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Sample records for alamethicin transmembrane channels

  1. Metal-Assisted Channel Stabilization: Disposition of a Single Histidine on the N-terminus of Alamethicin Yields Channels with Extraordinarily Long Lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Noshiro, Daisuke; Asami, Koji; Futaki, Shiroh

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Alamethicin, a member of the peptaibol family of antibiotics, is a typical channel-forming peptide with a helical structure. The self-assembly of the peptide in the membranes yields voltage-dependent channels. In this study, three alamethicin analogs possessing a charged residue (His, Lys, or Glu) on their N-termini were designed with the expectation of stabilizing the transmembrane structure. A slight elongation of channel lifetime was observed for the Lys and Glu analogs. On the other hand, extensive stabilization of certain channel open states was observed for the His analog. This stabilization was predominantly observed in the presence of metal ions such as Zn2+, suggesting that metal coordination with His facilitates the formation of a supramolecular assembly in the membranes. Channel stability was greatly diminished by acetylation of the N-terminal amino group, indicating that the N-terminal amino group also plays an important role in metal coordination. PMID:20441743

  2. Interaction of a Helical Peptide with Membrane: Study of Alamethicin.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yili

    Alamethicin is a transmembrane ion channel at low concentration, and a lytic agent of cell membrane at high concentration. It is a small size polypeptide (20 amino residues), and contains a large section of amphiphilic alpha-helix, which is an often-encountered secondary structure motif in membrane active peptides and proteins. Its membrane-active functions, typical secondary structure, and relatively small size made this peptide be an ideal model for studying the interaction of proteins with membranes. This thesis provides two novel methods to obtain structural information of such a peptide-lipid system. By the method of oriented circular dichroism (OCD), we are able to determine the orientation of the alamethicin with respect to the membrane bilayer. Depending on the alamethicin concentration and the water content in the membrane, alamethicin either perpendicularly inserts into the bilayer or binds parallel to the membrane surface. By the method of lamellar x-ray diffraction, we found the membrane bilayer thickness reduced by increasing concentration of alamethicin and decreasing relative humidity. From these two mutually complementary studies we constructed a consistent picture for the interaction between alamethicin and the membrane. When alamethicin concentration is low, the peptide molecules adsorb near the area of lipid head group, which effectively expands the average cross sectional area of the lipid molecules and makes the hydrocarbon chains more disordered, so that the lipid bilayer becomes thinner than pure lipid membrane. When alamethicin concentration reaches the critical point, where membrane structure becomes favorable for the insertion of alamethicin, alamethicin undergoes a transition from the surface state to the insertion state. The insertion of alamethicin would introduce much water into membrane, so the transition would happen only when relative humidity is high. Our alamethicin-lipid interaction model explains the spontaneous insertion of

  3. Influence of proline position upon the ion channel activity of alamethicin.

    PubMed Central

    Kaduk, C; Duclohier, H; Dathe, M; Wenschuh, H; Beyermann, M; Molle, G; Bienert, M

    1997-01-01

    Alamethicin, a 20-residue peptaibol, induces voltage-dependent ion channels in lipid bilayers according to the barrel-stave model. To study relationships between the proline-14-induced kink region and the channel-forming behavior of the peptide, a set of alamethicin analogs with proline incorporated at positions 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, and 17, respectively, as well as an analog with alanine instead of proline at position 14 were synthesized. Macroscopic conductance experiments show that the voltage dependence of the peptides is conserved although slightly influenced, but the apparent mean number of monomers forming the channels is significantly reduced when proline is not located at position 14. This is confirmed in single-channel experiments. The analogs with proline next to position 14 (i.e., 13, 15, 16) show stable conductance levels, but of reduced number, which follows the order Alam-P14 > Alam-P15 > Alam-P16 > Alam-P13. This reduction in the number of levels is connected with changes in the lifetime of the channels. Analogs with proline at position 11, 12, or 17 produce erratic, extremely short-lived current events that could not be resolved. The changes in functional properties are related to structural properties as probed by circular dichroism. The results indicate that proline at position 14 results in optimal channel activity, whereas channels formed by the analogs bearing proline at different positions are considerably less stable. PMID:9129817

  4. Lipid-alamethicin interactions influence alamethicin orientation.

    PubMed

    Huang, H W; Wu, Y

    1991-11-01

    Whereas the barrel-stave configuration is accepted by most investigators as a good description of the conducting state of alamethicin, there are conflicting interpretations on its nonconducting state; in the absence of an applied field, some found alamethicin molecules on the membrane surface, but others found them incorporated in the hydrophobic core of the membrane. This problem is resolved by the discovery of a phase-transitionlike behavior of alamethicin in the membrane. As a function of lipid/peptide ratio L/P and the chemical potential of water mu, alamethicin molecules were observed to switch between two states: in one, the majority of the peptide molecules bind parallel to the membrane surface; in another, the majority of the peptide molecules insert perpendicularly into the membrane. The state of alamethicin was monitored by the method of oriented circular dichroism (OCD; Wu, Y., H. W. Huang, and G. A. Olah, 1990, Biophys. J. 57:797-806) using aligned multilayer samples in the liquid crystalline L(alpha) phase. If L/P exceeds a critical value, most of the peptide molecules are on the membrane surface. If L/P is below the critical value, most of the peptide molecules are incorporated in the membrane when mu is high; when mu is low, most of them are again on the membrane surface. In a typical conduction experiment of voltage dependence, alamethicin molecules are in a partition equilibrium between the aqueous phase and the lipid phase before the application of voltage; in the lipid phase, the lipid/peptide ratio is such that most of alamethicin molecules are on the membrane surface. This is the nonconducting state of alamethicin. The OCD analysis showed that there is essentially no change in the secondary structure when alamethicin changes between the surface state and the inserted state. The voltage-gating mechanism can be explained if we assume that these surface peptide molecules probabilistically turn into the membrane core to form channels due to the

  5. Dynamics and aggregation of the peptide ion channel alamethicin. Measurements using spin-labeled peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Archer, S J; Ellena, J F; Cafiso, D S

    1991-01-01

    Two spin-labeled derivatives of the ion conductive peptide alamethicin were synthesized and used to examine its binding and state of aggregation. One derivative was spin labeled at the C-terminus and the other, a leucine analogue, was spin labeled at the N-terminus. In methanol, both the C and N terminal labeled peptides were monomeric. In aqueous solution, the C-terminal derivative was monomeric at low concentrations, but aggregated at higher concentrations with a critical concentration of 23 microM. In the membrane, the C-terminal label was localized to the membrane-aqueous interface using 13C-NMR, and could assume more than one orientation. The membrane binding of the C-terminal derivative was examined using EPR, and it exhibited a cooperativity seen previously for native alamethicin. However, this cooperativity was not the result of an aggregation of the peptide in the membrane. When the spectra of either the C or N-terminal labeled peptide were examined over a wide range of membrane lipid to peptide ratios, no evidence for aggregation could be found and the peptides remained monomeric under all conditions examined. Because electrical measurements on this peptide provide strong evidence for an ion-conductive aggregate, the ion-conductive form of alamethicin likely represents a minor fraction of the total membrane bound peptide. PMID:1717016

  6. Tubular Unimolecular Transmembrane Channels: Construction Strategy and Transport Activities.

    PubMed

    Si, Wen; Xin, Pengyang; Li, Zhan-Ting; Hou, Jun-Li

    2015-06-16

    Lipid bilayer membranes separate living cells from their environment. Membrane proteins are responsible for the processing of ion and molecular inputs and exports, sensing stimuli and signals across the bilayers, which may operate in a channel or carrier mechanism. Inspired by these wide-ranging functions of membrane proteins, chemists have made great efforts in constructing synthetic mimics in order to understand the transport mechanisms, create materials for separation, and develop therapeutic agents. Since the report of an alkylated cyclodextrin for transporting Cu(2+) and Co(2+) by Tabushi and co-workers in 1982, chemists have constructed a variety of artificial transmembrane channels by making use of either the multimolecular self-assembly or unimolecular strategy. In the context of the design of unimolecular channels, important advances have been made, including, among others, the tethering of natural gramicidin A or alamethicin and the modification of various macrocycles such as crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, and cucurbiturils. Many of these unimolecular channels exhibit high transport ability for metal ions, particularly K(+) and Na(+). Concerning the development of artificial channels based on macrocyclic frameworks, one straightforward and efficient approach is to introduce discrete chains to reinforce their capability to insert into bilayers. Currently, this approach has found the widest applications in the systems of crown ethers and calixarenes. We envisioned that for macrocycle-based unimolecular channels, control of the arrangement of the appended chains in the upward and/or downward direction would favor the insertion of the molecular systems into bilayers, while the introduction of additional interactions among the chains would further stabilize a tubular conformation. Both factors should be helpful for the formation of new efficient channels. In this Account, we discuss our efforts in designing new unimolecular artificial channels from

  7. Ion fluxes through nanopores and transmembrane channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordin, J. R.; Diehl, A.; Barbosa, M. C.; Levin, Y.

    2012-03-01

    We introduce an implicit solvent Molecular Dynamics approach for calculating ionic fluxes through narrow nanopores and transmembrane channels. The method relies on a dual-control-volume grand-canonical molecular dynamics (DCV-GCMD) simulation and the analytical solution for the electrostatic potential inside a cylindrical nanopore recently obtained by Levin [Europhys. Lett.EULEEJ0295-507510.1209/epl/i2006-10240-4 76, 163 (2006)]. The theory is used to calculate the ionic fluxes through an artificial transmembrane channel which mimics the antibacterial gramicidin A channel. Both current-voltage and current-concentration relations are calculated under various experimental conditions. We show that our results are comparable to the characteristics associated to the gramicidin A pore, especially the existence of two binding sites inside the pore and the observed saturation in the current-concentration profiles.

  8. The Origins of Transmembrane Ion Channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wilson, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Even though membrane proteins that mediate transport of ions and small molecules across cell walls are among the largest and least understood biopolymers in contemporary cells, it is still possible to shed light on their origins and early evolution. The central observation is that transmembrane portions of most ion channels are simply bundles of -helices. By combining results of experimental and computer simulation studies on synthetic models and natural channels, mostly of non-genomic origin, we show that the emergence of -helical channels was protobiologically plausible, and did not require highly specific amino acid sequences. Despite their simple structure, such channels could possess properties that, at the first sight, appear to require markedly larger complexity. Specifically, we explain how the antiamoebin channels, which are made of identical helices, 16 amino acids in length, achieve efficiency comparable to that of highly evolved channels. We further show that antiamoebin channels are extremely flexible, compared to modern, genetically coded channels. On the basis of our results, we propose that channels evolved further towards high structural complexity because they needed to acquire stable rigid structures and mechanisms for precise regulation rather than improve efficiency. In general, even though architectures of membrane proteins are not nearly as diverse as those of water-soluble proteins, they are sufficiently flexible to adapt readily to the functional demands arising during evolution.

  9. Single-molecular artificial transmembrane water channels.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Zhenxia; Tang, Gangfeng; Hou, Jun-Li; Li, Zhan-Ting

    2012-05-23

    Hydrazide-appended pillar[5]arene derivatives have been synthesized. X-ray crystal structure analysis and (1)H NMR studies revealed that the molecules adopt unique tubular conformations. Inserting the molecules into the lipid membranes of vesicles leads to the transport of water through the channels produced by single molecules, as supported by dynamic light scattering and cryo-SEM experiments. The channels exhibit the transport activity at a very low channel to lipid ratio (0.027 mol %), and a water permeability of 8.6 × 10(-10) cm s(-1) is realized. In addition, like natural water channel proteins, the artificial systems also block the transport of protons. PMID:22574988

  10. Asymmetric structure of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore suggested by mutagenesis of the twelfth transmembrane region.

    PubMed

    Gupta, J; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W; Linsdell, P

    2001-06-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel contains 12 membrane-spanning regions which are presumed to form the transmembrane pore. Although a number of findings have suggested that the sixth transmembrane region plays a key role in forming the pore and determining its functional properties, the role of other transmembrane regions is currently not well established. Here we assess the functional importance of the twelfth transmembrane region, which occupies a homologous position in the carboxy terminal half of the CFTR molecule to that of the sixth transmembrane region in the amino terminal half. Five residues in potentially important regions of the twelfth transmembrane region were mutated individually to alanines, and the function of the mutant channels was examined using patch clamp recording following expression in mammalian cell lines. Three of the five mutations significantly weakened block of unitary Cl(-) currents by SCN(-), implying a partial disruption of anion binding within the pore. Two of these mutations also caused a large reduction in the steady-state channel mean open probability, suggesting a role for the twelfth transmembrane region in channel gating. However, in direct contrast to analogous mutations in the sixth transmembrane region, all mutants studied here had negligible effects on the anion selectivity and unitary Cl(-) conductance of the channel. The relatively minor effects of these five mutations on channel permeation properties suggests that, despite their symmetrical positions within the CFTR protein, the sixth and twelfth transmembrane regions make highly asymmetric contributions to the functional properties of the pore. PMID:11380256

  11. Dependence of Alamethicin Membrane Orientation on the Solution Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei; Wu, Fu-Gen; Chen, Zhan

    2013-01-01

    Alamethicin has been extensively studied as an antimicrobial peptide and is widely used as a simple model for ion channel proteins. It has been shown that the antimicrobial activity of peptides is related to their membrane orientation. In this study, we determined the relationship between the solution concentration of alamethicin and its membrane orientation in lipid bilayers using sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. Our SFG results indicated that the alamethicin molecules more or less lay down on the surface of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) lipid bilayers at a low peptide concentration of 0.84 μM; the α-helix segment tilts at about 88°, and 310-helix segment tilts at about 58° versus the surface normal. However, when the peptide concentration was increased to 15.6 μM, we observed that alamethicin molecules further inserted into the lipid bilayers: the α-helical component changes its orientation to make a 37° tilt from the lipid bilayer normal, and the 310-helical component tilts at about 50° versus the surface normal. This is in agreement with the barrel-stave mode for the alamethicin–cell membrane interaction as reported previously. Additionally, we have also studied membrane orientation of alamethicin as a function of peptide concentration with SFG. Our results showed that the membrane orientation of the alamethicin α-helical component changed substantially with the increase of the alamethicin concentration, while the membrane orientation of the 310-helical component remained more or less the same. PMID:23565299

  12. Topology of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 protein.

    PubMed

    Labay, Valentina; Weichert, Rachel M; Makishima, Tomoko; Griffith, Andrew J

    2010-10-01

    Mutations of transmembrane channel-like gene 1 (TMC1) cause hearing loss in humans and mice. TMC1 is the founding member of a family of genes encoding proteins of unknown function that are predicted to contain multiple transmembrane domains. The goal of our study was to define the topology of mouse TMC1 expressed heterologously in tissue culture cells. TMC1 was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane of five tissue culture cell lines that we tested. We used anti-TMC1 and anti-HA antibodies to probe the topologic orientation of three native epitopes and seven HA epitope tags along full-length TMC1 after selective or complete permeabilization of transfected cells with digitonin or Triton X-100, respectively. TMC1 was present within the ER as an integral membrane protein containing six transmembrane domains and cytosolic N- and C-termini. There is a large cytoplasmic loop, between the fourth and fifth transmembrane domains, with two highly conserved hydrophobic regions that might associate with or penetrate, but do not span, the plasma membrane. Our study is the first to demonstrate that TMC1 is a transmembrane protein. The topologic organization revealed by this study shares some features with that of the shaker-TRP superfamily of ion channels. PMID:20672865

  13. Alamethicin adsorption to a planar lipid bilayer.

    PubMed Central

    Vodyanoy, I; Hall, J E; Vodyanoy, V

    1988-01-01

    The effect of alamethicin and its derivatives on the voltage-dependent capacitance of phosphatidylethanolamine (squalane) membranes was measured using two different methods: lock-in detection and voltage pulse. Alamethicin and its derivatives modulate the voltage-dependent capacitance at voltages lower than the voltage at which alamethicin-induced conductance is detected. The magnitude and sign of this alamethicin-induced capacitance change depends on the aqueous alamethicin concentration and the kind of alamethicin used. Our experimental data can be interpreted as a potential-dependent pseudocapacitance associated with adsorbed alamethicin. Pseudocapacitance is expressed as a function of alamethicin charge, its concentration in the bathing solution and the applied electric field. The theory describes the dependence of the capacitance on applied voltage and alamethicin concentration. When alamethicin is neutral the theory predicts no change of the voltage-dependent capacitance with either sign of applied voltage. Experimental data are consistent with the model in which alamethicin molecules interact with each other while being adsorbed to the membrane surface. The energy of this interaction depends on the alamethicin concentration. PMID:3390515

  14. Transmembrane allosteric coupling of the gates in a potassium channel

    PubMed Central

    Wylie, Benjamin J.; Bhate, Manasi P.; McDermott, Ann E.

    2014-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that transmembrane allostery is the basis for inactivation of the potassium channel KcsA: opening the intracellular gate is spontaneously followed by ion expulsion at the extracellular selectivity filter. This suggests a corollary: following ion expulsion at neutral pH, a spontaneous global conformation change of the transmembrane helices, similar to the motion involved in opening, is expected. Consequently, both the low potassium state and the low pH state of the system could provide useful models for the inactivated state. Unique NMR studies of full-length KcsA in hydrated bilayers provide strong evidence for such a mutual coupling across the bilayer: namely, upon removing ambient potassium ions, changes are seen in the NMR shifts of carboxylates E118 and E120 in the pH gate in the hinges of the inner transmembrane helix (98–103), and in the selectivity filter, all of which resemble changes seen upon acid-induced opening and inhibition and suggest that ion release can trigger channel helix opening. PMID:24344306

  15. Curcumin stimulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Randak, Christoph O; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Karp, Philip H; Vermeer, Daniel W; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-18

    Compounds that enhance either the function or biosynthetic processing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel may be of value in developing new treatments for cystic fibrosis (CF). Previous studies suggested that the herbal extract curcumin might affect the processing of a common CF mutant, CFTR-DeltaF508. Here, we tested the hypothesis that curcumin influences channel function. Curcumin increased CFTR channel activity in excised, inside-out membrane patches by reducing channel closed time and prolonging the time channels remained open. Stimulation was dose-dependent, reversible, and greater than that observed with genistein, another compound that stimulates CFTR. Curcumin-dependent stimulation required phosphorylated channels and the presence of ATP. We found that curcumin increased the activity of both wild-type and DeltaF508 channels. Adding curcumin also increased Cl(-) transport in differentiated non-CF airway epithelia but not in CF epithelia. These results suggest that curcumin may directly stimulate CFTR Cl(-) channels. PMID:15582996

  16. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  17. [Polymethoxylated flavonoids activate cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel].

    PubMed

    Cao, Huan-Huan; Fang, Fang; Yu, Bo; Luan, Jian; Jiang, Yu; Yang, Hong

    2015-04-25

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a cAMP-dependent chloride channel, plays key roles in fluid secretion in serous epithelial cells. Previously, we identified two polymethoxylated flavonoids, 3',4',5,5',6,7-hexamethoxyflavone (HMF) and 5-hydroxy-6,7,3',4'-tetramethoxyflavone (HTF) which could potentiate CFTR chloride channel activities. The present study was aimed to investigate the potentiation effects of HMF and HTF on CFTR Cl(-) channel activities by using a cell-based fluorescence assay and the short circuit Ussing chamber assay. The results of cell-based fluorescence assay showed that both HMF and HTF could dose-dependently potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities in rapid and reversible ways, and the activations could be reversed by the CFTR blocker CFTRinh-172. Notably, HMF showed the highest affinity (EC50 = 2 μmol/L) to CFTR protein among the flavonoid CFTR activators identified so far. The activation of CFTR by HMF or HTF was forskolin (FSK) dependent. Both compounds showed additive effect with FSK and 3-Isobutyl-1-methylx (IBMX) in the activation of CFTR, while had no additive effect with genistein (GEN). In ex vivo studies, HMF and HTF could stimulate transepithelial Cl(-) secretion in rat colonic mucosa and enhance fluid secretion in mouse trachea submucosal glands. These results suggest that HMF and HTF may potentiate CFTR Cl(-) channel activities through both elevation of cAMP level and binding to CFTR protein pathways. The results provide new clues in elucidating structure and activity relationship of flavonoid CFTR activators. HMF might be developed as a new drug in the therapy of CFTR-related diseases such as bronchiectasis and habitual constipation. PMID:25896054

  18. Alignment of transmembrane regions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; El Hiani, Yassine

    2011-01-01

    Different transmembrane (TM) α helices are known to line the pore of the cystic fibrosis TM conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel. However, the relative alignment of these TMs in the three-dimensional structure of the pore is not known. We have used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining first TM (TM1) of a cysteine-less variant of CFTR. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents irreversibly modify cysteines substituted for TM1 residues K95, Q98, P99, and L102 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. Residues closer to the intracellular end of TM1 (Y84–T94) were not apparently modified by MTS reagents, suggesting that this part of TM1 does not line the pore. None of the internal MTS reagent-reactive cysteines was modified by extracellular [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS. Only K95C, closest to the putative intracellular end of TM1, was apparently modified by intracellular [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS before channel activation. Comparison of these results with recent work on CFTR-TM6 suggests a relative alignment of these two important TMs along the axis of the pore. This alignment was tested experimentally by formation of disulfide bridges between pairs of cysteines introduced into these two TMs. Currents carried by the double mutants K95C/I344C and Q98C/I344C, but not by the corresponding single-site mutants, were inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline. This inhibition was irreversible on washing but could be reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between the introduced cysteine side chains. These results allow us to develop a model of the relative positions, functional contributions, and alignment of two important TMs lining the CFTR pore. Such functional information is necessary to understand and interpret the three-dimensional structure of the

  19. Alignment of transmembrane regions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-08-01

    Different transmembrane (TM) α helices are known to line the pore of the cystic fibrosis TM conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel. However, the relative alignment of these TMs in the three-dimensional structure of the pore is not known. We have used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining first TM (TM1) of a cysteine-less variant of CFTR. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents irreversibly modify cysteines substituted for TM1 residues K95, Q98, P99, and L102 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. Residues closer to the intracellular end of TM1 (Y84-T94) were not apparently modified by MTS reagents, suggesting that this part of TM1 does not line the pore. None of the internal MTS reagent-reactive cysteines was modified by extracellular [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS. Only K95C, closest to the putative intracellular end of TM1, was apparently modified by intracellular [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS before channel activation. Comparison of these results with recent work on CFTR-TM6 suggests a relative alignment of these two important TMs along the axis of the pore. This alignment was tested experimentally by formation of disulfide bridges between pairs of cysteines introduced into these two TMs. Currents carried by the double mutants K95C/I344C and Q98C/I344C, but not by the corresponding single-site mutants, were inhibited by the oxidizing agent copper(II)-o-phenanthroline. This inhibition was irreversible on washing but could be reversed by the reducing agent dithiothreitol, suggesting disulfide bond formation between the introduced cysteine side chains. These results allow us to develop a model of the relative positions, functional contributions, and alignment of two important TMs lining the CFTR pore. Such functional information is necessary to understand and interpret the three-dimensional structure of the pore

  20. Transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene regulates Drosophila larval locomotion.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmeng; Wang, Yuping; Zhang, Wei; Meltzer, Shan; Zanini, Damiano; Yu, Yue; Li, Jiefu; Cheng, Tong; Guo, Zhenhao; Wang, Qingxiu; Jacobs, Julie S; Sharma, Yashoda; Eberl, Daniel F; Göpfert, Martin C; Jan, Lily Yeh; Jan, Yuh Nung; Wang, Zuoren

    2016-06-28

    Drosophila larval locomotion, which entails rhythmic body contractions, is controlled by sensory feedback from proprioceptors. The molecular mechanisms mediating this feedback are little understood. By using genetic knock-in and immunostaining, we found that the Drosophila melanogaster transmembrane channel-like (tmc) gene is expressed in the larval class I and class II dendritic arborization (da) neurons and bipolar dendrite (bd) neurons, both of which are known to provide sensory feedback for larval locomotion. Larvae with knockdown or loss of tmc function displayed reduced crawling speeds, increased head cast frequencies, and enhanced backward locomotion. Expressing Drosophila TMC or mammalian TMC1 and/or TMC2 in the tmc-positive neurons rescued these mutant phenotypes. Bending of the larval body activated the tmc-positive neurons, and in tmc mutants this bending response was impaired. This implicates TMC's roles in Drosophila proprioception and the sensory control of larval locomotion. It also provides evidence for a functional conservation between Drosophila and mammalian TMCs. PMID:27298354

  1. Metal Bridges Illuminate Transmembrane Domain Movements during Gating of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd2+ bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd2+ bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd2+ bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd2+ bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd2+ bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  2. Metal bridges illuminate transmembrane domain movements during gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-10

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator are controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis by the cytoplasmic nucleotide-binding domains. Different conformational changes in the channel pore have been described during channel opening and closing; however, the relative importance of these changes to the process of gating the pore is not known. We have used patch clamp recording to identify high affinity Cd(2+) bridges formed between pairs of pore-lining cysteine residues introduced into different transmembrane α-helices (TMs). Seven Cd(2+) bridges were identified forming between cysteines in TMs 6 and 12. Interestingly, each of these Cd(2+) bridges apparently formed only in closed channels, and their formation stabilized the closed state. In contrast, a single Cd(2+) bridge identified between cysteines in TMs 1 and 12 stabilized the channel open state. Analysis of the pattern of Cd(2+) bridge formation in different channel states suggests that lateral separation and convergence of different TMs, rather than relative rotation or translation of different TMs, is the key conformational change that causes the channel pore to open and close. PMID:25143385

  3. Relative movements of transmembrane regions at the outer mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel pore during channel gating.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-09-14

    Multiple transmembrane (TM) segments line the pore of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel; however, the relative alignment of these TMs and their relative movements during channel gating are unknown. To gain three-dimensional structural information on the outer pore, we have used patch clamp recording to study the proximity of pairs of cysteine side chains introduced into TMs 6 and 11, using both disulfide cross-linking and Cd(2+) coordination. Following channel activation, disulfide bonds could apparently be formed between three cysteine pairs (of 15 studied): R334C/T1122C, R334C/G1127C, and T338C/S1118C. To examine the state dependence of cross-linking, we combined these cysteine mutations with a nucleotide-binding domain mutation (E1371Q) that stabilizes the channel open state. Investigation of the effects of the E1371Q mutation on disulfide bond formation and Cd(2+) coordination suggests that although R334C/T1122C and T338C/S1118C are closer together in the channel open state, R334C/G1127C are close together and can form disulfide bonds only when the channel is closed. These results provide important new information on the three-dimensional structure of the outer mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel pore: TMs 6 and 11 are close enough together to form disulfide bonds in both open and closed channels. Moreover, the altered relative locations of residues in open and in closed channels that we infer allow us to propose that channel opening and closing may be associated with a relative translational movement of TMs 6 and 11, with TM6 moving "down" (toward the cytoplasm) during channel opening. PMID:22843683

  4. Relative Movements of Transmembrane Regions at the Outer Mouth of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Channel Pore during Channel Gating*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Multiple transmembrane (TM) segments line the pore of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel; however, the relative alignment of these TMs and their relative movements during channel gating are unknown. To gain three-dimensional structural information on the outer pore, we have used patch clamp recording to study the proximity of pairs of cysteine side chains introduced into TMs 6 and 11, using both disulfide cross-linking and Cd2+ coordination. Following channel activation, disulfide bonds could apparently be formed between three cysteine pairs (of 15 studied): R334C/T1122C, R334C/G1127C, and T338C/S1118C. To examine the state dependence of cross-linking, we combined these cysteine mutations with a nucleotide-binding domain mutation (E1371Q) that stabilizes the channel open state. Investigation of the effects of the E1371Q mutation on disulfide bond formation and Cd2+ coordination suggests that although R334C/T1122C and T338C/S1118C are closer together in the channel open state, R334C/G1127C are close together and can form disulfide bonds only when the channel is closed. These results provide important new information on the three-dimensional structure of the outer mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel pore: TMs 6 and 11 are close enough together to form disulfide bonds in both open and closed channels. Moreover, the altered relative locations of residues in open and in closed channels that we infer allow us to propose that channel opening and closing may be associated with a relative translational movement of TMs 6 and 11, with TM6 moving “down” (toward the cytoplasm) during channel opening. PMID:22843683

  5. Biomimetic Transmembrane Channels with High Stability and Transporting Efficiency from Helically Folded Macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Lang, Chao; Li, Wenfang; Dong, Zeyuan; Zhang, Xin; Yang, Feihu; Yang, Bing; Deng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Chenyang; Xu, Jiayun; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-08-01

    Membrane channels span the cellular lipid bilayers to transport ions and molecules into cells with sophisticated properties including high efficiency and selectivity. It is of particular biological importance in developing biomimetic transmembrane channels with unique functions by means of chemically synthetic strategies. An artificial unimolecular transmembrane channel using pore-containing helical macromolecules is reported. The self-folding, shape-persistent, pore-containing helical macromolecules are able to span the lipid bilayer, and thus result in extraordinary channel stability and high transporting efficiency for protons and cations. The lifetime of this artificial unimolecular channel in the lipid bilayer membrane is impressively long, rivaling those of natural protein channels. Natural channel mimics designed by helically folded polymeric scaffolds will display robust and versatile transport-related properties at single-molecule level. PMID:27356157

  6. Tolbutamide causes open channel blockade of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels.

    PubMed Central

    Venglarik, C J; Schultz, B D; DeRoos, A D; Singh, A K; Bridges, R J

    1996-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an epithelial Cl- channel that is regulated by protein kinase A and cytosolic nucleotides. Previously, Sheppard and Welsh reported that the sulfonylureas glibenclamide and tolbutamide reduced CFTR whole cell currents. The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of tolbutamide on CFTR gating in excised membrane patches containing multiple channels. We chose tolbutamide because weak (i.e., fast-type) open channel blockers introduce brief events into multichannel recordings that can be readily quantified by current fluctuation analysis. Inspection of current records revealed that the addition of tolbutamide reduced the apparent single-channel current amplitude and increased the open-channel noise, as expected for a fast-type open channel blocker. The apparent decrease in unitary current amplitude provides a measure of open probability within a burst (P0 Burst), and the resulting concentration-response relationship was described by a simple Michaelis-Menten inhibition function. The concentration of tolbutamide causing a 50% reduction of Po Burst (540 +/- 20 microM) was similar to the concentration producing a 50% inhibition of short-circuit current across T84 colonic epithelial cell monolayers (400 +/- 20 microM). Changes in CFTR gating were then quantified by analyzing current fluctuations. Tolbutamide caused a high-frequency Lorentzian (corner frequency, fc > 300 Hz) to appear in the power density spectrum. The fc of this Lorentzian component increased as a linear function of tolbutamide concentration, as expected for a pseudo-first-order open-blocked mechanism and yielded estimates of the on rate (koff = 2.8 +/- 0.3 microM-1 s-1), the off rate (kon = 1210 +/- 225 s-1), and the dissociation constant (KD = 430 +/- 80 microM). Based on these observations, we propose that there is a bimolecular interaction between tolbutamide and CFTR, causing open channel blockade. PMID:8744307

  7. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  8. Transmembrane dynamics of the Thr-5 phosphorylated sarcolipin pentameric channel.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yipeng; Wu, Xue; Wang, Xinyu; Sun, Haiying; Lee, Imshik

    2016-08-15

    Sarcolipin (SLN), an important membrane protein expressed in the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR), regulates muscle contractions in cardiac and skeletal muscle. The phosphorylation at amino acid Thr5 of the SLN protein modulates the amount of Ca(2+) that passes through the SR. Using molecular dynamics simulation, we evaluated the phosphorylation at Thr5 of pentameric SLN (phospho-SLN) channel's energy barrier and pore characteristics by calculating the potential of mean force (PMF) along the channel pore and determining the diffusion coefficient. The results indicate that pentameric phospho-SLN promotes penetration of monovalent and divalent ions through the channel. The analysis of PMF, pore radius and diffusion coefficient indicates that Leu21 is the hydrophobic gate of the pentameric SLN channel. In the channel, water molecules near the Leu21 pore demonstrated a clear hydrated-dehydrated transition; however, the mutation of Leu21 to an Alanine (L21A) destroyed the hydrated-dehydrated transitions. These water-dynamic behaviors and PMF confirm that Leu21 is the key residue that regulates the ion permeability of the pentameric SLN channel. These results provide the structural-basis insights and molecular-dynamic information that are needed to understand the regulatory mechanisms of ion permeability in the pentameric SLN channel. PMID:27378083

  9. Bis-triazolyl diguanosine derivatives as synthetic transmembrane ion channels.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Y Pavan; Das, Rabindra Nath; Schütte, Ole Mathis; Steinem, Claudia; Dash, Jyotirmayee

    2016-06-01

    In nature, ion channels facilitate the transport of ions across biological membranes. The development of artificial ion channels that can mimic the fundamental functions of the natural ones would be of great importance to biological research. Artificial ion channels based on nucleoside derivatives are expected to be biocompatible with functions that can be controlled by the presence or absence of biologically relevant molecules. This protocol describes the detailed procedures for the synthesis and ion-channel activity of four diguanosine derivatives, each made up of two guanosine moieties separated by a covalent linker (e.g., PEG). The procedure describes the preparation of guanosine azide and guanosine alkine building blocks, as well as the preparation of four distinct synthetic linkers each containing either two alkynes or two azides. The diguanosine derivatives are synthesized using a 'one-pot' modular synthetic approach based on Cu(I)-catalyzed azide and alkyne cycloaddition. The ion-channel activity of these diguanosine derivatives for the transportation of ions across a phospholipid bilayer is investigated using voltage-clamp experiment. By using the PEG-containing diguanosine as an example, we describe how to determine the ion-channel activity in the presence of different metal ions (e.g., Na(+), K(+) and Cs(+)) and the inhibition of the ion-channel activity using the nucleobase cytosine. The approximate time frame for the synthesis of the PEG dinucleoside is 3 d, and that for the experiments to evaluate its ability to transport K(+) ion across a phospholipid bilayer is ∼8-10 h. PMID:27149327

  10. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Huyen, V. T. N.; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V. Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  11. Self-Optimized Biological Channels in Facilitating the Transmembrane Movement of Charged Molecules.

    PubMed

    Huyen, V T N; Ho, Le Bin; Lap, Vu Cong; Nguyen, V Lien

    2016-01-01

    We consider an anisotropically two-dimensional diffusion of a charged molecule (particle) through a large biological channel under an external voltage. The channel is modeled as a cylinder of three structure parameters: radius, length, and surface density of negative charges located at the channel interior-lining. These charges induce inside the channel a potential that plays a key role in controlling the particle current through the channel. It was shown that to facilitate the transmembrane particle movement the channel should be reasonably self-optimized so that its potential coincides with the resonant one, resulting in a large particle current across the channel. Observed facilitation appears to be an intrinsic property of biological channels, regardless of the external voltage or the particle concentration gradient. This facilitation is very selective in the sense that a channel of definite structure parameters can facilitate the transmembrane movement of only particles of proper valence at corresponding temperatures. Calculations also show that the modeled channel is nonohmic with the ion conductance which exhibits a resonance at the same channel potential as that identified in the current. PMID:27022394

  12. Structure and dynamics of one-dimensional ionic solutions in biological transmembrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Skerra, A; Brickmann, J

    1987-01-01

    The structure and dynamics of solvated alkali metal cations in transmembrane channels are treated using the molecular dynamics simulation technique. The simulations are based on a modified Fischer-Brickmann model (Fischer, W., and J. Brickmann, 1983, Biophys. Chem., 18:323-337) for gramicidin A-type channels. The trajectories of all particles in the channel as well as two-dimensional pair correlation functions are analyzed. It is found from the analysis of the stationary simulation state that one-dimensional solvation complexes are formed and that the number of water molecules in the channel varies for different alkali metal cations. PMID:2440485

  13. The pore architecture of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel revealed by co-mutation in pore-forming transmembrane regions.

    PubMed

    Qian, F; Liu, L; Liu, Z; Lu, C

    2016-07-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel contains 12 transmembrane (TM) regions that are presumed to form the channel pore. However, there is no direct evidence clearly illustrating the involvement of these transmembrane regions in the actual CFTR pore structure. To obtain insight into the architecture of the CFTR channel pore, we used patch clamp recording techniques and a strategy of co-mutagenesis of two potential pore-forming transmembrane regions (TM1 and TM6) to investigate the collaboration of these two TM regions. We performed a range of specific functional assays comparing the single channel conductance, anion binding, and anion selectivity properties of the co-mutated CFTR variants, and the results indicated that TM1 and TM6 play vital roles in forming the channel pore and, thus, determine the functional properties of the channel. Furthermore, we provided functional evidence that the amino acid threonine (T338) in TM6 has synergic effects with lysine (K95) in TM1. Therefore, we propose that these two residues have functional collaboration in the CFTR channel pore and may collectively form a selective filter. PMID:27070741

  14. Mechanism of alamethicin insertion into lipid bilayers.

    PubMed Central

    He, K; Ludtke, S J; Heller, W T; Huang, H W

    1996-01-01

    Alamethicin adsorbs on the membrane surface at low peptide concentrations. However, above a critical peptide-to-lipid ratio (P/L), a fraction of the peptide molecules insert in the membrane. This critical ratio is lipid dependent. For diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine it is about 1/40. At even higher concentrations P/L > or = 1/15, all of the alamethicin inserts into the membrane and forms well-defined pores as detected by neutron in-plane scattering. A previous x-ray diffraction measurement showed that alamethicin adsorbed on the surface has the effect of thinning the bilayer in proportion to the peptide concentration. A theoretical study showed that the energy cost of membrane thinning can indeed lead to peptide insertion. This paper extends the previous studies to the high-concentration region P/L > 1/40. X-ray diffraction shows that the bilayer thickness increases with the peptide concentration for P/L > 1/23 as the insertion approaches 100%. The thickness change with the percentage of insertion is consistent with the assumption that the hydrocarbon region of the bilayer matches the hydrophobic region of the inserted peptide. The elastic energy of a lipid bilayer including both adsorption and insertion of peptide is discussed. The Gibbs free energy is calculated as a function of P/L and the percentage of insertion phi in a simplified one-dimensional model. The model exhibits an insertion phase transition in qualitative agreement with the data. We conclude that the membrane deformation energy is the major driving force for the alamethicin insertion transition. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:8913604

  15. Direct comparison of the functional roles played by different transmembrane regions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ning; Muise, Chantal N; Gong, Xiandi; Linsdell, Paul

    2004-12-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel contains 12 transmembrane (TM) regions that are presumed to form the channel pore. However, little is known about the relative functional contribution of different TM regions to the pore. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the functional consequences of point mutations throughout the six transmembrane regions in the N-terminal part of the CFTR protein (TM1-TM6). A range of specific functional assays compared the single channel conductance, anion binding, and anion selectivity properties of different channel variants. Overall, our results suggest that TM1 and -6 play dominant roles in forming the channel pore and determining its functional properties, with TM5 perhaps playing a lesser role. In contrast, TM2, -3, and -4 appear to play only minor supporting roles. These results define transmembrane regions 1 and 6 as major contributors to the CFTR channel pore and have strong implications for emerging structural models of CFTR and related ATP-binding cassette proteins. PMID:15504721

  16. Transmembrane Passage of Hydrophobic Compounds Through a Protein Channel Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Hearn, E.; Patel, D; Lepore, D; Indic, M; van den Berg, B

    2009-01-01

    Membrane proteins that transport hydrophobic compounds have important roles in multi-drug resistance and can cause a number of diseases, underscoring the importance of protein-mediated transport of hydrophobic compounds. Hydrophobic compounds readily partition into regular membrane lipid bilayers, and their transport through an aqueous protein channel is energetically unfavourable3. Alternative transport models involving acquisition from the lipid bilayer by lateral diffusion have been proposed for hydrophobic substrates. So far, all transport proteins for which a lateral diffusion mechanism has been proposed function as efflux pumps. Here we present the first example of a lateral diffusion mechanism for the uptake of hydrophobic substrates by the Escherichia coli outer membrane long-chain fatty acid transporter FadL. A FadL mutant in which a lateral opening in the barrel wall is constricted, but which is otherwise structurally identical to wild-type FadL, does not transport substrates. A crystal structure of FadL from Pseudomonas aeruginosa shows that the opening in the wall of the {beta}-barrel is conserved and delineates a long, hydrophobic tunnel that could mediate substrate passage from the extracellular environment, through the polar lipopolysaccharide layer and, by means of the lateral opening in the barrel wall, into the lipid bilayer from where the substrate can diffuse into the periplasm. Because FadL homologues are found in pathogenic and biodegrading bacteria, our results have implications for combating bacterial infections and bioremediating xenobiotics in the environment.

  17. Engineering a Transmembrane Nanopore Ion Channel from a Membrane Breaker Peptide.

    PubMed

    Lella, Muralikrishna; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-07-01

    Re-engineering nature's molecules is an ideal strategy to obtain explicit functionality such as synthetic molecular machines, yet novel strategies for producing engineered molecular channels are few. Here we report a peptide engineering strategy through sequence reversal, which we applied on the first transmembrane peptide of the mycobacteriophage membranoporin protein holin. We have successfully redesigned the membrane rupture property of this peptide to form specific nanopore ion channels. We report the structural characterization and electrophysiology measurements of a library of 28-residue engineered membrane peptides, with remarkable ion channel behavior. We further identify that key residues at the peptide terminus, the central proline, charge distribution, and hydropathy index of the peptide together contribute to the channel properties that we measure. Our sequence reversal strategy for peptide engineering to successfully obtain nanopore channels can pave the way for better biobased design of controlled nanopores, using only natural amino acids. PMID:27257735

  18. State-dependent access of anions to the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2008-03-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is gated by intracellular factors; however, conformational changes in the channel pore associated with channel activation have not been identified. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the state-dependent accessibility of substituted cysteine residues in the CFTR channel pore to a range of cysteine-reactive reagents applied to the extracellular side of the membrane. Using functional modification of the channel current-voltage relationship as a marker of modification, we find that several positively charged reagents are able to penetrate deeply into the pore from the outside irrespective of whether or not the channels have been activated. In contrast, access of three anionic cysteine-reactive reagents, the methanesulfonate sodium (2-sulfonatoethyl)methanesulfonate, the organic mercurial p-chloromercuriphenylsulfonic acid, and the permeant anion Au(CN)(2)(-), to several different sites in the pore is strictly limited prior to channel activation. This suggests that in nonactivated channels some ion selectivity mechanism exists to exclude anions yet permit cations into the channel pore from the extracellular solution. We suggest that activation of CFTR channels involves a conformational change in the pore that removes a strong selectivity against anion entry from the extracellular solution. We propose further that this conformational change occurs in advance of channel opening, suggesting that multiple distinct closed pore conformations exist. PMID:18167343

  19. Transmembrane helix straightening and buckling underlies activation of mechanosensitive and thermosensitive K(2P) channels.

    PubMed

    Lolicato, Marco; Riegelhaupt, Paul M; Arrigoni, Cristina; Clark, Kimberly A; Minor, Daniel L

    2014-12-17

    Mechanical and thermal activation of ion channels is central to touch, thermosensation, and pain. The TRAAK/TREK K(2P) potassium channel subfamily produces background currents that alter neuronal excitability in response to pressure, temperature, signaling lipids, and anesthetics. How such diverse stimuli control channel function is unclear. Here we report structures of K(2P)4.1 (TRAAK) bearing C-type gate-activating mutations that reveal a tilting and straightening of the M4 inner transmembrane helix and a buckling of the M2 transmembrane helix. These conformational changes move M4 in a direction opposite to that in classical potassium channel activation mechanisms and open a passage lateral to the pore that faces the lipid bilayer inner leaflet. Together, our findings uncover a unique aspect of K(2P) modulation, indicate a means for how the K(2P) C-terminal cytoplasmic domain affects the C-type gate which lies ∼40Å away, and suggest how lipids and bilayer inner leaflet deformations may gate the channel. PMID:25500157

  20. Transmembrane proteoglycans control stretch-activated channels to set cytosolic calcium levels

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Sandeep; Søgaard, Pernille; Multhaupt, Hinke A.B.; Pataki, Csilla; Okina, Elena; Xian, Xiaojie; Pedersen, Mikael E.; Stevens, Troy; Griesbeck, Oliver; Park, Pyong Woo; Pocock, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Transmembrane heparan sulfate proteoglycans regulate multiple aspects of cell behavior, but the molecular basis of their signaling is unresolved. The major family of transmembrane proteoglycans is the syndecans, present in virtually all nucleated cells, but with mostly unknown functions. Here, we show that syndecans regulate transient receptor potential canonical (TRPCs) channels to control cytosolic calcium equilibria and consequent cell behavior. In fibroblasts, ligand interactions with heparan sulfate of syndecan-4 recruit cytoplasmic protein kinase C to target serine714 of TRPC7 with subsequent control of the cytoskeleton and the myofibroblast phenotype. In epidermal keratinocytes a syndecan–TRPC4 complex controls adhesion, adherens junction composition, and early differentiation in vivo and in vitro. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the TRPC orthologues TRP-1 and -2 genetically complement the loss of syndecan by suppressing neuronal guidance and locomotory defects related to increases in neuronal calcium levels. The widespread and conserved syndecan–TRPC axis therefore fine tunes cytoskeletal organization and cell behavior. PMID:26391658

  1. Molecular determinants of anion selectivity in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, P; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W

    2000-01-01

    Ionic selectivity in many cation channels is achieved over a short region of the pore known as the selectivity filter, the molecular determinants of which have been identified in Ca(2+), Na(+), and K(+) channels. However, a filter controlling selectivity among different anions has not previously been identified in any Cl(-) channel. In fact, because Cl(-) channels are only weakly selective among small anions, and because their selectivity has proved so resistant to site-directed mutagenesis, the very existence of a discrete anion selectivity filter has been called into question. Here we show that mutation of a putative pore-lining phenylalanine residue, F337, in the sixth membrane-spanning region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, dramatically alters the relative permeabilities of different anions in the channel. Specifically, mutations that reduce the size of the amino acid side chain present at this position virtually abolish the relationship between anion permeability and hydration energy, a relationship that characterizes the anion selectivity not only of wild-type CFTR, but of most classes of Cl(-) channels. These results suggest that the pore of CFTR may indeed contain a specialized region, analogous to the selectivity filter of cation channels, at which discrimination between different permeant anions takes place. Because F337 is adjacent to another amino acid residue, T338, which also affects anion selectivity in CFTR, we suggest that selectivity is predominantly determined over a physically discrete region of the pore located near these important residues. PMID:10827976

  2. Molecular determinants of anion selectivity in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Evagelidis, A; Hanrahan, J W

    2000-06-01

    Ionic selectivity in many cation channels is achieved over a short region of the pore known as the selectivity filter, the molecular determinants of which have been identified in Ca(2+), Na(+), and K(+) channels. However, a filter controlling selectivity among different anions has not previously been identified in any Cl(-) channel. In fact, because Cl(-) channels are only weakly selective among small anions, and because their selectivity has proved so resistant to site-directed mutagenesis, the very existence of a discrete anion selectivity filter has been called into question. Here we show that mutation of a putative pore-lining phenylalanine residue, F337, in the sixth membrane-spanning region of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel, dramatically alters the relative permeabilities of different anions in the channel. Specifically, mutations that reduce the size of the amino acid side chain present at this position virtually abolish the relationship between anion permeability and hydration energy, a relationship that characterizes the anion selectivity not only of wild-type CFTR, but of most classes of Cl(-) channels. These results suggest that the pore of CFTR may indeed contain a specialized region, analogous to the selectivity filter of cation channels, at which discrimination between different permeant anions takes place. Because F337 is adjacent to another amino acid residue, T338, which also affects anion selectivity in CFTR, we suggest that selectivity is predominantly determined over a physically discrete region of the pore located near these important residues. PMID:10827976

  3. The protein kinase A-regulated cardiac Cl- channel resembles the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Nagel, G; Hwang, T C; Nastiuk, K L; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1992-11-01

    Stimulation of beta-adrenoceptors in cardiac ventricular myocytes activates a strong chloride ion conductance as a result of phosphorylation by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). This Cl- conductance, which is time- and voltage-independent, counters the tendency of the simultaneously enhanced Ca2+ channel current to prolong the ventricular action potential. Using inside-out giant patches excised from guinea-pig myocytes, we show here that phosphorylation by the PKA catalytic subunit plus Mg-ATP elicits discrete Cl- channel currents. In almost symmetrical Cl- solutions (approximately 150 mM), unitary current amplitude scales with membrane potential, and reverses sign near 0 mV, to yield a single channel conductance of approximately 12 pS. Opening of the phosphorylated channels requires hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphate, indicating that phosphorylation by PKA is necessary, but not sufficient, for channel activation. The properties of these PKA-regulated cardiac Cl- channels are very similar, if not identical, to those of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the epithelial cell Cl- channel whose regulation is defective in patients with cystic fibrosis. The full cardiological impact of these Cl- channels and of their possible malfunction in patients with cystic fibrosis remains to be determined. PMID:1279437

  4. Relative contribution of different transmembrane segments to the CFTR chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; El Hiani, Yassine; Rubaiy, Hussein N; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-03-01

    The membrane-spanning part of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel comprises 12 transmembrane (TM) α-helices, arranged in 2 symmetrical groups of 6. However, those TMs that line the channel pore are not completely defined. We used patch clamp recording to compare the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into different TMs. Several residues in TM11 were accessible to extracellular and/or intracellular cysteine reactive reagents; however, no reactive cysteines were identified in TMs 5 or 11. Two accessible residues in TM11 (T1115C and S1118C) were found to be more readily modified from the extracellular solution in closed channels, but more readily modified from the intracellular solution in open channels, as previously reported for T338C in TM6. However, the effects of mutagenesis at S1118 (TM11) on a range of pore functional properties were relatively minor compared to the large effects of mutagenesis at T338 (TM6). Our results suggest that the CFTR pore is lined by TM11 but not by TM5 or TM7. Comparison with previous works therefore suggests that the pore is lined by TMs 1, 6, 11, and 12, suggesting that the structure of the open channel pore is asymmetric in terms of the contributions of different TMs. Although TMs 6 and 11 appear to undergo similar conformational changes during channel opening and closing, the influence of these two TMs on the functional properties of the narrowest region of the pore is clearly unequal. PMID:23955087

  5. Transmembrane channel-like (TMC) genes are required for auditory and vestibular mechanosensation

    PubMed Central

    Kawashima, Yoshiyuki; Kurima, Kiyoto; Pan, Bifeng; Griffith, Andrew J.; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations of the transmembrane channel-like 1 (TMC1) gene can cause dominant and recessive forms of deafness in humans and mice. TMC1 is one of eight mammalian TMC genes of unknown function. The multi-pass transmembrane topologic structure of the proteins they encode suggests roles as a receptor, transporter, channel or pump. Tmc1 and the closely related Tmc2 gene are expressed in neurosensory hair cells of the auditory and vestibular end organs of the mouse inner ear. Recent studies have demonstrated that Tmc1 and Tmc2 are specifically required for mechanoelectrical transduction in hair cells. The exact role of these proteins in mechanoelectrical transduction is unknown. TMC1 and TMC2 are viable candidates for the mechanoelectrical transduction channel of hair cells, whose component molecules have eluded identification for over 30 years. We expect that studies of TMC proteins will yield insights into molecular components and mechanisms of mechanosensation in auditory and vestibular hair cells, as well as in other tissues and organs. PMID:25074487

  6. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR): CLOSED AND OPEN STATE CHANNEL MODELS.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D Peter

    2015-09-18

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of "rational" approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287-288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287-288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  7. The Gramicidin A Transmembrane Channel: A Proposed π(L,D) Helix

    PubMed Central

    Urry, D. W.

    1971-01-01

    A lipophilic, left-handed helical structure is proposed for gramicidin A in which the C-O bonds alternately point toward the amino and carboxyl ends; it is a hybrid of the 4.314 and 4.416 helices. The C-O groups pointing toward the carboxyl end form part of 16-membered hydrogen-bonded rings, whereas the C-O moieties pointing toward the amino end form 14-membered hydrogenbonded rings. The proposed structure is based on conformational analysis combined with requirements for the gramicidin A transmembrane channel. Two helices combine to form the channel. The alternating C-O directions allow hydrogen-bonded dimerization by the unique possibilities of head-to-head and tail-to-tail attachment. The formyl group at the amino end allows for a favorable head-to-head attachment with no loss of structural continuity. Unpublished studies. by M. C. Goodall on the lipid bilayer conductance of deformyl gramicidin A strongly argue for head-to-head attachment. Such hydrogen-bonded association is not possible with previously described helices, as the C-O groups all point in the same direction. In relation to possible π(L,D) helices in mammalian systems, it should be noted that glycines would fill the role of D residues. The conformation can undergo ion-induced relaxations, which provide approximate tetrahedral coordination for the ion, with facile shifting of coordinations. The ready exchange of coordinations provides the mechanism for movement of the ion along the channel. Conceivably, such transmembrane channels could have application as models for ion transport across biological membranes—an application which may be as great as, or greater than, that of carriers such as valinomycin and nonactin. Specifically, biogenic amines and drugs containing aromatic groups could control access to the channel by interactions with the two tryptophan residues at the ethanolamine end and with the negative region provided by the three oxygens. Images PMID:5276779

  8. Mechanism of chloride permeation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) functions as a Cl- channel important in transepithelial salt and water transport. While there is a paucity of direct structural information on CFTR, much has been learned about the molecular determinants of the CFTR Cl- channel pore region and the mechanism of Cl- permeation through the pore from indirect structure-function studies. The first and sixth transmembrane regions of the CFTR protein play major roles in forming the channel pore and determining its functional properties by interacting with permeating Cl- ions. Positively charged amino acid side-chains are involved in attracting negatively charged Cl- ions into the pore region, where they interact briefly with a number of discrete sites on the pore walls. The pore appears able to accommodate more than one Cl- ion at a time, and Cl- ions bound inside the pore are probably sensitive to one another's presence. Repulsive interactions between Cl- ions bound concurrently within the pore may be important in ensuring rapid movement of Cl- ions through the pore. Chloride ion binding sites also interact with larger anions that can occlude the pore and block Cl- permeation, thus inhibiting CFTR function. Other ions besides Cl- are capable of passing through the pore, and specific amino acid residues that may be important in allowing the channel to discriminate between different anions have been identified. This brief review summarizes these mechanistic insights and tries to incorporate them into a simple cartoon model depicting the interactions between the channel and Cl- ions that are important for ion translocation. PMID:16157656

  9. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels. PMID:25963832

  10. Conformational rearrangements in the transmembrane domain of CNGA1 channels revealed by single-molecule force spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maity, Sourav; Mazzolini, Monica; Arcangeletti, Manuel; Valbuena, Alejandro; Fabris, Paolo; Lazzarino, Marco; Torre, Vincent

    2015-05-01

    Cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channels are activated by binding of cyclic nucleotides. Although structural studies have identified the channel pore and selectivity filter, conformation changes associated with gating remain poorly understood. Here we combine single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) with mutagenesis, bioinformatics and electrophysiology to study conformational changes associated with gating. By expressing functional channels with SMFS fingerprints in Xenopus laevis oocytes, we were able to investigate gating of CNGA1 in a physiological-like membrane. Force spectra determined that the S4 transmembrane domain is mechanically coupled to S5 in the closed state, but S3 in the open state. We also show there are multiple pathways for the unfolding of the transmembrane domains, probably caused by a different degree of α-helix folding. This approach demonstrates that CNG transmembrane domains have dynamic structure and establishes SMFS as a tool for probing conformational change in ion channels.

  11. Biogenesis and transmembrane topology of the CHIP28 water channel at the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Skach, W R; Shi, L B; Calayag, M C; Frigeri, A; Lingappa, V R; Verkman, A S

    1994-05-01

    CHIP28 is a 28-kD hydrophobic integral membrane protein that functions as a water channel in erythrocytes and renal tubule epithelial cell membranes. We examined the transmembrane topology of CHIP28 in the ER by engineering a reporter of translocation (derived from bovine prolactin) into nine sequential sites in the CHIP28 coding region. The resulting chimeras were expressed in Xenopus oocytes, and the topology of the reporter with respect to the ER membrane was determined by protease sensitivity. We found that although hydropathy analysis predicted up to seven potential transmembrane regions, CHIP28 spanned the membrane only four times. Two putative transmembrane helices, residues 52-68 and 143-157, reside on the lumenal and cytosolic surfaces of the ER membrane, respectively. Topology derived from these chimeric proteins was supported by cell-free translation of five truncated CHIP28 cDNAs, by N-linked glycosylation at an engineered consensus site in native CHIP28 (residue His69), and by epitope tagging of the CHIP28 amino terminus. Defined protein chimeras were used to identify internal sequences that direct events of CHIP28 topogenesis. A signal sequence located within the first 52 residues initiated nascent chain translocation into the ER lumen. A stop transfer sequence located in the hydrophobic region from residues 90-120 terminated ongoing translocation. A second internal signal sequence, residues 155-186, reinitiated translocation of a COOH-terminal domain (residues 186-210) into the ER lumen. Integration of the nascent chain into the ER membrane occurred after synthesis of 107 residues and required the presence of two membrane-spanning regions. From this data, we propose a structural model for CHIP28 at the ER membrane in which four membrane-spanning alpha-helices form a central aqueous channel through the lipid bilayer and create a pathway for water transport. PMID:7514605

  12. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel blockers: Pharmacological, biophysical and physiological relevance

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel causes cystic fibrosis, while inappropriate activity of this channel occurs in secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease. Drugs that interact directly with CFTR are therefore of interest in the treatment of a number of disease states. This review focuses on one class of small molecules that interacts directly with CFTR, namely inhibitors that act by directly blocking chloride movement through the open channel pore. In theory such compounds could be of use in the treatment of diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease, however in practice all known substances acting by this mechanism to inhibit CFTR function lack either the potency or specificity for in vivo use. Nevertheless, this theoretical pharmacological usefulness set the scene for the development of more potent, specific CFTR inhibitors. Biophysically, open channel blockers have proven most useful as experimental probes of the structure and function of the CFTR chloride channel pore. Most importantly, the use of these blockers has been fundamental in developing a functional model of the pore that includes a wide inner vestibule that uses positively charged amino acid side chains to attract both permeant and blocking anions from the cell cytoplasm. CFTR channels are also subject to this kind of blocking action by endogenous anions present in the cell cytoplasm, and recently this blocking effect has been suggested to play a role in the physiological control of CFTR channel function, in particular as a novel mechanism linking CFTR function dynamically to the composition of epithelial cell secretions. It has also been suggested that future drugs could target this same pathway as a way of pharmacologically increasing CFTR activity in cystic fibrosis. Studying open channel blockers and their mechanisms of action has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of CFTR as a pharmacological target in disease

  13. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel blockers: Pharmacological, biophysical and physiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2014-02-26

    Dysfunction of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel causes cystic fibrosis, while inappropriate activity of this channel occurs in secretory diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease. Drugs that interact directly with CFTR are therefore of interest in the treatment of a number of disease states. This review focuses on one class of small molecules that interacts directly with CFTR, namely inhibitors that act by directly blocking chloride movement through the open channel pore. In theory such compounds could be of use in the treatment of diarrhea and polycystic kidney disease, however in practice all known substances acting by this mechanism to inhibit CFTR function lack either the potency or specificity for in vivo use. Nevertheless, this theoretical pharmacological usefulness set the scene for the development of more potent, specific CFTR inhibitors. Biophysically, open channel blockers have proven most useful as experimental probes of the structure and function of the CFTR chloride channel pore. Most importantly, the use of these blockers has been fundamental in developing a functional model of the pore that includes a wide inner vestibule that uses positively charged amino acid side chains to attract both permeant and blocking anions from the cell cytoplasm. CFTR channels are also subject to this kind of blocking action by endogenous anions present in the cell cytoplasm, and recently this blocking effect has been suggested to play a role in the physiological control of CFTR channel function, in particular as a novel mechanism linking CFTR function dynamically to the composition of epithelial cell secretions. It has also been suggested that future drugs could target this same pathway as a way of pharmacologically increasing CFTR activity in cystic fibrosis. Studying open channel blockers and their mechanisms of action has resulted in significant advances in our understanding of CFTR as a pharmacological target in disease

  14. Direct block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel by butyrate and phenylbutyrate.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2001-01-12

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is inhibited by a broad range of intracellular organic anions. Here it is shown, using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines, that the fatty acids butyrate and 4-phenylbutyrate cause a voltage-dependent block of CFTR Cl(-) currents when applied to the cytoplasmic face of membrane patches, with apparent K(d)s (at 0 mV) of 29.6 mM for butyrate and 6.6 mM for 4-phenylbutyrate. At the single channel level, both these fatty acids caused an apparent reduction in CFTR current amplitude, suggesting a kinetically fast blocking mechanism. The concentration-dependence of block suggests that CFTR-mediated Cl(-) currents in vivo may be affected by both 4-phenylbutyrate used in the treatment of various diseases, including cystic fibrosis, and by butyrate produced endogenously within the colonic lumen. PMID:11164382

  15. Dual roles of the sixth transmembrane segment of the CFTR chloride channel in gating and permeation.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yonghong; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-09-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. Previous work has suggested that the external side of the sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) plays an important role in governing chloride permeation, but the function of the internal side remains relatively obscure. Here, on a cysless background, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and modification to screen the entire TM6 with intracellularly applied thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate reagents. Single-channel amplitude was reduced in seven cysteine-substituted mutants, suggesting a role of these residues in maintaining the pore structure for normal ion permeation. The reactivity pattern of differently charged reagents suggests that the cytoplasmic part of TM6 assumes a secondary structure of an alpha helix, and that reactive sites (341, 344, 345, 348, 352, and 353) reside in two neighboring faces of the helix. Although, as expected, modification by negatively charged reagents inhibits anion permeation, interestingly, modification by positively charged reagents of cysteine thiolates on one face (344, 348, and 352) of the helix affects gating. For I344C and M348C, the open time was prolonged and the closed time was shortened after modification, suggesting that depositions of positive charges at these positions stabilize the open state but destabilize the closed state. For R352C, which exhibited reduced single-channel amplitude, modifications by two positively charged reagents with different chemical properties completely restored the single-channel amplitude but had distinct effects on both the open time and the closed time. These results corroborate the idea that a helix rotation of TM6, which has been proposed to be part of the molecular motions during transport cycles in other ABC transporters, is associated with gating of the CFTR pore. PMID:20805575

  16. Dual roles of the sixth transmembrane segment of the CFTR chloride channel in gating and permeation

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yonghong; Li, Min

    2010-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is the only member of the adenosine triphosphate–binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a chloride channel. Previous work has suggested that the external side of the sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) plays an important role in governing chloride permeation, but the function of the internal side remains relatively obscure. Here, on a cysless background, we performed cysteine-scanning mutagenesis and modification to screen the entire TM6 with intracellularly applied thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate reagents. Single-channel amplitude was reduced in seven cysteine-substituted mutants, suggesting a role of these residues in maintaining the pore structure for normal ion permeation. The reactivity pattern of differently charged reagents suggests that the cytoplasmic part of TM6 assumes a secondary structure of an α helix, and that reactive sites (341, 344, 345, 348, 352, and 353) reside in two neighboring faces of the helix. Although, as expected, modification by negatively charged reagents inhibits anion permeation, interestingly, modification by positively charged reagents of cysteine thiolates on one face (344, 348, and 352) of the helix affects gating. For I344C and M348C, the open time was prolonged and the closed time was shortened after modification, suggesting that depositions of positive charges at these positions stabilize the open state but destabilize the closed state. For R352C, which exhibited reduced single-channel amplitude, modifications by two positively charged reagents with different chemical properties completely restored the single-channel amplitude but had distinct effects on both the open time and the closed time. These results corroborate the idea that a helix rotation of TM6, which has been proposed to be part of the molecular motions during transport cycles in other ABC transporters, is associated with gating of the CFTR pore. PMID:20805575

  17. Self-Assembling Organic Nanopores as Synthetic Transmembrane Channels with Tunable Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Xiaoxi

    A long-standing goal in the area of supramolecular self-assembly involves the development of synthetic ion/water channels capable of mimicking the mass-transport characteristics of biological channels and pores. Few examples of artificial transmembrane channels with large lumen, high conductivity and selectivity are known. A review of pronounced biological transmembrane protein channels and some representative synthetic models have been provided in Chapter 1, followed by our discovery and initial investigation of shape-persistent oligoamide and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles as synthetic ion/water channels. In Chapter 2, the systematic structural modification of oligoamide macrocycles 1, the so-called first-generation of these shape-persistent macrocycles, has led to third-generation macrocycles 3. The third generation was found to exhibit unprecedented, strong intermolecular association in both the solid state and solution via multiple techniques including X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, and 1H NMR. Fluorescence spectroscopy paired with dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealed that macrocycles 3 can assemble into a singly dispersed nanotubular structure in solution. The resultant self-assembling pores consisting of 3 were examined by HPTS-LUVs assays and BLM studies (Chapter 3) and found to form cation-selective (PK+/PCl- = 69:1) transmembrane ion channels with large conductance (200 ˜ 2000 pS for alkali cations) and high stability with open times reaching to 103 seconds. Tuning the aggregation state of macrocycles by choosing an appropriate polar solvent mixture (i.e., 3:1, THF:DMF, v/v) and concentration led to the formation of ion channels with well-defined square top behavior. A parallel study using DLS to examine the size of aggregates was used in conjunction with channel activity assays (LUVs/BLM) to reveal the effects of the aggregation state on channel activity. Empirical evidence now clearly indicates that a preassembled state, perhaps that of a

  18. Transmembrane Topologies of Ca2+-permeable Mechanosensitive Channels MCA1 and MCA2 in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Kamano, Shumpei; Kume, Shinichiro; Iida, Kazuko; Lei, Kai-Jian; Nakano, Masataka; Nakayama, Yoshitaka; Iida, Hidetoshi

    2015-12-25

    Sensing mechanical stresses, including touch, stretch, compression, and gravity, is crucial for growth and development in plants. A good mechanosensor candidate is the Ca(2+)-permeable mechanosensitive (MS) channel, the pore of which opens to permeate Ca(2+) in response to mechanical stresses. However, the structure-function relationships of plant MS channels are poorly understood. Arabidopsis MCA1 and MCA2 form a homotetramer and exhibit Ca(2+)-permeable MS channel activity; however, their structures have only been partially elucidated. The transmembrane topologies of these ion channels need to be determined in more detail to elucidate the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We herein determined the topologies of MCA1 and MCA2 using two independent methods, the Suc2C reporter and split-ubiquitin yeast two-hybrid methods, and found that both proteins are single-pass type I integral membrane proteins with extracellular N termini and intracellular C termini. These results imply that an EF hand-like motif, coiled-coil motif, and plac8 motif are all present in the cytoplasm. Thus, the activities of both channels can be regulated by intracellular Ca(2+) and protein interactions. PMID:26555262

  19. The non-hydrolytic pathway of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ion channel gating.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, A A; Chang, X; Aleksandrov, L; Riordan, J R

    2000-10-15

    It has been suggested that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel may utilize a novel gating mechanism in which open and closed states are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. This suggestion is based on the assumption that energy of ATP hydrolysis drives the gating cycle. We demonstrate that CFTR channel gating occurs in the absence of ATP hydrolysis and hence does not depend on an input of free energy from this source. The binding of ATP or structurally related analogues that are poorly or non-hydrolysable is sufficient to induce opening. Closing occurs on dissociation of these ligands or the hydrolysis products of those that can be cleaved. Not only can channel opening occur without ATP hydrolysis but the temperature dependence of the open probability (Po.) is reversed, i.e. Po. increases as temperature is lowered whereas under hydrolytic conditions, Po. increases as temperature is elevated. This indicates that there are different rate-limiting steps in the alternate gating pathways (hydrolytic and non-hydrolytic). These observations demonstrate that phosphorylated CFTR behaves as a conventional ligand-gated channel employing cytoplasmic ATP as a readily available cytoplasmic ligand; under physiological conditions ligand hydrolysis provides efficient reversibility of channel opening. PMID:11034616

  20. The non-hydrolytic pathway of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator ion channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Chang, Xiu-bao; Aleksandrov, Luba; Riordan, John R

    2000-01-01

    It has been suggested that the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel may utilize a novel gating mechanism in which open and closed states are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. This suggestion is based on the assumption that energy of ATP hydrolysis drives the gating cycle. We demonstrate that CFTR channel gating occurs in the absence of ATP hydrolysis and hence does not depend on an input of free energy from this source. The binding of ATP or structurally related analogues that are poorly or non-hydrolysable is sufficient to induce opening. Closing occurs on dissociation of these ligands or the hydrolysis products of those that can be cleaved. Not only can channel opening occur without ATP hydrolysis but the temperature dependence of the open probability (Po) is reversed, i.e. Po increases as temperature is lowered whereas under hydrolytic conditions, Po increases as temperature is elevated. This indicates that there are different rate-limiting steps in the alternate gating pathways (hydrolytic and non-hydrolytic). These observations demonstrate that phosphorylated CFTR behaves as a conventional ligand-gated channel employing cytoplasmic ATP as a readily available cytoplasmic ligand; under physiological conditions ligand hydrolysis provides efficient reversibility of channel opening. PMID:11034616

  1. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-06-15

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Phi values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Phi values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic 'lever-arm' mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  2. Relationship between nucleotide binding and ion channel gating in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator

    PubMed Central

    Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Cui, Liying; Riordan, John R

    2009-01-01

    We have employed rate-equilibrium free energy relationship (REFER) analysis to characterize the dynamic events involved in the allosteric regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) function. A wide range of different hydrolysable and poorly hydrolysable nucleoside triphosphates were used to elucidate the role of ATP hydrolysis in CFTR function. The linearity of the REFER plots and Φ values near unity for all ligands tested implies that CFTR channel gating is a reversible thermally driven process with all structural reorganization in the binding site(s) completed prior to channel opening. This is consistent with the requirement for nucleotide binding for channel opening. However, the channel structural transition from the open to the closed state occurs independently of any events in the binding sites. Similar results were obtained on substitution of amino acids at coupling joints between both nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and cytoplasmic loops (CL) in opposite halves of the protein, indicating that any structural reorganization there also had occurred in the channel closed state. The fact that fractional Φ values were not observed in either of these distant sites suggests that there may not be a deterministic ‘lever-arm’ mechanism acting between nucleotide binding sites and the channel gate. These findings favour a stochastic coupling between binding and gating in which all structural transitions are thermally driven processes. We speculate that increase of channel open state probability is due to reduction of the number of the closed state configurations available after physical interaction between ligand bound NBDs and the channel. PMID:19403599

  3. Conserved Allosteric Hot Spots in the Transmembrane Domains of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channels and Multidrug Resistance Protein (MRP) Pumps*

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C.; Chauvet, Sylvain; Guo, Jingyu; Hartman, John L.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are an ancient family of transmembrane proteins that utilize ATPase activity to move substrates across cell membranes. The ABCC subfamily of the ABC transporters includes active drug exporters (the multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs)) and a unique ATP-gated ion channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR)). The CFTR channel shares gating principles with conventional ligand-gated ion channels, but the allosteric network that couples ATP binding at its nucleotide binding domains (NBDs) with conformational changes in its transmembrane helices (TMs) is poorly defined. It is also unclear whether the mechanisms that govern CFTR gating are conserved with the thermodynamically distinct MRPs. Here we report a new class of gain of function (GOF) mutation of a conserved proline at the base of the pore-lining TM6. Multiple substitutions of this proline promoted ATP-free CFTR activity and activation by the weak agonist, 5′-adenylyl-β,γ-imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). TM6 proline mutations exhibited additive GOF effects when combined with a previously reported GOF mutation located in an outer collar of TMs that surrounds the pore-lining TMs. Each TM substitution allosterically rescued the ATP sensitivity of CFTR gating when introduced into an NBD mutant with defective ATP binding. Both classes of GOF mutations also rescued defective drug export by a yeast MRP (Yor1p) with ATP binding defects in its NBDs. We conclude that the conserved TM6 proline helps set the energy barrier to both CFTR channel opening and MRP-mediated drug efflux and that CFTR channels and MRP pumps utilize similar allosteric mechanisms for coupling conformational changes in their translocation pathways to ATP binding at their NBDs. PMID:24876383

  4. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1999-03-01

    1. The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. 2. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and beta-estradiol 17-(beta-D-glucuronide) (E217betaG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl- currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96+/-10 and 563+/-103 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453+/-44 and 3760+/-710 microM (at 0 mV) respectively. 3. Reducing the extracellular Cl- concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54+/-1 microM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl- permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. 4. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. 5. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. 6. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  5. Substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins block the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Hanrahan, John W

    1999-01-01

    The effects of physiological substrates of multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel currents were examined using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines. Two MRP substrates, taurolithocholate-3-sulphate (TLCS) and β-estradiol 17-(β-D-glucuronide) (E217βG) caused a voltage-dependent block of macroscopic CFTR Cl− currents when applied to the intracellular face of excised membrane patches, with mean apparent dissociation constants (KDs) of 96±10 and 563±103 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. The unconjugated bile salts taurocholate and cholate were also effective CFTR channel blockers under these conditions, with KDs of 453±44 and 3760±710 μM (at 0 mV) respectively. Reducing the extracellular Cl− concentration from 154 to 20 mM decreased the KD for block intracellular TLCS to 54±1 μM, and also significantly reduced the voltage dependence of block, by suggesting that TLCS blocks Cl− permeation through CFTR by binding within the channel pore. Intracellular TLCS reduced the apparent amplitude of CFTR single channel currents, suggesting that the duration of block is very fast compared to the gating of the channel. The apparent affinity of block by TLCs is comparable to that of other well-known CFTR channel blockers, suggesting that MRP substrates may comprise a novel class of probes of the CFTR channel pore. These results also suggest that the related proteins CFTR and MRP may share a structurally similar anion binding site at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. PMID:10217542

  6. Capsaicin potentiates wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride-channel currents.

    PubMed

    Ai, Tomohiko; Bompadre, Silvia G; Wang, Xiaohui; Hu, Shenghui; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2004-06-01

    To examine the effects of capsaicin on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), we recorded wild-type and mutant CFTR chloride-channel currents using patch-clamp methods. The effects of capsaicin were compared with those of genistein, a well-characterized CFTR activator. In whole-cell experiments, capsaicin potentiates cAMP-stimulated wild-type CFTR currents expressed in NIH 3T3 cells or Chinese hamster ovary cells in a dose-dependent manner with a maximal response approximately 60% of that with genistein and an apparent Kd of 48.4 +/- 6.8 microM. In cell-attached recordings, capsaicin alone fails to activate CFTR in cells that show negligible basal CFTR activity, indicating that capsaicin does not stimulate the cAMP cascade. The magnitude of potentiation with capsaicin depends on the channel activity before drug application; the lower the prestimulated Po, the higher the potentiation. Single-channel kinetic analysis shows that capsaicin potentiates CFTR by increasing the opening rate and decreasing the closing rate of the channel. Capsaicin may act as a partial agonist of genistein because the maximally enhanced wild-type CFTR currents with genistein are partially inhibited by capsaicin. Capsaicin increases DeltaR-CFTR, a protein kinase A (PKA)-independent, constitutively active channel, in cell-attached patches. In excised inside-out patches, capsaicin potentiates the PKA-phosphorylated, ATP-dependent CFTR activity. Both capsaicin and genistein potentiate the cAMP-stimulated G551D-CFTR, DeltaF508-CFTR, and 8SA mutant channel currents. The binding site for capsaicin is probably located at the cytoplasmic domain of CFTR, because pipette application of capsaicin fails to potentiate CFTR activity. In conclusion, capsaicin is a partial agonist of genistein in activation of the CFTR chloride channel. Both compounds affect ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. PMID:15155835

  7. The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator phenylalanine 508 side chain in ion channel gating.

    PubMed

    Cui, Liying; Aleksandrov, Luba; Hou, Yue-Xian; Gentzsch, Martina; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Riordan, John R; Aleksandrov, Andrei A

    2006-04-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel employing the ABC transporter structural motif. Deletion of a single residue (Phe508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which occurs in most patients with cystic fibrosis, impairs both maturation and function of the protein. However, substitution of the Phe508 with small uncharged amino acids, including cysteine, is permissive for maturation. To explore the possible role of the phenylalanine aromatic side chain in channel gating we introduced a cysteine at this position in cysless CFTR, enabling its selective chemical modification by sulfhydryl reagents. Both cysless and wild-type CFTR ion channels have identical mean open times when activated by different nucleotide ligands. Moreover, both channels could be locked in an open state by introducing an ATPase inhibiting mutation (E1371S). However, the introduction of a single cysteine (F508C) prevented the cysless E1371S channel from maintaining the permanently open state, allowing closing to occur. Chemical modification of cysless E1371S/F508C by sulfhydryl reagents was used to probe the role of the side chain in ion channel function. Specifically, benzyl-methanethiosulphonate modification of this variant restored the gating behaviour to that of cysless E1371S containing the wild-type phenylalanine at position 508. This provides the first direct evidence that a specific interaction of the Phe508 aromatic side chain plays a role in determining the residency time in the closed state. Thus, despite the fact that this aromatic side chain is not essential for CFTR folding, it is important in the ion channel function. PMID:16484308

  8. The role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator phenylalanine 508 side chain in ion channel gating

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Liying; Aleksandrov, Luba; Hou, Yue-Xian; Gentzsch, Martina; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Riordan, John R; Aleksandrov, Andrei A

    2006-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is an ion channel employing the ABC transporter structural motif. Deletion of a single residue (Phe508) in the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1), which occurs in most patients with cystic fibrosis, impairs both maturation and function of the protein. However, substitution of the Phe508 with small uncharged amino acids, including cysteine, is permissive for maturation. To explore the possible role of the phenylalanine aromatic side chain in channel gating we introduced a cysteine at this position in cysless CFTR, enabling its selective chemical modification by sulfhydryl reagents. Both cysless and wild-type CFTR ion channels have identical mean open times when activated by different nucleotide ligands. Moreover, both channels could be locked in an open state by introducing an ATPase inhibiting mutation (E1371S). However, the introduction of a single cysteine (F508C) prevented the cysless E1371S channel from maintaining the permanently open state, allowing closing to occur. Chemical modification of cysless E1371S/F508C by sulfhydryl reagents was used to probe the role of the side chain in ion channel function. Specifically, benzyl-methanethiosulphonate modification of this variant restored the gating behaviour to that of cysless E1371S containing the wild-type phenylalanine at position 508. This provides the first direct evidence that a specific interaction of the Phe508 aromatic side chain plays a role in determining the residency time in the closed state. Thus, despite the fact that this aromatic side chain is not essential for CFTR folding, it is important in the ion channel function. PMID:16484308

  9. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-06-19

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl(-) and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl(-) ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl(-) permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl(-) flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl(-). The location of these Cl(-)-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl(-) ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  10. Functional Architecture of the Cytoplasmic Entrance to the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-01-01

    As an ion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator must form a continuous pathway for the movement of Cl− and other anions between the cytoplasm and the extracellular solution. Both the structure and the function of the membrane-spanning part of this pathway are well defined. In contrast, the structure of the pathway that connects the cytoplasm to the membrane-spanning regions is unknown, and functional roles for different parts of the protein forming this pathway have not been described. We used patch clamp recording and substituted cysteine accessibility mutagenesis to identify positively charged amino acid side chains that attract cytoplasmic Cl− ions to the inner mouth of the pore. Our results indicate that the side chains of Lys-190, Arg-248, Arg-303, Lys-370, Lys-1041, and Arg-1048, located in different intracellular loops of the protein, play important roles in the electrostatic attraction of Cl− ions. Mutation and covalent modification of these residues have charge-dependent effects on the rate of Cl− permeation, demonstrating their functional role in maximization of Cl− flux. Other nearby positively charged side chains were not involved in electrostatic interactions with Cl−. The location of these Cl−-attractive residues suggests that cytoplasmic Cl− ions enter the pore via a lateral portal located between the cytoplasmic extensions to the fourth and sixth transmembrane helices; a secondary, functionally less relevant portal might exist between the extensions to the 10th and 12th transmembrane helices. These results define the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore and show how it attracts Cl− ions from the cytoplasm. PMID:25944907

  11. A CLAG3 mutation in an amphipathic transmembrane domain alters malaria parasite nutrient channels and confers leupeptin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Paresh; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Ito, Daisuke; Basore, Katherine; Desai, Sanjay A

    2015-06-01

    Erythrocytes infected with malaria parasites have increased permeability to ions and nutrients, as mediated by the plasmodial surface anion channel (PSAC) and recently linked to parasite clag3 genes. Although the encoded protein is integral to the host membrane, its precise contribution to solute transport remains unclear because it lacks conventional transmembrane domains and does not have homology to ion channel proteins in other organisms. Here, we identified a probable CLAG3 transmembrane domain adjacent to a variant extracellular motif. Helical-wheel analysis revealed strict segregation of polar and hydrophobic residues to opposite faces of a predicted α-helical transmembrane domain, suggesting that the domain lines a water-filled pore. A single CLAG3 mutation (A1210T) in a leupeptin-resistant PSAC mutant falls within this transmembrane domain and may affect pore structure. Allelic-exchange transfection and site-directed mutagenesis revealed that this mutation alters solute selectivity in the channel. The A1210T mutation also reduces the blocking affinity of PSAC inhibitors that bind on opposite channel faces, consistent with global changes in channel structure. Transfected parasites carrying this mutation survived a leupeptin challenge significantly better than a transfection control did. Thus, the A1210T mutation contributes directly to both altered PSAC activity and leupeptin resistance. These findings reveal the molecular basis of a novel antimalarial drug resistance mechanism, provide a framework for determining the channel's composition and structure, and should guide the development of therapies targeting the PSAC. PMID:25870226

  12. Slow conversions among subconductance states of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Tao, T; Xie, J; Drumm, M L; Zhao, J; Davis, P B; Ma, J

    1996-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel exhibits multiple subconductance states. To study the regulation of conductance states of the CFTR channel, we expressed the wild-type CFTR protein in HEK 293 cells, and isolated microsomal membrane vesicles for reconstitution studies in lipid bilayer membranes. A single CFTR channel had a dominant conductance of 7.8 pS (H), plus two sub-open states with conductances of approximately 6 pS (M) and 2.7 pS (L) in 200 mM KCl with 1 mM MgCl2 (intracellular) and 50 mM KCl with no MgCl2 (extracellular), with pH maintained at 7.4 by 10 mM HEPES-Tris on both sides of the channel. In 200 mM KCl, both H and L states could be measured in stable single-channel recordings, whereas M could not. Spontaneous transitions between H and L were slow; it took 4.5 min for L-->H, and 3.2 min for H-->L. These slow conversions among subconductance states of the CFTR channel were affected by extracellular Mg; in the presence of millimolar Mg, the channel remained stable in the H state. Similar phenomena were also observed with endogenous CFTR channels in T84 cells. In high-salt conditions (1.5 M KCl), all three conductance states of the expressed CFTR channel, 12.1 pS, 8.2 pS, and 3.6 pS, became stable and seemed to gate independently from each other. The existence of multiple stable conductance states associated with the CFTR channel suggests two possibilities: either a single CFTR molecule can exist in multiple configurations with different conductance values, or the CFTR channel may contain multimers of the 170-kDa CFTR protein, and different conductance states are due to different aggregation states of the CFTR protein. Images FIGURE 4 FIGURE 8 PMID:8789091

  13. Indazole inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channels in rat epididymal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gong, X D; Linsdell, P; Cheung, K H; Leung, G P H; Wong, P Y D

    2002-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that two indazole compounds, lonidamine [1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-indazole-3-carboxylic acid] and its analogue AF2785 [(1-(2,4-dichlorobenzyl)-indazol-3-acrylic acid], suppress fertility in male rats. We also found that these compounds inhibit the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride (CFTR-Cl(-)) current in epididymal epithelial cells. To further investigate how lonidamine and AF2785 inhibit the current, we used a spectral analysis protocol to study whole-cell CFTR current variance. Application of lonidamine or AF2785 to the extracellular membrane of rat epididymal epithelial cells introduced a new component to the whole-cell current variance. Spectral analysis of this variance suggested a block at a rate of 3.68 micro mol(-1)/sec(-1) and an off rate of 69.01 sec(-1) for lonidamine, and an on rate of 3.27 micro mol(-1)/sec(-1) and an off rate of 108 sec(-1) for AF2785. Single CFTR-Cl(-) channel activity using excised inside-out membrane patches from rat epididymal epithelial cells revealed that addition of lonidamine to the intracellular solution caused a flickery block (a reduction in channel-open time) at lower concentration (10 micro M) without any effect on open channel probability or single-channel current amplitude. At higher concentrations (50 and 100 micro M), lonidamine showed a flickery block and a decrease in open-channel probability. The flickery block by lonidamine was both voltage-dependent and concentration-dependent. These results suggest that lonidamine and AF2785, which are open-channel blockers of CFTR at low concentrations, also affect CFTR gating at high concentrations. We conclude that these indazole compounds provide new pharmacological tools for the investigation of CFTR. By virtue of their interference with reproductive processes, these drugs have the potential for being developed into novel male contraceptives. PMID:12444067

  14. Gating of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channels by Adenosine Triphosphate Hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zeltwanger, Shawn; Wang, Fei; Wang, Guo-Tang; Gillis, Kevin D.; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    1999-01-01

    Gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) involves a coordinated action of ATP on two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Previous studies using nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and NBD mutant CFTR have suggested that nucleotide hydrolysis at NBD1 is required for opening of the channel, while hydrolysis of nucleotides at NBD2 controls channel closing. We studied ATP-dependent gating of CFTR in excised inside-out patches from stably transfected NIH3T3 cells. Single channel kinetics of CFTR gating at different [ATP] were analyzed. The closed time constant (τc) decreased with increasing [ATP] to a minimum value of ∼0.43 s at [ATP] >1.00 mM. The open time constant (τo) increased with increasing [ATP] with a minimal τo of ∼260 ms. Kinetic analysis of K1250A-CFTR, a mutant that abolishes ATP hydrolysis at NBD2, reveals the presence of two open states. A short open state with a time constant of ∼250 ms is dominant at low ATP concentrations (10 μM) and a much longer open state with a time constant of ∼3 min is present at millimolar ATP. These data suggest that nucleotide binding and hydrolysis at NBD1 is coupled to channel opening and that the channel can close without nucleotide interaction with NBD2. A quantitative cyclic gating scheme with microscopic irreversibility was constructed based on the kinetic parameters derived from single-channel analysis. The estimated values of the kinetic parameters suggest that NBD1 and NBD2 are neither functionally nor biochemically equivalent. PMID:10102935

  15. Multiscale modeling and computation of nano-electronic transistors and transmembrane proton channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Duan

    The miniaturization of nano-scale electronic transistors, such as metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs), has given rise to a pressing demand in the new theoretical understanding and practical tactic for dealing with quantum mechanical effects in integrated circuits. In biology, proton dynamics and transport across membrane proteins are of paramount importance to the normal function of living cells. Similar physical characteristics are behind the two subjects, and model simulations share common mathematical interests/challenges. In this thesis work, multiscale and multiphysical models are proposed to study the mechanisms of nanotransistors and proton transport in transmembrane at the atomic level. For nano-electronic transistors, we introduce a unified two-scale energy functional to describe the electrons and the continuum electrostatic potential. This framework enables us to put microscopic and macroscopic descriptions on an equal footing at nano-scale. Additionally, this model includes layered structures and random doping effect of nano-transistors. For transmembrane proton channels, we describe proton dynamics quantum mechanically via a density functional approach while implicitly treat numerous solvent molecules as a dielectric continuum. The densities of all other ions in the solvent are assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution. The impact of protein molecular structure and its charge polarization on the proton transport is considered in atomic details. We formulate a total free energy functional to include kinetic and potential energies of protons, as well as electrostatic energy of all other ions on an equal footing. For both nano-transistors and proton channels systems, the variational principle is employed to derive nonlinear governing equations. The Poisson-Kohn-Sham equations are derived for nano-transistors while the generalized Poisson-Boltzmann equation and Kohn-Sham equation are obtained for proton channels. Related numerical

  16. Emerging role of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator - an epithelial chloride channel in gastrointestinal cancers.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuning; Guan, Xiaoqing; Yang, Zhe; Li, Chunying

    2016-03-15

    Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a glycoprotein with 1480 amino acids, has been well established as a chloride channel mainly expressed in the epithelial cells of various tissues and organs such as lungs, sweat glands, gastrointestinal system, and reproductive organs. Although defective CFTR leads to cystic fibrosis, a common genetic disorder in the Caucasian population, there is accumulating evidence that suggests a novel role of CFTR in various cancers, especially in gastroenterological cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and colon cancer. In this review, we summarize the emerging findings that link CFTR with various cancers, with focus on the association between CFTR defects and gastrointestinal cancers as well as the underlying mechanisms. Further study of CFTR in cancer biology may help pave a new way for the diagnosis and treatment of gastrointestinal cancers. PMID:26989463

  17. Inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel currents by arachidonic acid.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2000-06-01

    Chloride permeation through the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel is inhibited by a number of different classes of organic anions which are able to enter and block the channel pore from its cytoplasmic end. Here I show, using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected baby hamster kidney cell lines, that the cis-unsaturated fatty acid arachidonic acid also inhibits CFTR Cl- currents when applied to the cytoplasmic face of excised membrane patches. This inhibition was of a relatively high affinity compared with other known CFTR inhibitors, with an apparent Kd of 6.5 +/- 0.9 microM. However, in contrast with known CFTR pore blockers, inhibition by arachidonic acid was only very weakly voltage dependent, and was insensitive to the extracellular Cl- concentration. Arachidonic acid-mediated inhibition of CFTR Cl- currents was not abrogated by inhibitors of lipoxygenases, cyclooxygenases or cytochrome P450, suggesting that arachidonic acid itself, rather than some metabolite, directly affects CFTR. Similar inhibition of CFTR Cl- currents was seen with other fatty acids, with the rank order of potency linoleic > or = arachidonic > or = oleic > elaidic > or = palmitic > or = myristic. These results identify fatty acids as novel high affinity modulators of the CFTR Cl- channel. PMID:10914639

  18. Regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator anion channel by tyrosine phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Billet, Arnaud; Jia, Yanlin; Jensen, Tim; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    2015-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel is activated by PKA phosphorylation of a regulatory domain that interacts dynamically with multiple CFTR domains and with other proteins. The large number of consensus sequences for phosphorylation by PKA has naturally focused most attention on regulation by this kinase. We report here that human CFTR is also phosphorylated by the tyrosine kinases p60c-Src (proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase) and the proline-rich tyrosine kinase 2 (Pyk2), and they can also cause robust activation of quiescent CFTR channels. In excised patch-clamp experiments, CFTR activity during exposure to Src or Pyk2 reached ∼80% of that stimulated by PKA. Exposure to PKA after Src or Pyk2 caused a further increase to the level induced by PKA alone, implying a common limiting step. Channels became spontaneously active when v-Src or the catalytic domain of Pyk2 was coexpressed with CFTR and were further stimulated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor dephostatin. Exogenous Src also activated 15SA-CFTR, a variant that lacks 15 potential PKA sites and has little response to PKA. PKA-independent activation by tyrosine phosphorylation has implications for the mechanism of regulation by the R domain and for the physiologic functions of CFTR. PMID:26062600

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator: a chloride channel gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Bompadre, Silvia G; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2007-08-25

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a chloride channel that belongs to the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. Defective function of CFTR is responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common lethal autosomal recessive disorder in Caucasian populations. The disease is manifested in defective chloride transport across the epithelial cells in various tissues. To date, more than 1400 different mutations have been identified as CF-associated. CFTR is regulated by phosphorylation in its regulatory (R) domain, and gated by ATP binding and hydrolysis at its two nucleotide-binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies reveal that the NBDs of CFTR may dimerize as observed in other ABC proteins. Upon dimerization of CFTR's two NBDs, in a head-to-tail configuration, the two ATP-binding pockets (ABP1 and ABP2) are formed by the canonical Walker A and B motifs from one NBD and the signature sequence from the partner NBD. Mutations of the amino acids that interact with ATP reveal that the two ABPs play distinct roles in controlling ATP-dependent gating of CFTR. It was proposed that binding of ATP to the ABP2, which is formed by the Walker A and B in NBD2 and the signature sequence in NBD1, is critical for catalyzing channel opening. While binding of ATP to the ABP1 alone may not increase the opening rate, it does contribute to the stabilization of the open channel conformation. Several disease-associated mutations of the CFTR channel are characterized by gating defects. Understanding how CFTR's two NBDs work together to gate the channel could provide considerable mechanistic information for future pharmacological studies, which could pave the way for tailored drug design for therapeutical interventions in CF. PMID:17700963

  20. Alamethicin suppresses methanogenesis and promotes acetogenesis in bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-06-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼ 3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml(-1) day(-1), similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  1. Alamethicin Suppresses Methanogenesis and Promotes Acetogenesis in Bioelectrochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiuping; Siegert, Michael; Yates, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis (MES) systems with mixed cultures often generate a variety of gaseous and soluble chemicals. Methane is the primary end product in mixed-culture MES because it is the thermodynamically most favorable reduction product of CO2. Here, we show that the peptaibol alamethicin selectively suppressed the growth of methanogens in mixed-culture MES systems, resulting in a shift of the solution and cathode communities to an acetate-producing system dominated by Sporomusa, a known acetogenic genus in MES systems. Archaea in the methane-producing control were dominated by Methanobrevibacter species, but no Archaea were detected in the alamethicin-treated reactors. No methane was detected in the mixed-culture reactors treated with alamethicin over 10 cycles (∼3 days each). Instead, acetate was produced at an average rate of 115 nmol ml−1 day−1, similar to the rate reported previously for pure cultures of Sporomusa ovata on biocathodes. Mixed-culture control reactors without alamethicin generated methane at nearly 100% coulombic recovery, and no acetate was detected. These results show that alamethicin is effective for the suppression of methanogen growth in MES systems and that its use enables the production of industrially relevant organic compounds by the inhibition of methanogenesis. PMID:25819972

  2. Determinants of Anion Permeation in the Second Transmembrane Domain of the Mouse Bestrophin-2 Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Zhiqiang; Hartzell, Criss

    2004-01-01

    Bestrophins have been proposed to constitute a new family of Cl channels that are activated by cytosolic Ca. We showed previously that mutation of serine-79 to cysteine in mouse bestrophin-2 (mBest2) altered the relative permeability and conductance to SCN. In this paper, we have overexpressed various mutant constructs of mBest2 in HEK-293 cells to explore the contributions to anion selectivity of serine-79 and other amino acids (V78, F80, G83, F84, V86, and T87) located in the putative second transmembrane domain (TMD2). Residues selected for mutagenesis were distributed throughout TMD2, but mutations at all positions changed the selectivity. The effects on selectivity were rather modest. Replacement of residues 78, 79, 80, 83, 84, 86, or 87 with cysteine had similar effects: the permeability of the channel to SCN relative to Cl (PSCN/PCl) was decreased three- to fourfold and the relative SCN conductance (GSCN/GCl) was increased five- to tenfold. Side chains at positions 78 and 80 appeared to be situated close to the permeant anion, because the electrostatic charge at these positions affected permeation in specific ways. The effects of charged sulfhydryl-reactive MTS reagents were the opposite in the V78C and F80C mutants and the effects were partially mimicked by substitution of F80 with charged amino acids. In S79T, switching from Cl to SCN caused slow changes in GSCN/GCl (τ = 16.6 s), suggesting that SCN binding to the channel altered channel gating as well as conductance. The data in this paper and other data support a model in which TMD2 plays an important role in forming the bestrophin pore. We suggest that the major determinant in anion permeation involves partitioning of the permeant anion into an aqueous pore whose structural features are rather flexible. Furthermore, anion permeation and gating may be linked. PMID:15452198

  3. Expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator corrects defective chloride channel regulation in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rich, Devra P.; Anderson, Matthew P.; Gregory, Richard J.; Cheng, Seng H.; Paul, Sucharita; Jefferson, Douglas M.; McCann, John D.; Klinger, Katherine W.; Smith, Alan E.; Welsh, Michael J.

    1990-09-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was expressed in cultured cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells and Cl- channel activation assessed in single cells using a fluorescence microscopic assay and the patch-clamp technique. Expression of CFTR, but not of a mutant form of CFTR (ΔF508), corrected the Cl- channel defect. Correction of the phenotypic defect demonstrates a causal relationship between mutations in the CFTR gene and defective Cl- transport which is the hallmark of the disease.

  4. Voltage-dependent flickery block of an open cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel pore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Z; Hu, S; Hwang, T C

    2001-04-15

    1. Fast flickery block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was studied with cell-attached and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse NIH3T3 cells stably expressing a mutant CFTR channel, K1250A-CFTR. This mutant CFTR channel, once open, can stay open for minutes. Within a prolonged opening, the kinetics of fast flickery closures can be readily quantified. 2. Flickering block of K1250A-CFTR channels was voltage dependent since the open probability within an opening burst decreased as the membrane was hyperpolarized. 3. Mean open time (tau(o)) and mean closed time (tau(c)), obtained from single-channel kinetic analysis, were corrected for missed events. Our data show that corrected tau(c) was voltage dependent while corrected tau(o) exhibited little voltage dependence. Results from whole-cell current relaxation upon voltage jump further indicate that tau(c) at a membrane potential of -100 mV was at least 10-fold longer than that at +100 mV. 4. tau(c), but not tau(o), was sensitive to external permeant anions. After complete replacement of external Cl(-) with impermeant anions, tau(c) showed little voltage dependence and approximated a value observed under strong hyperpolarization in the presence of high external permeant anions. These results suggest that the resident time of the blocker is prolonged by conditions (i.e. hyperpolarization or the absence of external permeant anions) that deplete Cl(-) in the CFTR pore. 5. Results from macroscopic current noise analysis of both wild-type CFTR and K1250A-CFTR channels further confirm the voltage dependence and Cl(-) sensitivity of the fast flickery block observed with single-channel analysis. 6. We conclude that the voltage dependence of the flickery block in CFTR is mainly due to the voltage-dependent occupancy of an anion-binding site in the channel pore by trans-anions. The blocker acquires a voltage-dependent off rate through an electrostatic interaction with Cl(-) in the pore

  5. Voltage-dependent flickery block of an open cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhen; Hu, Shenghui; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2001-01-01

    Fast flickery block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) was studied with cell-attached and whole-cell patch-clamp recordings from mouse NIH3T3 cells stably expressing a mutant CFTR channel, K1250A-CFTR. This mutant CFTR channel, once open, can stay open for minutes. Within a prolonged opening, the kinetics of fast flickery closures can be readily quantified. Flickering block of K1250A-CFTR channels was voltage dependent since the open probability within an opening burst decreased as the membrane was hyperpolarized. Mean open time (τo) and mean closed time (τc), obtained from single-channel kinetic analysis, were corrected for missed events. Our data show that corrected τc was voltage dependent while corrected τo exhibited little voltage dependence. Results from whole-cell current relaxation upon voltage jump further indicate that τc at a membrane potential of -100 mV was at least 10-fold longer than that at +100 mV. τc, but not τo, was sensitive to external permeant anions. After complete replacement of external Cl− with impermeant anions, τc showed little voltage dependence and approximated a value observed under strong hyperpolarization in the presence of high external permeant anions. These results suggest that the resident time of the blocker is prolonged by conditions (i.e. hyperpolarization or the absence of external permeant anions) that deplete Cl− in the CFTR pore. Results from macroscopic current noise analysis of both wild-type CFTR and K1250A-CFTR channels further confirm the voltage dependence and Cl− sensitivity of the fast flickery block observed with single-channel analysis. We conclude that the voltage dependence of the flickery block in CFTR is mainly due to the voltage-dependent occupancy of an anion-binding site in the channel pore by trans-anions. The blocker acquires a voltage-dependent off rate through an electrostatic interaction with Cl− in the pore. PMID:11306662

  6. Point Mutations in the Transmembrane Region of the Clic1 Ion Channel Selectively Modify Its Biophysical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Averaimo, Stefania; Abeti, Rosella; Savalli, Nicoletta; Brown, Louise J.; Curmi, Paul M. G.; Breit, Samuel N.; Mazzanti, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Chloride intracellular Channel 1 (CLIC1) is a metamorphic protein that changes from a soluble cytoplasmic protein into a transmembrane protein. Once inserted into membranes, CLIC1 multimerises and is able to form chloride selective ion channels. Whilst CLIC1 behaves as an ion channel both in cells and in artificial lipid bilayers, its structure in the soluble form has led to some uncertainty as to whether it really is an ion channel protein. CLIC1 has a single putative transmembrane region that contains only two charged residues: arginine 29 (Arg29) and lysine 37 (Lys37). As charged residues are likely to have a key role in ion channel function, we hypothesized that mutating them to neutral alanine to generate K37A and R29A CLIC1 would alter the electrophysiological characteristics of CLIC1. By using three different electrophysiological approaches: i) single channel Tip-Dip in artificial bilayers using soluble recombinant CLIC1, ii) cell-attached and iii) whole-cell patch clamp recordings in transiently transfected HEK cells, we determined that the K37A mutation altered the single-channel conductance while the R29A mutation affected the single-channel open probability in response to variation in membrane potential. Our results show that mutation of the two charged amino acids (K37 and R29) in the putative transmembrane region of CLIC1 alters the biophysical properties of the ion channel in both artificial bilayers and cells. Hence these charged residues are directly involved in regulating its ion channel activity. This strongly suggests that, despite its unusual structure, CLIC1 itself is able to form a chloride ion channel. PMID:24058583

  7. The role of transmembrane channel–like proteins in the operation of hair cell mechanotransducer channels

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghee X.; Beurg, Maryline; Hackney, Carole M.; Furness, David N.; Mahendrasingam, Shanthini

    2013-01-01

    Sound stimuli elicit movement of the stereocilia that make up the hair bundle of cochlear hair cells, putting tension on the tip links connecting the stereocilia and thereby opening mechanotransducer (MT) channels. Tmc1 and Tmc2, two members of the transmembrane channel–like family, are necessary for mechanotransduction. To assess their precise role, we recorded MT currents elicited by hair bundle deflections in mice with null mutations of Tmc1, Tmc2, or both. During the first postnatal week, we observed a normal MT current in hair cells lacking Tmc1 or Tmc2; however, in the absence of both isoforms, we recorded a large MT current that was phase-shifted 180°, being evoked by displacements of the hair bundle away from its tallest edge rather than toward it as in wild-type hair cells. The anomalous MT current in hair cells lacking Tmc1 and Tmc2 was blocked by FM1-43, dihydrostreptomycin, and extracellular Ca2+ at concentrations similar to those that blocked wild type. MT channels in the double knockouts carried Ca2+ with a lower permeability than wild-type or single mutants. The MT current in double knockouts persisted during exposure to submicromolar Ca2+, even though this treatment destroyed the tip links. We conclude that the Tmc isoforms do not themselves constitute the MT channel but are essential for targeting and interaction with the tip link. Changes in the MT conductance and Ca2+ permeability observed in the absence of Tmc1 mutants may stem from loss of interaction with protein partners in the transduction complex. PMID:24127526

  8. Cytoplasmic loop three of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator contributes to regulation of chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Linsdell, P; Loo, T W; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R; Clarke, D M

    1996-11-01

    To examine the contribution of the large cytoplasmic loops of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to channel activity, the three point-mutations (S945L, H949Y, G970R) were characterized that have been detected in the third cytoplasmic loop (CL3, residues 933-990) in patients with cystic fibrosis. Chinese hamster ovary cell lines stably expressing wild-type CFTR or mutant G970R-CFTR yielded polypeptides with apparent masses of 170 kDa as the major products, whereas the major products of mutants S945L-CFTR and H949Y-CFTR had apparent masses of 150 kDa. The 150-kDa forms of CFTR were sensitive to endoglycosidase H digestion, indicating that these mutations interfered with maturation of the protein. Increased levels of mature CFTR (170 kDa) could be obtained for mutant H949Y when cells were grown at a lower temperature (26 degrees C) or incubated in the presence of 10% glycerol. For all mutants, the open probability (P0) of the CFTR channels was significantly altered. S945L-CFTR and G970R-CFTR showed a severe reduction in the P0, whereas the H949Y mutation doubled the P0 relative to wild-type. The changes in P0 predominantly resulted from an alteration of the mean burst durations which suggests that CL3 is involved in obtaining and/or maintaining stability of the open state. In addition, mutants S945L and G970R had current-voltage relationships that were not completely linear over the range +/-80 mV, but showed slight outward rectification. The fact that CL3 mutations can have subtle effects on channel conductance indicates that this region may be physically close to the inner mouth of the pore. PMID:8910333

  9. Actions of Genistein on Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Channel Gating

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Yang, Iris C.-H.; Nairn, Angus C.; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    1998-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that genistein increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity in the presence of saturating concentrations of forskolin and calyculin A in intact cells. Possible molecular mechanisms for genistein's action include inhibition of tyrosine kinases, inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, or direct binding of genistein to CFTR. Since genistein inhibits several enzymes that hydrolyze ATP, and ATP hydrolysis is an intrinsic property of CFTR, we examined the effect of genistein on CFTR gating in excised inside-out patches from Hi-5 insect cells and NIH3T3 cells expressing recombinant CFTR. Genistein (50 μM) did not open phosphorylated CFTR channels by itself, but increased the ATP- induced CFTR channel current by approximately twofold. A similar magnitude of enhancement was observed when genistein was applied with PKI, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A, or vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, suggesting that inhibition of protein phosphatases or tyrosine kinases does not account for genistein's effects. The enhancement of channel current increased with increasing concentrations of genistein and reached a maximum at 35 μM genistein. At higher concentrations of genistein concentration, CFTR channel current decreased, resulting in a bell-shaped dose–response relationship. In the absence of genistein, both open- and closed-time histograms could be fitted with a single exponential function, yielding a mean open time (τO) of 0.302 ± 0.002 s, and a mean closed time (τC) of 0.406 ± 0.003 s. In the presence of 50 μM genistein, the open time histogram could be fitted with a double exponential function with τO1 = 0.429 ± 0.003 s and τO2 = 2.033 ± 0.173 s. Thus, genistein induced a prolonged open state, an effect that mimics that of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs. Closed time analysis showed that 50 μM genistein caused a prolonged closed state with a time constant of 2.410 ± 0

  10. Molecular basis of fast inactivation in voltage and Ca2+-activated K+ channels: a transmembrane beta-subunit homolog.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1999-03-30

    Voltage-dependent and calcium-sensitive K+ (MaxiK) channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability, secretion, and vascular tone because of their ability to sense transmembrane voltage and intracellular Ca2+. In most tissues, their stimulation results in a noninactivating hyperpolarizing K+ current that reduces excitability. In addition to noninactivating MaxiK currents, an inactivating MaxiK channel phenotype is found in cells like chromaffin cells and hippocampal neurons. The molecular determinants underlying inactivating MaxiK channels remain unknown. Herein, we report a transmembrane beta subunit (beta2) that yields inactivating MaxiK currents on coexpression with the pore-forming alpha subunit of MaxiK channels. Intracellular application of trypsin as well as deletion of 19 N-terminal amino acids of the beta2 subunit abolished inactivation of the alpha subunit. Conversely, fusion of these N-terminal amino acids to the noninactivating smooth muscle beta1 subunit leads to an inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels. Furthermore, addition of a synthetic N-terminal peptide of the beta2 subunit causes inactivation of the MaxiK channel alpha subunit by occluding its K+-conducting pore resembling the inactivation caused by the "ball" peptide in voltage-dependent K+ channels. Thus, the inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels in native tissues can result from the association with different beta subunits. PMID:10097176

  11. Molecular basis of fast inactivation in voltage and Ca2+-activated K+ channels: A transmembrane β-subunit homolog

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Meera, Pratap; Toro, Ligia

    1999-01-01

    Voltage-dependent and calcium-sensitive K+ (MaxiK) channels are key regulators of neuronal excitability, secretion, and vascular tone because of their ability to sense transmembrane voltage and intracellular Ca2+. In most tissues, their stimulation results in a noninactivating hyperpolarizing K+ current that reduces excitability. In addition to noninactivating MaxiK currents, an inactivating MaxiK channel phenotype is found in cells like chromaffin cells and hippocampal neurons. The molecular determinants underlying inactivating MaxiK channels remain unknown. Herein, we report a transmembrane β subunit (β2) that yields inactivating MaxiK currents on coexpression with the pore-forming α subunit of MaxiK channels. Intracellular application of trypsin as well as deletion of 19 N-terminal amino acids of the β2 subunit abolished inactivation of the α subunit. Conversely, fusion of these N-terminal amino acids to the noninactivating smooth muscle β1 subunit leads to an inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels. Furthermore, addition of a synthetic N-terminal peptide of the β2 subunit causes inactivation of the MaxiK channel α subunit by occluding its K+-conducting pore resembling the inactivation caused by the “ball” peptide in voltage-dependent K+ channels. Thus, the inactivating phenotype of MaxiK channels in native tissues can result from the association with different β subunits. PMID:10097176

  12. Three-dimensional reconstruction of human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel revealed an ellipsoidal structure with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain.

    PubMed

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-10-31

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 x 106 x 162 A. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR.anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18723516

  13. Three-dimensional Reconstruction of Human Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Revealed an Ellipsoidal Structure with Orifices beneath the Putative Transmembrane Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Mio, Kazuhiro; Ogura, Toshihiko; Mio, Muneyo; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang; Sato, Chikara; Sohma, Yoshiro

    2008-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a membrane-integral protein that belongs to an ATP-binding cassette superfamily. Mutations in the CFTR gene cause cystic fibrosis in which salt, water, and protein transports are defective in various tissues. Here we expressed wild-type human CFTR as a FLAG-fused protein in HEK293 cells heterologously and purified it in three steps: anti-FLAG and wheat germ agglutinin affinity chromatographies and size exclusion chromatography. The stoichiometry of the protein was analyzed using various biochemical approaches, including chemical cross-linking, blue-native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography, and electron microscopy (EM) observation of antibody-decorated CFTR. All these data support a dimeric assembly of CFTR. Using 5,039 automatically selected particles from negatively stained EM images, the three-dimensional structure of CFTR was reconstructed at 2-nm resolution assuming a 2-fold symmetry. CFTR, presumably in a closed state, was shown to be an ellipsoidal particle with dimensions of 120 × 106 × 162Å. It comprises a small dome-shaped extracellular and membrane-spanning domain and a large cytoplasmic domain with orifices beneath the putative transmembrane domain. EM observation of CFTR·anti-regulatory domain antibody complex confirmed that two regulatory domains are located around the bottom end of the larger oval cytoplasmic domain. PMID:18723516

  14. Novel regulation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel gating by external chloride.

    PubMed

    Wright, Angela M; Gong, Xiandi; Verdon, Burns; Linsdell, Paul; Mehta, Anil; Riordan, John R; Argent, Barry E; Gray, Mike A

    2004-10-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is vital for Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) transport in many epithelia. As the HCO(3)(-) concentration in epithelial secretions varies and can reach as high as 140 mm, the lumen-facing domains of CFTR are exposed to large reciprocal variations in Cl(-) and HCO(3)(-) levels. We have investigated whether changes in the extracellular anionic environment affects the activity of CFTR using the patch clamp technique. In fast whole cell current recordings, the replacement of 100 mm external Cl(-) ((Cl(o)(-))) with HCO(3)(-), Br(-), NO(3)(-), or aspartate(-) inhibited inward CFTR current (Cl(-) efflux) by approximately 50% in a reversible manner. Lowering Cl(o)(-) alone by iso-osmotic replacement with mannitol also reduced Cl(-) efflux to a similar extent. The maximal inhibition of CFTR current was approximately 70%. Raising cytosolic calcium shifted the Cl(-) dose-inhibition curve to the left but did not alter the maximal current inhibition observed. In contrast, a reduction in the internal [Cl(-)] neither inhibited CFTR nor altered the block caused by reduced Cl(o)(-). Single channel recordings from outside-out patches showed that lowering Cl(o)(-) markedly reduced channel open probability with little effect on unitary conductance. Together, these results indicate that alterations in Cl(o)(-) alone and not the Cl(-)/HCO(3)(-) ratio regulate the gating of CFTR. Physiologically, our data have implications for current models of epithelial HCO(3)(-) secretion and for the control of pH at epithelial cell surfaces. PMID:15286085

  15. Halide permeation in wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels.

    PubMed

    Tabcharani, J A; Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-10-01

    Permeation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channels by halide ions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. In cell-attached patches with a high Cl pipette solution, the CFTR channel displayed outwardly rectifying currents and had a conductance near the membrane potential of 6.0 pS at 22 degrees C or 8.7 pS at 37 degrees C. The current-voltage relationship became linear when patches were excised into symmetrical, -tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminomethane sulfonate (TES)-buffered solutions. Under these conditions, conductance increased from 7.0 pS at 22 degrees C to 10.9 pS at 37 degrees C. The conductance at 22 degrees C was approximately 1.0 pS higher when TES and HEPES were omitted from the solution, suggesting weak, voltage-independent block by pH buffers. The relationship between conductance and Cl activity was hyperbolic and well fitted by a Michaelis-Menten-type function having a of approximately 38 mM and maximum conductance of 10 pS at 22 degrees C. Dilution potentials measured with NaCl gradients indicated high anion selectivity (P/P = 0.003-0.028). Biionic reversal potentials measured immediately after exposure of the cytoplasmic side to various test anions indicated P(1.8) > P(1. 3) > P(1.0) > P(0.17), consistent with a "weak field strength" selectivity site. The same sequence was obtained for external halides, although inward F flow was not observed. Iodide currents were protocol dependent and became blocked after 1-2 min. This coincided with a large shift in the (extrapolated) reversal potential to values indicating a greatly reduced I/Cl permeability ratio (P/P< 0.4). The switch to low I permeability was enhanced at potentials that favored Cl entry into the pore and was not observed in the R347D mutant, which is thought to lack an anion binding site involved in multi-ion pore behavior. Interactions between Cl and I ions may influence I permeation and be

  16. Dibasic protein kinase A sites regulate bursting rate and nucleotide sensitivity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Mathews, C J; Tabcharani, J A; Chang, X B; Jensen, T J; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-04-15

    1. The relationship between phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel and its gating by nucleotides was examined using the patch clamp technique by comparing strongly phosphorylated wild-type (WT) channels with weakly phosphorylated mutant channels lacking four (4SA) or all ten (10SA) dibasic consensus sequences for phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). 2. The open probability (Po) of strongly phosphorylated WT channels in excised patches was about twice that of 4SA and 10SA channels, after correcting for the number of functional channels per patch by addition of adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The mean burst durations of WT and mutant channels were similar, and therefore the elevated Po of WT was due to its higher bursting rate. 3. The ATP dependence of the 10SA mutant was shifted to higher nucleotide concentrations compared with WT channels. The relationship between Po and [ATP] was noticeably sigmoid for 10SA channels (Hill coefficient, 1.8), consistent with positive co-operativity between two sites. Increasing ATP concentration to 10 mM caused the Po of both WT and 10SA channels to decline. 4. Wild-type and mutant CFTR channels became locked in open bursts when exposed to mixtures of ATP and the non-hydrolysable analogue AMP-PNP. The rate at which the low phosphorylation mutants became locked open was about half that of WT channels, consistent with Po being the principal determinant of locking rate in WT and mutant channels. 5. We conclude that phosphorylation at 'weak' PKA sites is sufficient to sustain the interactions between the ATP binding domains that mediate locking by AMP-PNP. Phosphorylation of the strong dibasic PKA sites controls the bursting rate and Po of WT channels by increasing the apparent affinity of CFTR for ATP. PMID:9508802

  17. Dibasic protein kinase A sites regulate bursting rate and nucleotide sensitivity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Ceri J; Tabcharani, Joseph A; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Jensen, Timothy J; Riordan, John R; Hanrahan, John W

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between phosphorylation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel and its gating by nucleotides was examined using the patch clamp technique by comparing strongly phosphorylated wild-type (WT) channels with weakly phosphorylated mutant channels lacking four (4SA) or all ten (10SA) dibasic consensus sequences for phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). The open probability (Po) of strongly phosphorylated WT channels in excised patches was about twice that of 4SA and 10SA channels, after correcting for the number of functional channels per patch by addition of adenylylimidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP). The mean burst durations of WT and mutant channels were similar, and therefore the elevated Po of WT was due to its higher bursting rate. The ATP dependence of the 10SA mutant was shifted to higher nucleotide concentrations compared with WT channels. The relationship between Po and [ATP] was noticeably sigmoid for 10SA channels (Hill coefficient, 1.8), consistent with positive co-operativity between two sites. Increasing ATP concentration to 10 mM caused the Po of both WT and 10SA channels to decline. Wild-type and mutant CFTR channels became locked in open bursts when exposed to mixtures of ATP and the non-hydrolysable analogue AMP-PNP. The rate at which the low phosphorylation mutants became locked open was about half that of WT channels, consistent with Po being the principal determinant of locking rate in WT and mutant channels. We conclude that phosphorylation at ‘weak’ PKA sites is sufficient to sustain the interactions between the ATP binding domains that mediate locking by AMP-PNP. Phosphorylation of the strong dibasic PKA sites controls the bursting rate and Po of WT channels by increasing the apparent affinity of CFTR for ATP. PMID:9508802

  18. Determination of the functional unit of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel. One polypeptide forms one pore.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Cui, Guiying; Liu, Xuehong; Song, Binlin; Dawson, David C; McCarty, Nael A

    2005-01-01

    The magnitudes and distributions of subconductance states were studied in chloride channels formed by the wild-type cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and in CFTRs bearing amino acid substitutions in transmembrane segment 6. Within an open burst, it was possible to distinguish three distinct conductance states referred to as the full conductance, subconductance 1, and subconductance 2 states. Amino acid substitutions in transmembrane segment 6 altered the duration and probability of occurrence of these subconductance states but did not greatly alter their relative amplitudes. Results from real time measurements indicated that covalent modification of single R334C-CFTR channels by [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted in the simultaneous modification of all three conductance levels in what appeared to be a single step, without changing the proportion of time spent in each state. This behavior suggests that at least a portion of the conduction path is common to all three conducting states. The time course for the modification of R334C-CFTR, measured in outside-out macropatches using a rapid perfusion system, was also consistent with a single modification step as if each pore contained only a single copy of the cysteine at position 334. These results are consistent with a model for the CFTR conduction pathway in which a single anion-conducting pore is formed by a single CFTR polypeptide. PMID:15504728

  19. The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR): three-dimensional structure and localization of a channel gate.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Mark F; O'Ryan, Liam P; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2011-12-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  20. Halide Permeation in Wild-Type and Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channels

    PubMed Central

    Tabcharani, Joseph A.; Linsdell, Paul; Hanrahan, John W.

    1997-01-01

    Permeation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channels by halide ions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. In cell-attached patches with a high Cl− pipette solution, the CFTR channel displayed outwardly rectifying currents and had a conductance near the membrane potential of 6.0 pS at 22°C or 8.7 pS at 37°C. The current–voltage relationship became linear when patches were excised into symmetrical, N-tris(hydroxymethyl)methyl-2-aminomethane sulfonate (TES)-buffered solutions. Under these conditions, conductance increased from 7.0 pS at 22°C to 10.9 pS at 37°C. The conductance at 22°C was ∼1.0 pS higher when TES and HEPES were omitted from the solution, suggesting weak, voltage-independent block by pH buffers. The relationship between conductance and Cl− activity was hyperbolic and well fitted by a Michaelis-Menten–type function having a Km of ∼38 mM and maximum conductance of 10 pS at 22°C. Dilution potentials measured with NaCl gradients indicated high anion selectivity (PNa/PCl = 0.003–0.028). Biionic reversal potentials measured immediately after exposure of the cytoplasmic side to various test anions indicated PI (1.8) > PBr (1.3) > PCl (1.0) > PF (0.17), consistent with a “weak field strength” selectivity site. The same sequence was obtained for external halides, although inward F− flow was not observed. Iodide currents were protocol dependent and became blocked after 1–2 min. This coincided with a large shift in the (extrapolated) reversal potential to values indicating a greatly reduced I−/Cl− permeability ratio (PI/PCl < 0.4). The switch to low I− permeability was enhanced at potentials that favored Cl− entry into the pore and was not observed in the R347D mutant, which is thought to lack an anion binding site involved in multi-ion pore behavior. Interactions between Cl− and I− ions may influence I− permeation and be

  1. Regulation of the gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator C1 channels by phosphorylation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, T C; Nagel, G; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-01-01

    Opening of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channels requires their phosphorylation by protein kinase A followed by exposure to ATP. We examined the interaction between nucleotides and phosphorylated CFTR channels by recording currents in intact cardiac myocytes and in excised patches. We found that, although the hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue 5'-adenosine(beta,gamma- imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) cannot open phosphorylated CFTR channels, it can cause channels opened by ATP to remain open for many minutes. This suggests that ATP action at one site on CFTR is a prerequisite for AMP-PNP action at a second site. However, this action of AMP-PNP is restricted to highly phosphorylated CFTR channels, which, in the presence of ATP, display a relatively high open probability, but is not seen in partially phosphorylated CFTR channels, which have a low open probability in the presence of ATP. Our findings argue that incremental phosphorylation differentially regulates the interactions between nucleotides and the two nucleotide binding domains of CFTR. The nature of those interactions suggests that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide binding domain controls channel opening and ATP hydrolysis at the other regulates channel closing. Images PMID:7515176

  2. Regulation of the gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator C1 channels by phosphorylation and ATP hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, T C; Nagel, G; Nairn, A C; Gadsby, D C

    1994-05-24

    Opening of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channels requires their phosphorylation by protein kinase A followed by exposure to ATP. We examined the interaction between nucleotides and phosphorylated CFTR channels by recording currents in intact cardiac myocytes and in excised patches. We found that, although the hydrolysis-resistant ATP analogue 5'-adenosine(beta,gamma- imino)triphosphate (AMP-PNP) cannot open phosphorylated CFTR channels, it can cause channels opened by ATP to remain open for many minutes. This suggests that ATP action at one site on CFTR is a prerequisite for AMP-PNP action at a second site. However, this action of AMP-PNP is restricted to highly phosphorylated CFTR channels, which, in the presence of ATP, display a relatively high open probability, but is not seen in partially phosphorylated CFTR channels, which have a low open probability in the presence of ATP. Our findings argue that incremental phosphorylation differentially regulates the interactions between nucleotides and the two nucleotide binding domains of CFTR. The nature of those interactions suggests that ATP hydrolysis at one nucleotide binding domain controls channel opening and ATP hydrolysis at the other regulates channel closing. PMID:7515176

  3. Mouse cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator forms cAMP-PKA-regulated apical chloride channels in cortical collecting duct.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ming; Dong, Ke; Egan, Marie E; Giebisch, Gerhard H; Boulpaep, Emile L; Hebert, Steven C

    2010-03-30

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is expressed in many segments of the mammalian nephron, where it may interact with and modulate the activity of a variety of apical membrane proteins, including the renal outer medullary potassium (ROMK) K(+) channel. However, the expression of CFTR in apical cell membranes or its function as a Cl(-) channel in native renal epithelia has not been demonstrated. Here, we establish that CFTR forms protein kinase A (PKA)-activated Cl(-) channels in the apical membrane of principal cells from the cortical collecting duct obtained from mice. These Cl(-) channels were observed in cell-attached apical patches of principal cells after stimulation by forskolin/3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. Quiescent Cl(-) channels were present in patches excised from untreated tubules because they could be activated after exposure to Mg-ATP and the catalytic subunit of PKA. The single-channel conductance, kinetics, and anion selectivity of these Cl(-) channels were the same as those of recombinant mouse CFTR channels expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. The CFTR-specific closed-channel blocker CFTR(inh)-172 abolished apical Cl(-) channel activity in excised patches. Moreover, apical Cl(-) channel activity was completely absent in principal cells from transgenic mice expressing the DeltaF508 CFTR mutation but was present and unaltered in ROMK-null mice. We discuss the physiologic implications of open CFTR Cl(-) channels on salt handling by the collecting duct and on the functional CFTR-ROMK interactions in modulating the metabolic ATP-sensing of ROMK. PMID:20231442

  4. Transmembrane Communication: General Principles and Lessons from the Structure and Function of the M2 Proton Channel, K+ Channels, and Integrin Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Grigoryan, Gevorg; Moore, David T.; DeGrado, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Signal transduction across biological membranes is central to life. This process generally happens through communication between different domains and hierarchical coupling of information. Here, we review structural and thermodynamic principles behind transmembrane (TM) signal transduction and discuss common themes. Communication between signaling domains can be understood in terms of thermodynamic and kinetic principles, and complex signaling patterns can arise from simple wiring of thermodynamically coupled domains. We relate this to functions of several signal transduction systems: the M2 proton channel from influenza A virus, potassium channels, integrin receptors, and bacterial kinases. We also discuss key features in the structural rearrangements responsible for signal transduction in these systems. PMID:21548783

  5. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  6. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides

    SciTech Connect

    Du Yuzhe; Song Weizhong; Groome, James R.; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo Ningguang; Dong Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids.

  7. A negative charge in transmembrane segment 1 of domain II of the cockroach sodium channel is critical for channel gating and action of pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Du, Yuzhe; Song, Weizhong; Groome, James R; Nomura, Yoshiko; Luo, Ningguang; Dong, Ke

    2010-08-15

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are the primary target of pyrethroids, an important class of synthetic insecticides. Pyrethroids bind to a distinct receptor site on sodium channels and prolong the open state by inhibiting channel deactivation and inactivation. Recent studies have begun to reveal sodium channel residues important for pyrethroid binding. However, how pyrethroid binding leads to inhibition of sodium channel deactivation and inactivation remains elusive. In this study, we show that a negatively charged aspartic acid residue at position 802 (D802) located in the extracellular end of transmembrane segment 1 of domain II (IIS1) is critical for both the action of pyrethroids and the voltage dependence of channel activation. Charge-reversing or -neutralizing substitutions (K, G, or A) of D802 shifted the voltage dependence of activation in the depolarizing direction and reduced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide. The charge-reversing mutation D802K also accelerated open-state deactivation, which may have counteracted the inhibition of sodium channel deactivation by deltamethrin. In contrast, the D802G substitution slowed open-state deactivation, suggesting an additional mechanism for neutralizing the action of deltamethrin. Importantly, Schild analysis showed that D802 is not involved in pyrethroid binding. Thus, we have identified a sodium channel residue that is critical for regulating the action of pyrethroids on the sodium channel without affecting the receptor site of pyrethroids. PMID:20561903

  8. Asymmetric distribution of charged lipids between the leaflets of a vesicle bilayer induced by melittin and alamethicin

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo; Heller, William T

    2011-01-01

    Cellular membranes are complex mixtures of lipids, proteins, and other small molecules that provide functional, dynamic barriers between the cell and its environment, as well as between environments within the cell. The lipid composition of the membrane is highly specific and controlled in terms of both content and lipid localization. The membrane structure results from the complex interplay between the wide varieties of molecules present. Here, small-angle neutron scattering and selective deuterium labeling were used to probe the impact of the membrane-active peptides melittin and alamethicin on the structure of lipid bilayers composed of a mixture of the lipids dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) and chain-perdeuterated dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC). We found that both peptides enriched the outer leaflet of the bilayer with the negatively charged DMPG, creating an asymmetric distribution of lipids. The level of enrichment is peptide concentration-dependent and is stronger for melittin than it is for alamethicin. The enrichment between the inner and outer bilayer leaflets occurs at very low peptide concentrations and increases with peptide concentration, including when the peptide adopts a membrane-spanning, pore-forming state. The results suggest that these membrane-active peptides may have a secondary stressful effect on target cells at low concentrations that results from a disruption of the lipid distribution between the inner and outer leaflets of the bilayer that is independent of the formation of transmembrane pores.

  9. Impact of biofilm accumulation on transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop: effects of crossflow velocity, feed spacer and biodegradable nutrient.

    PubMed

    Dreszer, C; Flemming, H-C; Zwijnenburg, A; Kruithof, J C; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2014-03-01

    Biofilm formation causes performance loss in spiral-wound membrane systems. In this study a microfiltration membrane was used in experiments to simulate fouling in spiral-wound reverse osmosis (RO) and nanofiltration (NF) membrane modules without the influence of concentration polarization. The resistance of a microfiltration membrane is much lower than the intrinsic biofilm resistance, enabling the detection of biofilm accumulation in an early stage. The impact of biofilm accumulation on the transmembrane (biofilm) resistance and feed channel pressure drop as a function of the crossflow velocity (0.05 and 0.20 m s(-1)) and feed spacer presence was studied in transparent membrane biofouling monitors operated at a permeate flux of 20 L m(-2) h(-1). As biodegradable nutrient, acetate was dosed to the feed water (1.0 and 0.25 mg L(-1) carbon) to enhance biofilm accumulation in the monitors. The studies showed that biofilm formation caused an increased transmembrane resistance and feed channel pressure drop. The effect was strongest at the highest crossflow velocity (0.2 m s(-1)) and in the presence of a feed spacer. Simulating conditions as currently applied in nanofiltration and reverse osmosis installations (crossflow velocity 0.2 m s(-1) and standard feed spacer) showed that the impact of biofilm formation on performance, in terms of transmembrane and feed channel pressure drop, was strong. This emphasized the importance of hydrodynamics and feed spacer design. Biomass accumulation was related to the nutrient load (nutrient concentration and linear flow velocity). Reducing the nutrient concentration of the feed water enabled the application of higher crossflow velocities. Pretreatment to remove biodegradable nutrient and removal of biomass from the membrane elements played an important part to prevent or restrict biofouling. PMID:24374131

  10. External Zn(2+) binding to cysteine-substituted cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator constructs regulates channel gating and curcumin potentiation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangyu; Linsley, Rheeann; Norimatsu, Yohei

    2016-07-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is activated by ATP binding-induced dimerization of nucleotide-binding domains, the interaction between the phosphorylated regulatory (R) domain and the curcumin-sensitive interface between intracellular loop (ICL) 1 and ICL4, and the resultant inward-to-'outward' reorientation of transmembrane domains. Although transmembrane helices (TM) 2 and TM11 link the ICL1-ICL4 interface with the interface between extracellular loop (ECL) 1 and ECL6, it is unknown whether both interfaces are gating-coupled during the reorientation. Herein, R334C and T1122C mutations were used to engineer two Zn(2+) bridges near and at the ECL1-ECL6 interface, respectively, and the gating effects of a Zn(2+) disturbance at the ECL1-ECL6 interface on the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction were determined. The results showed that both Zn(2+) bridges inhibited channel activity in a dose- and Cl(-) -dependent manner, and the inhibition was reversed by a washout or suppressed by thiol-specific modification. Interestingly, their Cl(-) -dependent Zn(2+) inhibition was weakened at higher Zn(2+) concentrations, their Zn(2+) affinity was stronger in the resting state than in the activated state, and their activation current noises were decreased by external Zn(2+) binding. More importantly, the external Zn(2+) inhibition was reversed by internal curcumin in the R334C construct but not in the T1122C mutant. Therefore, although both Zn(2+) bridges may promote channel closure, external Zn(2+) may disturb the ECL1-ECL6 interface and thus prevent the stimulatory ICL1/ICL4-R interaction and curcumin potentiation via a gating coupling between these two interfaces. PMID:27175795

  11. Molecular determinants of Au(CN)(2)(-) binding and permeability within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel pore.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiandi; Burbridge, Susan M; Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-04-01

    Lyotropic anions with low free energy of hydration show both high permeability and tight binding in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore. However, the molecular bases of anion selectivity and anion binding within the CFTR pore are not well defined and the relationship between binding and selectivity is unclear. We have studied the effects of point mutations throughout the sixth transmembrane (TM6) region of CFTR on channel block by, and permeability of, the highly lyotropic Au(CN)(2)(-) anion, using patch clamp recording from transiently transfected baby hamster kidney cells. Channel block by 100 microM Au(CN)(2)(-), a measure of intrapore anion binding affinity, was significantly weakened in the CFTR mutants K335A, F337S, T338A and I344A, significantly strengthened in S341A and R352Q and unaltered in K329A. Relative Au(CN)(2)(-) permeability was significantly increased in T338A and S341A, significantly decreased in F337S and unaffected in all other mutants studied. These results are used to define a model of the pore containing multiple anion binding sites but a more localised anion selectivity region. The central part of TM6 (F337-S341) appears to be the main determinant of both anion binding and anion selectivity. However, comparison of the effects of individual mutations on binding and selectivity suggest that these two aspects of the permeation mechanism are not strongly interdependent. PMID:11927667

  12. Multiple inhibitory effects of Au(CN)(2-) ions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel currents.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul; Gong, Xiandi

    2002-04-01

    Lyotropic pseudohalide anions are potentially useful as high affinity probes of Cl(-) channel pores. However, the interaction between these pseudohalides and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel have not been described in detail. Here we show that Au(CN)(2-) ions applied to the intracellular face of membrane patches from stably transfected baby hamster kidney cells inhibit CFTR channel currents by at least two mechanisms, which can be distinguished at the single channel level or by inhibiting channel closure using 2 mM pyrophosphate. Low concentrations (< 10 microM) of Au(CN)(2-) significantly reduced CFTR channel open probability. This effect was apparently voltage insensitive, independent of extracellular Cl(-) concentration, and lost following exposure to pyrophosphate. Higher concentrations of intracellular Au(CN)(2-) caused an apparent reduction in unitary current amplitude, presumably due to a kinetically fast blocking reaction. This effect, isolated following exposure to pyrophosphate, was strongly voltage dependent (apparent K(d) 61.6 microM at -100 mV and 913 microM at +60 mV). Both the affinity and voltage dependence of block were highly sensitive to extracellular Cl(-) concentration. We propose that Au(CN)(2-) has at least two inhibitory effects on CFTR currents: a high affinity effect on channel gating due to action on a cytoplasmically accessible aspect of the channel and a lower affinity block within the open channel pore. These results offer important caveats for the use of lyotropic pseudohalide anions such as Au(CN)(2-) as specific high affinity probes of Cl(-) channel pores. PMID:11927666

  13. Multiple inhibitory effects of Au(CN)2− ions on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel currents

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Gong, Xiandi

    2002-01-01

    Lyotropic pseudohalide anions are potentially useful as high affinity probes of Cl− channel pores. However, the interaction between these pseudohalides and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel have not been described in detail. Here we show that Au(CN)2− ions applied to the intracellular face of membrane patches from stably transfected baby hamster kidney cells inhibit CFTR channel currents by at least two mechanisms, which can be distinguished at the single channel level or by inhibiting channel closure using 2 mm pyrophosphate. Low concentrations (< 10 μm) of Au(CN)2− significantly reduced CFTR channel open probability. This effect was apparently voltage insensitive, independent of extracellular Cl− concentration, and lost following exposure to pyrophosphate. Higher concentrations of intracellular Au(CN)2− caused an apparent reduction in unitary current amplitude, presumably due to a kinetically fast blocking reaction. This effect, isolated following exposure to pyrophosphate, was strongly voltage dependent (apparent Kd 61.6 μm at −100 mV and 913 μm at +60 mV). Both the affinity and voltage dependence of block were highly sensitive to extracellular Cl− concentration. We propose that Au(CN)2− has at least two inhibitory effects on CFTR currents: a high affinity effect on channel gating due to action on a cytoplasmically accessible aspect of the channel and a lower affinity block within the open channel pore. These results offer important caveats for the use of lyotropic pseudohalide anions such as Au(CN)2− as specific high affinity probes of Cl− channel pores. PMID:11927666

  14. Multi-Ion Mechanism for Ion Permeation and Block in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Tabcharani, Joseph A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    1997-01-01

    The mechanism of Cl− ion permeation through single cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels was studied using the channel-blocking ion gluconate. High concentrations of intracellular gluconate ions cause a rapid, voltage-dependent block of CFTR Cl− channels by binding to a site ∼40% of the way through the transmembrane electric field. The affinity of gluconate block was influenced by both intracellular and extracellular Cl− concentration. Increasing extracellular Cl− concentration reduced intracellular gluconate affinity, suggesting that a repulsive interaction occurs between Cl− and gluconate ions within the channel pore, an effect that would require the pore to be capable of holding more than one ion simultaneously. This effect of extracellular Cl− is not shared by extracellular gluconate ions, suggesting that gluconate is unable to enter the pore from the outside. Increasing the intracellular Cl− concentration also reduced the affinity of intracellular gluconate block, consistent with competition between intracellular Cl− and gluconate ions for a common binding site in the pore. Based on this evidence that CFTR is a multi-ion pore, we have analyzed Cl− permeation and gluconate block using discrete-state models with multiple occupancy. Both two- and three-site models were able to reproduce all of the experimental data with similar accuracy, including the dependence of blocker affinity on external Cl− (but not gluconate) ions and the dependence of channel conductance on Cl− concentration. The three-site model was also able to predict block by internal and external thiocyanate (SCN−) ions and anomalous mole fraction behavior seen in Cl−/SCN− mixtures. PMID:9379169

  15. Multi-Ion mechanism for ion permeation and block in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Tabcharani, J A; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-10-01

    The mechanism of Cl ion permeation through single cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels was studied using the channel-blocking ion gluconate. High concentrations of intracellular gluconate ions cause a rapid, voltage-dependent block of CFTR Cl channels by binding to a site approximately 40% of the way through the transmembrane electric field. The affinity of gluconate block was influenced by both intracellular and extracellular Cl concentration. Increasing extracellular Cl concentration reduced intracellular gluconate affinity, suggesting that a repulsive interaction occurs between Cl and gluconate ions within the channel pore, an effect that would require the pore to be capable of holding more than one ion simultaneously. This effect of extracellular Cl is not shared by extracellular gluconate ions, suggesting that gluconate is unable to enter the pore from the outside. Increasing the intracellular Cl concentration also reduced the affinity of intracellular gluconate block, consistent with competition between intracellular Cl and gluconate ions for a common binding site in the pore. Based on this evidence that CFTR is a multi-ion pore, we have analyzed Cl permeation and gluconate block using discrete-state models with multiple occupancy. Both two- and three-site models were able to reproduce all of the experimental data with similar accuracy, including the dependence of blocker affinity on external Cl (but not gluconate) ions and the dependence of channel conductance on Cl concentration. The three-site model was also able to predict block by internal and external thiocyanate (SCN) ions and anomalous mole fraction behavior seen in Cl/SCN mixtures. PMID:9379169

  16. Interaction between 2 extracellular loops influences the activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Broadbent, Steven D; Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2014-10-01

    Activity of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is thought to be controlled by cytoplasmic factors. However, recent evidence has shown that overall channel activity is also influenced by extracellular anions that interact directly with the extracellular loops (ECLs) of the CFTR protein. Very little is known about the structure of the ECLs or how substances interacting with these ECLs might affect CFTR function. We used patch-clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced throughout ECL1 and 2 key sites in ECL4. Furthermore, interactions between ECL1 and ECL4 were investigated by the formation of disulfide crosslinks between cysteines introduced into these 2 regions. Crosslinks could be formed between R899C (in ECL4) and a number of sites in ECL1 in a manner that was dependent on channel activity, suggesting that the relative orientation of these 2 loops changes on activation. Formation of these crosslinks inhibited channel function, suggesting that relative movement of these ECLs is important to normal channel function. Implications of these findings for the effects of mutations in the ECLs that are associated with cystic fibrosis and interactions with extracellular substances that influence channel activity are discussed. PMID:25253636

  17. State-dependent inhibition of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels by a novel peptide toxin.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Matthew D; Thompson, Christopher H; Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Freeman, Cody S; Schay, Eszter; Szakács, Gergely; Bakos, Eva; Sarkadi, Balázs; McMaster, Denis; French, Robert J; Pohl, Jan; Kubanek, Julia; McCarty, Nael A

    2007-12-28

    Peptide toxins from animal venom have been used for many years for the identification and study of cation-permeable ion channels. However, no peptide toxins have been identified that interact with known anion-selective channels, including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the protein defective in cystic fibrosis and a member of the ABC transporter superfamily. Here, we describe the identification and initial characterization of a novel 3.7-kDa peptide toxin, GaTx1, which is a potent and reversible inhibitor of CFTR, acting from the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Thus, GaTx1 is the first peptide toxin identified that inhibits a chloride channel of known molecular identity. GaTx1 exhibited high specificity, showing no effect on a panel of nine transport proteins, including Cl(-) and K(+) channels, and ABC transporters. GaTx1-mediated inhibition of CFTR channel activity is strongly state-dependent; both potency and efficacy are reduced under conditions of elevated [ATP], suggesting that GaTx1 may function as a non-competitive inhibitor of ATP-dependent channel gating. This tool will allow the application of new quantitative approaches to study CFTR structure and function, particularly with respect to the conformational changes that underlie transitions between open and closed states. PMID:17951250

  18. cAMP- and Ca2+-independent activation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels by phenylimidazothiazole drugs.

    PubMed

    Becq, F; Verrier, B; Chang, X B; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1996-07-01

    Patch-clamp, iodide efflux, and biochemical techniques were used to evaluate the ability of phenylimidazothiazoles to open normal and mutated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channels and to investigate the mechanism of activation. As reported previously for bromotetramisole, levamisole activated wild-type CFTR channels stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells in the absence of other secretagogues and without elevating intracellular cAMP or calcium. The protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor N - (2-(p-bromocinnamylamino)ethyl)-5-isoquinolinesul-fonamid e abolished activation by forskolin but only partially inhibited stimulation by levamisole, suggesting the involvement of other kinases. CFTR channels bearing mutations at multiple phosphorylation sites, in the membrane domains, and in the first nucleotide binding domain (including the disease-causing mutations G551D and DeltaF508) all responded to phenylimidazothiazoles. Moreover, levamisole and bromotetramisole increased the activity of wild-type and mutant channels already exposed to PKA + MgATP, consistent with the inhibition of a constitutive, membrane-associated phosphatase activity. We conclude that phenylimidazothiazole drugs can open normal and mutated CFTR channels by stabilization of phosphoforms of CFTR that are produced by basal activity of PKA and alternative protein kinases. If similar stimulation is observed in humans in vivo, phenylimidazothiazoles may be useful in the development of pharmacological therapies for cystic fibrosis. PMID:8663098

  19. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and the outwardly rectifying chloride channel: a relationship between two chloride channels expressed in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hryciw, D H; Guggino, W B

    2000-11-01

    1. Mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) result in the primary defect observed in patients with cystic fibrosis. 2. The CFTR is a member of the ATPase-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family but, unlike other members of this group, CFTR conducts a chloride current that is activated by cAMP. 3. In epithelial cells, the cAMP-stimulated chloride current is conducted by both CFTR and the outwardly rectifying chloride channel (ORCC). 4. The present review summarizes the current knowledge of the properties of the two channels, as well as their relationship. Because the gene encoding the ORCC has not been identified, a discussion as to possible candidates for this chloride channel is included. PMID:11071305

  20. Severed Channels Probe Regulation of Gating of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator by Its Cytoplasmic Domains

    PubMed Central

    Csanády, László; Chan, Kim W.; Seto-Young, Donna; Kopsco, David C.; Nairn, Angus C.; Gadsby, David C.

    2000-01-01

    Opening and closing of a CFTR Cl− channel is controlled by PKA-mediated phosphorylation of its cytoplasmic regulatory (R) domain and by ATP binding, and likely hydrolysis, at its two nucleotide binding domains. Functional interactions between the R domain and the two nucleotide binding domains were probed by characterizing the gating of severed CFTR channels expressed in Xenopus oocytes. Expression levels were assessed using measurements of oocyte conductance, and detailed functional characteristics of the channels were extracted from kinetic analyses of macroscopic current relaxations and of single-channel gating events in membrane patches excised from the oocytes. The kinetic behavior of wild-type (WT) CFTR channels was compared with that of split CFTR channels bearing a single cut (between residues 633 and 634) just before the R domain, of split channels with a single cut (between residues 835 and 837) just after the R domain, and of split channels from which the entire R domain (residues 634–836) between those two cut sites was omitted. The channels cut before the R domain had characteristics almost identical to those of WT channels, except for less than twofold shorter open burst durations in the presence of PKA. Channels cut just after the R domain were characterized by a low level of activity even without phosphorylation, strong stimulation by PKA, enhanced apparent affinity for ATP as assayed by open probability, and a somewhat destabilized binding site for the locking action of the nonhydrolyzable ATP analog AMPPNP. Split channels with no R domain (from coexpression of CFTR segments 1–633 and 837–1480) were highly active without phosphorylation, but otherwise displayed the characteristics of channels cut after the R domain, including higher apparent ATP affinity, and less tight binding of AMPPNP at the locking site, than for WT. Intriguingly, severed channels with no R domain were still noticeably stimulated by PKA, implying that activation of WT

  1. Nano-pipette directed transport of nanotube transmembrane channels and hybrid vesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Balazs, Anna C.

    2013-09-01

    Using computational modeling, we simulate the interactions between a nanopipette and transmembrane, end-functionalized nanotubes that are localized within flat bilayers or nanoscopic vesicles. The functional groups (hairs) provide a ``handle'' for the moving pipette to controllably pick up and move the nanotubes to specific locations in the flat membrane, or the hybrid vesicle to specified regions on a surface. The ability to localize these hybrid vesicles on surfaces paves the way for creating nanoreactor arrays in fluidic devices.Using computational modeling, we simulate the interactions between a nanopipette and transmembrane, end-functionalized nanotubes that are localized within flat bilayers or nanoscopic vesicles. The functional groups (hairs) provide a ``handle'' for the moving pipette to controllably pick up and move the nanotubes to specific locations in the flat membrane, or the hybrid vesicle to specified regions on a surface. The ability to localize these hybrid vesicles on surfaces paves the way for creating nanoreactor arrays in fluidic devices. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr33991b

  2. Simulation of voltage-driven hydrated cation transport through narrow transmembrane channels.

    PubMed Central

    Skerra, A; Brickmann, J

    1987-01-01

    Molecular dynamics studies for the voltage-driven transport of the alkali metal ions lithium, sodium, and potassium through gramicidin A-type channels filled with water molecules are presented. The number of water molecules in the channel is obtained from a previous study (Skerra, A., and J. Brickmann, 1987, Biophys. J., 51:969-976). It is shown that the selectivity of the intrachannel ion diffusion through our model pore conforms to the experimentally observed selectivity of the gramicidin A channel. It is demonstrated that the number of water molecules in the channel plays a key role for the selectivity. PMID:2440486

  3. Gating of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels by adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis. Quantitative analysis of a cyclic gating scheme.

    PubMed

    Zeltwanger, S; Wang, F; Wang, G T; Gillis, K D; Hwang, T C

    1999-04-01

    Gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) involves a coordinated action of ATP on two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Previous studies using nonhydrolyzable ATP analogues and NBD mutant CFTR have suggested that nucleotide hydrolysis at NBD1 is required for opening of the channel, while hydrolysis of nucleotides at NBD2 controls channel closing. We studied ATP-dependent gating of CFTR in excised inside-out patches from stably transfected NIH3T3 cells. Single channel kinetics of CFTR gating at different [ATP] were analyzed. The closed time constant (tauc) decreased with increasing [ATP] to a minimum value of approximately 0.43 s at [ATP] >1.00 mM. The open time constant (tauo) increased with increasing [ATP] with a minimal tauo of approximately 260 ms. Kinetic analysis of K1250A-CFTR, a mutant that abolishes ATP hydrolysis at NBD2, reveals the presence of two open states. A short open state with a time constant of approximately 250 ms is dominant at low ATP concentrations (10 microM) and a much longer open state with a time constant of approximately 3 min is present at millimolar ATP. These data suggest that nucleotide binding and hydrolysis at NBD1 is coupled to channel opening and that the channel can close without nucleotide interaction with NBD2. A quantitative cyclic gating scheme with microscopic irreversibility was constructed based on the kinetic parameters derived from single-channel analysis. The estimated values of the kinetic parameters suggest that NBD1 and NBD2 are neither functionally nor biochemically equivalent. PMID:10102935

  4. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses: Insights into epidermodysplasia verruciformis and progression to squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  5. Location of a permeant anion binding site in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Rubaiy, Hussein N; Linsdell, Paul

    2015-05-01

    In the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, lyotropic anions with high permeability also bind relatively tightly within the pore. However, the location of permeant anion binding sites, as well as their relationship to anion permeability, is not known. We have identified lysine residue K95 as a key determinant of permeant anion binding in the CFTR pore. Lyotropic anion binding affinity is related to the number of positively charged amino acids located in the inner vestibule of the pore. However, mutations that change the number of positive charges in this pore region have minimal effects on anion permeability. In contrast, a mutation at the narrow pore region alters permeability with minimal effects on anion binding. Our results suggest that a localized permeant anion binding site exists in the pore; however, anion binding to this site has little influence over anion permeability. Implications of this work for the mechanisms of anion recognition and permeability in CFTR are discussed. PMID:25673337

  6. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Matthew J; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I Martha

    2015-07-10

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  7. Tryptophan Scanning Reveals Dense Packing of Connexin Transmembrane Domains in Gap Junction Channels Composed of Connexin32*

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Matthew J.; Karcz, Jennifer; Vaughn, Nicholas R.; Woolwine-Cunningham, Yvonne; DePriest, Adam D.; Escalona, Yerko; Perez-Acle, Tomas; Skerrett, I. Martha

    2015-01-01

    Tryptophan was substituted for residues in all four transmembrane domains of connexin32. Function was assayed using dual cell two-electrode voltage clamp after expression in Xenopus oocytes. Tryptophan substitution was poorly tolerated in all domains, with the greatest impact in TM1 and TM4. For instance, in TM1, 15 substitutions were made, six abolished coupling and five others significantly reduced function. Only TM2 and TM3 included a distinct helical face that lacked sensitivity to tryptophan substitution. Results were visualized on a comparative model of Cx32 hemichannel. In this model, a region midway through the membrane appears highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution and includes residues Arg-32, Ile-33, Met-34, and Val-35. In the modeled channel, pore-facing regions of TM1 and TM2 were highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution, whereas the lipid-facing regions of TM3 and TM4 were variably tolerant. Residues facing a putative intracellular water pocket (the IC pocket) were also highly sensitive to tryptophan substitution. Although future studies will be required to separate trafficking-defective mutants from those that alter channel function, a subset of interactions important for voltage gating was identified. Interactions important for voltage gating occurred mainly in the mid-region of the channel and focused on TM1. To determine whether results could be extrapolated to other connexins, TM1 of Cx43 was scanned revealing similar but not identical sensitivity to TM1 of Cx32. PMID:25969535

  8. On the origin of asymmetric interactions between permeant anions and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Fatehi, Mohammad; St Aubin, Chantal N; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-02-15

    Single channel and macroscopic current recording was used to investigate block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore by the permeant anion Au(CN)2(-). Block was 1-2 orders of magnitude stronger when Au(CN)2(-) was added to the intracellular versus the extracellular solution, depending on membrane potential. A point mutation within the pore, T-338A, strongly decreased the asymmetry of block, by weakening block by intracellular Au(CN)2(-) and at the same time strengthening block by external Au(CN)2(-). Block of T-338A, but not wild-type, was strongest at the current reversal potential and weakened by either depolarization or hyperpolarization. In contrast to these effects, the T-338A mutation had no impact on block by the impermeant Pt(NO2)4(2-) ion. We suggest that the CFTR pore has at least two anion binding sites at which Au(CN)2(-) and Pt(NO2)4(2-) block Cl- permeation. The T-338A mutation decreases a barrier for Au(CN)2(-) movement between different sites, leading to significant changes in its blocking action. Our finding that apparent blocker binding affinity can be altered by mutagenesis of a residue which does not contribute to a blocker binding site has important implications for interpreting the effects of mutagenesis on channel blocker effects. PMID:17142267

  9. Relationship between anion binding and anion permeability revealed by mutagenesis within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul

    2001-01-01

    Anion binding within the pores of wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channels, expressed in two different mammalian cell lines, was assayed using patch clamp recording. Specifically, experiments measured both the conductance of different anions and the ability of other permeant anions to block Cl− permeation through the pore. Under symmetrical ionic conditions, wild-type CFTR channels showed the conductance sequence Cl− >NO3− >Br−≥formate >F− >SCN−≈ ClO4−. High SCN− conductance was not observed, nor was there an anomalous mole fraction effect of SCN− on conductance under the conditions used. Iodide currents could not be measured under symmetrical ionic conditions, but under bi-ionic conditions I− conductance appeared low. Chloride currents through CFTR channels were blocked by low concentrations (10 mM) of SCN−, I− and ClO4−, implying relatively tight binding of these anions within the pore. Two mutations in CFTR which alter the anion permeability sequence, F337S and T338A, also altered the anion conductance sequence. Furthermore, block by SCN−, I− and ClO4− were weakened in both mutants. Both these effects are consistent with altered anion binding within the pore. The effects of mutations on anion permeability and relative anion conductance suggested that, for most anions, increased permeability was associated with increased conductance. This indicates that the CFTR channel pore does not achieve its anion selectivity by selective anion binding within the mutated region. Instead, it is suggested that entry of anions into the region around F337 and T338 facilitates their passage through the pore. In wild-type CFTR channels, anion entry into this crucial pore region is probably dominated by anion hydration energies. PMID:11179391

  10. Relationship between anion binding and anion permeability revealed by mutagenesis within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2001-02-15

    1. Anion binding within the pores of wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channels, expressed in two different mammalian cell lines, was assayed using patch clamp recording. Specifically, experiments measured both the conductance of different anions and the ability of other permeant anions to block Cl- permeation through the pore. 2. Under symmetrical ionic conditions, wild-type CFTR channels showed the conductance sequence Cl- > NO3- > Br- > or = formate > F- > SCN- congruent to ClO4-. 3. High SCN- conductance was not observed, nor was there an anomalous mole fraction effect of SCN- on conductance under the conditions used. Iodide currents could not be measured under symmetrical ionic conditions, but under bi-ionic conditions I- conductance appeared low. 4. Chloride currents through CFTR channels were blocked by low concentrations (10 mM) of SCN-, I- and ClO4-, implying relatively tight binding of these anions within the pore. 5. Two mutations in CFTR which alter the anion permeability sequence, F337S and T338A, also altered the anion conductance sequence. Furthermore, block by SCN-, I- and ClO4- were weakened in both mutants. Both these effects are consistent with altered anion binding within the pore. 6. The effects of mutations on anion permeability and relative anion conductance suggested that, for most anions, increased permeability was associated with increased conductance. This indicates that the CFTR channel pore does not achieve its anion selectivity by selective anion binding within the mutated region. Instead, it is suggested that entry of anions into the region around F337 and T338 facilitates their passage through the pore. In wild-type CFTR channels, anion entry into this crucial pore region is probably dominated by anion hydration energies. PMID:11179391

  11. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator: Using Differential Reactivity toward Channel-Permeant and Channel-Impermeant Thiol-Reactive Probes To Test a Molecular Model for the Pore†

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The sixth transmembrane segment (TM6) of the CFTR chloride channel has been intensively investigated. The effects of amino acid substitutions and chemical modification of engineered cysteines (cysteine scanning) on channel properties strongly suggest that TM6 is a key component of the anion-conducting pore, but previous cysteine-scanning studies of TM6 have produced conflicting results. Our aim was to resolve these conflicts by combining a screening strategy based on multiple, thiol-directed probes with molecular modeling of the pore. CFTR constructs were screened for reactivity toward both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant thiol-directed reagents, and patterns of reactivity in TM6 were mapped onto two new, molecular models of the CFTR pore: one based on homology modeling using Sav1866 as the template and a second derived from the first by molecular dynamics simulation. Comparison of the pattern of cysteine reactivity with model predictions suggests that nonreactive sites are those where the TM6 side chains are occluded by other TMs. Reactive sites, in contrast, are generally situated such that the respective amino acid side chains either project into the predicted pore or lie within a predicted extracellular loop. Sites where engineered cysteines react with both channel-permeant and channel-impermeant probes occupy the outermost extent of TM6 or the predicted TM5−6 loop. Sites where cysteine reactivity is limited to channel-permeant probes occupy more cytoplasmic locations. The results provide an initial validation of two, new molecular models for CFTR and suggest that molecular dynamics simulation will be a useful tool for unraveling the structural basis of anion conduction by CFTR. PMID:19754156

  12. Direct and indirect effects of mutations at the outer mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jing-Jun; Fatehi, Mohammad; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore is thought to contain multiple binding sites for permeant and impermeant anions. Here, we investigate the effects of mutation of different positively charged residues in the pore on current inhibition by impermeant Pt(NO(2)) (4) (2-) and suramin anions. We show that mutations that remove positive charges (K95, R303) influence interactions with intracellular, but not extracellular, Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) ions, consistent with these residues being situated within the pore inner vestibule. In contrast, mutation of R334, supposedly located in the outer vestibule of the pore, affects block by both extracellular and intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-). Inhibition by extracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) requires a positive charge at position 334, consistent with a direct electrostatic interaction resulting in either open channel block or surface charge screening. In contrast, inhibition by intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) is weakened in all R334-mutant forms of the channel studied, inconsistent with a direct interaction. Furthermore, mutation of R334 had similar effects on block by intracellular suramin, a large organic molecule that is apparently unable to enter deeply into the channel pore. Mutation of R334 altered interactions between intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) and extracellular Cl(-) but not those between intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-) and extracellular Pt(NO(2))(4)(2-). We propose that while the positive charge of R334 interacts directly with extracellular anions, mutation of this residue also alters interactions with intracellular anions by an indirect mechanism, due to mutation-induced conformational changes in the protein that are propagated some distance from the site of the mutation in the outer mouth of the pore. PMID:17673962

  13. Multiple membrane-cytoplasmic domain contacts in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) mediate regulation of channel gating.

    PubMed

    He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Andrei A; Serohijos, Adrian W R; Hegedus, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V; Riordan, John R

    2008-09-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ion channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. The most common mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (DeltaF508) and many other disease-associated mutations occur in the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and the cytoplasmic loops (CL) of the membrane-spanning domains (MSD). A recently constructed computational model of the CFTR three-dimensional structure, supported by experimental data (Serohijos, A. W., Hegedus, T., Aleksandrov, A. A., He, L., Cui, L., Dokholyan, N. V., and Riordan, J. R. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 3256-3261) revealed that several of these mutations including DeltaF508 disrupted interfaces between these domains. Here we have used cysteine cross-linking experiments to verify all NBD/CL interfaces predicted by the structural model and observed that their cross-linking has a variety of different effects on channel gating. The interdomain contacts comprise aromatic clusters important for stabilization of the interfaces and also involve the Q-loops and X-loops that are in close proximity to the ATP binding sites. Cross-linking of all domain-swapping contacts between NBDs and MSD cytoplasmic loops in opposite halves of the protein rapidly and reversibly arrest single channel gating while those in the same halves have lesser impact. These results reinforce the idea that mediation of regulatory signals between cytoplasmic- and membrane-integrated domains of the CFTR channel apparently relies on an array of precise but highly dynamic interdomain structural joints. PMID:18658148

  14. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels with R domain deletions and translocations show phosphorylation-dependent and -independent activity.

    PubMed

    Baldursson, O; Ostedgaard, L S; Rokhlina, T; Cotten, J F; Welsh, M J

    2001-01-19

    Phosphorylation of the R domain regulates cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel activity. Earlier studies suggested that the R domain controls activity via more than one mechanism; a phosphorylated R domain may stimulate activity, and an unphosphorylated R domain may prevent constitutive activity, i.e. opening with ATP alone. However, the mechanisms responsible for these two regulatory properties are not understood. In this study we asked whether the two effects are dependent on its position in the protein and whether smaller regions from the R domain mediate the effects. We found that several portions of the R domain conferred phosphorylation-stimulated activity. This was true whether the R domain sequences were present in their normal location or were translocated to the C terminus. We also found that some parts of the R domain could be deleted without inducing constitutive activity. However, when residues 760-783 were deleted, channels opened without phosphorylation. Translocation of the R domain to the C terminus did not prevent constitutive activity. These results suggest that different parts of the phosphorylated R domain can stimulate activity and that their location within the protein is not critical. In contrast, prevention of constitutive activity required a short specific sequence that could not be moved to the C terminus. These results are consistent with a recent model of an R domain composed primarily of random coil in which more than one phosphorylation site is capable of stimulating channel activity, and net activity reflects interactions between multiple sites in the R domain and the rest of the channel. PMID:11038358

  15. Adenosine Triphosphate–dependent Asymmetry of Anion Permeation in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Hanrahan, John W.

    1998-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms a tightly regulated channel that mediates the passive diffusion of Cl− ions. Here we show, using macroscopic current recording from excised membrane patches, that CFTR also shows significant, but highly asymmetrical, permeability to a broad range of large organic anions. Thus, all large organic anions tested were permeant when present in the intracellular solution under biionic conditions (PX/PCl = 0.048–0.25), whereas most were not measurably permeant when present in the extracellular solution. This asymmetry was not observed for smaller anions. ATPase inhibitors that “lock” CFTR channels in the open state (pyrophosphate, 5′-adenylylimidodiphosphate) disrupted the asymmetry of large anion permeation by allowing their influx from the extracellular solution, which suggests that ATP hydrolysis is required to maintain asymmetric permeability. The ability of CFTR to allow efflux of large organic anions represents a novel function of CFTR. Loss of this function may contribute to the pleiotropic symptoms seen in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9524141

  16. Permeability of Wild-Type and Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channels to Polyatomic Anions

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, Paul; Tabcharani, Joseph A.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Hou, Yue-Xian; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Tsui, Lap-Chee; Riordan, John R.; Hanrahan, John W.

    1997-01-01

    Permeability of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel to polyatomic anions of known dimensions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. Biionic reversal potentials measured with external polyatomic anions gave the permeability ratio (PX/PCl) sequence NO3− > Cl− > HCO3− > formate > acetate. The same selectivity sequence but somewhat higher permeability ratios were obtained when anions were tested from the cytoplasmic side. Pyruvate, propanoate, methane sulfonate, ethane sulfonate, and gluconate were not measurably permeant (PX/PCl < 0.06) from either side of the membrane. The relationship between permeability ratios from the outside and ionic diameters suggests a minimum functional pore diameter of ∼5.3 Å. Permeability ratios also followed a lyotropic sequence, suggesting that permeability is dependent on ionic hydration energies. Site-directed mutagenesis of two adjacent threonines in TM6 to smaller, less polar alanines led to a significant (24%) increase in single channel conductance and elevated permeability to several large anions, suggesting that these residues do not strongly bind permeating anions, but may contribute to the narrowest part of the pore. PMID:9379168

  17. Permeability of wild-type and mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channels to polyatomic anions.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Tabcharani, J A; Rommens, J M; Hou, Y X; Chang, X B; Tsui, L C; Riordan, J R; Hanrahan, J W

    1997-10-01

    Permeability of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel to polyatomic anions of known dimensions was studied in stably transfected Chinese hamster ovary cells by using the patch clamp technique. Biionic reversal potentials measured with external polyatomic anions gave the permeability ratio (P/P) sequence NO > Cl > HCO > formate > acetate. The same selectivity sequence but somewhat higher permeability ratios were obtained when anions were tested from the cytoplasmic side. Pyruvate, propanoate, methane sulfonate, ethane sulfonate, and gluconate were not measurably permeant (P/P < 0.06) from either side of the membrane. The relationship between permeability ratios from the outside and ionic diameters suggests a minimum functional pore diameter of approximately 5.3 A. Permeability ratios also followed a lyotropic sequence, suggesting that permeability is dependent on ionic hydration energies. Site-directed mutagenesis of two adjacent threonines in TM6 to smaller, less polar alanines led to a significant (24%) increase in single channel conductance and elevated permeability to several large anions, suggesting that these residues do not strongly bind permeating anions, but may contribute to the narrowest part of the pore. PMID:9379168

  18. Adenosine triphosphate-dependent asymmetry of anion permeation in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1998-04-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms a tightly regulated channel that mediates the passive diffusion of Cl- ions. Here we show, using macroscopic current recording from excised membrane patches, that CFTR also shows significant, but highly asymmetrical, permeability to a broad range of large organic anions. Thus, all large organic anions tested were permeant when present in the intracellular solution under biionic conditions (PX/PCl = 0.048-0.25), whereas most were not measurably permeant when present in the extracellular solution. This asymmetry was not observed for smaller anions. ATPase inhibitors that "lock" CFTR channels in the open state (pyrophosphate, 5'-adenylylimidodiphosphate) disrupted the asymmetry of large anion permeation by allowing their influx from the extracellular solution, which suggests that ATP hydrolysis is required to maintain asymmetric permeability. The ability of CFTR to allow efflux of large organic anions represents a novel function of CFTR. Loss of this function may contribute to the pleiotropic symptoms seen in cystic fibrosis. PMID:9524141

  19. Thiocyanate as a probe of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P

    2001-07-01

    Immediately following exposure to thiocyanate (SCN-)-containing solutions, the cystic fibrosis conductance regulator Cl- channel exhibits high unitary SCN conductance and anomalous mole fraction behaviour, suggesting the presence of multiple anion binding sites within the channel pore. However, under steady-state conditions SCN-conductance is very low. Here I show, using patch clamp recording from CFTR-transfected mammalian cell lines, that under steady-state conditions neither SCN- conductance nor SCN- permeability show anomalous mole fraction behaviour. Instead, SCN conductance, permeability, and block of Cl- permeation can all be reproduced by a rate theory model that assumes only a single intrapore anion binding site. These results suggest that under steady-state conditions the interaction between SCN- and the CFTR channel pore can be understood by a simple model whereby SCN- ions enter the pore more easily than Cl-, and bind within the pore more tightly than Cl-. The implications of these findings for investigating and understanding the mechanism of anion permeation are discussed. PMID:11478590

  20. Developmental changes in the cochlear hair cell mechanotransducer channel and their regulation by transmembrane channel–like proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyunghee X.

    2013-01-01

    Vibration of the stereociliary bundles activates calcium-permeable mechanotransducer (MT) channels to initiate sound detection in cochlear hair cells. Different regions of the cochlea respond preferentially to different acoustic frequencies, with variation in the unitary conductance of the MT channels contributing to this tonotopic organization. Although the molecular identity of the MT channel remains uncertain, two members of the transmembrane channel–like family, Tmc1 and Tmc2, are crucial to hair cell mechanotransduction. We measured MT channel current amplitude and Ca2+ permeability along the cochlea’s longitudinal (tonotopic) axis during postnatal development of wild-type mice and mice lacking Tmc1 (Tmc1−/−) or Tmc2 (Tmc2−/−). In wild-type mice older than postnatal day (P) 4, MT current amplitude increased ∼1.5-fold from cochlear apex to base in outer hair cells (OHCs) but showed little change in inner hair cells (IHCs), a pattern apparent in mutant mice during the first postnatal week. After P7, the OHC MT current in Tmc1−/− (dn) mice declined to zero, consistent with their deafness phenotype. In wild-type mice before P6, the relative Ca2+ permeability, PCa, of the OHC MT channel decreased from cochlear apex to base. This gradient in PCa was not apparent in IHCs and disappeared after P7 in OHCs. In Tmc1−/− mice, PCa in basal OHCs was larger than that in wild-type mice (to equal that of apical OHCs), whereas in Tmc2−/−, PCa in apical and basal OHCs and IHCs was decreased compared with that in wild-type mice. We postulate that differences in Ca2+ permeability reflect different subunit compositions of the MT channel determined by expression of Tmc1 and Tmc2, with the latter conferring higher PCa in IHCs and immature apical OHCs. Changes in PCa with maturation are consistent with a developmental decrease in abundance of Tmc2 in OHCs but not in IHCs. PMID:23277480

  1. Voltage-dependent block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channel by two closely related arylaminobenzoates.

    PubMed

    McCarty, N A; McDonough, S; Cohen, B N; Riordan, J R; Davidson, N; Lester, H A

    1993-07-01

    The gene defective in cystic fibrosis encodes a Cl- channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). CFTR is blocked by diphenylamine-2-carboxylate (DPC) when applied extracellularly at millimolar concentrations. We studied the block of CFTR expressed in Xenopus oocytes by DPC or by a closely related molecule, flufenamic acid (FFA). Block of whole-cell CFTR currents by bath-applied DPC or by FFA, both at 200 microM, requires several minutes to reach full effect. Blockade is voltage dependent, suggesting open-channel block: currents at positive potentials are not affected but currents at negative potentials are reduced. The binding site for both drugs senses approximately 40% of the electric field across the membrane, measured from the inside. In single-channel recordings from excised patches without blockers, the conductance was 8.0 +/- 0.4 pS in symmetric 150 mM Cl-. A subconductance state, measuring approximately 60% of the main conductance, was often observed. Bursts to the full open state lasting up to tens of seconds were uninterrupted at depolarizing membrane voltages. At hyperpolarizing voltages, bursts were interrupted by brief closures. Either DPC or FFA (50 microM) applied to the cytoplasmic or extracellular face of the channel led to an increase in flicker at Vm = -100 mV and not at Vm = +100 mV, in agreement with whole-cell experiments. DPC induced a higher frequency of flickers from the cytoplasmic side than the extracellular side. FFA produced longer closures than DPC; the FFA closed time was roughly equal (approximately 1.2 ms) at -100 mV with application from either side. In cell-attached patch recordings with DPC or FFA applied to the bath, there was flickery block at Vm = -100 mV, confirming that the drugs permeate through the membrane to reach the binding site. The data are consistent with the presence of a single binding site for both drugs, reached from either end of the channel. Open-channel block by DPC or FFA may

  2. Actions of genistein on cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel gating. Evidence for two binding sites with opposite effects.

    PubMed

    Wang, F; Zeltwanger, S; Yang, I C; Nairn, A C; Hwang, T C

    1998-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that genistein increased cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel activity in the presence of saturating concentrations of forskolin and calyculin A in intact cells. Possible molecular mechanisms for genistein's action include inhibition of tyrosine kinases, inhibition of serine/threonine protein phosphatases, or direct binding of genistein to CFTR. Since genistein inhibits several enzymes that hydrolyze ATP, and ATP hydrolysis is an intrinsic property of CFTR, we examined the effect of genistein on CFTR gating in excised inside-out patches from Hi-5 insect cells and NIH3T3 cells expressing recombinant CFTR. Genistein (50 microM) did not open phosphorylated CFTR channels by itself, but increased the ATP- induced CFTR channel current by approximately twofold. A similar magnitude of enhancement was observed when genistein was applied with PKI, a specific inhibitor of protein kinase A, or vanadate, a tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor, suggesting that inhibition of protein phosphatases or tyrosine kinases does not account for genistein's effects. The enhancement of channel current increased with increasing concentrations of genistein and reached a maximum at 35 microM genistein. At higher concentrations of genistein concentration, CFTR channel current decreased, resulting in a bell-shaped dose-response relationship. In the absence of genistein, both open- and closed-time histograms could be fitted with a single exponential function, yielding a mean open time (tauO) of 0.302 +/- 0.002 s, and a mean closed time (tauC) of 0.406 +/- 0.003 s. In the presence of 50 microM genistein, the open time histogram could be fitted with a double exponential function with tauO1 = 0.429 +/- 0. 003 s and tauO2 = 2.033 +/- 0.173 s. Thus, genistein induced a prolonged open state, an effect that mimics that of nonhydrolyzable ATP analogs. Closed time analysis showed that 50 microM genistein caused a prolonged closed state with a time

  3. Role of the Juxtamembrane Region of Cytoplasmic Loop 3 in the Gating and Conductance of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel are controlled by interactions of ATP with its cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). The NBDs are connected to the transmembrane pore via four cytoplasmic loops. These loops have been suggested to play roles both in channel gating and in forming a cytoplasmic extension of the channel pore. To investigate the structure and function of one of these cytoplasmic loops, we have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into loop 3. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify cysteines introduced at 14 of 16 sites studied in the juxtamembrane region of loop 3, in all cases leading to inhibition of channel function. In most cases, both the functional effects of modification and the rate of modification were similar for negatively and positively charged MTS reagents. Single-channel recordings indicated that, at all sites, inhibition was the result of an MTS reagent-induced decrease in channel open probability; in no case was the Cl– conductance of open channels altered by modification. These results indicate that loop 3 is readily accessible to the cytoplasm and support the involvement of this region in the control of channel gating. However, our results do not support the hypothesis that this region is close enough to the Cl– permeation pathway to exert any influence on permeating Cl– ions. We propose that either the cytoplasmic pore is very wide or cytoplasmic Cl– ions use other routes to access the transmembrane pore. PMID:22545782

  4. Changes in accessibility of cytoplasmic substances to the pore associated with activation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2010-10-15

    Opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl(-) channel is dependent both on phosphorylation and on ATP binding and hydrolysis. However, the mechanisms by which these cytoplasmic regulatory factors open the Cl(-) channel pore are not known. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining sixth transmembrane region (TM6) of a cysteine-less variant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify irreversibly cysteines substituted for TM6 residues Phe-337, Thr-338, Ser-341, Ile-344, Val-345, Met-348, Ala-349, Arg-352, and Gln-353 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. However, the apparent rate of modification by internal [2-sulfonatoethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSES), a negatively charged MTS reagent, is dependent on the activation state of the channels. In particular, cysteines introduced far along the axis of TM6 from the inside (T338C, S341C, I344C) showed no evidence of significant modification even after prolonged pretreatment of non-activated channels with internal MTSES. In contrast, cysteines introduced closer to the inside of TM6 (V345C, M348C) were readily modified in both activated and non-activated channels. Access of a permeant anion, Au(CN)(2)(-), to T338C was similarly dependent upon channel activation state. The pattern of MTS modification we observe allows us to designate different pore-lining amino acid side chains to distinct functional regions of the channel pore. One logical interpretation of these findings is that cytoplasmic access to residues at the narrowest region of the pore changes concomitant with activation. PMID:20675380

  5. Role of the juxtamembrane region of cytoplasmic loop 3 in the gating and conductance of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-05-15

    Opening and closing of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel are controlled by interactions of ATP with its cytoplasmic nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). The NBDs are connected to the transmembrane pore via four cytoplasmic loops. These loops have been suggested to play roles both in channel gating and in forming a cytoplasmic extension of the channel pore. To investigate the structure and function of one of these cytoplasmic loops, we have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced into loop 3. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify cysteines introduced at 14 of 16 sites studied in the juxtamembrane region of loop 3, in all cases leading to inhibition of channel function. In most cases, both the functional effects of modification and the rate of modification were similar for negatively and positively charged MTS reagents. Single-channel recordings indicated that, at all sites, inhibition was the result of an MTS reagent-induced decrease in channel open probability; in no case was the Cl(-) conductance of open channels altered by modification. These results indicate that loop 3 is readily accessible to the cytoplasm and support the involvement of this region in the control of channel gating. However, our results do not support the hypothesis that this region is close enough to the Cl(-) permeation pathway to exert any influence on permeating Cl(-) ions. We propose that either the cytoplasmic pore is very wide or cytoplasmic Cl(-) ions use other routes to access the transmembrane pore. PMID:22545782

  6. Changes in Accessibility of Cytoplasmic Substances to the Pore Associated with Activation of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel*

    PubMed Central

    El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2010-01-01

    Opening of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel is dependent both on phosphorylation and on ATP binding and hydrolysis. However, the mechanisms by which these cytoplasmic regulatory factors open the Cl− channel pore are not known. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of the pore-lining sixth transmembrane region (TM6) of a cysteine-less variant of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents modify irreversibly cysteines substituted for TM6 residues Phe-337, Thr-338, Ser-341, Ile-344, Val-345, Met-348, Ala-349, Arg-352, and Gln-353 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. However, the apparent rate of modification by internal [2-sulfonatoethyl] methanethiosulfonate (MTSES), a negatively charged MTS reagent, is dependent on the activation state of the channels. In particular, cysteines introduced far along the axis of TM6 from the inside (T338C, S341C, I344C) showed no evidence of significant modification even after prolonged pretreatment of non-activated channels with internal MTSES. In contrast, cysteines introduced closer to the inside of TM6 (V345C, M348C) were readily modified in both activated and non-activated channels. Access of a permeant anion, Au(CN)2−, to T338C was similarly dependent upon channel activation state. The pattern of MTS modification we observe allows us to designate different pore-lining amino acid side chains to distinct functional regions of the channel pore. One logical interpretation of these findings is that cytoplasmic access to residues at the narrowest region of the pore changes concomitant with activation. PMID:20675380

  7. Determinant for β-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca2+-sensitive K+ channels: An additional transmembrane region at the N terminus

    PubMed Central

    Wallner, Martin; Meera, Pratap; Toro, Ligia

    1996-01-01

    The pore-forming α subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a β subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming α subunit necessary for β-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to β-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the α subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel α subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1–S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers β-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  8. Determinant for beta-subunit regulation in high-conductance voltage-activated and Ca(2+)-sensitive K+ channels: an additional transmembrane region at the N terminus.

    PubMed

    Wallner, M; Meera, P; Toro, L

    1996-12-10

    The pore-forming alpha subunit of large conductance voltage- and Ca(2+)-sensitive K (MaxiK) channels is regulated by a beta subunit that has two membrane-spanning regions separated by an extracellular loop. To investigate the structural determinants in the pore-forming alpha subunit necessary for beta-subunit modulation, we made chimeric constructs between a human MaxiK channel and the Drosophila homologue, which we show is insensitive to beta-subunit modulation, and analyzed the topology of the alpha subunit. A comparison of multiple sequence alignments with hydrophobicity plots revealed that MaxiK channel alpha subunits have a unique hydrophobic segment (S0) at the N terminus. This segment is in addition to the six putative transmembrane segments (S1-S6) usually found in voltage-dependent ion channels. The transmembrane nature of this unique S0 region was demonstrated by in vitro translation experiments. Moreover, normal functional expression of signal sequence fusions and in vitro N-linked glycosylation experiments indicate that S0 leads to an exoplasmic N terminus. Therefore, we propose a new model where MaxiK channels have a seventh transmembrane segment at the N terminus (S0). Chimeric exchange of 41 N-terminal amino acids, including S0, from the human MaxiK channel to the Drosophila homologue transfers beta-subunit regulation to the otherwise unresponsive Drosophila channel. Both the unique S0 region and the exoplasmic N terminus are necessary for this gain of function. PMID:8962157

  9. Effect of ceramic membrane channel geometry and uniform transmembrane pressure on limiting flux and serum protein removal during skim milk microfiltration.

    PubMed

    Adams, Michael C; Hurt, Emily E; Barbano, David M

    2015-11-01

    Our objectives were to determine the effects of a ceramic microfiltration (MF) membrane's retentate flow channel geometry (round or diamond-shaped) and uniform transmembrane pressure (UTP) on limiting flux (LF) and serum protein (SP) removal during skim milk MF at a temperature of 50°C, a retentate protein concentration of 8.5%, and an average cross-flow velocity of 7 m·s(-1). Performance of membranes with round and diamond flow channels was compared in UTP mode. Performance of the membrane with round flow channels was compared with and without UTP. Using UTP with round flow channel MF membranes increased the LF by 5% when compared with not using UTP, but SP removal was not affected by the use of UTP. Using membranes with round channels instead of diamond-shaped channels in UTP mode increased the LF by 24%. This increase was associated with a 25% increase in Reynolds number and can be explained by lower shear at the vertices of the diamond-shaped channel's surface. The SP removal factor of the diamond channel system was higher than the SP removal factor of the round channel system below the LF. However, the diamond channel system passed more casein into the MF permeate than the round channel system. Because only one batch of each membrane was tested in our study, it was not possible to determine if the differences in protein rejection between channel geometries were due to the membrane design or random manufacturing variation. Despite the lower LF of the diamond channel system, the 47% increase in membrane module surface area of the diamond channel system produced a modular permeate removal rate that was at least 19% higher than the round channel system. Consequently, using diamond channel membranes instead of round channel membranes could reduce some of the costs associated with ceramic MF of skim milk if fewer membrane modules could be used to attain the required membrane area. PMID:26298765

  10. Conducting polymer supported bilayer lipid membrane reconstituted with alamethicin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hao; Salinas, Sergio; Baba Sundaresan, Vishnu

    2011-09-01

    Ionic electroactive polymers and bioderived materials have been independently demonstrated as actuators, sensors and energy harvesting devices. In an electroactive polymer, the applied electric field between the cathode and anode drives ion transport between the electrodes, impregnated electrolyte and the bulk of the polymer to generate force and displacement. Similarly, in a bioderived material an input stimulus (electrical, chemoelectrical or chemical) applied across the protein in a bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) displaces ions across the membrane barrier and enables sensing and actuation functions. This paper presents a novel architecture for a device that integrates the ionic function of an electroactive polymer and a bioderived material into a thin-film laminated device combining their unique advantages. A conducting polymer (PPy(DBS)) is used as the electroactive polymer and alamethicin-bound bilayer lipid membrane is used as the bioderived material in the thin-film laminated device. Owing to the configuration of the laminated device, the protein regulates the ionic concentration in the conducting polymer and regulates the electrochemical doping/undoping process in the polymer. By electrically connecting the conducting polymer across its thickness, this arrangement provides a mechanism external to the polymer besides electrical field that can control the electrical, mechanical and/or optical properties of the conducting polymer. This paper also presents the fabrication and characterization of the integrated ionic device and presents a template for the development of a novel category of electroactive ionic devices.

  11. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shipeng; Roessler, Bryan C; Icyuz, Mert; Chauvet, Sylvain; Tao, Binli; Hartman, John L; Kirk, Kevin L

    2016-03-01

    The ABCC transporter subfamily includes pumps, the long and short multidrug resistance proteins (MRPs), and an ATP-gated anion channel, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We show that despite their thermodynamic differences, these ABCC transporter subtypes use broadly similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to the ATP occupancies of their cytosolic nucleotide binding domains. A conserved extracellular phenylalanine at this gate was a prime location for producing gain of function (GOF) mutants of a long MRP in yeast (Ycf1p cadmium transporter), a short yeast MRP (Yor1p oligomycin exporter), and human CFTR channels. Extracellular gate mutations rescued ATP binding mutants of the yeast MRPs and CFTR by increasing ATP sensitivity. Control ATPase-defective MRP mutants could not be rescued by this mechanism. A CFTR double mutant with an extracellular gate mutation plus a cytosolic GOF mutation was highly active (single-channel open probability >0.3) in the absence of ATP and protein kinase A, each normally required for CFTR activity. We conclude that all 3 ABCC transporter subtypes use similar mechanisms to couple their extracellular gates to ATP occupancy, and highly active CFTR channels that bypass defects in ATP binding or phosphorylation can be produced.-Wei, S., Roessler, B. C., Icyuz, M., Chauvet, S., Tao, B., Hartman IV, J. L., Kirk, K. L. Long-range coupling between the extracellular gates and the intracellular ATP binding domains of multidrug resistance protein pumps and cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channels. PMID:26606940

  12. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Eugênio E; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-09-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids. PMID:23764339

  13. A residue in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I in insect and mammalian sodium channels regulate differential sensitivities to pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Eugênio E.; Du, Yuzhe; Nomura, Yoshiko; Dong, Ke

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are critical for electrical signaling in the nervous system. Pyrethroid insecticides exert their toxic action by modifying the gating of sodium channels. A valine to methionine mutation in the transmembrane segment 6 of domain I (IS6) of sodium channels from tobacco budworms (Heliothis virescens) has been shown to alter channel gating and reduce insect sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroids. A valine to leucine substitution was subsequently reported in pyrethroid-resistant bedbug populations. Intriguingly, pyrethroid-resistant mammalian sodium channels possess an isoleucine at the corresponding position. To determine whether different substitutions at this position alter channel gating and confer pyrethroid resistance, we made valine to methionine, isoleucine or leucine substitutions at the corresponding position, V409, in a cockroach sodium channel and examined the gating properties and pyrethroid sensitivity of the three mutants in Xenopus oocytes. All three mutations reduced the channel sensitivity to three pyrethroids (permethrin, cismethrin and deltamethrin). V409M, but not V409I or V409L, caused 6-7 mV depolarizing shifts in the voltage dependences of both activation and inactivation. V409M and V409L slowed channel activation kinetics and accelerated open-state deactivation kinetics, but V409I did not. Furthermore, the substitution of isoleucine with valine, but not with methionine nor leucine, at the corresponding position in a rat skeletal muscle sodium channel, rNav1.4, enhanced channel sensitivity to deltamethrin. Collectively, our study highlights an important role of residues at 409 in regulating not only sodium channel gating, but also the differential sensitivities of insect and mammalian sodium channels to pyrethroids. PMID:23764339

  14. Aromatic–aromatic interactions between residues in KCa3.1 pore helix and S5 transmembrane segment control the channel gating process

    PubMed Central

    Garneau, Line; Klein, Hélène; Lavoie, Marie-France; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Parent, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    The Ca2+-activated potassium channel KCa3.1 is emerging as a therapeutic target for a large variety of health disorders. One distinguishing feature of KCa3.1 is that the channel open probability at saturating Ca2+ concentrations (Pomax) is low, typically 0.1–0.2 for KCa3.1 wild type. This observation argues for the binding of Ca2+ to the calmodulin (CaM)–KCa3.1 complex, promoting the formation of a preopen closed-state configuration leading to channel opening. We have previously shown that the KCa3.1 active gate is most likely located at the level of the selectivity filter. As Ca2+-dependent gating of KCa3.1 originates from the binding of Ca2+ to CaM in the C terminus, the hypothesis of a gate located at the level of the selectivity filter requires that the conformational change initiated in the C terminus be transmitted to the S5 and S6 transmembrane helices, with a resulting effect on the channel pore helix directly connected to the selectivity filter. A study was thus undertaken to determine to what extent the interactions between the channel pore helix with the S5 and S6 transmembrane segments contribute to KCa3.1 gating. Molecular dynamics simulations first revealed that the largest contact area between the pore helix and the S5 plus S6 transmembrane helices involves residue F248 at the C-terminal end of the pore helix. Unitary current recordings next confirmed that modulating aromatic–aromatic interactions between F248 and W216 of the S5 transmembrane helical segment and/or perturbing the interactions between F248 and residues in S6 surrounding the glycine hinge G274 cause important changes in Pomax. This work thus provides the first evidence for a key contribution of the pore helix in setting Pomax by stabilizing the channel closed configuration through aromatic–aromatic interactions involving F248 of the pore helix. We propose that the interface pore helix/S5 constitutes a promising site for designing KCa3.1 potentiators. PMID:24470490

  15. On the Origin of Asymmetric Interactions between Permeant Anions and the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Chloride Channel Pore

    PubMed Central

    Fatehi, Mohammad; St. Aubin, Chantal N.; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Single channel and macroscopic current recording was used to investigate block of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore by the permeant anion \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Block was 1–2 orders of magnitude stronger when \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} was added to the intracellular versus the extracellular solution, depending on membrane potential. A point mutation within the pore, T-338A, strongly decreased the asymmetry of block, by weakening block by intracellular \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} and at the same time strengthening block by external \\documentclass[10pt]{article} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\usepackage{pmc} \\pagestyle{empty} \\oddsidemargin -1.0in \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}{\\mathrm{Au}}({\\mathrm{CN}})_{2}^{-}\\end{equation*}\\end{document}. Block of T-338A, but not wild-type, was strongest at the current reversal potential and weakened by either depolarization or hyperpolarization. In contrast to these

  16. Identification of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator channel-lining residues in and flanking the M6 membrane-spanning segment.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, M; Akabas, M H

    1996-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) forms a chloride channel that is regulated by phosphorylation and ATP binding. Work by others suggested that some residues in the sixth transmembrane segment (M6) might be exposed in the channel and play a role in ion conduction and selectivity. To identify the residues in M6 that are exposed in the channel and the secondary structure of M6, we used the substituted cysteine accessibility method. We mutated to cysteine, one at a time, 24 consecutive residues in and flanking the M6 segment and expressed these mutants in Xenopus oocytes. We determined the accessibility of the engineered cysteines to charged, lipophobic, sulfhydryl-specific methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents applied extracellularly. The cysteines substituted for Ile331, Leu333, Arg334, Lys335, Phe337, Ser341, Ile344, Arg347, Thr351, Arg352, and Gln353 reacted with the MTS reagents, and we infer that they are exposed on the water-accessible surface of the protein. From the pattern of the exposed residues we infer that the secondary structure of the M6 segment includes both alpha-helical and extended regions. The diameter of the channel from the extracellular end to the level of Gln353 must be at least 6 A to allow the MTS reagents to reach these residues. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 PMID:8744306

  17. Functional arrangement of the 12th transmembrane region in the CFTR chloride channel pore based on functional investigation of a cysteine-less CFTR variant.

    PubMed

    Qian, Feng; El Hiani, Yassine; Linsdell, Paul

    2011-10-01

    The membrane-spanning part of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel comprises 12 transmembrane (TM) α-helices, arranged into two pseudo-symmetrical groups of six. While TM6 in the N-terminal TMs is known to line the pore and to make an important contribution to channel properties, much less is known about its C-terminal counterpart, TM12. We have used patch clamp recording to investigate the accessibility of cytoplasmically applied cysteine-reactive reagents to cysteines introduced along the length of TM12 in a cysteine-less variant of CFTR. We find that methanethiosulfonate (MTS) reagents irreversibly modify cysteines substituted for TM12 residues N1138, M1140, S1141, T1142, Q1144, W1145, V1147, N1148, and S1149 when applied to the cytoplasmic side of open channels. Cysteines sensitive to internal MTS reagents were not modified by extracellular [2-(trimethylammonium)ethyl] MTS, consistent with MTS reagent impermeability. Both S1141C and T1142C could be modified by intracellular [2-sulfonatoethyl] MTS prior to channel activation; however, N1138C and M1140C, located deeper into the pore from its cytoplasmic end, were modified only after channel activation. Comparison of these results with previous work on CFTR-TM6 allows us to develop a model of the relative positions, functional contributions, and alignment of these two important TMs lining the CFTR pore. We also propose a mechanism by which these seemingly structurally symmetrical TMs make asymmetric contributions to the functional properties of the channel pore. PMID:21796338

  18. Molecular determinants of Au(CN)2− binding and permeability within the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl− channel pore

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Xiandi; Burbridge, Susan M; Cowley, Elizabeth A; Linsdell, Paul

    2002-01-01

    Lyotropic anions with low free energy of hydration show both high permeability and tight binding in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl− channel pore. However, the molecular bases of anion selectivity and anion binding within the CFTR pore are not well defined and the relationship between binding and selectivity is unclear. We have studied the effects of point mutations throughout the sixth transmembrane (TM6) region of CFTR on channel block by, and permeability of, the highly lyotropic Au(CN)2− anion, using patch clamp recording from transiently transfected baby hamster kidney cells. Channel block by 100 μm Au(CN)2−, a measure of intrapore anion binding affinity, was significantly weakened in the CFTR mutants K335A, F337S, T338A and I344A, significantly strengthened in S341A and R352Q and unaltered in K329A. Relative Au(CN)2− permeability was significantly increased in T338A and S341A, significantly decreased in F337S and unaffected in all other mutants studied. These results are used to define a model of the pore containing multiple anion binding sites but a more localised anion selectivity region. The central part of TM6 (F337-S341) appears to be the main determinant of both anion binding and anion selectivity. However, comparison of the effects of individual mutations on binding and selectivity suggest that these two aspects of the permeation mechanism are not strongly interdependent. PMID:11927667

  19. The Transmembrane Region of Guard Cell SLAC1 Channels Perceives CO2 Signals via an ABA-Independent Pathway in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yoshiko; Negi, Juntaro; Wang, Cun; Isogai, Yasuhiro; Schroeder, Julian I; Iba, Koh

    2016-02-01

    The guard cell S-type anion channel, SLOW ANION CHANNEL1 (SLAC1), a key component in the control of stomatal movements, is activated in response to CO2 and abscisic acid (ABA). Several amino acids existing in the N-terminal region of SLAC1 are involved in regulating its activity via phosphorylation in the ABA response. However, little is known about sites involved in CO2 signal perception. To dissect sites that are necessary for the stomatal CO2 response, we performed slac1 complementation experiments using transgenic plants expressing truncated SLAC1 proteins. Measurements of gas exchange and stomatal apertures in the truncated transgenic lines in response to CO2 and ABA revealed that sites involved in the stomatal CO2 response exist in the transmembrane region and do not require the SLAC1 N and C termini. CO2 and ABA regulation of S-type anion channel activity in guard cells of the transgenic lines confirmed these results. In vivo site-directed mutagenesis experiments targeted to amino acids within the transmembrane region of SLAC1 raise the possibility that two tyrosine residues exposed on the membrane are involved in the stomatal CO2 response. PMID:26764376

  20. Disease-associated mutations in the fourth cytoplasmic loop of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator compromise biosynthetic processing and chloride channel activity.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Linsdell, P; Loo, T W; Hanrahan, J W; Clarke, D M; Riordan, J R

    1996-06-21

    A cluster of 18 point mutations in exon 17b of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene has been detected in patients with cystic fibrosis. These mutations cause single amino acid substitutions in the most C-terminal cytoplasmic loop (CL4, residues 1035-1102) of the CFTR chloride channel. Heterologous expression of the mutants showed that 12 produced only core-glycosylated CFTR, which was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum; the other six mutants matured and reached the cell surface. In some cases substitution of one member of pairs of adjacent residues resulted in misprocessing, whereas the other did not. Thus, the secondary structure of CL4 may contribute crucially to the proper folding of the entire CFTR molecule. Cyclic AMP-stimulated iodide efflux was not detected from cells expressing the misprocessed variants but was from the other six, indicating that their mutations cause relatively subtle channel defects. Consistent with this, these latter mutations generally are present in patients who are pancreatic-sufficient, while the processing mutants are mostly from patients who are pancreatic-insufficient. Single-channel patch-clamp analysis demonstrated that the processed mutants had the same ohmic conductance as wild-type CFTR, but a lower open probability, generally due to an increase in channel mean closed time and a reduction in mean open time. This suggests that mutations in CL4 do not affect pore properties of CFTR, but disrupt the mechanism of channel gating. PMID:8662892

  1. Intracellular segment between transmembrane helices S0 and S1 of BK channel α subunit contains two amphipathic helices connected by a flexible loop

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Pan; Li, Dong; Lai, Chaohua; Zhang, Longhua; Tian, Changlin

    2013-08-02

    Highlights: •The loop between S0 and S1 of BK channel was overexpressed and purified in DPC. •NMR studies indicated BK-IS1 contained two helices connected by a flexible loop. •Mg{sup 2+} titration of BK-IS1 indicated two possible binding sites of divalent ions. -- Abstract: The BK channel, a tetrameric potassium channel with very high conductance, has a central role in numerous physiological functions. The BK channel can be activated by intracellular Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}, as well as by membrane depolarization. Unlike other tetrameric potassium channels, the BK channel has seven transmembrane helices (S0–S6) including an extra helix S0. The intracellular segment between S0 and S1 (BK-IS1) is essential to BK channel functions and Asp99 in BK-IS1 is reported to be responsible for Mg{sup 2+} coordination. In this study, BK-IS1 (44–113) was over-expressed using a bacterial system and purified in the presence of detergent micelles for multidimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structural studies. Backbone resonance assignment and secondary structure analysis showed that BK-IS1 contains two amphipathic helices connected by a 36-residue loop. Amide {sup 1}H–{sup 15}N heteronuclear NOE analysis indicated that the loop is very flexible, while the two amphipathic helices are possibly stabilized through interaction with the membrane. A solution NMR-based titration assay of BK-IS1 was performed with various concentrations of Mg{sup 2+}. Two residues (Thr45 and Leu46) with chemical shift changes were observed but no, or very minor, chemical shift difference was observed for Asp99, indicating a possible site for binding divalent ions or other modulation partners.

  2. Hydrophobic interaction between contiguous residues in the S6 transmembrane segment acts as a stimuli integration node in the BK channel

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquel-Ursulaez, Willy; Contreras, Gustavo F.; Sepúlveda, Romina V.; Aguayo, Daniel; González-Nilo, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    Large-conductance Ca2+- and voltage-activated K+ channel (BK) open probability is enhanced by depolarization, increasing Ca2+ concentration, or both. These stimuli activate modular voltage and Ca2+ sensors that are allosterically coupled to channel gating. Here, we report a point mutation of a phenylalanine (F380A) in the S6 transmembrane helix that, in the absence of internal Ca2+, profoundly hinders channel opening while showing only minor effects on the voltage sensor active–resting equilibrium. Interpretation of these results using an allosteric model suggests that the F380A mutation greatly increases the free energy difference between open and closed states and uncouples Ca2+ binding from voltage sensor activation and voltage sensor activation from channel opening. However, the presence of a bulky and more hydrophobic amino acid in the F380 position (F380W) increases the intrinsic open–closed equilibrium, weakening the coupling between both sensors with the pore domain. Based on these functional experiments and molecular dynamics simulations, we propose that F380 interacts with another S6 hydrophobic residue (L377) in contiguous subunits. This pair forms a hydrophobic ring important in determining the open–closed equilibrium and, like an integration node, participates in the communication between sensors and between the sensors and pore. Moreover, because of its effects on open probabilities, the F380A mutant can be used for detailed voltage sensor experiments in the presence of permeant cations. PMID:25548136

  3. Location of a common inhibitor binding site in the cytoplasmic vestibule of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, Paul

    2005-03-11

    Chloride transport by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel is inhibited by a broad range of organic anions that enter the channel pore from its cytoplasmic end, physically occluding the Cl- permeation pathway. These open channel blocker molecules are presumed to bind within a relatively wide pore inner vestibule that shows little discrimination between different large anions. The present study uses patch clamp recording to identify a pore-lining lysine residue, Lys-95, that acts to attract large blocker molecules into this inner vestibule. Mutations that remove the fixed positive charge associated with this amino acid residue dramatically weaken the blocking effects of five structurally unrelated open channel blockers (glibenclamide, 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid, lonidamine, 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid, and taurolithocholate-3-sulfate) when applied to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. Mutagenesis of Lys-95 also induced amino acid side chain charge-dependent rectification of the macroscopic current-voltage relationship, consistent with the fixed positive charge on this residue normally acting to attract Cl- ions from the intracellular solution into the pore. These results identify Lys-95 as playing an important role in attracting permeant anions into the channel pore inner vestibule, probably by an electrostatic mechanism. This same electrostatic attraction mechanism also acts to attract larger anionic molecules into the relatively wide inner vestibule, where these substances bind to block Cl- permeation. Thus, structurally diverse open channel blockers of CFTR appear to share a common molecular mechanism of action that involves interaction with a positively charged amino acid side chain located in the inner vestibule of the pore. PMID:15634668

  4. The PDZ-binding chloride channel ClC-3B localizes to the Golgi and associates with cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator-interacting PDZ proteins.

    PubMed

    Gentzsch, Martina; Cui, Liying; Mengos, April; Chang, Xiu-Bao; Chen, Jey-Hsin; Riordan, John R

    2003-02-21

    ClC chloride channels are widely distributed in organisms across the evolutionary spectrum, and members of the mammalian family play crucial roles in cellular function and are mutated in several human diseases (Jentsch, T. J., Stein, V., Weinreich, F., and Zdebik, A. A. (2002) Physiol. Rev. 82, 503-568). Within the ClC-3, -4, -5 branch of the family that are intracellular channels, two alternatively spliced ClC-3 isoforms were recognized recently (Ogura, T., Furukawa, T., Toyozaki, T., Yamada, K., Zheng, Y. J., Katayama, Y., Nakaya, H., and Inagaki, N. (2002) FASEB J. 16, 863-865). ClC-3A resides in late endosomes where it serves as an anion shunt during acidification. We show here that the ClC-3B PDZ-binding isoform resides in the Golgi where it co-localizes with a small amount of the other known PDZ-binding chloride channel, CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator). Both channel proteins bind the Golgi PDZ protein, GOPC (Golgi-associated PDZ and coiled-coil motif-containing protein). Interestingly, however, when overexpressed, GOPC, which is thought to influence traffic in the endocytic/secretory pathway, causes a large reduction in the amounts of both channels, probably by leading them to the degradative end of this pathway. ClC-3B as well as CFTR also binds EBP50 (ERM-binding phosphoprotein 50) and PDZK1, which are concentrated at the plasma membrane. However, only PDZK1 was found to promote interaction between the two channels, perhaps because they were able to bind to two different PDZ domains in PDZK1. Thus while small portions of the populations of ClC-3B and CFTR may associate and co-localize, the bulk of the two populations reside in different organelles of cells where they are expressed heterologously or endogenously, and therefore their cellular functions are likely to be distinct and not primarily related. PMID:12471024

  5. Identification of a cluster of residues in transmembrane segment 6 of domain III of the cockroach sodium channel essential for the action of pyrethroid insecticides

    PubMed Central

    Du, Yuzhe; Lee, Jung-Eun; Nomura, Yoshiko; Zhang, Tianxiang; Zhorov, Boris S.; Dong, Ke

    2011-01-01

    A phenylalanine residue (Phe1519) in the sixth transmembrane segment of domain III (IIIS6) of the cockroach BgNav sodium channel is required for the binding and action of pyrethroids. However, whether or not other residues in IIIS6 participate in the action of pyrethroids remains to be determined. In the present study, we conducted a systematic analysis of 20 residues in IIIS6 of the BgNav channel using alanine-scanning mutagenesis. Our results show that alanine substitutions of four residues, Ile1514, Gly1516, Phe1518 and Asn1522, altered sodium channel sensitivity to pyrethroid insecticides. Whereas the G1516A, F1518A and N1522A substitutions diminished sodium channel sensitivity to all seven pyrethroids examined, including four type I (lacking the α-cyano group at the phenoxybenzyl alcohol) and three type II (containing the α-cyano group) pyrethroids, the I1514A substitution enhanced sodium channel sensitivity to four type I and type II pyrethroids that contain the phenoxybenzyl alcohol only. We also show that alanine/lysine substitutions of Leu1521 and Ser1517 affected the action of BTX (batrachotoxin), but not pyrethroids. In the Kv1.2-based homology model of the open sodium channel, side chains of Ile1514, Phe1518 and Asn1522 are exposed towards helix IIS5 and linker IIS4–IIS5, which contain previously identified pyrethroid-interacting residues, whereas Ser1517 and Leu1521 face the inner pore where the BTX receptor is located. Thus the present study provides further evidence for structural models in which pyrethroids bind to the lipid-exposed interface formed by helices IIIS6, IIS5 and linker helix IIS4–IIS5, whereas BTX binds to the pore-exposed side of the IIIS6 helix. PMID:19154185

  6. Curcumin Cross-links Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Polypeptides and Potentiates CFTR Channel Activity by Distinct Mechanisms*

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Karen; Wang, Wei; Narlawar, Rajeshwar; Schmidt, Boris; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2009-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CFTR chloride channel. Wild type and mutant CFTR channels can be activated by curcumin, a well tolerated dietary compound with some appeal as a prospective CF therapeutic. However, we show here that curcumin has the unexpected effect of cross-linking CFTR polypeptides into SDS-resistant oligomers. This effect occurred for CFTR channels in microsomes as well as in intact cells and at the same concentrations that are effective for promoting CFTR channel activity (5–50 μm). Both mature CFTR polypeptides at the cell surface and immature CFTR protein in the endoplasmic reticulum were cross-linked by curcumin, although the latter pool was more susceptible to this modification. Curcumin cross-linked two CF mutant channels (ΔF508 and G551D) as well as a variety of deletion constructs that lack the major cytoplasmic domains. In vitro cross-linking could be prevented by high concentrations of oxidant scavengers (i.e. reduced glutathione and sodium azide) indicating a possible oxidation reaction with the CFTR polypeptide. Importantly, cyclic derivatives of curcumin that lack the reactive β diketone moiety had no cross-linking activity. One of these cyclic derivatives stimulated the activities of wild type CFTR channels, Δ1198-CFTR channels, and G551D-CFTR channels in excised membrane patches. Like the parent compound, the cyclic derivative irreversibly activated CFTR channels in excised patches during prolonged exposure (>5 min). Our results raise a note of caution about secondary biochemical effects of reactive compounds like curcumin in the treatment of CF. Cyclic curcumin derivatives may have better therapeutic potential in this regard. PMID:19740743

  7. Conformational Changes Relevant to Channel Activity and Folding within the first Nucleotide Binding Domain of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator*

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Rhea P.; Chong, P. Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I.; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G.; Forman-Kay, Julie D.

    2012-01-01

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in Tm from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  8. Conformational changes relevant to channel activity and folding within the first nucleotide binding domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Rhea P; Chong, P Andrew; Protasevich, Irina I; Vernon, Robert; Noy, Efrat; Bihler, Hermann; An, Jian Li; Kalid, Ori; Sela-Culang, Inbal; Mense, Martin; Senderowitz, Hanoch; Brouillette, Christie G; Forman-Kay, Julie D

    2012-08-17

    Deletion of Phe-508 (F508del) in the first nucleotide binding domain (NBD1) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) leads to defects in folding and channel gating. NMR data on human F508del NBD1 indicate that an H620Q mutant, shown to increase channel open probability, and the dual corrector/potentiator CFFT-001 similarly disrupt interactions between β-strands S3, S9, and S10 and the C-terminal helices H8 and H9, shifting a preexisting conformational equilibrium from helix to coil. CFFT-001 appears to interact with β-strands S3/S9/S10, consistent with docking simulations. Decreases in T(m) from differential scanning calorimetry with H620Q or CFFT-001 suggest direct compound binding to a less thermostable state of NBD1. We hypothesize that, in full-length CFTR, shifting the conformational equilibrium to reduce H8/H9 interactions with the uniquely conserved strands S9/S10 facilitates release of the regulatory region from the NBD dimerization interface to promote dimerization and thereby increase channel open probability. These studies enabled by our NMR assignments for F508del NBD1 provide a window into the conformational fluctuations within CFTR that may regulate function and contribute to folding energetics. PMID:22722932

  9. Disease-associated mutations in the extracytoplasmic loops of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator do not impede biosynthetic processing but impair chloride channel stability.

    PubMed

    Hämmerle, M M; Aleksandrov, A A; Riordan, J R

    2001-05-01

    Consistent with its function as a chloride channel regulated entirely from the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) glycoprotein exposes little of its mass on the exterior surface of cells. The first and fourth extracytoplasmic loops (ELs) contain approximately 15 and 30 residues, respectively; the other four ELs are extremely short. To examine the influence of missense mutants in ELs detected in patients with cystic fibrosis, we have expressed them in mammalian (baby hamster kidney (BHK21)) cells and assessed their biosynthetic processing and chloride channel activity. In contrast to previous findings that 18 of 30 disease-associated missense mutations in cytoplasmic loops caused retention of the nascent polypeptides in the endoplasmic reticulum, all the EL mutants studied matured and were transported to the cell surface. This pronounced asymmetry is consistent with the notion that endoplasmic reticulum quality control of nascent CFTR is exerted primarily on the cytoplasmic side of the membrane. Although this set of EL mutations has little effect on CFTR maturation, most of them seriously compromise its chloride channel activity. Substitutions at six different positions in EL1 and single positions in EL2 and EL4 all destabilized the open state, some of them severely, indicating that the ELs contribute to the stability of the CFTR ion pore. PMID:11278813

  10. Locating a Plausible Binding Site for an Open-Channel Blocker, GlyH-101, in the Pore of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance RegulatorS⃞

    PubMed Central

    Ivetac, Anthony; Alexander, Christopher; O'Donnell, Nicolette; Frye, Leah; Sansom, Mark S. P.; Dawson, David C.

    2012-01-01

    High-throughput screening has led to the identification of small-molecule blockers of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, but the structural basis of blocker binding remains to be defined. We developed molecular models of the CFTR channel on the basis of homology to the bacterial transporter Sav1866, which could permit blocker binding to be analyzed in silico. The models accurately predicted the existence of a narrow region in the pore that is a likely candidate for the binding site of an open-channel pore blocker such as N-(2-naphthalenyl)-[(3,5-dibromo-2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)methylene]glycine hydrazide (GlyH-101), which is thought to act by entering the channel from the extracellular side. As a more-stringent test of predictions of the CFTR pore model, we applied induced-fit, virtual, ligand-docking techniques to identify potential binding sites for GlyH-101 within the CFTR pore. The highest-scoring docked position was near two pore-lining residues, Phe337 and Thr338, and the rates of reactions of anionic, thiol-directed reagents with cysteines substituted at these positions were slowed in the presence of the blocker, consistent with the predicted repulsive effect of the net negative charge on GlyH-101. When a bulky phenylalanine that forms part of the predicted binding pocket (Phe342) was replaced with alanine, the apparent affinity of the blocker was increased ∼200-fold. A molecular mechanics-generalized Born/surface area analysis of GlyH-101 binding predicted that substitution of Phe342 with alanine would substantially increase blocker affinity, primarily because of decreased intramolecular strain within the blocker-protein complex. This study suggests that GlyH-101 blocks the CFTR channel by binding within the pore bottleneck. PMID:22923500

  11. An Electrostatic Interaction at the Tetrahelix Bundle Promotes Phosphorylation-dependent Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Opening*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Roessler, Bryan C.; Kirk, Kevin L.

    2014-01-01

    The CFTR channel is an essential mediator of electrolyte transport across epithelial tissues. CFTR opening is promoted by ATP binding and dimerization of its two nucleotide binding domains (NBDs). Phosphorylation of its R domain (e.g. by PKA) is also required for channel activity. The CFTR structure is unsolved but homology models of the CFTR closed and open states have been produced based on the crystal structures of evolutionarily related ABC transporters. These models predict the formation of a tetrahelix bundle of intracellular loops (ICLs) during channel opening. Here we provide evidence that residues E267 in ICL2 and K1060 in ICL4 electrostatically interact at the interface of this predicted bundle to promote CFTR opening. Mutations or a thiol modifier that introduced like charges at these two positions substantially inhibited ATP-dependent channel opening. ATP-dependent activity was rescued by introducing a second site gain of function (GOF) mutation that was previously shown to promote ATP-dependent and ATP-independent opening (K978C). Conversely, the ATP-independent activity of the K978C GOF mutant was inhibited by charge- reversal mutations at positions 267 or 1060 either in the presence or absence of NBD2. The latter result indicates that this electrostatic interaction also promotes unliganded channel opening in the absence of ATP binding and NBD dimerization. Charge-reversal mutations at either position markedly reduced the PKA sensitivity of channel activation implying strong allosteric coupling between bundle formation and R domain phosphorylation. These findings support important roles of the tetrahelix bundle and the E267-K1060 electrostatic interaction in phosphorylation-dependent CFTR gating. PMID:25190805

  12. Two Salt Bridges Differentially Contribute to the Maintenance of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channel Function*

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S.; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z.; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg352-Asp993 and Arg347-Asp924, that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg347 not only interacts with Asp924 but also interacts with Asp993. The tripartite interaction Arg347-Asp924-Asp993 mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg352-Asp993 salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg352 and Asp993, channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  13. Two salt bridges differentially contribute to the maintenance of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channel function.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guiying; Freeman, Cody S; Knotts, Taylor; Prince, Chengyu Z; Kuang, Christopher; McCarty, Nael A

    2013-07-12

    Previous studies have identified two salt bridges in human CFTR chloride ion channels, Arg(352)-Asp(993) and Arg(347)-Asp(924), that are required for normal channel function. In the present study, we determined how the two salt bridges cooperate to maintain the open pore architecture of CFTR. Our data suggest that Arg(347) not only interacts with Asp(924) but also interacts with Asp(993). The tripartite interaction Arg(347)-Asp(924)-Asp(993) mainly contributes to maintaining a stable s2 open subconductance state. The Arg(352)-Asp(993) salt bridge, in contrast, is involved in stabilizing both the s2 and full (f) open conductance states, with the main contribution being to the f state. The s1 subconductance state does not require either salt bridge. In confirmation of the role of Arg(352) and Asp(993), channels bearing cysteines at these sites could be latched into a full open state using the bifunctional cross-linker 1,2-ethanediyl bismethanethiosulfonate, but only when applied in the open state. Channels remained latched open even after washout of ATP. The results suggest that these interacting residues contribute differently to stabilizing the open pore in different phases of the gating cycle. PMID:23709221

  14. Identification of a second blocker binding site at the cytoplasmic mouth of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore.

    PubMed

    St Aubin, Chantal N; Zhou, Jing-Jun; Linsdell, Paul

    2007-05-01

    Chloride transport by the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel is inhibited by a broad range of substances that bind within a wide inner vestibule in the pore and physically occlude Cl(-) permeation. Binding of many of these so-called open-channel blockers involves electrostatic interactions with a positively charged lysine residue (Lys95) located in the pore. Here, we use site-directed mutagenesis to identify a second blocker binding site located at the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore. Mutagenesis of a positively charged arginine at the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore, Arg303, leads to significant weakening of the blocking effects of suramin, a large negatively charged organic molecule. Apparent suramin affinity is correlated with the side chain charge at this position, consistent with an electrostatic interaction. In contrast, block by suramin is unaffected by mutagenesis of Lys95, suggesting that it does not approach close to this important pore-forming lysine residue. We propose that the CFTR pore inner vestibule contains two distinct blocker binding sites. Relatively small organic anions enter deeply into the pore to interact with Lys95, causing an open-channel block that is sensitive to both the membrane potential and the extracellular Cl(-) concentration. Larger anionic molecules can become lodged in the cytoplasmic mouth of the pore where they interact with Arg303, causing a distinct type of open-channel block that is insensitive to membrane potential or extracellular Cl(-) ions. The pore may narrow significantly between the locations of these two blocker binding sites. PMID:17293558

  15. Conformational changes induced by a single amino acid substitution in the trans-membrane domain of Vpu: Implications for HIV-1 susceptibility to channel blocking drugs

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2007-01-01

    The channel-forming trans-membrane domain of Vpu (Vpu TM) from HIV-1 is known to enhance virion release from the infected cells and is a potential target for ion-channel blockers. The substitution of alanine at position 18 by a histidine (A18H) has been shown to render HIV-1 infections susceptible to rimantadine, a channel blocker of M2 protein from the influenza virus. In order to describe the influence of the mutation on the structure and rimantadine susceptibility of Vpu, we determined the structure of A18H Vpu TM, and compared it to those of wild-type Vpu TM and M2 TM. Both isotropic and orientationally dependent NMR frequencies of the backbone amide resonance of His18 were perturbed by rimantadine, and those of Ile15 and Trp22 were also affected, suggesting that His18 is the key residue for rimantadine binding and that residues located on the same face of the TM helix are also involved. A18H Vpu TM has an ideal, straight α-helix spanning residues 6–27 with an average tilt angle of 41° in C14 phospholipid bicelles, indicating that the tilt angle is increased by 11° compared to that of wild-type Vpu TM. The longer helix formed by the A18H mutation has a larger tilt angle to compensate for the hydrophobic mismatch with the length of the phospholipids in the bilayer. These results demonstrate that the local change of the primary structure plays an important role in secondary and tertiary structures of Vpu TM in lipid bilayers and affects its ability to interact with channel blockers. PMID:17766368

  16. Multiple Membrane-Cytoplasmic Domain Contacts in the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Mediate Regulation of Channel Gating*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    He, Lihua; Aleksandrov, Andrei A.; Serohijos, Adrian W. R.; Hegedüs, Tamás; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Cui, Liying; Dokholyan, Nikolay V.; Riordan, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ATP-binding cassette (ABC) ion channel mutated in patients with cystic fibrosis. The most common mutation, deletion of phenylalanine 508 (ΔF508) and many other disease-associated mutations occur in the nucleotide binding domains (NBD) and the cytoplasmic loops (CL) of the membrane-spanning domains (MSD). A recently constructed computational model of the CFTR three-dimensional structure, supported by experimental data (Serohijos, A. W., Hegedus, T., Aleksandrov, A. A., He, L., Cui, L., Dokholyan, N. V., and Riordan, J. R. (2008) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105, 3256–3261) revealed that several of these mutations including ΔF508 disrupted interfaces between these domains. Here we have used cysteine cross-linking experiments to verify all NBD/CL interfaces predicted by the structural model and observed that their cross-linking has a variety of different effects on channel gating. The interdomain contacts comprise aromatic clusters important for stabilization of the interfaces and also involve the Q-loops and X-loops that are in close proximity to the ATP binding sites. Cross-linking of all domain-swapping contacts between NBDs and MSD cytoplasmic loops in opposite halves of the protein rapidly and reversibly arrest single channel gating while those in the same halves have lesser impact. These results reinforce the idea that mediation of regulatory signals between cytoplasmic- and membrane-integrated domains of the CFTR channel apparently relies on an array of precise but highly dynamic interdomain structural joints. PMID:18658148

  17. Disease-associated mutations in cytoplasmic loops 1 and 2 of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator impede processing or opening of the channel.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Jia, Y; Mathews, C J; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R; Loo, T W; Clarke, D M

    1997-09-30

    Since little is known about the contribution to function of the N-terminal cytoplasmic loops (CL1, residues 139-194; CL2, residues 242-307) of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), all nine point mutations identified in CLs 1 and 2 from patients with cystic fibrosis were reconstructed in the expression vector pcDNA3-CFTR and expressed transiently in COS-1 and HEK-293 cells and stably in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Four amino acid substitutions retarded production of mature, fully glycosylated CFTR, suggesting that misprocessing of the channel causes the disease symptoms in the affected patients. Protein maturation could not be promoted by cell culture conditions of reduced temperature (26 degrees C). When properly processed mutants were evaluated for functional defects by the iodide efflux method, the G178R- and E193K-CFTR-expressing cell lines showed impaired anion translocation activities. Patch-clamp studies of single channels revealed that E193K variants had a significantly decreased open probability, which resulted from an increase in the mean closed time of the channels. This contrasted with a previous study of disease-associated point mutations in CL3 that mainly affected the mean open time. None of the maturation-competent CL 1 and 2 mutants had altered conductance. Thus, the N-terminal CLs appear not to contribute to the anion translocation pathway of CFTR; rather, mutations in CL1 can impede transition to the open state. Interestingly, the ability of the non-hydrolyzable ATP analogue adenylyl imidodiphosphate (AMP-PNP) to lock the channel into open bursts was abolished by the I148T and G178R amino acid substitutions. PMID:9305991

  18. Disulphonic stilbene block of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels expressed in a mammalian cell line and its regulation by a critical pore residue.

    PubMed

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1996-11-01

    1. The disulphonic stilbenes 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) were shown to cause a voltage-dependent inhibition of macroscopic cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- currents expressed in baby hamster kidney cells when applied to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. These compounds are known to be relatively ineffective at blocking CFTR from the extracellular side of the membrane. 2. Mutation of a positively charged arginine, previously suggested to be located in the channel pore (R347), to a negatively charged aspartate significantly reduced the affinity of block by both DNDS and DIDS, suggesting that this residue contributes to the binding site for disulphonic stilbenes. 3. It is suggested that the CFTR Cl- channel may contain a relatively large inner vestibule in which a number of large anions bind and block Cl- permeation. Arginine 347 may be involved in anion binding within this region. PMID:8930836

  19. Disulphonic stilbene block of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator Cl- channels expressed in a mammalian cell line and its regulation by a critical pore residue.

    PubMed Central

    Linsdell, P; Hanrahan, J W

    1996-01-01

    1. The disulphonic stilbenes 4,4'-dinitrostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DNDS) and 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS) were shown to cause a voltage-dependent inhibition of macroscopic cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- currents expressed in baby hamster kidney cells when applied to the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. These compounds are known to be relatively ineffective at blocking CFTR from the extracellular side of the membrane. 2. Mutation of a positively charged arginine, previously suggested to be located in the channel pore (R347), to a negatively charged aspartate significantly reduced the affinity of block by both DNDS and DIDS, suggesting that this residue contributes to the binding site for disulphonic stilbenes. 3. It is suggested that the CFTR Cl- channel may contain a relatively large inner vestibule in which a number of large anions bind and block Cl- permeation. Arginine 347 may be involved in anion binding within this region. PMID:8930836

  20. The tyrosine kinase p60c-src regulates the fast gate of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel.

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, H; Machen, T E

    1996-01-01

    The role of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src on the gating of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel was investigated with the cell-attached and excised patch clamp technique in conjunction with current noise analysis of recordings containing multiple channels per patch. Spectra of CFTR-generated current noise contained a low-frequency and a high-frequency Lorentzian noise component. In the cell-attached mode, the high-frequency Lorentzian was significantly dependent on the membrane potential, while the low-frequency Lorentzian was unaffected. Excision of forskolin-stimulated patches into ATP-containing solution significantly reduced the amplitude of the voltage-dependent high-frequency Lorentzian. Addition of the tyrosine kinase p60c-src to excised, active, CFTR-containing membrane patches increased mean currents by 54%, increased the corner frequency of the low-frequency Lorentzian, and recovered the high-frequency Lorentzian and its characteristics. Treatment with lambda-phosphatase inactivated src-induced currents and changes in gating. When active patches were excised under conditions in which patch-associated tyrosine phosphatases were blocked with sodium vanadate, the high-frequency gating remained relatively unchanged. The results suggest that CFTR's open probability and its voltage-dependent fast gate are dependent on tyrosine phosphorylation, and that membrane-associated tyrosine phosphatases are responsible for inactivation of the fast gate after patch excision. PMID:8968578

  1. Allosteric coupling between proximal C-terminus and selectivity filter is facilitated by the movement of transmembrane segment 4 in TREK-2 channel

    PubMed Central

    Zhuo, Ren-Gong; Peng, Peng; Liu, Xiao-Yan; Yan, Hai-Tao; Xu, Jiang-Ping; Zheng, Jian-Quan; Wei, Xiao-Li; Ma, Xiao-Yun

    2016-01-01

    TREK-2, a member of two-pore-domain potassium channel family, regulates cellular excitability in response to diverse stimuli. However, how such stimuli control channel function remains unclear. Here, by characterizing the responses of cytosolic proximal C-terminus deletant (ΔpCt) and transmembrane segment 4 (M4)-glycine hinge mutant (G312A) to 2-Aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), an activator of TREK-2, we show that the transduction initiated from pCt domain is allosterically coupled with the conformation of selectivity filter (SF) via the movements of M4, without depending on the original status of SF. Moreover, ΔpCt and G312A also exhibited blunted responses to extracellular alkalization, a model to induce SF conformational transition. These results suggest that the coupling between pCt domain and SF is bidirectional, and M4 movements are involved in both processes. Further mechanistic exploration reveals that the function of Phe316, a residue close to the C-terminus of M4, is associated with such communications. However, unlike TREK-2, M4-hinge of TREK-1 only controls the transmission from pCt to SF, rather than SF conformational changes triggered by pHo changes. Together, our findings uncover the unique gating properties of TREK-2, and elucidate the mechanisms for how the extracellular and intracellular stimuli harness the pore gating allosterically. PMID:26879043

  2. RHYTHM--a server to predict the orientation of transmembrane helices in channels and membrane-coils.

    PubMed

    Rose, Alexander; Lorenzen, Stephan; Goede, Andrean; Gruening, Björn; Hildebrand, Peter W

    2009-07-01

    RHYTHM is a web server that predicts buried versus exposed residues of helical membrane proteins. Starting from a given protein sequence, secondary and tertiary structure information is calculated by RHYTHM within only a few seconds. The prediction applies structural information from a growing data base of precalculated packing files and evolutionary information from sequence patterns conserved in a representative dataset of membrane proteins ('Pfam-domains'). The program uses two types of position specific matrices to account for the different geometries of packing in channels and transporters ('channels') or other membrane proteins ('membrane-coils'). The output provides information on the secondary structure and topology of the protein and specifically on the contact type of each residue and its conservation. This information can be downloaded as a graphical file for illustration, a text file for analysis and statistics and a PyMOL file for modeling purposes. The server can be freely accessed at: URL: http://proteinformatics.de/rhythm. PMID:19465378

  3. Docking ellipticine to the V-VI transmembrane domain of the Kv11.1 potassium channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Brancaleon, Lorenzo; Gentile, S.

    2011-03-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs exerting their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal / mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal / mol) Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). The data shows that some configurations enable these molecules to bridge among channel subunits, thus potentially inhibiting the flow of ions.

  4. Interactions between impermeant blocking ions in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator chloride channel pore: evidence for anion-induced conformational changes.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ning; Linsdell, Paul

    2006-03-01

    It is well known that extracellular Cl(-) ions can weaken the inhibitory effects of intracellular open channel blockers in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel pore. This effect is frequently attributed to repulsive ion-ion interactions inside the pore. However, since Cl(-) ions are permeant in CFTR, it is also possible that extracellular Cl(-) ions are directly competing with intracellular blocking ions for a common binding site; thus, this does not provide direct evidence for multiple, independent anion binding sites in the pore. To test for the possible through-space nature of ion-ion interactions inside the CFTR pore, we investigated the interaction between impermeant anions applied to either end of the pore. We found that inclusion of low concentrations of impermeant Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions in the extracellular solution weaken the blocking effects of three different intracellular blockers [Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-), glibenclamide and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)benzoic acid] without affecting their apparent voltage dependence. However, the effects of extracellular Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions are too strong to be accounted for by simple competitive models of ion binding inside the pore. In addition, extracellular Fe(CN)(6) (3-) ions, which do not appear to enter the pore, also weaken the blocking effects of intracellular Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) ions. In contrast to previous models that invoked interactions between anions bound concurrently inside the pore, we propose that Pt(NO(2))(4) (2-) and Fe(CN)(6) (3-) binding to an extracellularly accessible site outside of the channel permeation pathway alters the structure of an intracellular anion binding site, leading to weakened binding of intracellular blocking ions. PMID:16794779

  5. Optimization of the degenerated interfacial ATP binding site improves the function of disease-related mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) channels.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-11-26

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed. PMID:20861014

  6. Optimization of the Degenerated Interfacial ATP Binding Site Improves the Function of Disease-related Mutant Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Channels*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Feng; Jih, Kang-Yang; Shimizu, Hiroyasu; Li, Min; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2010-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel, an ATP binding cassette (ABC) protein whose defects cause the deadly genetic disease cystic fibrosis (CF), encompasses two nucleotide binding domains (NBD1 and NBD2). Recent studies indicate that in the presence of ATP, the two NBDs coalesce into a dimer, trapping an ATP molecule in each of the two interfacial composite ATP binding sites (site 1 and site 2). Experimental evidence also suggests that CFTR gating is mainly controlled by ATP binding and hydrolysis in site 2, whereas site 1, which harbors several non-canonical substitutions in ATP-interacting motifs, is considered degenerated. The CF-associated mutation G551D, by introducing a bulky and negatively charged side chain into site 2, completely abolishes ATP-induced openings of CFTR. Here, we report a strategy to optimize site 1 for ATP binding by converting two amino acid residues to ABC consensus (i.e. H1348G) or more commonly seen residues in other ABC proteins (i.e. W401Y,W401F). Introducing either one or both of these mutations into G551D-CFTR confers ATP responsiveness for this disease-associated mutant channel. We further showed that the same maneuver also improved the function of WT-CFTR and the most common CF-associated ΔF508 channels, both of which rely on site 2 for gating control. Thus, our results demonstrated that the degenerated site 1 can be rebuilt to complement or support site 2 for CFTR function. Possible approaches for developing CFTR potentiators targeting site 1 will be discussed. PMID:20861014

  7. Solid-State NMR Investigation of the Conformation, Proton Conduction, and Hydration of the Influenza B Virus M2 Transmembrane Proton Channel.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jonathan K; Tietze, Daniel; Lee, Myungwoon; Wang, Jun; Hong, Mei

    2016-07-01

    Together with the influenza A virus, influenza B virus causes seasonal flu epidemics. The M2 protein of influenza B (BM2) forms a tetrameric proton-conducting channel that is important for the virus lifecycle. BM2 shares little sequence homology with AM2, except for a conserved HxxxW motif in the transmembrane (TM) domain. Unlike AM2, no antiviral drugs have been developed to block the BM2 channel. To elucidate the proton-conduction mechanism of BM2 and to facilitate the development of BM2 inhibitors, we have employed solid-state NMR spectroscopy to investigate the conformation, dynamics, and hydration of the BM2 TM domain in lipid bilayers. BM2 adopts an α-helical conformation in lipid membranes. At physiological temperature and low pH, the proton-selective residue, His19, shows relatively narrow (15)N chemical exchange peaks for the imidazole nitrogens, indicating fast proton shuttling that interconverts cationic and neutral histidines. Importantly, pH-dependent (15)N chemical shifts indicate that His19 retains the neutral population to much lower pH than His37 in AM2, indicating larger acid-dissociation constants or lower pKa's. We attribute these dynamical and equilibrium differences to the presence of a second titratable histidine, His27, which may increase the proton-dissociation rate of His19. Two-dimensional (1)H-(13)C correlation spectra probing water (1)H polarization transfer to the peptide indicates that the BM2 channel becomes much more hydrated at low pH than at high pH, particularly at Ser12, indicating that the pore-facing serine residues in BM2 mediate proton relay to the proton-selective histidine. PMID:27286559

  8. Structure and supramolecular architecture of membrane channel-forming peptides.

    PubMed

    Spach, G; Duclohier, H; Molle, G; Valleton, J M

    1989-01-01

    Peptides gathering together to induce channels in lipid bilayers may be classified in several categories according to the spatial structures involved. For example, gramicidin A forms intramolecular tubes, alamethicin, bundles of helical rods with intermolecular pores, porins (being proteins, properly speaking) are rich in beta-sheets that may form barrels, whereas cyclic peptides might stack together resulting in the formation of pores. The chemical structure of these compounds is now well characterized. The transmembrane electrical signals that they transmit are also typical of the particular supramolecular configurations (or architecture). Investigations in this field are thus relevant to structure-function relationship studies due to the availability of natural or synthetic analogues allowing the measurement of the influence of physico-chemical parameters upon the energy profiles of the pores. Consequently, questions such as the existence and probabilities of conductance substrates, their voltage-dependence and their ion or molecular selectivity can be tackled. Today, the loosest aspect of these studies lies in the actual molecular conformations and architecture in the membranes of the peptide aggregates, the knowledge of which remains imprecise, even 'at rest' in the best-studied cases. This review attempts to point out still unresolved questions and to propose some plausible approaches concerning, for example: 1) the configurations of the molecular aggregates responsible for ion transfer; 2) the mechanisms for channel-opening and closing (gating); 3) the eventual cooperative phenomena between channels, via the bilayer or interfacial components. Possible applications of these structures will be tentatively outlined. PMID:2470416

  9. Structure of Magainin and Alamethicin in Model Membranes Studied by X-Ray Reflectivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, C.; Salditt, T.

    2006-01-01

    We have investigated the structure of lipid bilayers containing varied molar ratios of different lipids and the antimicrobial peptides magainin and alamethicin. For this structural study, we have used x-ray reflectivity on highly aligned solid-supported multilamellar lipid membranes. The reflectivity curves have been analyzed by semi-kinematical reflectivity theory modeling the bilayer density profile ρ(z). Model simulations of the reflectivity curves cover a large range of vertical momentum transfer qz, and yield excellent agreement between data and theory. The structural changes observed as a function of the molar peptide/lipid concentration P/L are discussed in a comparative way. PMID:16920839

  10. cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated phosphorylation of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator residue Ser-753 and its role in channel activation.

    PubMed

    Seibert, F S; Tabcharani, J A; Chang, X B; Dulhanty, A M; Mathews, C; Hanrahan, J W; Riordan, J R

    1995-02-01

    Hormonal regulation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl- channel is largely mediated via cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). CFTR contains 10 dibasic consensus sites for potential PKA phosphorylation ((R/K) (R/K)X(S*/T*)). Previous studies (Chang, X.-B., Tabcharani, J. A., Hou, Y.-X., Jensen, T. J., Kartner, N., Alon, N., Hanrahan, J. W., and Riordan, J.R (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 11304-11311) showed that approximately 25% of the CFTR wild-type response to PKA activation remained upon inhibition of most detectable phosphorylation by in vitro mutagenesis of all 10 dibasic consensus sites (10SA CFTR). To identify potential additional sites responsible for the residual activity, large amounts of this mutant CFTR were phosphorylated with PKA using high specific activity [gamma-32P]ATP. Cyanogen bromide cleavage indicated that a large portion of the observed PKA phosphorylation occurred within a 5.8-kDa fragment of the R domain between residues 722-773. Removal of serines at potential PKA sites in this fragment showed that Ser-753 accounted for all of the gamma-32P labeling of the 5.8-kDa peptide. Replacement of Ser-753 with alanine reduced the level of residual CFTR activity by a further 40%, indicating that phosphorylation at this previously unidentified site contributes to the activation of 10SA CFTR. PMID:7530719

  11. Analysis of Trafficking, Stability and Function of Human Connexin 26 Gap Junction Channels with Deafness-Causing Mutations in the Fourth Transmembrane Helix

    PubMed Central

    Ambrosi, Cinzia; Walker, Amy E.; DePriest, Adam D.; Cone, Angela C.; Lu, Connie; Badger, John; Skerrett, I. Martha; Sosinsky, Gina E.

    2013-01-01

    Human Connexin26 gene mutations cause hearing loss. These hereditary mutations are the leading cause of childhood deafness worldwide. Mutations in gap junction proteins (connexins) can impair intercellular communication by eliminating protein synthesis, mis-trafficking, or inducing channels that fail to dock or have aberrant function. We previously identified a new class of mutants that form non-functional gap junction channels and hemichannels (connexons) by disrupting packing and inter-helix interactions. Here we analyzed fourteen point mutations in the fourth transmembrane helix of connexin26 (Cx26) that cause non-syndromic hearing loss. Eight mutations caused mis-trafficking (K188R, F191L, V198M, S199F, G200R, I203K, L205P, T208P). Of the remaining six that formed gap junctions in mammalian cells, M195T and A197S formed stable hemichannels after isolation with a baculovirus/Sf9 protein purification system, while C202F, I203T, L205V and N206S formed hemichannels with varying degrees of instability. The function of all six gap junction-forming mutants was further assessed through measurement of dye coupling in mammalian cells and junctional conductance in paired Xenopus oocytes. Dye coupling between cell pairs was reduced by varying degrees for all six mutants. In homotypic oocyte pairings, only A197S induced measurable conductance. In heterotypic pairings with wild-type Cx26, five of the six mutants formed functional gap junction channels, albeit with reduced efficiency. None of the mutants displayed significant alterations in sensitivity to transjunctional voltage or induced conductive hemichannels in single oocytes. Intra-hemichannel interactions between mutant and wild-type proteins were assessed in rescue experiments using baculovirus expression in Sf9 insect cells. Of the four unstable mutations (C202F, I203T, L205V, N206S) only C202F and N206S formed stable hemichannels when co-expressed with wild-type Cx26. Stable M195T hemichannels displayed an increased

  12. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia.

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E; Ostedgaard, Lynda S; Shah, Viral S; Ver Heul, Amanda R; Welsh, Michael J; Randak, Christoph O

    2015-05-29

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P(1),P(5)-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5'-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5'-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl(-) channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  13. Mutating the Conserved Q-loop Glutamine 1291 Selectively Disrupts Adenylate Kinase-dependent Channel Gating of the ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Adenylate Kinase Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) and Reduces Channel Function in Primary Human Airway Epithelia*

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Qian; Ernst, Sarah E.; Ostedgaard, Lynda S.; Shah, Viral S.; Ver Heul, Amanda R.; Welsh, Michael J.; Randak, Christoph O.

    2015-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and two other non-membrane-bound ABC proteins, Rad50 and a structural maintenance of chromosome (SMC) protein, exhibit adenylate kinase activity in the presence of physiologic concentrations of ATP and AMP or ADP (ATP + AMP ⇆ 2 ADP). The crystal structure of the nucleotide-binding domain of an SMC protein in complex with the adenylate kinase bisubstrate inhibitor P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate (Ap5A) suggests that AMP binds to the conserved Q-loop glutamine during the adenylate kinase reaction. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutating the corresponding residue in CFTR, Gln-1291, selectively disrupts adenylate kinase-dependent channel gating at physiologic nucleotide concentrations. We found that substituting Gln-1291 with bulky side-chain amino acids abolished the effects of Ap5A, AMP, and adenosine 5′-monophosphoramidate on CFTR channel function. 8-Azidoadenosine 5′-monophosphate photolabeling of the AMP-binding site and adenylate kinase activity were disrupted in Q1291F CFTR. The Gln-1291 mutations did not alter the potency of ATP at stimulating current or ATP-dependent gating when ATP was the only nucleotide present. However, when physiologic concentrations of ADP and AMP were added, adenylate kinase-deficient Q1291F channels opened significantly less than wild type. Consistent with this result, we found that Q1291F CFTR displayed significantly reduced Cl− channel function in well differentiated primary human airway epithelia. These results indicate that a highly conserved residue of an ABC transporter plays an important role in adenylate kinase-dependent CFTR gating. Furthermore, the results suggest that adenylate kinase activity is important for normal CFTR channel function in airway epithelia. PMID:25887396

  14. Conformational changes of alamethicin induced by solvent and temperature. A 13C-NMR and circular-dichroism study.

    PubMed

    Jung, G; Dubischar, N

    1975-06-01

    13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism (CD) have been used for studies on the conformation of alamethicin. The 13C NMR spectrum is assigned with the aid of signals of synthetic partial sequences and selective proton decoupling. The solvent and temperature-dependence of the 13C NMR spectra, T1 measurements and the use of lanthanide-shift reagents allow the differentiation between the amino acids belonging to a rigid alpha-helical portion of the alamethicin sequence and those belonging to a more flexible part. The 13C NMR results are in agreement with results obtained from extended solvent and temperature-dependent CD studies which indicate a highly stabilized nonpolar and intrachenar alpha-helical part. The concentration-dependence of the CD spectrum of alamethicin in a nematic phase revealed aggregation phenomena which might simulate those observed in natural and synthetic membranes. After dissolving alamethicin in aqueous alcohol there is a time-dependence of the ellipticity of the Cotton effects showing a sort of memory effect on the mode of dissolution. Four different conformations can be characterized by CD spectra depending on the solvent and concentration. A model illustrating the dynamic conformations and aggregation phenomena within a membrane is proposed. PMID:1175592

  15. A Unified View of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) Gating: Combining the Allosterism of a Ligand-gated Channel with the Enzymatic Activity of an ATP-binding Cassette (ABC) Transporter*

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Kevin L.; Wang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a unique ion channel in that its gating is coupled to an intrinsic enzymatic activity (ATP hydrolysis). This enzymatic activity derives from the evolutionary origin of CFTR as an ATP-binding cassette transporter. CFTR gating is distinct from that of a typical ligand-gated channel because its ligand (ATP) is usually consumed during the gating cycle. However, recent findings indicate that CFTR gating exhibits allosteric properties that are common to conventional ligand-gated channels (e.g. unliganded openings and constitutive mutations). Here, we provide a unified view of CFTR gating that combines the allosterism of a ligand-gated channel with its unique enzymatic activity. PMID:21296873

  16. Large conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent K+ channel, a distinct member of voltage-dependent ion channels with seven N-terminal transmembrane segments (S0-S6), an extracellular N terminus, and an intracellular (S9-S10) C terminus.

    PubMed

    Meera, P; Wallner, M; Song, M; Toro, L

    1997-12-01

    Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-dependent K+ (MaxiK) channels show sequence similarities to voltage-gated ion channels. They have a homologous S1-S6 region, but are unique at the N and C termini. At the C terminus, MaxiK channels have four additional hydrophobic regions (S7-S10) of unknown topology. At the N terminus, we have recently proposed a new model where MaxiK channels have an additional transmembrane region (S0) that confers beta subunit regulation. Using transient expression of epitope tagged MaxiK channels, in vitro translation, functional, and "in vivo" reconstitution assays, we now show that MaxiK channels have seven transmembrane segments (S0-S6) at the N terminus and a S1-S6 region that folds in a similar way as in voltage-gated ion channels. Further, our results indicate that hydrophobic segments S9-S10 in the C terminus are cytoplasmic and unequivocally demonstrate that S0 forms an additional transmembrane segment leading to an exoplasmic N terminus. PMID:9391153

  17. Large conductance voltage- and calcium-dependent K+ channel, a distinct member of voltage-dependent ion channels with seven N-terminal transmembrane segments (S0-S6), an extracellular N terminus, and an intracellular (S9-S10) C terminus

    PubMed Central

    Meera, Pratap; Wallner, Martin; Song, Min; Toro, Ligia

    1997-01-01

    Large conductance voltage- and Ca2+-dependent K+ (MaxiK) channels show sequence similarities to voltage-gated ion channels. They have a homologous S1-S6 region, but are unique at the N and C termini. At the C terminus, MaxiK channels have four additional hydrophobic regions (S7-S10) of unknown topology. At the N terminus, we have recently proposed a new model where MaxiK channels have an additional transmembrane region (S0) that confers β subunit regulation. Using transient expression of epitope tagged MaxiK channels, in vitro translation, functional, and “in vivo” reconstitution assays, we now show that MaxiK channels have seven transmembrane segments (S0-S6) at the N terminus and a S1-S6 region that folds in a similar way as in voltage-gated ion channels. Further, our results indicate that hydrophobic segments S9-S10 in the C terminus are cytoplasmic and unequivocally demonstrate that S0 forms an additional transmembrane segment leading to an exoplasmic N terminus. PMID:9391153

  18. Common Mechanism of Cross-Resistance Development in Pathogenic Bacteria Bacillus cereus Against Alamethicin and Pediocin Involves Alteration in Lipid Composition.

    PubMed

    Meena, Sunita; Mehla, Jitender; Kumar, Raj; Sood, S K

    2016-10-01

    To understand the mechanism of development of cross-resistance in food pathogen Bacillus cereus against an antimicrobial peptide pediocin and antibiotic alamethicin, the present study was designed. Pediococcus pentosaceus was taken as a source of pediocin, and it was purified by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by cation exchange chromatography with 14.01-fold purity and 14.4 % recovery. B. cereus strains alamethicin-resistant strains (IC50 3.23 µg/ml) were selected from sensitive population with IC50 2.37 µg/ml. The development of resistance in B. cereus against alamethicin was associated with decrease in alamethicin-membrane interaction observed by in vitro assay. Resistant strain of B. cereus was found to harbour one additional general lipid as compared to sensitive strain, one amino group lacking phospholipid and one amino group containing phospholipid (ACP). In addition, ACP content was increased in resistant mutant (29.7 %) as compared to sensitive strain (14.56 %). The alamethicin-resistant mutant B. cereus also showed increased IC50 (58.8 AU/ml) for pediocin as compared to sensitive strain (IC50 47.8 AU/ml). Cross-resistance to pediocin and alamethicin in resistant mutant of B. cereus suggested a common mechanism of resistance. Therefore, this understanding could result in the development of peptide which will be effective against the resistant strains that share same mechanism of resistance. PMID:27378130

  19. Sensitivity of a renal K+ channel (ROMK2) to the inhibitory sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide is enhanced by coexpression with the ATP-binding cassette transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator.

    PubMed Central

    McNicholas, C M; Guggino, W B; Schwiebert, E M; Hebert, S C; Giebisch, G; Egan, M E

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate here that coexpression of ROMK2, an inwardly rectifying ATP-sensitive renal K+ channel (IKATP) with cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) significantly enhances the sensitivity of ROMK2 to the sulfonylurea compound glibenclamide. When expressed alone, ROMK2 is relatively insensitive to glibenclamide. The interaction between ROMK2, CFTR, and glibenclamide is modulated by altering the phosphorylation state of either ROMK2, CFTR, or an associated protein, as exogenous MgATP and the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A significantly attenuate the inhibitory effect of glibenclamide on ROMK2. Thus CFTR, which has been demonstrated to interact with both Na+ and Cl- channels in airway epithelium, modulates the function of renal ROMK2 K+ channels. PMID:8755607

  20. Single-cell, time-resolved study of the effects of the antimicrobial peptide alamethicin on Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Barns, Kenneth J; Weisshaar, James C

    2016-04-01

    Alamethicin is a well-studied antimicrobial peptide (AMP) that kills Gram-positive bacteria. It forms narrow, barrel-stave pores in planar lipid bilayers. We present a detailed, time-resolved microscopy study of the sequence of events during the attack of alamethicin on individual, live Bacillus subtilis cells expressing GFP in the cytoplasm. At the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the first observed symptom is the halting of growth, as judged by the plateau in measured cell length vs time. The data strongly suggest that this growth-halting event occurs prior to membrane permeabilization. Gradual degradation of the proton-motive force, inferred from a decrease in pH-dependent GFP fluorescence intensity, evidently begins minutes later and continues over about 5 min. There follows an abrupt permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane to the DNA stain Sytox Orange and concomitant loss of small osmolytes, causing observable cell shrinkage, presumably due to decreased turgor pressure. This permeabilization of the cytoplasmic membrane occurs uniformly across the entire membrane, not locally, on a timescale of 5s or less. GFP gradually leaks out of the cell envelope, evidently impeded by the shrunken peptidoglycan layer. Disruption of the cell envelope by alamethicin occurs in stages, with larger and larger species permeating the envelope as time evolves over tens of minutes. Some of the observed symptoms are consistent with the formation of barrel-stave pores, but the data do not rule out "chaotic pore" or "carpet" mechanisms. We contrast the effects of alamethicin and the human cathelicidin LL-37 on B. subtilis. PMID:26777771

  1. Alamethicin permeabilizes the plasma membrane and mitochondria but not the tonoplast in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow) suspension cells

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The ion channel-forming peptide AlaM (alamethicin) is known to permeabilize isolated mitochondria as well as animal cells. When intact tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) Bright Yellow-2 cells were treated with AlaM, the cells became permeable for low-molecular-mass molecules as shown by induced leakage of NAD(P)+. After the addition of cofactors and substrates, activities of cytosolic as well as mitochondrial respiratory enzymes could be directly determined inside the permeabilized cells. However, at an AlaM concentration at which the cytoplasmic enzymes were maximally accessible, the vacuole remained intact, as indicated by an unaffected tonoplast proton gradient. Low-flux permeabilization of plasma membranes and mitochondria at moderate AlaM concentrations was reversible and did not affect cell vigour. Higher AlaM concentrations induced cell death. After the addition of catalase that removes the H2O2 necessary for NADH oxidation by apoplastic peroxidases, mitochondrial oxygen consumption could be measured in permeabilized cells. Inhibitor-sensitive oxidation of the respiratory substrates succinate, malate and NADH was observed after the addition of the appropriate coenzymes (ATP, NAD+). The capacities of different pathways in the respiratory electron-transport chain could thus be determined directly. We conclude that AlaM permeabilization provides a very useful tool for monitoring metabolic pathways or individual enzymes in their native proteinaceous environment with controlled cofactor concentrations. Possible uses and limitations of this method for plant cell research are discussed. PMID:15836437

  2. Phenylene vinylene macrocycles as artificial transmembrane transporters.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xinyu; Yu, Chao; D Okochi, Kenji; Jin, Yinghua; Liu, Zhenning; Zhang, Wei

    2016-04-30

    A series of rigid phenylene vinylene macrocycles and phenylene ethynylene macrocycles with various substituents have been investigated as transmembrane ion channels. The length and polarity of the substituents have a significant effect on the ion channel formation and the mass transport efficiency. Macrocycles with strong aggregation facilitate ion passage across lipid bilayers. PMID:27048875

  3. Trichoderma viride cellulase induces resistance to the antibiotic pore-forming peptide alamethicin associated with changes in the plasma membrane lipid composition of tobacco BY-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Alamethicin is a membrane-active peptide isolated from the beneficial root-colonising fungus Trichoderma viride. This peptide can insert into membranes to form voltage-dependent pores. We have previously shown that alamethicin efficiently permeabilises the plasma membrane, mitochondria and plastids of cultured plant cells. In the present investigation, tobacco cells (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright Yellow-2) were pre-treated with elicitors of defence responses to study whether this would affect permeabilisation. Results Oxygen consumption experiments showed that added cellulase, already upon a limited cell wall digestion, induced a cellular resistance to alamethicin permeabilisation. This effect could not be elicited by xylanase or bacterial elicitors such as flg22 or elf18. The induction of alamethicin resistance was independent of novel protein synthesis. Also, the permeabilisation was unaffected by the membrane-depolarising agent FCCP. As judged by lipid analyses, isolated plasma membranes from cellulase-pretreated tobacco cells contained less negatively charged phospholipids (PS and PI), yet higher ratios of membrane lipid fatty acid to sterol and to protein, as compared to control membranes. Conclusion We suggest that altered membrane lipid composition as induced by cellulase activity may render the cells resistant to alamethicin. This induced resistance could reflect a natural process where the plant cells alter their sensitivity to membrane pore-forming agents secreted by Trichoderma spp. to attack other microorganisms, and thus adding to the beneficial effect that Trichoderma has for plant root growth. Furthermore, our data extends previous reports on artificial membranes on the importance of lipid packing and charge for alamethicin permeabilisation to in vivo conditions. PMID:21156059

  4. Synthetic peptides corresponding to human follicle-stimulating hormone (hFSH)-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induce uptake of 45Ca++ by liposomes: evidence for calcium-conducting transmembrane channel formation

    SciTech Connect

    Grasso, P.; Santa-Coloma, T.A.; Reichert, L.E. Jr. )

    1991-06-01

    We have previously described FSH receptor-mediated influx of 45Ca++ in cultured Sertoli cells from immature rats and receptor-enriched proteoliposomes via activation of voltage-sensitive and voltage-independent calcium channels. We have further shown that this effect of FSH does not require cholera toxin- or pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide binding protein or activation of adenylate cyclase. In the present study, we have identified regions of human FSH-beta-subunit which appear to be involved in mediating calcium influx. We screened 11 overlapping peptide amides representing the entire primary structure of hFSH-beta-subunit for their effects on 45Ca++ flux in FSH receptor-enriched proteoliposomes. hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) induced uptake of 45Ca++ in a concentration-related manner. This effect of hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) was also observed in liposomes lacking incorporated FSH receptor. Reducing membrane fluidity by incubating liposomes (containing no receptor) with hFSH-beta-(1-15) or hFSH-beta-(51-65) at temperatures lower than the transition temperatures of their constituent phospholipids resulted in no significant (P greater than 0.05) difference in 45Ca++ uptake. The effectiveness of the calcium ionophore A23187, however, was abolished. Ruthenium red, a voltage-independent calcium channel antagonist, was able to completely block uptake of 45Ca++ induced by hFSH-beta-(1-15) and hFSH-beta-(51-65) whereas nifedipine, a calcium channel blocker specific for L-type voltage-sensitive calcium channels, was without effect. These results suggest that in addition to its effect on voltage-sensitive calcium channel activity, interaction of FSH with its receptor may induce formation of transmembrane aqueous channels which also facilitate influx of extracellular calcium.

  5. Differences Between Human and Rat Intestinal and Hepatic Bisphenol-A Glucuronidation and the Influence of Alamethicin on In vitro Kinetic Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The extent to which membrane disrupting agents, such as alamethicin, may alter cofactor transport and influence in vitro kinetic measurements of glucurondiation is a major concern regarding the characterization and extrapolation of inter-and intra-species pharmacokinetics of bisp...

  6. Determining Favorable Binding Configurations of the Anti-Cancer Drug Ellipticine to the KV11.1 Potassium Channel V-VI Transmembrane Domain Through Autodock Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipscomb, Dawn; Gentile, Saverio; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2011-10-01

    Ellipticines such as 9-methoxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (MMEA) and 9-hydroxy-N-2-methylellipticinium acetate (NMEA, Celiptium ) are antineoplastic drugs that exert their selective cytotoxicity against leukemia and endometrial carcinoma. Ellipticine's action is also related to severe physical side effects, but the link between undesired effects and pharmacological application is not well understood. We investigated the binding of Ellipticine derivatives with the Kv11.1 potassium ion channel using Autodock and revealed that hydroxyellipticinium derivatives provide binding configurations with Kv11.1, but the energy, location and estimated dissociation constant varied. The binding energy is as follows: Chloroceliptium (-6.60 kcal/mol) > Celiptium (- 6.37 kcal/mol) > Methoxyceliptium (- 6.20 kcal/mol) > Datelliptium (-6.08 kcal/mol). Autodock simulations demonstrate that binding affinity is high at opposing ends of the channel and low within the channel interior. These favorable binding configurations suggest that Ellipticine derivatives may bridge among end subunits of the channel and potentially inhibit the flow of ions.

  7. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Stephen S.; Steinle, Erich D.; Meyerhoff, Mark E.; Dawson, David C.

    1999-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl channel exhibits lyotropic anion selectivity. Anions that are more readily dehydrated than Cl exhibit permeability ratios (PS/PCl) greater than unity and also bind more tightly in the channel. We compared the selectivity of CFTR to that of a synthetic anion-selective membrane [poly(vinyl chloride)–tridodecylmethylammonium chloride; PVC-TDMAC] for which the nature of the physical process that governs the anion-selective response is more readily apparent. The permeability and binding selectivity patterns of CFTR differed only by a multiplicative constant from that of the PVC-TDMAC membrane; and a continuum electrostatic model suggested that both patterns could be understood in terms of the differences in the relative stabilization of anions by water and the polarizable interior of the channel or synthetic membrane. The calculated energies of anion–channel interaction, derived from measurements of either permeability or binding, varied as a linear function of inverse ionic radius (1/r), as expected from a Born-type model of ion charging in a medium characterized by an effective dielectric constant of 19. The model predicts that large anions, like SCN, although they experience weaker interactions (relative to Cl) with water and also with the channel, are more permeant than Cl because anion–water energy is a steeper function of 1/r than is the anion–channel energy. These large anions also bind more tightly for the same reason: the reduced energy of hydration allows the net transfer energy (the well depth) to be more negative. This simple selectivity mechanism that governs permeability and binding acts to optimize the function of CFTR as a Cl filter. Anions that are smaller (more difficult to dehydrate) than Cl are energetically retarded from entering the channel, while the larger (more readily dehydrated) anions are retarded in their passage by “sticking” within the channel. PMID:10578016

  8. From the sequence to the conformation of the unabridged transmembrane domains TM1 and TM2 of the cASIC1a ion channel - a parallel tempering approach.

    PubMed

    Pietra, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    This work was devised to unravel, along replica-exchange molecular-dynamics (REMD) simulations, the conformation in solution of the TM1 and TM2 transmembrane domains of the homotrimeric cASIC1a ion channel. This includes the head of TM1 and tail of TM2 that had previously defied X-ray diffraction analysis in the crystal. The structure of the open-channel complex of cASIC1a with psalmotoxin 1 (PcTx1) was chosen here as a basis, although, to make the simulations affordable, the procedure was limited to the missing portions, including a few adjacent α-helical turns. The latter were held fixed during the simulations. Reassembling the whole subunit, by superimposition of the fixed portions, resulted in diving of both TM1 and TM2 as continuous α-helices into the cytoplasm. At completion of this work, it appeared, from similar X-ray diffraction studies, that TM2 for both the complex of cASIC1a with the coral snake MitTx toxin, and the isolated desensitized ion channel, is discontinuous, with the triad G443-A444-S445 taking an extended, belt-like conformation. In this way, a filter ring against hydrated ions is formed by G443 in the trimer. Our REMD examination of this complex revealed a strong resistance by G443, and only that residue, to take dihedral-angle values compatible with an α-helical conformation. This suggests that the flexibility of glycine alone does not explain formation of the extended, belt-like conformation of the triad G443-A444-S445. This also requires cooperation in the trimer. PMID:25766908

  9. X-ray diffraction study of lipid bilayer membranes interacting with amphiphilic helical peptides: diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine with alamethicin at low concentrations.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Y; He, K; Ludtke, S J; Huang, H W

    1995-01-01

    A variety of amphiphilic helical peptides have been shown to exhibit a transition from adsorbing parallel to a membrane surface at low concentrations to inserting perpendicularly into the membrane at high concentrations. Furthermore, this transition has been correlated to the peptides' cytolytic activities. X-ray lamellar diffraction of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine-alamethicin mixtures revealed the changes of the bilayer structure with alamethicin concentration. In particular, the bilayer thickness decreases with increasing peptide concentration in proportion to the peptide-lipid molar ratio from as low as 1:150 to 1:47; the latter is near the threshold of the critical concentration for insertion. From the decreases of the bilayer thickness, one can calculate the cross sectional expansions of the lipid chains. For all of the peptide concentrations studied, the area expansion of the chain region for each adsorbed peptide is a constant 280 +/- 20 A2, which is approximately the cross sectional area of an adsorbed alamethicin. This implies that the peptide is adsorbed at the interface of the hydrocarbon region, separating the lipid headgroups laterally. Interestingly, the chain disorder caused by a peptide adsorption tends to spread over a large area, as much as 100 A in diameter. The theoretical basis of the long range nature of bilayer deformation is discussed. PMID:7647240

  10. Using Ion Channel-Forming Peptides to Quantify Protein-Ligand Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Michael; Semetey, Vincent; Gitlin, Irina; Yang, Jerry; Whitesides, George M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes a method for sensing affinity interactions by triggering disruption of self-assembly of ion channel-forming peptides in planar lipid bilayers. It shows that the binding of a derivative of alamethicin carrying a covalently attached sulfonamide ligand to carbonic anhydrase II (CA II) resulted in the inhibition of ion channel conductance through the bilayer. We propose that the binding of the bulky CA II protein (MW ~30 kD) to the ion channel-forming peptides (MW ~2.5 kD) either reduced the tendency of these peptides to self-assemble into a pore, or extracted them from the bilayer altogether. In both outcomes, the interactions between the protein and the ligand lead to a disruption of self-assembled pores. Addition of a competitive inhibitor – 4-carboxybenzenesulfonamide – to the solution released CA II from the alamethicin-sulfonamide conjugate and restored the current flow across the bilayer by allowing reassembly of the ion channels in the bilayer. Time-averaged recordings of the current over discrete time intervals made it possible to quantify this monovalent ligand binding interaction. This method gave a dissociation constant of ~2 µM for the binding of CA II to alamethicin-sulfonamide in the bilayer recording chamber: this value is consistent with a value obtained independently with CA II and a related sulfonamide derivative by isothermal titration calorimetry. PMID:18179217

  11. Cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator correctors and potentiators.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Steven M; Verkman, Alan S

    2013-07-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  12. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Regulator Correctors and Potentiators

    PubMed Central

    Rowe, Steven M.; Verkman, Alan S.

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein, a cAMP-regulated anion channel expressed primarily at the apical plasma membrane of secretory epithelia. Nearly 2000 mutations in the CFTR gene have been identified that cause disease by impairing its translation, cellular processing, and/or chloride channel gating. The fundamental premise of CFTR corrector and potentiator therapy for CF is that addressing the underlying defects in the cellular processing and chloride channel function of CF-causing mutant CFTR alleles will result in clinical benefit by addressing the basic defect underlying CF. Correctors are principally targeted at F508del cellular misprocessing, whereas potentiators are intended to restore cAMP-dependent chloride channel activity to mutant CFTRs at the cell surface. This article reviews the discovery of CFTR potentiators and correctors, what is known regarding their mechanistic basis, and encouraging results achieved in clinical testing. PMID:23818513

  13. The Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Mark F.; O'Ryan, Liam P.; Hughes, Guy; Zhao, Zhefeng; Aleksandrov, Luba A.; Riordan, John R.; Ford, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis affects about 1 in 2500 live births and involves loss of transmembrane chloride flux due to a lack of a membrane protein channel termed the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). We have studied CFTR structure by electron crystallography. The data were compared with existing structures of other ATP-binding cassette transporters. The protein was crystallized in the outward facing state and resembled the well characterized Sav1866 transporter. We identified regions in the CFTR map, not accounted for by Sav1866, which were potential locations for the regulatory region as well as the channel gate. In this analysis, we were aided by the fact that the unit cell was composed of two molecules not related by crystallographic symmetry. We also identified regions in the fitted Sav1866 model that were missing from the map, hence regions that were either disordered in CFTR or differently organized compared with Sav1866. Apart from the N and C termini, this indicated that in CFTR, the cytoplasmic end of transmembrane helix 5/11 and its associated loop could be partly disordered (or alternatively located). PMID:21931164

  14. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-09-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements.

  15. Alternating access to the transmembrane domain of the ATP-binding cassette protein cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (ABCC7).

    PubMed

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-03-23

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between "outwardly facing" and "inwardly facing" conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)(2)(-) ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)(2)(-), access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional ("vestigial") gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  16. Alternating Access to the Transmembrane Domain of the ATP-binding Cassette Protein Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (ABCC7)*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wuyang; Linsdell, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) chloride channel is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) protein family, most members of which act as active transporters. Actively transporting ABC proteins are thought to alternate between “outwardly facing” and “inwardly facing” conformations of the transmembrane substrate pathway. In CFTR, it is assumed that the outwardly facing conformation corresponds to the channel open state, based on homology with other ABC proteins. We have used patch clamp recording to quantify the rate of access of cysteine-reactive probes to cysteines introduced into two different transmembrane regions of CFTR from both the intracellular and extracellular solutions. Two probes, the large [2-sulfonatoethyl]methanethiosulfonate (MTSES) molecule and permeant Au(CN)2− ions, were applied to either side of the membrane to modify cysteines substituted for Leu-102 (first transmembrane region) and Thr-338 (sixth transmembrane region). Channel opening and closing were altered by mutations in the nucleotide binding domains of the channel. We find that, for both MTSES and Au(CN)2−, access to these two cysteines from the cytoplasmic side is faster in open channels, whereas access to these same sites from the extracellular side is faster in closed channels. These results are consistent with alternating access to the transmembrane regions, however with the open state facing inwardly and the closed state facing outwardly. Our findings therefore prompt revision of current CFTR structural and mechanistic models, as well as having broader implications for transport mechanisms in all ABC proteins. Our results also suggest possible locations of both functional and dysfunctional (“vestigial”) gates within the CFTR permeation pathway. PMID:22303012

  17. Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR)

    PubMed Central

    Corradi, Valentina; Vergani, Paola; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2015-01-01

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily. CFTR controls the flow of anions through the apical membrane of epithelia. Dysfunctional CFTR causes the common lethal genetic disease cystic fibrosis. Transitions between open and closed states of CFTR are regulated by ATP binding and hydrolysis on the cytosolic nucleotide binding domains, which are coupled with the transmembrane (TM) domains forming the pathway for anion permeation. Lack of structural data hampers a global understanding of CFTR and thus the development of “rational” approaches directly targeting defective CFTR. In this work, we explored possible conformational states of the CFTR gating cycle by means of homology modeling. As templates, we used structures of homologous ABC transporters, namely TM(287–288), ABC-B10, McjD, and Sav1866. In the light of published experimental results, structural analysis of the transmembrane cavity suggests that the TM(287–288)-based CFTR model could correspond to a commonly occupied closed state, whereas the McjD-based model could represent an open state. The models capture the important role played by Phe-337 as a filter/gating residue and provide structural information on the conformational transition from closed to open channel. PMID:26229102

  18. Transmembrane heme delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Barry S.; Beck, David L.; Monika, Elizabeth M.; Kranz, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Heme proteins play pivotal roles in a wealth of biological processes. Despite this, the molecular mechanisms by which heme traverses bilayer membranes for use in biosynthetic reactions are unknown. The biosynthesis of c-type cytochromes requires that heme is transported to the bacterial periplasm or mitochondrial intermembrane space where it is covalently ligated to two reduced cysteinyl residues of the apocytochrome. Results herein suggest that a family of integral membrane proteins in prokaryotes, protozoans, and plants act as transmembrane heme delivery systems for the biogenesis of c-type cytochromes. The complete topology of a representative from each of the three subfamilies was experimentally determined. Key histidinyl residues and a conserved tryptophan-rich region (designated the WWD domain) are positioned at the site of cytochrome c assembly for all three subfamilies. These histidinyl residues were shown to be essential for function in one of the subfamilies, an ABC transporter encoded by helABCD. We believe that a directed heme delivery pathway is vital for the synthesis of cytochromes c, whereby heme iron is protected from oxidation via ligation to histidinyl residues within the delivery proteins. PMID:9560218

  19. Disordered regions in transmembrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Tusnády, Gábor E; Dobson, László; Tompa, Peter

    2015-11-01

    The functions of transmembrane proteins in living cells are widespread; they range from various transport processes to energy production, from cell-cell adhesion to communication. Structurally, they are highly ordered in their membrane-spanning regions, but may contain disordered regions in the cytosolic and extra-cytosolic parts. In this study, we have investigated the disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by a stringent definition of disordered residues on the currently available largest experimental dataset, and show a significant correlation between the spatial distributions of positively charged residues and disordered regions. This finding suggests a new role of disordered regions in transmembrane proteins by providing structural flexibility for stabilizing interactions with negatively charged head groups of the lipid molecules. We also find a preference of structural disorder in the terminal--as opposed to loop--regions in transmembrane proteins, and survey the respective functions involved in recruiting other proteins or mediating allosteric signaling effects. Finally, we critically compare disorder prediction methods on our transmembrane protein set. While there are no major differences between these methods using the usual statistics, such as per residue accuracies, Matthew's correlation coefficients, etc.; substantial differences can be found regarding the spatial distribution of the predicted disordered regions. We conclude that a predictor optimized for transmembrane proteins would be of high value to the field of structural disorder. PMID:26275590

  20. The stability of the three transmembrane and the four transmembrane human vitamin K epoxide reductase models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Sangwook

    2016-04-01

    The three transmembrane and the four transmembrane helix models are suggested for human vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR). In this study, we investigate the stability of the human three transmembrane/four transmembrane VKOR models by employing a coarse-grained normal mode analysis and molecular dynamics simulation. Based on the analysis of the mobility of each transmembrane domain, we suggest that the three transmembrane human VKOR model is more stable than the four transmembrane human VKOR model.

  1. Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Context image for PIA03693 Channel

    This channel is located south of Iani Chaos.

    Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude -10.9N, Longitude 345.5E. 17 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  2. The Fifth Transmembrane Segment of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Contributes to Its Anion Permeation Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyao; Hwang, Tzyh-Chang

    2015-06-23

    Previous studies have identified several transmembrane segments (TMs), including TM1, TM3, TM6, TM9, TM11, and TM12, as pore-lining segments in cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), but the role of TM5 in pore construction remains controversial. In this study, we employed substituted cysteine accessibility methodology (SCAM) to screen the entire TM5 defined by the original topology model and its cytoplasmic extension in a Cysless background. We found six positions (A299, R303, N306, S307, F310, and F311) where engineered cysteines react to intracellular 2-sulfonatoethyl methanethiosulfonate (MTSES⁻). Quantification of the modification rate of engineered cysteines in the presence or absence of ATP suggests that these six residues are accessible in both the open and closed states. Whole-cell experiments with external MTSES⁻ identified only two positive positions (L323 and A326), resulting in a segment containing 11 consecutive amino acids, where substituted cysteines respond to neither internal nor external MTSES⁻, a unique feature not seen previously in CFTR's pore-lining segments. The observation that these positions are inaccessible to channel-permeant thiol-specific reagent [Au(CN)₂]⁻ suggests that this segment of TM5 between F311 and L323 is concealed from the pore by other TMs and/or lipid bilayers. In addition, our data support the idea that the positively charged arginine at position 303 poses a pure electrostatic action in determining the single-channel current amplitude of CFTR and the effect of an open-channel blocker glibencalmide. Collectively, we conclude that the cytoplasmic portion of CFTR's TM5 lines the pore. Our functional data are remarkably consistent with predicted structural arrangements of TM5 in some homology models of CFTR. PMID:26024338

  3. Are Aquaporins the Missing Transmembrane Osmosensors?

    PubMed

    Hill, A E; Shachar-Hill, Y

    2015-08-01

    Regulation of cell volume is central to homeostasis. It is assumed to begin with the detection of a change in water potential across the bounding membrane, but it is not clear how this is accomplished. While examples of general osmoreceptors (which sense osmotic pressure in one phase) and stretch-activated ion channels (which require swelling of a cell or organelle) are known, effective volume regulation requires true transmembrane osmosensors (TMOs) which directly detect a water potential difference spanning a membrane. At present, no TMO molecule has been unambiguously identified, and clear evidence for mammalian TMOs is notably lacking. In this paper, we set out a theory of TMOs which requires a water channel spanning the membrane that excludes the major osmotic solutes, responds directly without the need for any other process such as swelling, and signals to other molecules associated with the magnitude of changing osmotic differences. The most likely molecules that are fit for this purpose and which are also ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells are aquaporins (AQPs). We review experimental evidence from several systems which indicates that AQPs are essential elements in regulation and may be functioning as TMOs; i.e. the first step in an osmosensing sequence that signals osmotic imbalance in a cell or organelle. We extend this concept to several systems of current interest in which the cellular involvement of AQPs as simple water channels is puzzling or counter-intuitive. We suggest that, apart from regulatory volume changes in cells, AQPs may also be acting as TMOs in red cells, secretory granules and microorganisms. PMID:25791748

  4. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments.

    PubMed

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  5. Biological insertion of computationally designed short transmembrane segments

    PubMed Central

    Baeza-Delgado, Carlos; von Heijne, Gunnar; Marti-Renom, Marc A.; Mingarro, Ismael

    2016-01-01

    The great majority of helical membrane proteins are inserted co-translationally into the ER membrane through a continuous ribosome-translocon channel. The efficiency of membrane insertion depends on transmembrane (TM) helix amino acid composition, the helix length and the position of the amino acids within the helix. In this work, we conducted a computational analysis of the composition and location of amino acids in transmembrane helices found in membrane proteins of known structure to obtain an extensive set of designed polypeptide segments with naturally occurring amino acid distributions. Then, using an in vitro translation system in the presence of biological membranes, we experimentally validated our predictions by analyzing its membrane integration capacity. Coupled with known strategies to control membrane protein topology, these findings may pave the way to de novo membrane protein design. PMID:26987712

  6. Substitution of the transmembrane domain of Vpu in simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}) with that of M2 of influenza A results in a virus that is sensitive to inhibitors of the M2 ion channel and is pathogenic for pig-tailed macaques

    SciTech Connect

    Hout, David R.; Gomez, Melissa L.; Pacyniak, Erik; Gomez, Lisa M.; Fegley, Barbara; Mulcahy, Ellyn R.; Hill, M. Sarah; Culley, Nathan; Pinson, David M.; Nothnick, Warren; Powers, Michael F.; Wong, Scott W.; Stephens, Edward B. . E-mail: estephen@kumc.edu

    2006-01-20

    The Vpu protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been shown to shunt the CD4 receptor molecule to the proteasome for degradation and to enhance virus release from infected cells. The exact mechanism by which the Vpu protein enhances virus release is currently unknown but some investigators have shown that this function is associated with the transmembrane domain and potential ion channel properties. In this study, we determined if the transmembrane domain of Vpu could be functionally substituted with that of the prototypical viroporin, the M2 protein of influenza A virus. We constructed chimeric vpu gene in which the transmembrane domain of Vpu was replaced with that of the M2 protein of influenza. This chimeric vpu gene was substituted for the vpu gene in the genome of a pathogenic simian human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. The resulting virus, SHIV{sub M2}, synthesized a Vpu protein that had a slightly different M{sub r} compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}, reflecting the different sizes of the two Vpu proteins. The SHIV{sub M2} was shown to replicate with slightly reduced kinetics when compared to the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33} but electron microscopy revealed that the site of maturation was similar to the parental virus SHIV{sub KU1bMC33}. We show that the replication and spread of SHIV{sub M2} could be blocked with the antiviral drug rimantadine, which is known to target the M2 ion channel. Our results indicate a dose dependent inhibition of SHIV{sub M2} with 100 {mu}M rimantadine resulting in a >95% decrease in p27 released into the culture medium. Rimantadine did not affect the replication of the parental SHIV{sub KU-1bMC33}. Examination of SHIV{sub M2}-infected cells treated with 50 {mu}M rimantadine revealed numerous viral particles associated with the cell plasma membrane and within intracytoplasmic vesicles, which is similar to HIV-1 mutants lacking a functional vpu. To determine if SHIV{sub M2} was as pathogenic as

  7. An Autonomously Reciprocating Transmembrane Nanoactuator.

    PubMed

    Watson, Matthew A; Cockroft, Scott L

    2016-01-22

    Biological molecular machines operate far from equilibrium by coupling chemical potential to repeated cycles of dissipative nanomechanical motion. This principle has been exploited in supramolecular systems that exhibit true machine behavior in solution and on surfaces. However, designed membrane-spanning assemblies developed to date have been limited to simple switches or stochastic shuttles, and true machine behavior has remained elusive. Herein, we present a transmembrane nanoactuator that turns over chemical fuel to drive autonomous reciprocating (back-and-forth) nanomechanical motion. Ratcheted reciprocating motion of a DNA/PEG copolymer threaded through a single α-hemolysin pore was induced by a combination of DNA strand displacement processes and enzyme-catalyzed reactions. Ion-current recordings revealed saw-tooth patterns, indicating that the assemblies operated in autonomous, asymmetric cycles of conformational change at rates of up to one cycle per minute. PMID:26661295

  8. Transmembrane Helix Assembly by Max-Min Ant System Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Sujaree, Kanon; Kitjaruwankul, Sunan; Boonamnaj, Panisak; Supunyabut, Chirayut; Sompornpisut, Pornthep

    2015-12-01

    Because of the rapid progress in biochemical and structural studies of membrane proteins, considerable attention has been given on developing efficient computational methods for solving low-to-medium resolution structures using sparse structural data. In this study, we demonstrate a novel algorithm, max-min ant system (MMAS), designed to find an assembly of α-helical transmembrane proteins using a rigid helix arrangement guided by distance constraints. The new algorithm generates a large variety with finite number of orientations of transmembrane helix bundle and finds the solution that is matched with the provided distance constraints based on the behavior of ants to search for the shortest possible path between their nest and the food source. To demonstrate the efficiency of the novel search algorithm, MMAS is applied to determine the transmembrane packing of KcsA and MscL ion channels from a limited distance information extracted from the crystal structures, and the packing of KvAP voltage sensor domain using a set of 10 experimentally determined constraints, and the results are compared with those of two popular used stochastic methods, simulated annealing Monte Carlo method and genetic algorithm. PMID:26058409

  9. Detecting pore-lining regions in transmembrane protein sequences

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Alpha-helical transmembrane channel and transporter proteins play vital roles in a diverse range of essential biological processes and are crucial in facilitating the passage of ions and molecules across the lipid bilayer. However, the experimental difficulties associated with obtaining high quality crystals has led to their significant under-representation in structural databases. Computational methods that can identify structural features from sequence alone are therefore of high importance. Results We present a method capable of automatically identifying pore-lining regions in transmembrane proteins from sequence information alone, which can then be used to determine the pore stoichiometry. By labelling pore-lining residues in crystal structures using geometric criteria, we have trained a support vector machine classifier to predict the likelihood of a transmembrane helix being involved in pore formation. Results from testing this approach under stringent cross-validation indicate that prediction accuracy of 72% is possible, while a support vector regression model is able to predict the number of subunits participating in the pore with 62% accuracy. Conclusion To our knowledge, this is the first tool capable of identifying pore-lining regions in proteins and we present the results of applying it to a data set of sequences with available crystal structures. Our method provides a way to characterise pores in transmembrane proteins and may even provide a starting point for discovering novel routes of therapeutic intervention in a number of important diseases. This software is freely available as source code from: http://bioinf.cs.ucl.ac.uk/downloads/memsat-svm/. PMID:22805427

  10. Cooperative Transmembrane Penetration of Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haizhen; Ji, Qiuju; Huang, Changjin; Zhang, Sulin; Yuan, Bing; Yang, Kai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2015-01-01

    Physical penetration of lipid bilayer membranes presents an alternative pathway for cellular delivery of nanoparticles (NPs) besides endocytosis. NPs delivered through this pathway could reach the cytoplasm, thereby opening the possibility of organelle-specific targeting. Herein we perform dissipative particle dynamics simulations to elucidate the transmembrane penetration mechanisms of multiple NPs. Our simulations demonstrate that NPs’ translocation proceeds in a cooperative manner, where the interplay of the quantity and surface chemistry of the NPs regulates the translocation efficiency. For NPs with hydrophilic surfaces, the increase of particle quantity facilitates penetration, while for NPs with partly or totally hydrophobic surfaces, the opposite highly possibly holds. Moreover, a set of interesting cooperative ways, such as aggregation, aggregation-dispersion, and aggregation-dispersion-reaggregation of the NPs, are observed during the penetration process. We find that the penetration behaviors of multiple NPs are mostly dominated by the changes of the NP-membrane force components in the membrane plane direction, in addition to that in the penetration direction, suggesting a different interaction mechanism between the multiple NPs and the membrane compared with the one-NP case. These results provide a fundamental understanding in the underlying mechanisms of cooperative penetration of NPs, and shed light on the NP-based drug and gene delivery. PMID:26013284

  11. The Earliest Ion Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, A.; Wilson, M. A.; Wei, C.

    2009-12-01

    Supplying protocells with ions required assistance from channels spanning their membrane walls. The earliest channels were most likely short proteins that formed transmembrane helical bundles surrounding a water-filled pore. These simple aggregates were capable of transporting ions with efficiencies comparable to those of complex, contemporary ion channels. Channels with wide pores exhibited little ion selectivity but also imposed only modest constraints on amino acid sequences of channel-forming proteins. Channels with small pores could have been selective but also might have required a more precisely defined sequence of amino acids. In contrast to modern channels, their protocellular ancestors had only limited capabilities to regulate ion flux. It is postulated that subsequent evolution of ion channels progressed primarily to acquire precise regulation, and not high efficiency or selectivity. It is further proposed that channels and the surrounding membranes co-evolved.

  12. Spatial organization of transmembrane receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Bethani, Ioanna; Skånland, Sigrid S; Dikic, Ivan; Acker-Palmer, Amparo

    2010-01-01

    The spatial organization of transmembrane receptors is a critical step in signal transduction and receptor trafficking in cells. Transmembrane receptors engage in lateral homotypic and heterotypic cis-interactions as well as intercellular trans-interactions that result in the formation of signalling foci for the initiation of different signalling networks. Several aspects of ligand-induced receptor clustering and association with signalling proteins are also influenced by the lipid composition of membranes. Thus, lipid microdomains have a function in tuning the activity of many transmembrane receptors by positively or negatively affecting receptor clustering and signal transduction. We review the current knowledge about the functions of clustering of transmembrane receptors and lipid–protein interactions important for the spatial organization of signalling at the membrane. PMID:20717138

  13. Chloride Channels of Intracellular Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, John C.; Kahl, Christina R.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins implicated as intracellular chloride channels include the intracellular ClC proteins, the bestrophins, the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, the CLICs, and the recently described Golgi pH regulator. This paper examines current hypotheses regarding roles of intracellular chloride channels and reviews the evidence supporting a role in intracellular chloride transport for each of these proteins. PMID:20100480

  14. Molecular Determinants of Co- and Post-translational N-glycosylation of Type I Transmembrane Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Malaby, Heidi L. H.; Kobertz, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Type I transmembrane peptides acquire N-linked glycans during and after protein synthesis to facilitate anterograde trafficking through the secretory pathway. Mutations in N-glycosylation consensus sites (NXT and NXS, where X ≠ P) that alter the kinetics of the initial N-glycan attachment have been associated with cardiac arrhythmias; however, the molecular determinants that define co- and post-translational consensus sites in proteins are not known. Here, we identified co- and post-translational consensus sites in the KCNE family of K+ channel regulatory subunits to uncover three determinants that favor co-translational N-glycosylation kinetics of type I transmembrane peptides that lack a cleavable signal sequence: threonine containing-consensus sites (NXT), multiple N-terminal consensus sites, and long C-termini. The identification of these three molecular determinants now makes it possible to predict co- and post-translational consensus sites in type I transmembrane peptides. PMID:23718681

  15. Assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunker, Peter; Landry, Corey; Chong, Shaorong; Weitz, David

    2015-03-01

    Transmembrane proteins are difficult to handle by aqueous solution-based biochemical and biophysical approaches, due to the hydrophobicity of transmembrane helices. Detergents can solubilize transmembrane proteins; however, surfactant coated transmembrane proteins are not always functional, and purifying detergent coated proteins in a micellar solution can be difficult. Motivated by this problem, we study the self-assembly of transmembrane proteins on oil-water interfaces. We found that the large water-oil interface of oil drops prevents nascent transmembrane proteins from forming non-functional aggregates. The oil provides a hydrophobic environment for the transmembrane helix, allowing the ectodomain to fold into its natural structure and orientation. Further, modifying the strength or valency of hydrophobic interactions between transmembrane proteins results in the self-assembly of spatially clustered, active proteins on the oil-water interface. Thus, hydrophobic interactions can facilitate, rather than inhibit, the assembly of transmembrane proteins.

  16. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  17. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J.

    2015-03-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level.

  18. Detection of single ion channel activity with carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Weiwei; Wang, Yung Yu; Lim, Tae-Sun; Pham, Ted; Jain, Dheeraj; Burke, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Many processes in life are based on ion currents and membrane voltages controlled by a sophisticated and diverse family of membrane proteins (ion channels), which are comparable in size to the most advanced nanoelectronic components currently under development. Here we demonstrate an electrical assay of individual ion channel activity by measuring the dynamic opening and closing of the ion channel nanopores using single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Two canonical dynamic ion channels (gramicidin A (gA) and alamethicin) and one static biological nanopore (α-hemolysin (α-HL)) were successfully incorporated into supported lipid bilayers (SLBs, an artificial cell membrane), which in turn were interfaced to the carbon nanotubes through a variety of polymer-cushion surface functionalization schemes. The ion channel current directly charges the quantum capacitance of a single nanotube in a network of purified semiconducting nanotubes. This work forms the foundation for a scalable, massively parallel architecture of 1d nanoelectronic devices interrogating electrophysiology at the single ion channel level. PMID:25778101

  19. Transmembrane Segments Form Tertiary Hairpins in the Folding Vestibule of the Ribosome.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, LiWei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100 Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a ‘folding vestibule’ that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains, but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved, intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin (‘paddle’) of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane. PMID:24055377

  20. Transmembrane segments form tertiary hairpins in the folding vestibule of the ribosome.

    PubMed

    Tu, Liwei; Khanna, Pooja; Deutsch, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Folding of membrane proteins begins in the ribosome as the peptide is elongated. During this process, the nascent peptide navigates along 100Å of tunnel from the peptidyltransferase center to the exit port. Proximal to the exit port is a "folding vestibule" that permits the nascent peptide to compact and explore conformational space for potential tertiary folding partners. The latter occurs for cytosolic subdomains but has not yet been shown for transmembrane segments. We now demonstrate, using an accessibility assay and an improved intramolecular crosslinking assay, that the helical transmembrane S3b-S4 hairpin ("paddle") of a voltage-gated potassium (Kv) channel, a critical region of the Kv voltage sensor, forms in the vestibule. S3-S4 hairpin interactions are detected at an early stage of Kv biogenesis. Moreover, this vestibule hairpin is consistent with a closed-state conformation of the Kv channel in the plasma membrane. PMID:24055377

  1. Quantification of Transmembrane Currents during Action Potential Propagation in the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Gray, Richard A.; Mashburn, David N.; Sidorov, Veniamin Y.; Wikswo, John P.

    2013-01-01

    The measurement, quantitative analysis, theory, and mathematical modeling of transmembrane potential and currents have been an integral part of the field of electrophysiology since its inception. Biophysical modeling of action potential propagation begins with detailed ionic current models for a patch of membrane within a distributed cable model. Voltage-clamp techniques have revolutionized clinical electrophysiology via the characterization of the transmembrane current gating variables; however, this kinetic information alone is insufficient to accurately represent propagation. Other factors, including channel density, membrane area, surface/volume ratio, axial conductivities, etc., are also crucial determinants of transmembrane currents in multicellular tissue but are extremely difficult to measure. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, a novel analytical approach to compute transmembrane currents directly from experimental data, which involves high-temporal (200 kHz) recordings of intra- and extracellular potential with glass microelectrodes from the epicardial surface of isolated rabbit hearts during propagation. We show for the first time, to our knowledge, that during stable planar propagation the biphasic total transmembrane current (Im) dipole density during depolarization was ∼0.25 ms in duration and asymmetric in amplitude (peak outward current was ∼95 μA/cm2 and peak inward current was ∼140 μA/cm2), and the peak inward ionic current (Iion) during depolarization was ∼260 μA/cm2 with duration of ∼1.0 ms. Simulations of stable propagation using the ionic current versus transmembrane potential relationship fit from the experimental data reproduced these values better than traditional ionic models. During ventricular fibrillation, peak Im was decreased by 50% and peak Iion was decreased by 70%. Our results provide, to our knowledge, novel quantitative information that complements voltage- and patch-clamp data. PMID:23332079

  2. Crystallizing Transmembrane Peptides in Lipidic Mesophases

    SciTech Connect

    Höfer, Nicole; Aragão, David; Caffrey, Martin

    2011-09-28

    Structure determination of membrane proteins by crystallographic means has been facilitated by crystallization in lipidic mesophases. It has been suggested, however, that this so-called in meso method, as originally implemented, would not apply to small protein targets having {le}4 transmembrane crossings. In our study, the hypothesis that the inherent flexibility of the mesophase would enable crystallogenesis of small proteins was tested using a transmembrane pentadecapeptide, linear gramicidin, which produced structure-grade crystals. This result suggests that the in meso method should be considered as a viable means for high-resolution structure determination of integral membrane peptides, many of which are predicted to be coded for in the human genome.

  3. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  4. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S.; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D.; Brownell, William E.

    2006-06-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 µm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400-800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons.

  5. Photometric recording of transmembrane potential in outer hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Takashi; Oghalai, John S; Saggau, Peter; Rabbitt, Richard D; Brownell, William E

    2008-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHCs) are polarized epithelial cells that have mechanoelectrical transduction channels within their apical stereocilia and produce electromotile force along their lateral wall. Phase shifts, or time delays, in the transmembrane voltage occurring at different axial locations along the cell may contribute to our understanding of how these cells operate at auditory frequencies. We developed a method to optically measure the phase of the OHC transmembrane potential using the voltage-sensitive dye (VSD) di-8-ANEPPS. The exit aperture of a fibre-optic light source was driven in two dimensions so that a 24 μm spot of excitation light could be positioned along the length of the OHC. We used the whole-cell patch-clamp technique in the current-clamp mode to stimulate the OHC at the base. The photometric response and the voltage response were monitored with a photodetector and patch-clamp amplifier, respectively. The photometric response was used to measure the regional changes in the membrane potential in response to maintained (dc) and sinusoidal (ac) current stimuli applied at the base of the cell. We used a neutral density filter to lower the excitation light intensity and reduce phototoxicity. A sensitive detector and lock-in amplifier were used to measure the small ac VSD signal. This permitted measurements of the ac photometric response below the noise floor of the static fluorescence. The amplitude and phase components of the photometric response were recorded for stimuli up to 800 Hz. VSD data at 400–800 Hz show the presence of a small phase delay between the stimulus voltage at the base of the cell and the local membrane potential measured along the lateral wall. Results are consistent with the hypothesis that OHCs exhibit inhomogeneous membrane potentials that vary with position in analogy with the voltage in nerve axons. PMID:16705263

  6. Voltage-sensitive gating induced by a mutation in the fifth transmembrane domain of CFTR.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Ren; Zeltwanger, Shawn; Smith, Stephen S; Dawson, David C; McCarty, Nael A

    2002-01-01

    A mutation in the fifth transmembrane domain of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) Cl(-) channel (V317E) resulted in whole cell currents that exhibited marked outward rectification on expression in Xenopus oocytes. However, the single-channel unitary current (i)-voltage (V) relationship failed to account for the rectification of whole cell currents. In excised patches containing one to a few channels, the time-averaged single-channel current (I)-V relationship (I = N x P(o) x i, where N is the number of active channels and P(o) is open probability) of V317E CFTR displayed outward rectification, whereas that of wild-type CFTR was linear, indicating that the P(o) of V317E CFTR is voltage dependent. The decrease in P(o) at negative potentials was due to both a decreased burst duration and a decreased opening rate that could not be ameliorated by a 10-fold increase in ATP concentration. This behavior appears to reflect a true voltage dependence of the gating process because the P(o)-V relationship did not depend on the direction of Cl(-) movement. The results are consistent with the introduction, by a point mutation, of a novel voltage-dependent gating mode that may provide a useful tool for probing the portions of the protein that move in response to ATP-dependent gating. PMID:11741825

  7. MLKL forms cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Bingqing; Fang, Sui; Chen, Xueqin; Hu, Hong; Chen, Peiyuan; Wang, Huayi; Gao, Zhaobing

    2016-01-01

    The mixed lineage kinase domain-like (MLKL) protein is a key factor in tumor necrosis factor-induced necroptosis. Recent studies on necroptosis execution revealed a commitment role of MLKL in membrane disruption. However, our knowledge of how MLKL functions on membrane remains very limited. Here we demonstrate that MLKL forms cation channels that are permeable preferentially to Mg2+ rather than Ca2+ in the presence of Na+ and K+. Moreover, the N-terminal domain containing six helices (H1-H6) is sufficient to form channels. Using the substituted cysteine accessibility method, we further determine that helix H1, H2, H3, H5 and H6 are transmembrane segments, while H4 is located in the cytoplasm. Finally, MLKL-induced membrane depolarization and cell death exhibit a positive correlation to its channel activity. The Mg2+-preferred permeability and five transmembrane segment topology distinguish MLKL from previously identified Mg2+-permeable channels and thus establish MLKL as a novel class of cation channels. PMID:27033670

  8. Interferon-induced Transmembrane Protein 3 Is a Type II Transmembrane Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Charles C.; Kondur, Hema R.; Huang, I-Chueh; Farzan, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The interferon-induced transmembrane (IFITM) proteins are a family of small membrane proteins that inhibit the cellular entry of several genera of viruses. These proteins had been predicted to adopt a two-pass, type III transmembrane topology with an intracellular loop, two transmembrane helices (TM1 and TM2), and extracellular N and C termini. Recent work, however, supports an intramembrane topology for the helices with cytosolic orientation of both termini. Here we determined the topology of murine Ifitm3. We found that the N terminus of Ifitm3 could be stained by antibodies at the cell surface but that this conformation was cell type-dependent and represented a minority of the total plasma membrane pool. In contrast, the C terminus was readily accessible to antibodies at the cell surface and extracellular C termini comprised most or all of those present at the plasma membrane. The addition of a C-terminal KDEL endoplasmic reticulum retention motif to Ifitm3 resulted in sequestration of Ifitm3 in the ER, demonstrating an ER-luminal orientation of the C terminus. C-terminal, but not N-terminal, epitope tags were also degraded within lysosomes, consistent with their luminal orientation. Furthermore, epitope-tagged Ifitm3 TM2 functioned as a signal anchor sequence when expressed in isolation. Collectively, our results demonstrate a type II transmembrane topology for Ifitm3 and will provide insight into its interaction with potential targets and cofactors. PMID:24067232

  9. Predicting transmembrane beta-barrels in proteomes

    PubMed Central

    Bigelow, Henry R.; Petrey, Donald S.; Liu, Jinfeng; Przybylski, Dariusz; Rost, Burkhard

    2004-01-01

    Very few methods address the problem of predicting beta-barrel membrane proteins directly from sequence. One reason is that only very few high-resolution structures for transmembrane beta-barrel (TMB) proteins have been determined thus far. Here we introduced the design, statistics and results of a novel profile-based hidden Markov model for the prediction and discrimination of TMBs. The method carefully attempts to avoid over-fitting the sparse experimental data. While our model training and scoring procedures were very similar to a recently published work, the architecture and structure-based labelling were significantly different. In particular, we introduced a new definition of beta- hairpin motifs, explicit state modelling of transmembrane strands, and a log-odds whole-protein discrimination score. The resulting method reached an overall four-state (up-, down-strand, periplasmic-, outer-loop) accuracy as high as 86%. Furthermore, accurately discriminated TMB from non-TMB proteins (45% coverage at 100% accuracy). This high precision enabled the application to 72 entirely sequenced Gram-negative bacteria. We found over 164 previously uncharacterized TMB proteins at high confidence. Database searches did not implicate any of these proteins with membranes. We challenge that the vast majority of our 164 predictions will eventually be verified experimentally. All proteome predictions and the PROFtmb prediction method are available at http://www.rostlab.org/services/PROFtmb/. PMID:15141026

  10. Architecture of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator protein and structural changes associated with phosphorylation and nucleotide binding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Aleksandrov, Luba A; Zhao, Zhefeng; Birtley, James R; Riordan, John R; Ford, Robert C

    2009-09-01

    We describe biochemical and structural studies of the isolated cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) protein. Using electron cryomicroscopy, low resolution three-dimensional structures have been obtained for the non-phosphorylated protein in the absence of nucleotide and for the phosphorylated protein with ATP. In the latter state, the cytosolic nucleotide-binding domains move closer together, forming a more compact packing arrangement. Associated with this is a reorganization within the cylindrical transmembrane domains, consistent with a shift from an inward-facing to outward-facing configuration. A region of density in the non-phosphorylated protein that extends from the bottom of the cytosolic regions up to the transmembrane domains is hypothesised to represent the unique regulatory region of CFTR. These data offer insights into the architecture of this ATP-binding cassette protein, and shed light on the global motions associated with nucleotide binding and priming of the chloride channel via phosphorylation of the regulatory region. PMID:19524678