR ICES IN THE EDGE-ON STARBURST GALAXY NGC 253

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Toyoaki

    2011-04-10

    We present the spatially resolved near-infrared (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectra of the edge-on starburst galaxy NGC 253 obtained with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. Near the center of the galaxy, we clearly detect the absorption features of interstellar ices (H{sub 2}O: 3.05 {mu}m, CO{sub 2}: 4.27 {mu}m, and XCN: 4.62 {mu}m) and the emission of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) at 3.29 {mu}m and the hydrogen recombination line Br{alpha} at 4.05 {mu}m. We find that the distributions of the ices differ from those of the PAH and gas. We calculate the column densities of the ices and derive the abundance ratios of N(CO{sub 2})/N(H{sub 2}O) = 0.17 {+-} 0.05. They are similar to those obtained around the massive young stellar objects in our Galaxy (0.17 {+-} 0.03), although a much stronger interstellar radiation field and higher dust temperature are expected near the center of NGC 253.

  1. VizieR Online Data Catalog: 20cm survey of the AKARI SEP (ATCA-ADFS) (White+, 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, G. J.; Hatsukade, B.; Pearson, C.; Takagi, T.; Sedgwick, C.; Matsuura, S.; Matsuhara, H.; Serjeant, S.; Nakagawa, T.; Lee, H. M.; Oyabu, S.; Jeong, W.-S.; Shirahata, M.; Kohno, K.; Yamamura, I.; Hanami, H.; Goto, T.; Makiuti, S.; Clements, D. L.; Malek, K.; Khan, S. A.

    2013-08-01

    The AKARI ADF-S survey was primarily made in the far-infrared at wavelengths of 65, 90, 140, 160um over a 12deg2 area with the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument, with shallower mid-infrared coverage at 9, 18um using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC) instrument. In addition to the wide survey, deeper mid-infrared pointed observations, using the IRC, covering ~0.8deg2 and reaching 5σ sensitivities of 16, 16, 74, 132, 280 and 580uJy at 3.2, 4.6, 7, 11, 15, 24um were also carried out. The radio observations were collected over a 13d period in 2007 July using the ATCA operated at 1.344 and 1.432GHz. (1 data file).

  2. AKARI/FIS Mapping of the ISM-Wind Bow Shock around α Orionis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, Toshiya; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Yamamura, Issei; Nakada, Yoshikazu; Matsuura, Mikako; Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabé, Toshihiko; Fukushi, Hinako; Matsunaga, Noriyuki; Mito, Hiroyuki

    2008-12-01

    We present 10' × 50'scan maps around an M supergiant αOri at 65, 90, 140, and 160μm obtained with the AKARI Infrared Astronomy Satellite. Higher spatial resolution data with the exact analytic solution permit us to fit the de-projected shape of the stellar-wind bow shock around αOri to have a stand-off distance of 4'.8, position angle of 55° and inclination angle of 56°. The shape of the bow shock suggests that the velocity of αOri with respect to the local medium is v* = 40 nH-1/2, where nH is the hydrogen nucleus density at αOri. We found that the local medium is of nH = 1.5 to 1.9 cm-3 and the velocity of the local flow is at 11km s-1 by using the most recent astrometric solutions for αOri under the assumption that the medium local to αOri is moving away from the Orion OB 1 association. AKARI images may also reveal avortex ring due to instabilities on the surface of the bow shock, as demonstrated by numerical models. This research exemplifies the potential of AKARI All-Sky data as well as follow-up observations with Herschel Space Telescope and Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy for this avenue of research in revealing the nature of the interaction between the stellar wind and the interstellar medium.

  3. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinzeng; Huang, Yafang

    2015-08-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excessive emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define here stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined 2MASS and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution on the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined for exploring the nature and

  4. Efficient Selection and Classification of Infrared Excess Emission Stars Based on AKARI and 2MASS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ya Fang; Zeng Li, Jin; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-01

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  5. EFFICIENT SELECTION AND CLASSIFICATION OF INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION STARS BASED ON AKARI AND 2MASS DATA

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Yafang; Li Jinzeng; Rector, Travis A.; Mallamaci, Carlos C.

    2013-05-15

    The selection of young stellar objects (YSOs) based on excess emission in the infrared is easily contaminated by post-main-sequence stars and various types of emission line stars with similar properties. We define in this paper stringent criteria for an efficient selection and classification of stellar sources with infrared excess emission based on combined Two Micron All Sky Survey (2MASS) and AKARI colors. First of all, bright dwarfs and giants with known spectral types were selected from the Hipparcos Catalogue and cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI Point Source Catalogues to produce the main-sequence and the post-main-sequence tracks, which appear as expected as tight tracks with very small dispersion. However, several of the main-sequence stars indicate excess emission in the color space. Further investigations based on the SIMBAD data help to clarify their nature as classical Be stars, which are found to be located in a well isolated region on each of the color-color (C-C) diagrams. Several kinds of contaminants were then removed based on their distribution in the C-C diagrams. A test sample of Herbig Ae/Be stars and classical T Tauri stars were cross-identified with the 2MASS and AKARI catalogs to define the loci of YSOs with different masses on the C-C diagrams. Well classified Class I and Class II sources were taken as a second test sample to discriminate between various types of YSOs at possibly different evolutionary stages. This helped to define the loci of different types of YSOs and a set of criteria for selecting YSOs based on their colors in the near- and mid-infrared. Candidate YSOs toward IC 1396 indicating excess emission in the near-infrared were employed to verify the validity of the new source selection criteria defined based on C-C diagrams compiled with the 2MASS and AKARI data. Optical spectroscopy and spectral energy distributions of the IC 1396 sample yield a clear identification of the YSOs and further confirm the criteria defined

  6. Hunting for Long-lived Protoplanetary Disks Observed with AKARI/FIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiong, LIU; Yao, LIU

    2015-10-01

    Twenty-one YSO (Young Stellar Object) candidates nearby the solar system have been identified through cross-correlating Hipparcos (High Precision Parallax Collecting Satellite) catalog with the AKARI/FIS YSO catalog, and the reliability is over 90%. The central objects cover the spectral types from B to M. The Hipparcos's accurate measurements of trigonometric parallaxes enable us to place these objects in the H-R diagram, which can be used to determine their ages by the isochrones of theoretical evolution trajectories. In this sample, two YSOs have been found to be older than 10 Myr. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) from optical to infrared show that the two YSOs belong to the type II YSOs with protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, from the SED fitting, the ages of these two sources are constrained to be (14.1±4.2) Myr and (16.8±4.4) Myr, respectively. Therefore, two YSO candidates with long-lived protoplanetary disks have been detected in the AKARI/FIS data. The long-lived protoplanetary disks are closely related with the planet formation, and they are ideal birthplaces of protoplanets.

  7. VizieR Online Data Catalog: AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor YSO catalog (Toth+, 2014)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth, L. V.; Marton, G.; Zahorecz, S.; Balazs, L. G.; Ueno, M.; Tamura, M.; Kawamura, A.; Kiss, Z. T.; Kitamura, Y.

    2014-01-01

    AKARI FSC BSC data was combined with mid-IR photometric data from the WISE All-Sky Data Release. Classification was made with quadratic discriminant analysis based on the mid- and far-IR colours and brightness values. 44001 sources were classified as young stellar object candidate. For each candidate AKARI FIS ID, celestial position (RA2000, DEC2000), WISE magnitudes measured in passbands centered at 3.4, 4.6, 12 and 22um (W1, W2, W3, W4), their corresponding errors (eW1, eW2, eW3, eW4), FIS flux densities measured in passbands with nominal wavelengths of 65, 90, 140 and 160um (F65, F90, F140, F160) and the corresponding flux qualities (F_QUAL), the probability of being YSO, SIMBAD main type and subtypes, the angular distance between the FIS source and the matching SIMBAD object and the SIMBAD ID of the matching object are listed. (1 data file).

  8. Hunting for Long-lived Protoplanetary Disks Observed with AKARI/FIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Q.; Liu, Y.

    2015-03-01

    Twenty-one YSOs (Young Stellar Objects) in the solar neighbor have been identified through cross-correlating Hipparcos catalog with AKARI/FIS YSO catalog. The reliability of the match is over 90%. The central objects cover spectral types from B to M. The Hipparcos parallaxes enable us to place the objects in the H-R diagram, which can be used to determine their ages by isochrones. Among these objects, two YSOs have been found whose ages are larger than 10 Myr. The optical to infrared spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of these two YSOs are consistent with those of type II YSOs with protoplanetary disks. Furthermore, from the SED fitting, the ages of these two sources are constrained to (14.1±4.2) Myr and (16.8±4.4) Myr, respectively. Therefore, two YSO candidates with long-lived protoplanetary disks have been detected in AKARI/FIS. The presence of long-lived protoplanetary disks has significant implications for the formation of planets and their host stars.

  9. FAR-INFRARED EMISSION FROM THE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM IN STEPHAN'S QUINTET REVEALED BY AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Toyoaki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Onaka, Takashi; Kitayama, Tetsu

    2011-04-10

    Stephan's Quintet (SQ, HCG92) was observed with the Far-Infrared Surveyor on board AKARI in four far-infrared (IR) bands at 65, 90, 140, and 160 {mu}m. The AKARI four-band images show far-IR emission in the intergalactic medium of SQ. In particular, the 160 {mu}m band image shows single peak emission in addition to the structure extending in the north-south direction along the shock ridge as seen in the 140 {mu}m band, H{sub 2} emission, and X-ray emission. Whereas most of the far-IR emission in the shocked region comes from the cold dust component, shock-powered [C II]158 {mu}m emission can significantly contribute to the emission in the 160 {mu}m band that shows a single peak at the shocked region. In the shocked region, the observed gas-to-dust mass ratio is in agreement with the Galactic one. The color temperature of the cold dust component ({approx}20 K) is lower than that in surrounding galaxies ({approx}30 K). We discuss a possible origin of the intergalactic dust emission.

  10. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. II. THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi; Kato, Daisuke; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Kawamura, Akiko; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2013-02-01

    We performed a near-infrared spectroscopic survey toward an area of {approx}10 deg{sup 2} of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) with the infrared satellite AKARI. Observations were carried out as part of the AKARI Large-area Survey of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LSLMC). The slitless multi-object spectroscopic capability of the AKARI/IRC enabled us to obtain low-resolution (R {approx} 20) spectra in 2-5 {mu}m for a large number of point sources in the LMC. As a result of the survey, we extracted about 2000 infrared spectra of point sources. The data are organized as a near-infrared spectroscopic catalog. The catalog includes various infrared objects such as young stellar objects (YSOs), asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, supergiants, and so on. It is shown that 97% of the catalog sources have corresponding photometric data in the wavelength range from 1.2 to 11 {mu}m, and 67% of the sources also have photometric data up to 24 {mu}m. The catalog allows us to investigate near-infrared spectral features of sources by comparison with their infrared spectral energy distributions. In addition, it is estimated that about 10% of the catalog sources are observed at more than two different epochs. This enables us to study a spectroscopic variability of sources by using the present catalog. Initial results of source classifications for the LSLMC samples are presented. We classified 659 LSLMC spectra based on their near-infrared spectral features by visual inspection. As a result, it is shown that the present catalog includes 7 YSOs, 160 C-rich AGBs, 8 C-rich AGB candidates, 85 O-rich AGBs, 122 blue and yellow supergiants, 150 red super giants, and 128 unclassified sources. Distributions of the classified sources on the color-color and color-magnitude diagrams are discussed in the text. Continuous wavelength coverage and high spectroscopic sensitivity in 2-5 {mu}m can only be achieved by space observations. This is an unprecedented large-scale spectroscopic survey toward the

  11. AKARI observations of dust processing in merger galaxies: NGC2782 and NGC7727

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onaka, Takashi; Nakamura, Tomohiko; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Mori, Tamami; Wu, Ronin; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2015-08-01

    Dust grains are the major reservoir of heavy elements and play significant roles in the thermal balance and chemistry in the interstellar medium. Where dust grains are formed and how they evolve in the ISM are one of the key issues for the understanding of the material evolution in the Universe. Although theoretical studies have been made, very little is so far known observationally about the lifecycle of dust grains in the ISM and that associated with Galactic scale events. The lifecycle of very small carbonaceous grains that contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) or PAH-like atomic groups are of particular interest because they emit distinct band emission in the near- to mid-infrared region and they are thought to be most vulnerable to environmental conditions. PAHs may be formed in carbon-rich stars, while recent AKARI observations suggest that they may be formed by fragmentation of large carbonaceous grains in shocks in a supernova remnant or a galactic wind (Onaka et al. 2010, A&A, 514, 15; Seok et al. 2012, ApJ, 744, 160).Here we report results of AKARI observations of two mergers. NGC2782 (Arp 215) and NGC7727 (Arp 222). NGC2782 is a merger of 200Myr old. It shows a very long western tail of HI gas by a tidal interaction and the eastern tail that consists mainly of stellar components without an appreciable amount of gas and is thought to be a relic of the colliding low-mass galaxy whose gas component has been stripped off Smith 1994, AJ, 107, 1695. We found significant emission at the 7 μm band of the IRC onboard AKARI, which must come from PAH 6.2 and 7.7 μm bands, in the eastern tail. Based on dust model fitting, we found a low abundance of ~10nm size dust despite of the presence of PAHs, suggesting that PAHs may be formed from fragmentation of ~10nm carbonaceous dust grains. NGC7727 is a 1.2Gyr old merger and shows a SED similar to the NGC2782 tail in the northern tail of the merger event product, suggesting also the formation of PAHs from

  12. The AKARI/IRC mid-infrared all-sky survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, D.; Onaka, T.; Kataza, H.; Salama, A.; Alfageme, C.; Cassatella, A.; Cox, N.; García-Lario, P.; Stephenson, C.; Cohen, M.; Fujishiro, N.; Fujiwara, H.; Hasegawa, S.; Ita, Y.; Kim, W.; Matsuhara, H.; Murakami, H.; Müller, T. G.; Nakagawa, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Oyabu, S.; Pyo, J.; Sakon, I.; Shibai, H.; Takita, S.; Tanabé, T.; Uemizu, K.; Ueno, M.; Usui, F.; Wada, T.; Watarai, H.; Yamamura, I.; Yamauchi, C.

    2010-05-01

    Context. AKARI is the first Japanese astronomical satellite dedicated to infrared astronomy. One of the main purposes of AKARI is the all-sky survey performed with six infrared bands between 9 μm and 200 μm during the period from 2006 May 6 to 2007 August 28. In this paper, we present the mid-infrared part (9 μm and 18 μm bands) of the survey carried out with one of the on-board instruments, the infrared camera (IRC). Aims: We present unprecedented observational results of the 9 μm and 18 μm AKARI all-sky survey and detail the operation and data processing leading to the point source detection and measurements. Methods: The raw data are processed to produce small images for every scan, and the point sources candidates are derived above the 5σ noise level per single scan. The celestial coordinates and fluxes of the events are determined statistically and the reliability of their detections is secured through multiple detections of the same source within milli-seconds, hours, and months from each other. Results: The sky coverage is more than 90% for both bands. A total of 877 091 sources (851 189 for 9 μm, 195 893 for 18 μm) are confirmed and included in the current release of the point source catalog. The detection limit for point sources is 50 mJy and 90 mJy for the 9 μm and 18 μm bands, respectively. The position accuracy is estimated to be better than 2''. Uncertainties in the in-flight absolute flux calibration are estimated to be 3% for the 9 μm band and 4% for the 18 μm band. The coordinates and fluxes of detected sources in this survey are also compared with those of the IRAS survey and are found to be statistically consistent. Catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/514/A1

  13. Extended Dust Shell of the Carbon Star U Hya Revealed by AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueta, T.; Izumiura, H.; Yamamura, I.; Matsunaga, N.; Ita, Y.; Matsuura, M.; Nakada, Y.; Fukushi, H.; Mito, H.; Tanabé, T.; Hashimoto, O.

    2011-09-01

    We have observed the carbon-rich AGB star U Hya in the far-infrared (FIR) at 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm simultaneously, using the slow-scan observing mode of the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) aboard the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. Our aim is to probe the mass-loss history of U Hya in the last ˜104 years by investigating the distribution of cold dust in the extended circumstellar envelope using FIR maps at high spatial resolution. The observed hollow shell and model calculations suggest that the shell was formed as a direct consequence of a thermal pulse, two-wind interactions, a termination shock, or some combination of these processes.

  14. AKARI/AcuA PHYSICAL STUDIES OF THE CYBELE ASTEROID FAMILY

    SciTech Connect

    Kasuga, Toshihiro; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Kuroda, Daisuke; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Mueller, Thomas G.; Ishiguro, Masateru

    2012-06-15

    We present a study of 107 Cybele asteroids based on the archival database 'Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA)' taken by the Infrared Astronomical Satellite. The database provides diameters D > 10 km, geometric albedos, and taxonomic information (75%) of the Cybeles. We find taxonomic diversity (mainly C-, D-, and P-type) in the population of 78 small Cybeles with diameters 10 km 80 km are mostly classified as C- or P-types (90%), with a power-law index of 2.39 {+-} 0.18. The total mass of Cybele asteroids is estimated to be {approx}10{sup -5} M{sub Earth}. We also discuss the origin and formation process of the Cybele asteroid family.

  15. INTERSTELLAR DUST PROPERTIES OF M51 FROM AKARI MID-INFRARED IMAGES

    SciTech Connect

    Egusa, Fumi; Wada, Takehiko; Arimatsu, Ko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Sakon, Itsuki; Onaka, Takashi

    2013-11-20

    Using mid-infrared (MIR) images of four photometric bands of the Infrared Camera on board the AKARI satellite, S7 (7 μm), S11 (11 μm), L15 (15 μm), and L24 (24 μm), we investigate the interstellar dust properties of the nearby pair of galaxies M51 with respect to their spiral arm structure. The arm and interarm regions are defined based on a spatially filtered stellar component model image and we measure the arm/interarm contrast for each band. The contrast is lowest in the S11 image, which we interpret as meaning that among the four AKARI MIR bands, the S11 image best correlates with the spatial distribution of dust grains including colder components. On the other hand, the L24 image, with the highest contrast, traces warmer dust heated by star forming activity. The surface brightness ratio between the bands, i.e., color, is measured over the disk of the main galaxy, M51a, at 300 pc resolution. We find that the distribution of S7/S11 is smooth and traces the global spiral arm pattern well while L15/S11 and L24/S11 peak at individual H II regions. This result indicates that the ionization state of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is related to the spiral structure. Comparison with observational data and dust models also supports the importance of the variation in the PAH ionization state within the M51a disk. However, the mechanism driving this variation is not yet clear from the currently available datasets. Another suggestion from the comparison with the models is that the PAH fraction in the total dust mass is higher than previously estimated.

  16. Widely Extended [O III] 88μm Line Emission around the 30 Doradus Region Revealed with AKARI FIS-FTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawada, Mitsunobu; Takahashi, Ai; Yasuda, Akiko; Kiriyama, Yuichi; Mori, Tatsuya; Mouri, Akio; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Okada, Yoko; Takahashi, Hidenori; Murakami, Noriko

    2011-08-01

    We present a distribution map of the far-infrared [O II] 88 μm line emission around the 30 Doradus (30 Dor) region in the Large Magellanic Cloud obtained with the Fourier Transform Spectrometer of the Far-Infrared Surveyor on board AKARI. The map reveals that the [O III] emission is widely distributed by more than 10' around the super star cluster R 136, implying that the 30 Dor region is affluent with interstellar radiation field that is hard enough to ionize O2+. The observed [O III] line intensities are as high as (1-2) × 10-6 W m-2 sr-1 on the peripheral regions 4'-5' away from the center of 30 Dor, which requires gas densities of 60-100 cm-3. However, the observed size of the distribution of the [O III] emission is too large to be explained by massive stars in the 30 Dor region enshrouded by clouds with a constant gas density of 102 cm-3. Therefore, the surrounding structure is likely to be highly clumpy. We also find a global correlation between the [O III] and the far-infrared continuum emission, suggesting that the gas and dust are well mixed in the highly ionized region where the dust survives in clumpy dense clouds shielded from energetic photons.

  17. A SURVEY OF H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, AND CO ICE FEATURES TOWARD BACKGROUND STARS AND LOW-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS USING AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, J. A.; Fraser, H. J.; Aikawa, Y.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Sakon, I.

    2013-10-01

    We present near-infrared spectroscopic observations of 19 molecular clouds made using the AKARI satellite, and the data reduction pipeline written to analyze those observations. The 2.5-5 μm spectra of 30 objects—22 field stars behind quiescent molecular clouds and 8 low-mass young stellar objects in cores—were successfully extracted using the pipeline. Those spectra are further analyzed to calculate the column densities of key solid phase molecular species, including H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2}, CO, and OCN{sup –}. The profile of the H{sub 2}O ice band is seen to vary across the objects observed and we suggest that the extended red wing may be an evolutionary indicator of both dust and ice mantle properties. The observation of 22 spectra with fluxes as low as < 5 mJy toward background stars, including 15 where the column densities of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were calculated, provides valuable data that could help to benchmark the initial conditions in star-forming regions prior to the onset of star formation.

  18. AKARI INFRARED CAMERA SURVEY OF THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD. I. POINT-SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Daisuke; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ita, Yoshifusa; Tanabe, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Hidenori; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Kawamura, Akiko; Wada, Takehiko; Usui, Fumihiko; Koo, Bon-Chul; Matsuura, Mikako E-mail: onaka@astron.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2012-12-01

    We present a near- to mid-infrared point-source catalog of five photometric bands at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m for a 10 deg{sup 2} area of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) obtained with the Infrared Camera on board the AKARI satellite. To cover the survey area the observations were carried out at three separate seasons from 2006 May to June, 2006 October to December, and 2007 March to July. The 10{sigma} limiting magnitudes of the present survey are 17.9, 13.8, 12.4, 9.9, and 8.6 mag at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. The photometric accuracy is estimated to be about 0.1 mag at 3.2 {mu}m and 0.06-0.07 mag in the other bands. The position accuracy is 0.''3 at 3.2, 7, and 11 {mu}m and 1.''0 at 15 and 24 {mu}m. The sensitivities at 3.2, 7, and 24 {mu}m are roughly comparable to those of the Spitzer SAGE LMC point-source catalog, while the AKARI catalog provides the data at 11 and 15 {mu}m, covering the mid-infrared spectral range contiguously. Two types of catalog are provided: a Catalog and an Archive. The Archive contains all the detected sources, while the Catalog only includes the sources that have a counterpart in the Spitzer SAGE point-source catalog. The Archive contains about 650,000, 140,000, 97,000, 43,000, and 52,000 sources at 3.2, 7, 11, 15, and 24 {mu}m, respectively. Based on the catalog, we discuss the luminosity functions at each band, the color-color diagram, and the color-magnitude diagram using the 3.2, 7, and 11 {mu}m band data. Stars without circumstellar envelopes, dusty C-rich and O-rich stars, young stellar objects, and background galaxies are located at distinct regions in the diagrams, suggesting that the present catalog is useful for the classification of objects toward the LMC.

  19. Ice Mapping Observations in Galactic Star-Forming Regions: the AKARI Legacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraser, Helen Jane; Suutarinnen, Aleksi; Noble, Jennifer

    2015-08-01

    It is becoming increasingly clear that explaining the small-scale distribution of many gas-phase molecules relies on our interpretation of the complex inter-connectivity between gas- and solid-phase interstellar chemistries. Inputs to proto-stellar astrochemical models are required that exploit ice compositions reflecting the historical physical conditions in pre-stellar environments when the ices first formed. Such data are required to translate the near-universe picture of ice-composition to our understanding of the role of extra-galactic ices in star-formation at higher redshifts.Here we present the first attempts at multi-object ice detections, and the subsequent ice column density mapping. The AKARI space telescope was uniquely capable of observing all the ice features between 2 and 5 microns, thereby detecting H2O, CO and CO2 ices concurrently, through their stretching vibrational features. Our group has successfully extracted an unprecedented volume of ice spectra from AKARI, including sources with not more than 2 mJy flux at 3 microns, showing:(a) H2O CO and CO2 ices on 30 lines of sight towards pre-stellar and star-forming cores, which when combined with laboratory experiments indicate how the chemistries of these three ices are interlinked (Noble et al (2013)),(b) ice maps showing the spatial distribution of water ice across 12 pre-stellar cores, in different molecular clouds (Suutarinnen et al (2015)), and the distribution of ice components within these cores on 1000 AU scales (Noble et al (2015)),(c) over 200 new detections of water ice, mostly on lines of sight towards background sources (> 145), indicating that water ice column density has a minimum value as a function of Av, but on a cloud-by-cloud basis typically correlates with Av, and dust emissivity at 250 microns (Suutarinnen et al (2015)),(d) the first detections of HDO ice towards background stars (Fraser et al (2015)).We discuss whether these results support the picture of a generic chemical

  20. Bright debris disk candidates detected with the AKARI/FAR-infrared surveyor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Tinggui; Jiang, Peng E-mail: twang@ustc.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    We cross-correlate the Hipparcos main-sequence star catalog with the AKARI/FIS catalog and identify 136 stars (at >90% reliability) with far-infrared detections in at least one band. After rejecting 57 stars classified as young stellar objects, Be stars and other type stars with known dust disks or with potential contaminations, and 4 stars without infrared excess emission, we obtain a sample of 75 candidate stars with debris disks. Stars in our sample cover spectral types from B to K with most being early types. This represents a unique sample of luminous debris disks that derived uniformly from an all-sky survey with a spatial resolution factor of four better than the previous such survey by IRAS. Moreover, by collecting the infrared photometric data from other public archives, almost three-quarters of them have infrared excesses in more than one band, allowing an estimate of the dust temperatures. We fit the blackbody model to the broadband spectral energy distribution of these stars to derive the statistical distribution of the disk parameters. Four B stars with excesses in four or more bands require a double blackbody model, with the high one around 100 or 200 K and the low one around 40-50 K.

  1. Bright Debris Disk Candidates Detected with the AKARI/Far-infrared Surveyor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qiong; Wang, Tinggui; Jiang, Peng

    2014-07-01

    We cross-correlate the Hipparcos main-sequence star catalog with the AKARI/FIS catalog and identify 136 stars (at >90% reliability) with far-infrared detections in at least one band. After rejecting 57 stars classified as young stellar objects, Be stars and other type stars with known dust disks or with potential contaminations, and 4 stars without infrared excess emission, we obtain a sample of 75 candidate stars with debris disks. Stars in our sample cover spectral types from B to K with most being early types. This represents a unique sample of luminous debris disks that derived uniformly from an all-sky survey with a spatial resolution factor of four better than the previous such survey by IRAS. Moreover, by collecting the infrared photometric data from other public archives, almost three-quarters of them have infrared excesses in more than one band, allowing an estimate of the dust temperatures. We fit the blackbody model to the broadband spectral energy distribution of these stars to derive the statistical distribution of the disk parameters. Four B stars with excesses in four or more bands require a double blackbody model, with the high one around 100 or 200 K and the low one around 40-50 K.

  2. Point source calibration of the AKARI/FIS all-sky survey maps for stacking analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimatsu, Ko; Doi, Yasuo; Wada, Takehiko; Takita, Satoshi; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Matsuura, Shuji; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kataza, Hirokazu

    2014-04-01

    Investigations of the point spread functions (PSFs) and flux calibrations for stacking analysis have been performed with the far-infrared (wavelength range of 60 to 140 μm) all-sky maps taken by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) on board the AKARI satellite. The PSFs are investigated by stacking the maps at the positions of standard stars with their fluxes of 0.02-10 Jy. The derived full widths at the half maximum (FWHMs) of the PSFs are ˜ 60'' at 65 and 90 μm and ˜ 90'' at 140 μm, which are much smaller than those of the previous all-sky maps obtained with the Infrared Astronomical Satellite IRAS (˜ 6'). Any flux dependence in the PSFs is not seen on the investigated flux range. By performing the flux calibrations, we found that absolute photometry for faint sources can be carried out with constant calibration factors, which range from 0.6 to 0.8. After applying the calibration factors, the photometric accuracies for the stacked sources in the 65, 90, and 140 μm bands are 9%, 3%, and 21%, respectively, even below the detection limits of the survey. No systematic dependence between the observed flux and model flux is found. These results indicate that the FIS map is a useful dataset for the stacking analyses of faint sources at far-infrared wavelengths.

  3. WATER MASER SURVEY ON AKARI AND IRAS SOURCES: A SEARCH FOR ''LOW-VELOCITY'' WATER FOUNTAINS

    SciTech Connect

    Yung, Bosco H. K.; Nakashima, Jun-ichi; Kwok, Sun; Imai, Hiroshi; Deguchi, Shuji; Henkel, Christian

    2013-05-20

    We present the results of a 22 GHz H{sub 2}O maser survey toward a new sample of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) and post-AGB star candidates. Most of the objects are selected for the first time based on the AKARI data, which have high flux sensitivity in the mid-infrared ranges. We aim at finding H{sub 2}O maser sources in the transient phase between the AGB and post-AGB stages of evolution, where the envelopes start to develop large deviations from spherical symmetry. The observations were carried out with the Effelsberg 100 m radio telescope. Among 204 observed objects, 63 detections (36 new) were obtained. We found four objects that may be ''water fountain'' sources (IRAS 15193+3132, IRAS 18056-1514, OH 16.3-3.0, and IRAS 18455+0448). They possess an H{sub 2}O maser velocity coverage much smaller than those in other known water fountains. However, the coverage is still larger than that of the 1612 MHz OH maser. It implies that there is an outflow with a higher velocity than the envelope expansion velocity (typically {<=}25 km s{sup -1}), meeting the criterion of the water fountain class. We suggest that these candidates are possibly oxygen-rich late AGB or early post-AGB stars in a stage of evolution immediately after the spherically symmetric AGB mass loss has ceased.

  4. Calibration of the AKARI far-infrared all-sky survey maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takita, Satoshi; Doi, Yasuo; Ootsubo, Takafumi; Arimatsu, Ko; Ikeda, Norio; Kawada, Mitsunobu; Kitamura, Yoshimi; Matsuura, Shuji; Nakagawa, Takao; Hattori, Makoto; Morishima, Takahiro; Tanaka, Masahiro; Komugi, Shinya

    2015-06-01

    We present an initial analysis of the properties of an all-sky image obtained by the Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) onboard the AKARI satellite, at 65 μm (N60), 90 μm (WIDE-S), 140 μm (WIDE-L), and 160 μm (N160). An absolute flux calibration was determined by comparing the data with COBE/DIRBE data sets; the intensity range was as wide as from a few MJy sr-1 to > 1 GJy sr-1. The uncertainties are considered to be the standard deviations with respect to the DIRBE data, and are less than 10% for intensities above 10, 3, 25, and 26 MJy sr-1 at the N60, WIDE-S, WIDE-L, and N160 bands, respectively. The characteristics of point sources in the image were also determined by stacking maps centred on photometric standard stars. The full width at half maxima of the point spread functions (PSFs) were 63″, 78″, and 88″ at the N60, WIDE-S, and WIDE-L bands, respectively. The PSF at the N160 band was not obtained due to the sensitivity, but it is thought to be the same as that of the WIDE-L one.

  5. AKARI IRC 2.5-5 μm spectroscopy of infrared galaxies over a wide luminosity range

    SciTech Connect

    Ichikawa, Kohei; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Oyabu, Shinki

    2014-10-20

    We present the result of a systematic infrared 2.5-5 μm spectroscopic study of 22 nearby infrared galaxies over a wide infrared luminosity range (10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} < L {sub IR} < 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}) obtained from the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). The unique band of the AKARI IRC spectroscopy enables us to access both the 3.3 μm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission feature from star-forming activity and the continuum of torus-dust emission heated by an active galactic nucleus (AGN). Applying our AGN diagnostics to the AKARI spectra, we discover 14 buried AGNs. The large fraction of buried AGNs suggests that AGN activity behind the dust is almost ubiquitous in ultra-/luminous infrared galaxies (U/LIRGs). We also find that both the fraction and energy contribution of buried AGNs increase with infrared luminosity from 10{sup 10} L {sub ☉} to 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉}, including normal infrared galaxies with L {sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L {sub ☉}. The energy contribution from AGNs in the total infrared luminosity is only ∼7% in LIRGs and ∼20% in ULIRGs, suggesting that the majority of the infrared luminosity originates from starburst activity. Using the PAH emission, we investigate the luminosity relation between star formation and AGNs. We find that these infrared galaxies exhibit higher star formation rates than optically selected Seyfert galaxies with the same AGN luminosities, implying that infrared galaxies could be an early evolutionary phase of AGN.

  6. Detection of the Detached Dust Shell of U Antliae at Mid-infrared Wavelengths with AKARI/IRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimatsu, Ko; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei; Onaka, Takashi

    2011-03-01

    We report mid-infrared (MIR) imaging observations of the carbon star U Ant made with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. Subtraction of the artifacts and extended point-spread function of the central star reveals the detached dust shell around the carbon star at MIR wavelengths (15 and 24 μm) for the first time. The observed radial brightness profiles of the MIR emission are well explained by two shells at 43'' and 50'' from the central star detected in optical scattered light observations. Combining Herschel/PACS, AKARI/FIS, and AKARI/IRC data, we obtain the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of the thermal emission from the detached shell of U Ant in a wide infrared spectral range of 15-160 μm. Thermal emission of amorphous carbon grains with a single temperature cannot account for the observed SED from 15 to 160 μm: it underestimates the emission at 15 μm. Alternatively, the observed SED is fitted by the model in which amorphous carbon grains in the two shells have different temperatures of 60 and 104 K, which allocates most dust mass in the shell at 50''. This supports the previous suggestion that the 43'' shell is gas-rich and the 50'' shell is dust-rich. We suggest a possibility that the segregation of the gas and dust resulting from the drift motion of submicron-sized dust grains relative to the gas and that the hot dust component associated with the gas-rich shell is composed of very small grains that are strongly coupled with the gas.

  7. DETECTION OF THE DETACHED DUST SHELL OF U ANTLIAE AT MID-INFRARED WAVELENGTHS WITH AKARI/IRC

    SciTech Connect

    Arimatsu, Ko; Onaka, Takashi; Izumiura, Hideyuki; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei

    2011-03-10

    We report mid-infrared (MIR) imaging observations of the carbon star U Ant made with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. Subtraction of the artifacts and extended point-spread function of the central star reveals the detached dust shell around the carbon star at MIR wavelengths (15 and 24 {mu}m) for the first time. The observed radial brightness profiles of the MIR emission are well explained by two shells at 43'' and 50'' from the central star detected in optical scattered light observations. Combining Herschel/PACS, AKARI/FIS, and AKARI/IRC data, we obtain the infrared spectral energy distribution (SED) of the thermal emission from the detached shell of U Ant in a wide infrared spectral range of 15-160 {mu}m. Thermal emission of amorphous carbon grains with a single temperature cannot account for the observed SED from 15 to 160 {mu}m: it underestimates the emission at 15 {mu}m. Alternatively, the observed SED is fitted by the model in which amorphous carbon grains in the two shells have different temperatures of 60 and 104 K, which allocates most dust mass in the shell at 50''. This supports the previous suggestion that the 43'' shell is gas-rich and the 50'' shell is dust-rich. We suggest a possibility that the segregation of the gas and dust resulting from the drift motion of submicron-sized dust grains relative to the gas and that the hot dust component associated with the gas-rich shell is composed of very small grains that are strongly coupled with the gas.

  8. AKARI North Ecliptic Pole Deep Survey. Revision of the catalogue via a new image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, K.; Matsuhara, H.; Wada, T.; Arimatsu, K.; Oi, N.; Takagi, T.; Oyabu, S.; Goto, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Malkan, M.; Pearson, C.; Małek, K.; Solarz, A.

    2013-11-01

    Context. We present the revised near- to mid-infrared catalogue of the AKARI North Ecliptic Pole deep survey. The survey has the unique advantage of continuous filter coverage from 2 to 24 μm over nine photometric bands, but the initial version of the survey catalogue leaves room for improvement in the image analysis stage; the original images are strongly contaminated by the behaviour of the detector and the optical system. Aims: The purpose of this study is to devise new image analysis methods and to improve the detection limit and reliability of the source extraction. Methods: We removed the scattered light and stray light from the Earth limb, and corrected for artificial patterns in the images by creating appropriate templates. We also removed any artificial sources due to bright sources by using their properties or masked them out visually. In addition, for the mid-infrared source extraction, we created detection images by stacking all six bands. This reduced the sky noise and enabled us to detect fainter sources more reliably. For the near-infrared source catalogue, we considered only objects with counterparts from ground-based catalogues to avoid fake sources. For our ground-based catalogues, we used catalogues based on the CFHT/MegaCam z' band, CFHT/WIRCam Ks band and Subaru/Scam z' band. Objects with multiple counterparts were all listed in the catalogue with a merged flag for the AKARI flux. Results: The detection limits of all mid-infrared bands were improved by ~20%, and the total number of detected objects was increased by ~2000 compared with the previous version of the catalogue; it now has 9560 objects. The 5σ detection limits in our catalogue are 11, 9, 10, 30, 34, 57, 87, 93, and 256 μJy in the N2, N3, N4, S7, S9W, S11, L15, L18W, and L24 bands, respectively. The astrometric accuracies of these band detections are 0.48, 0.52, 0.55, 0.99, 0.95, 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, and 1.6 arcsec, respectively. The false-detection rate of all nine bands was decreased

  9. A New Sample of Obscured AGNs Selected from the XMM-Newton and AKARI Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terashima, Yuichi; Hirata, Yoshitaka; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Oyabu, Shinki; Gandhi, Poshak; Toba, Yoshiki; Matsuhara, Hideo

    2015-11-01

    We report a new sample of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs) selected from the XMM-Newton serendipitous source and AKARI point-source catalogs. We match X-ray sources with infrared (18 and 90 μm) sources located at | b| \\gt 10^\\circ to create a sample consisting of 173 objects. Their optical classifications and absorption column densities measured by X-ray spectra are compiled and study efficient selection criteria to find obscured AGNs. We apply the criteria (1) X-ray hardness ratio defined by using the 2-4.5 keV and 4.5-12 keV bands > -0.1 and (2) EPIC-PN count rate (CR) in the 0.2-12 keV to infrared flux ratio CR/{F}90\\lt 0.1 or CR/{F}18\\lt 1, where F18 and F90 are infrared fluxes at 18 and 90 μm in Jy, respectively, to search for obscured AGNs. X-ray spectra of 48 candidates, for which no X-ray results have been published, are analyzed and X-ray evidence for the presence of obscured AGNs such as a convex shape X-ray spectrum indicative of absorption of {N}{{H}} ˜ 1022-24 cm-2, a very flat continuum, or a strong Fe-K emission line with an equivalent width of \\gt 700 {{eV}} is found in 26 objects. Six of them are classified as Compton-thick AGNs, and four are represented by either Compton-thin or Compton-thick spectral models. The success rate of finding obscured AGNs combining our analysis and the literature is 92% if the 18 μm condition is used. Of the 26 objects, 4 are optically classified as an H ii nucleus and are new “elusive AGNs” in which star formation activity likely overwhelms AGN emission in the optical and infrared bands.

  10. Revised wavelength and spectral response calibrations for AKARI near-infrared grism spectroscopy: Cryogenic phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Shunsuke; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Isobe, Naoki; Usui, Fumihiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Onaka, Takashi; Yano, Kenichi; Kochi, Chihiro

    2016-04-01

    We perform revised spectral calibrations for the AKARI near-infrared grism to correct quantitatively for the effect of the wavelength-dependent refractive index. The near-infrared grism covering the wavelength range of 2.5-5.0 μm, with a spectral resolving power of 120 at 3.6 μm, is found to be contaminated by second-order light at wavelengths longer than 4.9 μm, which is especially serious for red objects. First, we present the wavelength calibration considering the refractive index of the grism as a function of the wavelength for the first time. We find that the previous solution is positively shifted by up to 0.01 μm compared with the revised wavelengths at 2.5-5.0 μm. In addition, we demonstrate that second-order contamination occurs even with a perfect order-sorting filter owing to the wavelength dependence of the refractive index. Secondly, the spectral responses of the system from the first- and second-order light are simultaneously obtained from two types of standard objects with different colors. The response from the second-order light suggests leakage of the order-sorting filter below 2.5 μm. The relations between the output of the detector and the intensities of the first- and second-order light are formalized by a matrix equation that combines the two orders. The removal of the contaminating second-order light can be achieved by solving the matrix equation. The new calibration extends the available spectral coverage of the grism mode from 4.9 μm up to 5.0 μm. The revision can be used to study spectral features falling in these extended wavelengths, e.g., the carbon monoxide fundamental ro-vibrational absorption within nearby active galactic nuclei.

  11. Spectral energy distributions of an AKARI-SDSS-GALEX sample of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buat, V.; Giovannoli, E.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Heinis, S.; Yuan, F.-T.; Burgarella, D.; Noll, S.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2011-05-01

    Context. The nearby universe remains the best laboratory to understand the physical properties of galaxies and is a reference for any comparison with high redshift observations. The all sky (or very large) surveys that have been performed from the ultraviolet (UV) to the far-infrared (far-IR) provide us with large datasets of very large wavelength coverage to perform a reference study. Aims: We investigate the dust attenuation characteristics, as well as the star formation rate (SFR) calibrations of a sample of nearby galaxies observed over 13 bands from 0.15 to 160 μm. Methods: A sample of 363 galaxies is built from the AKARI /FIS all sky survey cross-correlated with the SDSS and GALEX surveys. Broad-band spectral energy distributions are fitted with the CIGALE code optimized to analyse variations in the dust attenuation curves and SFR measurements and based on an energetic budget between the stellar and dust emission. Results: Our galaxy sample is primarily selected in far-IR and mostly constituted of massive, actively star-forming galaxies. There is some evidence for a dust attenuation law that is slightly steeper than that used for starburst galaxies but we are unable to constrain the presence or not of a bump at 220 nm. We confirm that a time-dependent dust attenuation is necessary to perform the best fits. Various calibrations of the dust attenuation in the UV as a function of UV-optical colours are discussed. A calibration of the current SFR combining UV and total IR emissions is proposed with an accurate estimate of dust heating by old stars. For the whole sample, 17% of the total dust luminosity is unrelated to the recent star formation.

  12. AKARI NEAR-INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC SURVEY FOR CO{sub 2} IN 18 COMETS

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Hamada, Saki; Kobayashi, Hitomi; Yamaguchi, Mitsuru; Usui, Fumihiko; Nakagawa, Takao; Ueno, Munetaka; Ishiguro, Masateru; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sakon, Itsuki; Shimonishi, Takashi; Onaka, Takashi

    2012-06-10

    We conducted a spectroscopic survey of cometary volatiles with the Infrared Camera on board the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the wavelength range from 2.5 to 5 {mu}m. In our survey, 18 comets, including both the Oort cloud comets and the Jupiter-family comets, were observed in the period from 2008 June to 2010 January, most of which were observed at least twice. The prominent emission bands in the observed spectra are the fundamental vibrational bands of water (H{sub 2}O) at 2.7 {mu}m and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) at 4.3 {mu}m. The fundamental vibrational band of carbon monoxide (CO) around 4.7 {mu}m and the broad emission feature, probably related to carbon-hydrogen-bearing molecules, can also be recognized around the 3.3-3.5-{mu}m region in some of the comets. With respect to H{sub 2}O, gas production rate ratios of CO{sub 2} have been derived in 17 comets, except for the comet 29P/Schwassmann-Wachmann 1. Our data set provides the largest homogeneous database of CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O production rate ratios in comets obtained so far. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O production rate ratios are considered to reflect the composition of cometary ice when a comet is observed at a heliocentric distance within {approx}2.5 AU, since H{sub 2}O ice fully sublimates there. The CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ratio in cometary ice spans from several to {approx}30% among the comets observed at <2.5 AU (13 out of the 17 comets). Alternatively, the ratio of CO/CO{sub 2} in the comets seems to be smaller than unity based on our observations, although we only obtain upper limits for CO in most of the comets.

  13. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M., Fraser, H. J.; Terada, H.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass YSOs contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. In order to investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we have observed ice absorption bands towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Slit-less spectroscopic observations are performed using the grism mode of Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO_2 band and the blue wing of the H_2O band, which are not accessible from the ground. We developed procedures to reduce the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra are fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. Then we fit the molecular absorption bands with the laboratory spectra from the database, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the dispersion element. Towards the Class 0-I sources, absorption bands of H_2O, CO_2, CO and XCN (OCN^-) are clearly detected. Weak features of 13CO_2, HDO, the C-H band, and gaseous CO are detected as well. OCS ice absorption is tentatively detected towards IRC-L1041-2. The detected features would mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN^- could originate in the region close to the protostar. Towards class II stars, H_2O ice band is detected. We also detected H_2O ice, CO_2 ice and tentative CO gas features of the foreground component of class II stars.

  14. Dust Thermal Emission in a Suspected H2-Forming, Perseus-Arm Cloud via AKARI, IRAS, and SST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Aaron C.; Gibson, S. J.; Onaka, T.; Sakon, I.; Ohsawa, R.; Noriega-Crespo, A.; Reach, W. T.; Carey, S. J.; Miville-Deschenes, M.; Boulanger, F.; Brunt, C.; Taylor, A. R.; Martin, P. G.; Douglas, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    Formation of new stars requires the condensation of ambient neutral atomic hydrogen into the molecular phase. It is well known that stars form from molecular hydrogen clouds; less understood is how molecular clouds themselves begin to form. We use AKARI (MIR and FIS), HIRES (IRAS) and Spitzer (IRAC and MIPS) imaging photometry to probe thermal dust emission in a target cloud in the Perseus spiral arm, where the H1 to H2 transition appears to be underway. H2 formation in this region is indicated by strong HI self-absorption, variable CO emission, and significant ``excess'' infrared emission. We have sampled the dust spectral energy distribution (SED) at many positions on and off this cloud using AKARI, IRAS, and SST data. We present these SED plots with fits generated by the DustEM modeling program to provide some insight as to the nature of the dust composition, size distribution, and dominant heating mechanisms within this target and possibly other H2 forming regions.

  15. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  16. The initial conditions of isolated star formation - IX. Akari mapping of an externally heated pre-stellar core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nutter, D.; Stamatellos, D.; Ward-Thompson, D.

    2009-07-01

    We present observations of L1155 and L1148 in the Cepheus molecular cloud, taken using the Far Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on the Akari satellite. We compare these data to submillimetre data taken using the Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array (SCUBA) camera on the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope, and far-infrared data taken with the imaging photo-polarimeter (ISOPHOT) camera on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) satellite. The Akari data cover a similar spectral window and are consistent with the ISO data. All of the data show a relation between the position of the peak of emission and the wavelength for the core of L1155. We interpret this as a temperature gradient. We fit modified blackbody curves to the spectral energy distributions at two positions in the core and see that the central core in L1155 (L1155C) is approximately 2° warmer at one edge than it is in the centre. We consider a number of possible heating sources and conclude that the A6V star BD+67 1263 is the most likely candidate. This star is at a distance of 0.7pc from the front of L1155C in the plane of the sky. We carry out radiative transfer modelling of the L1155C core including the effects from the nearby star. We find that we can generate a good fit to the observed data at all wavelengths, and demonstrate that the different morphologies of the core at different wavelengths can be explained by the observed 2° temperature gradient. The L1148 core exhibits a similar morphology to that of L1155C, and the data are also consistent with a temperature gradient across the core. In this case, the most likely heating source is the star BD197053. Our findings illustrate very clearly that the apparent observed morphology of a pre-stellar core can be highly dependent on the wavelength of the observation, and that temperature gradients must be taken into account before converting images into column density distributions. This is important to note when interpreting Akari and Spitzer data

  17. AKARI All-Sky Survey: Contribution from AGB Stars to the Far Infrared Flux of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Rybka, P.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2011-09-01

    Using the data from the AKARI FIS All-Sky Survey, we estimate the contribution from AGB stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We check the positions of different types of AGB stars in FIR color-color diagrams. Our conclusion is a large contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux in the outer regions of the Milky Way, and possibly other similar galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars are similar, with a large scatter, but post-AGB stars seem to be significantly redder and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux at longer FIR wavelengths.

  18. Llaki and ñakary: idioms of distress and suffering among the highland Quechua in the Peruvian Andes.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Duncan; Kienzler, Hanna; Gamarra, Jeffrey

    2010-06-01

    This article examines some of the long-term health outcomes of extreme adversities and the ways in which social inequalities and idioms of distress are historically and socially produced in the Peruvian context. We describe how the highland Quechua of northern Ayacucho construct and experience expressions of distress and suffering such as pinsamientuwan (worrying thoughts, worries), ñakary (suffering) and llaki (sorrow, sadness), in a context of persistent social inequalities, social exclusion and a recent history of political violence. It is concluded that the multiple expressions of distress and suffering are closely related to past and current events, shaped by beliefs, core values and cultural norms and, in this process, transformed, recreated and invested with new meanings and attributions. PMID:20405314

  19. Revised calibration for near- and mid-infrared images from ˜4000 pointed observations with AKARI/IRC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egusa, Fumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Murata, Kazumi; Yamashita, Takuji; Yamamura, Issei; Onaka, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI performed ˜4000 pointed observations for 16 months until the end of August 2007, when the telescope and instruments were cooled by liquid helium. Observation targets include solar system objects, Galactic objects, local galaxies, and galaxies at cosmological distances. We describe recent updates on calibration processes of near- and mid-infrared images taken by the Infrared Camera (IRC), which has nine photometric filters covering 2-27 μm continuously. Using the latest data reduction toolkit, we created calibrated and stacked images from each pointed observation. About 90% of the stacked images have a position accuracy better than 1{^''.}5. Uncertainties in aperture photometry estimated from a typical standard sky deviation of stacked images are a factor of ˜2-4 smaller than those of AllWISE at similar wavelengths. The processed images, together with documents such as process logs, as well as the latest toolkit are available online.

  20. Properties of Newly Formed Dust by SN 2006JC Based on Near- to Mid-Infrared Observation With AKARI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Ohyama, Y.; Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Tanabé, T.; Minezaki, T.; Yoshii, Y.; Tominaga, N.; Nomoto, K.; Nozawa, T.; Kozasa, T.; Tanaka, M.; Suzuki, T.; Umeda, H.; Ohyabu, S.; Usui, F.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.

    2009-02-01

    We present our latest results on near- to mid-infrared (MIR) observation of supernova (SN) 2006jc at 200 days after the discovery using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. The near-infrared (2-5 μm) spectrum of SN 2006jc is obtained for the first time and is found to be well interpreted in terms of the thermal emission from amorphous carbon of 800 ± 10 K with the mass of 6.9 ± 0.5 × 10-5 M sun that was formed in the SN ejecta. This dust mass newly formed in the ejecta of SN 2006jc is in a range similar to those obtained for other several dust-forming core-collapse supernovae based on recent observations (i.e., 10-3-10-5 M sun). MIR photometric data with AKARI/IRC MIR-S/S7, S9W, and S11 bands have shown excess emission over the thermal emission by hot amorphous carbon of 800 K. This MIR excess emission is likely to be accounted for by the emission from warm amorphous carbon dust of 320 ± 10 K with the mass of 2.7+0.7 -0.5 × 10-3 M sun rather than by the band emission of astronomical silicate and/or silica grains. This warm amorphous carbon dust is expected to have been formed in the mass-loss wind associated with the Wolf-Rayet stellar activity before the SN explosion. Our result suggests that a significant amount of dust is condensed in the mass-loss wind prior to the SN explosion.

  1. AKARI IRC INFRARED 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTROSCOPY OF A LARGE SAMPLE OF LUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Imanishi, Masatoshi; Nakagawa, Takao; Shirahata, Mai; Ohyama, Yoichi; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    We present the results of our systematic infrared 2.5-5 {mu}m spectroscopy of 60 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) with infrared luminosities L{sub IR} = 10{sup 11}-10{sup 12} L{sub sun} and 54 ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) with L{sub IR} {>=} 10{sup 12} L{sub sun}, using the AKARI Infrared Camera (IRC). AKARI IRC slit-less spectroscopy allows us to probe the full range of emission from these galaxies, including spatially extended components. The 3.3 {mu}m polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) emission features, hydrogen recombination emission lines, and various absorption features are detected and used to investigate the properties of these galaxies. Because of the relatively small effect of dust extinction in the infrared range, quantitative discussion of these dusty galaxy populations is possible. For sources with clearly detectable Br{beta} (2.63 {mu}m) and Br{alpha} (4.05 {mu}m) emission lines, the flux ratios are found to be similar to those predicted by case B theory. Starburst luminosities are estimated from both 3.3 {mu}m PAH and Br{alpha} emission, which roughly agree with each other. In addition to the detected starburst activity, a significant fraction of the observed sources display signatures of obscured active galactic nuclei (AGNs), such as low PAH equivalent widths, large optical depths of dust absorption features, and red continuum emission. The energetic importance of optically elusive buried AGNs in optically non-Seyfert galaxies tends to increase with increasing galaxy infrared luminosity, from LIRGs to ULIRGs.

  2. BRIGHTNESS AND FLUCTUATION OF THE MID-INFRARED SKY FROM AKARI OBSERVATIONS TOWARD THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE

    SciTech Connect

    Pyo, Jeonghyun; Jeong, Woong-Seob; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji

    2012-12-01

    We present the smoothness of the mid-infrared sky from observations by the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. AKARI monitored the north ecliptic pole (NEP) during its cold phase with nine wave bands covering from 2.4 to 24 {mu}m, out of which six mid-infrared bands were used in this study. We applied power-spectrum analysis to the images in order to search for the fluctuation of the sky brightness. Observed fluctuation is explained by fluctuation of photon noise, shot noise of faint sources, and Galactic cirrus. The fluctuations at a few arcminutes scales at short mid-infrared wavelengths (7, 9, and 11 {mu}m) are largely caused by the diffuse Galactic light of the interstellar dust cirrus. At long mid-infrared wavelengths (15, 18, and 24 {mu}m), photon noise is the dominant source of fluctuation over the scale from arcseconds to a few arcminutes. The residual fluctuation amplitude at 200'' after removing these contributions is at most 1.04 {+-} 0.23 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.05% of the brightness at 24 {mu}m and at least 0.47 {+-} 0.14 nW m{sup -2} sr{sup -1} or 0.02% at 18 {mu}m. We conclude that the upper limit of the fluctuation in the zodiacal light toward the NEP is 0.03% of the sky brightness, taking 2{sigma} error into account.

  3. Effects of High-Energy Ionizing Particles on the Si:As Mid-Infrared Detector Array on Board the AKARI Satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouri, A.; Kaneda, H.; Ishihara, D.; Oyabu, S.; Yamagishi, M.; Mori, T.; Onaka, T.; Wada, T.; Kataza, H.

    2011-05-01

    We evaluate the effects of high-energy ionizing particles on the Si:As impurity band conduction (IBC) mid-infrared detector on board AKARI, the Japanese infrared astronomical satellite. IBC-type detectors are known to be little influenced by ionizing radiation. However, we find that the detector is significantly affected by in-orbit ionizing radiation even after spikes induced by ionizing particles are removed. The effects are described as changes mostly in the offset of detector output, but not in the gain. We conclude that the changes in the offset are caused mainly by increase in dark current. We establish a method to correct these ionizing radiation effects. The method is essential to improve the quality and to increase the sky coverage of the AKARI mid-infrared all-sky-survey map.

  4. ALBEDO PROPERTIES OF MAIN BELT ASTEROIDS BASED ON THE ALL-SKY SURVEY OF THE INFRARED ASTRONOMICAL SATELLITE AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Ishiguro, Masateru; Kuroda, Daisuke; Mueller, Thomas G.; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2013-01-01

    We present an analysis of the albedo properties of main belt asteroids (MBAs) detected by the All-Sky Survey of the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI. The characteristics of 5120 asteroids detected by the survey, including their sizes and albedos, were cataloged in the Asteroid Catalog Using AKARI (AcuA). Size and albedo measurements were based on the standard thermal model, using inputs of infrared fluxes and absolute magnitudes measured at optical wavelengths. MBAs, which account for 4722 of the 5120 AcuA asteroids, have semimajor axes of 2.06-3.27 AU, except for the near-Earth asteroids. AcuA provides a complete data set of all MBAs brighter than the absolute magnitude of H < 10.3, which corresponds to the diameter of d > 20 km. We confirmed that the albedo distribution of the MBAs is strongly bimodal as was already known from the past observations, and that the bimodal distribution occurs not only in the total population, but also within inner, middle, and outer regions of the main belt. The bimodal distribution in each group consists of low-albedo components in C-type asteroids and high-albedo components in S-type asteroids. We found that the small asteroids have much more variety in albedo than the large asteroids. In spite of the albedo transition process like space weathering, the heliocentric distribution of the mean albedo of asteroids in each taxonomic type is nearly flat. The mean albedo of the total, on the other hand, gradually decreases with an increase in semimajor axis. This can be explained by the compositional ratio of taxonomic types; that is, the proportion of dark asteroids such as C- and D-types increases, while that of bright asteroids such as S-type decreases, with increasing heliocentric distance. The heliocentric distributions of X-subclasses: E-, M-, and P-types, which can be divided based on albedo values, are also examined. P-types, which are the major component in X-types, are distributed throughout the main belt regions, and the

  5. Mid- and Far-Infrared Photometry of Galactic Planetary Nebulae with the AKARI All-Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. P.; Márquez-Lugo, R. A.

    2011-04-01

    We provide mid- and far-infrared photometry of 857 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) using data derived from the AKARI All-Sky Survey. These include fluxes at 9 and 18 μm obtained with the Infrared Camera (IRC), and at 65, 90, 140 and 160 μm using the far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS). It is noted that the IR luminosities of the youngest PNe are comparable to the total luminosities of the central stars, and subsequently decline to 5×102 L⊙ where D > 0.08 pc. This is consistent with an evolution of PNe dust opacities, and appreciable absorption in young and proto-PNe. We also note that there is little evidence for the evolution in IR/radio flux ratios suggested by previous authors. The fall-off of dust temperatures with increasing nebular diameter is similar to that determined in previous studies, whilst levels of Lyα heating are <0.5 of the total energy budget of the grains. There appears to be an evolution in the infrared excess (IRE) as nebulae expand, with the largest values occurring in the most compact PNe.

  6. Searching for the Culprit of Anomalous Microwave Emission: An AKARI PAHrange Analysis of Probable Electric Dipole Emitting Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, A. C.; Onaka, T.; Sakon, I.; Ishihara, D.; Kaneda, H.; Lee, H. G.; Itoh, M.; Ohsawa, R.; Hammonds, M.

    In the march forward of interstellar medium inquiry, many new species of interstellar dust have been modelled and discovered. The modes by which these species interact and evolve are beginning to be understood, but in recent years a peculiar new feature has appeared in microwave surveys. Anomalous microwave emission (AME), appearing between 10 and 90Ghz, has been correlated with thermal dust emission, leading to the popular suggestion that this anomaly is electric dipole emission from spinning dust [2]. The observed frequencies suggest that spinning grains should be on the order of 10nm in size, hinting at poly-cyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules. We present data from AKARI/Infrared Camera [1], due to the effective PAH/Unidentified Infrared Band (UIR) coverage of its 9um survey to investigate their role within a few regions showing strong AME in the Planck low frequency data. We include the well studied Perseus and ρOphiuchi clouds . We use the IRAS/IRIS 100µm data to account for the overall dust temperature. We present our results as abundance maps for dust emitting around 9µm, and 100µm. Part of the AME in these regions may actually be attributed to thermal dust emission, or the star forming nature of these targets is masking the vibrational modes of PAHs which should be present there, suggesting further investigation for various galactic environments.

  7. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yasuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-04-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 μm images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken, and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm, and cold dust components by decomposing six-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities, and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morphological types. In particular, they follow a power-law relation with an index of ˜3 between the total IR luminosity and radius, as expected from the conventional picture of the Strömgren sphere. The exceptions are large broken bubbles; they indicate higher total IR luminosities, lower fractional luminosities of the PAH emission, and dust heating sources located nearer to the shells. We discuss the implications of those differences for a massive star-formation scenario.

  8. Mid- and far-infrared properties of Spitzer Galactic bubbles revealed by the AKARI all-sky surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hattori, Yasuki; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Fukui, Yasuo; Torii, Kazufumi; Hanaoka, Misaki; Kokusho, Takuma; Kondo, Akino; Shichi, Kazuyuki; Ukai, Sota; Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Yamaguchi, Yuta

    2016-06-01

    We have carried out a statistical study on the mid- and far-infrared (IR) properties of Galactic IR bubbles observed by Spitzer. Using the Spitzer 8 μm images, we estimated the radii and covering fractions of their shells, and categorized them into closed, broken, and unclassified bubbles with our data analysis method. Then, using the AKARI all-sky images at wavelengths of 9, 18, 65, 90, 140, and 160 μm, we obtained the spatial distributions and the luminosities of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), warm, and cold dust components by decomposing six-band spectral energy distributions with model fitting. As a result, 180 sample bubbles show a wide range of total IR luminosities corresponding to the bolometric luminosities of a single B-type star to many O-type stars. For all the bubbles, we investigated relationships between the radius, luminosities, and luminosity ratios, and found that there are overall similarities in the IR properties among the bubbles regardless of their morphological types. In particular, they follow a power-law relation with an index of ˜3 between the total IR luminosity and radius, as expected from the conventional picture of the Strömgren sphere. The exceptions are large broken bubbles; they indicate higher total IR luminosities, lower fractional luminosities of the PAH emission, and dust heating sources located nearer to the shells. We discuss the implications of those differences for a massive star-formation scenario.

  9. OBSERVATIONS OF THE OPTICAL TRANSIENT IN NGC 300 WITH AKARI/IRC: POSSIBILITIES OF ASYMMETRIC DUST FORMATION

    SciTech Connect

    Ohsawa, R.; Sakon, I.; Onaka, T.; Tanaka, M.; Moriya, T.; Nozawa, T.; Maeda, K.; Nomoto, K.; Tominaga, N.; Usui, F.; Matsuhara, H.; Nakagawa, T.; Murakami, H.

    2010-08-01

    We present the results of near-infrared (NIR) multi-epoch observations of the optical transient in the nearby galaxy NGC 300 (NGC 300-OT) at 398 and 582 days after the discovery with the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI. NIR spectra (2-5 {mu}m) of NGC 300-OT were obtained for the first time. They show no prominent emission nor absorption features, but are dominated by continuum thermal emission from the dust around NGC 300-OT. NIR images were taken in the 2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m bands. The spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of NGC 300-OT indicate the dust temperature of 810 {+-} 14 K at 398 days and 670 {+-} 12 K at 582 days. We attribute the observed NIR emission to the thermal emission from dust grains formed in the ejecta of NGC 300-OT. The multi-epoch observations enable us to estimate the dust optical depth as {approx}>12 at 398 days and {approx}>6 at 582 days at 2.4 {mu}m by assuming an isothermal dust cloud. The observed NIR emission must be optically thick, unless the amount of dust grains increases with time. Little extinction at visible wavelengths reported in earlier observations suggests that the dust cloud around NGC 300-OT should be distributed inhomogeneously so as to not screen the radiation from the ejecta gas and the central star. The present results suggest the dust grains are not formed in a spherically symmetric geometry, but rather in a torus, a bipolar outflow, or clumpy cloudlets.

  10. Infrared and hard X-ray diagnostics of AGN identifications from the Swift/BAT and AKARI all sky surveys.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuta, Keiko

    2011-11-01

    It is known that there is a good correlation between the mid-infrared and the intrinsic soft X-ray luminosities (<10 keV) of local active galactic nuclei (AGN). We now combine two complete all sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and very hard X-ray (>10 keV) luminosities in AGN. We selected sources from the 22-month Swift/BAT hard X-ray survey catalogue which were also detected by Infrared Camera (IRC, 9 and 18 micron) and Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS, 90 micron) on AKARI. The large sample allows us to include not only Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies but also quasars, low luminosity AGN and radio-loud objects. We found a strong linear correlation for most of the AGN between the logarithms of the observed infrared and hard X-ray powers over four decades in luminosity, L(IR) vs. L(HX). Many Compton-thick sources show a large deviation from the correlation, probably because of the relatively low observed L(HX) due to the high column density. The observed luminosity correlation indicates that the various types of AGN may be occupying distinct regions of parameter space in the diagram. Color-color plots such as "L(90um)/L(9um) vs. L(HX)/L(9um)" are found to be useful redshift independent indicators for isolating Compton-thick AGN. Interestingly, starburst galaxies are also separated in this plane. This correlation can be a new and important tool for AGN classification, which may be useful for large upcoming surveys.

  11. FAR-INFRARED IMAGING OF POST-ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS AND (PROTO)-PLANETARY NEBULAE WITH THE AKARI FAR-INFRARED SURVEYOR

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, N. L. J.; Garcia-Hernandez, D. A.; Manchado, A.

    2011-04-15

    By tracing the distribution of cool dust in the extended envelopes of post-asymptotic giant branch stars and (proto)-planetary nebulae ((P)PNe), we aim to recover, or constrain, the mass-loss history experienced by these stars in their recent past. The Far-Infrared Surveyor (FIS) instrument on board the AKARI satellite was used to obtain far-infrared maps for a selected sample of post-AGB stars and (P)PNe. We derived flux densities (aperture photometry) for 13 post-AGB stars and (P)PNe at four far-infrared wavelengths (65, 90, 140, and 160 {mu}m). Radial (azimuthally averaged) profiles are used to investigate the presence of extended emission from cool dust. No (detached) extended emission is detected for any target in our sample at levels significant with respect to background and cirrus emission. Only IRAS 21046+4739 reveals tentative excess emission between 30'' and 130''. Estimates of the total dust and gas mass from the obtained maps indicate that the envelope masses of these stars should be large in order to be detected with the AKARI FIS. Imaging with higher sensitivity and higher spatial resolution is needed to detect and resolve, if present, any cool compact or extended emission associated with these evolved stars.

  12. The AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm Spectral Atlas of Type-1 Active Galactic Nuclei: Black Hole Mass Estimator, Line Ratio, and Hot Dust Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Oyabu, Shinki; Takagi, Toshinobu; Ohyama, Youichi; Lee, Seong-Kook

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ~1100 K and ~220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  13. DIFFERENCE IN THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION BETWEEN H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} ICES IN M 82 FOUND WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Mitsuyoshi; Kaneda, Hidehiro; Ishihara, Daisuke; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi; Shimonishi, Takashi; Suzuki, Toyoaki; Minh, Young Chol

    2013-08-20

    With AKARI, we obtain the spatially resolved near-infrared (NIR) (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) spectra for the nearby starburst galaxy M 82. These spectra clearly show absorption features due to interstellar ices. Based on the spectra, we created the column density maps of H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2} ices. As a result, we find that the spatial distribution of H{sub 2}O ice is significantly different from that of CO{sub 2} ice; H{sub 2}O ice is widely distributed, while CO{sub 2} ice is concentrated near the galactic center. Our result reveals for the first time variations in CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice abundance ratio on a galactic scale, suggesting that an ice-forming interstellar environment changes within a galaxy. We discuss the cause of the spatial variations in the ice abundance ratio, utilizing spectral information on the hydrogen recombination Br{alpha} and Br{beta} lines and the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon 3.3 {mu}m emission appearing in the AKARI NIR spectra.

  14. Deep 15μm AKARI Observations in the CDFS: Estimating Dust Luminosities for a MIR-Selected Sample and for Lyman Break Galaxies and the Evolution of Ldust/LUV with the Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgarella, Denis; Buat, Véronique; Takeuchi, Tsutomu T.; Wada, Takehiko; Pearson, Chris

    2009-02-01

    Deep observations of the Chandra Deep Field South have been secured at 15μm with AKARI/IRC infrared space telescope. From these observations, we define a sample of mid infrared-selected galaxies at 15μm and we also obtain 15μm flux densities for a sample of Lyman Break Galaxies at z ˜ 1 already observed at 24μm with Spitzer/MIPS. Number counts for the mid infrared-selected sample show a bump around a 15μm flux density of 0.2mJy that can be attributed to galaxies at z > 0.4 and at z > 0.8 for the fainter part of the bump. This bump seems to be shifted as compared to other works and a possible origin can be the Cosmic variance. On the two above samples at z ˜ 1 we have tested the validity of the conversions from luminosities ν.fν at 8νm to total dust luminosities by comparing with luminosities estimated from 12νm data used as a reference. Some calibrations seem better when compared to evaluated from longer wavelength luminosities. We also find that the rest-frame 8μm luminosities provide good estimates of Ldust. By comparing our data to several libraries of spectral energy distributions, we find that models can explain the diversity of the observed f24/f15 ratio quite reasonably. However, when we analyse the luminosity dependence of this ratio, we find important discrepancies. Finally, we revisit the evolution of Ldust/LUV ratio with the redshift z by re-calibrating previous Ldust at z ˜ 2 based on our results and added new data points at higher redshifts. The decreasing trend is amplified as compared to the previous estimate.

  15. AKARI All Sky Survey: contribution from AGB stars to the far infrared flux from the Milky Way related to point sources outside the Galactic plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollo, A.; Takeuchi, T. T.; Rybka, P.

    2011-10-01

    Using data from the FIS AKARI All-Sky Survey, we make a first step towards the estimation of the contribution from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars to the far-infrared (FIR) flux from the Milky Way. We estimate the contribution from the AGB, and post-AGB, stars to the total flux generated by point sources outside the Galactic plane. Additionally, we present the positions of different types of AGB, and post-AGB, stars in the FIR color-color diagrams. Our main conclusion is that there is a high contribution from AGB stars, and particularly post-AGB stars, to the FIR flux coming from point sources in the outer parts of the Milky Way and possibly other Milky Way-type galaxies. FIR colors of different types of AGB stars remain similar but post-AGB stars are redder in the FIR and, as a result, contribute more to the total Galaxy flux density at longer FIR wavelengths.

  16. INFRARED AND HARD X-RAY DIAGNOSTICS OF ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IDENTIFICATION FROM THE SWIFT/BAT AND AKARI ALL-SKY SURVEYS

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuta, K.; Dotani, T.; Yamamura, I.; Gandhi, P.; Nakagawa, T.; Isobe, N.; Stawarz, L.; Ueda, Y.; Ichikawa, K.; Terashima, Y.; Oyabu, S.

    2012-07-10

    We combine data from two all-sky surveys in order to study the connection between the infrared and hard X-ray (>10 keV) properties for local active galactic nuclei (AGNs). The Swift Burst Alert Telescope all-sky survey provides an unbiased, flux-limited selection of hard X-ray-detected AGNs. Cross-correlating the 22 month hard X-ray survey with the AKARI all-sky survey, we studied 158 AGNs detected by the AKARI instruments. We find a strong correlation for most AGNs between the infrared (9, 18, and 90 {mu}m) and hard X-ray (14-195 keV) luminosities, and quantify the correlation for various subsamples of AGNs. Partial correlation analysis confirms the intrinsic correlation after removing the redshift contribution. The correlation for radio galaxies has a slope and normalization identical to that for Seyfert 1 galaxies, implying similar hard X-ray/infrared emission processes in both. In contrast, Compton-thick (CT) sources show a large deficit in the hard X-ray band, because high gas column densities diminish even their hard X-ray luminosities. We propose two photometric diagnostics for source classification: one is an X-ray luminosity versus infrared color diagram, in which type 1 radio-loud AGNs are well isolated from the others in the sample. The other uses the X-ray versus infrared color as a useful redshift-independent indicator for identifying CT AGNs. Importantly, CT AGNs and starburst galaxies in composite systems can also be differentiated in this plane based upon their hard X-ray fluxes and dust temperatures. This diagram may be useful as a new indicator to classify objects in new and upcoming surveys such as WISE and NuSTAR.

  17. AKARI observations of brown dwarfs. IV. Effect of elemental abundances on near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2014-09-20

    The detection of the CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 μm in brown dwarf spectra by AKARI has made it possible to discuss CO{sub 2} molecular abundance in brown dwarf atmospheres. In our previous studies, we found an excess in the 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band of three brown dwarf spectra, and suggested that these deviations were caused by high C and O elemental abundances in their atmospheres. To validate this hypothesis, we have constructed a set of models of brown dwarf atmospheres with various elemental abundance patterns, and we investigate the variations of the molecular composition and the thermal structure, and how they affect the near-infrared spectra between 1.0 and 5.0 μm. The 4.2 μm CO{sub 2} absorption band in some late-L and T dwarfs taken by AKARI is stronger or weaker than predicted by corresponding models with solar abundance. By comparing the CO{sub 2} band in the model spectra to the observed near-infrared spectra, we confirm possible elemental abundance variations among brown dwarfs. We find that the band strength is especially sensitive to O abundance, but C is also needed to reproduce the entire near-infrared spectra. This result indicates that both the C and O abundances should increase and decrease simultaneously for brown dwarfs. We find that a weaker CO{sub 2} absorption band in a spectrum can also be explained by a model with lower 'C and O' abundances.

  18. THE AKARI 2.5-5.0 μm SPECTRAL ATLAS OF TYPE-1 ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: BLACK HOLE MASS ESTIMATOR, LINE RATIO, AND HOT DUST TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Dohyeong; Im, Myungshin; Kim, Ji Hoon; Jun, Hyunsung David; Lee, Seong-Kook; Woo, Jong-Hak; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Nakagawa, Takao; Matsuhara, Hideo; Wada, Takehiko; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki; Ohyama, Youichi E-mail: mim@astro.snu.ac.kr

    2015-01-01

    We present 2.5-5.0 μm spectra of 83 nearby (0.002 < z < 0.48) and bright (K < 14 mag) type-1 active galactic nuclei (AGNs) taken with the Infrared Camera on board AKARI. The 2.5-5.0 μm spectral region contains emission lines such as Brβ (2.63 μm), Brα (4.05 μm), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (3.3 μm), which can be used for studying the black hole (BH) masses and star formation activity in the host galaxies of AGNs. The spectral region also suffers less dust extinction than in the ultra violet (UV) or optical wavelengths, which may provide an unobscured view of dusty AGNs. Our sample is selected from bright quasar surveys of Palomar-Green and SNUQSO, and AGNs with reverberation-mapped BH masses from Peterson et al. Using 11 AGNs with reliable detection of Brackett lines, we derive the Brackett-line-based BH mass estimators. We also find that the observed Brackett line ratios can be explained with the commonly adopted physical conditions of the broad line region. Moreover, we fit the hot and warm dust components of the dust torus by adding photometric data of SDSS, 2MASS, WISE, and ISO to the AKARI spectra, finding hot and warm dust temperatures of ∼1100 K and ∼220 K, respectively, rather than the commonly cited hot dust temperature of 1500 K.

  19. VizieR Online Data Catalog: IR sources spectroscopy in the AKARI NEP (Shim+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shim, H.; Im, M.; Ko, J.; Jeon, Y.; Karouzos, M.; Kim, S. J.; Lee, H. M.; Papovich, C.; Willmer, C.; Weiner, B. J.

    2013-09-01

    Most of the targets for the spectroscopic observation were selected from the optical to mid-infrared band-merged photometry catalog over the NEP-Wide field (Kim et al. 2012, Cat. J/A+A/548/A29). The observations, with the MMT/Hectospec spectrograph, were executed in queue mode: a total of five configurations were observed between 2008 May and November, with each configuration covering an area within a 1deg diameter circle. The observations used the 270 line/mm grating covering ~3700Å to ~8500Å, with a spectral resolution of about 6.2Å. We obtained optical spectra using the Hydra multi-object spectrograph on WIYN, the 3.5m telescope at the Kitt Peak National Observatory, on the nights of 2008 June 27-30. The covered wavelength range is 4500-9000Å, yet the spectrum quality is very poor beyond 8000Å. We used 98 red fibers feeding the bench spectrograph with a 316 lines/mm grating, yielding a spectral resolution of 5.7Å. (2 data files).

  20. AKARI OBSERVATION OF THE NORTH ECLIPTIC POLE (NEP) SUPERCLUSTER AT z = 0.087: MID-INFRARED VIEW OF TRANSITION GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jongwan; Im, Myungshin; Lee, Hyung Mok; Lee, Myung Gyoon; Kim, Seong Jin; Jeon, Yiseul; Shim, Hyunjin; Hwang, Ho Seong; Willmer, Christopher N. A.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; Malkan, Matthew A.; Papovich, Casey; Matsuhara, Hideo; Takagi, Toshinobu; Oyabu, Shinki

    2012-02-01

    We present the mid-infrared (MIR) properties of galaxies within a supercluster in the north ecliptic pole region at z {approx} 0.087 observed with the AKARI satellite. We use data from the AKARI NEP-Wide (5.4 deg{sup 2}) IR survey and the CLusters of galaxies EVoLution studies (CLEVL) mission program. We show that near-IR (3 {mu}m)-mid-IR (11 {mu}m) color can be used as an indicator of the specific star formation rate and the presence of intermediate-age stellar populations. From the MIR observations, we find that red-sequence galaxies consist not only of passively evolving red early-type galaxies, but also of (1) 'weak-SFGs' (disk-dominated star-forming galaxies that have star formation rates lower by {approx}4 Multiplication-Sign than blue-cloud galaxies) and (2) 'intermediate-MXGs' (bulge-dominated galaxies showing stronger MIR dust emission than normal red early-type galaxies). These two populations can be a set of transition galaxies from blue, star-forming, late-type galaxies evolving into red, quiescent, early-type ones. We find that the weak-SFGs are predominant at intermediate masses (10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) and are typically found in local densities similar to the outskirts of galaxy clusters. As much as 40% of the supercluster member galaxies in this mass range can be classified as weak-SFGs, but their proportion decreases to <10% at larger masses (M{sub *} > 10{sup 10.5} M{sub Sun }) at any galaxy density. The fraction of the intermediate-MXG among red-sequence galaxies at 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} < M{sub *} < 10{sup 11} M{sub Sun} also decreases as the density and mass increase. In particular, {approx}42% of the red-sequence galaxies with early-type morphologies are classified as intermediate-MXGs at intermediate densities. These results suggest that the star formation activity is strongly dependent on the stellar mass, but that the morphological transformation is mainly controlled by the environment.

  1. Image stacking analysis of SDSS galaxies with AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okabe, Taizo; Kashiwagi, Toshiya; Suto, Yasushi; Matsuura, Shuji; Doi, Yasuo; Takita, Satoshi; Ootsubo, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    We perform image stacking analysis of Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) photometric galaxies over the AKARI Far-Infrared Surveyor maps at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm. The resulting image profiles are decomposed into the central galaxy component (single term) and the nearby galaxy component (clustering term), as a function of the r-band magnitude, mr, of the central galaxy. We find that the mean far-infrared (FIR) flux of a galaxy with magnitude mr is well fitted with f^s_{90μ m}=13× 10^{0.306(18-m_{ r})} [mJy]. The FIR amplitude of the clustering term is consistent with that expected from the angular-correlation function of the SDSS galaxies, but galaxy morphology dependence needs to be taken into account for a more quantitative conclusion. We also fit the spectral energy distribution of stacked galaxies at 65 μm, 90 μm, and 140 μm, and derive a mean dust temperature of ˜30 K. This is consistent with the typical dust temperature of galaxies that are FIR luminous and individually detected.

  2. Low-Resolution Spectrum of the Diffuse Galactic Light and 3.3 μm PAH Emission with the AKARI InfraRed Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsumura, Kohji; Matsumoto, Toshio; Matsuura, Shuji; Sakon, Itsuki; Tanaka, Masahiro; Wada, Takehiko

    2013-12-01

    We first obtained the spectrum of the diffuse Galactic light (DGL) at general interstellar space in the 1.8-5.3μm wavelength region with the low-resolution prism spectroscopy mode of the AKARI Infra-Red Camera (IRC) NIR channel. The 3.3μm m PAH band is detected in the DGL spectrum at Galactic latitude |b| < 15˚, and its correlations with the Galactic dust and gas are confirmed. The correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust is expressed not by a simple linear correlation, but by a relation with extinction. Using this correlation, the spectral shape of DGL at an optically thin region (5˚ < |b| < 15˚) was derived as a template spectrum. Assuming that the spectral shape of this template spectrum is uniform at any position, the DGL spectrum can be estimated by scaling this template spectrum using the correlation between the 3.3μm PAH band and the thermal emission from the Galactic dust.

  3. DETECTION OF PARENT H{sub 2}O AND CO{sub 2} MOLECULES IN THE 2.5-5 {mu}m SPECTRUM OF COMET C/2007 N3 (LULIN) OBSERVED WITH AKARI

    SciTech Connect

    Ootsubo, Takafumi; Usui, Fumihiko; Hasegawa, Sunao; Ueno, Munetaka; Wada, Takehiko; Matsuhara, Hideo; Nakagawa, Takao; Murakami, Hiroshi; Kawakita, Hideyo; Ishiguro, Masateru; Furusho, Reiko; Watanabe, Jun-ichi; Sekiguchi, Tomohiko; Ohyama, Youichi; Oyabu, Shinki; Onaka, Takashi

    2010-07-01

    Comet C/2007 N3 (Lulin) was observed with the Japanese infrared satellite AKARI in the near-infrared at a post-perihelion heliocentric distance of 1.7 AU. Observations were performed with the spectroscopic (2.5-5.0 {mu}m) and imaging (2.4, 3.2, and 4.1 {mu}m) modes on 2009 March 30 and 31 UT, respectively. AKARI images of the comet exhibit a sunward crescent-like shape coma and a dust tail extended toward the anti-solar direction. The 4.1 {mu}m image (CO/CO{sub 2} and dust grains) shows a distribution different from the 2.4 and 3.2 {mu}m images (H{sub 2}O and dust grains). The observed spectrum shows distinct bands at 2.66 and 4.26 {mu}m, attributed to H{sub 2}O and CO{sub 2}, respectively. This is the fifth comet in which CO{sub 2} has been directly detected in the near-infrared spectrum. In addition, CO at 4.67 {mu}m and a broad 3.2-3.6 {mu}m emission band from C-H bearing molecules were detected in the AKARI spectrum. The relative abundance ratios CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O and CO/H{sub 2}O derived from the molecular production rates are {approx}4%-5% and <2%, respectively. Comet Lulin belongs to the group that has relatively low abundances of CO and CO{sub 2} among all observed comets.

  4. Star formation and dust extinction properties of local galaxies from the AKARI-GALEX all-sky surveys . First results from the most secure multiband sample from the far-ultraviolet to the far-infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, T. T.; Buat, V.; Heinis, S.; Giovannoli, E.; Yuan, F.-T.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.; Murata, K. L.; Burgarella, D.

    2010-05-01

    Aims: We explore spectral energy distributions (SEDs), star formation (SF), and dust extinction properties of galaxies in the Local Universe. Methods: The AKARI all-sky survey provided the first bright point source catalog detected at 90 μm. Beginning with this catalog, we selected galaxies by matching the AKARI sources with those in the IRAS point source catalog redshift survey. We measured the total GALEX FUV and NUV flux densities with a photometry software we specifically developed for this purpose. In a further step we matched this sample with the Sloan digital sky survey (SDSS) and 2 micron all sky survey (2MASS) galaxies. With this procedure we obtained a basic sample which consists of 776 galaxies. After removing objects whose photometry was contaminated by foreground sources (mainly in the SDSS), we defined the “secure sample” which contains 607 galaxies. Results: The sample galaxies have redshifts of ⪉0.15, and their 90-μm luminosities range from 106 to 1012 L_⊙, with a peak at 1010 L_⊙. The SEDs display a large variety, especially more than four orders of magnitude at the mid-far-infrared (M-FIR), but if we sort the sample with respect to 90 μm, the average SED shows a coherent trend: the more luminous an SED at 90 μm, the redder the global SED becomes. The Mr - NUV - r color-magnitude relation of our sample does not show bimodality, and the distribution is centered on the green valley. We established formulae to convert the FIR luminosity from the AKARI bands to the total IR (TIR) luminosity LTIR. The luminosity related to the SF activity (LSF) is dominated by LTIR even if we take into account the FIR emission from dust heated by old stars. At a high SF rate (SFR) (>20 M_⊙ yr-1), the fraction of the directly visible SFR, SFRFUV, decreases. We also estimated the FUV attenuation AFUV from the FUV-to-TIR luminosity ratio. We examined the LTIR/LFUV-UV slope (FUV - NUV) relation. The majority of the sample has LTIR/LFUV ratios five to ten

  5. The Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic Survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baronchelli, I.; Scarlata, C.; Rodighiero, G.; Franceschini, A.; Capak, P. L.; Mei, S.; Vaccari, M.; Marchetti, L.; Hibon, P.; Sedgwick, C.; Pearson, C.; Serjeant, S.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Salvato, M.; Malkan, M.; Teplitz, H. I.; Hayes, M.; Colbert, J.; Papovich, C.; Devlin, M.; Kovacs, A.; Scott, K. S.; Surace, J.; Kirkpatrick, J. D.; Atek, H.; Urrutia, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Takeuchi, T. T.

    2016-03-01

    We present the Spitzer-IRAC/MIPS Extragalactic survey (SIMES) in the South Ecliptic Pole field. The large area covered (7.7 deg2), together with one of the lowest Galactic cirrus emissions in the entire sky and a very extensive coverage by Spitzer, Herschel, Akari, and GALEX, make the SIMES field ideal for extragalactic studies. The elongated geometry of the SIMES area (≈4:1), allowing for significant cosmic variance reduction, further improves the quality of statistical studies in this field. Here we present the reduction and photometric measurements of the Spitzer/IRAC data. The survey reaches depths of 1.93 and 1.75 μJy (1σ) at 3.6 and 4.5 μm, respectively. We discuss the multiwavelength IRAC-based catalog, completed with optical, mid-, and far-IR observations. We detect 341,000 sources with {F}3.6μ {{m}}≥slant 3σ . Of these, 10% have an associated 24 μm counterpart, while 2.7% have an associated SPIRE source. We release the catalog through the NASA/IPAC Infrared Science Archive. Two scientific applications of these IRAC data are presented in this paper. First, we compute integral number counts at 3.6 μm. Second, we use the [3.6]-[4.5] color index to identify galaxy clusters at z > 1.3. We select 27 clusters in the full area, a result consistent with previous studies at similar depth.

  6. THE COSMIC INFRARED BACKGROUND EXPERIMENT (CIBER): THE WIDE-FIELD IMAGERS

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, J.; Battle, J.; Sullivan, I.; Arai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Matsuura, S.; Tsumura, K.; Cooray, A.; Mitchell-Wynne, K.; Smidt, J.; Hristov, V.; Lam, A. C.; Levenson, L. R.; Mason, P.; Keating, B.; Renbarger, T.; Kim, M. G.; Lee, D. H.; Nam, U. W.; Suzuki, K.; and others

    2013-08-15

    We have developed and characterized an imaging instrument to measure the spatial properties of the diffuse near-infrared extragalactic background light (EBL) in a search for fluctuations from z > 6 galaxies during the epoch of reionization. The instrument is part of the Cosmic Infrared Background Experiment (CIBER), designed to observe the EBL above Earth's atmosphere during a suborbital sounding rocket flight. The imaging instrument incorporates a 2 Degree-Sign Multiplication-Sign 2 Degree-Sign field of view to measure fluctuations over the predicted peak of the spatial power spectrum at 10 arcmin, and 7'' Multiplication-Sign 7'' pixels, to remove lower redshift galaxies to a depth sufficient to reduce the low-redshift galaxy clustering foreground below instrumental sensitivity. The imaging instrument employs two cameras with {Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approx} 0.5 bandpasses centered at 1.1 {mu}m and 1.6 {mu}m to spectrally discriminate reionization extragalactic background fluctuations from local foreground fluctuations. CIBER operates at wavelengths where the electromagnetic spectrum of the reionization extragalactic background is thought to peak, and complements fluctuation measurements by AKARI and Spitzer at longer wavelengths. We have characterized the instrument in the laboratory, including measurements of the sensitivity, flat-field response, stray light performance, and noise properties. Several modifications were made to the instrument following a first flight in 2009 February. The instrument performed to specifications in three subsequent flights, and the scientific data are now being analyzed.

  7. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  8. Visual field

    MedlinePlus

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider sits directly in front ...

  9. Probing Ancient Mass Loss with AKARI's Extended Dust Emission Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasino, R.; Ueta, T.; Yamamura, I.; Izumiura, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results from the calibration and analysis of 166 far-IR extended thermal dust emission objects that were observed with AKARI’s FIS detector. The primary goal is to map the circumstellar shells of evolved stars in detail to excavate the ancient history of dusty mass loss. After establishing an extended aperture photometry method, we characterized the flux dependent slow transient response correction factors for each of the four wavelength bands. Using the new correction factors for extended (far-IR) emission, we present the photometric values that were calculated for the entire data set and also report our work on morphology characterization of the extended dust shells.

  10. Multivalued Fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinert, Hagen

    2008-01-03

    The lecture gives a short introduction to the theory of multivalued fields which are important for understanding the behavior and phase transitions of many physical systems, such as superfluids, superconductors, crystals, and confined charges.

  11. Overview of North Ecliptic Pole Deep Multi-wavelength Survey as a Probe of the Cosmic Noon Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuhara, Hideo; Oi, Nagisa

    2015-08-01

    An overview of the North Ecliptic Pole deep (0.5 deg2, NEP-Deep) multi-wavelength survey covering from X-ray to radio-wave is presented. The NEP-Deep provides us with several thousands of 15 μm or 18 μm selected sample of galaxies, which is the largest sample ever made at these wavelengths. A continuous filter coverage in the mid-infrared wavelength (7, 9, 11, 15, 18, and 24 μm) is unique and vital to diagnose the contributions from starbursts and AGNs in the galaxies out to z=2. The goal of the project is to resolve the nature of the cosmic star formation history at the cosmic noon era (e.g. z=1--2), and to find a clue to understand its decline from z=1 to present universe by utilizing the unique power of the multiwavelength survey. To achieve the goal we use a few diagnostic physical parameters unique to the NEP dataset: specific star-formation rate, dust attenuation, and obscured AGN fraction, etc.It is also noteworthy that the NEP is the legacy field thanks to its high visibility by the space observatories, such as eROSITA, Euclid, JWST, and SPICA. SPICA, the next generation large cooled space telescope is extremely powerful to study the rise and fall of the cosmic star-formation history in the universe.

  12. Arun field

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr.; Abdullah, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Arun field is a giant gas-condensate field operated by Mobil and Pertamina with over 20,000 acres of closure at the top of the Arun reservoir. A middle-shelf patch reef complex of early to middle Miocene age is the producing facies at the Arun field. About 1,100 ft of porous limestones, encased in shales, create a stratigraphic trap for overpressure hydrocarbons. Three main carbonate lithologies were encountered during the examination of over 4,300 ft of core; (1) a reef facies consisting of vuggy, coral encrusting, red-algal boundstones, (2) a near-reef facies consisting of foraminiferal, mixed-skeletal packstones with gravel-size coral fragments, and (3) an interreef lagoonal facies consisting of benthonic-foram packstones. Twenty-two species of corals have been identified from Arun reef facies; major reef-forming coals, listed in order of decreasing abundance, are Porites cf P. Lutes, Cyphastrea microphthalma, Astreopora myriophthalma, Styloconiella gunetheri, Porites solida, and Acropora ssp. The Arun reef is comprised of limestones (with minor amounts of dolomite). No shale beds occur in the sequence, and all carbonate facies are in communication. A pervasive microporosity, occurring throughout the Arun Limestone, results from meteoric alteration of original carbonate mud to form a microrhombic porosity that accounts for about three-fourths of the field's total porosity.

  13. Gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, R.

    1989-06-01

    This article is a survey of the history and ideas of gauge theory. Described here are the gradual emergence of symmetry as a driving force in the shaping of physical theory; the elevation of Noether's theorem, relating symmetries to conservation laws, to a fundamental principle of nature; and the force of the idea (''the gauge principle'') that the symmetries of nature, like the interactions themselves, should be local in character. The fundamental role of gauge fields in mediating the interactions of physics springs from Noether's theorem and the gauge principle in a remarkably clean and elegant way, leaving, however, some tantalizing loose ends that might prove to be the clue to a future deeper level of understanding. The example of the electromagnetic field as the prototype gauge theory is discussed in some detail and serves as the basis for examining the similarities and differences that emerge in generalizing to non-Abelian gauge theories. The article concludes with a brief examination of the dream of total unification: all the forces of nature in a single unified gauge theory, with the differences among the forces due to the specific way in which the fundamental symmetries are broken in the local environment.

  14. Beyond Field Education: Leadership of Field Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wertheimer, Mindy R.; Sodhi, Mimi

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a conceptual model of the field director's role outside of field education, specifically in the following 3 areas of leadership: (1) curricular, (2) programmatic, and (3) institutional. A survey was conducted to explore the field director's input targeted in these areas beyond prescribed field education tasks. The…

  15. Internal split field generator

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat; Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  16. Transverse Schwarzschild field

    SciTech Connect

    Belinfante, F.J.

    1982-06-15

    For Schwarzschild's static spherically symmetric external field, a coordinate system is determined in which the metric field is the transverse field satisfying the coordinate conditions of Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner.

  17. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak.

    PubMed

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  18. Fractal vector optical fields.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yue; Gao, Xu-Zhen; Cai, Meng-Qiang; Zhang, Guan-Lin; Li, Yongnan; Tu, Chenghou; Wang, Hui-Tian

    2016-07-15

    We introduce the concept of a fractal, which provides an alternative approach for flexibly engineering the optical fields and their focal fields. We propose, design, and create a new family of optical fields-fractal vector optical fields, which build a bridge between the fractal and vector optical fields. The fractal vector optical fields have polarization states exhibiting fractal geometry, and may also involve the phase and/or amplitude simultaneously. The results reveal that the focal fields exhibit self-similarity, and the hierarchy of the fractal has the "weeding" role. The fractal can be used to engineer the focal field. PMID:27420485

  19. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications. PMID:26552343

  20. Electrostatic Field Invisibility Cloak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Chuwen; Yang, Yuping; Geng, Zhaoxin; Li, Bo; Zhou, Ji

    2015-11-01

    The invisibility cloak has been drawing much attention due to its new concept for manipulating many physical fields, from oscillating wave fields (electromagnetic, acoustic and elastic) to static magnetic fields, dc electric fields, and diffusive fields. Here, an electrostatic field invisibility cloak has been theoretically investigated and experimentally demonstrated to perfectly hide two dimensional objects without disturbing their external electrostatic fields. The desired cloaking effect has been achieved via both cancelling technology and transformation optics (TO). This study demonstrates a novel way for manipulating electrostatic fields, which shows promise for a wide range of potential applications.

  1. External split field generator

    SciTech Connect

    Thundat, Thomas George; Van Neste, Charles W.; Vass, Arpad Alexander

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  2. Wake fields and wake field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, K.L.F.; Wilson, P.B.; Weiland, T.

    1984-12-01

    In this lecture we introduce the concepts of wake fields and wake potentials, examine some basic properties of these functions, show how they can be calculated, and look briefly at a few important applications. One such application is wake field acceleration. The wake field accelerator is capable of producing the high gradients required for future very high energy e/sup +/e/sup -/ linear colliders. The principles of wake field acceleration, and a brief description of experiments in progress in this area, are presented in the concluding section. 40 references, 27 figures.

  3. Field Trips. Beginnings Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Sally; Aronson, Susan S.; Stacey, Susan; Winbush, Olga

    2001-01-01

    Five articles highlight benefits and organization of field trips: (1) "Field Trips Promote Child Learning at Its Best"; (2) "Planning for Maximum Benefit, Minimum Risk"; (3) "Coaching Community Hosts"; (4) "The Story of a Field Trip: Trash and Its Place within Children's Learning and Community"; and (5) "Field Trip Stories and Perspectives" (from…

  4. Field Campaign Guidelines

    SciTech Connect

    Voyles, J. W.; Chapman, L. A.

    2015-12-01

    This document establishes a common set of guidelines for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility for planning, executing, and closing out field campaigns. The steps that guide individual field campaigns are described in the Field Campaign Tracking System and are specifically tailored to meet the scope of each field campaign.

  5. PREPROCESSING MAGNETIC FIELDS WITH CHROMOSPHERIC LONGITUDINAL FIELDS

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Tetsuya T.; Kusano, K.

    2012-06-20

    Nonlinear force-free field (NLFFF) extrapolation is a powerful tool for the modeling of the magnetic field in the solar corona. However, since the photospheric magnetic field does not in general satisfy the force-free condition, some kind of processing is required to assimilate data into the model. In this paper, we report the results of new preprocessing for the NLFFF extrapolation. Through this preprocessing, we expect to obtain magnetic field data similar to those in the chromosphere. In our preprocessing, we add a new term concerning chromospheric longitudinal fields into the optimization function proposed by Wiegelmann et al. We perform a parameter survey of six free parameters to find minimum force- and torque-freeness with the simulated-annealing method. Analyzed data are a photospheric vector magnetogram of AR 10953 observed with the Hinode spectropolarimeter and a chromospheric longitudinal magnetogram observed with SOLIS spectropolarimeter. It is found that some preprocessed fields show the smallest force- and torque-freeness and are very similar to the chromospheric longitudinal fields. On the other hand, other preprocessed fields show noisy maps, although the force- and torque-freeness are of the same order. By analyzing preprocessed noisy maps in the wave number space, we found that small and large wave number components balance out on the force-free index. We also discuss our iteration limit of the simulated-annealing method and magnetic structure broadening in the chromosphere.

  6. What Are Electromagnetic Fields?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with distance from it. Conductors such as metal shield them very effectively. Other materials, such as building ... with distance from the source. Most building materials shield electric fields to some extent. Magnetic fields arise ...

  7. Dissipative Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kheirandish, F.; Amooshahi, M.

    2008-11-18

    Quantum field theory of a damped vibrating string as the simplest dissipative scalar field theory is investigated by introducing a minimal coupling method. The rate of energy flowing between the system and its environment is obtained.

  8. Understanding Vector Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curjel, C. R.

    1990-01-01

    Presented are activities that help students understand the idea of a vector field. Included are definitions, flow lines, tangential and normal components along curves, flux and work, field conservation, and differential equations. (KR)

  9. Electric Field Imaging Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcutt, Terrence; Hughitt, Brian; Burke, Eric; Generazio, Edward

    2016-01-01

    NDE historically has focused technology development in propagating wave phenomena with little attention to the field of electrostatics and emanating electric fields. This work is intended to bring electrostatic imaging to the forefront of new inspection technologies, and new technologies in general. The specific goals are to specify the electric potential and electric field including the electric field spatial components emanating from, to, and throughout volumes containing objects or in free space.

  10. Solar Wind Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. J.

    1995-01-01

    The magnetic fields originate as coronal fields that are converted into space by the supersonic, infinitely conducting, solar wind. On average, the sun's rotation causes the field to wind up and form an Archimedes Spiral. However, the field direction changes almost continuously on a variety of scales and the irregular nature of these changes is often interpreted as evidence that the solar wind flow is turbulent.

  11. Nonperturbative Quantum Field Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Xingbo; Ilderton, Anton; Maris, Pieter; Vary, James P.

    2014-06-01

    We introduce a nonperturbative, first-principles approach to time-dependent problems in quantum field theory. In this approach, the time-evolution of quantum field configurations is calculated in real time and at the amplitude level. This method is particularly suitable for treating systems interacting with a time-dependent background field. As a test problem, we apply this approach to QED and study electron acceleration and the associated photon emission in a time- and space-dependent electromagnetic background field.

  12. Far field acceleration

    SciTech Connect

    Fernow, R.C.

    1995-07-01

    Far fields are propagating electromagnetic waves far from their source, boundary surfaces, and free charges. The general principles governing the acceleration of charged particles by far fields are reviewed. A survey of proposed field configurations is given. The two most important schemes, Inverse Cerenkov acceleration and Inverse free electron laser acceleration, are discussed in detail.

  13. Introducing Electromagnetic Field Momentum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Ben Yu-Kuang

    2012-01-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional…

  14. Magnetic field sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Nicolas

    2012-09-01

    Earlier papers1-3 in this journal have described experiments on measuring the magnetic fields of current-carrying wires and permanent magnets using magnetic field probes of various kinds. This paper explains how to use an iPad and the free app MagnetMeter-3D Vector Magnetometer and Accelerometer4 (compass HD) to measure the magnetic fields.

  15. Politics of aviation fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vivent, Jacques

    1922-01-01

    In short, the "politics of aviation" lies in a few propositions: the need of having as large a number of fields as possible and of sufficient area; the utilization of the larger part of the existing military fields; the selection of uncultivated or unproductive fields, whenever technical conditions permit; ability to disregard (save in exceptional cases) objections of an agricultural nature.

  16. String field theory and tachyon field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yi

    In this thesis, we study Sen's conjecture on tachyon condensation by using string field theories, i.e. boundary string field theory (BSFT) and cubic string field theory (CSFT). In the BSFT side, the first explicit calculation of effective tachyon action for the bosonic string was given by Witten ten years ago and by many other authors in the last two years. It was extended to the superstring case shortly after. In our work, we give an explicit calculation of Green functions for the fermionic fields and compute the effective tachyon action for the superstring. The results we obtain agree with earlier results. We then generalize the BSFT method to one loop level. The tachyon condensation at one loop level is systematically studied, and many interesting results are obtained which verify Sen's conjecture. We also apply this method to the non-orientable theory at one loop level, where the expected divergence cancellation is reproduced and the similar effective tachyon action is obtained. By using the boundary state formalism, we verify the duality between open and closed strings. In the CSFT side, since there is no known solution to this theory, tachyon condensation can only be studied by numerical methods, i.e. level truncation. However, at the tachyon vacuum, CSFT is simplified to vacuum string field theory (VSFT) which has a solution - sliver state. By adding a tachyon vertex to the boundary of the sliver state, we have calculated the effective action.

  17. Artificial gravity field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markley, Larry C.; Lindner, John F.

    Using computer algebra to run Einstein's equations "backward", from field to source rather than from source to field, we design an artificial gravity field for a space station or spaceship. Everywhere inside astronauts experience normal Earth gravity, while outside they float freely. The stress-energy that generates the field contains exotic matter of negative energy density but also relies importantly on pressures and shears, which we describe. The same techniques can be readily used to design other interesting spacetimes and thereby elucidate the connection between the source and field in general relativity.

  18. Magnetic field generator

    DOEpatents

    Krienin, Frank

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  19. AKARI/IRC Near-infrared Spectral Atlas of Galactic Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohsawa, Ryou; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Matsuura, Mikako; Kaneda, Hidehiro

    2016-04-01

    Near-infrared (2.5-5.0 μm) low-resolution (λ/Δλ ˜ 100) spectra of 72 Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) were obtained with the Infrared Camera (IRC) in the post-helium phase. The IRC, equipped with a 1‧ × 1‧ window for spectroscopy of a point source, was capable of obtaining near-infrared spectra in a slit-less mode without any flux loss due to a slit. The spectra show emission features including hydrogen recombination lines and the 3.3-3.5 μm hydrocarbon features. The intensity and equivalent width of the emission features were measured by spectral fitting. We made a catalog providing unique information on the investigation of the near-infrared emission of PNe. In this paper, details of the observations and characteristics of the catalog are described.

  20. Probing Ancient Mass Loss with AKARI's Extended Thermal Dust Emission Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomasino, Rachael L.; Ueta, Toshiya; Yamamura, Issei; Izumiura, Hideyuki

    We present the method for the calibration and analysis of 166 far-IR extended thermal dust emission objects that were observed with AKARI’s FIS detector. The primary goal of the analysis of this data set is to map the circumstellar shells of evolved stars in detail to understand the ancient history of dusty mass loss. After establishing an extended aperture photometry method, we re-characterize the flux dependent slow transient response correction factors for each of the four wavelength bands and propose a new flux calibration method for extended sources. Using these new correction factors, the photometric measurements are made using a extended aperture which is defined by a background + 3σ threshold. With photometry measurements for each of the four FIS bands, an SED of a modified blackbody was fit to produce the emissivity beta, effective temperature, and color correction factor.

  1. Gauge fields in spintronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, T.; Jalil, M. B. A.; Tan, S. G.; Murakami, S.

    2011-12-01

    We present an overview of gauge fields in spintronics, focusing on their origin and physical consequences. Important topics, such as the Berry gauge field associated with adiabatic quantum evolution as well as gauge fields arising from other non-adiabatic considerations, are discussed. We examine the appearance and effects of gauge fields across three spaces, namely real-space, momentum-space, and time, taking on a largely semiclassical approach. We seize the opportunity to study other "spin-like" systems, including graphene, topological insulators, magnonics, and photonics, which emphasize the ubiquity and importance of gauge fields. We aim to provide an intuitive and pedagogical insight into the role played by gauge fields in spin transport.

  2. Simulated workplace neutron fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacoste, V.; Taylor, G.; Röttger, S.

    2011-12-01

    The use of simulated workplace neutron fields, which aim at replicating radiation fields at practical workplaces, is an alternative solution for the calibration of neutron dosemeters. They offer more appropriate calibration coefficients when the mean fluence-to-dose equivalent conversion coefficients of the simulated and practical fields are comparable. Intensive Monte Carlo modelling work has become quite indispensable for the design and/or the characterization of the produced mixed neutron/photon fields, and the use of Bonner sphere systems and proton recoil spectrometers is also mandatory for a reliable experimental determination of the neutron fluence energy distribution over the whole energy range. The establishment of a calibration capability with a simulated workplace neutron field is not an easy task; to date only few facilities are available as standard calibration fields.

  3. 3D field harmonics

    SciTech Connect

    Caspi, S.; Helm, M.; Laslett, L.J.

    1991-03-30

    We have developed an harmonic representation for the three dimensional field components within the windings of accelerator magnets. The form by which the field is presented is suitable for interfacing with other codes that make use of the 3D field components (particle tracking and stability). The field components can be calculated with high precision and reduced cup time at any location (r,{theta},z) inside the magnet bore. The same conductor geometry which is used to simulate line currents is also used in CAD with modifications more readily available. It is our hope that the format used here for magnetic fields can be used not only as a means of delivering fields but also as a way by which beam dynamics can suggest correction to the conductor geometry. 5 refs., 70 figs.

  4. Quaternion gauge fields. Pseudocolor

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, A.B.

    1987-03-01

    A simplified Guenaydin-Guersey model, in which a Majorana field constructed using quaternions combines a lepton and a color quark, is considered. Formulation of the gauge principle directly in the quaternions leads to the appearance of two vector quaternion gauge fields, these corresponding to the decomposition SO(4) approx. SO(3) x SO(3) of the invariance group. The diagonal subgroup SO(3) of automorphisms of the quarternions appears as a pseudocolor symmetry of the quarks, and the gauge field corresponding to it as the field of three color gluons. The other gauge field corresponds to lepton-quark transitions and in the presence of spontaneous breaking of the SO(4) gauge symmetry by the scalar quaternion field acquires a (large) finite mass.

  5. Wake field accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, P.B.

    1986-02-01

    In a wake field accelerator a high current driving bunch injected into a structure or plasma produces intense induced fields, which are in turn used to accelerate a trailing charge or bunch. The basic concepts of wake field acceleration are described. Wake potentials for closed cavities and periodic structures are derived, as are wake potentials on a collinear path with a charge distribution. Cylindrically symmetric structures excited by a beam in the form of a ring are considered. (LEW)

  6. Field emission electron source

    SciTech Connect

    Zettl, A.K.; Cohen, M.L.

    2000-05-02

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm{sup 2} at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  7. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  8. Field emission chemical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Panitz, J.A.

    1983-11-22

    A field emission chemical sensor for specific detection of a chemical entity in a sample includes a closed chamber enclosing two field emission electrode sets, each field emission electrode set comprising (a) an electron emitter electrode from which field emission electrons can be emitted when an effective voltage is connected to the electrode set; and (b) a collector electrode which will capture said electrons emitted from said emitter electrode. One of the electrode sets is passive to the chemical entity and the other is active thereto and has an active emitter electrode which will bind the chemical entity when contacted therewith.

  9. Magnetic Fields in Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are a major agent in the interstellar medium. They contribute significantly to the total pressure which balances the gas disk against gravitation. They affect the gas flows in spiral arms (Gómez and Cox, 2002). The effective sound speed of the gas is increased by the presence of strong fields which reduce the shock strength. The interstellar fields are closely connected to gas clouds. They affect the dynamics of the gas clouds (Elmegreen, 1981; de Avillez and Breitschwerdt, 2004). The stability and evolution of gas clouds are also influenced by magnetic fields, but it is not understood how (Crutcher, 1999; see Chap. 7). Magnetic fields are essential for the onset of star formation as they enable the removal of angular momentum from the protostellar cloud during its collapse (magnetic braking, Mouschovias, 1990). Strong fields may shift the stellar mass spectrum towards the more massive stars (Mestel, 1990). MHD turbulence distributes energy from supernova explosions within the ISM (Subramanian, 1998) and regenerates the field via the dynamo process (Wielebinski, R., Krause, 1993, Beck et al., 1996; Sect. 6). Magnetic reconnection is a possible heating source for the ISM and halo gas (Birk et al., 1998). Magnetic fields also control the density and distribution of cosmic rays in the ISM. A realistic model for any process in the ISM needs basic information about the magnetic field which has to be provided by observations.

  10. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  11. Photospheric magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R.

    1972-01-01

    Knowledge on the nature of magnetic fields on the solar surface is reviewed. At least a large part of the magnetic flux in the solar surface is confined to small bundles of lines of force within which the field strength is of the order of 500 gauss. Magnetic fields are closely associated with all types of solar activity. Magnetic flux appears at the surface at the clearly defined birth or regeneration of activity of an active region. As the region ages, the magnetic flux migrates to form large-scale patterns and the polar fields. Some manifestations of the large-scale distribution are discussed.

  12. Modeling Saturn's Magnetospheric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Leinweber, H. K.; Russell, C. T.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2015-12-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has now provided an excellent coverage of radial distances, local times and latitudes in Saturn's magnetosphere. The magnetic field observations from Cassini continue to provide deep insights on the structure and dynamics of Saturn's magnetosphere. Two of the unexpected findings from Saturn's magnetosphere are that the current sheet of Saturn assumes a shallow saucer like shape from the forcing of the solar wind on the magnetosphere and that rotational diurnal periodicities are ubiquitous in a magnetosphere formed by an axisymmetric internal field from Saturn. We have used the comprehensive magnetic field data from Cassini to construct a versatile new model of Saturn's magnetospheric field for use in current and future data analysis. Our model consists of fully shielded modules that specify the internal spherical harmonic field of Saturn, the ring current and the magnetotail current systems and the interconnection magnetic field from the solar wind IMF. The tilt and hinging of the current sheet is introduced by using the general deformation technique [Tsyganenko, 1998]. In the new model, Saturn's current sheet field is based on Tsyganenko and Peredo [1994] formalism for disk-shaped current sheets. The shielding field from the magnetopause for the equatorial current sheet and the internal field is specified by Cartesian and cylindrical harmonics, respectively. To derive the shielding fields we use a model of the magnetopause constructed from magnetopause crossings observed by both Cassini and Voyager (Arridge et al. 2006). The model uses observations from Pioneer, Voyager and Cassini. A comparison of model field with the observations will be presented. Finally, we discuss both the applications of the new model and its further generalization using data from the proximal orbit phase of Cassini.

  13. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-03-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  14. Forrest or Field?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangiante, Elaine Silva

    2009-01-01

    An open field--with its wildflowers, grasses, and vole tunnels--became an instant classroom. Students' senses were awakened there, and upon entering a nearby forest, they immediately detected a difference: less light and cooler air. "Why are there no grasses in the forest? Why aren't there ferns in the field?" These and other questions emerged as…

  15. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  16. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Gail; Cooper, Garry

    The Internet field trips in this directory allow teachers to take students almost anywhere--without the usual ordeals associated with field trips. Organized by subject and cross-referenced for quick and easy access, this book leads educators and students to the most exciting, educational, and innovative Web sites on the Internet. Chapters cover…

  17. Octonic Massive Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Kekeç, Seray

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper we propose the octonic form of massive field equations based on the analogy with electromagnetism and linear gravity. Using the advantages of octon algebra the Maxwell-Dirac-Proca equations have been reformulated in compact and elegant way. The energy-momentum relations for massive field are discussed.

  18. Pulsed electric fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The concept of pulsed electric fields (PEF) was first proposed in 1967 to change the behavior or microorganisms. The electric field phenomenon was identified as membrane rupture theory in the 1980s. Increasing the membrane permeability led to the application of PEF assisted extraction of cellular co...

  19. Undulator Field Integral Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-07

    The LCLS undulator field integrals must be very small so that the beam trajectory slope and offset stay within tolerance. In order to make accurate measurements of the small field integrals, a long coil will be used. This note describes the design of the coil measurement system.

  20. Track and Field Facilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Tony

    2001-01-01

    Discusses planning and design tips that help ensure track and field facilities are successful and well-suited to both school and community use. Examines approaches to determining the best track surface and ways to maximize track and field flexibility with limited space. (GR)

  1. Quaternion scalar field

    SciTech Connect

    De Leo, S. ); Rotelli, P. )

    1992-01-15

    We discuss the extension of a version of {ital quaternion} quantum mechanics to field theory and in particular to the simplest example, the free scalar field. A previous difficulty with the conservation of four-momentum for the anomalous'' bosonic particles is resolved.

  2. Tips from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connolly, Rachel; Groome, Meghan; Sheppard, Keith; Stroud, Nick

    2006-01-01

    Field trips are opportunities to experience science in settings beyond the classroom. Much educational research has focused on effective ways of designing and planning field trips for optimal impact on the classroom and science curriculum. However, teachers are sometimes at a loss on how to design a trip that will enhance students' analytical…

  3. OMSI's Hancock Field Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Connie Hofferber

    1990-01-01

    The Hancock field station (Oregon), owned by the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, offers programs for children (age 6-13) which stress development of scientific observation and investigation skills, through field work in such areas as fossil hunting with professional paleontologists as well as other outdoor activities. (DB)

  4. Electromagnetic Field Penetration Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deshpande, M.D.

    2000-01-01

    A numerical method is presented to determine electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of rectangular enclosure with apertures on its wall used for input and output connections, control panels, visual-access windows, ventilation panels, etc. Expressing EM fields in terms of cavity Green's function inside the enclosure and the free space Green's function outside the enclosure, integral equations with aperture tangential electric fields as unknown variables are obtained by enforcing the continuity of tangential electric and magnetic fields across the apertures. Using the Method of Moments, the integral equations are solved for unknown aperture fields. From these aperture fields, the EM field inside a rectangular enclosure due to external electromagnetic sources are determined. Numerical results on electric field shielding of a rectangular cavity with a thin rectangular slot obtained using the present method are compared with the results obtained using simple transmission line technique for code validation. The present technique is applied to determine field penetration inside a Boeing-757 by approximating its passenger cabin as a rectangular cavity filled with a homogeneous medium and its passenger windows by rectangular apertures. Preliminary results for, two windows, one on each side of fuselage were considered. Numerical results for Boeing-757 at frequencies 26 MHz, 171-175 MHz, and 428-432 MHz are presented.

  5. A Biomes Field Trip.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, William H.; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes a field trip designed to give students opportunities to experience relevant data leading to concepts in biogeography. Suggests that teachers (including college instructors) adapt the areas studied and procedures used to their own locations. Includes a suggested field trip handout. (JN)

  6. Field Trip Fundamentals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how to prepare for and conduct a safe and worry-free educational experience. She shares a few tips that will ensure field trips will be fun, safe, engaging, and productive. She stresses that with proper planning, field trips can be unique ways to explore the world with students.

  7. Teaching in the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Lou; Donaldson, George

    Beginning with a field-trip justification, this guide illuminates the problems and procedural considerations of taking school classes outside of school grounds. Major divisions of treatment are Motivating Field Work, Preparing Yourself (the teacher), Determining Purposes, Preparing for the Mechanics of the Trip, Getting Permission, Planning for…

  8. Open field lines instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Pozzoli, R. |

    1995-09-01

    The results of some recent theoretical papers dealing with flute-like instabilities in the scrape-off layer of a tokamak with limiter configuration, where the magnetic field intersects conducting walls, are briefly recalled. Attention is then paid to the instability driven by the electron temperature gradient across the field in conjunction with the formation of the Debye sheath at the boundary, and to the effects due to the inclination of the end walls with respect to the magnetic field. When a divertor configuration is considered, important modifications are found owing to the strong deformations of the flux tubes passing near the {ital x}-point, which contrast the onset of flute-like perturbations, and to the stochasticity of field lines that can be excited by magnetic field perturbations. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  9. Dual double field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergshoeff, Eric A.; Hohm, Olaf; Penas, Victor A.; Riccioni, Fabio

    2016-06-01

    We present the dual formulation of double field theory at the linearized level. This is a classically equivalent theory describing the duals of the dilaton, the Kalb-Ramond field and the graviton in a T-duality or O( D, D) covariant way. In agreement with previous proposals, the resulting theory encodes fields in mixed Young-tableau representations, combining them into an antisymmetric 4-tensor under O( D, D). In contrast to previous proposals, the theory also requires an antisymmetric 2-tensor and a singlet, which are not all pure gauge. The need for these additional fields is analogous to a similar phenomenon for "exotic" dualizations, and we clarify this by comparing with the dualizations of the component fields. We close with some speculative remarks on the significance of these observations for the full non-linear theory yet to be constructed.

  10. The Coriolis field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, L. Filipe; Natário, José

    2016-05-01

    We present a pedagogical discussion of the Coriolis field, emphasizing its not-so-well-understood aspects. We show that this field satisfies the field equations of the so-called Newton-Cartan theory, a generalization of Newtonian gravity that is covariant under changes of arbitrarily rotating and accelerated frames. Examples of solutions of this theory are given, including the Newtonian analogue of the Gödel universe. We discuss how to detect the Coriolis field by its effect on gyroscopes, of which the gyrocompass is an example. Finally, using a similar framework, we discuss the Coriolis field generated by mass currents in general relativity, and its measurement by the gravity probe B and LAGEOS/LARES experiments.

  11. Field-Dependence/Field-Independence. Educational Implications for Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holtzman, Elsa Hernandez; And Others

    An overview of cognitve styles and research in the field of field dependence/field independence within the context of the special needs of Hispanic students is presented. Various studies by Witkin et al. on the dimension of field dependence/field independence required the subject to perceive an item independently of the field or context that…

  12. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  13. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-01-01

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  14. Introducing electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roche, John

    2016-09-01

    The clear introduction of basic concepts and definitions is crucial for teaching any topic in physics. I have always found it difficult to teach fields. While searching for better explanations I hit on an approach of reading foundational texts and electromagnetic textbooks in ten year lots, ranging from 1840 to the present. By combining this with modern techniques of textual interpretation I attempt to clarify three introductory concepts: how the field is defined; the principle of superposition and the role of the electrostatic field in a circuit.

  15. Octonic massless field equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Tanişli, Murat; Kansu, Mustafa Emre

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, it is proven that the associative octons including scalar, pseudoscalar, pseudovector and vector values are convenient and capable tools to generalize the Maxwell-Dirac like field equations of electromagnetism and linear gravity in a compact and simple way. Although an attempt to describe the massless field equations of electromagnetism and linear gravity needs the sixteen real component mathematical structures, it is proved that these equations can be formulated in terms of eight components of octons. Furthermore, the generalized wave equation in terms of potentials is derived in the presence of electromagnetic and gravitational charges (masses). Finally, conservation of energy concept has also been investigated for massless fields.

  16. Magnetic Field Measurement System

    SciTech Connect

    Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar; Dunn, Jonathan Hunter

    2007-01-19

    A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

  17. Introducing electromagnetic field momentum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu-Kuang Hu, Ben

    2012-07-01

    I describe an elementary way of introducing electromagnetic field momentum. By considering a system of a long solenoid and line charge, the dependence of the field momentum on the electric and magnetic fields can be deduced. I obtain the electromagnetic angular momentum for a point charge and magnetic monopole pair partially through dimensional analysis and without using vector calculus identities or the need to evaluate integrals. I use this result to show that linear and angular momenta are conserved for a charge in the presence of a magnetic dipole when the dipole strength is changed.

  18. Field resonance propulsion concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holt, A. C.

    1979-01-01

    A propulsion concept was developed based on a proposed resonance between coherent, pulsed electromagnetic wave forms, and gravitational wave forms (or space-time metrics). Using this concept a spacecraft propulsion system potentially capable of galactic and intergalactic travel without prohibitive travel times was designed. The propulsion system utilizes recent research associated with magnetic field line merging, hydromagnetic wave effects, free-electron lasers, laser generation of megagauss fields, and special structural and containment metals. The research required to determine potential, field resonance characteristics and to evaluate various aspects of the spacecraft propulsion design is described.

  19. Remnant field detector

    DOEpatents

    Visser, Age T.

    1988-05-03

    A method apparatus for qualitatively detecting remnant magnetic fields in matched pairs of magnet cores. Equal magnitude and oppositely oriented magnetic flux is induced in the magnet cores by oppositely wound primary windings and current source. Identically wound secondary windings generate output voltages in response to the induced flux. The output voltages generated should be of equal magnitude and opposite polarity if there is no remnant field in the cores. The output voltages will be unequal which is detected if either core has a remnant field.

  20. Gauge fields and inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maleknejad, A.; Sheikh-Jabbari, M. M.; Soda, J.

    2013-07-01

    The isotropy and homogeneity of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) favors “scalar driven” early Universe inflationary models. However, gauge fields and other non-scalar fields are far more common at all energy scales, in particular at high energies seemingly relevant to inflation models. Hence, in this review we consider the role and consequences, theoretical and observational, that gauge fields can have during the inflationary era. Gauge fields may be turned on in the background during inflation, or may become relevant at the level of cosmic perturbations. There have been two main classes of models with gauge fields in the background, models which show violation of the cosmic no-hair theorem and those which lead to isotropic FLRW cosmology, respecting the cosmic no-hair theorem. Models in which gauge fields are only turned on at the cosmic perturbation level, may source primordial magnetic fields. We also review specific observational features of these models on the CMB and/or the primordial cosmic magnetic fields. Our discussions will be mainly focused on the inflation period, with only a brief discussion on the post inflationary (p)reheating era. Large field models: The initial value of the inflaton field is large, generically super-Planckian, and it rolls slowly down toward the potential minimum at smaller φ values. For instance, chaotic inflation is one of the representative models of this class. The typical potential of large-field models has a monomial form as V(φ)=V0φn. A simple analysis using the dynamical equations reveals that for number of e-folds Ne larger than 60, we require super-Planckian initial field values,5φ0>3M. For these models typically ɛ˜η˜Ne-1. Small field models: Inflaton field is initially small and slowly evolves toward the potential minimum at larger φ values. The small field models are characterized by the following potential V(φ)=V0(1-(), which corresponds to a Taylor expansion about the origin, but more realistic

  1. On Cosmic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florido, E.; Battaner, E.

    2010-12-01

    Magnetic fields are present in all astrophysical media. However, many models and interpretations of observations often ignore them, because magnetic fields are difficult to handle and because they produce complicated morphological features. Here we will comment on the basic intuitive properties, which even if not completely true, provide a first guiding insight on the physics of a particular astrophysical problem. These magnetic properties are not mathematically demonstrated here. How magnetic fields evolve and how they introduce dynamical effects are considered, also including a short comment on General Relativity Magnetohydrodynamics. In a second part we consider some audacious and speculative matters. They are answers to three questions: a) How draw a cube without lifting the pencil from the paper so that when the pen passes through the same side do in the same direction? B) Are MILAGRO anisotropies miraculous? C) Do cosmic magnetic lenses exist?. The last two questions deal with issues related with the interplay between magnetic fields and cosmic ray propagation.

  2. Field Geology/Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Carlton; Jakes, Petr; Jaumann, Ralf; Marshall, John; Moses, Stewart; Ryder, Graham; Saunders, Stephen; Singer, Robert

    1996-01-01

    The field geology/process group examined the basic operations of a terrestrial field geologist and the manner in which these operations could be transferred to a planetary lander. Four basic requirements for robotic field geology were determined: geologic content; surface vision; mobility; and manipulation. Geologic content requires a combination of orbital and descent imaging. Surface vision requirements include range, resolution, stereo, and multispectral imaging. The minimum mobility for useful field geology depends on the scale of orbital imagery. Manipulation requirements include exposing unweathered surfaces, screening samples, and bringing samples in contact with analytical instruments. To support these requirements, several advanced capabilities for future development are recommended. Capabilities include near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy, hyper-spectral imaging, multispectral microscopy, artificial intelligence in support of imaging, x ray diffraction, x ray fluorescence, and rock chipping.

  3. Kepler Field of View

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Kepler mission will be looking continuously at over 100,000 stars in one region of the sky, in the Cygnus and Lyra constellations. The field of view is extremely large for an astronomical teles...

  4. Crystal Field Handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newman, D. J.; Ng, Betty

    2007-09-01

    List of contributors; Preface; Introduction; 1. Crystal field splitting mechanisms D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 2. Empirical crystal fields D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 3. Fitting crystal field parameters D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 4. Lanthanide and actinide optical spectra G. K. Liu; 5. Superposition model D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 6. Effects of electron correlation on crystal field splitting M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; 7. Ground state splittings in S-state ions D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; 8. Invariants and moments Y. Y. Yeung; 9. Semiclassical model K. S. Chan; 10. Transition intensities M. F. Reid; Appendix 1. Point symmetry D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 2. QBASIC programs D. J. Newman and Betty Ng; Appendix 3. Accessible program packages Y. Y. Yeung, M. F. Reid and D. J. Newman; Appendix 4. Computer package CST Cz. Rudowicz; Bibliography; Index.

  5. Algebraic Mean Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dankova, T. S.; Rosensteel, G.

    1998-10-01

    Mean field theory has an unexpected group theoretic mathematical foundation. Instead of representation theory which applies to most group theoretic quantum models, Hartree-Fock and Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov have been formulated in terms of coadjoint orbits for the groups U(n) and O(2n). The general theory of mean fields is formulated for an arbitrary Lie algebra L of fermion operators. The moment map provides the correspondence between the Hilbert space of microscopic wave functions and the dual space L^* of densities. The coadjoint orbits of the group in the dual space are phase spaces on which time-dependent mean field theory is equivalent to a classical Hamiltonian dynamical system. Indeed it forms a finite-dimensional Lax system. The mean field theories for the Elliott SU(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) algebras are constructed explicitly in the coadjoint orbit framework.

  6. Hyperspectral light field imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitner, Raimund; Kenda, Andreas; Tortschanoff, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    A light field camera acquires the intensity and direction of rays from a scene providing a 4D representation L(x,y,u,v) called the light field. The acquired light field allows to virtually change view point and selectively re-focus regions algorithmically, an important feature for many applications in imaging and microscopy. The combination with hyperspectral imaging provides the additional advantage that small objects (beads, cells, nuclei) can be categorised using their spectroscopic signatures. Using an inverse fluorescence microscope, a LCTF tuneable filter and a light field setup as a test-bed, fluorescence-marked beads have been imaged and reconstructed into a 4D hyper-spectral image cube LHSI(x,y,z,λ). The results demonstrate the advantages of the approach for fluorescence microscopy providing extended depth of focus (DoF) and the fidelity of hyper-spectral imaging.

  7. Electric Field Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arribas, E.; Gallardo, C.; Molina, M.; Sanjosé, V.

    We present the computer program called LINES which is able to calculate and visualize the electric field lines due to seven different discrete configurations of electric point charges. Also we show two examples of the graphic screens generated by LINES.

  8. MISR Field Campaign Imagery

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-07-23

      MISR Support of Field Campaigns Aerosol Arctic Research of the Composition of the ... Daily ARCTAS Aerosol Polar Imagery ​Gulf of Mexico Atmospheric Composition and Climate Study ( GoMACCS ) ​July - ...

  9. Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinze, William J.

    Coincidentally, as I sat down in late October 2003 to read and review the second edition of Wallace H. Campbell's text, Introduction to Geomagnetic Fields, we received warnings from the news media of a massive solar flare and its possible effect on power supply systems and satellite communications. News programs briefly explained the source of Sun-Earth interactions. If you are interested in learning more about the physics of the connection between sun spots and power supply systems and their impact on orbiting satellites, I urge you to become acquainted with Campbell's book. It presents an interesting and informative explanation of the geomagnetic field and its applications to a wide variety of topics, including oil exploration, climate change, and fraudulent claims of the utility of magnetic fields for alleviating human pain. Geomagnetism, the study of the nature and processes of the Earth's magnetic fields and its application to the investigation of the Earth, its processes, and history, is a mature science with a well-developed theoretical foundation and a vast array of observations. It is discussed in varied detail in Earth physics books and most entry-level geoscience texts. The latter treatments largely are driven by the need to discuss paleomagnetism as an essential tool in studying plate tectonics. A more thorough explanation of geomagnetism is needed by many interested scientists in related fields and by laypersons. This is the objective of Campbell's book. It is particularly germane in view of a broad range of geomagnetic topics that are at the forefront of today's science, including environmental magnetism, so-called ``jerks'' observed in the Earth's magnetic field, the perplexing magnetic field of Mars, improved satellite magnetic field observations, and the increasing availability of high-quality continental magnetic anomaly maps, to name only a few.

  10. Magnetic field dosimeter development

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1980-09-01

    In recent years there has been increased concern over potential health hazards related to exposure of personnel to magnetic fields. If exposure standards are to be established, then a means for measuring magnetic field dose must be available. To meet this need, the Department of Energy has funded development of prototype dosimeters at the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory. This manual reviews the principle of operation of the dosimeter and also contains step-by-step instructions for its operation.

  11. Collective field accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Luce, John S.

    1978-01-01

    A collective field accelerator which operates with a vacuum diode and utilizes a grooved cathode and a dielectric anode that operates with a relativistic electron beam with a .nu./.gamma. of .about. 1, and a plurality of dielectric lenses having an axial magnetic field thereabout to focus the collectively accelerated electrons and ions which are ejected from the anode. The anode and lenses operate as unoptimized r-f cavities which modulate and focus the beam.

  12. Radial Field Piezoelectric Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, R. G.; Effinger, R. T., IV; Copeland, B. M., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    A series of active piezoelectric diaphragms were fabricated and patterned with several geometrically defined Inter-Circulating Electrodes "ICE" and Interdigitated Ring Electrodes "ICE". When a voltage potential is applied to the electrodes, the result is a radially distributed electric field that mechanically strains the piezoceramic along the Z-axis (perpendicular to the applied electric field). Unlike other piezoelectric bender actuators, these Radial Field Diaphragms (RFDs) strain concentrically yet afford high displacements (several times that of the equivalent Unimorph) while maintaining a constant circumference. One of the more intriguing aspects is that the radial strain field reverses itself along the radius of the RFD while the tangential strain remains relatively constant. The result is a Z-deflection that has a conical profile. This paper covers the fabrication and characterization of the 5 cm. (2 in.) diaphragms as a function of poling field strength, ceramic thickness, electrode type and line spacing, as well as the surface topography, the resulting strain field and displacement as a function of applied voltage at low frequencies. The unique features of these RFDs include the ability to be clamped about their perimeter with little or no change in displacement, the environmentally insulated packaging, and a highly repeatable fabrication process that uses commodity materials.

  13. Distillation under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, V.M.; Blankenship, K.D.; Tsouris, C.

    1997-11-01

    Distillation Is the most common separation process used in the chemical and petroleum industry. Major limitations in the applicability and efficiency of distillation come from thermodynamic equilibria, that is, vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE), and heat and mass transfer rates. In this work, electric fields are used to manipulate the VLE of mixtures. VLE experiments are performed for various binary mixtures in the presence of electric fields on the order of a few kilovolts per centimeter. The results show that the VLE is changed by electric fields, with changes in the separation factor as high as 10% being observed. Batch distillation experiments are also carried out for binary mixtures of 2-propanol and water with and without an applied electric field. Results show enhanced distillation rates and separation efficiency in the presence of an electric field but decreased separation enhancement when the electric current is increased. The latter phenomenon is caused by the formation at the surface of the liquid mixture of microdroplets that are entrained by the vapor. These observations suggest that there should be an electric field strength for each system for which the separation enhancement is maximum.

  14. The Gorgon gas field

    SciTech Connect

    Clegg, L.J.; Sayers, M.J.; Tait, A.M. )

    1990-09-01

    The Gorgon gas field was discovered by West Australian Petroleum Pty Limited (WAPET) in 1980 with the 1 Gorgon well, and appraised by 1 North Gorgon in 1982 and 1 Central Gorgon in 1983. The gas field is situated on the North West Shelf of Western Australia, 65 km northwest of WAPET's Barrow Island oil field, itself 65 km offshore. The Gorgon gas field is at the southwestern end of the Rankin Platform, which contains several giant gas fields. Water depth at the Gorgon gas field is around 250 m. The top of the Triassic Mungaroo Formation reservoir sequence is at approximately 3,500 m subsea. Individual meander-belt sandstones are up to 50 m thick and occur either interbedded with interchannel claystones or stacked to form sand bodies up to 220 m thick. The Triassic sediments form a tilted horst sealed by Cretaceous Barrow Group shales. Gross gas columns and net gas pays in the 1 Gorgon, 1 Central Gorgon, and 1 North Gorgon wells are 409 and 106 m, 441 and 45 m, and 761 and 136 m, respectively. The field is 5 km wide and at least 30 km long. Gas reserves are estimated at 232 {times} 10{sup 9} m{sup 3}, of which around 17% is carbon dioxide and nitrogen. The reservoir sandstones have porosities of 15 to 20% and permeabilities from tens to thousands of millidarcys. Individual zones have flowed gas at rates of up to 1.06 million m{sup 3}/day through a 31.75 mm choke.

  15. Field reversed ion rings

    SciTech Connect

    Sudan, R.N.; Omelchenko, Y.A.

    1995-09-01

    In typical field-reversed ion ring experiments, an intense annular ion beam is injected across a plasma-filled magnetic cusp region into a neutral gas immersed in a ramped solenoidal magnetic field. Assuming the characteristic ionization time is much shorter than the long ({ital t}{approx_gt}2{pi}/{Omega}{sub {ital i}}) beam evolution time scale, we investigate the formation of an ion ring in the background plasma followed by field reversal, using a 21/2-D hybrid, PIC code FIRE, in which the beam and background ions are treated as particles and the electrons as a massless fluid. We show that beam bunching and trapping occurs downstream in a ramped magnetic field for an appropriate set of experimental parameters. We find that a compact ion ring is formed and a large field reversal {zeta}={delta}{ital B}/{ital B}{approx_gt}1 on axis develops. We also observe significant deceleration of the ring on reflection due to the transfer of its axial momentum to the background ions, which creates favorable trapping conditions. {copyright} {ital 1995 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Coronal Magnetic Field Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegelmann, Thomas; Petrie, Gordon J. D.; Riley, Pete

    2015-07-01

    Coronal magnetic field models use photospheric field measurements as boundary condition to model the solar corona. We review in this paper the most common model assumptions, starting from MHD-models, magnetohydrostatics, force-free and finally potential field models. Each model in this list is somewhat less complex than the previous one and makes more restrictive assumptions by neglecting physical effects. The magnetohydrostatic approach neglects time-dependent phenomena and plasma flows, the force-free approach neglects additionally the gradient of the plasma pressure and the gravity force. This leads to the assumption of a vanishing Lorentz force and electric currents are parallel (or anti-parallel) to the magnetic field lines. Finally, the potential field approach neglects also these currents. We outline the main assumptions, benefits and limitations of these models both from a theoretical (how realistic are the models?) and a practical viewpoint (which computer resources to we need?). Finally we address the important problem of noisy and inconsistent photospheric boundary conditions and the possibility of using chromospheric and coronal observations to improve the models.

  17. Cubesat Gravity Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burla, Santoshkumar; Mueller, Vitali; Flury, Jakob; Jovanovic, Nemanja

    2016-04-01

    CHAMP, GRACE and GOCE missions have been successful in the field of satellite geodesy (especially to improve Earth's gravity field models) and have established the necessity towards the next generation gravity field missions. Especially, GRACE has shown its capabilities beyond any other gravity field missions. GRACE Follow-On mission is going to continue GRACE's legacy which is almost identical to GRACE mission with addition of laser interferometry. But these missions are not only quite expensive but also takes quite an effort to plan and to execute. Still there are few drawbacks such as under-sampling and incapability of exploring new ideas within a single mission (ex: to perform different orbit configurations with multi satellite mission(s) at different altitudes). The budget is the major limiting factor to build multi satellite mission(s). Here, we offer a solution to overcome these drawbacks using cubesat/ nanosatellite mission. Cubesats are widely used in research because they are cheaper, smaller in size and building them is easy and faster than bigger satellites. Here, we design a 3D model of GRACE like mission with available sensors and explain how the Attitude and Orbit Control System (AOCS) works. The expected accuracies on final results of gravity field are also explained here.

  18. Spiking the Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constable, C.; Davies, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Geomagnetic field intensities corresponding to virtual axial dipole moments of up to 200 ZAm2, more than twice the modern value, have been inferred from archeomagnetic measurements on artifacts dated at or shortly after 1000 BC. Anomalously high values occur in the Levant and Georgia, but not in Bulgaria. The origin of this spike is believed to lie in Earth's core: however, its spatio-temporal characteristics and the geomagnetic processes responsible for such a feature remain a mystery. We show that a localized spike in the radial magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary (CMB) must necessarily contribute to the largest scale changes in Earth's surface field, namely the dipole. Even the limiting spike of a delta function at the CMB produces a minimum surface cap size of 60 degrees for a factor of two increase in paleointensity. Combined evidence from modern satellite and millennial scale field modeling suggests that the Levantine Spike is intimately associated with a strong increase in dipole moment prior to 1000 BC and likely the product of north-westward motion of concentrated near equatorial Asian flux patches like those seen in the modern field. New archeomagnetic studies are needed to confirm this interpretation. Minimum estimates of the power dissipated by the spike are comparable to independent estimates of the dissipation associated with the entire steady state geodynamo. This suggests that geomagnetic spikes are either associated with rapid changes in magnetic energy or strong Lorentz forces.

  19. Frontier Field RXCJ2248

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep "blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies that are 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  20. Frontier Field Abell 370

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soifer, Tom; Capak, Peter

    2014-08-01

    After considering valuable advice from the astronomical community and broad range of open questions in galaxy evolution an advisory committee unanimously recommended HST undertake a program of six deep fields centered on strong lensing galaxy clusters in p arallel with six deep blank fields". The key science goals of these twelve new frontier fields are: 1) to reveal hitherto inaccessible populations of z = 5 - 10 galaxies thatare 10 - 50 times fainter intrinsically than any presently known. 2) to solidify our understanding of the stellar masses and star formation histories of sub-L* galaxies at the earliest times 3) to provide the first statistically meaningful morphological characterization of star forming galaxies at z > 5 4) to find z > 8 galaxies stretched out enough by cluster lensing to discern internal structure and/or magnified enough by cluster lensing for spectroscopic follow-up. Spitzer data are essential to meeting these goals because it enables mass and physical parameter estimates for the high redshift sources and differentiates between low and high redshift galaxies. As a result Spitzer has committed to observing these fields as a major DDT program. The first 4 galaxies clusters and the first 4 deep "blank fields" will be observed by Spitzer over cycles 9 and 10.

  1. Field error lottery

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, C.J.; McVey, B. ); Quimby, D.C. )

    1990-01-01

    The level of field errors in an FEL is an important determinant of its performance. We have computed 3D performance of a large laser subsystem subjected to field errors of various types. These calculations have been guided by simple models such as SWOOP. The technique of choice is utilization of the FELEX free electron laser code that now possesses extensive engineering capabilities. Modeling includes the ability to establish tolerances of various types: fast and slow scale field bowing, field error level, beam position monitor error level, gap errors, defocusing errors, energy slew, displacement and pointing errors. Many effects of these errors on relative gain and relative power extraction are displayed and are the essential elements of determining an error budget. The random errors also depend on the particular random number seed used in the calculation. The simultaneous display of the performance versus error level of cases with multiple seeds illustrates the variations attributable to stochasticity of this model. All these errors are evaluated numerically for comprehensive engineering of the system. In particular, gap errors are found to place requirements beyond mechanical tolerances of {plus minus}25{mu}m, and amelioration of these may occur by a procedure utilizing direct measurement of the magnetic fields at assembly time. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  2. Canonical field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Setthivoine

    2015-11-01

    A new canonical field theory has been developed to help interpret the interaction between plasma flows and magnetic fields. The theory augments the Lagrangian of general dynamical systems to rigourously demonstrate that canonical helicity transport is valid across single particle, kinetic and fluid regimes, on scales ranging from classical to general relativistic. The Lagrangian is augmented with two extra terms that represent the interaction between the motion of matter and electromagnetic fields. The dynamical equations can then be re-formulated as a canonical form of Maxwell's equations or a canonical form of Ohm's law valid across all non-quantum regimes. The field theory rigourously shows that helicity can be preserved in kinetic regimes and not only fluid regimes, that helicity transfer between species governs the formation of flows or magnetic fields, and that helicity changes little compared to total energy only if density gradients are shallow. The theory suggests a possible interpretation of particle energization partitioning during magnetic reconnection as canonical wave interactions. This work is supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0010340.

  3. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  4. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  5. Carbohydrate force fields

    PubMed Central

    Foley, B. Lachele; Tessier, Matthew B.; Woods, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Carbohydrates present a special set of challenges to the generation of force fields. First, the tertiary structures of monosaccharides are complex merely by virtue of their exceptionally high number of chiral centers. In addition, their electronic characteristics lead to molecular geometries and electrostatic landscapes that can be challenging to predict and model. The monosaccharide units can also interconnect in many ways, resulting in a large number of possible oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, both linear and branched. These larger structures contain a number of rotatable bonds, meaning they potentially sample an enormous conformational space. This article briefly reviews the history of carbohydrate force fields, examining and comparing their challenges, forms, philosophies, and development strategies. Then it presents a survey of recent uses of these force fields, noting trends, strengths, deficiencies, and possible directions for future expansion. PMID:25530813

  6. Electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, H. R.; Robinson, R. S.; Etters, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A number of energy momentum anomalies are described that result from the use of Abraham-Lorentz electromagnetic theory. These anomalies have in common the motion of charged bodies or current carrying conductors relative to the observer. The anomalies can be avoided by using the nonflow approach, based on internal energy of the electromagnetic field. The anomalies can also be avoided by using the flow approach, if all contributions to flow work are included. The general objective of this research is a fundamental physical understanding of electric and magnetic fields which, in turn, might promote the development of new concepts in electric space propulsion. The approach taken is to investigate quantum representations of these fields.

  7. Orsted Initial Field Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, N.; Holme, R.; Hulot, G.; Sabaka, T.; Neubert, T.; Toffner-Clausen, L.; Primdahl, F.; Jorgensen, J.; Leger, J.-M.; Barraclough, D.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Magnetic measurements taken by the Orsted satellite during geomagnetic quiet conditions around January 1, 2000 have been used to derive a spherical harmonic model of the Earth's magnetic field for epoch 2000.0. The maximum degree and order of the model is 19 for internal, and 2 for external, source fields; however, coefficients above degree 14 may not be robust. Such detailed models exist for only one previous epoch, 1980. Achieved rms misfit is 2 nT for the scalar intensity and 4 nT for the vector components perpendicular to the magnetic field. This model is of higher detail than the IGRF 2000, which for scientific purposes related to the Orsted mission it supersedes.

  8. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Coates, J.D.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1993-05-01

    A multi-well microbially enhanced oil recovery field pilot has been performed in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit in Payne County, Oklahoma. The primary emphasis of the experiment was preferential plugging of high permeability zones for the purpose of improving waterflood sweep efficiency. Studies were performed to determine reservoir chemistry, ecology, and indigenous bacteria populations. Growth experiments were used to select a nutrient system compatible with the reservoir that encouraged growth of a group of indigenous nitrate-using bacteria and inhibit growth of sulfate-reducing bacteria. A specific field pilot area behind an active line drive waterflood was selected. Surface facilities were designed and installed. Injection protocols of bulk nutrient materials were prepared to facilitate uniform distribution of nutrients within the pilot area. By the end of December, 1991, 82.5 tons (75.0 tonnes) of nutrients had been injected in the field. A tracer test identified significant heterogeneity in the SEVVSU and made it necessary to monitor additional production wells in the field. The tracer tests and changes in production behavior indicate the additional production wells monitored during the field trial were also affected. Eighty two and one half barrels (13.1 m[sup 3]) of tertiary oil have been recovered. Microbial activity has increased CO[sub 2] content as indicated by increased alkalinity. A temporary rise in sulfide concentration was experienced. These indicate an active microbial community was generated in the field by the nutrient injection. Pilot area interwell pressure interference test results showed that significant permeability reduction occurred. The interwell permeabilities in the pilot area between the injector and the three pilot production wells were made more uniform which indicates a successful preferential plugging enhanced oil recovery project.

  9. Octonic Gravitational Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Süleyman; Tanişli, Murat; Tolan, Tülay

    2013-08-01

    Generalized field equations of linear gravity are formulated on the basis of octons. When compared to the other eight-component noncommutative hypercomplex number systems, it is demonstrated that associative octons with scalar, pseudoscalar, pseudovector and vector values present a convenient and capable tool to describe the Maxwell-Proca-like field equations of gravitoelectromagnetism in a compact and simple way. Introducing massive graviton and gravitomagnetic monopole terms, the generalized gravitational wave equation and Klein-Gordon equation for linear gravity are also developed.

  10. LSA field test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, P.

    1979-01-01

    Degradation tests indicate that electrical degradation is not a slow monotonically increasing phenomenon as originally thought but occurs abruptly as the result of some traumatic event. This finding has led to a change in the test philosophy. A discussion of this change is presented along with a summary of degradation and failure data from all the sites and results from a variety of special tests. New instrumentation for in-field measurements are described. Field testing activity was expanded by the addition of twelve remote sites located as far away as Alaska and the Canal Zone. Descriptions of the new sites are included.

  11. Assessment of Field Placement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshood, Nabil

    While field placement in human services programs is an extremely important practical phase of training, it has generally not been standardized, and thus can be difficult to assess. A model program and assessment format developed by Hudson County Community College (HCCC), in Jersey City, New Jersey, however, provides a possible framework for…

  12. Field of Dreams.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Richard

    2003-01-01

    When planning summer work, school athletic facility managers must address the maintenance and renovation of natural grass and synthetic fields, tennis courts, and running tracks. This article presents a guide to the simple, effective, and relatively inexpensive summer maintenance of athletic facilities in order to help extend the life of a schools…

  13. Lessons from the Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Billett, Paulina

    2012-01-01

    Social capital is an exciting and growing field in academic circles. However, its research has often been criticised by youth theorists for its lack of relevance to youth life and experience--the portrayal of young people as consumers rather than producers of social capital--and a failure to acknowledge the complexity of youth life. Many of these…

  14. Managing Field Evacuations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satz, Jay A.; McEvoy, David; Merrill, Kurt

    In the event of a debilitating injury or illness, outdoor leaders should consider four critical phases in successfully managing backcountry field evaluations. The first phase, managing the immediate scene, involves assuring scene safety, medical care of the patient, instituting the emergency response plan, and providing for the needs of uninjured…

  15. Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walter, Virginia A.

    1997-01-01

    Virtual field trips can provide experiences beyond the reach of average K-12 students. Describes multimedia products for school use: Africa Trail, Dinosaur Hunter, Louvre Museum, Magic School Bus Explores the Rainforest, and Up to the Himalayas: Kingdoms in the Clouds and provides book and Internet connections for additional learning, highlighting…

  16. Extended conformal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taormina, Anne

    1990-08-01

    Some extended conformal field theories are briefly reviewed. They illustrate how non minimal models of the Virasoro algebra (c≥1) can become minimal with respect to a larger algebra. The accent is put on N-extended superconformal algebras, which are relevant in superstring compactification.

  17. Field-Flow Fractionation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Karin D.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a technique for separating samples that range over 15 orders of magnitude in molecular weight. Discusses theory, apparatus, and sample preparation techniques. Lists several types of field-flow fractionation (FFF) and their uses: sedimentation FFF, thermal FFF, flow FFF, electrical FFF, and steric FFF. (ML)

  18. [Field Learning Activities].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolde Forest Environmental Education Center, Reading, PA.

    Seventy field activities, pertinent to outdoor, environmental studies, are described in this compilation. Designed for elementary and junior high school students, the activities cover many discipline areas--science, social studies, language arts, health, history, mathematics, and art--and many are multidisciplinary in use. Topics range from soil…

  19. Quantum field tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steffens, A.; Riofrío, C. A.; Hübener, R.; Eisert, J.

    2014-12-01

    We introduce the concept of quantum field tomography, the efficient and reliable reconstruction of unknown quantum fields based on data of correlation functions. At the basis of the analysis is the concept of continuous matrix product states (cMPS), a complete set of variational states grasping states in one-dimensional quantum field theory. We innovate a practical method, making use of and developing tools in estimation theory used in the context of compressed sensing such as Prony methods and matrix pencils, allowing us to faithfully reconstruct quantum field states based on low-order correlation functions. In the absence of a phase reference, we highlight how specific higher order correlation functions can still be predicted. We exemplify the functioning of the approach by reconstructing randomized cMPS from their correlation data and study the robustness of the reconstruction for different noise models. Furthermore, we apply the method to data generated by simulations based on cMPS and using the time-dependent variational principle. The presented approach is expected to open up a new window into experimentally studying continuous quantum systems, such as those encountered in experiments with ultra-cold atoms on top of atom chips. By virtue of the analogy with the input-output formalism in quantum optics, it also allows for studying open quantum systems.

  20. Warp Field Mechanics 101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, H.

    This paper will begin with a short review of the Alcubierre warp drive metric and describes how the phenomenon might work based on the original paper. The canonical form of the metric was developed and published in [6] which provided key insight into the field potential and boost for the field which remedied a critical paradox in the original Alcubierre concept of operations. A modified concept of operations based on the canonical form of the metric that remedies the paradox is presented and discussed. The idea of a warp drive in higher dimensional space-time (manifold) will then be briefly considered by comparing the null-like geodesics of the Alcubierre metric to the Chung-Freese metric to illustrate the mathematical role of hyperspace coordinates. The net effect of using a warp drive "technology" coupled with conventional propulsion systems on an exploration mission will be discussed using the nomenclature of early mission planning. Finally, an overview of the warp field interferometer test bed being implemented in the Advanced Propulsion Physics Laboratory: Eagleworks (APPL:E) at the Johnson Space Center will be detailed. While warp field mechanics has not had a "Chicago Pile" moment, the tools necessary to detect a modest instance of the phenomenon are near at hand.

  1. Warp Field Mechanics 101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Harold

    2011-01-01

    This paper will begin with a short review of the Alcubierre warp drive metric and describes how the phenomenon might work based on the original paper. The canonical form of the metric was developed and published in [6] which provided key insight into the field potential and boost for the field which remedied a critical paradox in the original Alcubierre concept of operations. A modified concept of operations based on the canonical form of the metric that remedies the paradox is presented and discussed. The idea of a warp drive in higher dimensional space-time (manifold) will then be briefly considered by comparing the null-like geodesics of the Alcubierre metric to the Chung-Freese metric to illustrate the mathematical role of hyperspace coordinates. The net effect of using a warp drive technology coupled with conventional propulsion systems on an exploration mission will be discussed using the nomenclature of early mission planning. Finally, an overview of the warp field interferometer test bed being implemented in the Advanced Propulsion Physics Laboratory: Eagleworks (APPL:E) at the Johnson Space Center will be detailed. While warp field mechanics has not had a Chicago Pile moment, the tools necessary to detect a modest instance of the phenomenon are near at hand.

  2. Magnetic fields at neptune.

    PubMed

    Ness, N F; Acuña, M H; Burlaga, L F; Connerney, J E; Lepping, R P; Neubauer, F M

    1989-12-15

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center-University of Delaware Bartol Research Institute magnetic field experiment on the Voyager 2 spacecraft discovered a strong and complex intrinsic magnetic field of Neptune and an associated magnetosphere and magnetic tail. The detached bow shock wave in the supersonic solar wind flow was detected upstream at 34.9 Neptune radii (R(N)), and the magnetopause boundary was tentatively identified at 26.5 R(N) near the planet-sun line (1 R(N) = 24,765 kilometers). A maximum magnetic field of nearly 10,000 nanoteslas (1 nanotesla = 10(-5) gauss) was observed near closest approach, at a distance of 1.18 R(N). The planetary magnetic field between 4 and 15 R(N) can be well represented by an offset tilted magnetic dipole (OTD), displaced from the center of Neptune by the surprisingly large amount of 0.55 R(N) and inclined by 47 degrees with respect to the rotation axis. The OTD dipole moment is 0.133 gauss-R(N)(3). Within 4 R(N), the magnetic field representation must include localized sources or higher order magnetic multipoles, or both, which are not yet well determined. The obliquity of Neptune and the phase of its rotation at encounter combined serendipitously so that the spacecraft entered the magnetosphere at a time when the polar cusp region was directed almost precisely sunward. As the spacecraft exited the magnetosphere, the magnetic tail appeared to be monopolar, and no crossings of an imbedded magnetic field reversal or plasma neutral sheet were observed. The auroral zones are most likely located far from the rotation poles and may have a complicated geometry. The rings and all the known moons of Neptune are imbedded deep inside the magnetosphere, except for Nereid, which is outside when sunward of the planet. The radiation belts will have a complex structure owing to the absorption of energetic particles by the moons and rings of Neptune and losses associated with the significant changes

  3. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiba, Masashi

    The magnetic-field characteristics in spiral galaxies are investigated, with emphasis on the Milky Way. The dynamo theory is considered, and axisymmetric spiral (ASS) and bisymmetric spiral (BSS) magnetic fields are analyzed. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields are discussed.

  4. Holden Crater Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    A common location for dune fields on Mars is in the basin of large craters. This dune field is located in Holden Crater at 25 degrees South atitude.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -25.5, Longitude 326.8 East (33.2 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  5. NPOESS Field Terminal Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heckmann, G.; Route, G.

    2009-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system; the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD. The NPOESS satellites carry a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground data processing segment for NPOESS is the Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS), developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems. The IDPS processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products (aka, Environmental Data Records or EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. The IDPS will process EDRs beginning with the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP) and continuing through the lifetime of the NPOESS system. IDPS also provides the software and requirements for the Field Terminal Segment (FTS). NPOESS provides support to deployed field terminals by providing mission data in the Low Rate and High Rate downlinks (LRD/HRD), mission support data needed to generate EDRs and decryption keys needed to decrypt mission data during Selective data Encryption (SDE). Mission support data consists of globally relevant data, geographically constrained data, and two line element sets. NPOESS provides these mission support data via the Internet accessible Mission Support Data Server and HRD/LRD downlinks. This presentation will illustrate and describe the NPOESS capabilities in support of Field Terminal users. This discussion will include the mission support data available to Field Terminal users, content of the direct broadcast HRD and LRD

  6. Methane Hydrate Field Program

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-31

    This final report document summarizes the activities undertaken and the output from three primary deliverables generated during this project. This fifteen month effort comprised numerous key steps including the creation of an international methane hydrate science team, determining and reporting the current state of marine methane hydrate research, convening an international workshop to collect the ideas needed to write a comprehensive Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan and the development and publication of that plan. The following documents represent the primary deliverables of this project and are discussed in summary level detail in this final report. • Historical Methane Hydrate Project Review Report • Methane Hydrate Workshop Report • Topical Report: Marine Methane Hydrate Field Research Plan • Final Scientific/Technical Report

  7. Field site selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, D. E.; Ellefsen, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Several general guidelines should be kept in mind when considering the selection of field sites for teaching remote sensing fundamentals. Proximity and vantage point are two very practical considerations. Only through viewing a broad enough area to place the site in context can one make efficient use of a site. The effects of inclement weather when selecting sites should be considered. If field work is to be an effective tool to illustrate remote sensing principles, the following criteria are critical: (1) the site must represent the range of class interest; (2) the site must have a theme or add something no other site offers; (3) there should be intrasite variation within the theme; (4) ground resolution and spectral signature distinction should be illustrated; and (5) the sites should not be ordered sequentially.

  8. Segmented field OFFGEL® electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Tobolkina, Elena; Cortés-Salazar, Fernando; Momotenko, Dmitry; Maillard, Julien; Girault, Hubert H

    2012-11-01

    A multielectrode setup for protein OFFGEL electrophoresis that significantly improves protein separation efficiency has been developed. Here, the electric field is applied by segments between seven electrodes connected in series to six independent power supplies. The aim of this strategy is to distribute evenly the electric field along the multiwell system, and as a consequence to enhance electrophoresis in terms of separation time, resolution, and protein collection efficiency, while minimizing the overall potential difference and therefore the Joule heating. The performances were compared to a standard two-electrode setup for OFFGEL fractionation of a protein mixture, using UV-Vis spectroscopy for quantification and MALDI-MS for identification. The electrophoretic separation process was simulated, and optimized by solving the time-dependent Nernst-Planck differential equation. PMID:23086720

  9. Graphene field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Raghavan, S.; Duesberg, G. S.; Pratap, R.

    2014-09-08

    Graphene field emission devices are fabricated using a scalable process. The field enhancement factors, determined from the Fowler-Nordheim plots, are within few hundreds and match the theoretical predictions. The devices show high emission current density of ∼10 nA μm{sup −1} at modest voltages of tens of volts. The emission is stable with time and repeatable over long term, whereas the noise in the emission current is comparable to that from individual carbon nanotubes emitting under similar conditions. We demonstrate a power law dependence of emission current on pressure which can be utilized for sensing. The excellent characteristics and relative ease of making the devices promise their great potential for sensing and electronic applications.

  10. The interplanetary magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, L., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Large-scale properties of the interplanetary magnetic field as determined by the solar wind velocity structure are examined. The various ways in which magnetic fields affect phenomena in the solar wind are summarized. The dominant role of high and low velocity solar wind streams that persist, with fluctuations and evolution, for weeks or months is emphasized. It is suggested that for most purposes the sector structure is better identified with the stream structure than with the magnetic polarity and that the polarity does not necessarily change from one velocity sector to the next. Several mechanisms that might produce the stream structure are considered. The interaction of the high and low velocity streams is analyzed in a model that is steady state when viewed in a frame that corotates with the sun.

  11. Bigfoot Field Manual

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. L.; Burrows, S.; Gower, S. T.; Cohen, W. B.

    1999-09-01

    The BigFoot Project is funded by the Earth Science Enterprise to collect and organize data to be used in the EOS Validation Program. The data collected by the BigFoot Project are unique in being ground-based observations coincident with satellite overpasses. In addition to collecting data, the BigFoot project will develop and test new algorithms for scaling point measurements to the same spatial scales as the EOS satellite products. This BigFoot Field Manual Mill be used to achieve completeness and consistency of data collected at four initial BigFoot sites and at future sites that may collect similar validation data. Therefore, validation datasets submitted to the ORNL DAAC that have been compiled in a manner consistent with the field manual will be especially valuable in the validation program.

  12. Classical higgs fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanashvily, G. A.

    2014-12-01

    We consider a classical gauge theory on a principal fiber bundle P → X in the case where its structure group G is reduced to a subgroup H in the presence of classical Higgs fields described by global sections of the quotient fiber bundle P/H → X. We show that matter fields with the exact symmetry group H in such a theory are described by sections of the composition fiber bundle Y → P/H → X, where Y → P/H is the fiber bundle with the structure group H, and the Lagrangian of these sections is factored by virtue of the vertical covariant differential determined by a connection on the fiber bundle Y → P/H.

  13. Proca and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Hillion, P.; Quinnerz, S.

    1986-07-01

    In the framework of the proper orthochronous Lorentz group, the old connection is revived between the electromagnetic field characterized by a self-dual tensor and a traceless second-rank spinor obeying the Proca equation. The relationship between this spinor and the Hertz potential also considered as a self-dual tensor is emphasized. The extension of this formalism to meet the covariance under the full Lorentz group is also discussed.

  14. Fields, Flares, And Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boucheron, L.; Al-Ghraibah, Amani; McAteer, J.; Cao, H.; Jackiewicz, J.; McNamara, B.; Voelz, D.; Calabro, B.; DeGrave, K.; Kirk, M.; Madadi, A.; Petsov, A.; Taylor, G.

    2011-05-01

    Solar active regions are the source of many energetic and geo-effective events such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Understanding how these complex source regions evolve and produce these events is of fundamental importance, not only to solar physics, but also to the demands of space weather forecasting. We propose to investigate the physical properties of active region magnetic fields using fractal-, gradient-, neutral line-, emerging flux-, wavelet- and general image-based techniques, and to correlate them to solar activity. The combination of these projects with solarmonitor.org and the international Max Millenium Campaign presents an opportunity for accurate and timely flare predictions for the first time. Many studies have attempted to relate solar flares to their concomitant magnetic field distributions. However, a consistent, causal relationship between the magnetic field on the photosphere and the production of solar flares is unknown. Often the local properties of the active region magnetic field - critical in many theories of activity - are lost in the global definition of their diagnostics, in effect smoothing out variations that occur on small spatial scales. Mindful of this, our overall goal is to create measures that are sensitive to both the global and the small-scale nature of energy storage and release in the solar atmosphere in order to study solar flare prediction. This set of active region characteristics will be automatically explored for discriminating features through the use of feature selection methods. Such methods search a feature space while optimizing a criterion - the prediction of a flare in this case. The large size of the datasets used in this project make it well suited for an exploration of a large feature space. This work is funded through a New Mexico State University Interdisciplinary Research Grant.

  15. Microbial Field Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1990-11-01

    This report covers progress made during the first year of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology and characterization, facility and treatment design, core experiments, bacterial mobility, and mathematical modeling are addressed. To facilitate an understanding of the ecology of the target reservoir analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. A preliminary design of facilities for the operation of the field pilot test was prepared. In addition, procedures for facilities installation and for injection treatments are described. The Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU), the site of the proposed field pilot study, is described physically, historically, and geologically. The fields current status is presented and the ongoing reservoir simulation is discussed. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. Two possible mechanisms, relative permeability effects and changes in the capillary number, are discussed and related to four Berea core experiments' results. The experiments were conducted at reservoir temperature using SEVVSU oil, brine, and bacteria. The movement and activity of bacteria in porous media were investigated by monitoring the growth of bacteria in sandpack cores under no flow conditions. The rate of bacteria advancement through the cores was determined. A mathematical model of the MEOR process has been developed. The model is a three phase, seven species, one dimensional model. Finite difference methods are used for solution. Advection terms in balance equations are represented with a third- order upwind differencing scheme to reduce numerical dispersion and oscillations. The model is applied to a batch fermentation example. 52 refs., 26 figs., 21 tabs.

  16. Conformal scalar field wormholes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halliwell, Jonathan J.; Laflamme, Raymond

    1989-01-01

    The Euclidian Einstein equations with a cosmological constant and a conformally coupled scalar field are solved, taking the metric to be of the Robertson-Walker type. In the case Lambda = 0, solutions are found which represent a wormhole connecting two asymptotically flat Euclidian regions. In the case Lambda greater than 0, the solutions represent tunneling from a small Tolman-like universe to a large Robertson-Walker universe.

  17. Phase Field Fracture Mechanics.

    SciTech Connect

    Robertson, Brett Anthony

    2015-11-01

    For this assignment, a newer technique of fracture mechanics using a phase field approach, will be examined and compared with experimental data for a bend test and a tension test. The software being used is Sierra Solid Mechanics, an implicit/explicit finite element code developed at Sandia National Labs in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The bend test experimental data was also obtained at Sandia Labs while the tension test data was found in a report online from Purdue University.

  18. Nili Patera Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    This VIS image shows a dune field within Nili Patera, the northern caldera of a large volcanic complex in Syrtis Major.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 9, Longitude 67 East (293 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  19. Crater Floor Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Our topic for the weeks of April 4 and April 11 is dunes on Mars. We will look at the north polar sand sea and at isolated dune fields at lower latitudes. Sand seas on Earth are often called 'ergs,' an Arabic name for dune field. A sand sea differs from a dune field in two ways: 1) a sand sea has a large regional extent, and 2) the individual dunes are large in size and complex in form.

    Our final dune image shows a small dune field inside an unnamed crater south of Nili Fossae.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 20.6, Longitude 79 East (281 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  20. COS NUV Flat Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena

    2011-10-01

    This program aims at obtaining COS NUV-MAMA flat-field observations for monitoring purpose only.The program uses the internal deuterium lamp and the MR grism G185M {at the central wavelengths 1835, 1850 and 1864 A}, as during thermal vacuum testing and SMOV4. The estimated SNR reached at the end of the program {13 hr integration during 10 orbits} is 20-25 per 3x3 pixel.

  1. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year's report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  2. Microbial field pilot study

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, R.M.; McInerney, M.J.; Menzie, D.E.; Chisholm, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this project is to perform a microbial enhanced oil recovery field pilot in the Southeast Vassar Vertz Sand Unit (SEVVSU) in Payne County, Oklahoma. Indigenous, anaerobic, nitrate reducing bacteria will be stimulated to selectively plug flow paths which have been referentially swept by a prior waterflood. This will force future flood water to invade bypassed regions of the reservoir and increase sweep efficiency. This report covers progress made during the second year, January 1, 1990 to December 31, 1990, of the Microbial Field Pilot Study project. Information on reservoir ecology, surface facilities design, operation of the unit, core experiments, modeling of microbial processes, and reservoir characterization and simulation are presented in the report. To better understand the ecology of the target reservoir, additional analyses of the fluids which support bacteriological growth and the microbiology of the reservoir were performed. The results of the produced and injected water analysis show increasing sulfide concentrations with respect to time. In March of 1990 Mesa Limited Partnership sold their interest in the SEVVSU to Sullivan and Company. In April, Sullivan and Company assumed operation of the field. The facilities for the field operation of the pilot were refined and implementation was begun. Core flood experiments conducted during the last year were used to help define possible mechanisms involved in microbial enhanced oil recovery. The experiments were performed at SEVVSU temperature using fluids and inoculum from the unit. The model described in last year`s report was further validated using results from a core flood experiment. The model was able to simulate the results of one of the core flood experiments with good quality.

  3. Mobile Field Goniospectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltoniemi, J. I.; Kaasalainen, S.; Näränen, J.

    2004-05-01

    Multiangle remote sensing needs multiangle models and multiangle ground reference data. The ground data can be measured using goniometers. Many targets are in difficult terrains and hard to bring into laboratory, which makes the ground data collection more complicated We have developed several field goniometers to measure the directional and spectral reflection signatures of various targets. The heaviest of the instruments is fully manual and very robust for field work. It can be transported using a light trailer and mounted in an hour. The new very light goniometer measures the BRDF automatically in few minutes. It can be carried by two persons even large distances to difficult places. Both of these instruments use the ASD Field Spec PRO FR spectrometer with a 4m light fibre allowing optics to be mounted up and the heavy parts down. The dimensions --- arm length about 2m --- and optics (1--8 degree view angles) limit the useful spot diameter to about 3, 10 or 30cm, making the system useful for small vegetation and soil. These two wide angle goniometers are complemented by a narrow angle backscattering goniometer utilising beamsplitters to measure up to exact backscattering direction and about 15 degree around. We present BRDF and spectra for undergrowth (lichen, moss, peat, twigs) from a field campaign in August 2003, and various grasses dry and wet. We recognise significant differences in the directional pattern between different species (factors of 2-10) and varying structural properties, making the use of directional signal for remote sensing very attractive. We are working with scattering models of snow and soil, and will continue with vegetation soon.

  4. Heavy rain field measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melson, ED

    1991-01-01

    A weight-measuring rain gauge was developed to collect rain data and configured to operate at a high sample rate (one sample pre second). Instead of averaging the rain rate in minutes, hours, and sometime days as normally performed, the rain data collected are examined in seconds. The results of six field sites are compiled. Rain rate levels, duration of downpours, and frequency of heavy rainfall events are presented.

  5. Warped conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stéphane; Hartman, Thomas; Hofman, Diego M.

    2012-12-01

    We study field theories in two spacetime dimensions invariant under a chiral scaling symmetry that acts only on right-movers. The local symmetries include one copy of the Virasoro algebra and a U(1) current algebra. This differs from the two-dimensional conformal group but in some respects is equally powerful in constraining the theory. In particular, the symmetries on a torus lead to modular covariance of the partition function, which is used to derive a universal formula for the asymptotic density of states. For an application we turn to the holographic description of black holes in quantum gravity, motivated by the fact that the symmetries in the near-horizon geometry of any extremal black hole are identical to those of a two-dimensional field theory with chiral scaling. We consider two examples: black holes in warped AdS3 in topologically massive gravity and in string theory. In both cases, the density of states in the two-dimensional field theory reproduces the Bekenstein-Hawking entropy of black holes in the gravity theory.

  6. Bright field illumination system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huber, Edward D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A Bright Field Illumination system for inspecting a range of characteristically different kinds of defects, depressions, and ridges in a selected material surface. The system has an illumination source placed near a first focus of an elliptical reflector. In addition, a camera facing the inspected area is placed near the illumination source and the first focus. The second focus of the elliptical reflector is located at a distance approximately twice the elliptical reflector's distance above the inspected surface. The elliptical reflector directs the light from the source onto the inspected surface. Due to the shape of the elliptical reflector, light that is specularly reflected from the inspected surface is directed into the camera is which located at the position of the reflected second focus of the ellipse. This system creates a brightly lighted background field against which damage sites appear as high contrast dark objects which can be easily detected by a person or an automated inspection system. In addition, the Bright Field Illumination system and method can be used in combination with a vision inspection system providing for multiplexed illumination and data handling of multiple kinds of surface characteristics including abrupt and gradual surface variations and differences between measured characteristics of different kinds and prior instruments.

  7. Polymer parametrized field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Laddha, Alok; Varadarajan, Madhavan

    2008-08-15

    Free scalar field theory on 2-dimensional flat spacetime, cast in diffeomorphism invariant guise by treating the inertial coordinates of the spacetime as dynamical variables, is quantized using loop quantum gravity (LQG) type 'polymer' representations for the matter field and the inertial variables. The quantum constraints are solved via group averaging techniques and, analogous to the case of spatial geometry in LQG, the smooth (flat) spacetime geometry is replaced by a discrete quantum structure. An overcomplete set of Dirac observables, consisting of (a) (exponentials of) the standard free scalar field creation-annihilation modes and (b) canonical transformations corresponding to conformal isometries, are represented as operators on the physical Hilbert space. None of these constructions suffer from any of the 'triangulation'-dependent choices which arise in treatments of LQG. In contrast to the standard Fock quantization, the non-Fock nature of the representation ensures that the group of conformal isometries as well as that of the gauge transformations generated by the constraints are represented in an anomaly free manner. Semiclassical states can be analyzed at the gauge invariant level. It is shown that 'physical weaves' necessarily underlie such states and that such states display semiclassicality with respect to, at most, a countable subset of the (uncountably large) set of observables of type (a). The model thus offers a fertile testing ground for proposed definitions of quantum dynamics as well as semiclassical states in LQG.

  8. Magnetic Field Solver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ilin, Andrew V.

    2006-01-01

    The Magnetic Field Solver computer program calculates the magnetic field generated by a group of collinear, cylindrical axisymmetric electromagnet coils. Given the current flowing in, and the number of turns, axial position, and axial and radial dimensions of each coil, the program calculates matrix coefficients for a finite-difference system of equations that approximates a two-dimensional partial differential equation for the magnetic potential contributed by the coil. The program iteratively solves these finite-difference equations by use of the modified incomplete Cholesky preconditioned-conjugate-gradient method. The total magnetic potential as a function of axial (z) and radial (r) position is then calculated as a sum of the magnetic potentials of the individual coils, using a high-accuracy interpolation scheme. Then the r and z components of the magnetic field as functions of r and z are calculated from the total magnetic potential by use of a high-accuracy finite-difference scheme. Notably, for the finite-difference calculations, the program generates nonuniform two-dimensional computational meshes from nonuniform one-dimensional meshes. Each mesh is generated in such a way as to minimize the numerical error for a benchmark one-dimensional magnetostatic problem.

  9. Field Trips: Tradition in Jeopardy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheeler, Ginger

    2011-01-01

    The school field trip: something fun, different, exciting, exhausting--a break from the school day grind. But the field trip has ramifications beyond just getting out of school for the day. For students, the field trip is to the classroom what the big game is to athletes. For museums and other attractions, the field trip is a way to cultivate…

  10. Instantaneous fields in classical electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heras, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we express the retarded fields of Maxwell's theory in terms of the instantaneous fields of a Galilei-invariant electromagnetic and we find the vector function χL whose spatial and temporal derivatives transform the Euclidean fields into the retarded ones. We conclude that the instantaneous fields can formally be introduced as unphysical objects into classical electrodynamics which can be used to find the physical retarded fields.

  11. Unbalanced field RF electron gun

    DOEpatents

    Hofler, Alicia

    2013-11-12

    A design for an RF electron gun having a gun cavity utilizing an unbalanced electric field arrangement. Essentially, the electric field in the first (partial) cell has higher field strength than the electric field in the second (full) cell of the electron gun. The accompanying method discloses the use of the unbalanced field arrangement in the operation of an RF electron gun in order to accelerate an electron beam.

  12. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  13. Spherically Symmetric Gravitational Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Moniz, P.

    The purpose of this paper is to investigate the quantum vacua directly implied by the wave function of a gravitational configuration characterized by the presence of an apparent horizon, namely the Vaidya space-time solution. Spherical symmetry is a main feature of this configuration, with a scalar field constituting a source [a Klein-Gordon geon or Berger-Chitre-Moncrief-Nutku (BCMN) type model]. The subsequent analysis requires solving a Wheeler-DeWitt equation near the apparent horizon (following the guidelinesintroduced by A. Tomimatsu,18; M. Pollock, 19 and developed by A. Hosoya and I. Oda20,21) with the scalar field herein expanded in terms of S2 spherical harmonics: midisuperspace quantization. The main results present in this paper are as follows. It is found that the mass function characteristic of the Vaidya metric is positive definite within this quantum approach. Furthermore, the inhomogeneous matter sector determines a descrip-tion in terms of open quantum (sub)systems, namely in the form of an harmonic oscillator whose frequency depends on the mass function. For this open (sub)system, a twofold approach is employed. On the one hand, an exact invariant observable is obtained from the effective Hamiltonian for the inhomogeneous matter modes. It is shown that this invariant admits a set of discrete eigenvalues which depend on the mass function. The corresponding set of eigenstates is constructed from a particular vacuum state. On the other hand, exact solutions are found for the Schrädinger equation associated with the inhomogeneous matter modes. This paper is concluded with a discussion, where two other issues are raised: (i) the possible application to realistic black hole dynamics of the results obtained for a simplified (BCMN) model and (ii) whether such vacuum states could be related with others defined instead within scalar field theories constructed in classical backgrounds.

  14. Semiclassical Coulomb field

    SciTech Connect

    Polonyi, J.

    2008-06-15

    The contribution of different modes of the Coulomb field to decoherence and to the dynamical breakdown of the time reversal invariance is calculated in the one-loop approximation for nonrelativistic electron gas. The dominant contribution was found to come from the usual collective modes in the plasma, namely, the zero-sound and the plasmon oscillations. The length scale of the quantum-classical transition is found to be close to the Thomas-Fermi screening length. It is argued that the extension of these modes to the whole Fock space yields optimal pointer states.

  15. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  16. Reconnection of Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Spacecraft observations of steady and nonsteady reconnection at the magnetopause are reviewed. Computer simulations of three-dimensional reconnection in the geomagnetic tail are discussed. Theoretical aspects of the energization of particles in current sheets and of the microprocesses in the diffusion region are presented. Terrella experiments in which magnetospheric reconnection is simulated at both the magnetopause and in the tail are described. The possible role of reconnection in the evolution of solar magnetic fields and solar flares is discussed. A two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic computer simulation of turbulent reconnection is examined. Results concerning reconnection in Tokamak devices are also presented.

  17. Digital field ion microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sijbrandij, S.J.; Russell, K.F.; Miller, M.K.; Thomson, R.C.

    1998-01-01

    Due to environmental concerns, there is a trend to avoid the use of chemicals needed to develop negatives and to process photographic paper, and to use digital technologies instead. Digital technology also offers the advantages that it is convenient, as it enables quick access to the end result, allows image storage and processing on computer, allows rapid hard copy output, and simplifies electronic publishing. Recently significant improvements have been made to the performance and cost of camera-sensors and printers. In this paper, field ion images recorded with two digital cameras of different resolution are compared to images recorded on standard 35 mm negative film. It should be noted that field ion images exhibit low light intensity and high contrast. Field ion images were recorded from a standard microchannel plate and a phosphor screen and had acceptance angles of {approximately} 60{degree}. Digital recordings were made with a Digital Vision Technologies (DVT) MICAM VHR1000 camera with a resolution of 752 x 582 pixels, and a Kodak DCS 460 digital camera with a resolution of 3,060 x 2,036 pixels. Film based recordings were made with Kodak T-MAX film rated at 400 ASA. The resolving power of T-MAX film, as specified by Kodak, is between 50 and 125 lines per mm, which corresponds to between 1,778 x 1,181 and 4,445 x 2,953 pixels, i.e. similar to that from the DCS 460 camera. The intensities of the images were sufficient to be recorded with standard fl:1.2 lenses with exposure times of less than 2 s. Many digital cameras were excluded from these experiments due to their lack of sensitivity or the inability to record a full frame image due to the fixed working distance defined by the vacuum system. The digital images were output on a Kodak Digital Science 8650 PS dye sublimation color printer (300 dpi). All field ion micrographs presented were obtained from a Ni-Al-Be specimen.

  18. Holographic effective field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martucci, Luca; Zaffaroni, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    We derive the four-dimensional low-energy effective field theory governing the moduli space of strongly coupled superconformal quiver gauge theories associated with D3-branes at Calabi-Yau conical singularities in the holographic regime of validity. We use the dual supergravity description provided by warped resolved conical geometries with mobile D3-branes. Information on the baryonic directions of the moduli space is also obtained by using wrapped Euclidean D3-branes. We illustrate our general results by discussing in detail their application to the Klebanov-Witten model.

  19. Quaternionic quantum field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, S.L.

    1985-08-19

    We show that a quaternionic quantum field theory can be formulated when the numbers of bosonic and fermionic degrees of freedom are equal and the fermions, as well as the bosons, obey a second-order wave equation. The theory is initially defined in terms of a quaternion-imaginary Lagrangian using the Feynman sum over histories. A Schroedinger equation can be derived from the functional integral, which identifies the quaternion-imaginary quantum Hamiltonian. Conversely, the transformation theory based on this Hamiltonian can be used to rederive the functional-integral formulation.

  20. Magnetic fields and stardust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hildebrand, Roger H.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to outline the principles governing the use of far-infrared and submillimeter polarimetry to investigate magnetic fields and dust in interstellar clouds. Particular topics of discussion are the alignment of dust grains in dense clouds, the dependence on wavelength of polarization due to emission or to partial absorption by aligned grains, the nature of that dependence for mixtures of grains with different properties, and the problem of distinguishing between (1) the effects of the shapes and dielectric functions of the grains and (2) the degree and direction of their alignment.

  1. Aerial field guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nummedal, D.

    1978-01-01

    There are two overflights planned for the field conference; one for the Cheney-Palouse tract of the eastern channeled scabland, the other covering the coulees and basins of the western region. The approximate flight lines are indicated on the accompanying LANDSAT images. The first flight will follow the eastern margin of this large scabland tract, passing a series of loess remnants, gravel bars and excavated rock basins. The western scablands overflight will provide a review of the structurally controlled complex pattern of large-scale erosion and deposition characteristic of the region between the upper Grand Coulee (Banks Lake) and the Pasco Basin.

  2. Semprius field results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosal, Kanchan; Lilly, Doug; Gabriel, John; Burroughs, Scott

    2014-09-01

    Semprius has increased its printed micro-cell module efficiency to 35.5% at CSTC. This design has been field tested for more than two years with no measurable signs of degradation. Three different commercial ready CPV systems have been designed, installed and characterized. The pointing error of all three trackers is ±0.1°, well within the module angle of acceptance (AOA) of ±0.8°. The on-sun performance of these systems is consistent with expectations. The peak AC efficiency of the systems was ˜30%.

  3. Superhorizon magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the evolution of superhorizon-scale magnetic fields from the end of inflation till today. Whatever is the mechanism responsible for their generation during inflation, we find that a given magnetic mode with wave number k evolves, after inflation, according to the values of k ηe , nk , and Ωk , where ηe is the conformal time at the end of inflation, nk is the number density spectrum of inflation-produced photons, and Ωk is the phase difference between the two Bogoliubov coefficients which characterize the state of that mode at the end of inflation. For any realistic inflationary magnetogenesis scenario, we find that nk-1≪|k ηe|≪1 , and three evolutionary scenarios are possible: (i) |Ωk∓π |=O (1 ) , in which case the evolution of the magnetic spectrum Bk(η ) is adiabatic, a2Bk(η )=const , with a being the expansion parameter; (ii) |Ωk∓π |≪|k ηe| , in which case the evolution is superadiabatic, a2Bk(η )∝η ; (iii) |k ηe|≪|Ωk∓π |≪1 or |k ηe|˜|Ωk∓π |≪1 , in which case an early phase of adiabatic evolution is followed, after a time η⋆˜|Ωk∓π |/k , by a superadiabatic evolution. Once a given mode reenters the horizon, it remains frozen into the plasma and then evolves adiabatically till today. As a corollary of our results, we find that inflation-generated magnetic fields evolve adiabatically on all scales and for all times in conformal-invariant free Maxwell theory, while they evolve superadiabatically after inflation on superhorizon scales in the nonconformal-invariant Ratra model, where the inflaton is kinematically coupled to the electromagnetic field. The latter result supports and, somehow, clarifies our recent claim that the Ratra model can account for the presence of cosmic magnetic fields without suffering from both backreaction and strong-coupling problems.

  4. Generalized gravitational entropy of interacting scalar field and Maxwell field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wung-Hong

    2014-12-01

    The generalized gravitational entropy proposed recently by Lewkowycz and Maldacena is extended to the interacting real scalar field and Maxwell field system. Using the BTZ geometry we first investigate the case of free real scalar field and then show a possible way to calculate the entropy of the interacting scalar field. Next, we investigate the Maxwell field system. We exactly solve the wave equation and calculate the analytic value of the generalized gravitational entropy. We also use the Einstein equation to find the effect of backreaction of the Maxwell field on the area of horizon. The associated modified area law is consistent with the generalized gravitational entropy.

  5. Statistical Physics of Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kardar, Mehran

    2006-06-01

    While many scientists are familiar with fractals, fewer are familiar with the concepts of scale-invariance and universality which underly the ubiquity of their shapes. These properties may emerge from the collective behaviour of simple fundamental constituents, and are studied using statistical field theories. Based on lectures for a course in statistical mechanics taught by Professor Kardar at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, this textbook demonstrates how such theories are formulated and studied. Perturbation theory, exact solutions, renormalization groups, and other tools are employed to demonstrate the emergence of scale invariance and universality, and the non-equilibrium dynamics of interfaces and directed paths in random media are discussed. Ideal for advanced graduate courses in statistical physics, it contains an integrated set of problems, with solutions to selected problems at the end of the book. A complete set of solutions is available to lecturers on a password protected website at www.cambridge.org/9780521873413. Based on lecture notes from a course on Statistical Mechanics taught by the author at MIT Contains 65 exercises, with solutions to selected problems Features a thorough introduction to the methods of Statistical Field theory Ideal for graduate courses in Statistical Physics

  6. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    SciTech Connect

    Leonowich, J.A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation and field below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields. 23 refs.

  7. Microwave field effect transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, Ho-Chung (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Electrodes of a high power, microwave field effect transistor are substantially matched to external input and output networks. The field effect transistor includes a metal ground plane layer, a dielectric layer on the ground plane layer, a gallium arsenide active region on the dielectric layer, and substantially coplanar spaced source, gate, and drain electrodes having active segments covering the active region. The active segment of the gate electrode is located between edges of the active segments of the source and drain electrodes. The gate and drain electrodes include inactive pads remote from the active segments. The pads are connected directly to the input and output networks. The source electrode is connected to the ground plane layer. The space between the electrodes and the geometry of the electrodes extablish parasitic shunt capacitances and series inductances that provide substantial matches between the input network and the gate electrode and between the output network and the drain electrode. Many of the devices are connected in parallel and share a common active region, so that each pair of adjacent devices shares the same source electrodes and each pair of adjacent devices shares the same drain electrodes. The gate electrodes for the parallel devices are formed by a continuous stripe that extends between adjacent devices and is connected at different points to the common gate pad.

  8. Passive field reflectance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Christian; Schinca, Daniel C.; Tocho, Jorge O.; Videla, Fabian

    2008-10-01

    The results of reflectance measurements performed with a three-band passive radiometer with independent channels for solar irradiance reference are presented. Comparative operation between the traditional method that uses downward-looking field and reference white panel measurements and the new approach involving duplicated downward- and upward-looking spectral channels (each latter one with its own diffuser) is analyzed. The results indicate that the latter method performs in very good agreement with the standard method and is more suitable for passive sensors under rapidly changing atmospheric conditions (such as clouds, dust, mist, smog and other scatterers), since a more reliable synchronous recording of reference and incident light is achieved. Besides, having separate channels for the reference and the signal allows a better balancing of gains in the amplifiers for each spectral channel. We show the results obtained in the determination of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) corresponding to the period 2004-2007 field experiments concerning weed detection in soybean stubbles and fertilizer level assessment in wheat. The method may be used to refine sensor-based nitrogen fertilizer rate recommendations and to determine suitable zones for herbicide applications.

  9. Polar Magnetic Field Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, C. T.

    1999-01-01

    This grant covers the initial data reduction and analysis of the magnetic field measurements of the Polar spacecraft. At this writing data for the first three years of the mission have been processed and deposited in the key parameter database. These data are also available in a variety of time resolutions and coordinate systems via a webserver at UCLA that provides both plots and digital data. The flight software has twice been reprogrammed: once to remove a glitch in the data where there were rare collisions between commands in the central processing unit and once to provide burst mode data at 100 samples per second on a regular basis. The instrument continues to function as described in the instrument paper (1.1 in the bibliography attached below). The early observations were compared with observations on the same field lines at lower altitude. The polar magnetic measurements also proved to be most useful for testing the accuracy of MHD models. WE also made important contributions to study of waves and turbulence.

  10. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  11. The First Chandra Field

    SciTech Connect

    Weisskopf, Martin C.; Aldcroft, Thomas L.; Cameron, Robert A.; Gandhi, Poshak; Foellmi, Cedric; Elsner, Ronald F.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Wu, Kinwah; O'Dell, Stephen L.; /NASA, Marshall

    2005-09-09

    Before the official first-light images, the Chandra X-ray Observatory obtained an X-ray image of the field to which its focal plane was first exposed. We describe this historic observation and report our study of the first Chandra field. Chandra's Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS) detected 15 X-ray sources, the brightest being dubbed ''Leon X-1'' to honor the Chandra Telescope Scientist, Leon Van Speybroeck. Based upon our analysis of the X-ray data and spectroscopy at the European Southern Observatory (ESO; La Silla, Chile), we find that Leon X-1 is a Type-1 (unobscured) active galactic nucleus (AGN) at a redshift z = 0.3207. Leon X-1 exhibits strong Fe II emission and a broad-line Balmer decrement that is unusually flat for an AGN. Within the context of the Eigenvector-1 correlation space, these properties suggest that Leon X-1 may be a massive ({ge} 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}}) black hole, accreting at a rate approaching its Eddington limit.

  12. Photonic Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyntjes, Geert

    2002-02-01

    Small, in-line polarization rotators or isolators to reduce feedback in fiber optic links can be the basis for excellent magnetic field sensors. Based on the giant magneto-optical (GMO) or Faraday effect in iron garnets, they with a magnetic field of a few hundred Gauss, (20 mT) for an interaction length for an optical beam of a few millimeters achieve a polarization rotation or phase shift of 45 deg (1/8 cycle). When powered by a small laser diode, with the induced linear phase shift recovered at the shot noise limit, we have demonstrated sensitivities at the 3.3 nT/Hz1/2 level for frequencies from less than 1 Hz to frequencies into the high kHz range. Through further improvements; an increase in interaction length, better materials and by far the greatest factor, the addition of a flux concentrator, sensitivities at the pT/Hz1/2 level appear to be within reach. We will detail such a design and discuss the issues that may limit achieving these goals.

  13. The Themis heliostat field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collon, A.; Leclerc, A.

    The 201-heliostat field which supplies solar rays to the central receiver as part of the Themis project is detailed. Each heliostat has 54 sq m of surface and is connected with all others in a central control circuit. The energy is directed to a square aperture 4 m on a side. The control logic is written in three levels, with microprocessors located in each heliostat drive to follow commands of a central computer. The reflector field is subsequently divided into zones in order to maximize control efficiency and power deposition on the receiver as the day progresses. A maximum of 9.7 MWth is shone on the power tower at an operational efficiency of 77 percent. A cylindrical shape was chosen for the array, which turns face downward to survive in strong winds. Emergency procedures which would also cause the plant to shut down due to an accident in the primary loop are explored, along with hazards to human eyesight from seeing the reflected flux.

  14. Beyond mean field theory: statistical field theory for neural networks

    PubMed Central

    Buice, Michael A; Chow, Carson C

    2014-01-01

    Mean field theories have been a stalwart for studying the dynamics of networks of coupled neurons. They are convenient because they are relatively simple and possible to analyze. However, classical mean field theory neglects the effects of fluctuations and correlations due to single neuron effects. Here, we consider various possible approaches for going beyond mean field theory and incorporating correlation effects. Statistical field theory methods, in particular the Doi–Peliti–Janssen formalism, are particularly useful in this regard. PMID:25243014

  15. Field theory of Mottness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Ting-Pong

    One of the leading problems in condensed matter physics is what state of matter obtain when there is a strong Coulomb repulsion between the electrons. One of the exotic examples is the high temperature superconductivity which was discovered in copper-oxide ceramics (cuprates) over twenty years ago. Thus far, a satisfactory theory is absent. In particular, the nature of the electron state outside the superconducting phase remains controversial. In analogy with the BCS theory of a conventional superconductor, in which the metal is well known to be a Fermi liquid, a complete understanding of the normal state of cuprate is necessary prior to the study of the superconducting mechanism in the high temperature superconductors. In this thesis, we will provide a theory for these exotic normal state properties by studying the minimal microscopic model which captures the physics of strong electron correlation. Even in such a simple microscopic model, striking properties including charge localization and presence of a Luttinger surface resemble the normal state properties of cuprate. An exact low energy theory of a doped Mott insulator will be constructed by explicitly integrating (rather than projecting) out the degrees of freedom far away from the chemical potential. The exact low energy theory contains degrees of freedom that cannot be obtained from projective schemes. In particular, a charge 2e bosonic field which is not made out of elemental excitations emerges at low energies. Such a field accounts for dynamical spectral weight transfer across the Mott gap. At half-filling, we show that two such excitations emerge which play a crucial role in preserving the Luttinger surface along which the single-particle Green function vanishes. We also apply this method to the Anderson-U impurity and show that in addition to the Kondo interaction, bosonic degrees of freedom appear as well. We show that many of the normal state properties of the cuprates can result from this new charge

  16. Squishy Physics Field Trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weeks, Eric R.; Cianci, Gianguido; Habdas, Piotr

    2008-03-01

    Our laboratory studies soft condensed matter, which means we investigate squishy materials such as foams, emulsions, and colloidal suspensions. These materials include common things such as peanut butter, toothpaste, mayonnaise, shampoo, and shaving cream. We have conducted several field trips for grade school students, where they come to our laboratory and play with squishy materials. They do both hands-on table-top projects and also look at samples with a microscope. We have also developed some of these activities into labs appropriate for first-year college students. Our first goal for these activities is to show students that science is fun, and the second goal is to get them intrigued by the idea that there are more phases than just solids, liquids, and gases.

  17. Oil field management system

    DOEpatents

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-09-23

    Oil field management systems and methods for managing operation of one or more wells producing a high void fraction multiphase flow. The system includes a differential pressure flow meter which samples pressure readings at various points of interest throughout the system and uses pressure differentials derived from the pressure readings to determine gas and liquid phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flow. One or both of the gas and liquid phase mass flow rates are then compared with predetermined criteria. In the event such mass flow rates satisfy the predetermined criteria, a well control system implements a correlating adjustment action respecting the multiphase flow. In this way, various parameters regarding the high void fraction multiphase flow are used as control inputs to the well control system and thus facilitate management of well operations.

  18. Measurement of radiofrequency fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonowich, J. A.

    1992-05-01

    We are literally surrounded by radiofrequency (RFR) and microwave radiation, from both natural and man-made sources. The identification and control of man-made sources of RFR has become a high priority of radiation safety professionals in recent years. For the purposes of this paper, we will consider RFR to cover the frequencies from 3 kHz to 300 MHz, and microwaves from 300 MHz to 300 GHz, and will use the term RFR interchangeably to describe both. Electromagnetic radiation below 3 kHz is considered Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) and will not be discussed in this paper. Unlike x- and gamma radiation, RFR is non-ionizing. The energy of any RFR photon is insufficient to produce ionizations in matter. The measurement and control of RFR hazards is therefore fundamentally different from ionizing radiation. The purpose of this paper is to acquaint the reader with the fundamental issues involved in measuring and safely using RFR fields.

  19. Supersymmetric Quantum Field Theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigore, D. R.

    2005-03-01

    We consider some supersymmetric multiplets in a purely quantum framework. A crucial point is to ensure the positivity of the scalar product in the Hilbert space of the quantum system. For the vector multiplet we obtain some discrepancies with respect to the literature in the expression of the super-propagator and we prove that the model is consistent only for positive mass. The gauge structure is constructed purely deductive and leads to the necessity of introducing scalar ghost superfields, in analogy to the usual gauge theories. Then we consider a supersymmetric extension of quantum gauge theory based on a vector multiplet containing supersymmetric partners of spin 3/2 for the vector fields. As an application we consider the supersymmetric electroweak theory. The resulting self-couplings of the gauge bosons agree with the standard model up to a divergence.

  20. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  1. Stories from the field.

    PubMed

    Caine, Julie; Pokhrel, Kabi

    2011-11-01

    "Stories From the Field" is a series of short profiles of tobacco control programs and their leaders, showcasing promising technical assistance and training models in Louisiana, Puerto Rico, the Cherokee Nation, West Virginia, the Pacific Islands, and the Virgin Islands. The series illuminates key themes of collaboration with diverse stakeholders, elimination of health disparities, building tobacco control coalitions, engaging youth to reduce commercial tobacco use, sustaining tobacco control efforts, and the use of the media to raise public awareness that are highlighted in the Health Promotion Practice Supplement Theme Issue, Training and Technical Assistance: Lessons Learned to Sustain Social Norm Changes in Tobacco Control. Common tobacco control strategies bind the stories together. Local knowledge, coalition building, community involvement, innovative partnerships, and educational outreach are at the core of all of these tobacco control projects. PMID:22068583

  2. Groundwater contamination field methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ivan

    Half of the drinking water in the United States comes from groundwater; 75% of the nation's cities obtain all or part of their supplies from groundwater; and the rural areas are 95% dependent upon groundwater. Therefore it is imperative that every possible precaution be taken to protect the purity of the groundwater.Because of the increasing interest in prevention of groundwater contamination and the need for nationally recognized methods for investigation of contamination, a symposium entitled “Field Methods for Groundwater Contamination Studies and Their Standardization” was held February 2-7, 1986, in Cocoa Beach, Fla. The symposium was sponsored and organized by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) Committee D18 on Soil and Rock and Committee D19 on Water. Gene Collins of the National Institute for Petroleum and Energy Research (Bartlesville, Okla.) was symposium chair, and Ivan Johnson (A. Ivan Johnson, Inc., Consulting, Arvada, Colo.) was vice chair.

  3. High field superconducting magnets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hait, Thomas P. (Inventor); Shirron, Peter J. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting magnet includes an insulating layer disposed about the surface of a mandrel; a superconducting wire wound in adjacent turns about the mandrel to form the superconducting magnet, wherein the superconducting wire is in thermal communication with the mandrel, and the superconducting magnet has a field-to-current ratio equal to or greater than 1.1 Tesla per Ampere; a thermally conductive potting material configured to fill interstices between the adjacent turns, wherein the thermally conductive potting material and the superconducting wire provide a path for dissipation of heat; and a voltage limiting device disposed across each end of the superconducting wire, wherein the voltage limiting device is configured to prevent a voltage excursion across the superconducting wire during quench of the superconducting magnet.

  4. Imploding scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, M.D.

    1996-09-01

    Static spherically symmetric uncoupled scalar space{endash}times have no event horizon and a divergent Kretschmann singularity at the origin of the coordinates. The singularity is always present so that nonstatic solutions have been sought to see if the singularities can develop from an initially singular free space{endash}time. In flat space{endash}time the Klein{endash}Gordon equation {D`Alembertian}{var_phi}=0 has the nonstatic spherically symmetric solution {var_phi}={sigma}({ital v})/{ital r}, where {sigma}({ital v}) is a once differentiable function of the null coordinate {ital v}. In particular, the function {sigma}({ital v}) can be taken to be initially zero and then grow, thus producing a singularity in the scalar field. A similar situation occurs when the scalar field is coupled to gravity via Einstein{close_quote}s equations; the solution also develops a divergent Kretschmann invariant singularity, but it has no overall energy. To overcome this, Bekenstein{close_quote}s theorems are applied to give two corresponding conformally coupled solutions. One of these has positive ADM mass and has the following properties: (i) it develops a Kretschmann invariant singularity, (ii) it has no event horizon, (iii) it has a well-defined source, (iv) it has well-defined junction condition to Minkowski space{endash}time, and (v) it is asymptotically flat with positive overall energy. This paper presents this solution and several other nonstatic scalar solutions. The properties of these solutions which are studied are limited to the following three: (i) whether the solution can be joined to Minkowski space{endash}time, (ii) whether the solution is asymptotically flat, (iii) and, if so, what the solutions{close_quote} Bondi and ADM masses are. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  5. Crustal Magnetic Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Patrick T.; Ravat, D.; Frawley, James J.

    1999-01-01

    Cosmos 49, Polar Orbit Geophysical Observatory (POGO) (Orbiting Geophysical Observatory (OGO-2, 4 and 6)) and Magsat have been the only low-earth orbiting satellites to measure the crustal magnetic field on a global scale. These missions revealed the presence of long- wavelength (> 500 km) crustal anomalies predominantly located over continents. Ground based methods were, for the most part, unable to record these very large-scale features; no doubt due to the problems of assembling continental scale maps from numerous smaller surveys acquired over many years. Questions arose as to the source and nature of these long-wave length anomalies. As a result there was a great stimulant given to the study of the magnetic properties of the lower crust and upper mantle. Some indication as to the nature of these deep sources has been provided by the recent results from the deep crustal drilling programs. In addition, the mechanism of magnetization, induced or remanent, was largely unknown. For computational ease these anomalies were considered to result solely from induced magnetization. However, recent results from Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA), a magnetometer-bearing mission to Mars, have revealed crustal anomalies with dimensions similar to the largest anomalies on Earth. These Martian features could only have been produced by remanent magnetization, since Mars lacks an inducing field. The origin of long-wavelength crustal anomalies, however, has not been completely determined. Several large crustal magnetic anomalies (e.g., Bangui, Kursk, Kiruna and Central Europe) will be discussed and the role of future satellite magnetometer missions (Orsted, SUNSAT and Champ) in their interpretation evaluated.

  6. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  7. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Miller, G

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields. PMID:3434538

  8. Exposure guidelines for magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, G.

    1987-12-01

    The powerful magnetic fields produced by a controlled fusion experiment at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) necessitated the development of personnel-exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. A literature search and conversations with active researchers showed that it is currently possible to develop preliminary exposure guidelines for steady magnetic fields. An overview of the results of past research into the bioeffects of magnetic fields was compiled, along with a discussion of hazards that may be encountered by people with sickle-cell anemia or medical electronic and prosthetic implants. The LLNL steady magnetic-field exposure guidelines along with a review of developments concerning the safety of time-varying fields were also presented in this compilation. Guidelines developed elsewhere for time varying fields were also given. Further research is needed to develop exposure standards for both steady or time-varying fields.

  9. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    Krylov, V V; Iziumov, Iu G; Izvekov, E I; Nepomniashchikh, V A

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25438567

  10. [Magnetic fields and fish behavior].

    PubMed

    2013-01-01

    In the review, contemporary data on the influence of natural and artificial magnetic fields on fish behavior are considered. In this regard, elasmobranchs and teleosts appear to be studied most exhaustively. Elasmobranchs and some teleosts are able to perceive magnetic fields via electroreceptors. A number of teleosts can sense magnetic fields via sensory cells containing crystals of biogenic magnetite. Laboratory experiments and field observations indicate the influence of magnetic fields on fish locomotor activity and spatial distribution. The geomagnetic field can be used by fish for navigation. Besides, artificial magnetic fields and natural fluctuations of the geomagnetic field can affect fish embryos leading to alterations in their development. It is suggested that, afterwards, these alterations can have an effect on fish behavior. PMID:25508098

  11. On Pfaffian Random Point Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargin, V.

    2014-02-01

    We study Pfaffian random point fields by using the Moore-Dyson quaternion determinants. First, we give sufficient conditions that ensure that a self-dual quaternion kernel defines a valid random point field, and then we prove a CLT for Pfaffian point fields. The proofs are based on a new quaternion extension of the Cauchy-Binet determinantal identity. In addition, we derive the Fredholm determinantal formulas for the Pfaffian point fields which use the quaternion determinant.

  12. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, A.R.

    1998-03-10

    A positive-drive field actuator motor is described which includes a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately. 62 figs.

  13. Martian external magnetic field proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langlais, Benoit; Civet, Francois

    2015-04-01

    Mars possesses no dynamic magnetic field of internal origin as it is the case for the Earth or for Mercury. Instead Mars is characterized by an intense and localized magnetic field of crustal origin. This field is the result of past magnetization and demagnetization processes, and reflects its evolution. The Interplanetary Magnetic Field (IMF) interacts with Mars' ionized environment to create an external magnetic field. This external field is weak compared to lithospheric one but very dynamic, and may hamper the detailed analysis of the internal magnetic field at some places or times. Because there are currently no magnetic field measurements made at Mars' surface, it is not possible to directly monitor the external field temporal variability as it is done in Earth's ground magnetic observatories. In this study we examine to indirect ways of quantifying this external field. First we use the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) mission which measures the solar wind about one hour upstream of the bow-shock resulting from the interaction between the solar wind and the Earth's internal magnetic field. These measurements are extrapolated to Mars' position taking into account the orbital configurations of the Mars-Earth system and the velocity of particles carrying the IMF. Second we directly use Mars Global Surveyor magnetic field measurements to quantify the level of variability of the external field. We subtract from the measurements the internal field which is otherwise modeled, and bin the residuals first on a spatial and then on a temporal mesh. This allows to compute daily or semi daily index. We present a comparison of these two proxies and demonstrate their complementarity. We also illustrate our analysis by comparing our Martian external field proxies to terrestrial index at epochs of known strong activity. These proxies will especially be useful for upcoming magnetic field measurements made around or at the surface of Mars.

  14. Direct drive field actuator motors

    DOEpatents

    Grahn, Allen R.

    1998-01-01

    A positive-drive field actuator motor including a stator carrying at least one field actuator which changes in dimension responsive to application of an energy field, and at least one drive shoe movable by the dimensional changes of the field actuator to contact and move a rotor element with respect to the stator. Various embodiments of the motor are disclosed, and the rotor element may be moved linearly or arcuately.

  15. VELETA 2002 Field Campaign.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alados-Arboledas, L.; Veleta2002 Team

    2003-04-01

    Depletion of the Earth's ozone layer is considered responsible of an increase in the solar ultraviolet irradiance incoming at surface level (WMO, 1998). For this reason, it is important to know the amount of ultraviolet radiation received by plants and animal organisms to evaluate the potential impact of increased UV radiation on biological systems. During recent years several studies has investigated the differences in UV radiation between places located at different altitude. Depending on the choice of the experimental area altitudinal gradients in erythemal UV have been reported ranging from 0.08 to 0.40 at different regions. Rather high altitudinal gradients were obtained when the studies have been undertaken at sites with important tropospheric pollution or when snow cover was present in the high-level sites. In this sense, it seems of interest to study these altitudinal gradients including comprehensive observations of the environmental conditions relevant to the incoming UV irradiance in order to separate the different contributions to this altitudinal effect. This paper presents the field campaign VELETA2002 (eValuation of the Effects of eLevation and aErosols on the ultravioleT rAdiation), developed during the month of July 2002 in the area of Sierra Nevada (Spain). This field campaign was designed to obtain experimental data on elevation and atmospheric aerosol effects on the solar ultraviolet irradiance. For this purpose a set of radiometers and spectroradiometers has been installed at both slopes of Sierra Nevada Massif, from coastal to inland locations. The field stations include Motril, a coastal location at sea level, Pitres (1200 m a.s.l.) located in the South slope of Sierra Nevada Massif, the Veleta Peak (3398 m a.s.l.), Las Sabinas (2200 m a.s.l.) located on the north slope of the mountain range and Armilla (680 m a.s.l.) located in the valley. The principal feature of the locations is that they provide a strong altitudinal gradient considering

  16. Real-World Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsworthy, Richard

    1997-01-01

    In addition to virtual field trips, technology can play a role in planning for real-world field trips. Describes how students at the Woodbridge Academy in Lexington, Kentucky planned a field trip to Washington, DC, using the Internet and computer software to research, administer, and report their experiences. Provides the addresses of related Web…

  17. Superconducting Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, Kul; Romanofsky, Robert R.; Tabib-Azar, Massood

    1995-01-01

    Devices offer switching speeds greater than semiconducting counterparts. High-Tc superconducting field-effect transistors (SUPEFETs) investigated for use as electronic switches in delay-line-type microwave phase shifters. Resemble semiconductor field-effect transistors in some respects, but their operation based on different principle; namely, electric-field control of transition between superconductivity and normal conductivity.

  18. Magnetic Field Topology in Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardiner, T. A.; Frank, A.

    2000-01-01

    We present results on the magnetic field topology in a pulsed radiative. jet. For initially helical magnetic fields and periodic velocity variations, we find that the magnetic field alternates along the, length of the jet from toroidally dominated in the knots to possibly poloidally dominated in the intervening regions.

  19. Light fields in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelevin, V. N.; Kozlyaninov, M. V.

    1981-01-01

    The problem of light fields in the ocean is in basic ocean optics. Twenty-six separate studies discuss: (1) the field of solar radiation in the ocean; (2) stationary and nonstationary light fields created in the sea by artificial sources; and (3) the use of optical methods to study biological and hydrodynamic characteristics of the sea.

  20. Numerical calculations of flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D.; Vogel, J. M.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical calculations were made of flow fields generated by various aerodynamic configurations. Data cover flow fields generated by a finitely thick lifting three dimensional wing with subsonic tips moving at supersonic speeds, cross flow instability associated with lifting delta wing configurations such as space shuttles, and flow fields produced by a lifting elliptic cone. Finite difference techniques were used to determine elliptic cone flow.

  1. Lattice QCD in Background Fields

    SciTech Connect

    William Detmold, Brian Tiburzi, Andre Walker-Loud

    2009-06-01

    Electromagnetic properties of hadrons can be computed by lattice simulations of QCD in background fields. We demonstrate new techniques for the investigation of charged hadron properties in electric fields. Our current calculations employ large electric fields, motivating us to analyze chiral dynamics in strong QED backgrounds, and subsequently uncover surprising non-perturbative effects present at finite volume.

  2. Low field magnetic resonance imaging

    DOEpatents

    Pines, Alexander; Sakellariou, Dimitrios; Meriles, Carlos A.; Trabesinger, Andreas H.

    2010-07-13

    A method and system of magnetic resonance imaging does not need a large homogenous field to truncate a gradient field. Spatial information is encoded into the spin magnetization by allowing the magnetization to evolve in a non-truncated gradient field and inducing a set of 180 degree rotations prior to signal acquisition.

  3. Undergraduates and Field Research Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marotz, Glen A.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes a course (with a framework loosely based on the environmental impact statement) in which students learn research methods as they cooperate in interdisciplinary field research projects. Includes a rationale for the course, a generalized outline of field experiences, and examples of student projects (both on-campus briefings and field site…

  4. Force-Field Parameter Fitter

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-05-27

    ParFit is a flexible and extendable framework and library of classes for fitting force-field parameters to data from high-level ab-initio calculations on the basis of deterministic and stochastic algorithms. Currently, the code is fitting MM3 and Merck force-field parameters but could easily extend to other force-field types.

  5. Computer Based Virtual Field Trips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Kenneth F.; Hosticka, Alice; Schriver, Martha; Bedell, Jackie

    This paper discusses computer based virtual field trips that use technologies commonly found in public schools in the United States. The discussion focuses on the advantages of both using and creating these field trips for an instructional situation. A virtual field trip to Cumberland Island National Seashore, St. Marys, Georgia is used as a point…

  6. Magnetic-field-dosimetry system

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

    1981-01-21

    A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

  7. RESOLVE 2010 Field Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Captain, J.; Quinn, J.; Moss, T.; Weis, K.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the field tests conducted in 2010 of the Regolith Environment Science & Oxygen & Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE). The Resolve program consist of several mechanism: (1) Excavation and Bulk Regolith Characterization (EBRC) which is designed to act as a drill and crusher, (2) Regolith Volatiles Characterization (RVC) which is a reactor and does gas analysis,(3) Lunar Water Resources Demonstration (LWRD) which is a fluid system, water and hydrogen capture device and (4) the Rover. The scientific goal of this test is to demonstrate evolution of low levels of hydrogen and water as a function of temperature. The Engineering goals of this test are to demonstrate:(1) Integration onto new rover (2) Miniaturization of electronics rack (3) Operation from battery packs (elimination of generator) (4) Remote command/control and (5) Operation while roving. Views of the 2008 and the 2010 mechanisms, a overhead view of the mission path, a view of the terrain, the two drill sites, and a graphic of the Master Events Controller Graphical User Interface (MEC GUI) are shown. There are descriptions of the Gas chromatography (GC), the operational procedure, water and hydrogen doping of tephra. There is also a review of some of the results, and future direction for research and tests.

  8. Martian Dune Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    This spectacular picture of the Martian landscape by the Viking 1 Lander shows a dune field with features remarkably similar to many seen in the deserts of Earth. The dramatic early morning lighting - 7:30 a.m. local Mars time--reveals subtle details and shading. Taken yesterday (August 3) by the Lander s camera #1, the picture covers 100 , looking northeast at left and southeast at right. Viking scientists have studied areas very much like the one in this view in Mexico and in California (Kelso, Death Valley, Yuma). The sharp dune crests indicate the most recent wind storms capable of moving sand over the dunes in the general direction from upper left to lower right. Small deposits downwind of rocks also indicate this wind direction. Large boulder at left is about eight meters (25 feet) from the spacecraft and measures about one by three meters (3 by 10 feet). The meteorology boom, which supports Viking s miniature weather station, cuts through the picture s center. The sun rose two hours earlier and is about 30 above the horizon near the center of the picture.

  9. Interactions between electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwan, H. P.

    1985-02-01

    We applied for this grant to support a workshop at Erice, Italy. This workshop has been commonly called Erice School and the main subject of this workshop is the interaction of electromagnetic fields with biological cells and molecules. The grant from ONR enabled us to invite American scientists to participants in this workshop and deliver scientific papers. The duration of the Erice School was ten days. Therefore, we had sufficient time to discuss the problems of electromagnetic radiations. Vigorous discussions took place during official sessions and during private conversations. The participants of this workshop are mostly those who have been active in the research on bioelectromagnetics, but there are some numbers of speakers who discussed the basic electrical and magnetic properties of polyelectrolytes, biological membranes and tissue. The workshop was unique in that there were participants with a variety of training backgrounds. This enabled us to exchange the information between applied scientists and basic scientists. Also, active exchanges of opinions took place between biological scientists and physical scientists.

  10. Megagauss Fields During Milliseconds

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, L.J.; Embury, D.; Han, K.; Parkin, D.M.; Baca, A.; Kihara, K.H.; Sims, J.R.; Boebinger, G.S.; Eyssa, Y.; Lesch, B.; Li, L.; Schillig, J.B.; Schneider-Muntau, H.; Walsh, R.

    1998-10-18

    A non-destructive, one megagauss magnet is now being designed in cooperation between Los Alamos and the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory (NHMFL) through joint funding by the US Department of Energy and the US NSF. The design combines two types of pulsed magnet now in use at the NHMFL: a capacitor-driven 'insert' magnet with a total pulse width of order 10 ms and a much larger 'outsert' magnet with a total pulse width of order 2 seconds that is driven by a controlled power source. The insert and outsert produce approximately 1/2 megagauss each. Although the design uses CuAg as the principal conductor further design efforts and materials development are exploring CuNb and stainless steel-clad copper as possible future alternatives. A crucial innovation was to employ wound steel strip (sheet) as a reinforcement in both insert and outsert coils. This gives extra strength due to the higher degree of cold-work possible in strip materials. For this leading edge magnet a key role is played by materials development. A major component, the 7 module 560 MVA controlled dc power supply required for the outsert, has been installed and commissioned.

  11. Airborne field strength monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredemeyer, J.; Kleine-Ostmann, T.; Schrader, T.; Münter, K.; Ritter, J.

    2007-06-01

    In civil and military aviation, ground based navigation aids (NAVAIDS) are still crucial for flight guidance even though the acceptance of satellite based systems (GNSS) increases. Part of the calibration process for NAVAIDS (ILS, DME, VOR) is to perform a flight inspection according to specified methods as stated in a document (DOC8071, 2000) by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). One major task is to determine the coverage, or, in other words, the true signal-in-space field strength of a ground transmitter. This has always been a challenge to flight inspection up to now, since, especially in the L-band (DME, 1GHz), the antenna installed performance was known with an uncertainty of 10 dB or even more. In order to meet ICAO's required accuracy of ±3 dB it is necessary to have a precise 3-D antenna factor of the receiving antenna operating on the airborne platform including all losses and impedance mismatching. Introducing precise, effective antenna factors to flight inspection to achieve the required accuracy is new and not published in relevant papers yet. The authors try to establish a new balanced procedure between simulation and validation by airborne and ground measurements. This involves the interpretation of measured scattering parameters gained both on the ground and airborne in comparison with numerical results obtained by the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) accelerated method of moments (MoM) using a complex geometric model of the aircraft. First results will be presented in this paper.

  12. Electronic field permeameter

    DOEpatents

    Chandler, Mark A.; Goggin, David J.; Horne, Patrick J.; Kocurek, Gary G.; Lake, Larry W.

    1989-01-01

    For making rapid, non-destructive permeability measurements in the field, a portable minipermeameter of the kind having a manually-operated gas injection tip is provided with a microcomputer system which operates a flow controller to precisely regulate gas flow rate to a test sample, and reads a pressure sensor which senses the pressure across the test sample. The microcomputer system automatically turns on the gas supply at the start of each measurement, senses when a steady-state is reached, collects and records pressure and flow rate data, and shuts off the gas supply immediately after the measurement is completed. Preferably temperature is also sensed to correct for changes in gas viscosity. The microcomputer system may also provide automatic zero-point adjustment, sensor calibration, over-range sensing, and may select controllers, sensors, and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements. Electronic sensors may provide increased accuracy and precision. Preferably one microcomputer is used for sensing instrument control and data collection, and a second microcomputer is used which is dedicated to recording and processing the data, selecting the sensors and set-points for obtaining the most precise measurements, and instructing the user how to set-up and operate the minipermeameter. To provide mass data collection and user-friendly operation, the second microcomputer is preferably a lap-type portable microcomputer having a non-volatile or battery-backed CMOS memory.

  13. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  14. Overview - Electric fields. [in magnetosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cauffman, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The electric fields session is designed to review progress in observation, theory, and modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, and to expose important new results. The present report comments on the state and prospects of electric field research, with particular emphasis on relevance to quantitative modeling of the magnetospheric processes. Attention is given to underlying theories and models. Modeling philosophy is discussed relative to explanatory models and representative models. Modeling of magnetospheric electric fields, while in its infancy, is developing rapidly on many fronts employing a variety of approaches. The general topic of magnetospheric electric fields is becoming of prime importance in understanding space plasmas.

  15. Field practice internship final report

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, T.

    1994-05-01

    This field practice internship final report gives an overview of the field practice, which was completed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Environmental Management Department, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The field practice focused on the completion of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA) Title III, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act Section 312, Tier II Report. The field practice internship was conducted on a full-time basis between December 13, 1993 through February 18, 1994. Sheila Poligone, Emergency Planning and Community Right-to-Know Act (EPCRA) Coordinator served as the field practice preceptor.

  16. Observations of galactic magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Rainer

    Magnetic fields are enchored in gas clouds. Field lines are tangled in spiral arms, but highly regular between the arms. The similarity of pitch angles between gaseous and magnetic arms suggests a coupling between the density wave and the magnetic wave. Observations of large-scale patterns in Faraday rotation favour a dynamo origin of the regular fields. Fields in barred galaxies do not reveal the strong shearing shocks observed in the cold gas, but swing smoothly from the upstream region into the bar. Magnetic fields are important for the dynamcis of gas clouds, for the formation of spiral structures, bars and halos, and for mass and angular momentum transport in central regions.

  17. Logarithmic conformal field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gainutdinov, Azat; Ridout, David; Runkel, Ingo

    2013-12-01

    Conformal field theory (CFT) has proven to be one of the richest and deepest subjects of modern theoretical and mathematical physics research, especially as regards statistical mechanics and string theory. It has also stimulated an enormous amount of activity in mathematics, shaping and building bridges between seemingly disparate fields through the study of vertex operator algebras, a (partial) axiomatisation of a chiral CFT. One can add to this that the successes of CFT, particularly when applied to statistical lattice models, have also served as an inspiration for mathematicians to develop entirely new fields: the Schramm-Loewner evolution and Smirnov's discrete complex analysis being notable examples. When the energy operator fails to be diagonalisable on the quantum state space, the CFT is said to be logarithmic. Consequently, a logarithmic CFT is one whose quantum space of states is constructed from a collection of representations which includes reducible but indecomposable ones. This qualifier arises because of the consequence that certain correlation functions will possess logarithmic singularities, something that contrasts with the familiar case of power law singularities. While such logarithmic singularities and reducible representations were noted by Rozansky and Saleur in their study of the U (1|1) Wess-Zumino-Witten model in 1992, the link between the non-diagonalisability of the energy operator and logarithmic singularities in correlators is usually ascribed to Gurarie's 1993 article (his paper also contains the first usage of the term 'logarithmic conformal field theory'). The class of CFTs that were under control at this time was quite small. In particular, an enormous amount of work from the statistical mechanics and string theory communities had produced a fairly detailed understanding of the (so-called) rational CFTs. However, physicists from both camps were well aware that applications from many diverse fields required significantly more

  18. Field Model: An Object-Oriented Data Model for Fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Patrick J.

    2001-01-01

    We present an extensible, object-oriented data model designed for field data entitled Field Model (FM). FM objects can represent a wide variety of fields, including fields of arbitrary dimension and node type. FM can also handle time-series data. FM achieves generality through carefully selected topological primitives and through an implementation that leverages the potential of templated C++. FM supports fields where the nodes values are paired with any cell type. Thus FM can represent data where the field nodes are paired with the vertices ("vertex-centered" data), fields where the nodes are paired with the D-dimensional cells in R(sup D) (often called "cell-centered" data), as well as fields where nodes are paired with edges or other cell types. FM is designed to effectively handle very large data sets; in particular FM employs a demand-driven evaluation strategy that works especially well with large field data. Finally, the interfaces developed for FM have the potential to effectively abstract field data based on adaptive meshes. We present initial results with a triangular adaptive grid in R(sup 2) and discuss how the same design abstractions would work equally well with other adaptive-grid variations, including meshes in R(sup 3).

  19. Hinode observations of polar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuneta, Saku

    The Sun's polar magnetic fields are the direct extension of the global poloidal field, which serves as seed fields for the toroidal fields forming active regions and sunspots. The polar regions are also the source of fast solar wind, and are the final destination of pole-ward meridional flows. We present spectro-polarimetric maps of the vector magnetic fields in the polar region of the Sun that are unprecedented in terms of high spatial resolution, large field of view, and polarimetric precision. These observations were carried out with the Solar Optical Telescope aboard Hinode. More than 100 canopy-like vertical magnetic structures as strong as 1-1.2 kG are scattered in heliographic latitude of 70-90o . They all have the same polarity, consistent with the global polar fields. The temporal-spatial evolution of these kG patches, which are crucial to understanding of their origin, will be reported. In addition to the vertical fields, the polar region appears to be covered with ubiquitous horizontal fields. Chromospheric observations with Hinode indicate that substantial amount of the horizontal fields reach chromosphere. Our observations describe the magnetic landscape of this poorly known region of the solar atmosphere. The polar regions are the source of the fast solar wind channelled along unipolar coronal-hole magnetic fields. We conjecture that the fast solar wind emanates only from the vertical flux tubes (canopies), which also seem to serve as efficient chimneys for Alfven waves to accelerate the solar wind.

  20. Magnetic fields in quiescent prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; Martens, P. C. H.

    1990-01-01

    The origin of the axial fields in high-latitude quiescent prominences is considered. The fact that almost all quiescent prominences obey the same hemisphere-dependent rule strongly suggests that the solar differential rotation plays an important role in producing the axial fields. However, the observations are inconsistent with the hypothesis that the axial fields are produced by differential rotation acting on an existing coronal magnetic field. Several possible explanations for this discrepancy are considered. The possibility that the sign of the axial field depends on the topology of the magnetic field in which the prominence is embedded is examined, as is the possibility that the neutral line is tilted with respect to the east-west direction, so that differential rotation causes the neutral line also to rotate with time. The possibility that the axial fields of quiescent prominences have their origin below the solar surface is also considered.

  1. Magnetospheric electric fields and currents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mauk, B. H.; Zanetti, L. J.

    1987-01-01

    The progress made in the years 1983-1986 in understanding the character and operation of magnetospheric electric fields and electric currents is discussed, with emphasis placed on the connection with the interior regions. Special attention is given to determinations of global electric-field configurations, measurements of the response of magnetospheric particle populations to the electric-field configurations, and observations of the magnetospheric currents at high altitude and during northward IMF. Global simulations of current distributions are discussed, and the sources of global electric fields and currents are examined. The topics discussed in the area of impulsive and small-scale phenomena include substorm current systems, impulsive electric fields and associated currents, and field-aligned electrodynamics. A key finding of these studies is that the electric fields and currents are interrelated and cannot be viewed as separate entities.

  2. Abundance of field galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klypin, Anatoly; Karachentsev, Igor; Makarov, Dmitry; Nasonova, Olga

    2015-12-01

    We present new measurements of the abundance of galaxies with a given circular velocity in the Local Volume: a region centred on the Milky Way Galaxy and extending to distance ˜10 Mpc. The sample of ˜750 mostly dwarf galaxies provides a unique opportunity to study the abundance and properties of galaxies down to absolute magnitudes MB ≈ -10 and virial masses M_vir= 109{ M_{⊙}}. We find that the standard Λ cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model gives remarkably accurate estimates for the velocity function of galaxies with circular velocities V ≳ 70 kms-1 and corresponding virial masses M_vir≳ 5× 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, but it badly fails by overpredicting ˜5 times the abundance of large dwarfs with velocities V = 30-40 kms-1. The warm dark matter (WDM) models cannot explain the data either, regardless of mass of WDM particle. Just as in previous observational studies, we find a shallow asymptotic slope dN/dlog V ∝ Vα, α ≈ -1 of the velocity function, which is inconsistent with the standard ΛCDM model that predicts the slope α = -3. Though reminiscent to the known overabundance of satellite problem, the overabundance of field galaxies is a much more difficult problem. For the standard ΛCDM model to survive, in the 10 Mpc radius of the Milky Way there should be 1000 not yet detected galaxies with virial mass M_vir≈ 10^{10}{ M_{⊙}}, extremely low surface brightness and no detectable H I gas. So far none of this type of galaxies have been discovered.

  3. Effective field theory out of equilibrium: Brownian quantum fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyanovsky, D.

    2015-06-01

    The emergence of an effective field theory out of equilibrium is studied in the case in which a light field—the system—interacts with very heavy fields in a finite temperature bath. We obtain the reduced density matrix for the light field, its time evolution is determined by an effective action that includes the influence action from correlations of the heavy degrees of freedom. The non-equilibrium effective field theory yields a Langevin equation of motion for the light field in terms of dissipative and noise kernels that obey a generalized fluctuation dissipation relation. These are completely determined by the spectral density of the bath which is analyzed in detail for several cases. At T = 0 we elucidate the effect of thresholds in the renormalization aspects and the asymptotic emergence of a local effective field theory with unitary time evolution. At T\

  4. Helical quadrupole field stabilization of field-reversed configuration plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Shimamura, S.; Nogi, Y.

    1986-01-01

    The n = 2 mode rotational instability, which appears on a field-reversed configuration plasma produced by a theta pinch, is stabilized by a helical quadrupole field. The critical strength of the field to stabilize the instability is obtained as a function of pitch angle of the helical coil ..cap alpha.. rad/m. Typically, the plasma in the ..cap alpha.. = 6 winding field is stabilized by about one-fifth of ..cap alpha.. = 0 field strength. To physically explain such a good effectiveness of the helical field, the rotation speed of the plasma is measured by a Doppler shift of a carbon V 2270.9-A line. However, the clear explanation to the helical effect is not yet given.

  5. Whistler Modes with Wave Magnetic Fields Exceeding the Ambient Field

    SciTech Connect

    Stenzel, R.L.; Urrutia, J.M.; Strohmaier, K.D.

    2006-03-10

    Whistler-mode wave packets with fields exceeding the ambient dc magnetic field have been excited in a large, high electron-beta plasma. The waves are induced with a loop antenna with dipole moment either along or opposite to the dc field. In the latter case the excited wave packets have the topology of a spheromak but are propagating in the whistler mode along and opposite to the dc magnetic field. Field-reversed configurations with net zero helicity have also been produced. The electron magnetohydrodynamics fields are force free, have wave energy density exceeding the particle energy density, and propagate stably at subelectron thermal velocities through a nearly uniform stationary ion density background.

  6. Field-aligned currents and large scale magnetospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dangelo, N.

    1980-01-01

    D'Angelo's model of polar cap electric fields (1977) was used to visualize how high-latitude field-aligned currents are driven by the solar wind generator. The region 1 and region 2 currents of Iijima and Potemra (1976) and the cusp field-aligned currents of Wilhjelm et al. (1978) and McDiarmid et al. (1978) are apparently driven by different generators, although in both cases the solar wind is their ultimate source.

  7. Field Science--the Nature and Utility of Scientific Fields.

    PubMed

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C

    2015-01-01

    Fields are the fundamental sociological units of science. Despite their importance, relatively little has been written about their emergence, composition, structure, and function in the scientific enterprise. This essay considers the nature of fields and their important role in maintaining information and providing normative standards for scientific work. We suggest that fields arise naturally as a consequence of increasing information and scientific specialization. New fields tend to emerge as research communities grow, which may reflect biologically determined optima for the size of human groups. The benefits of fields include the organization of scientists with similar interests into communities that collectively define the next important problems to pursue. In the discipline of microbiology, fields are often organized on the basis of phylogenetic differences between microorganisms being studied. Although fields are essential to the proper functioning of science, their emergence can restrict access by outsiders and sustain dogmas that hinder progress. We suggest mechanisms to improve the functioning of scientific fields and to promote interdisciplinary interaction between fields. PMID:26350968

  8. Field Science—the Nature and Utility of Scientific Fields

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ferric C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fields are the fundamental sociological units of science. Despite their importance, relatively little has been written about their emergence, composition, structure, and function in the scientific enterprise. This essay considers the nature of fields and their important role in maintaining information and providing normative standards for scientific work. We suggest that fields arise naturally as a consequence of increasing information and scientific specialization. New fields tend to emerge as research communities grow, which may reflect biologically determined optima for the size of human groups. The benefits of fields include the organization of scientists with similar interests into communities that collectively define the next important problems to pursue. In the discipline of microbiology, fields are often organized on the basis of phylogenetic differences between microorganisms being studied. Although fields are essential to the proper functioning of science, their emergence can restrict access by outsiders and sustain dogmas that hinder progress. We suggest mechanisms to improve the functioning of scientific fields and to promote interdisciplinary interaction between fields. PMID:26350968

  9. The field lines of an axisymmetric magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Backus, George E.

    1988-01-01

    The equations of Willis and Young (1987) for the field lines of an arbitrary axisymmetric multipole are generalized to an arbitrary linear combination of multipoles, i.e., to an arbitrary axisymmetric magnetic field B outside a sphere of radius a, S(a), centered on the origin, and containing all the sources of B. For this field, axisymmetric Stokes stream function is expressed in terms of the Gauss coefficients. It is shown that if only one Gauss coefficient is nonzero, the field line equations are identical to those obtained by Willis and Young.

  10. Magnetic fields around evolved stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leal-Ferreira, M.; Vlemmings, W.; Kemball, A.; Amiri, N.; Maercker, M.; Ramstedt, S.; Olofsson, G.

    2014-04-01

    A number of mechanisms, such as magnetic fields, (binary) companions and circumstellar disks have been suggested to be the cause of non-spherical PNe and in particular collimated outflows. This work investigates one of these mechanisms: the magnetic fields. While MHD simulations show that the fields can indeed be important, few observations of magnetic fields have been done so far. We used the VLBA to observe five evolved stars, with the goal of detecting the magnetic field by means of water maser polarization. The sample consists in four AGB stars (IK Tau, RT Vir, IRC+60370 and AP Lyn) and one pPN (OH231.8+4.2). In four of the five sources, several strong maser features were detected allowing us to measure the linear and/or circular polarization. Based on the circular polarization detections, we infer the strength of the component of the field along the line of sight to be between ~30 mG and ~330 mG in the water maser regions of these four sources. When extrapolated to the surface of the stars, the magnetic field strength would be between a few hundred mG and a few Gauss when assuming a toroidal field geometry and higher when assuming more complex magnetic fields. We conclude that the magnetic energy we derived in the water maser regions is higher than the thermal and kinetic energy, leading to the conclusion that, indeed, magnetic fields probably play an important role in shaping Planetary Nebulae.

  11. Magnetic fields in the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullan, D. J.

    1974-01-01

    The observed properties of solar magnetic fields are reviewed, with particular reference to the complexities imposed on the field by motions of the highly conducting gas. Turbulent interactions between gas and field lead to heating or cooling of the gas according to whether the field energy density is less or greater than the maximum kinetic energy density in the convection zone. The field strength above which cooling sets in is 700 gauss. A weak solar dipole field may be primeval, but dynamo action is also important in generating new flux. The dynamo is probably not confined to the convection zone, but extends throughout most of the volume of the sun. Planetary tides appear to play a role in driving the dynamo.

  12. Field-structured composite studies.

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James Ellis; Williamson, Rodney L.

    2004-04-01

    Field-structured composites (FSCs) were produced by hosting micron-sized gold-coated nickel particles in a pre-polymer and allowing the mixture to cure in a magnetic field environment. The feasibility of controlling a composite's electrical conductivity using feedback control applied to the field coils was investigated. It was discovered that conductivity in FSCs is primarily determined by stresses in the polymer host matrix due to cure shrinkage. Thus, in cases where the structuring field was uniform and unidirectional so as to produce chainlike structures in the composite, no electrical conductivity was measured until well after the structuring field was turned off at the gel point. In situations where complex, rotating fields were used to generate complex, three-dimensional structures in a composite, very small, but measurable, conductivity was observed prior to the gel point. Responsive, sensitive prototype chemical sensors were developed based on this technology with initial tests showing very promising results.

  13. Resolving Witten's superstring field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erler, Theodore; Konopka, Sebastian; Sachs, Ivo

    2014-04-01

    We regulate Witten's open superstring field theory by replacing the picturechanging insertion at the midpoint with a contour integral of picture changing insertions over the half-string overlaps of the cubic vertex. The resulting product between string fields is non-associative, but we provide a solution to the A ∞ relations defining all higher vertices. The result is an explicit covariant superstring field theory which by construction satisfies the classical BV master equation.

  14. Spatial Information of Sound Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oikawa, Yasuhiro

    The nature of a sound field can only be fully understood when we have spatial information about it. Being able to visualize a sound field is a very useful way of understanding it. This section describes how to estimate many direction of arrivals (DOAs) by using two microphones, how to get spatial information by using four closely located microphones, and how to visualize and measure sound fields by using a laser Doppler vibrometer (LVB).

  15. Agricultural fields, Khartoum, Sudan, Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This herringbone pattern of irrigated agricultural fields near Khartoum, Sudan (14.5N, 33.5E) is very distinctive in both size and shape. The region contains thousands of these rectangular fields bounded by canals which carry water from both the White and Blue Nile Rivers. A crop rotation system is used so that some fields are in cotton, millit, sorghum or fallow to conserve moisture and control weeds and insects. See also STS049-96-003.

  16. Photospheric and coronal magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Sheeley, N.R., Jr. )

    1991-01-01

    Research on small-scale and large-scale photospheric and coronal magnetic fields during 1987-1990 is reviewed, focusing on observational studies. Particular attention is given to the new techniques, which include the correlation tracking of granules, the use of highly Zeeman-sensitive infrared spectral lines and multiple lines to deduce small-scale field strength, the application of long integration times coupled with good seeing conditions to study weak fields, and the use of high-resolution CCD detectors together with computer image-processing techniques to obtain images with unsurpassed spatial resolution. Synoptic observations of large-scale fields during the sunspot cycle are also discussed. 101 refs.

  17. The Nonlinear Field Space Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielczarek, Jakub; Trześniewski, Tomasz

    2016-08-01

    In recent years the idea that not only the configuration space of particles, i.e. spacetime, but also the corresponding momentum space may have nontrivial geometry has attracted significant attention, especially in the context of quantum gravity. The aim of this letter is to extend this concept to the domain of field theories, by introducing field spaces (i.e. phase spaces of field values) that are not affine spaces. After discussing the motivation and general aspects of our approach we present a detailed analysis of the prototype (quantum) Nonlinear Field Space Theory of a scalar field on the Minkowski background. We show that the nonlinear structure of a field space leads to numerous interesting predictions, including: non-locality, generalization of the uncertainty relations, algebra deformations, constraining of the maximal occupation number, shifting of the vacuum energy and renormalization of the charge and speed of propagation of field excitations. Furthermore, a compact field space is a natural way to implement the "Principle of finiteness" of physical theories, which once motivated the Born-Infeld theory. Thus the presented framework has a variety of potential applications in the theories of fundamental interactions (e.g. quantum gravity), as well as in condensed matter physics (e.g. continuous spin chains), and can shed new light on the issue of divergences in quantum field theories.

  18. Gravitomagnetic field of rotating rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-04-01

    In the framework of the so-called gravitoelectromagnetic formalism, according to which the equations of the gravitational field can be written in analogy with classical electromagnetism, we study the gravitomagnetic field of a rotating ring, orbiting around a central body. We calculate the gravitomagnetic component of the field, both in the intermediate zone between the ring and the central body, and far away from the ring and central body. We evaluate the impact of the gravitomagnetic field on the motion of test particles and, as an application, we study the possibility of using these results, together with the Solar System ephemeris, to infer information on the spin of ring-like structures.

  19. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Schedl, David C.; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  20. Multiple fields in stochastic inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assadullahi, Hooshyar; Firouzjahi, Hassan; Noorbala, Mahdiyar; Vennin, Vincent; Wands, David

    2016-06-01

    Stochastic effects in multi-field inflationary scenarios are investigated. A hierarchy of diffusion equations is derived, the solutions of which yield moments of the numbers of inflationary e-folds. Solving the resulting partial differential equations in multi-dimensional field space is more challenging than the single-field case. A few tractable examples are discussed, which show that the number of fields is, in general, a critical parameter. When more than two fields are present for instance, the probability to explore arbitrarily large-field regions of the potential, otherwise inaccessible to single-field dynamics, becomes non-zero. In some configurations, this gives rise to an infinite mean number of e-folds, regardless of the initial conditions. Another difference with respect to single-field scenarios is that multi-field stochastic effects can be large even at sub-Planckian energy. This opens interesting new possibilities for probing quantum effects in inflationary dynamics, since the moments of the numbers of e-folds can be used to calculate the distribution of primordial density perturbations in the stochastic-δ N formalism.

  1. Volumetric Light-Field Excitation.

    PubMed

    Schedl, David C; Bimber, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    We explain how to concentrate light simultaneously at multiple selected volumetric positions by means of a 4D illumination light field. First, to select target objects, a 4D imaging light field is captured. A light field mask is then computed automatically for this selection to avoid illumination of the remaining areas. With one-photon illumination, simultaneous generation of complex volumetric light patterns becomes possible. As a full light-field can be captured and projected simultaneously at the desired exposure and excitation times, short readout and lighting durations are supported. PMID:27363565

  2. Magnetic fields in nearby spirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaohui; Lenc, Emil

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic fields play an important role in star formation process and dynamic evolution of galaxies. Previous studies of magnetic fields relied on narrow band polarisation observations and difficult to disentangle magnetised structures along line of sight. Thanks to the broad bandwidth and multi-channels of CABB we are now able to recover the 3D structures of magnetic fields using RM synthesis and QU-fitting. We propose to observe two nearby spirals M83 and NGC 4945 to build clear pictures of their magnetic fields.

  3. Photonic E-field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Savchenkov, A. A.; Liang, W.; Ilchenko, V. S.; Dale, E.; Savchenkova, E. A.; Matsko, A. B. Seidel, D.; Maleki, L.

    2014-12-15

    We report on both theoretical and experimental studies of a photonic implementation of the electric (E-) field sensor using a probe made with all-dielectric RF-transparent elements. The geometrical dimensions of the electric field probe can be smaller than the wavelength of the measured electromagnetic field in the material. Our theoretical calculations show that the sensor allows detecting electric fields in a broad frequency range (100 Hz-20 GHz) with sensitivity better than 1 μV/[Hz{sup 1/2} m]. We demonstrate the sensor operating at X-band and validate the theoretical predictions.

  4. Field Surveys of Amphibian Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodman, Robert

    2000-01-01

    Describes a course on amphibian research for environmental science majors. Involves students in field studies and introduces them to investigative research. Evaluates the course. (Contains 19 references.) (YDS)

  5. Quantum fields in curved spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollands, Stefan; Wald, Robert M.

    2015-04-01

    We review the theory of quantum fields propagating in an arbitrary, classical, globally hyperbolic spacetime. Our review emphasizes the conceptual issues arising in the formulation of the theory and presents known results in a mathematically precise way. Particular attention is paid to the distributional nature of quantum fields, to their local and covariant character, and to microlocal spectrum conditions satisfied by physically reasonable states. We review the Unruh and Hawking effects for free fields, as well as the behavior of free fields in deSitter spacetime and FLRW spacetimes with an exponential phase of expansion. We review how nonlinear observables of a free field, such as the stress-energy tensor, are defined, as well as time-ordered-products. The "renormalization ambiguities" involved in the definition of time-ordered products are fully characterized. Interacting fields are then perturbatively constructed. Our main focus is on the theory of a scalar field, but a brief discussion of gauge fields is included. We conclude with a brief discussion of a possible approach towards a nonperturbative formulation of quantum field theory in curved spacetime and some remarks on the formulation of quantum gravity.

  6. Field theory and particle physics

    SciTech Connect

    Eboli, O.J.P.; Gomes, M.; Santoro, A.

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings of the topics covered during the fifth Jorge Andre Swieca Summer School. The first part of the book collects the material devoted to quantum field theory. There were four courses on methods in Field Theory; H. O. Girotti lectured on constrained dynamics, R. Jackiw on the Schrodinger representation in Field Theory, S.-Y. Pi on the application of this representation to quantum fields in a Robertson-Walker spacetime, and L. Vinet on Berry Connections. There were three courses on Conformal Field Theory: I. Todorov focused on the problem of construction and classification of conformal field theories. Lattice models, two-dimensional S matrices and conformal field theory were looked from the unifying perspective of the Yang-Baxter algebras in the lectures given by M. Karowski. Parasupersymmetric quantum mechanics was discussed in the lectures by L. Vinet. Besides those courses, there was an introduction to string field theory given by G. Horowitz. There were also three seminars: F. Schaposnik reported on recent applications of topological methods in field theory, P. Gerbert gave a seminar on three dimensional gravity and V. Kurak talked on two dimensional parafermionic models. The second part of this proceedings is devoted to phenomenology. There were three courses on Particle Physics: Dan Green lectured on collider physics, E. Predrazzi on strong interactions and G. Cohen-Tanoudji on the use of strings in strong interactions.

  7. Thomson scattering in a magnetic field. I - Field along z

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method is used here to solve the radiative transfer equation for Thomson scattering in a constant magnetic field perpendicular to the atmosphere. Emergent radiation and polarization are presented for various atmospheric thicknesses. The circular polarization peaks at frequencies near the cyclotron, omega(c), and for propagation direction along the field. At low field strengths, the circular polarization is roughly proportional to omega(c)/omega; the linear polarization is proportional to the square of omega(c)/omega and the amount of circular polarization present at each scatter and is therefore much smaller than the circular polarization. The linear polarization is large for propagation direction perpendicular to the magnetic field and at frequencies near the cyclotron and in the strong-field limit. The position angle of the linear polarization undergoes a rotation of 90 deg at a value of omega(c)/omega near the square root of three.

  8. Superconductivity in Strong Magnetic Field (Greater Than Upper Critical Field)

    SciTech Connect

    Tessema, G.X.; Gamble, B.K.; Skove, M.J.; Lacerda, A.H.; Mielke, C.H.

    1998-08-22

    The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, funded by the National Science Foundation and other US federal Agencies, has in recent years built a wide range of magnetic fields, DC 25 to 35 Tesla, short pulse 50 - 60 Tesla, and quasi-continuous 60 Tesla. Future plans are to push the frontiers to 45 Tesla DC and 70 to 100 Tesla pulse. This user facility, is open for national and international users, and creates an excellent tool for materials research (metals, semiconductors, superconductors, biological systems ..., etc). Here we present results of a systematic study of the upper critical field of a novel superconducting material which is considered a promising candidate for the search for superconductivity beyond H{sub c2} as proposed by several new theories. These theories predict that superconductors with low carrier density can reenter the superconducting phase beyond the conventional upper critical field H{sub c2}. This negates the conventional thinking that superconductivity and magnetic fields are antagonistic.

  9. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  10. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2015-12-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a resolution of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05 %. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers—multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes—to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  11. The MAVEN Magnetic Field Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connerney, J. E. P.; Espley, J.; Lawton, P.; Murphy, S.; Odom, J.; Oliversen, R.; Sheppard, D.

    2014-01-01

    The MAVEN magnetic field investigation is part of a comprehensive particles and fields subsystem that will measure the magnetic and electric fields and plasma environment of Mars and its interaction with the solar wind. The magnetic field instrumentation consists of two independent tri-axial fluxgate magnetometer sensors, remotely mounted at the outer extremity of the two solar arrays on small extensions ("boomlets"). The sensors are controlled by independent and functionally identical electronics assemblies that are integrated within the particles and fields subsystem and draw their power from redundant power supplies within that system. Each magnetometer measures the ambient vector magnetic field over a wide dynamic range (to 65,536 nT per axis) with a quantization uncertainty of 0.008 nT in the most sensitive dynamic range and an accuracy of better than 0.05%. Both magnetometers sample the ambient magnetic field at an intrinsic sample rate of 32 vector samples per second. Telemetry is transferred from each magnetometer to the particles and fields package once per second and subsequently passed to the spacecraft after some reformatting. The magnetic field data volume may be reduced by averaging and decimation, when necessary to meet telemetry allocations, and application of data compression, utilizing a lossless 8-bit differencing scheme. The MAVEN magnetic field experiment may be reconfigured in flight to meet unanticipated needs and is fully hardware redundant. A spacecraft magnetic control program was implemented to provide a magnetically clean environment for the magnetic sensors and the MAVEN mission plan provides for occasional spacecraft maneuvers - multiple rotations about the spacecraft x and z axes - to characterize spacecraft fields and/or instrument offsets in flight.

  12. Magnetic Fields: Visible and Permanent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkeljohn, Dorothy R.; Earl, Robert D.

    1983-01-01

    Children will be able to see the concept of a magnetic field translated into a visible reality using the simple method outlined. Standard shelf paper, magnets, iron filings, and paint in a spray can are used to prepare a permanent and well-detailed picture of the magnetic field. (Author/JN)

  13. Emerging Innovation: Allied Health Fields

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Janell B.

    2004-01-01

    This article takes a closer look at emerging fields in the allied health arena. The relatively new field of Health Information Technology is one of the exciting prospects, surging with growth opportunities. These individuals are medical language experts who interpret, process, store and retrieve health information for research and data collection.…

  14. Caution: Strong Gravitational Field Present

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reif, Marc

    2014-01-01

    I came up with a new way to introduce the concept of a constant gravitational field near the surface of the Earth. I made "g-field detectors" (see Fig. 1 ) and suspended them by strings from the ceiling in a regular spacing. The detectors are cardstock arrows with a hole punched out of them and the letter "g" in the center.

  15. Teaching Field Biology with Photography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Ronald L.; Howell, W. Mike; Davenport, L. J.; Wood, Linda F.

    2003-01-01

    Photography makes an easy and excellent tool for teaching field biology courses, allowing students to study nature without harming it. This photographic technique is used in capturing images of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants during class field trips, then making these images available for students to identify and study from a departmental…

  16. Integrated flow field (IFF) structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pien, Shyhing M. (Inventor); Warshay, Marvin (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present disclosure relates in part to a flow field structure comprising a hydrophilic part and a hydrophobic part communicably attached to each other via a connecting interface. The present disclosure further relates to electrochemical cells comprising the aforementioned flow fields.

  17. Research in particles and fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vogt, R. E.; Buffington, A.; Davis, L., Jr.; Stone, E. C.

    1980-01-01

    The astrophysical aspects of cosmic and gamma rays and the radiation environment of the Earth and other planets investigated by means of energetic particle detector systems flown on spacecraft and balloons are discussed. The theory of particles and fields in space is also addressed with particular emphasis on models of Saturn's magnetic field.

  18. Field Trips Within Easy Reach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzsimmons, Charles P.

    1983-01-01

    Provides suggestions for conducting field trips at the local school site. Points of interest might include building materials, evidence of chemical/physical weathering, variations in soil type, changes in elevation on school ground, and others. Three simple field trips are described. (JN)

  19. Weed Identification Field Training Demonstrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murdock, Edward C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reviews efforts undertaken in weed identification field training sessions for agriprofessionals in South Carolina. Data over a four year period (1980-1983) revealed that participants showed significant improvement in their ability to identify weeds. Reaffirms the value of the field demonstration technique. (ML)

  20. Visual field defects in onchocerciasis.

    PubMed Central

    Thylefors, B; Tønjum, A M

    1978-01-01

    Lesions in the posterior segment of the eye in onchocerciasis may give visual field defects, but so far no detailed investigation has been done to determine the functional visual loss. Examination of the visual fields in 18 selected cases of onchocerciasis by means of a tangent screen test revealed important visual field defects associated with lesions in the posterior segment of the eye. Involvement of the optic nerve seemed to be important, giving rise to severely constricted visual fields. Cases of postneuritic optic atrophy showed a very uniform pattern of almost completely constricted visual fields, with only 5 to 10 degree central rest spared. Papillitis gave a similar severe constriction of the visual fields. The pattern of visual fields associated with optic neuropathy in onchocerciasis indicates that a progressive lesion of the optic nerve from the periphery may be responsible for the loss of vision. The visual field defects in onchocerciasis constitute a serious handicap, which must be taken into consideration when estimating the socioeconomic importance of the disease. Images PMID:678499

  1. Youth Field Day Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Youth field days expose children to outdoor activities, land use ethics, and habitat conservation and encourage adults to be mentors in these areas. A typical youth field day could have programs in archery, fishing, boating, shooting, or safety. The event requires a diverse steering committee that usually includes sporting clubs and state…

  2. Hysteresis in rotation magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyi, Amalia

    2000-01-01

    The different properties of the vector Jiles-Atherton hysteresis operator is proved under forced H- and B-field supply. Feeding the magnetic material with alternating and circular polarised rotational excitation, the different properties of the model under the input field intensity and the flux density are investigated and the results are proved in figures.

  3. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Y.; Mahale, N.K.

    1996-08-06

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles. 6 figs.

  4. Fast superconducting magnetic field switch

    DOEpatents

    Goren, Yehuda; Mahale, Narayan K.

    1996-01-01

    The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

  5. Geometrization conditions for perfect fluids, scalar fields, and electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krongos, D. S.; Torre, C. G.

    2015-07-01

    Rainich-type conditions giving a spacetime "geometrization" of matter fields in general relativity are reviewed and extended. Three types of matter are considered: perfect fluids, scalar fields, and electromagnetic fields. Necessary and sufficient conditions on a spacetime metric for it to be part of a perfect fluid solution of the Einstein equations are given. Formulas for constructing the fluid from the metric are obtained. All fluid results hold for any spacetime dimension. Geometric conditions on a metric which are necessary and sufficient for it to define a solution of the Einstein-scalar field equations and formulas for constructing the scalar field from the metric are unified and extended to arbitrary dimensions, to include a cosmological constant, and to include any self-interaction potential. Necessary and sufficient conditions on a four-dimensional spacetime metric for it to be an electrovacuum and formulas for constructing the electromagnetic field from the metric are generalized to include a cosmological constant. Both null and non-null electromagnetic fields are treated. A number of examples and applications of these results are presented.

  6. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOEpatents

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  7. Shaping the nonlinear near field.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Daniela; Schumacher, Thorsten; Lippitz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Light scattering at plasmonic nanoparticles and their assemblies has led to a wealth of applications in metamaterials and nano-optics. Although shaping of fields around nanostructures is widely studied, the influence of the field inside the nanostructures is often overlooked. The linear field distribution inside the structure taken to the third power causes third-harmonic generation, a nonlinear optical response of matter. Here we demonstrate by a far field Fourier imaging method how this simple fact can be used to shape complex fields around a single particle alone. We employ this scheme to switch the third-harmonic emission from a single point source to two spatially separated but coherent sources, as in Young's double-slit assembly. We envision applications as diverse as coherently feeding antenna arrays and optical spectroscopy of spatially extended electronic states. PMID:26762487

  8. Electromagnetic fields and public health.

    PubMed Central

    Aldrich, T E; Easterly, C E

    1987-01-01

    A review of the literature is provided for the topic of health-related research and power frequency electromagnetic fields. Minimal evidence for concern is present on the basis of animal and plant research. General observation would accord with the implication that there is no single and manifest health effect as the result of exposure to these fields. There are persistent indications, however, that these fields have biologic activity, and consequently, there may be a deleterious component to their action, possibly in the presence of other factors. Power frequency electromagnetic field exposures are essentially ubiquitous in modern society, and their implications in the larger perspective of public health are unclear at this time. Electromagnetic fields represent a methodological obstacle for epidemiologic studies and a quandary for risk assessment; there is need for more data. PMID:3319560

  9. Vestibular stimulation by magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Bryan K.; Roberts, Dale C.; Della Santina, Charles C.; Carey, John P.; Zee, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Individuals working next to strong static magnetic fields occasionally report disorientation and vertigo. With the increasing strength of magnetic fields used for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, these reports have become more common. It was recently learned that humans, mice and zebrafish all demonstrate behaviors consistent with constant peripheral vestibular stimulation while inside a strong, static magnetic field. The proposed mechanism for this effect involves a Lorentz force resulting from the interaction of a strong static magnetic field with naturally occurring ionic currents flowing through the inner ear endolymph into vestibular hair cells. The resulting force within the endolymph is strong enough to displace the lateral semicircular canal cupula, inducing vertigo and the horizontal nystagmus seen in normal mice and in humans. This review explores the evidence for interactions of magnetic fields with the vestibular system. PMID:25735662

  10. Double field theory inspired cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Houwen; Yang, Haitang E-mail: hyanga@scu.edu.cn

    2014-07-01

    Double field theory proposes a generalized spacetime action possessing manifest T-duality on the level of component fields. We calculate the cosmological solutions of double field theory with vanishing Kalb-Ramond field. It turns out that double field theory provides a more consistent way to construct cosmological solutions than the standard string cosmology. We construct solutions for vanishing and non-vanishing symmetry preserving dilaton potentials. The solutions assemble the pre- and post-big bang evolutions in one single line element. Our results show a smooth evolution from an anisotropic early stage to an isotropic phase without any special initial conditions in contrast to previous models. In addition, we demonstrate that the contraction of the dual space automatically leads to both an inflation phase and a decelerated expansion of the ordinary space during different evolution stages.

  11. Error Field Correction in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Jong-kyu; Boozer, Allen H.; Menard, Jonathan E.; Schaffer, Michael J.

    2008-05-22

    A new method for correcting magnetic field errors in the ITER tokamak is developed using the Ideal Perturbed Equilibrium Code (IPEC). The dominant external magnetic field for driving islands is shown to be localized to the outboard midplane for three ITER equilibria that represent the projected range of operational scenarios. The coupling matrices between the poloidal harmonics of the external magnetic perturbations and the resonant fields on the rational surfaces that drive islands are combined for different equilibria and used to determine an ordered list of the dominant errors in the external magnetic field. It is found that efficient and robust error field correction is possible with a fixed setting of the correction currents relative to the currents in the main coils across the range of ITER operating scenarios that was considered.

  12. PYROTRON WITH TRANSLATIONAL CLOSURE FIELDS

    DOEpatents

    Hartwig, E.C.; Cummings, D.B.; Post, R.F.

    1962-01-01

    Circuit means is described for effecting inward transla- ' tory motion of the intensified terminal reflector field regions of a magnetic mirror plasma containment field with a simultaneous intensification of the over-all field configuration. The circuit includes a segmented magnetic field generating solenoid and sequentially actuated switch means to consecutively short-circuit the solenoid segments and place charged capacitor banks in shunt with the segments in an appropriate correlated sequence such that electrical energy is transferred inwardly between adjacent segments from the opposite ends of the solenoid. The resulting magnetic field is effective in both radially and axially adiabatically compressing a plasma in a reaction chamber disposed concentrically within the solenoid. In addition, one half of the circuit may be employed to unidirectionally accelerate plasma. (AEC)

  13. Multipole expansions and intense fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiss, Howard R.

    1984-02-01

    In the context of two-body bound-state systems subjected to a plane-wave electromagnetic field, it is shown that high field intensity introduces a distinction between long-wavelength approximation and electric dipole approximation. This distinction is gauge dependent, since it is absent in Coulomb gauge, whereas in "completed" gauges of Göppert-Mayer type the presence of high field intensity makes electric quadrupole and magnetic dipole terms of importance equal to electric dipole at long wavelengths. Another consequence of high field intensity is that multipole expansions lose their utility in view of the equivalent importance of a number of low-order multipole terms and the appearance of large-magnitude terms which defy multipole categorization. This loss of the multipole expansion is gauge independent. Also gauge independent is another related consequence of high field intensity, which is the intimate coupling of center-of-mass and relative coordinate motions in a two-body system.

  14. Field spectroscopy of agricultural crops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, M. E.; Daughtry, C. S. T.; Biehl, L. L.; Kanemasu, E. T.; Hall, F. G.

    1986-01-01

    The development of the full potential of multispectral data acquired from satellites, requires quantitative knowledge, and physical models of the spectral properties of specific earth surface features. Knowledge of the relationships between spectral-radiometric characteristics and important biophysical parameters of agricultural crops and soils can best be obtained by carefully controlled studies of fields or plots. It is important to select plots where data describing the agronomic-biophysical properties of the crop canopies and soil background are attainable, taking into account also the feasibility of frequent timely calibrated spectral measurements. The term 'field spectroscopy' is employed for this research. The present paper is concerned with field research which was sponsored by NASA as part of the AgRISTARS Supporting Research Project. Attention is given to field research objectives, field research instrumentation, measurement procedures, spectral-temporal profile modeling, and the effects of cultural and environmental factors on crop reflectance.

  15. Ultrarelativistic boost with scalar field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svítek, O.; Tahamtan, T.

    2016-02-01

    We present the ultrarelativistic boost of the general global monopole solution which is parametrized by mass and deficit solid angle. The problem is addressed from two different perspectives. In the first one the primary object for performing the boost is the metric tensor while in the second one the energy momentum tensor is used. Since the solution is sourced by a triplet of scalar fields that effectively vanish in the boosting limit we investigate the behavior of a scalar field in a simpler setup. Namely, we perform the boosting study of the spherically symmetric solution with a free scalar field given by Janis, Newman and Winicour. The scalar field is again vanishing in the limit pointing to a broader pattern of scalar field behaviour during an ultrarelativistic boost in highly symmetric situations.

  16. Shaping the nonlinear near field

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Daniela; Schumacher, Thorsten; Lippitz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    Light scattering at plasmonic nanoparticles and their assemblies has led to a wealth of applications in metamaterials and nano-optics. Although shaping of fields around nanostructures is widely studied, the influence of the field inside the nanostructures is often overlooked. The linear field distribution inside the structure taken to the third power causes third-harmonic generation, a nonlinear optical response of matter. Here we demonstrate by a far field Fourier imaging method how this simple fact can be used to shape complex fields around a single particle alone. We employ this scheme to switch the third-harmonic emission from a single point source to two spatially separated but coherent sources, as in Young's double-slit assembly. We envision applications as diverse as coherently feeding antenna arrays and optical spectroscopy of spatially extended electronic states. PMID:26762487

  17. Plasma Production via Field Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, C.L.; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.; Krejcik, P.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K.A.; Mori, W.; Zhou, M.; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2007-01-02

    Plasma production via field ionization occurs when an incoming particle beam is sufficiently dense that the electric field associated with the beam ionizes a neutral vapor or gas. Experiments conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center explore the threshold conditions necessary to induce field ionization by an electron beam in a neutral lithium vapor. By independently varying the transverse beam size, number of electrons per bunch or bunch length, the radial component of the electric field is controlled to be above or below the threshold for field ionization. Additional experiments ionized neutral xenon and neutral nitric oxide by varying the incoming beam's bunch length. A self-ionized plasma is an essential step for the viability of plasma-based accelerators for future high-energy experiments.

  18. Preflare magnetic and velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagyard, M. J.; Gaizauskas, V.; Chapman, G. A.; Deloach, A. C.; Gary, G. A.; Jones, H. P.; Karpen, J. T.; Martres, M.-J.; Porter, J. G.; Schmeider, B.

    1986-01-01

    A characterization is given of the preflare magnetic field, using theoretical models of force free fields together with observed field structure to determine the general morphology. Direct observational evidence for sheared magnetic fields is presented. The role of this magnetic shear in the flare process is considered within the context of a MHD model that describes the buildup of magnetic energy, and the concept of a critical value of shear is explored. The related subject of electric currents in the preflare state is discussed next, with emphasis on new insights provided by direct calculations of the vertical electric current density from vector magnetograph data and on the role of these currents in producing preflare brightenings. Results from investigations concerning velocity fields in flaring active regions, describing observations and analyses of preflare ejecta, sheared velocities, and vortical motions near flaring sites are given. This is followed by a critical review of prevalent concepts concerning the association of flux emergence with flares

  19. Magnetic field induced dynamical chaos

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Somrita; Baura, Alendu; Bag, Bidhan Chandra

    2013-12-15

    In this article, we have studied the dynamics of a particle having charge in the presence of a magnetic field. The motion of the particle is confined in the x–y plane under a two dimensional nonlinear potential. We have shown that constant magnetic field induced dynamical chaos is possible even for a force which is derived from a simple potential. For a given strength of the magnetic field, initial position, and velocity of the particle, the dynamics may be regular, but it may become chaotic when the field is time dependent. Chaotic dynamics is very often if the field is time dependent. Origin of chaos has been explored using the Hamiltonian function of the dynamics in terms of action and angle variables. Applicability of the present study has been discussed with a few examples.

  20. Ground vortex flow field investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Richard E.; Delfrate, John H.; Eshleman, James E.

    1988-01-01

    Flow field investigations were conducted at the NASA Ames-Dryden Flow Visualization Facility (water tunnel) to investigate the ground effect produced by the impingement of jets from aircraft nozzles on a ground board in a STOL operation. Effects on the overall flow field with both a stationary and a moving ground board were photographed and compared with similar data found in other references. Nozzle jet impingement angles, nozzle and inlet interaction, side-by-side nozzles, nozzles in tandem, and nozzles and inlets mounted on a flat plate model were investigated. Results show that the wall jet that generates the ground effect is unsteady and the boundary between the ground vortex flow field and the free-stream flow is unsteady. Additionally, the forward projection of the ground vortex flow field with a moving ground board is one-third less than that measured over a fixed ground board. Results also showed that inlets did not alter the ground vortex flow field.

  1. Towards a quantum field theory of primitive string fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ruehl, W.

    2012-10-15

    We denote generating functions of massless even higher-spin fields 'primitive string fields' (PSF's). In an introduction we present the necessary definitions and derive propagators and currents of these PDF's on flat space. Their off-shell cubic interaction can be derived after all off-shell cubic interactions of triplets of higher-spin fields have become known. Then we discuss four-point functions of any quartet of PSF's. In subsequent sections we exploit the fact that higher-spin field theories in AdS{sub d+1} are determined by AdS/CFT correspondence from universality classes of critical systems in d-dimensional flat spaces. The O(N) invariant sectors of the O(N) vector models for 1 {<=} N {<=}{infinity} play for us the role of 'standard models', for varying N, they contain, e.g., the Ising model for N = 1 and the spherical model for N = {infinity}. A formula for the masses squared that break gauge symmetry for these O(N) classes is presented for d = 3. For the PSF on AdS space it is shown that it can be derived by lifting the PSF on flat space by a simple kernel which contains the sum over all spins. Finally we use an algorithm to derive all symmetric tensor higher-spin fields. They arise from monomials of scalar fields by derivation and selection of conformal (quasiprimary) fields. Typically one monomial produces a multiplet of spin s conformal higher-spin fields for all s {>=} 4, they are distinguished by their anomalous dimensions (in CFT{sub 3}) or by theirmass (in AdS{sub 4}). We sum over these multiplets and the spins to obtain 'string type fields', one for each such monomial.

  2. Thermal system field performance predictions from laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Teaney, Brian P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2016-05-01

    Laboratory measurements on thermal imaging systems are critical to understanding their performance in a field environment. However, it is rarely a straightforward process to directly inject thermal measurements into thermal performance modeling software to acquire meaningful results. Some of the sources of discrepancies between laboratory and field measurements are sensor gain and level, dynamic range, sensor display and display brightness, and the environment where the sensor is operating. If measurements for the aforementioned parameters could be performed, a more accurate description of sensor performance in a particular environment is possible. This research will also include the procedure for turning both laboratory and field measurements into a system model.

  3. Reversed field pinch current drive with oscillating helical fields

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, Ricardo; Clemente, Roberto Antonio

    2006-04-15

    The use of oscillating helical magnetic fields to produce and sustain the toroidal and poloidal currents in a reversed field pinch (RFP) is investigated. A simple physical model that assumes fixed ions, massless electrons, and uniform density and resistivity is employed. Thermal effects are neglected in Ohm's law and helical coordinates are introduced to reduce the number of coupled nonlinear equations that must be advanced in time. The results show that it is possible to produce RFP-like magnetic field profiles with pinch parameters close to the experimental values. The efficiencies obtained for moderate resistivity, and the observed scaling, indicate that this could be a very attractive method for high temperature plasmas.

  4. An overview of craniospinal axis fields and field matching

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, Robin L.

    2013-01-01

    Many methods are implemented for craniospinal axis (CSA) radiation treatment (RT). This paper’s goal is to define correctly matched CSA RT fields. Overlap or a space between matched RT fields can create variances of dose and the possibility of negative side effects or disease recurrence, respectively. An accurate CSA RT match procedure is created with localization markers, immobilization devices, equations, feathered matches, safety gap, and portal imaging. A CS match angle is predetermined to optimize patient position before immobilization device fabrication. Various central axis (CA) placements within the brain and spine fields that effect gantry, table, and collimator rotation are described. An overview of the methods used to create CSA RT fields and matches is presented for optimal CSA RT implementation. In addition, to the author’s knowledge, this is the first time that a prone CSA RT with anesthesia has been described.

  5. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric electric fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yasuhara, F.; Akasofu, S.-I.

    1977-01-01

    It is shown that the observed distribution of the ionospheric electric field can be deduced from an equation combining Ohm's law with the current continuity equation by using the 'observed' distribution of field-aligned currents as the boundary condition for two models of the ionosphere. The first model has one conductive annular ring representing the quiet-time auroral precipitation belt; the second has two conductive annular rings that simulate the discrete and diffuse auroral regions. An analysis is performed to determine how well the electric-field distribution can be reproduced. The results indicate that the first model reproduces the Sq(p)-type distribution, the second model reproduces reasonably well a substorm-type potential and ionospheric current patterns together with the Harang discontinuity, and that the distribution of field-aligned currents is the same for both models.

  6. History of the geomagnetic field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doell, Richard R.

    1969-01-01

    Direct measurements of the direction and strength of the earth's magnetic field have provided a knowledge of the field's form and behavior during the last few hundreds of years. For older times, however, it has been necessary to measure the magnetism of certain rocks to learn what the geomagnetic field was like. For example, when a lava flow solidifies (at temperatures near 1000??C) and cools through the Curie point of the magnetic minerals contained in it (around 500??C) it acquires a remanent magnetism that is (1) very weak, (2) very stablel, (3) paralle to the direction of the ambient geomagnetic field, and (4) proportional in intensity to the ambient field. Separating, by various analytical means, this magnetization from other 'unwanted' magnetizations has allowed paleomagnetists to study the historical and prehistorical behavior of the earth's field. It has been learned, for example, that the strength of the field was almost twice its present value 2000 years ago and that it has often completely reversed its polarity. Paleo-magnetists have also confirmed that most oceans are, geologically speaking, relatively new features, and that the continents have markedly changed their positions over the surface of the earth. ?? 1969 The American Institute of Physics.

  7. Geomagnetic Field Modeling with DMSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alken, P.; Redmon, R. J.; Rich, F. J.; Maus, S.; Luhr, H.

    2013-12-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) launches and maintains a network of satellites to monitor the meteorological, oceanographic, and solar-terrestrial physics environments. In the past decade, geomagnetic field modelers have focused much attention on magnetic measurements from missions such as CHAMP, Oersted and SAC-C. With the completion of the CHAMP mission in 2010, there have been limited satellite-based vector and scalar magnetic field measurements available for main field modeling. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of using the Special Sensor Magnetometer (SSM) instrument onboard DMSP for main field modeling. These vector field measurements are calibrated to compute instrument timing shifts, scale factors, offsets, and non-orthogonalities in the fluxgate magnetometer cores. Euler angles are then computed to determine the orientation of the vector magnetometer with respect to a local coordinate system. We fit a degree 12 main field model to the dataset and compare with similar models such as the World Magnetic Model (WMM) and IGRF. Initial results indicate that the DMSP dataset will be a valuable source for main field modeling for the years between CHAMP and the upcoming Swarm mission.

  8. Some remarks on Nelson's stochastic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. C.

    1980-09-01

    An attempt to extend Nelson's stochastic quantization procedure to tensor fields indicates that the results of Guerra et al. on the connection between a euclidean Markov scalar field and a stochastic scalar field fails to hold for tensor fields.

  9. Strong-field atomic ionization in an elliptically polarized laser field and a constant magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rylyuk, V. M.

    2016-05-01

    Within the framework of the quasistationary quasienergy state (QQES) formalism, the tunneling and multiphoton ionization of atoms and ions subjected to a perturbation by a high intense laser radiation field of an arbitrary polarization and a constant magnetic field are considered. On the basis of the exact solution of the Schrödinger equation and the Green's function for the electron moving in an arbitrary laser field and crossed constant electric and magnetic fields, the integral equation for the complex quasienergy and the energy spectrum of the ejected electron are derived. Using the "imaginary-time" method, the extremal subbarrier trajectory of the photoelectron moving in a nonstationary laser field and a constant magnetic field are considered. Within the framework of the QQES formalism and the quasiclassical perturbation theory, ionization rates when the Coulomb interaction of the photoelectron with the parent ion is taken into account at arbitrary values of the Keldysh parameter are derived. The high accuracy of rates is confirmed by comparison with the results of numerical calculations. Simple analytical expressions for the ionization rate with the Coulomb correction in the tunneling and multiphoton regimes in the case of an elliptically polarized laser beam propagating at an arbitrary angle to the constant magnetic field are derived and discussed. The limits of small and large magnetic fields and low and high frequency of a laser field are considered in details. It is shown that in the presence of a nonstationary laser field perturbation, the constant magnetic field may either decrease or increase the ionization rate. The analytical consideration and numerical calculations also showed that the difference between the ionization rates for an s electron in the case of right- and left-elliptically polarized laser fields is especially significant in the multiphoton regime for not-too-high magnetic fields and decreases as the magnetic field increases. The paper

  10. Magnetic field structure evolution in rotating magnetic field plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Petrov, Yuri; Yang Xiaokang; Huang, T.-S.

    2008-07-15

    A study of magnetic field structure evolution during 40-ms plasma discharge has been performed in a new device with 80 cm long/40 cm diameter cylindrical chamber, in which a plasma current I{sub p}{approx_equal}2 kA was driven and sustained by a rotating magnetic field. The main focus of the experiments is on how the changes in externally applied magnetic field affect the current profile and magnetic field in plasma. During plasma discharge, a pulse current was briefly fed to a magnetic coil located at the midplane (middle coil). The magnetic field in cross section of plasma was scanned with pickup probes. Two regimes were studied: without and with an external toroidal field (TF) produced by axial I{sub z} current. With a relatively small current (I{sub m} {<=} 600 A) in the middle coil, the plasma current is boosted up to 5 kA. The magnetic flux surfaces become extended along the axial Z direction, sometimes with the formation of doublet shape plasma. The regime without TF appears to be less stable, presumably due to the reversal of plasma current in central area of plasma column.

  11. MAGNETIC FIELD MEASUREMENTS FOR FAST-CHANGING MAGNETIC FIELDS.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS. R.; WANDERER, P.

    2004-10-03

    Several recent applications for fast ramped magnets have been found that require rapid measurement of the field quality during the ramp. (In one instance, accelerator dipoles will be ramped at 1 T/sec, with measurements needed to the accuracy typically required for accelerators.) We have built and tested a new type of magnetic field measuring system to meet this need. The system consists of 16 stationary pickup windings mounted on a cylinder. The signals induced in the windings in a changing magnetic field are sampled and analyzed to obtain the field harmonics. To minimize costs, printed circuit boards were used for the pickup windings and a combination of amplifiers and ADPs used for the voltage readout system. New software was developed for the analysis. Magnetic field measurements of a model dipole developed for the SIS200 accelerator at GSI are presented. The measurements are needed to insure that eddy currents induced by the fast ramps do not impact the field quality needed for successful accelerator operation.

  12. NMR in rotating magnetic fields: Magic angle field spinning

    SciTech Connect

    Sakellariou, D.; Meriles, C.; Martin, R.; Pines, A.

    2004-09-10

    Magic angle sample spinning has been one of the cornerstones in high-resolution solid state NMR. Spinning frequencies nowadays have increased by at least one order of magnitude over the ones used in the first experiments and the technique has gained tremendous popularity. It is currently a routine procedure in solid-state NMR, high-resolution liquid-state NMR and solid-state MRI. The technique enhances the spectral resolution by averaging away rank 2 anisotropic spin interactions thereby producing isotropic-like spectra with resolved chemical shifts and scalar couplings. Andrew proposed that it should be possible to induce similar effects in a static sample if the direction of the magnetic field is varied, e.g., magic-angle rotation of the B0 field (B0-MAS) and this has been recently demonstrated using electromagnetic field rotation. Here we discuss on the possibilities to perform field rotation using alternative hardware, together with spectroscopic methods to recover isotropic resolution even in cases where the field is not rotating at the magic angle. Extension to higher magnetic fields would be beneficial in situations where the physical manipulation of the sample is inconvenient or impossible. Such situations occur often in materials or biomedical samples where ''ex-situ'' NMR spectroscopy and imaging analysis is needed.

  13. Continuous indicator fields: a novel universal type of molecular fields.

    PubMed

    Sitnikov, Gleb V; Zhokhova, Nelly I; Ustynyuk, Yury A; Varnek, Alexandre; Baskin, Igor I

    2015-03-01

    A novel type of molecular fields, Continuous Indicator Fields (CIFs), is suggested to provide 3D structural description of molecules. The values of CIFs are calculated as the degree to which a point with given 3D coordinates belongs to an atom of a certain type. They can be used similarly to standard physicochemical fields for building 3D structure-activity models. One can build CIF-based 3D structure-activity models in the framework of the continuous molecular fields approach described earlier (J Comput-Aided Mol Des 27 (5):427-442, 2013) for the case of physicochemical molecular fields. CIFs are thought to complement and further extend traditional physicochemical fields. The models built with CIFs can be interpreted in terms of preferable and undesirable positions of certain types of atoms in space. This helps to understand which changes in chemical structure should be made in order to design a compound possessing desirable properties. We have demonstrated that CIFs can be considered as 3D analogues of 2D topological molecular fragments. The performance of this approach is demonstrated in structure-activity studies of thrombin inhibitors, multidentate N-heterocyclic ligands for Am(3+)/Eu(3+) separation, and coloring dyes. PMID:25449975

  14. Approach to Mars Field Geology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muehlberger, William; Rice, James W.; Parker, Timothy; Lipps, Jere H.; Hoffman, Paul; Burchfiel, Clark; Brasier, Martin

    1998-01-01

    The goals of field study on Mars are nothing less than to understand the processes and history of the planet at whatever level of detail is necessary. A manned mission gives us an unprecedented opportunity to use the immense power of the human mind to comprehend Mars in extraordinary detail. To take advantage of this opportunity, it is important to examine how we should approach the field study of Mars. In this effort, we are guided by over 200 years of field exploration experience on Earth as well as six manned missions exploring the Moon.

  15. Magnetic Field of Strange Dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baghdasaryan, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    The generation of a magnetic field in a strange quark star owing to differential rotation of the superfluid and superconducting quark core relative to the normal electron-nuclear crust of the star is examined. The maximum possible magnetic field on the surface is estimated for various models of strange dwarfs. Depending on the configuration parameters, i.e., the mass M and radius R of the star, a range of 103-105 G is found. These values of the magnetic field may be an additional condition for identification of strange dwarfs among the extensive class of observed white dwarfs.

  16. Magnetic fields and scintillator performance

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.; Ronzhin, A.; Hagopian, V.

    1995-06-01

    Experimental data have shown that the light output of a scintillator depends on the magnitude of the externally applied magnetic fields, and that this variation can affect the calorimeter calibration and possibly resolution. The goal of the measurements presented here is to study the light yield of scintillators in high magnetic fields in conditions that are similar to those anticipated for the LHC CMS detector. Two independent measurements were performed, the first at Fermilab and the second at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory at Florida State University.

  17. Sedeonic Equations of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, Sergey V.; Mironov, Victor L.

    2015-01-01

    Prior work on space-time sedeon algebra models relativistic quantum mechanical equation of motion with corresponding field equations, mediated by massive or massless spin-1 or spin-1/2 particles. In the massless spin-1 case, such exchange particles mediate fields in analogy to Maxwell's equations in Lorentz gauge. This paper demonstrates fundamental aspects of massive field's theory, such as gauge invariance, charge conservation, Poynting's theorem, potential of a stationary scalar point source, plane wave solution, and interaction between point sources. We briefly discuss some aspects of sedeonic algebra and their potential physical applications.

  18. Electric Field Mediated Droplet Centering

    SciTech Connect

    Bei, Z.-M.; Jones, T.B.; Tucker-Schwartz, A.; Harding, D.R.

    2010-03-12

    Double emulsion droplets subjected to a uniform ac electric field self-assemble into highly concentric structures via the dipole/dipole force if the outer droplet has a higher dielectric constant than the suspending liquid. The dielectric constant of the inner droplet has no influence. To minimize field-induced droplet distortion, the liquids must be density matched to ~0.1%. Centering of ~3 to 6 mm diameter droplets is achieved within ~60 s for field strengths of ~10^4 V_rms /m in liquids of viscosity ~10 cP. Effective centering depends strongly on frequency if the outer shell is conductive.

  19. Measurements of magnetic field alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

    1987-11-06

    The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  20. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  1. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Cahn, Robert N.; de Putter, Roland; Linder, Eric V.

    2008-07-08

    Scalar field dark energy evolving from a long radiation- or matter-dominated epoch has characteristic dynamics. While slow-roll approximations are invalid, a well defined field expansion captures the key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of the matter-dominated epoch. Since this behavior is determined, it is not faithfully represented if priors for dynamical quantities are chosen at random. We demonstrate these features for both thawing and freezing fields, and for some modified gravity models, and unify several special cases in the literature.

  2. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, John A.; Greenwald, Shlomo

    1989-01-01

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle.

  3. High field gradient particle accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Nation, J.A.; Greenwald, S.

    1989-05-30

    A high electric field gradient electron accelerator utilizing short duration, microwave radiation, and capable of operating at high field gradients for high energy physics applications or at reduced electric field gradients for high average current intermediate energy accelerator applications is disclosed. Particles are accelerated in a smooth bore, periodic undulating waveguide, wherein the period is so selected that the particles slip an integral number of cycles of the r.f. wave every period of the structure. This phase step of the particles produces substantially continuous acceleration in a traveling wave without transverse magnetic or other guide means for the particle. 10 figs.

  4. The Emerging Field of Neuroepigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Sweatt, J. David

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 25 years the broad field of epigenetics, and over the past decade in particular the emerging field of neuroepigenetics, have begun to have tremendous impact in the areas of learned behavior, neurotoxicology, CNS development, cognition, addiction, and psychopathology. However, epigenetics is such a new field that in most of these areas the impact is more in the category of fascinating implications as opposed to established facts. In this brief commentary I will attempt to address and delineate some of the open questions and areas of opportunity that discoveries in epigenetics are providing to the discipline of neuroscience. PMID:24183015

  5. Studies in quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polmar, S. K.

    The theoretical physics group at Washington University has been devoted to the solution of problems in theoretical and mathematical physics. All of the personnel on this task have a similar approach to their research in that they apply sophisticated analytical and numerical techniques to problems primarily in quantum field theory. Specifically, this group has worked on quantum chromodynamics, classical Yang-Mills fields, chiral symmetry breaking condensates, lattice field theory, strong-coupling approximations, perturbation theory in large order, nonlinear waves, 1/N expansions, quantum solitons, phase transitions, nuclear potentials, and early universe calculations.

  6. Review of magnetic field observations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1972-01-01

    Recent observations in previously unexplored regions of the magnetosphere, particularly in the polar-cusp region, compliment and reinforce emphasis on particle access to the plasma sheet via the polar neutral points. Significant distortions of the geomagnetic field in the polar-cusp region suggest field-aligned currents at large geocentric distances which can be related to low-altitude polar-cap phenomena. Studies of the microstructure of the field reversal region of the plasma sheet embedded in the geomagnetic tail suggest a periodic structure of more complexity than earlier assumed simplified single neutral-line models.

  7. Border separation for adjacent orthogonal fields

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, B.L.; Khan, F.M.; Sharma, S.C.; Lee, C.K.; Kim, T.H. )

    1991-06-01

    Field border separations for adjacent orthogonal fields can be calculated geometrically, given the validity of some important assumptions such as beam alignment and field uniformity. Thermoluminescent dosimetry (TLD) measurements were used to investigate dose uniformity across field junctions as a function of field separation and, in particular, to review the CCSG recommendation for the treatment of medulloblastoma with separate head and spine fields.

  8. Impact of inclusive field trips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilley, Brett; Atchison, Chris; Feig, Anthony; Stokes, Alison

    2015-08-01

    The geosciences benefit from diverse student perspectives and backgrounds, but the field-based learning requirements pose barriers to students with disabilities. If carefully designed, fieldwork can be made accessible while still meeting expectations of academic rigour.

  9. Teaching Depth of Field Concept

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Frederick C.; Smith, Rodney J.

    1978-01-01

    This activity utilizes an overhead projector, a wax pencil, and a petri-dish to demonstrate the depth of field concept to students learning the use of the microscope. Illustrations and directions are included. (MA)

  10. The Capacitive Magnetic Field Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyatkov, D. O.; Yurchenko, A. V.; Balashov, V. B.; Yurchenko, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    The results of a study of sensitive element magnetic field sensor are represented in this paper. The sensor is based on the change of the capacitance with an active dielectric (ferrofluid) due to the magnitude of magnetic field. To prepare the ferrofluid magnetic particles are used, which have a followingdispersion equal to 50 < Ø < 56, 45 < Ø < 50, 40 < Ø < 45 and Ø < 40micron of nanocrystalline alloy of brand 5BDSR. The dependence of the sensitivity of the capacitive element from the ferrofluid with different dispersion of magnetic particles is considered. The threshold of sensitivity and sensitivity of a measuring cell with ferrofluid by a magnetic field was determined. The experimental graphs of capacitance change of the magnitude of magnetic field are presented.

  11. Measuring Earth's Magnetic Field Simply.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Gay B.

    2000-01-01

    Describes a method for measuring the earth's magnetic field using an empty toilet paper tube, copper wire, clear tape, a battery, a linear variable resistor, a small compass, cardboard, a protractor, and an ammeter. (WRM)

  12. Mojave remote sensing field experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, Raymond E.; Petroy, S. B.; Plaut, J. J.; Shepard, Michael K.; Evans, D.; Farr, T.; Greeley, Ronald; Gaddis, L.; Lancaster, N.

    1991-01-01

    The Mojave Remote Sensing Field Experiment (MFE), conducted in June 1988, involved acquisition of Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS); C, L, and P-band polarimetric radar (AIRSAR) data; and simultaneous field observations at the Pisgah and Cima volcanic fields, and Lavic and Silver Lake Playas, Mojave Desert, California. A LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) scene is also included in the MFE archive. TM-based reflectance and TIMS-based emissivity surface spectra were extracted for selected surfaces. Radiative transfer procedures were used to model the atmosphere and surface simultaneously, with the constraint that the spectra must be consistent with field-based spectral observations. AIRSAR data were calibrated to backscatter cross sections using corner reflectors deployed at target sites. Analyses of MFE data focus on extraction of reflectance, emissivity, and cross section for lava flows of various ages and degradation states. Results have relevance for the evolution of volcanic plains on Venus and Mars.

  13. ANALYSIS OF DIFFUSION FIELD EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report describes general theoretical frameworks for the ordering of diffusion field data in terms of meteorological measurements. The three methods described are surface-layer (Monin-Obukhov) similarity, convective scaling, and statistical theory using wind fluctuations. Earl...

  14. Field Lines of Flying Fur.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapp, David R.

    1996-01-01

    Presents a demonstration that uses insulated conductors and hairs clipped from rabbit fur to help students visualize the electric field in three dimensions and motivate them to try their own variations. (JRH)

  15. Real Automation in the Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar; Mayero, Micaela; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We provide a package of strategies for automation of non-linear arithmetic in PVS. In particular, we describe a simplication procedure for the field of real numbers and a strategy for cancellation of common terms.

  16. Electric fields and quantum wormholes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, Dalit; Freivogel, Ben; Iqbal, Nabil

    2015-09-01

    Electric fields can thread a classical Einstein-Rosen bridge. Maldacena and Susskind have recently suggested that in a theory of dynamical gravity the entanglement of ordinary perturbative quanta should be viewed as creating a quantum version of an Einstein-Rosen bridge between the particles, or a "quantum wormhole." We demonstrate within low-energy effective field theory that there is a precise sense in which electric fields can also thread such quantum wormholes. We define a nonperturbative "wormhole susceptibility" that measures the ease of passing an electric field through any sort of wormhole. The susceptibility of a quantum wormhole is suppressed by powers of the U (1 ) gauge coupling relative to that for a classical wormhole but can be made numerically equal with a sufficiently large amount of entangled matter.

  17. Origin of cosmic magnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Campanelli, Leonardo

    2013-08-01

    We calculate, in the free Maxwell theory, the renormalized quantum vacuum expectation value of the two-point magnetic correlation function in de Sitter inflation. We find that quantum magnetic fluctuations remain constant during inflation instead of being washed out adiabatically, as usually assumed in the literature. The quantum-to-classical transition of super-Hubble magnetic modes during inflation allow us to treat the magnetic field classically after reheating, when it is coupled to the primeval plasma. The actual magnetic field is scale independent and has an intensity of few×10(-12)  G if the energy scale of inflation is few×10(16)  GeV. Such a field accounts for galactic and galaxy cluster magnetic fields. PMID:23971556

  18. Symmetry inheritance of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smolić, Ivica

    2015-07-01

    Matter fields do not necessarily have to share the symmetries with the spacetime they live in. When this happens, we speak of the symmetry inheritance of fields. In this paper we classify the obstructions of symmetry inheritance by the scalar fields, both real and complex, and look more closely at the special cases of stationary and axially symmetric spacetimes. Since the symmetry noninheritance is present in the scalar fields of boson stars and may enable the existence of the black hole scalar hair, our results narrow the possible classes of such solutions. Finally, we define and analyse the symmetry noninheritance contributions to the Komar mass and angular momentum of the black hole scalar hair.

  19. Cosmological magnetic fields from inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motta, Leonardo

    In this thesis we review the methods for computation of cosmological correlations in the early universe known as the in-in formalism which are then applied to the problem of magnetogenesis from inflation. For this computation, a power-law single field slow- roll inflation is assumed together with a coupling of the form eφ/nuF μnuFμnu between the inflaton φ and the electrodynamical field strength Fμnu. For certain choice of parameters, the model produces a scale-invariant power spectrum that can be as high as 10-12 G at cosmological scales at present time. Finally, we compute the correlation between the magnetic field energy density and scalar metric fluctuations at tree-level from which the shape of the resulting non-gaussianity is analyzed.We show that the corresponding bispectrum is of order 10-5 times the power spectrum of magnetic fields.

  20. Gradiometry and gravitomagnetic field detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mashhoon, Bahram

    1989-01-01

    Gravitomagnetism was apparently first introduced into physics about 120 years ago when major developments in electrodynamics and the strong similarity between Coulomb's law of electricity and Newton's law of gravity led to the hypothesis that mass current generates a fundamental force of gravitational origin analogous to the magnetic force caused by charge current. According to general relativity, the rotation of a body leads to the dragging of the local inertial frames. In the weak-field approximation, the dragging frequency can be interpreted, up to a constant proportionality factor, as a gravitational magnetic field. There is, as yet, no direct evidence regarding the existence of such a field. The possibility is examined of detecting the gravitomagnetic field of the Earth by gravity gradiometry.

  1. Chapter A6. Field Measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D., (Edited By); Radtke, Dean B.

    1998-01-01

    The National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (National Field Manual) provides guidelines and standard procedures for U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) personnel who collect data used to assess the quality of the Nation's surface-water and ground-water resources. Chapter A6 presents procedures and guidelines for the collection of data on air and water temperature, and on dissolved-oxygen concentrations, specific electrical conductance, pH, reduction-oxidation potential, alkalinity, and turbidity in water. Each chapter of the National Field Manual is published separately and revised periodically. Newly published and revised chapters are posted on the World Wide Web on the USGS page 'National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data.' The URL for this page is http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A (accessed August 6, 2005).

  2. Magnetic field structure of Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiremath, K. M.

    2012-04-01

    Recently planet Mercury - an unexplored territory in our solar system - has been of much interest to the scientific community due to recent flybys of the spacecraft MESSENGER that discovered its intrinsic stationary and large-scale dipole like magnetic field structure with an intensity of ˜300nT confirming Mariner 10 observations. In the present study, with the observed constraint of Mercury's atmospheric magnetic field structure, internal magnetic field structure is modeled as a solution of magnetic diffusion equation. In this study, Mercury's internal structure mainly consists of a stable stratified fluid core and the convective mantle. For simplicity, magnetic diffusivity in both parts of the structure is considered to be uniform and constant with a value represented by a suitable averages. It is further assumed that vigorous convection in the mantle disposes of the electric currents leading to a very high diffusivity in that region. Thus, in order to satisfy observed atmospheric magnetic field structure, Mercury's most likely magnetic field structure consists of a solution of MHD diffusion equation in the core and a combined multipolar (dipole and quadrupole like magnetic field structures embedded in the uniform field) solution of a current free like magnetic field structure in the mantle and in the atmosphere. With imposition of appropriate boundary conditions at the core-mantle boundary for the first two diffusion eigen modes, in order to satisfy the observed field structure, present study puts the constraint on Mercury's core radius to be ˜2000km. From the estimated magnetic diffusivity and the core radius, it is also possible to estimate the two diffusion eigen modes with their diffusion time scales of ˜8.6 and 3.7 billion years respectively suggesting that the planet inherits its present-day magnetic field structure from the solar Nebula. It is proposed that permanency of such a large-scale magnetic field structure of the planet is attained during

  3. Small-Scale-Field Dynamo

    SciTech Connect

    Gruzinov, A.; Cowley, S.; Sudan, R. ||

    1996-11-01

    Generation of magnetic field energy, without mean field generation, is studied. Isotropic mirror-symmetric turbulence of a conducting fluid amplifies the energy of small-scale magnetic perturbations if the magnetic Reynolds number is high, and the dimensionality of space {ital d} satisfies 2.103{lt}{ital d}{lt}8.765. The result does not depend on the model of turbulence, incompressibility, and isotropy being the only requirements. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. Field Operators in Real Space.

    PubMed

    Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2016-05-19

    Field operators are widely used in many-body theory of indistinguishable particles. In this work it is shown that these operators can be represented solely in position space. Explicit expressions for the field operators in position space are given. Using the derived expression, we further show how by generalizing operators in first quantization to arbitrary particle numbers, one can directly connect to the respective operators in second quantization. A few illustrative examples are also presented. PMID:26594868

  5. Diffeomorphism groups and anyon fields

    SciTech Connect

    Goldin, G.A.; Sharp, D.H.

    1995-09-01

    We make use of unitary representations of the group of diffeomorphisms of the plane to construct an explicit field theory of anyons. The resulting anyon fields satisfy q-commutators, where q is the well-known phase shift associated with a single counterclockwise exchange of a pair of anyons. Our method uses a realization of the braid group by means of paths in the plane, that transform naturally under diffeomorphisms of R{sup 2}.

  6. Invariants from classical field theory

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz, Rafael; Leal, Lorenzo

    2008-06-15

    We introduce a method that generates invariant functions from perturbative classical field theories depending on external parameters. By applying our methods to several field theories such as Abelian BF, Chern-Simons, and two-dimensional Yang-Mills theory, we obtain, respectively, the linking number for embedded submanifolds in compact varieties, the Gauss' and the second Milnor's invariant for links in S{sup 3}, and invariants under area-preserving diffeomorphisms for configurations of immersed planar curves.

  7. Bioluminescence under static magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaka, M.; Ueno, S.

    1998-06-01

    In the present study, the effect of magnetic fields on the emission of light by a living system was studied. The fireflies Hotaria parvula and Luciola cruciata were used as the bioluminescence systems. The firefly light organ was fixed at the edge of an optical fiber. The emitted light was introduced into a single-channel photon-counting system using an optical fiber. We measured both the spectrum of a constant light emission and, the time course of bioluminescence pulses. Two horizontal-type superconducting magnets, which produced 8 and 14 T magnetic fields at their center, were used as the magnetic-field generators. We also carried out an in vitro study of bioluminescence. The enzymatic activity of luciferase was measured under a 14 T magnetic field. We measured emission spectra of bioluminescence over the interval 500-600 nm at 25 °C in a stable emission state. It was observed that the peak wavelength around 550 nm shifted to 560 nm under a 14 T magnetic field. However, the effects of magnetic fields were not significant. Also, we measured the time course of emissions at 550 nm in a transient emission state. The rate in the light intensity under a 14 T magnetic field increased compared to the control. There is a possibility that the change in the emission intensities under a magnetic field is related to a change in the biochemical systems of the firefly, such as the enzymatic process of luciferase and the excited singlet state with subsequent light emission.

  8. Optical measurements of gravity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maleki, L.; Yu, N.; Matsko, A.

    2003-01-01

    Optical measurements of a gravitational field with sensitivity close to the sensitivity of atomic devices are possible if one detects properties of light after its interaction with optically thick atomic cloud moving freely in the gravity field. A nondestructive detection of a number of ultracold atoms in a cloud as well as tracking of the ground state population distribution of the atoms is possible by optical means.

  9. Paraxial Full-Field Cloaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Joseph; Howell, John

    2015-05-01

    Broadband, omnidirectional invisibility cloaking has been a goal of scientists since coordinate transformations were suggested for cloaking. The requirements for realizing such a cloak can be simplified by considering only the paraxial (`small-angle') regime. We recap the experimental demonstration of paraxial ray optics cloaking and theoretically complete its formalism, by extending it to the full-field of light. We then show how to build a full-field paraxial cloaking system.

  10. Measurement of surface velocity fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, J. A., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    A new technique for measuring surface velocity fields is briefly described. It determines the surface velocity vector as a function of location and time by the analysis of thermal fluctuations of the surface profile in a small domain around the point of interest. The apparatus now being constructed will be used in a series of experiments involving flow fields established by temperature gradients imposed along a surface.

  11. Magnetic fields in young galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordlund, Åke; Rögnvaldsson, Örnólfur

    We have studied the fate of initial magnetic fields in the hot halo gas out of which the visible parts of galaxies form, using three-dimensional numerical MHD-experiments. The halo gas undergoes compression by several orders of magnitude in the subsonic cooling flow that forms the cold disk. The magnetic field is carried along and is amplified considerably in the process, reaching μG levels for reasonable values of the initial ratio of magnetic to thermal energy density.

  12. Fock representation for quaternion fields

    SciTech Connect

    Govorkov, A.B.

    1987-04-01

    A Fock representation is determined for a nonrelativistic self-adjoint (Majorana) field based on quaternions, and the quantum mechanics of the parafermions of third order corresponding to it is formulated. Attention is drawn to the difference between the gauge pseudocolor SO(3) symmetry of the automorphisms of such a field and the global SU(3) symmetry of the states of the particles corresponding to it in the Fock space.

  13. Self-dual electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubykalo, Andrew E.; Espinoza, Augusto; Kosyakov, B. P.

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate the utility of self-dual fields in electrodynamics. Stable configurations of free electromagnetic fields can be represented as superpositions of standing waves, each possessing zero Poynting vector and zero orbital angular momentum. The standing waves are themselves superpositions of self-dual and anti-self-dual solutions. The idea of self-duality provides additional insights into the geometrical and spectral properties of stable electromagnetic configurations, such as those responsible for the formation of ball lightning.

  14. CDC field mapping device - ''ROTOTRACK''

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, R.; Hawtree, J.; Kaczar, K.; Leverence, R.; McGuire, K.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Schmidt, E.E.; Shallenberger, J.

    1985-10-01

    A field mapping device for the magnet of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) was constructed. The device was used for extensive study of the CDF magnetic field distribution. The mechanical and electrical features of the device, as well as the data acquisition system and software, are described. The mechanical system was designed so that the errors on the position and angle of the probe were +-0.75 mm and +-1 mrad, respectively.

  15. Electric Field Containerless Processing Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elleman, D. D.; Rhim, W. K.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this task is to develop the science and technology base required to design and construct a high temperature electric field positioning module that could be used by materials scientists to conduct containerless science experiments in a low gravity environment. Containerless science modules that employ electric fields to position and manipulate samples offer several advantages over acoustic or electromagnetic systems. The electric field system will operate not only at atmospheric pressures but also in a vacuum, in contrast to the acoustic modules which can only operate in atmosphere where the acoustic forces are sufficient. The electric field technique puts minimum energy into the sample, whereas the electromagnetic system can deposit energy into the sample through eddy current heat as well as physical mixing in the sample. Two types of electric field modules have been constructed and tested to date. One employs a charged sample and uses electrostatic forces to position and control the sample. The second type of module induces electrical polarization of the sample and electric field gradients to position and control the sample.

  16. The magnetic field of Mercury

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.

    1977-01-01

    The Mariner 10 spacecraft encountered Mercury three times in 1974-1975. The first and third encounters provided detailed observations of a well-developed detached bow shock wave which results from the interaction of the solar wind. The planet possesses a global magnetic field and a modest magnetosphere, which deflects the solar wind. The field is approximately dipolar, with orientation in the same sense as earth, tilted 12 deg from the rotation axis. The magnetic moment corresponds to an undistorted equatorial field intensity of 350 gammas, approximately 1% of earth's. The field, while unequivocally intrinsic to the planet, may be due to remanent magnetization acquired from an extinct dynamo or a primordial magnetic field or due to a presently active dynamo. The latter possibility appears more plausible at present. In any case, the existence of the magnetic field provides very strong evidence of a mature differentiated planetary interior with a large core (core radius about 0.7 Mercury radius) and a record of the history of planetary formation in the magnetization of the crustal rocks.

  17. Link invariants of electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    von Bodecker, Hanno; Hornig, Gunnar

    2004-01-23

    The cross-helicity integral is known in fluid dynamics and plasma physics as a topological invariant which measures the mutual linkage of two divergence-free vector fields, e.g., magnetic fields, on a three-dimensional domain. Generalizing this concept, a new topological invariant is found which measures the mutual linkage of three closed two-forms, e.g., electromagnetic fields, on a four-dimensional domain. The integral is shown to detect a separation of the cross helicity between two of the fields with the help of the third field. It can be related to the triple linking number known in knot theory. Furthermore, it is shown that the well-known three-dimensional cross helicity and the new four-dimensional invariant are the first two examples of a series of topological invariants which are defined by n-1 field strengths F=dA on a simply connected n-dimensional manifold M(n). PMID:14753856

  18. Observations of Mercury's magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ness, N. F.; Behannon, K. W.; Lepping, R. P.; Whang, Y. C.

    1975-01-01

    Magnetic field data obtained by Mariner 10 during the third and final encounter with the planet Mercury on 16 March 1975 were studied. A well developed bow shock and modest magnetosphere, previously observed at first encounter on 29 March 1974, were again observed. In addition, a much stronger magnetic field near closest approach, 400 gamma versus 98 gamma, was observed at an altitude of 327 km and approximately 70 deg north Mercurian latitude. Spherical harmonic analysis of the data provide an estimate of the centered planetary magnetic dipole of 4.7 x 10 to the 22nd power Gauss/cu cm with the axis tilted 12 deg to the rotation axis and in the same sense as Earth's. The interplanetary field was sufficiently different between first and third encounters that in addition to the very large field magnitude observed, it argues strongly against a complex induction process generating the observed planetary field. While a possibility exists that Mercury possesses a remanent field due to magnetization early in its formation, a present day active dynamo seems to be a more likely candidate for its origin.

  19. Stochastic-field cavitation model

    SciTech Connect

    Dumond, J.; Magagnato, F.; Class, A.

    2013-07-15

    Nonlinear phenomena can often be well described using probability density functions (pdf) and pdf transport models. Traditionally, the simulation of pdf transport requires Monte-Carlo codes based on Lagrangian “particles” or prescribed pdf assumptions including binning techniques. Recently, in the field of combustion, a novel formulation called the stochastic-field method solving pdf transport based on Eulerian fields has been proposed which eliminates the necessity to mix Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques or prescribed pdf assumptions. In the present work, for the first time the stochastic-field method is applied to multi-phase flow and, in particular, to cavitating flow. To validate the proposed stochastic-field cavitation model, two applications are considered. First, sheet cavitation is simulated in a Venturi-type nozzle. The second application is an innovative fluidic diode which exhibits coolant flashing. Agreement with experimental results is obtained for both applications with a fixed set of model constants. The stochastic-field cavitation model captures the wide range of pdf shapes present at different locations.

  20. Static-field-induced states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gets, Artem V.; Tolstikhin, Oleg I.

    2013-01-01

    Considering an electron interacting with an atomic or molecular potential and an external static electric field, one usually focuses on narrow resonances at negative energies originating from the bound states in the absence of the field; we call them tunneling states (TSs). Meanwhile, there also exist relatively broad resonances at positive energies having no counterparts in the absence of the field; we call them static-field-induced states (SFISs). In this paper, the recently developed weak-field asymptotic theory of TSs [O. I. Tolstikhin , Phys. Rev. APLRAAN1050-294710.1103/PhysRevA.84.053423 84, 053423 (2011)] is extended to SFISs. An asymptotic quantization condition defining the energies of SFISs in an arbitrary potential in the three-dimensional case is derived. The parabolic scattering amplitudes appearing in this quantization condition are defined. The theory is illustrated by calculations for the zero-range and Coulomb potentials. The SFISs in these potentials are found and their energies are shown to be in good agreement with the asymptotic results over a wide interval of the values of the field.

  1. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOEpatents

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  2. Transient scattering from dielectric cylinders - E-field, H-field, and combined field solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vechinski, Douglas A.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1992-10-01

    In this work, the problem of transient scattering by arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional dielectric cylinders is solved using the marching-on-in-time technique. The dielectric problem is approached via the equivalence principle. Three different formulations, namely, the electric field integral equation formulation, the magnetic field integral equation formulation, and the combined field integral equation formulation are considered. Numerical results are presented for two cross sections, namely, a circle and a square, and compared with inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT) techniques. In each case, good agreement is obtained with the IDFT solution.

  3. Transient scattering from dielectric cylinders - E-field, H-field, and combined field solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vechinski, Douglas A.; Rao, Sadasiva M.

    1992-01-01

    In this work, the problem of transient scattering by arbitrarily shaped two-dimensional dielectric cylinders is solved using the marching-on-in-time technique. The dielectric problem is approached via the equivalence principle. Three different formulations, namely, the electric field integral equation formulation, the magnetic field integral equation formulation, and the combined field integral equation formulation are considered. Numerical results are presented for two cross sections, namely, a circle and a square, and compared with inverse discrete Fourier transform (IDFT) techniques. In each case, good agreement is obtained with the IDFT solution.

  4. Electrophoresis in strong electric fields.

    PubMed

    Barany, Sandor

    2009-01-01

    Two kinds of non-linear electrophoresis (ef) that can be detected in strong electric fields (several hundred V/cm) are considered. The first ("classical" non-linear ef) is due to the interaction of the outer field with field-induced ionic charges in the electric double layer (EDL) under conditions, when field-induced variations of electrolyte concentration remain to be small comparatively to its equilibrium value. According to the Shilov theory, the non-linear component of the electrophoretic velocity for dielectric particles is proportional to the cubic power of the applied field strength (cubic electrophoresis) and to the second power of the particles radius; it is independent of the zeta-potential but is determined by the surface conductivity of particles. The second one, the so-called "superfast electrophoresis" is connected with the interaction of a strong outer field with a secondary diffuse layer of counterions (space charge) that is induced outside the primary (classical) diffuse EDL by the external field itself because of concentration polarization. The Dukhin-Mishchuk theory of "superfast electrophoresis" predicts quadratic dependence of the electrophoretic velocity of unipolar (ionically or electronically) conducting particles on the external field gradient and linear dependence on the particle's size in strong electric fields. These are in sharp contrast to the laws of classical electrophoresis (no dependence of V(ef) on the particle's size and linear dependence on the electric field gradient). A new method to measure the ef velocity of particles in strong electric fields is developed that is based on separation of the effects of sedimentation and electrophoresis using videoimaging and a new flowcell and use of short electric pulses. To test the "classical" non-linear electrophoresis, we have measured the ef velocity of non-conducting polystyrene, aluminium-oxide and (semiconductor) graphite particles as well as Saccharomice cerevisiae yeast cells as a

  5. THOR Electric Field Instrument - EFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Bale, Stuart D.; Bonnell, John W.; Lindqvist, Per-Arne; Phal, Yamuna; Rothkaehl, Hanna; Soucek, Jan; Vaivads, Andris; Åhlen, Lennart

    2016-04-01

    Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. The Electric Field Instrument (EFI) will measure the vector electric field from 0 to 200 kHz. EFI consists of two sets of sensors: Spin-plane Double Probes (EFI-SDP) providing high sensitivity DC electric field in the spacecraft spin plane (2D), and the High-Frequency Antenna (EFI-HFA) providing 3D electric field at frequencies above ~1 kHz. EFI-SDP consists of 4 biased spherical probes extended on 50 m long wire booms, 90 degrees apart in the spin plane, giving a 100 m baseline for each of the two spin-plane electric field components. EFI-HFA consists of 6 x 1.25 m long monopoles, forming 3 dipolar antennas crossed at 90 degrees to each other. In addition to the sensors, EFI contains HFA and SDP pre-amplifiers, as well as bias electronics boards (BEBs) hosted in the man electronics box of the Field and Wave processor (FWP). As THOR spacecraft has a sun-pointing spin axis, EFI-SDP measures the electric field in the plane approximately orthogonal to the sun using long wire booms. The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces errors due to wake effects and asymmetric photoelectron clouds, enabling the highly accurate in comparison to earlier missions ±0.1 mV/m near-DC electric field measurements. Interferometry using the electric field probes can be used to infer wavelengths and scale sizes at the smallest scales in the plasma. EFI also measures the floating potential of the satellite, which can be used to estimate the plasma density at very high time resolution (up to a few hundred Hz). The sun-pointing attitude greatly reduces changes in the illuminated area, and hence the associated spin-dependent errors. In combination with densities derived from the observed plasma frequency emission line, EFI monitors the plasma density from DC to a few hundred Hz. EFI measurements characterize electric field and density variations associated with kinetic scale plasma

  6. Magnetic fields in spiral galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Marita

    2015-03-01

    The magnetic field structure in edge-on galaxies observed so far shows a plane-parallel magnetic field component in the disk of the galaxy and an X-shaped field in its halo. The plane-parallel field is thought to be the projected axisymmetric (ASS) disk field as observed in face-on galaxies. Some galaxies addionionally exhibit strong vertical magnetic fields in the halo right above and below the central region of the disk. The mean-field dynamo theory in the disk cannot explain these observed fields without the action of a wind, which also probably plays an important role to keep the vertical scale heights constant in galaxies of different Hubble types and star formation activities, as has been observed in the radio continuum: At λ6 cm the vertical scale heights of the thin disk and the thick disk/halo in a sample of five edge-on galaxies are similar with a mean value of 300 +/- 50 pc for the thin disk and 1.8 +/- 0.2 kpc for the thick disk (a table and references are given in Krause 2011) with our sample including the brightest halo observed so far, NGC 253, with strong star formation, as well as one of the weakest halos, NGC 4565, with weak star formation. If synchrotron emission is the dominant loss process of the relativistic electrons the outer shape of the radio emission should be dumbbell-like as has been observed in several edge-on galaxies like e.g. NGC 253 (Heesen et al. 2009) and NGC 4565. As the synchrotron lifetime t syn at a single frequency is proportional to the total magnetic field strength B t -1.5, a cosmic ray bulk speed (velocity of a galactic wind) can be defined as v CR = h CR /t syn = 2 h z /t syn , where h CR and h z are the scale heights of the cosmic rays and the observed radio emission at this freqnency. Similar observed radio scale heights imply a self regulation mechanism between the galactic wind velocity, the total magnetic field strength and the star formation rate SFR in the disk: v CR ~ B t 1.5 ~ SFR ~ 0.5 (Niklas & Beck 1997).

  7. Monoenergetic fast neutron reference fields: II. Field characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nolte, Ralf; Thomas, David J.

    2011-12-01

    Monoenergetic neutron reference fields are required for the calibration of neutron detectors and dosemeters for various applications ranging from nuclear physics and nuclear data measurements to radiation protection. In a series of two separate publications the metrological aspects of the production and measurement of fast neutrons are reviewed. In the first part, requirements for the nuclear reactions used to produce neutron fields as well as methods for target characterization and the general layout of reference facilities were discussed. This second part focuses on the most important techniques for field characterization and includes the determination of the neutron fluence as well as the spectral neutron distribution and the determination of the fluence of contaminating photons. The measurements are usually carried out relative to reference cross sections which are reviewed in a separate contribution, but for certain conditions 'absolute' methods for neutron measurements can be used which are directly traceable to the international system of units (SI).

  8. Scalar field dark matter and the Higgs field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertolami, O.; Cosme, Catarina; Rosa, João G.

    2016-08-01

    We discuss the possibility that dark matter corresponds to an oscillating scalar field coupled to the Higgs boson. We argue that the initial field amplitude should generically be of the order of the Hubble parameter during inflation, as a result of its quasi-de Sitter fluctuations. This implies that such a field may account for the present dark matter abundance for masses in the range 10-6-10-4eV, if the tensor-to-scalar ratio is within the range of planned CMB experiments. We show that such mass values can naturally be obtained through either Planck-suppressed non-renormalizable interactions with the Higgs boson or, alternatively, through renormalizable interactions within the Randall-Sundrum scenario, where the dark matter scalar resides in the bulk of the warped extra-dimension and the Higgs is confined to the infrared brane.

  9. Searching for converging research using field to field citations

    PubMed Central

    Noyons, Ed. C. M.; Van Raan, Anthony F. J.

    2010-01-01

    We define converging research as the emergence of an interdisciplinary research area from fields that did not show interdisciplinary connections before. This paper presents a process to search for converging research using journal subject categories as a proxy for fields and citations to measure interdisciplinary connections, as well as an application of this search. The search consists of two phases: a quantitative phase in which pairs of citing and cited fields are located that show a significant change in number of citations, followed by a qualitative phase in which thematic focus is sought in publications associated with located pairs. Applying this search on publications from the Web of Science published between 1995 and 2005, 38 candidate converging pairs were located, 27 of which showed thematic focus, and 20 also showed a similar focus in the other, reciprocal pair. PMID:21297857

  10. Magnetoconvection in sheared magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Bian, N. H.; Garcia, O. E.

    2008-10-15

    The development of magnetoconvection in a sheared magnetic field is investigated. The equilibrium magnetic field B{sub 0} is horizontal and its orientation varies linearly along the vertical axis. Preliminary consideration of the transition from the inertial to the viscous regime of the gravitational resistive interchange instability, reveals that the latter is characterized by the existence of viscoresistive boundary layers of vertical width which scales as Q{sup -1/6}, where Q is the Chandrasekhar number. The situation is analogous to the one encountered in magnetically confined laboratory plasmas, where convective flows are constrained by the magnetic shear to develop in boundary layers located around resonant magnetic surfaces in order to fulfill the 'interchange condition'k{center_dot}B{sub 0}=0, where k is the wave vector of the magnetic perturbation. It follows that when the effect of thermal diffusion is taken into account in the process, convection can only occur above a certain critical value of the Rayleigh number which scales as Q{sup 2/3} for large Q. At the onset, the convection pattern is a superposition of identically thin convective rolls everywhere aligned with the local magnetic field lines and which therefore adopt the magnetic field geometry, a situation also reminiscent of the penumbra of sunspots. Using this degeneracy, equations describing the weakly nonlinear state are obtained and discussed. A reduced magnetohydrodynamic description of magnetoconvection is introduced. Since it is valid for arbitrary magnetic field configurations, it allows a simple extension to the case where there exists an inclination between the direction of gravity and the plane spanned by the equilibrium magnetic field. These reduced magnetohydrodynamic equations are proposed as a powerful tool for further investigations of magnetoconvection in more complex field line geometries.

  11. [Visual field defects in hydrocephalus].

    PubMed

    Kojima, N; Tamaki, N; Hosoda, K; Matsumoto, S

    1985-03-01

    Eight patients representing visual field defects associated with hydrocephalus are reviewed. Seven cases had aqueductal stenosis and one had congenital communicating hydrocephalus. We found five cases of defects in visual field typical of a chiasmal or optic nerve lesion: (1) inferior altitudinal hemianopia with inferior nasal quadrantanopia in the opposite eye; (2) inferior binasal quadrantanopia; (3) unilateral inferior nasal depression; (4) unilateral temporal defect; (5) bilateral central scotoma. In these cases CT demonstrated moderate or marked symmetrical dilatation of the third and lateral ventricles. Four out of five cases showed bulging of the third ventricle anteriorly into the sella turcica on CT or ventriculography. Other three patients had incongruous homonymous hemianopia. Characteristic asymmetrical dilatation of the lateral ventricles was noted in all three cases. The more enlarged lateral ventricles were ipsilateral with the affected visual pathways. The sites of lesion responsible for these field defects seemed to be optic tract in one case and optic radiation in two cases. Ventriculoperitoneal shunt was placed in five out of seven cases. Impaired visual field improved in three patients after shunt insertion. A 28-year-old female who had history of blurred vision fos 14 days showed improvement in visual acuity and field when the enlarged ventricles became slit-like by shunting. In the other two patients defects in visual fields improved in spite of consistent ventriculomegaly. These facts suggested that not only the mechanical forces with distended third ventricle but also increased intracranial pressure played an important role in producing visual field defects in hydrocephalic patients. PMID:3874634

  12. Magnetic Fields in Stellar Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartigan, Patrick; Frank, Adam; Varniére, Peggy; Blackman, Eric G.

    2007-06-01

    Although several lines of evidence suggest that jets from young stars are driven magnetically from accretion disks, existing observations of field strengths in the bow shocks of these flows imply that magnetic fields play only a minor role in the dynamics at these locations. To investigate this apparent discrepancy we performed numerical simulations of expanding magnetized jets with stochastically variable input velocities with the AstroBEAR MHD code. Because the magnetic field B is proportional to the density n within compression and rarefaction regions, the magnetic signal speed drops in rarefactions and increases in the compressed areas of velocity-variable flows. In contrast, B~n0.5 for a steady state conical flow with a toroidal field, so the Alfvén speed in that case is constant along the entire jet. The simulations show that the combined effects of shocks, rarefactions, and divergent flow cause magnetic fields to scale with density as an intermediate power 1>p>0.5. Because p>0.5, the Alfvén speed in rarefactions decreases on average as the jet propagates away from the star. Hence, a typical Alfvén velocity in the jet close to the star is significantly larger than it is in the rarefactions ahead of bow shocks at larger distances. We find that the observed values of weak fields at large distances are consistent with strong fields required to drive the observed mass loss close to the star. Typical velocity perturbations, which form shocks at large distances, will produce only magnetic waves close to the star. For a typical stellar jet the crossover point inside which velocity perturbations of 30-40 km s-1 no longer produce shocks is ~300 AU from the source.

  13. Field-Induced Rheology in Uniaxial and Biaxial Fields

    SciTech Connect

    MARTIN, JAMES E.

    1999-10-22

    Steady and oscillatory shear 3-D simulations of electro- and magnetorheology in uniaxial and biaxial fields are presented, and compared to the predictions of the chain model. These large scale simulations are three dimensional, and include the effect of Brownian motion. In the absence of thermal fluctuations, the expected shear thinning viscosity is observed in steady shear, and a striped phase is seen to rapidly form in a uniaxial field, with a shear slip zone in each sheet. However, as the influence of Brownian motion increases, the fluid stress decreases, especially at lower Mason numbers, and the striped phase eventually disappears, even when the fluid stress is still high. In a biaxial field, an opposite trend is seen, where Brownian motion decreases the stress most significantly at higher Mason numbers. to account for the uniaxial steady shear data they propose a microscopic chain model of the role played by thermal fluctuations on the rheology of ER and MR fluids that delineates the regimes where an applied field can impact the fluid viscosity, and gives an analytical prediction for the thermal effect. In oscillatory shear, a striped phase again appears in uniaxial field, at strain amplitudes greater than {approx} 0.15, and the presence of a shear slip zone creates strong stress nonlinearities at low strain amplitudes. In a biaxial field, a shear slip zone is not created, and so the stress nonlinearities develop only at expected strain amplitudes. The nonlinear dynamics of these systems is shown to be in good agreement with the Kinetic Chain Model.

  14. Thomson scattering in a magnetic field. II - Arbitrary field orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitney, Barbara A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents solutions to the equation of transfer for Thomson scattering in a constant magnetic field of arbitrary orientation. Results from several atmospheres are combined to give the flux from a dipole star. The results are compared to the polarization data of the magnetic white dwarf Grw + 70 deg 8247. The fit is good, though it implies a very large polarization in the ultraviolet. Thomson scattering is not thought to be an important opacity source in white dwarfs, so the good fit is either fortuitous or is perhaps explained by assuming the magnetic field affects the polarization processes in all opacities similarly.

  15. Testing two-field inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Courtney M.; Tegmark, Max

    2011-01-01

    We derive accurate semianalytic formulas for the power spectra from two-field inflation assuming an arbitrary potential and arbitrary noncanonical kinetic terms, and we use them both to build phenomenological intuition and to constrain classes of two-field models using WMAP data. Using covariant formalism, we first develop a framework for understanding the background field kinematics and introduce a “slow-turn” approximation. Next, we find covariant expressions for the evolution of the adiabatic/curvature and entropy/isocurvature modes, and we discuss how the evolution of modes can be inferred mostly from the background kinematics and the geometry of the field manifold. From these expressions, we derive semianalytic formulas for the curvature, isocurvature, and cross spectra, and the standard spectral observables, all to second order in the slow-roll and slow-turn approximations. In tandem, we show how our covariant formalism provides useful intuition into how the general features of the inflationary Lagrangian translate into distinct features in the observable power spectra. In particular, we find that key features of the power spectra can be directly read off from the nature of the roll path, the curve the field vector rolls along with respect to the two-dimensional field manifold. For example, models whose roll path makes a sharp turn around 60 e-foldings before the end of inflation tend to be ruled out because they produce stronger departures from scale invariance than are allowed by the latest CMB observations. Finally, we apply our formalism to confront four classes of two-field models with WMAP data, including doubly quadratic and quartic potentials and nonstandard kinetic terms, showing how whether a model is ruled out or not depends not only on certain features of the inflationary Lagrangian, but also on the initial conditions. Ultimately, for a two-field model to be consistent with observations, we show that it must possess the right balance of

  16. Magnetic field fluctuations during substorms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fairfield, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    Before a magnetospheric substorm and during its early phases the magnetic field magnitude in the geomagnetic tail increases and field lines in the nighttime hemisphere assume a more tail-like configuration. Before the substorm onset a minimum amount of magnetic flux is observed to cross the neutral sheet which means that the neutral sheet currents attain their most earthward locations and their greatest current densities. This configuration apparently results from an increased transport of magnetic flux to the tail caused by a southward interplanetary magnetic field. The field begins relaxing toward a more dipolar configuration at the time of a substorm onset with the recovery probably occurring first between 6 and 10 R sub E. This recovery must be associated with magnetospheric convection which restores magnetic flux to the dayside hemisphere. Field aligned currents appear to be required to connect magnetospheric currents to the auroral electrojets, implying that a net current flows in a limited range of longitudes. Space measurements supporting current systems are limited. More evidence exists for the occurrence of double current sheets which do not involve net current at a given longitude.

  17. ASYMMETRIC SOLAR POLAR FIELD REVERSALS

    SciTech Connect

    Svalgaard, Leif; Kamide, Yohsuke

    2013-01-20

    The solar polar fields reverse because magnetic flux from decaying sunspots moves toward the poles, with a preponderance of flux from the trailing spots. If there is a strong asymmetry, in the sense that most activity is in the northern hemisphere, then that excess flux will move toward the north pole and reverse that pole first. If there is more activity in the south later on, then that flux will help to reverse the south pole. In this way, two humps in the solar activity and a corresponding difference in the time of reversals develop (in the ideal case). Such a difference was originally noted in the very first observation of polar field reversal just after the maximum of the strongly asymmetric solar cycle 19, when the southern hemisphere was most active before sunspot maximum and the south pole duly reversed first, followed by the northern hemisphere more than a year later, when that hemisphere became most active. Solar cycles since then have had the opposite asymmetry, with the northern hemisphere being most active before solar maximum. We show that polar field reversals for these cycles have all happened in the north first, as expected. This is especially noteworthy for the present solar cycle 24. We suggest that the association of two or more peaks of solar activity when separated by hemispheres with correspondingly different times of polar field reversals is a general feature of the cycle, and that asymmetric polar field reversals are simply a consequence of the asymmetry of solar activity.

  18. Inversion of spinning sound fields.

    PubMed

    Carley, Michael

    2009-02-01

    A method is presented for the reconstruction of rotating monopole source distributions using acoustic pressures measured on a sideline parallel to the source axis. The method requires no a priori assumptions about the source other than that its strength at the frequency of interest varies sinusoidally in azimuth on the source disk so that the radiated acoustic field is composed of a single circumferential mode. When multiple azimuthal modes are present, the acoustic field can be decomposed into azimuthal modes and the method applied to each mode in sequence. The method proceeds in two stages, first finding an intermediate line source derived from the source distribution and then inverting this line source to find the radial variation in source strength. A far-field form of the radiation integrals is derived, showing that the far-field pressure is a band-limited Fourier transform of the line source, establishing a limit on the quality of source reconstruction, which can be achieved using far-field measurements. The method is applied to simulated data representing wind-tunnel testing of a ducted rotor system (tip Mach number of 0.74) and to control of noise from an automotive cooling fan (tip Mach number of 0.14), studies which have appeared in the literature of source identification. PMID:19206846

  19. Cyclical magnetic field flow fractionation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tasci, T. O.; Johnson, W. P.; Gale, B. K.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new magnetic field flow fractionation (FFF) system was designed and modeled by using finite element simulations. Other than current magnetic FFF systems, which use static magnetic fields, our system uses cyclical magnetic fields. Results of the simulations show that our cyclical magnetic FFF system can be used effectively for the separation of magnetic nanoparticles. Cyclical magnetic FFF system is composed of a microfluidic channel (length = 5 cm, height = 30 μm) and 2 coils. Square wave currents of 1 Hz (with 90 deg of phase difference) were applied to the coils. By using Comsol Multiphysics 3.5a, magnetic field profile and corresponding magnetic force exerted on the magnetite nanoparticles were calculated. The magnetic force data were exported from Comsol to Matlab. In Matlab, a parabolic flow profile with maximum flow speed of 0.4 mL/h was defined. Particle trajectories were obtained by the calculation of the particle speeds resulted from both magnetic and hydrodynamic forces. Particle trajectories of the particles with sizes ranging from 10 to 50 nm were simulated and elution times of the particles were calculated. Results show that there is a significant difference between the elution times of the particles so that baseline separation of the particles can be obtained. In this work, it is shown that by the application of cyclical magnetic fields, the separation of magnetic nanoparticles can be done efficiently.

  20. Electromagnetic fields in cased borehole

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ki Ha; Kim, Hee Joon; Uchida, Toshihiro

    2001-07-20

    Borehole electromagnetic (EM) measurements, using fiberglass-cased boreholes, have proven useful in oil field reservoir characterization and process monitoring (Wilt et al., 1995). It has been presumed that these measurements would be impossible in steel-cased wells due to the very large EM attenuation and phase shifts. Recent laboratory and field studies have indicated that detection of EM signals through steel casing should be possible at low frequencies, and that these data provide a reasonable conductivity image at a useful scale. Thus, we see an increased application of this technique to mature oilfields, and an immediate extension to geothermal industry as well. Along with the field experiments numerical model studies have been carried out for analyzing the effect of steel casing to the EM fields. The model used to be an infinitely long uniform casing embedded in a homogeneous whole space. Nevertheless, the results indicated that the formation signal could be accurately recovered if the casing characteristics were independently known (Becker et al., 1998; Lee el al., 1998). Real steel-cased wells are much more complex than the simple laboratory models used in work to date. The purpose of this study is to develop efficient numerical methods for analyzing EM fields in realistic settings, and to evaluate the potential application of EM technologies to cross-borehole and single-hole environment for reservoir characterization and monitoring.

  1. Gene transcription and electromagnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Henderson, A.S.

    1992-01-01

    Our overall aim is to obtain sufficient information to allow us to ultimately determine whether ELF EM field exposure is an initiating factor in neoplastic transformation and/or if exposure can mimic characteristics of the second-step counterpart in neoplastic disease. This aim is based on our previous findings that levels of some transcripts are increased in cells exposed to EM fields. While the research is basic in nature, the ramifications have bearing on the general safety of exposure to EM fields in industrial and everyday life. A large array of diverse biological effects are reported to occur as the result of exposure to elf EM fields, suggesting that the cell response to EM fields is at a basic level, presumably initiated by molecular and/or biophysical events at the cell membrane. The hypothesized route is a signal transduction pathway involving membrane calcium fluxes. Information flow resulting from signal transduction can mediate the induction of regulatory factors in the cell, and directly affect how transcription is regulated.

  2. Cryopumping Field Joint Can Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Wesley L.; Fesmire, James E.; Meneghelli, Barry E.

    2011-01-01

    For long installations, vacuum jacketed piping often comes in 40 foot sections that are butt welded together in the field. A short can is then welded over the bare pipe connection to allow for insulation to be protected from the environment. Traditionally, the field joint is insulated with multilayer insulation and a vacuum is pulled on the can to minimize heat leak through the bare section and prevent frost from forming on the pipe section. The vacuum jacketed lines for the Ares I mobile launch platform were to be a combined 2000 feet long, with 60+ pipe sections and field joint cans. Historically, Kennedy Space Center has drilled a hole in the long sections to create a common vacuum with the field joint can to minimize maintenance on the vacuum jacketed piping. However, this effort looked at ways to use a passive system that didn't require a vacuum, but may cryopump to create its own vacuum. Various forms of aerogel, multilayer insulations, and combinations thereof were tested to determine the best method of insulating the field joint while minimizing maintenance and thermal losses.

  3. (Studies in quantum field theory)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    During the period 4/1/89--3/31/90 the theoretical physics group supported by Department of Energy Contract No. AC02-78ER04915.A015 and consisting of Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Senior Research Associate Visser has made progress in many areas of theoretical and mathematical physics. Professors Bender and Shrauner, Associate Professor Papanicolaou, Assistant Professor Ogilvie, and Research Associate Visser are currently conducting research in many areas of high energy theoretical and mathematical physics. These areas include: strong-coupling approximation; classical solutions of non-Abelian gauge theories; mean-field approximation in quantum field theory; path integral and coherent state representations in quantum field theory; lattice gauge calculations; the nature of perturbation theory in large order; quark condensation in QCD; chiral symmetry breaking; the 1/N expansion in quantum field theory; effective potential and action in quantum field theories, including OCD; studies of the early universe and inflation, and quantum gravity.

  4. [Nonionizing radiation and electromagnetic fields].

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, J H

    1991-01-01

    Nonionising radiation comprises all kinds of radiation and fields of the electromagnetic spectrum where biological matter is not ionised, as well as mechanical waves such as infrasound and ultrasound. The electromagnetic spectrum is subdivided into individual sections and includes: Static and low-frequency electric and magnetic fields including technical applications of energy with mains frequency, radio frequency fields, microwaves and optic radiation (infrared, visible light, ultraviolet radiation including laser). The following categories of persons can be affected by emissions by non-ionising radiation: Persons in the environment and in the household, workers, patients undergoing medical diagnosis or treatment. If the radiation is sufficiently intense, or if the fields are of appropriate strength, a multitude of effects can occur (depending on the type of radiation), such as heat and stimulating or irritating action, inflammations of the skin or eyes, changes in the blood picture, burns or in some cases cancer as a late sequel. The ability of radiation to penetrate into the human body, as well as the types of interaction with biological tissue, with organs and organisms, differs significantly for the various kinds of nonionising radiation. The following aspects of nonionising radiation are discussed: protection of humans against excessive sunlight rays when sunbathing and when exposed to UV radiation (e.g. in solaria); health risks of radio and microwaves (safety of microwave cookers and mobile radio units); effects on human health by electric and magnetic fields in everyday life. PMID:1837859

  5. Nanoconfined water under electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzar, Alenka; Bratko, D.; Daub, C. D.

    2010-03-01

    We study the effect of electric field on interfacial tension of nanoconfined water [1,2] using molecular simulations. Our analysis and simulations confirm that classical electrostriction characterizes usual electrowetting behavior in nanoscale hydrophobic channels and nanoporous materials [3]. We suggest a new mechanism to orient nanoparticles by an applied electric field even when the particles carry no charges or dipoles of their own. Coupling to the field can be accomplished trough solvent-mediated interaction between the electric field and a nanoparticle [4]. For nanoscale particles in water, we find the response to the applied field to be sufficiently fast to make this mechanism relevant for biological processes, design of novel nanostructures and sensors, and development of nanoengineering methods [5]. [1]C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Phys. Chem. C 111, 505 (2007). [2] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub, K. Leung and A. Luzar, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 129, 2504 (2007) [3] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 10, 6807 (2008). [4] D. Bratko, C. D. Daub and A. Luzar, Faraday Discussions 141, 55 (2009). [5] C. D. Daub, D. Bratko, T. Ali and A. Luzar, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 207801 (2009).

  6. Field evaluation of a humic product in Iowa corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The benefit to corn production of a humic product derived from lignite was evaluated for three years under otherwise conventional crop management in Iowa farmers’ fields. Humic material was applied as a liquid extract at a rate of 3 pints acre-1 (0.57 L ha-1), generally as a foliar spray along with ...

  7. USA Track & Field Coaching Manual. USA Track & Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    USA Track and Field, Inc., Indianapolis, IN.

    This book presents comprehensive, ready-to-apply information from 33 world-class coaches and experts about major track and field events for high school and college coaches. The volume features proven predictive testing procedures; detailed event-specific technique instruction; carefully crafted training programs; and preparation and performance…

  8. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    SciTech Connect

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  9. A symmetry of massless fields

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Keller, J.

    1996-09-01

    It is proved that there exists an additional intrinsic symmetry in the left-handed and right-handed fermions (and other fields). The corresponding group of transformations is induced by the Poincar{acute e} translations in the space{endash}time manifold. This symmetry predicts an additional intrinsic energy-momentum for fermions. Considering this symmetry as local leads to introduction of a gauge field and of a nonintegrable phase angle, the corresponding Berry-type phase depends on the topology of the Riemannian space{endash}time manifold as determined by the vierbein. This additional symmetry provides us with the possibility of considering the fermions as gauge fields on the nonvector bundle. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. The magnetic field of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Ness, N. F.

    1976-01-01

    The paper is concerned mainly with the intrinsic planetary field which dominates the inner magnetosphere up to a distance of 10 to 12 Jovian radii where other phenomena, such as ring currents and diamagnetic effects of trapped charged particles, become significant. The main magnetic field of Jupiter as determined by in-situ observations by Pioner 10 and 11 is found to be relatively more complex than a simple offset tilted dipole. Deviations from a simple dipole geometry lead to distortions of the charged particle L shells and warping of the magnetic equator. Enhanced absorption effects associated with Io and Amalthea are predicted. The results are consistent with the conclusions derived from extensive radio observations at decimetric and decametric wavelengths for the planetary field.

  11. Magnetic Field Generation in Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrario, Lilia; Melatos, Andrew; Zrake, Jonathan

    2015-10-01

    Enormous progress has been made on observing stellar magnetism in stars from the main sequence (particularly thanks to the MiMeS, MAGORI and BOB surveys) through to compact objects. Recent data have thrown into sharper relief the vexed question of the origin of stellar magnetic fields, which remains one of the main unanswered questions in astrophysics. In this chapter we review recent work in this area of research. In particular, we look at the fossil field hypothesis which links magnetism in compact stars to magnetism in main sequence and pre-main sequence stars and we consider why its feasibility has now been questioned particularly in the context of highly magnetic white dwarfs. We also review the fossil versus dynamo debate in the context of neutron stars and the roles played by key physical processes such as buoyancy, helicity, and superfluid turbulence, in the generation and stability of neutron star fields.

  12. Rearranging Pionless Effective Field Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Savage; Silas Beane

    2001-11-19

    We point out a redundancy in the operator structure of the pionless effective field theory which dramatically simplifies computations. This redundancy is best exploited by using dibaryon fields as fundamental degrees of freedom. In turn, this suggests a new power counting scheme which sums range corrections to all orders. We explore this method with a few simple observables: the deuteron charge form factor, n p -> d gamma, and Compton scattering from the deuteron. Higher dimension operators involving electroweak gauge fields are not renormalized by the s-wave strong interactions, and therefore do not scale with inverse powers of the renormalization scale. Thus, naive dimensional analysis of these operators is sufficient to estimate their contribution to a given process.

  13. Field insulation materials and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogt, G. H.

    1981-12-01

    In a turbine generator the rotating field requires insulation materials and design considerations much different from the high voltage insulation used for armature windings. The principal properties to be looked for are mechanical strength, resistance to abrasion and resistance to thermal degradation. Electrical strength is also important because field windings are required to withstand a high potential test of ten times rated voltage. Some of the materials used over the years ranged from various kinds of fibers and flake mica composites, to asbestos, fiberglass epoxy or polyester laminates, Nomex and combinations of fiberglass, Nomex and insulating films. New materials have been applied to satisfy demands for better properties as generators grew in size and output, and it is the new materials that have made it possible to obtain more power from smaller machines. Field insulation materials and problems are discussed further.

  14. Galactic and Intergalactic Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, U.; Fletcher, A.

    This course-tested textbook conveys the fundamentals of magnetic fields and relativistic plasma in diffuse cosmic media, with a primary focus on phenomena that have been observed at different wavelengths. Theoretical concepts are addressed wherever necessary, with derivations presented in sufficient detail to be generally accessible. In the first few chapters the authors present an introduction to various astrophysical phenomena related to cosmic magnetism, with scales ranging from molecular clouds in star-forming regions and supernova remnants in the Milky Way, to clusters of galaxies. Later chapters address the role of magnetic fields in the evolution of the interstellar medium, galaxies and galaxy clusters. The book is intended for advanced undergraduate and postgraduate students in astronomy and physics and will serve as an entry point for those starting their first research projects in the field.

  15. A teleoperated robotic field geologist

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. Jeffrey; Spudis, Paul D.

    1990-01-01

    A robotic field geologist, called Teleprospector, is proposed that would be teleoperated from a base on the moon, or possibly from the earth. For field work on Mars, Teleprospector could also be operated from a base in Mars orbit or on the Martian surface. The design incorporates telepresence, so the operator-geologist, though actually located thousands of kilometers away from the telerobot, has the sensation of being inside the body of the robot. The system could be equipped with superhuman sensory capabilities, such as multispectral eyes. This concept combines human intelligence with robotic capabilities, without risk to a human operator, yet still provides the operator with the important sense of personal involvement in the field work.

  16. Remote field eddy current inspection

    SciTech Connect

    Atherton, D.L.

    1995-11-01

    The Remote Field Eddy Current (RFEC) technique uses an internal probe to inspect conducting tubes nondestructively. A coaxial solenoidal exciter, energized with low frequency AC, and detector coils near the inside of the pipe wall are separated by about two pipe diameters to obtain through wall transmission and equal sensitivity to defects on the outside or inside of the pipe wall. Calculation methods are outlined and the voltage plane polar plot signal representation for defect measurement is described. Slit defect interactions in ferromagnetic and non-ferromagnetic tubes are discussed. Defect-induced anomalous fields are interpreted in terms of anomalous source eddy current and missing magnetization defect models. The use of computer animations to represent the time variations of high resolution field measurements and calculations is described.

  17. Nonlocal and quasilocal field theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomboulis, E. T.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate nonlocal field theories, a subject that has attracted some renewed interest in connection with nonlocal gravity models. We study, in particular, scalar theories of interacting delocalized fields, the delocalization being specified by nonlocal integral kernels. We distinguish between strictly nonlocal and quasilocal (compact support) kernels and impose conditions on them to insure UV finiteness and unitarity of amplitudes. We study the classical initial value problem for the partial integro-differential equations of motion in detail. We give rigorous proofs of the existence but accompanying loss of uniqueness of solutions due to the presence of future, as well as past, "delays," a manifestation of acausality. In the quantum theory we derive a generalization of the Bogoliubov causality condition equation for amplitudes, which explicitly exhibits the corrections due to nonlocality. One finds that, remarkably, for quasilocal kernels all acausal effects are confined within the compact support regions. We briefly discuss the extension to other types of fields and prospects of such theories.

  18. Field method for sulfide determination

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, B L; Schwarser, R R; Chukwuenye, C O

    1982-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed for determining the total sulfide concentration in water in the field. Direct measurements were made using a silver/sulfide ion selective electrode in conjunction with a double junction reference electrode connected to an Orion Model 407A/F Specific Ion Meter. The method also made use of a sulfide anti-oxidant buffer (SAOB II) which consists of ascorbic acid, sodium hydroxide, and disodium EDTA. Preweighed sodium sulfide crystals were sealed in air tight plastic volumetric flasks which were used in standardization process in the field. Field standards were prepared by adding SAOB II to the flask containing the sulfide crystals and diluting it to the mark with deionized deaerated water. Serial dilutions of the standards were used to prepare standards of lower concentrations. Concentrations as low as 6 ppB were obtained on lake samples with a reproducibility better than +- 10%.

  19. The North Carolina Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sharp, T.R.; Ternes, M.P.

    1990-08-01

    The North Carolina Field Test will test the effectiveness of two weatherization approaches: the current North Carolina Low-Income Weatherization Assistance Program and the North Carolina Field Test Audit. The Field Test Audit will differ from North Carolina's current weatherization program in that it will incorporate new weatherization measures and techniques, a procedure for basing measure selection of the characteristics of the individual house and the cost-effectiveness of the measure, and also emphasize cooling energy savings. The field test will determine the differences of the two weatherization approaches from the viewpoints of energy savings, cost effectiveness, and implementation ease. This Experimental Plan details the steps in performing the field test. The field test will be a group effort by several participating organizations. Pre- and post-weatherization data will be collected over a two-year period (November 1989 through August 1991). The 120 houses included in the test will be divided into a control group and two treatment groups (one for each weatherization procedure) of 40 houses each. Weekly energy use data will be collected for each house representing whole-house electric, space heating and cooling, and water heating energy uses. Corresponding outdoor weather and house indoor temperature data will also be collected. The energy savings of each house will be determined using linear-regression based models. To account for variations between the pre- and post-weatherization periods, house energy savings will be normalized for differences in outdoor weather conditions and indoor temperatures. Differences between the average energy savings of treatment groups will be identified using an analysis of variance approach. Differences between energy savings will be quantified using multiple comparison techniques. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  20. Magnetic fields in ring galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, D.; Mikhailov, E.; Silchenko, O.; Sokoloff, D.; Horellou, C.; Beck, R.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Many galaxies contain magnetic fields supported by galactic dynamo action. The investigation of these magnetic fields can be helpful for understanding galactic evolution; however, nothing definitive is known about magnetic fields in ring galaxies. Aims: Here we investigate large-scale magnetic fields in a previously unexplored context, namely ring galaxies, and concentrate our efforts on the structures that appear most promising for galactic dynamo action, i.e. outer star-forming rings in visually unbarred galaxies. Methods: We use tested methods for modelling α-Ω galactic dynamos, taking into account the available observational information concerning ionized interstellar matter in ring galaxies. Results: Our main result is that dynamo drivers in ring galaxies are strong enough to excite large-scale magnetic fields in the ring galaxies studied. The variety of dynamo driven magnetic configurations in ring galaxies obtained in our modelling is much richer than that found in classical spiral galaxies. In particular, various long-lived transients are possible. An especially interesting case is that of NGC 4513, where the ring counter-rotates with respect to the disc. Strong shear in the region between the disc and the ring is associated with unusually strong dynamo drivers in such counter-rotators. The effect of the strong drivers is found to be unexpectedly moderate. With counter-rotation in the disc, a generic model shows that a steady mixed parity magnetic configuration that is unknown for classical spiral galaxies, may be excited, although we do not specifically model NGC 4513. Conclusions: We deduce that ring galaxies constitute a morphological class of galaxies in which identification of large-scale magnetic fields from observations of polarized radio emission, as well as dynamo modelling, may be possible. Such studies have the potential to throw additional light on the physical nature of rings, their lifetimes, and evolution.

  1. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1990-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of the broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  2. Oxide superconductors under magnetic field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitazawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    One of the current most serious problems for the oxide superconductors from the standpoint of practical application is the various novel features derived mainly from their extremely short coherence. In particular, the coherence length so far observed in the cuprate superconductors is in the range of 0.1 nm perpendicular to the CuO2 plane. This seems to be creating most of the difficulties in the device fabrication and in the performance under the magnetic field. Some of the superconducting properties under the magnetic field will be discussed in terms of the short coherence length. A model will be presented based on the gradual strengthening of the pinning force with decrease in temperature and the weak coupling at the grain boundaries. Secondly, the broadening of the superconducting transition under the magnetic field is discussed. This is observed significantly only when the field is applied perpendicular to the basal plane and the relative orientation of the current to the field is insignificant in determining the extent of broadening. Besides, the change in the strength of the pinning force does not affect the width of the broadening. From these observations discussions will be made on a model based on the giant fluctuation. Based on this model, it is predicted that the coherence length along the c-axis will be the single most important material parameter to determine the performance of the superconductor under a strong magnetic field. It seems that BYCO is superior in this regard to Bi- or Tl-systems as far as the performance at 77 K is considered, although another material with the coherence length slightly longer along the c-axis is still highly desired.

  3. Pulsed electric field increases reproduction.

    PubMed

    Panagopoulos, Dimitris J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To study the effect of pulsed electric field - applied in corona discharge photography - on Drosophila melanogaster reproduction, possible induction of DNA fragmentation, and morphological alterations in the gonads. Materials and methods Animals were exposed to different field intensities (100, 200, 300, and 400 kV/m) during the first 2-5 days of their adult lives, and the effect on reproductive capacity was assessed. DNA fragmentation during early- and mid-oogenesis was investigated by application of the TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotide transferase dUTP Nick End Labeling) assay. Sections of follicles after fixation and embedding in resins were observed for possible morphological/developmental abnormalities. Results The field increased reproduction by up to 30% by increasing reproductive capacity in both sexes. The effect increased with increasing field intensities. The rate of increase diminished at the strongest intensities. Slight induction of DNA fragmentation was observed exclusively in the nurse (predominantly) and follicle cells, and exclusively at the two most sensitive developmental stages, i.e., germarium and predominantly stage 7-8. Sections of follicles from exposed females at stages of early and mid-oogennesis other than germarium and stages 7-8 did not reveal abnormalities. Conclusions (1) The specific type of electric field may represent a mild stress factor, inducing DNA fragmentation and cell death in a small percentage of gametes, triggering the reaction of the animal's reproductive system to increase the rate of gametogenesis in order to compensate the loss of a small number of gametes. (2) The nurse cells are the most sensitive from all three types of egg chamber cells. (3) The mid-oogenesis checkpoint (stage 7-8) is more sensitive to this field than the early oogenesis one (germarium) in contrast to microwave exposure. (4) Possible therapeutic applications, or applications in increasing fertility, should be investigated. PMID:26651869

  4. Sensitivity to volcanic field boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Melody; Bebbington, Mark; Cronin, Shane; Lindsay, Jan; Rashad Moufti, Mohammed

    2016-04-01

    Volcanic hazard analyses are desirable where there is potential for future volcanic activity to affect a proximal population. This is frequently the case for volcanic fields (regions of distributed volcanism) where low eruption rates, fertile soil, and attractive landscapes draw populations to live close by. Forecasting future activity in volcanic fields almost invariably uses spatial or spatio-temporal point processes with model selection and development based on exploratory analyses of previous eruption data. For identifiability reasons, spatio-temporal processes, and practically also spatial processes, the definition of a spatial region is required to which volcanism is confined. However, due to the complex and predominantly unknown sub-surface processes driving volcanic eruptions, definition of a region based solely on geological information is currently impossible. Thus, the current approach is to fit a shape to the known previous eruption sites. The class of boundary shape is an unavoidable subjective decision taken by the forecaster that is often overlooked during subsequent analysis of results. This study shows the substantial effect that this choice may have on even the simplest exploratory methods for hazard forecasting, illustrated using four commonly used exploratory statistical methods and two very different regions: the Auckland Volcanic Field, New Zealand, and Harrat Rahat, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. For Harrat Rahat, sensitivity of results to boundary definition is substantial. For the Auckland Volcanic Field, the range of options resulted in similar shapes, nevertheless, some of the statistical tests still showed substantial variation in results. This work highlights the fact that when carrying out any hazard analysis on volcanic fields, it is vital to specify how the volcanic field boundary has been defined, assess the sensitivity of boundary choice, and to carry these assumptions and related uncertainties through to estimates of future activity and

  5. Introduction to Vector Field Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kao, David; Shen, Han-Wei

    2010-01-01

    Vector field visualization techniques are essential to help us understand the complex dynamics of flow fields. These can be found in a wide range of applications such as study of flows around an aircraft, the blood flow in our heart chambers, ocean circulation models, and severe weather predictions. The vector fields from these various applications can be visually depicted using a number of techniques such as particle traces and advecting textures. In this tutorial, we present several fundamental algorithms in flow visualization including particle integration, particle tracking in time-dependent flows, and seeding strategies. For flows near surfaces, a wide variety of synthetic texture-based algorithms have been developed to depict near-body flow features. The most common approach is based on the Line Integral Convolution (LIC) algorithm. There also exist extensions of LIC to support more flexible texture generations for 3D flow data. This tutorial reviews these algorithms. Tensor fields are found in several real-world applications and also require the aid of visualization to help users understand their data sets. Examples where one can find tensor fields include mechanics to see how material respond to external forces, civil engineering and geomechanics of roads and bridges, and the study of neural pathway via diffusion tensor imaging. This tutorial will provide an overview of the different tensor field visualization techniques, discuss basic tensor decompositions, and go into detail on glyph based methods, deformation based methods, and streamline based methods. Practical examples will be used when presenting the methods; and applications from some case studies will be used as part of the motivation.

  6. Variational methods for field theories

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Menahem, S.

    1986-09-01

    Four field theory models are studied: Periodic Quantum Electrodynamics (PQED) in (2 + 1) dimensions, free scalar field theory in (1 + 1) dimensions, the Quantum XY model in (1 + 1) dimensions, and the (1 + 1) dimensional Ising model in a transverse magnetic field. The last three parts deal exclusively with variational methods; the PQED part involves mainly the path-integral approach. The PQED calculation results in a better understanding of the connection between electric confinement through monopole screening, and confinement through tunneling between degenerate vacua. This includes a better quantitative agreement for the string tensions in the two approaches. Free field theory is used as a laboratory for a new variational blocking-truncation approximation, in which the high-frequency modes in a block are truncated to wave functions that depend on the slower background modes (Boron-Oppenheimer approximation). This ''adiabatic truncation'' method gives very accurate results for ground-state energy density and correlation functions. Various adiabatic schemes, with one variable kept per site and then two variables per site, are used. For the XY model, several trial wave functions for the ground state are explored, with an emphasis on the periodic Gaussian. A connection is established with the vortex Coulomb gas of the Euclidean path integral approach. The approximations used are taken from the realms of statistical mechanics (mean field approximation, transfer-matrix methods) and of quantum mechanics (iterative blocking schemes). In developing blocking schemes based on continuous variables, problems due to the periodicity of the model were solved. Our results exhibit an order-disorder phase transition. The transfer-matrix method is used to find a good (non-blocking) trial ground state for the Ising model in a transverse magnetic field in (1 + 1) dimensions.

  7. Inflating with large effective fields

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Cicoli, M.; Quevedo, F.; Williams, M. E-mail: mcicoli@ictp.it E-mail: mwilliams@perimeterinsititute.ca

    2014-11-01

    We re-examine large scalar fields within effective field theory, in particular focussing on the issues raised by their use in inflationary models (as suggested by BICEP2 to obtain primordial tensor modes). We argue that when the large-field and low-energy regimes coincide the scalar dynamics is most effectively described in terms of an asymptotic large-field expansion whose form can be dictated by approximate symmetries, which also help control the size of quantum corrections. We discuss several possible symmetries that can achieve this, including pseudo-Goldstone inflatons characterized by a coset G/H (based on abelian and non-abelian, compact and non-compact symmetries), as well as symmetries that are intrinsically higher dimensional. Besides the usual trigonometric potentials of Natural Inflation we also find in this way simple large-field power laws (like V ∝ φ{sup 2}) and exponential potentials, V(φ) = ∑{sub k}V{sub x}e{sup −kφ/M}. Both of these can describe the data well and give slow-roll inflation for large fields without the need for a precise balancing of terms in the potential. The exponential potentials achieve large r through the limit |η| || ε and so predict r ≅ (8/3)(1-n{sub s}); consequently n{sub s} ≅ 0.96 gives r ≅ 0.11 but not much larger (and so could be ruled out as measurements on r and n{sub s} improve). We examine the naturalness issues for these models and give simple examples where symmetries protect these forms, using both pseudo-Goldstone inflatons (with non-abelian non-compact shift symmetries following familiar techniques from chiral perturbation theory) and extra-dimensional models.

  8. Spontaneous Scalarization of Massive Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramazanoglu, Fethi M.; Pretorius, Frans

    2014-03-01

    Spontaneous scalarization is a phenomenon in certain scalar-tensor theories where large deviations from general relativity can be observed inside compact stars, while the known observational bounds can also be satisfied far away. This scenario has been investigated for massless scalars and binary neutron stars using numerical relativity, but the parameter space for such theories have been severely restricted by recent observations. Here, we present our results on the spontaneous scalarization of massive scalars. We simulate cases with different equations of state and scalar field parameters, and comment on the detectability of the scalar field effects from the gravitational wave signal.

  9. Indoor localization using magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathapati Subbu, Kalyan Sasidhar

    Indoor localization consists of locating oneself inside new buildings. GPS does not work indoors due to multipath reflection and signal blockage. WiFi based systems assume ubiquitous availability and infrastructure based systems require expensive installations, hence making indoor localization an open problem. This dissertation consists of solving the problem of indoor localization by thoroughly exploiting the indoor ambient magnetic fields comprising mainly of disturbances termed as anomalies in the Earth's magnetic field caused by pillars, doors and elevators in hallways which are ferromagnetic in nature. By observing uniqueness in magnetic signatures collected from different campus buildings, the work presents the identification of landmarks and guideposts from these signatures and further develops magnetic maps of buildings - all of which can be used to locate and navigate people indoors. To understand the reason behind these anomalies, first a comparison between the measured and model generated Earth's magnetic field is made, verifying the presence of a constant field without any disturbances. Then by modeling the magnetic field behavior of different pillars such as steel reinforced concrete, solid steel, and other structures like doors and elevators, the interaction of the Earth's field with the ferromagnetic fields is described thereby explaining the causes of the uniqueness in the signatures that comprise these disturbances. Next, by employing the dynamic time warping algorithm to account for time differences in signatures obtained from users walking at different speeds, an indoor localization application capable of classifying locations using the magnetic signatures is developed solely on the smart phone. The application required users to walk short distances of 3-6 m anywhere in hallway to be located with accuracies of 80-99%. The classification framework was further validated with over 90% accuracies using model generated magnetic signatures representing

  10. Are stealth scalar fields stable?

    SciTech Connect

    Faraoni, Valerio; Moreno, Andres F. Zambrano

    2010-06-15

    Nongravitating (stealth) scalar fields associated with Minkowski space in scalar-tensor gravity are examined. Analytical solutions for both nonminimally coupled scalar field theory and for Brans-Dicke gravity are studied and their stability with respect to tensor perturbations is assessed using a covariant and gauge-invariant formalism developed for alternative gravity. For Brans-Dicke solutions, the stability with respect to homogeneous perturbations is also studied. There are regions of parameter space corresponding to stability and other regions corresponding to instability.

  11. Interferometry with synthetic gauge fields

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brandon M.; Taylor, Jacob M.; Galitski, Victor M.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a compact atom interferometry scheme for measuring weak, time-dependent accelerations. Our proposal uses an ensemble of dilute trapped bosons with two internal states that couple to a synthetic gauge field with opposite charges. The trapped gauge field couples spin to momentum to allow time-dependent accelerations to be continuously imparted on the internal states. We generalize this system to reduce noise and estimate the sensitivity of such a system to be S{approx}10{sup -7}(m/s{sup 2}/{radical}(Hz)).

  12. Magnetic field of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popov, Aleksey

    2013-04-01

    The magnetic field of the Earth has global meaning for a life on the Earth. The world geophysical science explains: - occurrence of a magnetic field of the Earth it is transformation of kinetic energy of movements of the fused iron in the liquid core of Earth - into the magnetic energy; - the warming up of a kernel of the Earth occurs due to radioactive disintegration of elements, with excretion of thermal energy. The world science does not define the reasons: - drift of a magnetic dipole on 0,2 a year to the West; - drift of lithospheric slabs and continents. The author offers: an alternative variant existing in a world science the theories "Geodynamo" - it is the theory « the Magnetic field of the Earth », created on the basis of physical laws. Education of a magnetic field of the Earth occurs at moving the electric charge located in a liquid kernel, at rotation of the Earth. At calculation of a magnetic field is used law the Bio Savara for a ring electric current: dB = . Magnetic induction in a kernel of the Earth: B = 2,58 Gs. According to the law of electromagnetic induction the Faradey, rotation of a iron kernel of the Earth in magnetic field causes occurrence of an electric field Emf which moves electrons from the center of a kernel towards the mantle. So of arise the radial electric currents. The magnetic field amplifies the iron of mantle and a kernel of the Earth. As a result of action of a radial electric field the electrons will flow from the center of a kernel in a layer of an electric charge. The central part of a kernel represents the field with a positive electric charge, which creates inverse magnetic field Binv and Emfinv When ?mfinv = ?mf ; ?inv = B, there will be an inversion a magnetic field of the Earth. It is a fact: drift of a magnetic dipole of the Earth in the western direction approximately 0,2 longitude, into a year. Radial electric currents a actions with the basic magnetic field of a Earth - it turn a kernel. It coincides with laws

  13. Violinist: sophisticated pu field monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Umbarger, C.J.; Trujillo, F.; Wolf, M.A.

    1984-02-01

    A new, smart, portable multichannel analyzer based plutonium field monitor has been developed that will significantly improve field monitoring capability by accident response teams. Called the Violinist, the system uses the ever-popular thin NaI (Tl) detector developed some years ago. The electronics weigh 1.7 lb and fit inside a package 7''x5''x1-3/4'' deep. The device has: 256 channel MCA; microcomputer control; 32x84 dot matrix LCD alphanumeric and spectral display; three independent cursor sets for region of interest definition; keyboard-entered constants (3); computation algorithms; and internal battery power (15 hr lifetime). The package has wide radiation monitoring applications.

  14. Ecophysiological patterns in field crops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langensiepen, M.; Stadler, A.; Kupisch, M.; Ewert, F.

    2013-12-01

    Soils in agricultural fields are often characterized by different degrees of heterogeneities in physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Plants may respond distinctively to these patterns by adjusting ecophysiological processes and architectural growth at different organizational, spatial, and temporal, scales. The purpose of this research was to quantify the heterogeneity in physical soil conditions at a key research field of the Transregio 32 collaborative research center (www.tr32.de) near Jülich (50°52' N , 6° 27‧ E) and to characterize their effects on the magnitudes of photosynthesis, transpiration, and sap-flow rates at the leaf, point, and field scales. Such information is a necessary prerequisite for deciding which theoretical model representations should be taken for quantifying these processes and which routines are appropriate for scaling the chosen model types from point to field level and beyond. Outputs from the gas-exchange and sap-flow equipment were initially validated against independent eddy-covariance measurements of H2O and CO2 fluxes in a uniform wheat-field 10 km apart from the research site to ensure good data quality. The actual experiment was subsequently carried during two wheat growing years (2010/11 and 2011/12) at the actual field site in. Electromagnetic induction (EMI) and soil measurements were carried out to quantify heterogeneities in soil physical conditions which showed distinctive patterns. These patterns were reflected in observed spatial and temporal patterns of leaf area development and biomass growth which were carried out at bi-weekly intervals. Surprisingly, spatial patterns in soil heterogeneity did not significantly affect field patterns of stomatal conductance, leaf gas-exchange and sap-flow which reflects whole-plant transpiration, whereas canopy fluxes of H2O and CO2 were strongly distinct in different field locations. Morphological adaptations at the plant and canopy levels to soil heterogeneity were

  15. Stochastic kinetic mean field model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdélyi, Zoltán; Pasichnyy, Mykola; Bezpalchuk, Volodymyr; Tomán, János J.; Gajdics, Bence; Gusak, Andriy M.

    2016-07-01

    This paper introduces a new model for calculating the change in time of three-dimensional atomic configurations. The model is based on the kinetic mean field (KMF) approach, however we have transformed that model into a stochastic approach by introducing dynamic Langevin noise. The result is a stochastic kinetic mean field model (SKMF) which produces results similar to the lattice kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). SKMF is, however, far more cost-effective and easier to implement the algorithm (open source program code is provided on

  16. Dynamics of gauge field inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, Stephon; Jyoti, Dhrubo; Kosowsky, Arthur; Marcianò, Antonino

    2015-05-05

    We analyze the existence and stability of dynamical attractor solutions for cosmological inflation driven by the coupling between fermions and a gauge field. Assuming a spatially homogeneous and isotropic gauge field and fermion current, the interacting fermion equation of motion reduces to that of a free fermion up to a phase shift. Consistency of the model is ensured via the Stückelberg mechanism. We prove the existence of exactly one stable solution, and demonstrate the stability numerically. Inflation arises without fine tuning, and does not require postulating any effective potential or non-standard coupling.

  17. Entropic quantization of scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Ipek, Selman; Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-13

    Entropic Dynamics is an information-based framework that seeks to derive the laws of physics as an application of the methods of entropic inference. The dynamics is derived by maximizing an entropy subject to constraints that represent the physically relevant information that the motion is continuous and non-dissipative. Here we focus on the quantum theory of scalar fields. We provide an entropic derivation of Hamiltonian dynamics and using concepts from information geometry derive the standard quantum field theory in the Schrödinger representation.

  18. Introduction to Statistical Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brézin, Edouard

    2010-07-01

    1. A few well-known basic results; 2. Introduction: order parameters, broken symmetries; 3. Examples of physical situations modelled by the Ising model; 4. A few results about the Ising model; 5. High temperature and low temperature expansions; 6. Some geometric problems related to phase transitions; 7. Phenomenological description of the critical behaviour; 8. Mean field theory; 9. Beyond mean field theory; 10. Introduction to the renormalization group; 11. Renormalization group for the φ4 theory; 12. Renormalized theory; 13. Goldstone modes; 14. Large n; Index.

  19. Wide field of view telescope

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark R.; McGraw, John T.; Zimmer, Peter C.

    2008-01-15

    A wide field of view telescope having two concave and two convex reflective surfaces, each with an aspheric surface contour, has a flat focal plane array. Each of the primary, secondary, tertiary, and quaternary reflective surfaces are rotationally symmetric about the optical axis. The combination of the reflective surfaces results in a wide field of view in the range of approximately 3.8.degree. to approximately 6.5.degree.. The length of the telescope along the optical axis is approximately equal to or less than the diameter of the largest of the reflective surfaces.

  20. Entropic quantization of scalar fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ipek, Selman; Caticha, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Entropic Dynamics is an information-based framework that seeks to derive the laws of physics as an application of the methods of entropic inference. The dynamics is derived by maximizing an entropy subject to constraints that represent the physically relevant information that the motion is continuous and non-dissipative. Here we focus on the quantum theory of scalar fields. We provide an entropic derivation of Hamiltonian dynamics and using concepts from information geometry derive the standard quantum field theory in the Schrödinger representation.