Science.gov

Sample records for alamos neutron science

  1. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Nuclear Science Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen; Wender, Steve

    2015-06-19

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facilities for Nuclear Science consist of a high-energy "white" neutron source (Target 4) with 6 flight paths, three low-energy nuclear science flight paths at the Lujan Center, and a proton reaction area. The neutron beams produced at the Target 4 complement those produced at the Lujan Center because they are of much higher energy and have shorter pulse widths. The neutron sources are driven by the 800-MeV proton beam of the LANSCE linear accelerator. With these facilities, LANSCE is able to deliver neutrons with energies ranging from a milli-electron volt to several hundreds of MeV, as well as proton beams with a wide range of energy, time and intensity characteristics. The facilities, instruments and research programs are described briefly.

  2. Operational status of the Los Alamos neutron science center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L; Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources; the thermal and cold source for the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) high-energy neutron source, and a pulsed Ultra-Cold Neutron Source. These three sources are the foundation of strong and productive multi-disciplinary research programs that serve a diverse and robust user community. The facility also provides multiplexed beams for the production of medical radioisotopes and proton radiography of dynamic events. The recent operating history of these sources will be reviewed and plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the proposed LANSCE Refurbishment project. The details of this latter project are presented in a separate contribution.

  3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator timing system upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    Rybarcyk, L.J.; Shelley, F.E. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) 800 MeV proton linear accelerator (linac) operates at a maximum repetition rate of twice the AC power line frequency, i.e. 120 Hz. The start of each machine cycle occurs a fixed delay after each zero-crossing of the AC line voltage. Fluctuations in the AC line frequency and phase are therefore present on all linac timing signals. Proper beam acceleration along the linac requires that the timing signals remain well synchronized to the AC line. For neutron chopper spectrometers, e.g., PHAROS at the Manuel Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center, accurate neutron energy selection requires that precise synchronization be maintained between the beam-on-target arrival time and the neutron chopper rotor position. This is most easily accomplished when the chopper is synchronized to a stable, fixed frequency signal. A new zero-crossing circuit which employs a Phase-Locked Loop (PLL) has been developed to increase the phase and frequency stability of the linac timing signals and thereby improve neutron chopper performance while simultaneously maintaining proper linac operation. Results of timing signal data analysis and modeling and a description of the PLL circuit are presented.

  4. Basic and Applied Science Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, Paul W.

    2005-05-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, or LANSCE, is an accelerator-based national user facility for research in basic and applied science using four experimental areas. LANSCE has two areas that provide neutrons generated by the 800-MeV proton beam striking tungsten target systems. A third area uses the proton beam for radiography. The fourth area uses 100 MeV protons to produce medical radioisotopes. This paper describes the four LANSCE experimental areas, gives nuclear science highlights of the past operating period, and discusses plans for the future.

  5. Upgrades to the ultracold neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pattie, Robert; LANL-nEDM Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The spallation-driven solid deutrium-based ultracold neutron (UCN) source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has provided a facility for precision measurements of fundamental symmetries via the decay observables from neutron beta decay for nearly a decade. In preparation for a new room temperature neutron electric dipole moment (nEDM) experiment and to increase the statistical sensitivity of all experiments using the source an effort to increase the UCN output is underway. The ultimate goal is to provide a density of 100 UCN/cc or greater in the nEDM storage cell. This upgrade includes redesign of the cold neutron moderator and UCN converter geometries, improved coupling and coating of the UCN transport system through the biological shielding, optimization of beam timing structure, and increase of the proton beam current. We will present the results of the MCNP and UCN transport simulations that led to the new design, which will be installed spring 2016, and UCN guide tests performed at LANSCE and the Institut Laue-Langevin to study the UCN transport properties of a new nickel-based guide coating.

  6. Los Alamos neutron science user facility - control system risk mitigation & updates

    SciTech Connect

    Pieck, Martin

    2011-01-05

    LANSCE User Facility is seeing continuing support and investments. The investment will sustain reliable facility operations well into the next decade. As a result, the LANSCE User Facility will continue to be a premier Neutron Science Facility at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

  7. Operational Status and Life Extension Plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, John L.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources, a proton radiography facility and a medical and research isotope production facility. The recent operating history of the facility, including both achievements and challenges, will be reviewed. Plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the ongoing LANSCE Linac Risk Mitigation (LRM) project. The details of this latter project will also be discussed.

  8. Operational status and life extension plans for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Garnett, Robert W; Gulley, Mark S; Jones, Kevin W; Erickson, John L

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator and beam delivery complex generates the proton beams that serve three neutron production sources, a proton radiography facility and a medical and research isotope production facility. The recent operating history of the facility, including both achievements and challenges, will be reviewed. Plans for performance improvement will be discussed, together with the underlying drivers for the ongoing LANSCE Risk Mitigation project. The details of this latter project will also be discussed.

  9. Defense, basic, and industrial research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Longshore, A.; Salgado, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Workshop on Defense, Basic, and Industrial Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss the use of neutrons in science-based stockpile stewardship, The workshop began with presentations by government officials, senior representatives from the three weapons laboratories, and scientific opinion leaders. Workshop participants then met in breakout sessions on the following topics: materials science and engineering; polymers, complex fluids, and biomaterials; fundamental neutron physics; applied nuclear physics; condensed matter physics and chemistry; and nuclear weapons research. They concluded that neutrons can play an essential role in science-based stockpile stewardship and that there is overlap and synergy between defense and other uses of neutrons in basic, applied, and industrial research from which defense and civilian research can benefit. This proceedings is a collection of talks and papers from the plenary, technical, and breakout session presentations. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  10. New Developments in Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, C. L.; Brown, E. N.; Agee, C.; Bernert, T.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Burkett, M. W.; Buttler, W. T.; Byler, D. D.; Chen, C. F.; Clarke, A. J.; Cooley, J. C.; Gibbs, P. J.; Imhoff, S. D.; Jones, R.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Mariam, F. G.; Merrill, F. E.; Murray, M. M.; Olinger, C. T.; Oro, D. M.; Nedrow, P.; Saunders, A.; Terrones, G.; Trouw, F.; Tupa, D.; Vogan, W.; Winkler, B.; Wang, Z.; Zellner, M. B.

    2015-12-30

    An application of nuclear physics, a facility for using protons for flash radiography, was developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography because of their long mean free path, good position resolution, and low scatter background. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons are discussed, data from some recent experiments will be reviewed and concepts for new techniques are introduced.

  11. Los Alamos neutron science center nuclear weapons stewardship and unique national scientific capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, Kurt F

    2010-12-15

    This presentation gives an overview of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and its contributions to science and the nuclear weapons program. LANSCE is made of multiple experimental facilities (the Lujan Center, the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), the Ultra-Cold Neutron facility (UCN), the proton Radiography facility (pRad) and the Isotope Production Facility (IPF)) served by the its kilometer long linear accelerator. Several research areas are supported, including materials and bioscience, nuclear science, materials dynamics, irradiation response and medical isotope production. LANSCE is a national user facility that supports researchers worldwide. The LANSCE Risk Mitigation program is currently in progress to update critical accelerator equipment to help extend the lifetime of LANSCE as a key user facility. The Associate Directorate of Business Sciences (ADBS) plays an important role in the continued success of LANSCE. This includes key procurement support, human resource support, technical writing support, and training support. LANSCE is also the foundation of the future signature facility MARIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes).

  12. Bombs, Bosons and Beer Cans-Research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pynn, Roger

    1997-04-01

    The neutron scattering community is justifiably proud of the contributions it has made to basic research in many areas of science. Information obtained using neutrons has contributed strongly to our basic understanding of phenomena in diverse systems of interest to physicists, chemists and biologists - think, for example, of how little we would know about excitations in quantum fluids, the spin-density-wave state of chromium, electronic back-donation in the bonding of organometallic compounds, or the conformation of proteins and DNA in nucleosomes without neutron scattering. However, illustrious as this history of neutron scattering may be, it is not the only type of contribution neutrons have made to our modern scientific and technological enterprise. Increasingly in recent years, we have witnessed the application of neutrons to later parts of the R&D cycle, to problems that have been called ''strategic research'' and even in areas that are ''applied research'' or ''product development''. The purpose of my talk at this meeting is to illustrate this aspect of research at spallation neutron sources, using examples of work that has been done at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Some of this work is driven by the fact that our principal funding agency, the Office of Defense Programs within the U.S. Department of Energy, has a need to master the science behind technologies relevant to nuclear weapons. Even so, most of the examples I have picked are equally relevant to the industrial sector and several would not shame even the most devout proponent of ''pure'' research. To demonstrate the breadth of the research performed at LANSCE, I will describe examples of recent experiments in the following areas: materials texture; temperature and particle velocity measurement in reacting high explosives; radiographic imaging with protons; chemical bonding in metal-dihydride complexes; and the structure of thin adhesive layers. LANSCE operates a user program and

  13. New Developments in Proton Radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE)

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Morris, C. L.; Brown, E. N.; Agee, C.; Bernert, T.; Bourke, M. A. M.; Burkett, M. W.; Buttler, W. T.; Byler, D. D.; Chen, C. F.; Clarke, A. J.; et al

    2015-12-30

    An application of nuclear physics, a facility for using protons for flash radiography, was developed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Protons have proven far superior to high energy x-rays for flash radiography because of their long mean free path, good position resolution, and low scatter background. Although this facility is primarily used for studying very fast phenomena such as high explosive driven experiments, it is finding increasing application to other fields, such as tomography of static objects, phase changes in materials and the dynamics of chemical reactions. The advantages of protons are discussed, data from some recentmore » experiments will be reviewed and concepts for new techniques are introduced.« less

  14. SPIDER: A new instrument for fission fragment research at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tovesson, Fredrik; Arnold, Charles; Blakeley, Rick; Hecht, Adam; Laptev, Alexander; Mader, Drew; Meierbachtol, Krista; Snyder, Lucas; White, Morgan

    2013-12-01

    The study of fission fragment yields and how they behave as a function of excitation energy provides insight into the process in which they are formed. Fission yields are also important for nuclear applications, as they can be used as a diagnostic tool. A new instrument, SPIDER (Spectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research), is being developed for measuring fission yields as a function of incident neutron energy at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The instrument employs a time-of-flight mass spectrometry method in which the velocity and kinetic energy of the fragments are measured in order to determine their mass. Additionally, by using Bragg peak spectroscopy, the charge of the fragments can be identified. A prototype instrument has been developed and preliminary results indicate that ˜ 1 mass unit resolution is feasible using this approach. A larger detector array is currently being designed, and will be used at study fission yields from thermal neutron energies up to at least 20 MeV.

  15. Design of a subcritical multiplying low-enriched uranium externally driven neutron assembly at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, Victor

    2008-01-01

    The Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) has had a long history of supplying short intense neutron bursts to test the survivability of critical weapons components. The most recent version, SPR III, was resurrected in 2005 in support of critical survivability testing for W-76 Life Extension Program and other testing for the Qualification Alternatives to SPR program. SPR has now been decommissioned. The SPR had a cylindrical shape, with an internal cylindrical cavity where samples were placed for testing. The approximate dimensions of the cavity were 16.5 cm radius, and 38.1 cm high. The uniformity of the fluence over the entire volume was {+-} 25%. The nominal fluence was 5.4 {center_dot} 10{sup 14} n/cm{sup 2}, 1 MeV Si equivalent (Si equivalent implies that the neutron spectrum, at energies other than 1 MeV, is weighted by its relative damage potential in silicon), with a pulse duration of 55 microseconds, FWHM. We propose a new facility as a replacement to the SPR pulsed neutron capabilities, utilizing the proton linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Currently, LANSCE provides neutron beams generated by the 800 MeV proton beam, over 13 decades of energy, to five different facilities. LANSCE is in the process of being refurbished; the refurbishment project (LANSCE-R) is funded and due to be completed by 2014. In parallel to the refurbishment, the experimental user program will continue and provide 3000 hours of beam per year. LANSCE is also considering upgrade options in the framework of MaRIE (Materials and Radiation Interactions in Extreme). MaRIE is planned to be the new signature facility for Los Alamos for the foreseeable future. Hence, they expect LANSCE to continue to operate and provide beams for decades t come. They propose to use the 800 MeV proton beam, extracted from the Proton Storage Ring (PSR), to initiate a neutron pulse in a sub-critical multiplying assembly, fabricated from Low-Enriched Uranium (LEU). The reason for using

  16. Klystron Modulator Design for the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Reass, William A.; Baca, David M.; Partridge, Edward R.; Rees, Daniel E.

    2012-06-22

    This paper will describe the design of the 44 modulator systems that will be installed to upgrade the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerator RF system. The klystrons can operate up to 86 kV with a nominal 32 Amp beam current with a 120 Hz repetition rate and 15% duty cycle. The klystrons are a mod-anode design. The modulator is designed with analog feedback control to ensure the klystron beam current is flat-top regulated. To achieve fast switching while maintaining linear feedback control, a grid-clamp, totem-pole modulator configuration is used with an 'on' deck and an 'off' deck. The on and off deck modulators are of identical design and utilize a cascode connected planar triode, cathode driven with a high speed MOSFET. The derived feedback is connected to the planar triode grid to enable the flat-top control. Although modern design approaches suggest solid state designs may be considered, the planar triode (Eimac Y-847B) is very cost effective, is easy to integrate with the existing hardware, and provides a simplified linear feedback control mechanism. The design is very compact and fault tolerant. This paper will review the complete electrical design, operational performance, and system characterization as applied to the LANSCE installation.

  17. LOS ALAMOS NEUTRON SCIENCE CENTER CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE POWER REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    GAVRON, VICTOR I.; HILL, TONY S.; PITCHER, ERIC J.; TOVESSON, FREDERIK K.

    2007-01-09

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a large spallation neutron complex centered around an 800 MeV high-currently proton accelerator. Existing facilities include a highly-moderated neutron facility (Lujan Center) where neutrons between thermal and keV energies are produced, and the Weapons Neutron Research Center (WNR), where a bare spallation target produces neutrons between 0.1 and several hundred MeV.The LANSCE facility offers a unique capability to provide high precision nuclear data over a large energy region, including that for fast reactor systems. In an ongoing experimental program the fission and capture cross sections are being measured for a number of minor actinides relevant for Generation-IV reactors and transmutation technology. Fission experiments makes use of both the highly moderated spallation neutron spectrum at the Lujan Center, and the unmoderated high energy spectrum at WNR. By combininb measurements at these two facilities the differential fission cross section is measured relative to the {sup 235}U(n,f) standard from subthermal energies up to about 200 MeV. An elaborate data acquisition system is designed to deal with all the different types of background present when spanning 10 energy decades. The first isotope to be measured was {sup 237}Np, and the results were used to improve the current ENDF/B-VII evaluation. Partial results have also been obtained for {sup 240}Pu and {sup 242}Pu, and the final results are expected shortly. Capture cross sections are measured at LANSCE using the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE). This unique instrument is highly efficient in detecting radiative capture events, and can thus handle radioactive samples of half-lives as low as 100 years. A number of capture cross sections important to fast reaction applications have been measured with DANCE. The first measurement was on {sup 237}Np(n,{gamma}), and the results have been submitted for publication. Other capture

  18. Recent Research with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (dance) at the LOS Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.

    2014-09-01

    The DANCE detector at Los Alamos is a 160 element, nearly 4π BaF2 detector array designed to make measurements of neutron capture on rare or radioactive nuclides. It has also been used to make measurements of gamma-ray multiplicity following capture and gamma-ray output from fission. Several examples of measurements are briefly discussed.

  19. Stripping of H- beams by residual gas in the linac at the Los Alamos neutron science center

    SciTech Connect

    Mccrady, Rodney C; Ito, Takeyasu; Cooper, Martin D; Alexander, Saunders

    2010-09-07

    The linear accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) accelerates both protons and H{sup -} ions using Cockroft-Walton-type injectors, a drift-tube linac and a coupled-cavity linac. The vacuum is maintained in the range of 10{sup -6} to 10{sup -7} Torr; the residual gas in the vacuum system results in some stripping of the electrons from the H{sup -} ions resulting in beam spill and the potential for unwanted proton beams delivered to experiments. We have measured the amount of fully-stripped H{sup -} beam (protons) that end up at approximately 800 MeV in the beam switchyard at LANSCE using image plates as very sensitive detectors. We present here the motivation for the measurement, the measurement technique and results.

  20. Los Alamos Science: Number 16

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

  1. Neutron Capture Experiments Using the DANCE Array at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D.; Mitchell, G. E.; Baramsai, B.; Chyzh, A.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becker, J. A.; Parker, W.; Sleaford, B.; Wu, C. Y.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Krticka, M.; Becvar, F.

    2009-03-31

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is designed for neutron capture measurements on very small and/or radioactive targets. The DANCE array of 160 BaF{sub 2} scintillation detectors is located at the Lujan Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Accurate measurements of neutron capture data are important for many current applications as well as for basic understanding of neutron capture. The gamma rays following neutron capture reactions have been studied by the time-of-flight technique using the DANCE array. The high granularity of the array allows measurements of the gamma-ray multiplicity. The gamma-ray multiplicities and energy spectra for different multiplicities can be measured and analyzed for spin and parity determination of the resolved resonances.

  2. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    SciTech Connect

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2013-06-03

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  3. Los Alamos Using Neutrons to Stop Nuclear Smugglers

    ScienceCinema

    Favalli, Andrea; Swinhoe, Martyn

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos National Laboratory researchers have successfully demonstrated for the first time that laser-generated neutrons can be enlisted as a useful tool in the War on Terror. The international research team used the short-pulse laser at Los Alamos's TRIDENT facility to generate a neutron beam with novel characteristics that interrogated a closed container to confirm the presence and quantity of nuclear material inside. The successful experiment paves the way for creation of a table-top-sized or truck-mounted neutron generator that could be installed at strategic locations worldwide to thwart smugglers trafficking in nuclear materials.

  4. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J.; Bliss, J.L.

    1992-08-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  5. Personnel neutron dosimetry improvements at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hoffman, J.M.; Brake, R.J. ); Bliss, J.L. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1992-01-01

    We are investigating methods to improve neutron dosimetry at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) using the track etch dosemeter CR-39. Specifically, use of CR-39 for dynamic environments, typically encountered at the LANL Plutonium Facility, is shown to be a superior method for personnel neutron dosimetry when compared to the currently used TLD system. The results of glovebox experiments simulating hydrogenous shielding used at LANL, temporal variations of neutron correction factors used at the Plutonium Facility, trial implementation at this facility and preliminary neutron spectroscopy measurements are presented and compared to reference dosimetry measurements. Our results confirm that use of a TLD system in a facility implementing hydrogenous shielding requires frequent field re-calibration. When such correction factors are not re-evaluated frequently, or are maintained at pre-shielding levels, significant (i.e., 2- to 3-fold) overestimation of the neutron dose equivalent can occur.

  6. Post-Cold War Science and Technology at Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, John C.

    2002-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory serves the nation through the development and application of leading-edge science and technology in support of national security. Our mission supports national security by: ensuring the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear stockpile; reducing the threat of weapons of mass destruction in support of counter terrorism and homeland defense; and solving national energy, environment, infrastructure, and health security problems. We require crosscutting fundamental and advanced science and technology research to accomplish our mission. The Stockpile Stewardship Program develops and applies, advanced experimental science, computational simulation, and technology to ensure the safety and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons in the absence of nuclear testing. This effort in itself is a grand challenge. However, the terrorist attack of September 11, 2001, reminded us of the importance of robust and vibrant research and development capabilities to meet new and evolving threats to our national security. Today through rapid prototyping we are applying new, innovative, science and technology for homeland defense, to address the threats of nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons globally. Synergistically, with the capabilities that we require for our core mission, we contribute in many other areas of scientific endeavor. For example, our Laboratory has been part of the NASA effort on mapping water on the moon and NSF/DOE projects studying high-energy astrophysical phenomena, understanding fundamental scaling phenomena of life, exploring high-temperature superconductors, investigating quantum information systems, applying neutrons to condensed-matter and nuclear physics research, developing large-scale modeling and simulations to understand complex phenomena, and exploring nanoscience that bridges the atomic to macroscopic scales. In this presentation, I will highlight some of these post-cold war science and technology advances

  7. Induction of Micronuclei in Human Fibroblasts from the Los Alamos High Energy Neutron Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    The space radiation field includes a broad spectrum of high energy neutrons. Interactions between these neutrons and a spacecraft, or other material, significantly contribute to the dose equivalent for astronauts. The 15 degree beam line in the Weapons Neutron Research beam at Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center generates a neutron spectrum relatively similar to that seen in space. Human foreskin fibroblast (AG1522) samples were irradiated behind 0 to 20 cm of water equivalent shielding. The cells were exposed to either a 0.05 or 0.2 Gy entrance dose. Following irradiation, micronuclei were counted to see how the water shield affects the beam and its damage to cell nuclei. Micronuclei induction was then compared with dose equivalent data provided from a tissue equivalent proportional counter.

  8. The Los Alamos Science Pillars The Science of Signatures

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Joshua E.; Peterson, Eugene J.

    2012-09-13

    As a national security science laboratory, Los Alamos is often asked to detect and measure the characteristics of complex systems and to use the resulting information to quantify the system's behavior. The Science of Signatures (SoS) pillar is the broad suite of technical expertise and capability that we use to accomplish this task. With it, we discover new signatures, develop new methods for detecting or measuring signatures, and deploy new detection technologies. The breadth of work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in SoS is impressive and spans from the initial understanding of nuclear weapon performance during the Manhattan Project, to unraveling the human genome, to deploying laser spectroscopy instrumentation on Mars. Clearly, SoS is a primary science area for the Laboratory and we foresee that as it matures, new regimes of signatures will be discovered and new ways of extracting information from existing data streams will be developed. These advances will in turn drive the development of sensing instrumentation and sensor deployment. The Science of Signatures is one of three science pillars championed by the Laboratory and vital to supporting our status as a leading national security science laboratory. As with the other two pillars, Materials for the Future and Information Science and Technology for Predictive Science (IS&T), SoS relies on the integration of technical disciplines and the multidisciplinary science and engineering that is our hallmark to tackle the most difficult national security challenges. Over nine months in 2011 and 2012, a team of science leaders from across the Laboratory has worked to develop a SoS strategy that positions us for the future. The crafting of this strategy has been championed by the Chemistry, Life, and Earth Sciences Directorate, but as you will see from this document, SoS is truly an Institution-wide effort and it has engagement from every organization at the Laboratory. This process tapped the insight and

  9. Micronuclei Induction in Human Fibroblasts Exposed In Vitro to Los Alamos High-Energy Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2006-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility#s ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth#s atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/hr and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a gamma source at a low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  10. Micronuclei induction in human fibroblasts exposed in vitro to Los Alamos high-energy neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gersey, Brad; Sodolak, John; Hada, Megumi; Saganti, Prem; Wilkins, Richard; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute to a significant fraction to the dose equivalent in crew members and passengers during commercial aviation travel, and astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's ICE House 30L beamline is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectra of earth's atmosphere. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecraft like the MIR and International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human fibroblasts in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams without degrader at an entrance dose rate of 25 mGy/h and analyzed the micronuclei (MN) induction. The cells were also placed behind a 9.9 cm water column to study the effect of shielding in the protection of neutron induced damages. It was found that the dose response in the MN frequency was linear for the samples with and without shielding and the slope of the MN yield behind the shielding was reduced by a factor of 3.5. Compared to the MN induction in human fibroblasts exposed to a γ source at a similar low dose rate, the RBE was found to be 16.7 and 10.0 for the neutrons without and with the 9.9 cm water shielding, respectively.

  11. Plans for an Ultra Cold Neutron source at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Bowles, T.J.; Hill, R.; Greene, G.L.

    1996-10-01

    Ultra Cold Neutrons (UCN) can be produced at spallation sources using a variety of techniques. To date the technique used has been to Bragg scatter and Doppler shift cold neutrons into UCN from a moving crystal. This is particularly applicable to short-pulse spallation sources. We are presently constructing a UCN source at LANSCE using this method. In addition, large gains in UCN density should be possible using cryogenic UCN sources. Research is under way at Gatchina to demonstrate technical feasibility of a frozen deuterium source. If successful, a source of this type could be implemented at future spallation source, such as the long pulse source being planned at Los Alamos, with a UCN density that may be two orders of magnitude higher than that presently available at reactors.

  12. The Los Alamos Space Science Outreach (LASSO) Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barker, P. L.; Skoug, R. M.; Alexander, R. J.; Thomsen, M. F.; Gary, S. P.

    2002-12-01

    The Los Alamos Space Science Outreach (LASSO) program features summer workshops in which K-14 teachers spend several weeks at LANL learning space science from Los Alamos scientists and developing methods and materials for teaching this science to their students. The program is designed to provide hands-on space science training to teachers as well as assistance in developing lesson plans for use in their classrooms. The program supports an instructional model based on education research and cognitive theory. Students and teachers engage in activities that encourage critical thinking and a constructivist approach to learning. LASSO is run through the Los Alamos Science Education Team (SET). SET personnel have many years of experience in teaching, education research, and science education programs. Their involvement ensures that the teacher workshop program is grounded in sound pedagogical methods and meets current educational standards. Lesson plans focus on current LANL satellite projects to study the solar wind and the Earth's magnetosphere. LASSO is an umbrella program for space science education activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) that was created to enhance the science and math interests and skills of students from New Mexico and the nation. The LASSO umbrella allows maximum leveraging of EPO funding from a number of projects (and thus maximum educational benefits to both students and teachers), while providing a format for the expression of the unique science perspective of each project.

  13. Cross section and γ-ray spectra for U238(n,γ) measured with the DANCE detector array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Chyzh, A.; Wu, C. Y.; Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Krtička, M.

    2014-03-01

    Background: Accurate knowledge of the U238(n,γ) cross section is important for developing theoretical nuclear reaction models and for applications. However, capture cross sections are difficult to calculate accurately and often must be measured. Purpose: We seek to confirm previous measurements and test cross-section calculations with an emphasis on the unresolved resonance region from 1 to 500 keV. Method: Cross sections were measured from 10 eV to 500 keV using the DANCE detector array at the LANSCE spallation neutron source. The measurements used a thin target, 48 mg/cm2 of depleted uranium. Gamma cascade spectra were also measured to provide an additional constraint on calculations. The data are compared to cross-section calculations using the code CoH3 and cascade spectra calculations made using the code dicebox. Results: This new cross-section measurement confirms the previous data. The measured gamma-ray spectra suggest the need for additional low-lying dipole strength in the radiative strength function. New Hauser-Feshbach calculations including this strength accurately predict the capture cross section without renormalization. Conclusions: The present cross-section data confirm previous measurements. Including additional low-lying dipole strength in the radiative strength function may lead to more accurate cross-section calculations in nuclei where <Γγ> has not been measured.

  14. Neutrons for technology and science

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    1995-10-01

    We reviewed recent work using neutrons generated at nuclear reactors an accelerator-based spallation sources. Provided that large new sources become available, neutron beams will continue to have as great an impact on technology and science as in the past.

  15. Nuclear science research at the WNR and LANSCE neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1994-06-01

    The Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) Facility and the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center (LANSCE) use 800 MeV proton beam from the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) to generate intense bursts of neutrons. Experiments using time-of-flight (TOF) energy determination can cover an energy range from thermal to about 2 MeV at LANSCE and 0.1 to 800 MeV at WNR. At present, three flight paths at LANSCE and six flight paths at WNR are used in basic and applied nuclear science research. In this paper we present a status report on WNR and LANSCE, discuss plans for the future, and describe three experiments recently completed or underway that use the unique features of these sources.

  16. Neutron Capture Reactions for Stockpile Stewardship and Basic Science

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Wilk, P; Wu, C; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Haight, R; Jandel, M; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Sheets, S; Mitchell, G; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2007-08-04

    The capture process is a nuclear reaction in which a target atom captures an incident projectile, e.g. a neutron. The excited-state compound nucleus de-excites by emitting photons. This process creates an atom that has one more neutron than the target atom, so it is a different isotope of the same element. With low energy (slow) neutron projectiles, capture is the dominant reaction, other than elastic scattering. However, with very heavy nuclei, fission competes with capture as a method of de-excitation of the compound nucleus. With higher energy (faster) incident neutrons, additional reactions are also possible, such as emission of protons or emission of multiple neutrons. The probability of a particular reaction occurring (such as capture) is referred to as the cross section for that reaction. Cross sections are very dependent on the incoming neutron's energy. Capture reactions can be studied either using monoenergetic neutron sources or 'white' neutron sources. A 'white' neutron source has a wide range of neutron energies in one neutron beam. The advantage to the white neutron source is that it allows the study of cross sections as they depend on neutron energies. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, located at Los Alamos National Laboratory, provides an intense white neutron source. Neutrons there are created by a high-energy proton beam from a linear accelerator striking a heavy metal (tungsten) target. The neutrons range in energy from subthermal up to very fast - over 100 MeV in energy. Low-energy neutron reaction cross sections fluctuate dramatically from one target to another, and they are very difficult to predict by theoretical modeling. The cross sections for particular capture reactions are important for defense sciences, advanced reactor concepts, transmutation of radioactive wastes and nuclear astrophysics. We now have a strong collaboration between Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, North Carolina State

  17. The Los Alamos neutron spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auchampaugh, George; Barraclough, Bruce; Byrd, Roger; Drake, Darrell; Feldman, William; Moss, Calvin; Reedy, Robert

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a neutron spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-1 mission, which is the first of two such missions to obtain global compositional, gravity, topography, and image maps of the lunar surface during nominal one-year missions. The neutron spectrometer will measure fast and slow (epithermal and thermal) neutrons in the ranges of 0.5 MeV to 25 MeV and 0.01 eV to more than 1 keV, respectively. The neutron spectrometer will consist of two independent instruments, a fast-neutron one, and a thermal and epithermal one. The measured neutron fluxes are very sensitive to hydrogen in the top meter of the lunar surface and provide additional information about lunar composition.

  18. A Long-Pulse Spallation Source at Los Alamos: Facility description and preliminary neutronic performance for cold neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Weinacht, D.J.; Pitcher, E.J.; Ferguson, P.D.

    1998-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has discussed installing a new 1-MW spallation neutron target station in an existing building at the end of its 800-MeV proton linear accelerator. Because the accelerator provides pulses of protons each about 1 msec in duration, the new source would be a Long Pulse Spallation Source (LPSS). The facility would employ vertical extraction of moderators and reflectors, and horizontal extraction of the spallation target. An LPSS uses coupled moderators rather than decoupled ones. There are potential gains of about a factor of 6 to 7 in the time-averaged neutron brightness for cold-neutron production from a coupled liquid H{sub 2} moderator compared to a decoupled one. However, these gains come at the expense of putting ``tails`` on the neutron pulses. The particulars of the neutron pulses from a moderator (e.g., energy-dependent rise times, peak intensities, pulse widths, and decay constant(s) of the tails) are crucial parameters for designing instruments and estimating their performance at an LPSS. Tungsten is the reference target material. Inconel 718 is the reference target canister and proton beam window material, with Al-6061 being the choice for the liquid H{sub 2} moderator canister and vacuum container. A 1-MW LPSS would have world-class neutronic performance. The authors describe the proposed Los Alamos LPSS facility, and show that, for cold neutrons, the calculated time-averaged neutronic performance of a liquid H{sub 2} moderator at the 1-MW LPSS is equivalent to about 1/4th the calculated neutronic performance of the best liquid D{sub 2} moderator at the Institute Laue-Langevin reactor. They show that the time-averaged moderator neutronic brightness increases as the size of the moderator gets smaller.

  19. The Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center data acquisition system

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.O.; Cort, G.; Gjovig, A.; Goldstone, J.A.; McMillan, D.E.; Ross, J.; Seal, J.; Machen, D.R.

    1987-05-20

    The FASTBUS subsystem of the LANSCE data acquisition system consists of a single FASTBUS crate segment with four custom modules and a QPI interface for the VAX. Since experiments at the LANSCE facility always include a time-of-flight parameter for the detected neutron and may optionally include additional position parameters characterizing the event, a time stamp is generated for each event by the Programmable Master Clock (PMC) module. The time and any position information are latched into the Time-Of-Flight buffer (TOF) module. After all events associated with a single neutron burst have been captured in a frame buffer internal to the TOF module, each event is analyzed by the MAPPER module and reduced to a histogram address to increment in the BULKSTORE module. Software access to the histogram is provided through the QPI interface.

  20. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.

    1995-09-01

    This report is quarterly progress report on the Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Included in the report are dicussions on teacher and faculty enhancement, curriculum improvement, student support, educational technology, and institutional improvement.

  1. Alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra under different shieldings in the Los Alamos high-energy neutron field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badhwar, G. D.; Huff, H.; Wilkins, R.

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear interactions of space radiation with shielding materials result in alterations in dose and lineal energy spectra that depend on the specific elemental composition, density and thickness of the material. The shielding characteristics of materials have been studied using charged-particle beams and radiation transport models by examining the risk reduction using the conventional dose-equivalent approach. Secondary neutrons contribute a significant fraction of the total radiation exposure in space. An experiment to study the changes in dose and lineal energy spectra by shielding materials was carried out at the Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center neutron facility. In the energy range of about 2 to 200 MeV, this neutron spectrum is similar in shape within a factor of about 2 to the spectrum expected in the International Space Station habitable modules. It is shown that with a shielding thickness of about 5 g cm(-2), the conventional radiation risk increases, in some cases by as much as a factor of 2, but decreases with thicknesses of about of 20 g cm(-2). This suggests that care must be taken in evaluating the shielding effectiveness of a given material by including both the charged-particle and neutron components of space radiation.

  2. Chromosome Aberrations in Human Epithelial Cells Exposed Los Alamos High-Energy Secondary Neutrons: M-BAND Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hada, M.; Saganti, P. B.; Gersey, B.; Wilkins, R.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Wu, H.

    2007-01-01

    High-energy secondary neutrons, produced by the interaction of galactic cosmic rays (GCR) with the atmosphere, spacecraft structure and planetary surfaces, contribute a significant fraction to the dose equivalent radiation measurement in crew members and passengers of commercial aviation travel as well as astronauts in space missions. The Los Alamos Nuclear Science Center (LANSCE) neutron facility's 30L beam line (4FP30L-A/ICE House) is known to generate neutrons that simulate the secondary neutron spectrum of the Earth's atmosphere at high altitude. The neutron spectrum is also similar to that measured onboard spacecrafts like the MIR and the International Space Station (ISS). To evaluate the biological damage, we exposed human epithelial cells in vitro to the LANSCE neutron beams with an entrance dose rate of 2.5 cGy/hr, and studied the induction of chromosome aberrations that were identified with multicolor-banding in situ hybridization (mBAND) technique. With this technique, individually painted chromosomal bands on one chromosome allowed the identification of inter-chromosomal aberrations (translocation to unpainted chromosomes) and intra-chromosomal aberrations (inversions and deletions within a single painted chromosome). Compared to our previous results with gamma-rays and 600 MeV/nucleon Fe ions of high dose rate at NSRL (NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at Brookhaven National Laboratory), the neutron data from the LANSCE experiments showed significantly higher frequency of chromosome aberrations. However, detailed analysis of the inversion type revealed that all of the three radiation types in the study induced a low incidence of simple inversions. Most of the inversions in gamma-ray irradiated samples were accompanied by other types of intrachromosomal aberrations but few inversions were accompanied by interchromosomal aberrations. In contrast, neutrons and Fe ions induced a significant fraction of inversions that involved complex rearrangements of both

  3. Multisphere neutron spectroscopy measurements at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Plutonium Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, W.F.; Hajnal, F.

    1993-06-01

    Multisphere neutron spectroscopy methods are applied to measure representative working fields within the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Plutonium Facility. This facility hosts dynamic processes, which include the fabrication of {sup 238}Pu heat sources for radioisotope generators used to power space equipment and a variety of plutonium research programs that involve recovery, hydrofluorination, and metal production. Neutron fluence per unit lethargy, as a function of neutron energy measured for locations throughout this facility, are described. Dosimeter/remmeter response functions [e.g., determined for a 22.8-cm-diameter neutron rem detector (NRD), an Anderson/Braun-type neutron ``Snoopy`` monitor, track-etch CR-39, BDI-100 bubble detectors, and Kodak type A nuclear track emulsion film, (NTA)] are folded into these spectra to calculate absolute response values of counts, tracks, or bubbles per unit-dose equivalent. The relative response values per unit- dose equivalent for bare and albedo {sup 6}LiF-based thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) are also calculated to estimate response scenarios encountered with use of the LANL-TLD. These results are further compared to more conventional methods of estimating neutron spectral energies such as the ``9-to-3 ratio`` method.

  4. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-17

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of {delta}d/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 A{sup -1}

  5. Pulsed Neutron Powder Diffraction for Materials Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiyama, T.

    2008-03-01

    The accelerator-based neutron diffraction began in the end of 60's at Tohoku University which was succeeded by the four spallation neutron facilities with proton accelerators at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (Japan), Argonne National Laboratory and Los Alamos Laboratory (USA), and Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (UK). Since then, the next generation source has been pursued for 20 years, and 1MW-class spallation neutron sources will be appeared in about three years at the three parts of the world: Japan, UK and USA. The joint proton accelerator project (J-PARC), a collaborative project between KEK and JAEA, is one of them. The aim of the talk is to describe about J-PARC and the neutron diffractometers being installed at the materials and life science facility of J-PARC. The materials and life science facility of J-PARC has 23 neutron beam ports and will start delivering the first neutron beam of 25 Hz from 2008 May. Until now, more than 20 proposals have been reviewed by the review committee, and accepted proposal groups have started to get fund. Those proposals include five polycrystalline diffractometers: a super high resolution powder diffractometer (SHRPD), a 0.2%-resolution powder diffractometer of Ibaraki prefecture (IPD), an engineering diffractometers (Takumi), a high intensity S(Q) diffractometer (VSD), and a high-pressure dedicated diffractometer. SHRPD, Takumi and IPD are being designed and constructed by the joint team of KEK, JAEA and Ibaraki University, whose member are originally from the KEK powder group. These three instruments are expected to start in 2008. VSD is a super high intensity diffractometer with the highest resolution of Δd/d = 0.3%. VSD can measure rapid time-dependent phenomena of crystalline materials as well as glass, liquid and amorphous materials. The pair distribution function will be routinely obtained by the Fourier transiformation of S(Q) data. Q range of VSD will be as wide as 0.01 Å-1

  6. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G.; Shea, N. eds.

    1992-01-01

    This document provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  7. Los Alamos Science: The Human Genome Project. Number 20, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G; Shea, N

    1992-01-01

    This article provides a broad overview of the Human Genome Project, with particular emphasis on work being done at Los Alamos. It tries to emphasize the scientific aspects of the project, compared to the more speculative information presented in the popular press. There is a brief introduction to modern genetics, including a review of classic work. There is a broad overview of the Genome Project, describing what the project is, what are some of its major five-year goals, what are major technological challenges ahead of the project, and what can the field of biology, as well as society expect to see as benefits from this project. Specific results on the efforts directed at mapping chromosomes 16 and 5 are discussed. A brief introduction to DNA libraries is presented, bearing in mind that Los Alamos has housed such libraries for many years prior to the Genome Project. Information on efforts to do applied computational work related to the project are discussed, as well as experimental efforts to do rapid DNA sequencing by means of single-molecule detection using applied spectroscopic methods. The article introduces the Los Alamos staff which are working on the Genome Project, and concludes with brief discussions on ethical, legal, and social implications of this work; a brief glimpse of genetics as it may be practiced in the next century; and a glossary of relevant terms.

  8. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N.G.

    1997-12-31

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  9. Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the Neutrino

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cooper, N. G. ed.

    1997-01-01

    This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

  10. Overview of the Science Program at the LANL Ultracold Neutron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Takeyasu; LANL Area B UCN Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) currently operates a proton-beam-driven solid-deuterium-based ultracold neutron (UCN) source. It was originally built to provide UCN to the UCNA experiment, an experiment to measure the angular correlation between the neutron spin and electron emission in polarized beta decay of free neutrons. The science program at the LANL UCN source has since significantly grown. It now provides UCN to various activities including a suite of neutron beta decay experiments, R&D for the SNS nEDM experiment, detector development for the Nab experiment at the SNS, development of a new nEDM experiment at LANL, and a study of material damage due to neutron induced fission fragments. In addition, the UCN source is in the process of being upgraded and an active research program on UCN source and guide technology is taking place. In this talk, an overview of the science program at the LANL UCN source will be given.

  11. Center for Materials Science, Los Alamos National Laboratory. Status report, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Parkin, D.M.; Boring, A.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Center for Materials Science (CMS) from October 1, 1990 to September 30, 1991, and is the nineth such annual report. It has been a year of remarkable progress in building the programs of the Center. The extent of this progress is described in detail. The CMS was established to enhance the contribution of materials science and technology to the Laboratory`s defense, energy and scientific missions, and the Laboratory. In carrying out these responsibilities it has accepted four demanding missions: (1) Build a core group of highly rated, established materials scientists and solid state physicists. (2) Promote and support top quality, interdisciplinary materials research programs at Los Alamos. (3) Strengthen the interactions of materials science and Los Alamos with the external materials science community. and (4) Establish and maintain modern materials research facilities in a readily accessible, central location.

  12. New sources and instrumentation for neutron science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, Alina

    2011-04-01

    Neutron-scattering research has a lot to do with our everyday lives. Things like medicine, food, electronics, cars and airplanes have all been improved by neutron-scattering research. Neutron research also helps scientists improve materials used in a multitude of different products, such as high-temperature superconductors, powerful lightweight magnets, stronger, lighter plastic products etc. Neutron scattering is one of the most effective ways to obtain information on both, the structure and the dynamics of condensed matter. Most of the world's neutron sources were built decades ago, and although the uses and demand for neutrons have increased throughout the years, few new sources have been built. The new construction, accelerator-based neutron source, the spallation source will provide the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and industrial development. In this paper it will be described what neutrons are and what unique properties make them useful for science, how spallation source is designed to produce neutron beams and the experimental instruments that will use those beams. Finally, it will be described how past neutron research has affected our everyday lives and what we might expect from the most exciting future applications.

  13. Neutron activation analysis in the life sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frontasyeva, M. V.

    2011-03-01

    Development of methods for instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) and their applications in the life sciences are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on epithermal activation with reactor neutrons (ENAA), and the advantages of this technique in analysis of environmental objects are shown. The results of applied INAA studies in the field of the life sciences carried out at the world's leading nuclear centers are reported. Experience in employing a radioanalytical complex at the IBR-2 reactor (Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna) for such studies is summarized.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory A National Science Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, Mark B.

    2012-07-20

    Our mission as a DOE national security science laboratory is to develop and apply science, technology, and engineering solutions that: (1) Ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the US nuclear deterrent; (2) Protect against the nuclear threat; and (3) Solve Energy Security and other emerging national security challenges.

  15. Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Vickie; Chen, Meili; Cobb, John; Kohl, Jim; Miller, Steve; Speirs, David; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan

    2010-11-01

    The unique contributions of the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) are the connection of national user facility instrument data sources to the integrated cyberinfrastructure of the National Science FoundationTeraGrid and the development of a neutron science gateway that allows neutron scientists to use TeraGrid resources to analyze their data, including comparison of experiment with simulation. The NSTG is working in close collaboration with the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge as their principal facility partner. The SNS is a next-generation neutron source. It has completed construction at a cost of 1.4 billion and is ramping up operations. The SNS will provide an order of magnitude greater flux than any previous facility in the world and will be available to all of the nation's scientists, independent of funding source, on a peer-reviewed merit basis. With this new capability, the neutron science community is facing orders of magnitude larger data sets and is at a critical point for data analysis and simulation. There is a recognized need for new ways to manage and analyze data to optimize both beam time and scientific output. The TeraGrid is providing new capabilities in the gateway for simulations using McStas and a fitting service on distributed TeraGrid resources to improved turnaround. NSTG staff are also exploring replicating experimental data in archival storage. As part of the SNS partnership, the NSTG provides access to gateway support, cyberinfrastructure outreach, community development, and user support for the neutron science community. This community includes not only SNS staff and users but extends to all the major worldwide neutron scattering centers.

  16. Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Chen, Meili; Cobb, John W; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Speirs, David A; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2010-01-01

    The unique contributions of the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG) are the connection of national user facility instrument data sources to the integrated cyberinfrastructure of the National Science FoundationTeraGrid and the development of a neutron science gateway that allows neutron scientists to use TeraGrid resources to analyze their data, including comparison of experiment with simulation. The NSTG is working in close collaboration with the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge as their principal facility partner. The SNS is a next-generation neutron source. It has completed construction at a cost of $1.4 billion and is ramping up operations. The SNS will provide an order of magnitude greater flux than any previous facility in the world and will be available to all of the nation's scientists, independent of funding source, on a peer-reviewed merit basis. With this new capability, the neutron science community is facing orders of magnitude larger data sets and is at a critical point for data analysis and simulation. There is a recognized need for new ways to manage and analyze data to optimize both beam time and scientific output. The TeraGrid is providing new capabilities in the gateway for simulations using McStas and a fitting service on distributed TeraGrid resources to improved turnaround. NSTG staff are also exploring replicating experimental data in archival storage. As part of the SNS partnership, the NSTG provides access to gateway support, cyberinfrastructure outreach, community development, and user support for the neutron science community. This community includes not only SNS staff and users but extends to all the major worldwide neutron scattering centers.

  17. Scientific Advancements and Technological Developments of High P-T Neutron Diffraction at LANSCE, Los Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Daemen, L. L.; Zhang, J.

    2003-12-01

    In-situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments provide unique opportunities to study the crystal structure, hydrogen bonding, magnetism, and thermal parameters of light elements (eg. H, Li, B) and heavy elements (eg. Ta, U, Pu,), that are virtually impossible to determine with x-ray diffraction techniques. For example, thermoelasticity and Debye-Waller factor as function of pressure and temperature can be derived using in-situ high P-T neutron diffraction techniques. These applications can also be extended to a much broader spectrum of scientific problems. For instance, puzzles in Earth science such as the carbon cycle and the role of hydrous minerals for water exchange between lithosphere and biosphere can be directly addressed. Moreover, by introducing in-situ shear, texture of metals and minerals accompanied with phase transitions at high P-T conditions can also be studied by high P-T neutron diffraction. We have successfully conducted high P-T neutron diffraction experiments at LANSCE and achieved simultaneous high pressures and temperatures of 10 GPa and 1500 K. With an average 3-6 hours of data collection, the diffraction data are of sufficiently high quality for the determination of structural parameters and thermal vibrations. We have studied hydrous mineral (MgOD), perovskite (K.15,Na.85)MgF3, clathrate hydrates (CH4-, CO2-, and H2-), metals (Mo, Al, Zr), and amorphous materials (carbon black, BMG). The aim of our research is to accurately map bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. Studies based on high-pressure neutron diffraction are important for multi-disciplinary science and we welcome researchers from all fields to use this advanced technique. We have developed a 500-ton toroidal press, TAP-98, to conduct simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction experiments inside of HIPPO (High-Pressure and Preferred-Orientation diffractometer). We have also developed a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP-01

  18. Neutron science opportunities at pulsed spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, J.M.

    1996-12-31

    Using the IPNS Upgrade plan developed at Argonne National Laboratory as a worked example of the design of a pulsed spallation neutron source, this paper explores some of the scientific applications of an advanced facility for materials science studies and the instrumentation for those purposes.

  19. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1981. [Leading abstract

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.

    1982-10-01

    This report summarizes research and development activities of the Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's Biomedical and Environmental Research program for the calendar year 1981. Individual reports describing the current status of projects have been entered individually into the data base.

  20. Science-based stockpile stewardship at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Immele, J.

    1995-10-01

    I would like to start by working from Vic Reis`s total quality management diagram in which he began with the strategy and then worked through the customer requirements-what the Department of Defense (DoD) is hoping for from the science-based stockpile stewardship program. Maybe our customer`s requirements will help guide some of the issues that we should be working on. ONe quick answer to {open_quotes}why have we adopted a science-based strategy{close_quotes} is that nuclear weapons are a 50-year responsibility, not just a 5-year responsibility, and stewardship without testing is a grand challenge. While we can do engineering maintenance and turn over and remake a few things on the short time scale, without nuclear testing, without new weapons development, and without much of the manufacturing base that we had in the past, we need to learn better just how these weapons are actually working.

  1. Performance of the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, A.; Makela, M.; Bagdasarova, Y.; Boissevain, J.; Bowles, T. J.; Currie, S. A.; Hill, R. E.; Hogan, G.; Morris, C. L.; Mortensen, R. N.; Ramsey, J.; Seestrom, S. J.; Sondheim, W. E.; Teasdale, W.; Wang, Z.; Back, H. O.; Broussard, L. J.; Hoagland, J.; Holley, A. T.; Pattie, R. W. Jr.; and others

    2013-01-15

    In this paper, we describe the performance of the Los Alamos spallation-driven solid-deuterium ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source. Measurements of the cold neutron flux, the very low energy neutron production rate, and the UCN rates and density at the exit from the biological shield are presented and compared to Monte Carlo predictions. The cold neutron rates compare well with predictions from the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the UCN rates agree with our custom UCN Monte Carlo code. The source is shown to perform as modeled. The maximum delivered UCN density at the exit from the biological shield is 52(9) UCN/cc with a solid deuterium volume of {approx}1500 cm{sup 3}.

  2. ORNL Neutron Sciences Annual Report for 2007

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Ian S; Horak, Charlie M; Counce, Deborah Melinda; Ekkebus, Allen E

    2008-07-01

    This is the first annual report of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Neutron Sciences Directorate for calendar year 2007. It describes the neutron science facilities, current developments, and future plans; highlights of the year's activities and scientific research; and information on the user program. It also contains information about education and outreach activities and about the organization and staff. The Neutron Sciences Directorate is responsible for operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Spallation Neutron Source. The main highlights of 2007 were highly successful operation and instrument commissioning at both facilities. At HFIR, the year began with the reactor in shutdown mode and work on the new cold source progressing as planned. The restart on May 16, with the cold source operating, was a significant achievement. Furthermore, measurements of the cold source showed that the performance exceeded expectations, making it one of the world's most brilliant sources of cold neutrons. HFIR finished the year having completed five run cycles and 5,880 MWd of operation. At SNS, the year began with 20 kW of beam power on target; and thanks to a highly motivated staff, we reached a record-breaking power level of 183 kW by the end of the year. Integrated beam power delivered to the target was 160 MWh. Although this is a substantial accomplishment, the next year will bring the challenge of increasing the integrated beam power delivered to 887 MWh as we chart our path toward 5,350 MWh by 2011.

  3. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on 239Pu, 235U, 238U

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selby, H. D.; Mac Innes, M. R.; Barr, D. W.; Keksis, A. L.; Meade, R. A.; Burns, C. J.; Chadwick, M. B.; Wallstrom, T. C.

    2010-12-01

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for 99Mo, 95Zr, 137Cs, 140Ba, 141,143Ce, and 147Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the 147Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by ˜5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried over to the ENDF/B-VII.0 library, except for 99Mo

  4. Integrating Safety with Science,Technology and Innovation at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Rich, Bethany M

    2012-04-02

    The mission of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is to develop and apply science, technology and engineering solutions to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve emerging national security challenges. The most important responsibility is to direct and conduct efforts to meet the mission with an emphasis on safety, security, and quality. In this article, LANL Environmental, Safety, and Health (ESH) trainers discuss how their application and use of a kinetic learning module (learn by doing) with a unique fall arrest system is helping to address one the most common industrial safety challenges: slips and falls. A unique integration of Human Performance Improvement (HPI), Behavior Based Safety (BBS) and elements of the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) combined with an interactive simulator experience is being used to address slip and fall events at Los Alamos.

  5. Material Science and Engineering with Neutron Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penumadu, D.

    This chapter summarizes some of the results related to the use of neutron imaging (radiography and tomography) as applied to the broad area of materials science and engineering research. These include multi-phase flow visualization in metal casting techniques, energy-selective imaging of materials and its use for texture and stress imaging in polycrystalline materials, characterization of discrete particle systems, flow through porous media, and stroboscopic imaging. The importance of spatial resolution and neutron detector type for given engineering applications is also addressed.

  6. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Program. Annual progress report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.H.

    1997-01-01

    The National Teacher Enhancement program (NTEP) is a three-year, multi-laboratory effort funded by the National Science Foundation and the Department of Energy to improve elementary school science programs. The Los Alamos National Laboratory targets teachers in northern New Mexico. FY96, the third year of the program, involved 11 teams of elementary school teachers (grades 4-6) in a three-week summer session, four two-day workshops during the school year and an on-going planning and implementation process. The teams included twenty-one teachers from 11 schools. Participants earned a possible six semester hours of graduate credit for the summer institute and two hours for the academic year workshops from the University of New Mexico. The Laboratory expertise in the earth and environmental science provided the tie between the Laboratory initiatives and program content, and allowed for the design of real world problems.

  7. A proposal for a long-pulse spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Weinacht, D.

    1995-12-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is proposing a new spallation neutron source that will provide the US with an internationally competitive facility for neutron science and technology that can be built in approximately three years for less than $100 million. The establishment of a 1-MW, long-pulse spallation source (LPSS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) will meet many of the present needs of scientists in the neutron scattering community and provide a significant boost to neutron research in the US. The new facility will support the development of a future, more intense spallation neutron source, that is planned by DOE`s Office of Energy Research. Together with the existing short pulse spallation source (SPSS) at the Manual Lujan, Jr. Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at Los Alamos, the new LPSS will provide US scientists with a complementary pair of high-performance neutron sources to rival the world`s leading facilities in Europe.

  8. 2010 Neutron Review: ORNL Neutron Sciences Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bardoel, Agatha A; Counce, Deborah M; Ekkebus, Allen E; Horak, Charlie M; Nagler, Stephen E; Kszos, Lynn A

    2011-06-01

    During 2010, the Neutron Sciences Directorate focused on producing world-class science, while supporting the needs of the scientific community. As the instrument, sample environment, and data analysis tools at High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR ) and Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) have grown over the last year, so has promising neutron scattering research. This was an exciting year in science, technology, and operations. Some topics discussed are: (1) HFIR and SNS Experiments Take Gordon Battelle Awards for Scientific Discovery - Battelle Memorial Institute presented the inaugural Gordon Battelle Prizes for scientific discovery and technology impact in 2010. Battelle awards the prizes to recognize the most significant advancements at national laboratories that it manages or co-manages. (2) Discovery of Element 117 - As part of an international team of scientists from Russia and the United States, HFIR staff played a pivotal role in the discovery by generating the berkelium used to produce the new element. A total of six atoms of ''ununseptium'' were detected in a two-year campaign employing HFIR and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the heavy-ion accelerator capabilities at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research in Dubna, Russia. The discovery of the new element expands the understanding of the properties of nuclei at extreme numbers of protons and neutrons. The production of a new element and observation of 11 new heaviest isotopes demonstrate the increased stability of super-heavy elements with increasing neutron numbers and provide the strongest evidence to date for the existence of an island of enhanced stability for super-heavy elements. (3) Studies of Iron-Based High-Temperature Superconductors - ORNL applied its distinctive capabilities in neutron scattering, chemistry, physics, and computation to detailed studies of the magnetic excitations of iron-based superconductors (iron pnictides and

  9. Protein structures by spallation neutron crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Langan, Paul; Fisher, Zoë; Kovalevsky, Andrii; Mustyakimov, Marat; Sutcliffe Valone, Amanda; Unkefer, Cliff; Waltman, Mary Jo; Coates, Leighton; Adams, Paul D.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Bennett, Brad; Dealwis, Chris; Schoenborn, Benno P.

    2008-01-01

    The Protein Crystallography Station at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is a high-performance beamline that forms the core of a capability for neutron macromolecular structure and function determination. This capability also includes the Macromolecular Neutron Crystallography (MNC) consortium between Los Alamos (LANL) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories for developing computational tools for neutron protein crystallography, a biological deuteration laboratory, the National Stable Isotope Production Facility, and an MNC drug design consortium between LANL and Case Western Reserve University. PMID:18421142

  10. Review of the Lujan neutron scattering center: basic energy sciences prereport February 2009

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Alan J; Rhyne, James J; Lewis, Paul S

    2009-01-01

    The Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (Lujan Center) at LANSCE is a designated National User Facility for neutron scattering and nuclear physics studies with pulsed beams of moderated neutrons (cold, thermal, and epithermal). As one of five experimental areas at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), the Lujan Center hosts engineers, scientists, and students from around the world. The Lujan Center consists of Experimental Room (ER) 1 (ERl) built by the Laboratory in 1977, ER2 built by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES) in 1989, and the Office Building (622) also built by BES in 1989, along with a chem-bio lab, a shop, and other out-buildings. According to a 1996 Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) between the Defense Programs (DP) Office of the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) and the Office of Science (SC, then the Office of Energy Research), the Lujan Center flight paths were transferred from DP to SC, including those in ERI. That MOA was updated in 2001. Under the MOA, NNSA-DP delivers neutron beam to the windows of the target crypt, outside of which BES becomes the 'landlord.' The leveraging nature of the Lujan Center on the LANSCE accelerator is a substantial annual leverage to the $11 M BES operating fund worth approximately $56 M operating cost of the linear accelerator (LINAC)-in beam delivery.

  11. Los Alamos National Laboratory Facility Review

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald Owen

    2015-06-05

    This series of slides depicts the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). The Center's 800-MeV linac produces H+ and H- beams as well as beams of moderated (cold to 1 MeV) and unmoderated (0.1 to 600 MeV) neutrons. Experimental facilities and their capabilities and characteristics are outlined. Among these are LENZ, SPIDER, and DANCE.

  12. European Spallation Source and Neutron Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeck, James

    2014-03-01

    International collaborations in large-scale scientific projects can link Sciences and Society. Following this goal, the European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries. Scandinavia is providing 50 percent of the construction cost whilst the other member states are providing financial support mainly via in-kind contribution from institutes, laboratories or industries of the given countries. Scientists and engineers from 35 different countries are members of the workforce in Lund who participate in its design and construction. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics by producing very high flux neutrons to study condensed matter physics, chemistry, biology, nuclear physics and materials science. The ESS will be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. A tungsten target and a 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator, composed mainly of superconducting Radio-Frequency components, are used to achieve these goals.

  13. Virtual Experiments on the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, V. E.; Cobb, J. W.; Farhi, E.; Miller, S. D.; Taylor, M.

    The TeraGrid's outreach effort to the neutron science community is creating an environment that is encouraging the exploration of advanced cyberinfrastructure being incorporated into facility operations in a way that leverages facility operations to multiply the scientific output of its users, including many NSF supported scientists in many disciplines. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway serves as an exploratory incubator for several TeraGrid projects. Virtual neutron scattering experiments from one exploratory project will be highlighted.

  14. Virtual Experiments on the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Cobb, John W; Farhi, Emmanuel N; Miller, Stephen D; Taylor, M

    2008-01-01

    The TeraGrid's outreach effort to the neutron science community is creating an environment that is encouraging the exploration of advanced cyberinfrastructure being incorporated into facility operations in a way that leverages facility operations to multiply the scientific output of its users, including many NSF supported scientists in many disciplines. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway serves as an exploratory incubator for several TeraGrid projects. Virtual neutron scattering experiments from one exploratory project will be highlighted.

  15. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, John

    2014-04-24

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  16. Advancing Materials Science using Neutrons at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    ScienceCinema

    Carpenter, John

    2014-06-03

    Jack Carpenter, pioneer of accelerator-based pulsed spallation neutron sources, talks about neutron science at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and a need for a second target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). ORNL is the Department of Energy's largest multiprogram science and energy laboratory, and is home to two scientific user facilities serving the neutron science research community: the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and SNS. HFIR and SNS provide researchers with unmatched capabilities for understanding the structure and properties of materials, macromolecular and biological systems, and the fundamental physics of the neutron. Neutrons provide a window through which to view materials at a microscopic level that allow researchers to develop better materials and better products. Neutrons enable us to understand materials we use in everyday life. Carpenter explains the need for another station to produce long wavelength neutrons, or cold neutrons, to answer questions that are addressed only with cold neutrons. The second target station is optimized for that purpose. Modern technology depends more and more upon intimate atomic knowledge of materials, and neutrons are an ideal probe.

  17. Information about Practicums at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Paul A.

    2012-07-24

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is the premier facility for neutron science experiments ranging from cross section measurements, neutron scattering experiments, proton radiography, cold neutrons, actinide neutronic properties, and many other exciting topics. The National High Magnetic Field Laboratory is home to several powerful magnets, including the one that created the first non-destructive 100 Tesla field in March 2012. They probe the electronic structure of superconductors, magnetic properties of materials (including magneto-quantum effects). Research is also conducted in correlated materials, thermoacoustics, and magnetic properties of actinides. The Trident Laser has a unique niche with very high power, short pulse experiments, with a peak power of 10{sup 20} W in short pulse mode. Discoveries range from production of monoenergetic MeV ion beam, nonlinear kinetic plasma waves, the transition between kinetic and fluid nonlinear behavior and other laser-plasma interaction processes.

  18. Workshop on Probing Frontiers in Matter with Neutron Scattering, Wrap-up Session Chaired by John C. Browne on December 14, 1997, at Fuller Lodge, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Mezei, F.; Thompson, J.

    1998-12-01

    The Workshop on Probing Frontiers in Matter with Neutron Scattering consisted of a series of lectures and discussions about recent highlights in neutron scattering. In this report, we present the transcript of the concluding discussion session (wrap-up session) chaired by John C. Browne, Director of Los Alamos National Laboratory. The workshop had covered a spectrum of topics ranging from high T{sub c} superconductivity to polymer science, from glasses to molecular biology, a broad review aimed at identifying trends and future needs in condensed matter research. The focus of the wrap-up session was to summarize the workshop participants' views on developments to come. Most of the highlights presented during the workshop were the result of experiments performed at the leading reactor-based neutron scattering facilities. However, recent advances with very high power accelerators open up opportunities to develop new approaches to spallation technique that could decisively advance neutron scattering research in areas for which reactor sources are today by far the best choice. The powerful combination of neutron scattering and increasingly accurate computer modeling emerged as another area of opportunity for research in the coming decades.

  19. Los Alamos National Laboratory strategic directions

    SciTech Connect

    Hecker, S.

    1995-10-01

    It is my pleasure to welcome you to Los Alamos. I like the idea of bringing together all aspects of the research community-defense, basic science, and industrial. It is particularly important in today`s times of constrained budgets and in fields such as neutron research because I am convinced that the best science and the best applications will come from their interplay. If we do the science well, then we will do good applications. Keeping our eye focused on interesting applications will spawn new areas of science. This interplay is especially critical, and it is good to have these communities represented here today.

  20. Thermal and Cold Neutron Computed Tomography at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center Using an Amorphous Silicon Detector Array

    SciTech Connect

    Claytor, T.N.; Schwab, M.J.; Farnum, E.H.; McDonald, T.E.; Summa, D.A.; Sheats, M.J.; Stupin, D.M.; Sievers, W.L.

    1998-07-19

    The use of the EG and G-Heimann RTM 128 or dpiX FS20 amorphous silicon (a-Si) detector array for thermal neutron radiography/computed tomography has proven to be a quick and efficient means of producing high quality digital radiographic images. The resolution, although not as good as film, is about 750 pm with the RTM and 127 pm with the dpiX array with a dynamic range in excess of 2,800. In many respects using an amorphous silicon detector is an improvement over other techniques such as imaging with a CCD camera, using a storage phosphor plate or film radiography. Unlike a CCD camera, which is highly susceptible to radiation damage, a-Si detectors can be placed in the beam directly behind the object under examination and do not require any special optics or turning mirrors. The amorphous silicon detector also allows enough data to be acquired to construct a digital image in just a few seconds (minimum gate time 40 ms) whereas film or storage plate exposures can take many minutes and then need to be digitized with a scanner. The flat panel can therefore acquire a complete 3D computed tomography data set in just a few tens of minutes. While a-Si detectors have been proposed for use in imaging neutron beams, this is the first reported implementation of such a detector for neutron imaging.

  1. Neutron Transfer Reactions: Surrogates for Neutron Capture for Basic and Applied Nuclear Science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Peters, W. A.; Allen, J.; Hatarik, R.; Matthews, C.; O'Malley, P.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Howard, J.; Patterson, N.; Paulauskas, S. V.; Rogers, J.; Sissom, D. J.; Pain, S. D.; Adekola, A.; Bardayan, D. W.; Blackmon, J. C.; Liang, F.; Nesaraja, C. D.; Pittman, S. T.

    2009-03-10

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  2. Neutron transfer reactions: Surrogates for neutron capture for basic and applied nuclear science

    SciTech Connect

    Cizewski, J. A.; Jones, K. L.; Kozub, R. L.; Pain, Steven D; Peters, W. A.; Adekola, Aderemi S; Allen, J.; Bardayan, Daniel W; Becker, J.; Blackmon, Jeff C; Chae, K. Y.; Chipps, K.; Erikson, Luke; Gaddis, A. L.; Harlin, Christopher W; Hatarik, Robert; Howard, Joshua A; Jandel, M.; Johnson, Micah; Kapler, R.; Krolas, W.; Liang, J Felix; Livesay, Jake; Ma, Zhanwen; Matei, Catalin; Matthews, C.; Moazen, Brian; Nesaraja, Caroline D; O'Malley, Patrick; Patterson, N. P.; Paulauskas, Stanley; Pelham, T.; Pittman, S. T.; Radford, David C; Rogers, J.; Schmitt, Kyle; Shapira, Dan; ShrinerJr., J. F.; Sissom, D. J.; Smith, Michael Scott; Swan, T. P.; Thomas, J. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wilson, Gemma L

    2009-04-01

    Neutron capture reactions on unstable nuclei are important for both basic and applied nuclear science. A program has been developed at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to study single-neutron transfer (d,p) reactions with rare isotope beams to provide information on neutron-induced reactions on unstable nuclei. Results from (d,p) studies on {sup 130,132}Sn, {sup 134}Te and {sup 75}As are discussed.

  3. Solutions for implementing time-of-flight techniques in low-angle neutron scattering, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1992-12-01

    The implementation of small-angle (Low-momentum transfer) neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources, using time of flight methods, has meant the introduction of some new ideas in instrument design, data acquisition, data reduction and computer management of the experiment and the data. Here we recount some of the salient aspects of solutions for implementing time of fight small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed sources, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer, LQD, at Los Alamos. We consider, fortlier, some of the problems that are yet to be solved, and take a short excursion into the future of SANS instrumentation at pulsed sources.

  4. Solutions for implementing time-of-flight techniques in low-angle neutron scattering, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Hjelm, R.P. Jr.; Seeger, P.A.

    1992-01-01

    The implementation of small-angle (Low-momentum transfer) neutron scattering at pulsed spallation sources, using time of flight methods, has meant the introduction of some new ideas in instrument design, data acquisition, data reduction and computer management of the experiment and the data. Here we recount some of the salient aspects of solutions for implementing time of fight small-angle neutron scattering instruments at pulsed sources, as realized on the Low-Q Diffractometer, LQD, at Los Alamos. We consider, fortlier, some of the problems that are yet to be solved, and take a short excursion into the future of SANS instrumentation at pulsed sources.

  5. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2012-01-26

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  6. Stockpile Stewardship: Los Alamos

    ScienceCinema

    McMillan, Charlie; Morgan, Nathanial; Goorley, Tom; Merrill, Frank; Funk, Dave; Korzekwa, Deniece; Laintz, Ken

    2014-08-12

    "Heritage of Science" is a short video that highlights the Stockpile Stewardship program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Stockpile Stewardship was conceived in the early 1990s as a national science-based program that could assure the safety, security, and effectiveness of the U.S. nuclear deterrent without the need for full-scale underground nuclear testing. This video was produced by Los Alamos National Laboratory for screening at the Lab's Bradbury Science Museum in Los Alamos, NM and is narrated by science correspondent Miles O'Brien.

  7. Fission Product Data Measured at Los Alamos for Fission Spectrum and Thermal Neutrons on {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U

    SciTech Connect

    Selby, H.D.; Mac Innes, M.R.; Barr, D.W.; Keksis, A.L.; Meade, R.A.; Burns, C.J.; Chadwick, M.B.; Wallstrom, T.C.

    2010-12-15

    We describe measurements of fission product data at Los Alamos that are important for determining the number of fissions that have occurred when neutrons are incident on plutonium and uranium isotopes. The fission-spectrum measurements were made using a fission chamber designed by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in the BIG TEN critical assembly, as part of the Inter-laboratory Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) Reaction Rate (ILRR) collaboration. The thermal measurements were made at Los Alamos' Omega West Reactor. A related set of measurements were made of fission-product ratios (so-called R-values) in neutron environments provided by a number of Los Alamos critical assemblies that range from having average energies causing fission of 400-600 keV (BIG TEN and the outer regions of the Flattop-25 assembly) to higher energies (1.4-1.9 MeV) in the Jezebel, and in the central regions of the Flattop-25 and Flattop-Pu, critical assemblies. From these data we determine ratios of fission product yields in different fuel and neutron environments (Q-values) and fission product yields in fission spectrum neutron environments for {sup 99}Mo, {sup 95}Zr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 140}Ba, {sup 141,143}Ce, and {sup 147}Nd. Modest incident-energy dependence exists for the {sup 147}Nd fission product yield; this is discussed in the context of models for fission that include thermal and dynamical effects. The fission product data agree with measurements by Maeck and other authors using mass-spectrometry methods, and with the ILRR collaboration results that used gamma spectroscopy for quantifying fission products. We note that the measurements also contradict earlier 1950s historical Los Alamos estimates by {approx}5-7%, most likely owing to self-shielding corrections not made in the early thermal measurements. Our experimental results provide a confirmation of the England-Rider ENDF/B-VI evaluated fission-spectrum fission product yields that were carried

  8. Neutron production from polyethylene and common spacecraft materials.

    PubMed

    Maurer, R H; Roth, D R; Kinnison, J D; Jordan, T M; Heilbronn, L H; Miller, J; Zeitlin, C J

    2001-12-01

    We report experimental measurements of neutron production from collisions of neutron beams with polyethylene blocks simulating tissue at the Los Alamos National Laboratory Neutron Science Center and 1 GeV/amu iron nuclei with spacecraft shielding materials at the Brookhaven National Laboratory AGS. PMID:12033226

  9. Biomedical neutron research at the Californium User Facility for neutron science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Byrne, T.E.; Miller, L.F.

    1997-04-01

    The Californium User Facility for Neutron Science has been established at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The Californium User Facility (CUF) is a part of the larger Californium Facility, which fabricates and stores compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources for worldwide distribution. The CUF can provide a cost-effective option for research with {sup 252}Cf sources. Three projects at the CUF that demonstrate the versatility of {sup 252}Cf for biological and biomedical neutron-based research are described: future establishment of a {sup 252}Cf-based neutron activation analysis system, ongoing work to produce miniature high-intensity, remotely afterloaded {sup 252}Cf sources for tumor therapy, and a recent experiment that irradiated living human lung cancer cells impregnated with experimental boron compounds to test their effectiveness for boron neutron capture therapy.

  10. Low temperature nickel titanium iron shape memory alloys: Actuator engineering and investigation of deformation mechanisms using in situ neutron diffraction at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnan, Vinu B.

    Shape memory alloys are incorporated as actuator elements due to their inherent ability to sense a change in temperature and actuate against external loads by undergoing a shape change as a result of a temperature-induced phase transformation. The cubic so-called austenite to the trigonal so-called R-phase transformation in NiTiFe shape memory alloys offers a practical temperature range for actuator operation at low temperatures, as it exhibits a narrow temperature-hysteresis with a desirable fatigue response. Overall, this work is an investigation of selected science and engineering aspects of low temperature NiTiFe shape memory alloys. The scientific study was performed using in situ neutron diffraction measurements at the newly developed low temperature loading capability on the Spectrometer for Materials Research at Temperature and Stress (SMARTS) at Los Alamos National Laboratory and encompasses three aspects of the behavior of Ni46.8Ti50Fe3.2 at 92 K (the lowest steady state temperature attainable with the capability). First, in order to study deformation mechanisms in the R-phase in NiTiFe, measurements were performed at a constant temperature of 92 K under external loading. Second, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in one-time, high-stroke, actuator applications (such as in safety valves), a NiTiFe sample was strained to approximately 5% (the R-phase was transformed to B19' phase in the process) at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under a load. Third, with the objective of examining NiTiFe in cyclic, low-stroke, actuator applications (such as in cryogenic thermal switches), a NiTiFe sample was strained to 1% at 92 K and subsequently heated to full strain recovery under load. Neutron diffraction spectra were recorded at selected time and stress intervals during these experiments. The spectra were subsequently used to obtain quantitative information related to the phase-specific strain, texture and phase fraction evolution using the

  11. The Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore Laboratories: Integration and collaboration solving science and technology problems for the nation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-12-01

    More than 40 years ago, three laboratories were established to take on scientific responsibility for the nation`s nuclear weapons - Los Alamos, Sandia, and Livermore. This triad of laboratories has provided the state-of-the-art science and technology to create America`s nuclear deterrent and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and to ensure that the weapons are safe, secure, and reliable. These national security laboratories carried out their responsibilities through intense efforts involving almost every field of science, engineering, and technology. Today, they are recognized as three of the world`s premier research and development laboratories. This report sketches the history of the laboratories and their evolution to an integrated three-laboratory system. The characteristics that make them unique are described and some of the major contributions they have made over the years are highlighted.

  12. The Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway, a TeraGrid Science Gateway to Support the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Cobb, John W; Geist, Al; Kohl, James Arthur; Miller, Stephen D; Peterson, Peter F; Pike, Gregory; Reuter, Michael A; Swain, William; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Vijayakumar, Nithya N

    2006-01-01

    The National Science Foundation's (NSF's) Extensible Terascale Facility (ETF), or TeraGrid [1] is entering its operational phase. An ETF science gateway effort is the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway (NSTG.) The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resource provider effort (ORNL-RP) during construction and now in operations is bridging a large scale experimental community and the TeraGrid as a large-scale national cyberinfrastructure. Of particular emphasis is collaboration with the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at ORNL. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) SNS [2] at ORNL will be commissioned in spring of 2006 as the world's brightest source of neutrons. Neutron science users can run experiments, generate datasets, perform data reduction, analysis, visualize results; collaborate with remotes users; and archive long term data in repositories with curation services. The ORNL-RP and the SNS data analysis group have spent 18 months developing and exploring user requirements, including the creation of prototypical services such as facility portal, data, and application execution services. We describe results from these efforts and discuss implications for science gateway creation. Finally, we show incorporation into implementation planning for the NSTG and SNS architectures. The plan is for a primarily portal-based user interaction supported by a service oriented architecture for functional implementation.

  13. Neutron activation analysis at the Californium User Facility for Neutron Science

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.C.; Smith, E.H.; Glasgow, D.C.; Jerde, E.A.; Marsh, D.L.; Zhao, L.

    1997-12-01

    The Californium User Facility (CUF) for Neutron Science has been established to provide {sup 252}Cf-based neutron irradiation services and research capabilities including neutron activation analysis (NAA). A major advantage of the CUF is its accessibility and controlled experimental conditions compared with those of a reactor environment The CUF maintains the world`s largest inventory of compact {sup 252}Cf neutron sources. Neutron source intensities of {le} 10{sup 11} neutrons/s are available for irradiations within a contamination-free hot cell, capable of providing thermal and fast neutron fluxes exceeding 10{sup 8} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} at the sample. Total flux of {ge}10{sup 9} cm{sup {minus}2} s{sup {minus}1} is feasible for large-volume irradiation rabbits within the {sup 252}Cf storage pool. Neutron and gamma transport calculations have been performed using the Monte Carlo transport code MCNP to estimate irradiation fluxes available for sample activation within the hot cell and storage pool and to design and optimize a prompt gamma NAA (PGNAA) configuration for large sample volumes. Confirmatory NAA irradiations have been performed within the pool. Gamma spectroscopy capabilities including PGNAA are being established within the CUF for sample analysis.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory Science Education Programs. Progress report, October 1, 1994--December 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.H.

    1995-02-01

    During the 1994 summer institute NTEP teachers worked in coordination with LANL and the Los Alamos Middle School and Mountain Elementary School to gain experience in communicating on-line, to gain further information from the Internet and in using electronic Bulletin Board Systems (BBSs) to exchange ideas with other teachers. To build on their telecommunications skills, NTEP teachers participated in the International Telecommunications In Education Conference (Tel*ED `94) at the Albuquerque Convention Center on November 11 & 12, 1994. They attended the multimedia keynote address, various workshops highlighting many aspects of educational telecommunications skills, and the Telecomm Rodeo sponsored by Los Alamos National Laboratory. The Rodeo featured many presentations by Laboratory personnel and educational institutions on ways in which telecommunications technologies can be use din the classroom. Many were of the `hands-on` type, so that teachers were able to try out methods and equipment and evaluate their usefulness in their own schools and classrooms. Some of the presentations featured were the Geonet educational BBS system, the Supercomputing Challenge, and the Sunrise Project, all sponsored by LANL; the `CU-seeMe` live video software, various simulation software packages, networking help, and many other interesting and useful exhibits.

  15. Neutron proton crystallography station (PCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, Zoe; Kovalevsky, Andrey; Johnson, Hannah; Mustyakimov, Marat

    2009-01-01

    The PCS (Protein Crystallography Station) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is a unique facility in the USA that is designed and optimized for detecting and collecting neutron diffraction data from macromolecular crystals. PCS utilizes the 20 Hz spallation neutron source at LANSCE to enable time-of-flight measurements using 0.6-7.0 {angstrom} neutrons. This increases the neutron flux on the sample by using a wavelength range that is optimal for studying macromolecular crystal structures. The diagram below show a schematic of PCS and photos of the detector and instrument cave.

  16. Los Alamos Life Sciences Division's biomedical and environmental research programs. Progress report, January-December 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Stafford, C.G.; Bolen, S.K.

    1981-09-01

    Highlights of research progress accomplished in the Life Sciences Division during the year ending December 1980 are summarized. Reports from the following groups are included: Toxicology, Biophysics, Genetics; Environmental Pathology, Organic Chemistry, and Environmental Sciences. Individual abstracts have been prepared for 46 items for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (RJC)

  17. Welcome to Los Alamos National Laboratory: A premier national security science laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Terry

    2012-06-25

    Dr Wallace presents visitors with an overview of LANL's national security science mission: stockpile stewardship, protecting against the nuclear threat, and energy security & emerging threats, which are underpinned by excellence in science/technology/engineering capabilities. He shows visitors a general Lab overview of budget, staff, and facilities before providing a more in-depth look at recent Global Security accomplishments and current programs.

  18. Neutron capture cross section of 136 Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daugherty, Sean; Albert, Joshua; Johnson, Tessa; O'Conner, Thomasina; Kaufman, Lisa

    2015-04-01

    136 Xe is an important 0 νββ candidate, studied in experiments such as EXO-200 and, in the future, nEXO. These experiments require a precise study of neutron capture for their background models. The neutron capture cross section of 136 Xe has been measured at the Detector for Advanced Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. A neutron beam ranging from thermal energy to 100 keV was incident on a gas cell filled with isotopically pure 136 Xe . We will discuss the measurement of partial neutron capture cross sections at thermal and first neutron resonance energies along with corresponding capture gamma cascades.

  19. Neutron Star Science with the NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J. K.

    2015-10-16

    The Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), launched in June 2012, helped scientists obtain for the first time a sensitive high-­energy X-­ray map of the sky with extraordinary resolution. This pioneering telescope has aided in the understanding of how stars explode and neutron stars are born. LLNL is a founding member of the NuSTAR project, with key personnel on its optics and science team. We used NuSTAR to observe and analyze the observations of different neutron star classes identified in the last decade that are still poorly understood. These studies not only help to comprehend newly discovered astrophysical phenomena and emission processes for members of the neutron star family, but also expand the utility of such observations for addressing broader questions in astrophysics and other physics disciplines. For example, neutron stars provide an excellent laboratory to study exotic and extreme phenomena, such as the equation of state of the densest matter known, the behavior of matter in extreme magnetic fields, and the effects of general relativity. At the same time, knowing their accurate populations has profound implications for understanding the life cycle of massive stars, star collapse, and overall galactic evolution.

  20. Advanced research capabilities for neutron science and technology: Neutron polarizers for neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Penttila, S.I.; Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Delheij, P.J.

    1998-12-01

    The authors describe work on the development of polarized gaseous {sup 3}He cells, which are intended for use as neutron polarizers. Laser diode arrays polarize Rb vapor in a sample cell and the {sup 3}He is polarized via collisions. They describe development and tests of such a system at LANSCE.

  1. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center Area-A beam window heat transfer alalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Poston, D.

    1997-07-01

    Several analyses that investigate heat transfer in the Area-A beam window were conducted. It was found that the Area-A window should be able to withstand the 1-mA, 3-cm beam of the accelerator production of tritium materials test, but that the margins to failure are small. It was also determined that when the window is subjected to the 1-mA, 3-cm beam, the inner window thermocouples should read higher than the current temperature limit of 900{degrees}C, although it is possible that the thermocouples may fail before they reach these temperatures. Another finding of this study was that the actual beam width before April 1997 was 20 to 25% greater than the harp-wire printout indicated. Finally, the effect of a copper-oxide layer on the window coolant passage was studied. The results did not indicate the presence of a large copper-oxide layer; however, the results were not conclusive.

  2. High-Pressure Neutron Diffraction Studies for Materials Sciences and Energy Sciences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Los Alamos High Pressure Materials Research Team

    2013-05-01

    The development of neutron diffraction under extreme pressure (P) and temperature (T) conditions is highly valuable to condensed matter physics, crystal chemistry, materials sciences, as well as earth and planetary sciences. We have incorporated a 500-ton press TAP-98 into the HiPPO diffractometer at LANSCE to conduct in situ high P-T neutron diffraction experiments. We have worked out a large gem-crystal anvil cell, ZAP, to conduct neutron diffraction experiments at high-P and low-T. The ZAP cell can be used to integrate multiple experimental techniques such as neutron diffraction, laser spectroscopy, and ultrasonic interferometery. Recently, we have developed high-P low-T gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments. These techniques enable in-situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes and allow high-resolution time-dependent determination of changes in crystal structure and related reaction kinetics. We have successfully used these techniques to study the equation of state, structural phase transition, and thermo-mechanical properties of metals, ceramics, and minerals. We have conducted researches on the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, and hydrogen adsorption of the inclusion compounds such as the recently discovered metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The aim of our research is to accurately map phase diagram, lattice parameters, thermal parameters, bond lengths, bond angles, neighboring atomic environments, and phase stability in P-T-X space. We are currently developing further high P-T technology with a new "true" triaxial loading press, TAP_6x, to compress cubic sample package to achieve pressures up to 20 GPa and temperatures up to 2000 K in routine experiments. The implementation of TAP_6x300 with high-pressure neutron beamlines is underway for simultaneous high P-T neutron diffraction, ultrasonic, calorimetry, radiography, and tomography studies. Studies based on high

  3. Los Alamos National Laboratory Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Neu, Mary

    2010-06-02

    Mary Neu, Associate Director for Chemistry, Life and Earth Sciences at Los Alamos National Laboratory, delivers opening remarks at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  4. Applied Nuclear Science Research and Development progress report, June 1, 1984-May 31, 1985

    SciTech Connect

    Arthur, E.D.; Mutschlecner, A.D.

    1985-09-01

    This progress report describes the activities of the Los Alamos Applied Nuclear Science Group for June 1, 1984 through May 31, 1985. The topical content includes the theory and evaluation of nuclear cross sections; neutron cross section processing and testing; neutron activation, fission products and actinides; and core neutronics code development and application. 70 refs., 31 figs., 15 tabs. (WRF)

  5. Powder diffraction in materials science using the KENS cold-neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Kamiyama, T.; Oikawa, K.; Akiba, E.

    1997-12-01

    Since superconductivity fever spread around the world, neutron powder diffraction has become very popular and been widely used by crystallographers, physicists, chemists, mineralogists, and materials scientists. The purpose of present paper is to show, firstly, important characteristics of time-of-flight TOF powder diffraction using cold-neutron source in the study of materials science, and, secondly, recent studies on the structure and function of batteries at the Neutron Science Laboratory (KENS) in the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK).

  6. Neutron measurement support for radiation material science in research reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Bregadze, Yu.I.; Grigor'ev, E.I.; Ivanov, V.B.; Klinov, A.V.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Starostov, B.I.; Yaryna, V.P.

    1987-07-01

    The authors discuss the need for development of a support system for unity in neutron measurement. Basic problems are outlined with regard to the support of neutron measurement unity for specialized service, such as research of working neutron fields, monitoring neutron fields during irradiation, and classification, analysis and storage of information about the controlled neutron field. Methods of realizing the metrological functions of the Metrological Center of Neutron Measurements are discussed as is the technical equipment used by the Center.

  7. Detector for advanced neutron capture experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Strottman, D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E. P.

    2002-01-01

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4x barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is bcing implemented

  8. The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J.L.; Reifarth, R.; Haight, R.C.; Hunt, L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Rundberg, R.S.; Bredeweg, T.A.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Fowler, M.M.; Vieira, D.J.; Wouters, J.M.; Strottman, D.D.; Kaeppeler, F.; Heil, M.; Chamberlin, E.P.

    2003-08-26

    The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) is a 159-element 4{pi} barium fluoride array designed to study neutron capture on small quantities, 1 mg or less, of radioactive nuclides. It is being built on a 20 m neutron flight path which views the 'upper tier' water moderator at the Manuel J. Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The detector design is based on Monte Carlo calculations which have suggested ways to minimize backgrounds due to neutron scattering events. A data acquisition system based on fast transient digitizers is being implemented.

  9. Recent UCN source developments at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Seestrom, S.J.; Anaya, J.M.; Bowles, T.J.

    1998-12-01

    The most intense sources of ultra cold neutrons (UCN) have bee built at reactors where the high average thermal neutron flux can overcome the low UCN production rate to achieve usable densities of UCN. At spallation neutron sources the average flux available is much lower than at a reactor, though the peak flux can be comparable or higher. The authors have built a UCN source that attempts to take advantage of the high peak flux available at the short pulse spallation neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to generate a useful number of UCN. In the source UCN are produced by Doppler-shifted Bragg scattering of neutrons to convert 400-m/s neutrons down into the UCN regime. This source was initially tested in 1996 and various improvements were made based on the results of the 1996 running. These improvements were implemented and tested in 1997. In sections 2 and 3 they discuss the improvements that have been made and the resulting source performance. Recently an even more interesting concept was put forward by Serebrov et al. This involves combining a solid Deuterium UCN source, previously studied by Serebrov et al., with a pulsed spallation source to achieve world record UCN densities. They have initiated a program of calculations and measurements aimed at verifying the solid Deuterium UCN source concept. The approach has been to develop an analytical capability, combine with Monte Carlo calculations of neutron production, and perform benchmark experiments to verify the validity of the calculations. Based on the calculations and measurements they plan to test a modified version of the Serebrov UCN factory. They estimate that they could produce over 1,000 UCN/cc in a 15 liter volume, using 1 {micro}amp of 800 MeV protons for two seconds every 500 seconds. They will discuss the result UCN production measurements in section 4.

  10. Precision Measurement of Parity Violation in Polarized Cold Neutron Capture on the Proton: the NPDGamma Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Bernhard Lauss; J.D. Bowman; R. Carlini; T.E. Chupp; W. Chen; S. Corvig; M. Dabaghyan; D. Desai; S.J. Freeman; T.R. Gentile; M.T. Gericke; R.C. Gillis; G.L. Greene; F.W. Hersman; T. Ino; T. Ito; G.L. Jones; M. Kandes; M. Leuschner; B. Lozowski; R. Mahurin; M. Mason; Y. Masuda; J. Mei; G.S. Mitchell; S. Muto; H. Nann; S.A. Page; S.I. Penttila; W.D. Ramsay; S. Santra; P.-N. Seo; E.I. Sharapov; T.B. Smith; W.M. Snow; W.S. Wilburn; V. Yuan; H. Zhu

    2005-10-24

    The NPD{gamma} experiment at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is dedicated to measure with high precision the parity violating asymmetry in the {gamma} emission after capture of spin polarized cold neutrons in para-hydrogen. The measurement will determine unambiguously the weak pion-nucleon-nucleon ({pi} NN) coupling constant (line integral){sub {pi}}{sup l}.

  11. The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment for NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Litvak, M L; Mitrofanov, I G; Barmakov, Yu N; Behar, A; Bitulev, A; Bobrovnitsky, Yu; Bogolubov, E P; Boynton, W V; Bragin, S I; Churin, S; Grebennikov, A S; Konovalov, A; Kozyrev, A S; Kurdumov, I G; Krylov, A; Kuznetsov, Yu P; Malakhov, A V; Mokrousov, M I; Ryzhkov, V I; Sanin, A B; Shvetsov, V N; Smirnov, G A; Sholeninov, S; Timoshenko, G N; Tomilina, T M; Tuvakin, D V; Tretyakov, V I; Troshin, V S; Uvarov, V N; Varenikov, A; Vostrukhin, A

    2008-06-01

    We present a summary of the physical principles and design of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument onboard NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission. The DAN instrument will use the method of neutron-neutron activation analysis in a space application to study the abundance and depth distribution of water in the martian subsurface along the path of the MSL rover. PMID:18598140

  12. Current applications of neutron scattering in condensed matter physics, materials science and engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cywinski, R.

    1997-02-01

    A brief review is presented of the current applications of neutron scattering in the fields of magnetism, highly correlated electron systems, materials science and industrial applications, as represented by presentations at ECNS'96.

  13. Pilot Project on Women and Science. A report on women scientists at the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Salvaggio, R.

    1993-08-01

    In the fall of 1991, through the coordinating efforts of the University of New Mexico and Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Pilot Project on Women and Science was initiated as a year-long study of women scientists at both the university and the laboratory. Its purpose was to gather information directly from women scientists in an attempt to analyze and make recommendations concerning the professional and cultural environment for women in the sciences. This report is an initial attempt to understand the ways in which women scientists view themselves, their profession, and the scientific culture they inhabit. By recording what these women say about their backgrounds and educational experiences, their current positions, the difficult negotiations many have made between their personal and professional lives, and their relative positions inside and outside the scientific community, the report calls attention both to the individual perspectives offered by these women and to the common concerns they share.

  14. Effects of geochemical composition on neutron die-away measurements: Implications for Mars Science Laboratory's Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardgrove, C.; Moersch, J.; Drake, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment, part of the scientific payload of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover mission, will have the ability to assess both the abundance and the burial depth of subsurface hydrogen as the rover traverses the Martian surface. DAN will employ a method of measuring neutron fluxes called “neutron die-away” that has not been used in previous planetary exploration missions. This method requires the use of a pulsed neutron generator that supplements neutrons produced via spallation in the subsurface by the cosmic ray background. It is well established in neutron remote sensing that low-energy (thermal) neutrons are sensitive not only to hydrogen content, but also to the macroscopic absorption cross-section of near-surface materials. To better understand the results that will be forthcoming from DAN, we model the effects of varying abundances of high absorption cross-section elements that are likely to be found on the Martian surface (Cl, Fe) on neutron die-away measurements made from a rover platform. Previously, the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) Spirit and Opportunity found that elevated abundances of these two elements are commonly associated with locales that have experienced some form of aqueous activity in the past, even though hydrogen-rich materials are not necessarily still present. By modeling a suite of H and Cl compositions, we demonstrate that (for abundance ranges reasonable for Mars) both the elements will significantly affect DAN thermal neutron count rates. Additionally, we show that the timing of thermal neutron arrivals at the detector can be used together with the thermal neutron count rates to independently determine the abundances of hydrogen and high neutron absorption cross-section elements (the most important being Cl). Epithermal neutron die-away curves may also be used to separate these two components. We model neutron scattering in actual Martian compositions that were determined by the MER Alpha

  15. Los Alamos personnel and area criticality dosimeter systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.

    1981-06-01

    Fissionable materials are handled and processed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Although the probability of a nuclear criticality accident is very remote, it must be considered. Los Alamos maintains a broad spectrum of dose assessment capabilities. This report describes the methods employed for personnel neutron, area neutron, and photon dose evaluations with passive dosimetry systems.

  16. New Pulsed Cold Neutron Beam Line for Fundamental Nuclear Physics at LANSCE

    PubMed Central

    Seo, P.-N.; Bowman, J. D.; Gericke, M.; Gillis, R. C.; Greene, G. L.; Leuschner, M. B.; Long, J.; Mahurin, R.; Mitchell, G. S.; Penttila, S. I.; Peralta, G.; Sharapov, E. I.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has completed the construction of a pulsed cold neutron beam line on flight path12 at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). We describe the new beam line and characteristics of the beam. We report results of the moderator brightness and the guide performance measurements. FP12 has the highest pulsed cold neutron intensity for nuclear physics in the world. PMID:27308111

  17. New Pulsed Cold Neutron Beam Line for Fundamental Nuclear Physics at LANSCE.

    PubMed

    Seo, P-N; Bowman, J D; Gericke, M; Gillis, R C; Greene, G L; Leuschner, M B; Long, J; Mahurin, R; Mitchell, G S; Penttila, S I; Peralta, G; Sharapov, E I; Wilburn, W S

    2005-01-01

    The NPDGamma collaboration has completed the construction of a pulsed cold neutron beam line on flight path12 at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). We describe the new beam line and characteristics of the beam. We report results of the moderator brightness and the guide performance measurements. FP12 has the highest pulsed cold neutron intensity for nuclear physics in the world. PMID:27308111

  18. Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) Experiment Onboard NASA's Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, I. G.; Litvak, M. L.; Varenikov, A. B.; Barmakov, Y. N.; Behar, A.; Bobrovnitsky, Y. I.; Bogolubov, E. P.; Boynton, W. V.; Harshman, K.; Kan, E.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Kuzmin, R. O.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Ponomareva, S. N.; Ryzhkov, V. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Smirnov, G. A.; Shvetsov, V. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Tomilina, T. M.; Tret'yakov, V. I.; Vostrukhin, A. A.

    2012-09-01

    The description of Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) experiment is presented, as a part of the NASA's Mars Science Laboratory mission onboard the mars rover Curiosity. The instrument DAN includes Pulsing Neutron Generator (PNG) producing pulses of 14.1 MeV neutrons for irradiation of subsurface material below the rover, and Detectors and Electronics (DE) unit, which operates the instrument itself and measures the die-away time profiles of epithermal and thermal neutrons following each neutron pulse. It is shown that the DAN investigation will measure a content of hydrogen along the path of the MSL rover, and it will also provide information about a depth distribution of hydrogen at 10-20 regions selected for the detailed studies and sampling analysis.

  19. Immersive Visual Analytics for Transformative Neutron Scattering Science

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A; Daniel, Jamison R; Drouhard, Margaret; Hahn, Steven E; Proffen, Thomas E

    2016-01-01

    The ORNL Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) provides the most intense pulsed neutron beams in the world for scientific research and development across a broad range of disciplines. SNS experiments produce large volumes of complex data that are analyzed by scientists with varying degrees of experience using 3D visualization and analysis systems. However, it is notoriously difficult to achieve proficiency with 3D visualizations. Because 3D representations are key to understanding the neutron scattering data, scientists are unable to analyze their data in a timely fashion resulting in inefficient use of the limited and expensive SNS beam time. We believe a more intuitive interface for exploring neutron scattering data can be created by combining immersive virtual reality technology with high performance data analytics and human interaction. In this paper, we present our initial investigations of immersive visualization concepts as well as our vision for an immersive visual analytics framework that could lower the barriers to 3D exploratory data analysis of neutron scattering data at the SNS.

  20. MCNP modeling of a neutron generator and its shielding at Missouri University of Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manish K.; Alajo, Ayodeji Babatunde; Liu, Xin

    2014-12-01

    The shielding of a neutron generator producing fast neutrons should be sufficient to limit the dose rates to the prescribed values. A deuterium-deuterium neutron generator has been installed in the Nuclear Engineering Department at Missouri University of Science and Technology (Missouri S&T). The generator produces fast neutrons with an approximate energy of 2.5 MeV. The generator is currently shielded with different materials like lead, high-density polyethylene, and borated polyethylene. An MCNP transport simulation has been performed to estimate the dose rates at various places in and around the facility. The simulations incorporated the geometric and composition information of these shielding materials to determine neutron and photon dose rates at three central planes passing through the neutron source. Neutron and photon dose rate contour plots at these planes were provided using a MATLAB program. Furthermore, the maximum dose rates in the vicinity of the facility were used to estimate the annual limit for the generator's hours of operation. A successful operation of this generator will provide a convenient neutron source for basic and applied research at the Nuclear Engineering Department of Missouri S&T.

  1. Edward Teller Returns to LOS Alamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hecker, Siegfried S.

    2010-01-01

    I was asked to share some reflections of Edward Teller's return to Los Alamos during my directorship. I met Teller late in his life. My comments focus on that time and they will be mostly in the form of stories of my interactions and those of my colleagues with Teller. Although the focus of this symposium is on Teller's contributions to science, at Los Alamos it was never possible to separate Teller's science from policy and controversy ...

  2. Active Neutron Shielding R&D for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Shawn; Monroe, Jocelyn; Fisher, Peter; Dmtpc Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Neutrons are a dangerous background to direct dark matter detection searches because they can mimic exactly the signal signature. For this reason, it is desirable to measure the neutron flux directly at underground sites where dark matter experiments are active. We have developed a liquid scintillator-based neutron detector for this purpose, which is currently underground and taking data at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in NM. Before being commissioned underground, the response of this detector to neutrons with kinetic energies from 50 MeV to 800 MeV was determined in a beam test at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in NM. The goal of this R&D is to (i) demonstrate the feasibility of a large scale active and passive neutron shield for dark matter searches and (ii) to measure the neutron energy spectrum underground at WIPP above 50 MeV neutron kinetic energies.

  3. The Art of Neutron Spin Flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieffers, Justin; Holley, Adam; Snow, W. M.

    2014-09-01

    Low energy precision measurements complement high energy collider results in the search for physics beyond the Standard Model. Neutron spin rotation is a sensitive technique to search for possible exotic velocity and spin-dependent interactions involving the neutron from the exchange of light (~ meV) spin 1 bosons. We plan to conduct such searches using beams of cold neutrons at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). To change the spin state of the neutrons in the apparatus we have developed an Adiabatic Fast Passage (AFP) neutron spin flipper. I will present the mechanical design, static and RF magnetic field modeling and measurements, and spin flip efficiency optimization of the constructed device. I would like to acknowledge the NSF REU program (NSF-REU grant PHY-1156540) and the Indiana University nuclear physics group (NSF grant PHY-1306942) for this opportunity.

  4. Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Dogliani, Harold O

    2011-01-19

    The purpose of the briefing is to describe general laboratory technical capabilities to be used for various groups such as military cadets or university faculty/students and post docs to recruit into a variety of Los Alamos programs. Discussed are: (1) development and application of high leverage science to enable effeictive, predictable and reliability outcomes; (2) deter, detect, characterize, reverse and prevent the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their use by adversaries and terrorists; (3) modeling and simulation to define complex processes, predict outcomes, and develop effective prevention, response, and remediation strategies; (4) energetic materials and hydrodynamic testing to develop materials for precise delivery of focused energy; (5) materials cience focused on fundamental understanding of materials behaviors, their quantum-molecular properties, and their dynamic responses, and (6) bio-science to rapidly detect and characterize pathogens, to develop vaccines and prophylactic remedies, and to develop attribution forensics.

  5. Active Neutron and Gamma-Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, A.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the development of an instrument capable of detailed in situ bulk geochemical analysis of the surface of planets, moons, asteroids, and comets. This instrument technology uses a pulsed neutron generator to excite the solid materials of a planet and measures the resulting neutron and gamma-ray emission with its detector system. These time-resolved neutron and gamma-ray data provide detailed information about the bulk elemental composition, chemical context, and density distribution of the soil within 50 cm of the surface. While active neutron scattering and neutron-induced gamma-ray techniques have been used extensively for terrestrial nuclear well logging applications, our goal is to apply these techniques to surface instruments for use on any solid solar system body. As described, experiments at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center use a prototype neutron-induced gamma-ray instrument and the resulting data presented show the promise of this technique for becoming a versatile, robust, workhorse technology for planetary science, and exploration of any of the solid bodies in the solar system. The detection of neutrons at the surface also provides useful information about the material. This paper focuses on the data provided by the gamma-ray detector.

  6. Remote Job Testing for the Neutron Science TeraGrid Gateway

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, Vickie E; Cobb, John W; Miller, Stephen D; Reuter, Michael A; Smith, Bradford C

    2009-01-01

    Remote job execution gives neutron science facilities access to high performance computing such as the TeraGrid. A scientific community can use community software with a community certificate and account through a common interface of a portal. Results show this approach is successful, but with more testing and problem solving, we expect remote job executions to become more reliable.

  7. Audit Report, "Fire Protection Deficiencies at Los Alamos National Laboratory"

    SciTech Connect

    2009-06-01

    ; and, (2) A substantial portion of the uncorrected deficiencies, 86 (49 percent) were considered by the walk-down teams to be significant enough to warrant compensatory actions until the deficiency was corrected or was tracked to closure through implementation of corrective actions. Further, we found that 32 of the significant deficiencies had been closed by the previous Los Alamos contractor, prior to LANS assuming responsibility for operation of the Laboratory, even though the deficiencies had not been corrected. A fire protection expert provided technical support during the audit. As an example of uncorrected problems, LANS had not resolved, by performing periodic tests, a deficiency identified in 2006 regarding a kitchen hood fire suppression system in a facility located within the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Such systems are required to be tested twice a year by the National Fire Protection Association standard, a standard that had been adopted by Department of Energy under DOE Order 420.1B. Yet, in 2006, the LANS walk-down team recognized that this system had not been inspected since May 2004 and noted that deficient suppression systems could result in significantly high levels of property damage and loss. After we brought this issue to management's attention on February 6, 2009, LANS officials stated that the Laboratory would correct this deficiency. As with the problems involving the fire suppression system, we observed that LANS had not always corrected life safety deficiencies involving building exits at one of its primary facilities. This included providing a secondary emergency exit for a building with occupants on multiple floor levels. LANS had removed personnel from the third floor and improved the sprinkler system of the facility, but it had still not provided a secondary exit for personnel on the second floor by the time we completed our review. NNSA has since stated that this fire protection issue will be completely addressed by relocating

  8. Materials for spallation neutron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Sommer, W.F.; Daemen, L.L.

    1996-03-01

    The Workshop on Materials for Spallation Neutron Sources at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, February 6 to 10, 1995, gathered scientists from Department of Energy national laboratories, other federal institutions, universities, and industry to discuss areas in which work is needed, successful designs and use of materials, and opportunities for further studies. During the first day of the workshop, speakers presented overviews of current spallation neutron sources. During the next 3 days, seven panels allowed speakers to present information on a variety of topics ranging from experimental and theoretical considerations on radiation damage to materials safety issues. An attempt was made to identify specific problems that require attention within the context of spallation neutron sources. This proceedings is a collection of summaries from the overview sessions and the panel presentations.

  9. Advanced neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, Si Young

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). By increasing the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy, the neutron spectra were shifted into lower energies by the scattering interactions of fast neutrons with the alloy. It is possible, therefore, by changing the alloy thickness, to produce distinctly different dose weighted neutron spectra inside the exposure cave of the FNIS. The calculated neutron spectra showed close agreement with the results of activation foil measurements, unfolded by SAND-II close to the cell window. However, there was a considerable less agreement for locations far away from the cell window. Even though the magnitude of values such as neutron flux and tissue kerma rates in air differed, the weighted average neutron energies showed close agreement between the MCNP and SAND-II since the normalized neutron spectra were in a good agreement each other. A paired ion chamber system was constructed, one with a tissue equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring, and another with graphite and argon for photon dose monitoring. Using the pair of detectors, the neutron to gamma ratio can be inferred. With the 20 cm-thick FNIS, the absorbed dose rates of neutrons measured with the paired ion chamber method and calculated with the SAND-II results were 13.7 +/- 0.02 Gy/min and 15.5 Gy/min, respectively. The absorbed dose rate of photons and the gamma contribution to total dose were 6.7 x 10

  10. Polarised nuclei for neutron science: recent applications and perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glättli, Hans

    2004-08-01

    Neutron scattering on nuclei is spin dependent, particularly strongly for 1H. The means to achieve large nuclear polarisations and its use for structure analysis or as spin-handling device are reviewed. High resolution (diffraction) as well as low resolution (SANS) measurements can benefit from polarised nuclei by changing selectively the form factors of Bragg reflections or the contrasts (the scattering length density profiles) in SANS. The internal structure of ribosomes and the conformation of polymers in solution have been investigated by this method. A numerical simulation is presented to show the influence of steady-state polarisation of protons on the scattering from a protein-ARN model complex. In addition, a more recent technique, time-resolved SANS is described. It makes use of spatial polarisation gradients created around paramagnetic centres at the onset of nuclear polarisation. Such polarisation domains can enhance considerably the scattering amplitude of free radicals and thus contribute to determine their positions inside a complex protein. Examples of possible future experiments are proposed which combine simultaneously the selectivity of solid-state NMR techniques and neutron scattering.

  11. Design of a target and moderator at the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) as a neutron source for fusion reactor materials development

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.E.; Sommer, W.F.; Farnum, E.H.

    1993-10-01

    The LASREF facility is located in the beam stop area at LAMPF. The neutron spectrum is fission-like with the addition of a 3% to 5% component with E > 20 MeV. The present study evaluates the limits on geometry and material selection that will maximize the neutron flux. MCNP and LAHET were used to predict the neutron flux and energy spectrum for a variety of geometries. The problem considers 760 MeV protons incident on tungsten. The resulting neutrons are multiplied in uranium through (n,xn) reactions. Calculations show that a neutron flux greater than 10{sup 19} n/m{sup 2}/s is achievable. The helium to dpa ratio and the transmutation product generation are calculated. These results are compared to expectations for the proposed DEMO fusion reactor and to FFTF.

  12. The sciences and applications of the Electron LINAC-driven neutron source in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granada, J. R.; Mayer, R. E.; Dawidowski, J.; Santisteban, J. R.; Cantargi, F.; Blostein, J. J.; Rodríguez Palomino, L. A.; Tartaglione, A.

    2016-06-01

    The Neutron Physics group at Centro Atómico Bariloche (CNEA, Argentina) has evolved for more than forty five years around a small 25MeV linear electron accelerator. It constitutes our compact accelerator-driven neutron source (CANS), which is dedicated to the use and development of neutronic methods to tackle problems of basic sciences and technological applications. Its historical first commitment has been the determination of the total cross sections of materials as a function of neutron energy by means of transmission experiments for thermal and sub-thermal neutrons. This also allowed testing theoretical models for the generation of scattering kernels and cross sections. Through the years, our interests moved from classic pulsed neutron diffraction, which included the development of high-precision methods for the determination of very low hydrogen content in metals, towards deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS), a powerful tool for the determination of atomic momentum distribution in condensed matter. More recently non-intrusive techniques aimed at the scanning of large cargo containers have started to be developed with our CANS, testing the capacity and limitations to detect special nuclear material and dangerous substances. Also, the ever-present "bremsstrahlung" radiation has been recognized and tested as a useful complement to instrumental neutron activation, as it permits to detect other nuclear species through high-energy photon activation. The facility is also used for graduate and undergraduate students' experimental work within the frame of Instituto Balseiro Physics and Nuclear Engineering courses of study, and also MSc and PhD theses work.

  13. Los Alamos waste drum shufflers users manual

    SciTech Connect

    Rinard, P.M.; Adams, E.L.; Painter, J.

    1993-08-24

    This user manual describes the Los Alamos waste drum shufflers. The primary purpose of the instruments is to assay the mass of {sup 235}U (or other fissile materials) in drums of assorted waste. It can perform passive assays for isotopes that spontaneously emit neutrons or active assays using the shuffler technique as described on this manual.

  14. High energy neutron radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Gavron, A.; Morley, K.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.; Ullmann, J.; Yates, G.; Zumbro, J.

    1996-06-01

    High-energy spallation neutron sources are now being considered in the US and elsewhere as a replacement for neutron beams produced by reactors. High-energy and high intensity neutron beams, produced by unmoderated spallation sources, open potential new vistas of neutron radiography. The authors discuss the basic advantages and disadvantages of high-energy neutron radiography, and consider some experimental results obtained at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at Los Alamos.

  15. Actinide Studies with Ultracold Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broussard, Leah

    2014-03-01

    Understanding the effects of sputtering due to nuclear fission is crucial to the nuclear industry and has wide-reaching applications, including nuclear energy, space science, and national defense. A new program at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center uses ultracold neutrons (UCN) to induce fission in actinides such as uranium and plutonium. UCN are an ideal tool for finely controlling induced fission as a function of depth in an actinide sample. The mechanism for fission-induced surface damage is not well understood, especially regarding the effect of a surface oxide layer. We will discuss our experimental strategy for studies of UCN-induced fission and the ejected material, and present preliminary data from enriched and depleted uranium. We gratefully acknowledge the support of the G. T. Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science and the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD Program for this work.

  16. Neutron chopper development at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Nutter, M.; Lewis, L.; Tepper, S.; Silver, R.N.; Heffner, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    Progress is reported on neutron chopper systems for the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center pulsed spallation neutron source. This includes the development of 600+ Hz active magnetic bearing neutron chopper and a high speed control system designed to operate with the Proton Storage Ring to phase the chopper to the neutron source. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  17. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Köhler, J; Ehresmann, B; Zeitlin, C; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R F; Hassler, D M; Reitz, G; Brinza, D E; Appel, J; Böttcher, S; Böhm, E; Burmeister, S; Guo, J; Lohf, H; Martin, C; Posner, A; Rafkin, S

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8±1.2 μGy/day and a dose equivalent of 19±5 μSv/day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6±2 μGy/day and the dose equivalent rate is 30±10 μSv/day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11±4 mSv. PMID:26177845

  18. Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J.; Ehresmann, B.; Zeitlin, C.; Wimmer-Schweingruber, R. F.; Hassler, D. M.; Reitz, G.; Brinza, D. E.; Appel, J.; Böttcher, S.; Böhm, E.; Burmeister, S.; Guo, J.; Lohf, H.; Martin, C.; Posner, A.; Rafkin, S.

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft, containing the Curiosity rover, was launched to Mars on 26 November 2011. Although designed for measuring the radiation on the surface of Mars, the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD) measured the radiation environment inside the spacecraft during most of the 253-day, 560-million-kilometer cruise to Mars. An important factor for determining the biological impact of the radiation environment inside the spacecraft is the specific contribution of neutrons with their high biological effectiveness. We apply an inversion method (based on a maximum-likelihood estimation) to calculate the neutron and gamma spectra from the RAD neutral particle measurements. The measured neutron spectrum (12-436 MeV) translates into a radiation dose rate of 3.8 ± 1.2 μGy /day and a dose equivalent of 19 ± 5 μSv /day. Extrapolating the measured spectrum (0.1-1000 MeV), we find that the total neutron-induced dose rate is 6 ± 2 μGy /day and the dose equivalent rate is 30 ± 10 μSv /day. For a 360 day round-trip from Earth to Mars with comparable shielding, this translates into a neutron induced dose equivalent of about 11 ± 4 mSv.

  19. Neutron capture measurement on {sup 173}Lu at LANSCE with DANCE detector

    SciTech Connect

    Theroine, C.; Ebran, A.; Meot, V.; Roig, O.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Nortier, F. M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Taylor, W. A.; Ullmann, J. L.; Viera, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.

    2013-06-10

    The (n,{gamma}) cross section on the unstable {sup 173}Lu(t{sub 1/2} = 1.37y) has been measured from thermal energy up to 200 eV at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) with The Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiements (DANCE). The main aim of this study is to validate and optimize reaction models for unstable nucleus. A preliminary capture yield will be presented in this paper.

  20. Actinide neutron-induced fission cross section measurements at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Tovesson, Fredrik K; Laptev, Alexander B; Hill, Tony S

    2010-01-01

    Fission cross sections of a range of actinides have been measured at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in support of nuclear energy applications in a wide energy range from sub-thermal energies up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate ionization chamber are used to measure fission cross sections ratios relative to the {sup 235}U standard while incident neutron energies are determined using the time-of-flight method. Recent measurements include the {sup 233,238}U, {sup 239-242}Pu and {sup 243}Am neutron-induced fission cross sections. Obtained data are presented in comparison with ex isting evaluations and previous data.

  1. Science-based stockpile stewardship at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, J.

    1995-10-01

    Let me tell you a little about the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) and how some of the examples you heard about from Sig Hecker and John Immele fit together in this view of a different world in the future where defense, basic and industrial research overlap. I am going to talk about science-based stockpile stewardship at LANSCE; the accelerator production of tritium (APT), which I think has a real bearing on the neutron road map; the world-class neutron science user facility, for which I will provide some examples so you can see the connection with defense science; and lastly, testing concepts for a high-power spallation neutron target and waste transmutation.

  2. Fission neutron spectra measurements at LANSCE - status and plans

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Noda, Shusaku; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Devlin, Matt; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Laurent, Benoit; Belier, Gilbert; Becker, John A; Wu, Ching - Yen

    2009-01-01

    A program to measure fission neutron spectra from neutron-induced fission of actinides is underway at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) in a collaboration among the CEA laboratory at Bruyeres-le-Chatel, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The spallation source of fast neutrons at LANSCE is used to provide incident neutron energies from less than 1 MeV to 100 MeV or higher. The fission events take place in a gas-ionization fission chamber, and the time of flight from the neutron source to that chamber gives the energy of the incident neutron. Outgoing neutrons are detected by an array of organic liquid scintillator neutron detectors, and their energies are deduced from the time of flight from the fission chamber to the neutron detector. Measurements have been made of the fission neutrons from fission of {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 237}Np and {sup 239}Pu. The range of outgoing energies measured so far is from 1 MeV to approximately 8 MeV. These partial spectra and average fission neutron energies are compared with evaluated data and with models of fission neutron emission. Results to date will be presented and a discussion of uncertainties will be given in this presentation. Future plans are to make significant improvements in the fission chambers, neutron detectors, signal processing, data acquisition and the experimental environment to provide high fidelity data including mea urements of fission neutrons below 1 MeV and improvements in the data above 8 MeV.

  3. Determination of the axial-vector weak coupling constant with ultracold neutrons.

    PubMed

    Liu, J; Mendenhall, M P; Holley, A T; Back, H O; Bowles, T J; Broussard, L J; Carr, R; Clayton, S; Currie, S; Filippone, B W; García, A; Geltenbort, P; Hickerson, K P; Hoagland, J; Hogan, G E; Hona, B; Ito, T M; Liu, C-Y; Makela, M; Mammei, R R; Martin, J W; Melconian, D; Morris, C L; Pattie, R W; Pérez Galván, A; Pitt, M L; Plaster, B; Ramsey, J C; Rios, R; Russell, R; Saunders, A; Seestrom, S J; Sondheim, W E; Tatar, E; Vogelaar, R B; VornDick, B; Wrede, C; Yan, H; Young, A R

    2010-10-29

    A precise measurement of the neutron decay β asymmetry A₀ has been carried out using polarized ultracold neutrons from the pulsed spallation ultracold neutron source at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Combining data obtained in 2008 and 2009, we report A₀ = -0.119 66±0.000 89{-0.001 40}{+0.001 23}, from which we determine the ratio of the axial-vector to vector weak coupling of the nucleon g{A}/g{V}=-1.275 90{-0.004 45}{+0.004 09}. PMID:21231098

  4. Neutron-induced reaction studies at FIGARO using a spallation source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochman, D.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Devlin, M.; Ethvignot, T.; Granier, T.

    2004-05-01

    A description is given of the new flexible facility Fast Neutron-Induced Gamma-Ray Observer (FIGARO) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. FIGARO is designed to study fast-neutron-induced reactions that result in the emission of γ rays and neutrons, using the white neutron beam of the Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The emitted neutrons and γ rays are detected by several liquid scintillators and one high-resolution germanium or one barium-fluoride detector, respectively. As an example, the inelastic neutron scattering on Si from 4 to 20 MeV is presented and the results are compared with predictions of the nuclear model calculations performed with the codes GNASH and EMPIRE II.

  5. Comparison of beam transport simulations to measurements at the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkinson, C.; Neri, F.; Fitzgerald, D.H.; Blind, B.; Macek, R.; Plum, M.; Sander, O.; Thiessen, H.A.

    1997-10-01

    The ability to model and simulate beam behavior in the Proton Storage Ring (PSR) of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is an important diagnostic and predictive tool. This paper gives the results of an effort to model the ring apertures and lattice and use beam simulation programs to track the beam. The results are then compared to measured activation levels from beam loss in the ring. The success of the method determines its usefulness in evaluating the effects of planned upgrades to the Proton Storage Ring.

  6. Radiative neutron capture cross sections on 176Lu at DANCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, O.; Jandel, M.; Méot, V.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A. J.; Haight, R. C.; Keksis, A. L.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    The cross section of the neutron capture reaction 176Lu(n ,γ ) has been measured for a wide incident neutron energy range with the Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be (1912 ±132 ) b for one of the Lu natural isotopes, 176Lu. The resonance part was measured and compared to the Mughabghab's atlas using the R -matrix code, sammy. At higher neutron energies the measured cross sections are compared to ENDF/B-VII.1, JEFF-3.2, and BRC evaluated nuclear data. The Maxwellian averaged cross sections in a stellar plasma for thermal energies between 5 keV and 100 keV were extracted using these data.

  7. Macromolecular neutron crystallography at the Protein Crystallography Station (PCS)

    PubMed Central

    Kovalevsky, Andrey; Fisher, Zoe; Johnson, Hannah; Mustyakimov, Marat; Waltman, Mary Jo; Langan, Paul

    2010-01-01

    The Protein Crystallography Station (PCS) at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is a high-performance beamline that forms the core of a capability for neutron macromolecular structure and function determination. Neutron diffraction is a powerful technique for locating H atoms and can therefore provide unique information about how biological macro­molecules function and interact with each other and smaller molecules. Users of the PCS have access to neutron beam time, deuteration facilities, the expression of proteins and the synthesis of substrates with stable isotopes and also support for data reduction and structure analysis. The beamline exploits the pulsed nature of spallation neutrons and a large electronic detector in order to collect wavelength-resolved Laue patterns using all available neutrons in the white beam. The PCS user facility is described and highlights from the user program are presented. PMID:21041938

  8. A Kinesthetic Learning Approach to Earth Science for 3rd and 4th Grade Students on the Pajarito Plateau, Los Alamos, NM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wershow, H. N.; Green, M.; Stocker, A.; Staires, D.

    2010-12-01

    Current efforts towards Earth Science literacy in New Mexico are guided by the New Mexico Science Benchmarks [1]. We are geoscience professionals in Los Alamos, NM who believe there is an important role for non-traditional educators utilizing innovative teaching methods. We propose to further Earth Science literacy for local 3rd and 4th grade students using a kinesthetic learning approach, with the goal of fostering an interactive relationship between the students and their geologic environment. We will be working in partnership with the Pajarito Environmental Education Center (PEEC), which teaches the natural heritage of the Pajarito Plateau to 3rd and 4th grade students from the surrounding area, as well as the Family YMCA’s Adventure Programs Director. The Pajarito Plateau provides a remarkable geologic classroom because minimal structural features complicate the stratigraphy and dramatic volcanic and erosional processes are plainly on display and easily accessible. Our methodology consists of two approaches. First, we will build an interpretive display of the local geology at PEEC that will highlight prominent rock formations and geologic processes seen on a daily basis. It will include a simplified stratigraphic section with field specimens and a map linked to each specimen’s location to encourage further exploration. Second, we will develop and implement a kinesthetic curriculum for an exploratory field class. Active engagement with geologic phenomena will take place in many forms, such as a scavenger hunt for precipitated crystals in the vesicles of basalt flows and a search for progressively smaller rhyodacite clasts scattered along an actively eroding canyon. We believe students will be more receptive to origin explanations when they possess a piece of the story. Students will be provided with field books to make drawings of geologic features. This will encourage independent assessment of phenomena and introduce the skill of scientific observation. We

  9. Materials science and engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Holden, T.M.

    1995-10-01

    The science-based stockpile stewardship program emphasizes a better understanding of how complex components function through advanced computer calculations. Many of the problem areas are in the behavior of materials making up the equipment. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) can contribute to solving these problems by providing diagnostic tools to examine parts noninvasively and by providing the experimental tools to understand material behavior in terms of both the atomic structure and the microstructure. Advanced computer codes need experimental information on material behavior in response to stress, temperature, and pressure as input, and they need benchmarking experiments to test the model predictions for the finished part.

  10. Filtered fast neutron irradiation system using Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, S. Y.; Kim, C. H.; Reece, W. D.; Braby, L. A.

    2004-09-01

    A heavily filtered fast neutron irradiation system (FNIS) was developed for a variety of applications, including the study of long-term health effects of fast neutrons by evaluating the biological mechanisms of damage in cultured cells and living animals such as rats or mice. This irradiation system includes an exposure cave made with a lead-bismuth alloy, a cave positioning system, a gamma and neutron monitoring system, a sample transfer system, and interchangeable filters. This system was installed in the irradiation cell of the Texas A&M University Nuclear Science Center Reactor (NSCR). For a realistic modeling of the NSCR, the irradiation cell, and the FNIS, this study used the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) code and a set of high-temperature ENDF/B-VI continuous neutron cross-section data. Sensitivity analysis was performed to find the characteristics of the FNIS as a function of the thickness of the lead-bismuth alloy. A paired ion chamber system was constructed with a tissue-equivalent plastic (A-150) and propane gas for total dose monitoring and with graphite and argon for gamma dose monitoring. This study, in addition, tested the Monte Carlo modeling of the FNIS system, as well as the performance of the system by comparing the calculated results with experimental measurements using activation foils and paired ion chambers.

  11. Active Neutron and Gamma Ray Instrumentation for In Situ Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S.; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2010-01-01

    The Pulsed Neutron Generator-Gamma Ray And Neutron Detectors (PNG-GRAND) experiment is an innovative application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology so successfully used in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA-GSFC) is to bring the PNG-GRAND instrument to the point where it can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Menus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. Gamma-Ray Spectrometers (GRS) have been incorporated into numerous orbital planetary science missions and, especially its the case of the Mars Odyssey GRS, have contributed detailed maps of the elemental composition over the entire surface of Mars. However, orbital gamma ray measurements have low spatial sensitivity (100's of km) due to their low surface emission rates from cosmic rays and subsequent need to be averaged over large surface areas. PNG-GRAND overcomes this impediment by incorporating a powerful neutron excitation source that permits high sensitivity surface and subsurface measurements of bulk elemental compositions. PNG-GRAND combines a pulsed neutron generator (PNG) with gamma ray and neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument to determine subsurface elemental composition without needing to drill into a planet's surface a great advantage in mission design. We are currently testing PNG-GRAND prototypes at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility recently constructed at NASA/GSFC that consists of a 2 m x 2 in x 1 m granite structure placed outdoors in an empty field. Because an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on the material, this granite sample is a known standard with which to compare both Monte Carlo simulations and our experimentally measured elemental composition data. We will present data from operating PNG-GRAND in various experimental configurations on a

  12. Los Alamos science, Number 14

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    Nine authored articles are included covering: natural heat engine, photoconductivity, the Caribbean Basin, energy in Central America, peat, geothermal energy, and the MANIAC computer. Separate abstracts were prepared for the articles. (DLC)

  13. Status of Monte Carlo at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, W.L.; Cashwell, E.D.

    1980-01-01

    At Los Alamos the early work of Fermi, von Neumann, and Ulam has been developed and supplemented by many followers, notably Cashwell and Everett, and the main product today is the continuous-energy, general-purpose, generalized-geometry, time-dependent, coupled neutron-photon transport code called MCNP. The Los Alamos Monte Carlo research and development effort is concentrated in Group X-6. MCNP treats an arbitrary three-dimensional configuration of arbitrary materials in geometric cells bounded by first- and second-degree surfaces and some fourth-degree surfaces (elliptical tori). Monte Carlo has evolved into perhaps the main method for radiation transport calculations at Los Alamos. MCNP is used in every technical division at the Laboratory by over 130 users about 600 times a month accounting for nearly 200 hours of CDC-7600 time.

  14. Los Alamos National Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, Edward F., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Current and post World War II scientific research at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (New Mexico) is discussed. The operation of the laboratory, the Los Alamos consultant program, and continuation education, and continuing education activities at the laboratory are also discussed. (JN)

  15. Monte Carlo simulations for high-rate fast neutron flux measurements made at the RAON neutron science facility by using MICROMEGAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Dae Hee; Hong, Ser Gi; Kim, Jae Cheon; Kim, Gi Dong; Kim, Yong Kyun

    2015-10-01

    RAON is a Korean heavy-ion accelerator complex that is planned to be built by 2021. Deuterons (53 MeV) and protons (88 MeV) accelerated by using a low-energy driver linac (SCL1) are delivered to the neutron production target in the Neutron Science Facility (NSF) to produce high-energy neutrons in the interval from 1 to 88 MeV with high fluxes of the order of 1012 n/cm2-sec. The repetition rate of the neutron beam ranges from 1 kHz to 1 MHz, and the maximum beam current is ~12 μA at 1 MHz. The beam width is 1 ~ 2 ns. The high-energy and high-rate fast neutrons are used to estimate accurate neutron-induced cross sections for various nuclides at the NSF. A MICROMEGAS (MICRO Mesh Gaseous Structure), which is a gaseous detector initially developed for tracking in high-rate, high-energy physics experiments, is tentatively being considered as a neutron beam monitor. It can be used to measure both the energy distribution and the flux of the neutron beam. In this study, a MICROMEGAS detector for installation at the NSF was designed and investigated. 6Li, 10B, 235U and 238U targets are being considered as neutron/charged particle converters. For the low-energy region, 6Li(n,α)t and 10B(n,α)7Li are used in the energy range from thermal to 1 MeV. 235U(n,f) and 238U(n,f) reactions are used for high-energy region up to 90 MeV. All calculations are performed by using the GEANT4 toolkit.

  16. A feasibility study for a one-megawatt pulsed spallation source at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.

    1994-07-01

    Over the past two decades, high-intensity proton accelerators have been designed and developed to support nuclear physics research and defense applications. This technology has now matured to the point where it can support simultaneous and cost-effective exploitation of a number of important areas of both basic and applied science. Examples include neutron scattering, the production of radioisotopes, tests of technologies to transmute nuclear waste, radiation damage studies, nuclear physics, and muon spin research. As part of a larger program involving these and other areas, a team at Los Alamos National Laboratory has undertaken a feasibility study for a 1-MW pulsed spallation neutron source (PSS) based on the use of an 800-MeV proton linac and an accumulator ring. In January 1994, the feasibility study was reviewed by a large, international group of experts in the design of accelerators and neutron spallation targets. This group confirmed the viability of the proposed neutron source. In this paper, I describe the approach Los Alamos has taken to the feasibility study, which has involved a synergistic application of the Laboratory`s expertise in nuclear science and technology, computation, and particle-beam technologies. Several examples of problems resolved by the study are described, including chopping of low-energy proton beam, interactions between H{sup {minus}} particles and the stripper foil used to produce protons for injection into an accumulator ring, and the inclusion of engineering realities into the design of a neutron production target. These examples are chosen to illustrate the breadth of the expertise that has been brought to bear on the feasibility study and to demonstrate that there are real R&D issues that need to be resolved before a next-generation spoliation source can be built.

  17. HEND Maps of Fast Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in high-energy, or fast, neutrons. These maps are based on data acquired by the high-energy neutron detector, one of the instruments in the gamma ray spectrometer suite. Fast neutrons, like epithermal neutrons, are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen. Unlike epithermal neutrons, however, they are not affected by the presence of carbon dioxide, which at the time of these observations covered the north polar area as 'dry ice' frost. The low flux of fast neutrons (blue and purple colors) in the north polar region suggests an abundance of hydrogen in the soil comparable to that determined in the south from the flux of epithermal neutrons. These observations were acquired during the first two months of mapping operations. Contours of topography are superimposed on these maps for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  18. Studies of Neutron-Induced Fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duke, Dana; TKE Team

    2014-09-01

    A Frisch-gridded ionization chamber and the double energy (2E) analysis method were used to study mass yield distributions and average total kinetic energy (TKE) release from neutron-induced fission of 235U, 238U, and 239Pu. Despite decades of fission research, little or no TKE data exist for high incident neutron energies. Additional average TKE information at incident neutron energies relevant to defense- and energy-related applications will provide a valuable observable for benchmarking simulations. The data can also be used as inputs in theoretical fission models. The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center-Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE - WNR) provides a neutron beam from thermal to hundreds of MeV, well-suited for filling in the gaps in existing data and exploring fission behavior in the fast neutron region. The results of the studies on 238U, 235U, and 239Pu will be presented. LA-UR-14-24921.

  19. Status of the Los Alamos Anger camera

    SciTech Connect

    Seeger, P.A.; Nutter, M.J.

    1985-01-01

    Results of preliminary tests of the neutron Anger camera being developed at Los Alamos are presented. This detector uses a unique encoding scheme involving parellel processing of multiple receptive fields. Design goals have not yet been met, but the results are very encouraging and improvements in the test procedures are expected to show that the detector will be ready for use on a small-angle scattering instrument next year. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  20. HEND Maps of Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in intermediate-energy, or epithermal, neutrons. These maps are based on data acquired by the high-energy neutron detector, one of the instruments in the gamma ray spectrometer suite. Soil enriched by hydrogen is indicated by the purple and deep blue colors on the maps, which show a low intensity of epithermal neutrons. Progressively smaller amounts of hydrogen are shown in the colors light blue, green, yellow and red. Hydrogen in the far north is hidden at this time beneath a layer of carbon dioxide frost (dry ice). These observations were acquired during the first two months of mapping operations. Contours of topography are superimposed on these maps for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  1. Spin distribution in neutron induced preequilibrium reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Dashdorj, D; Kawano, T; Chadwick, M; Devlin, M; Fotiades, N; Nelson, R O; Mitchell, G E; Garrett, P E; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Bernstein, L A; Macri, R; Younes, W

    2005-10-04

    The preequilibrium reaction mechanism makes an important contribution to neutron-induced reactions above E{sub n} {approx} 10 MeV. The preequilibrium process has been studied exclusively via the characteristic high energy neutrons produced at bombarding energies greater than 10 MeV. They are expanding the study of the preequilibrium reaction mechanism through {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. Cross-section measurements were made of prompt {gamma}-ray production as a function of incident neutron energy (E{sub n} = 1 to 250 MeV) on a {sup 48}Ti sample. Energetic neutrons were delivered by the Los Alamos National Laboratory spallation neutron source located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility. The prompt-reaction {gamma} rays were detected with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Germanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE). Neutron energies were determined by the time-of-flight technique. The {gamma}-ray excitation functions were converted to partial {gamma}-ray cross sections taking into account the dead-time correction, target thickness, detector efficiency and neutron flux (monitored with an in-line fission chamber). Residual state population was predicted using the GNASH reaction code, enhanced for preequilibrium. The preequilibrium reaction spin distribution was calculated using the quantum mechanical theory of Feshback, Kerman, and Koonin (FKK). The multistep direct part of the FKK theory was calculated for a one-step process. The FKK preequilibrium spin distribution was incorporated into the GNASH calculations and the {gamma}-ray production cross sections were calculated and compared with experimental data. The difference in the partial {gamma}-ray cross sections using spin distributions with and without preequilibrium effects is significant.

  2. Neutron Resonance Spin Determination Using Multi-Segmented Detector DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Baramsai, B.; Mitchell, G. E.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Walker, C.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Becvar, F.; Krticka, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Keksis, A. L.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.

    2011-06-01

    A sensitive method to determine the spin of neutron resonances is introduced based on the statistical pattern recognition technique. The new method was used to assign the spins of s-wave resonances in {sup 155}Gd. The experimental neutron capture data for these nuclei were measured with the DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiment) calorimeter at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The highly segmented calorimeter provided detailed multiplicity distributions of the capture {gamma}-rays. Using this information, the spins of the neutron capture resonances were determined. With these new spin assignments, level spacings are determined separately for s-wave resonances with J{sup {pi}} = 1{sup -} and 2{sup -}.

  3. 500 MHz neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, Yi-Fen; Bowman, J.D.; Matsuda, Y.

    1993-12-01

    A {sup 10}B-loaded scintillation detector was built for neutron transmission measurements at the Los Alamos Neutron Scattering Center. The efficiency of the detector is nearly 100% for neutron energies from 0 to 1 keV. The neutron moderation time in the scintillator is about 250 ns and is energy independent. The detector and data processing system are designed to handle an instantaneous rate as high as 500 MHz. The active area of the detector is 40 cm in diameter.

  4. PREFACE: Buried Interface Sciences with X-rays and Neutrons 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2011-09-01

    The 2010 summer workshop on buried interface science with x-rays and neutrons was held at Nagoya University, Japan, on 25-27 July 2010. The workshop was organized by the Japan Applied Physics Society, which established a group to develop the research field of studying buried function interfaces with x-rays and neutrons. The workshop was the latest in a series held since 2001; Tsukuba (December 2001), Niigata (September 2002), Nagoya (July 2003), Tsukuba (July 2004), Saitama (March 2005), Yokohama (July 2006), Kusatsu (August 2006), Tokyo (December 2006), Sendai (July 2007), Sapporo (September 2007), Tokyo (December 2007), Tokyo-Akihabara (July 2009) and Hiratsuka (March 2010). The 2010 summer workshop had 64 participants and 34 presentations. Interfaces mark the boundaries of different material systems at which many interesting phenomena take place, thus making it extremely important to design, fabricate and analyse the structures of interfaces at both the atomic and macroscopic scale. For many applications, devices are prepared in the form of multi-layered thin films, with the result that interfaces are not exposed but buried under multiple layers. Because of such buried conditions, it is generally not easy to analyse such interfaces. In certain cases, for example, when the thin surface layer is not a solid but a liquid such as water, scientists can observe the atomic arrangement of the liquid-solid interface directly by using a scanning probe microscope, of which the tip is soaked in water. However, it has become clear that the use of a stylus tip positioned extremely close to the interface might change the structure of the water molecules. Therefore it is absolutely crucial to develop non-contact, non-destructive probes for buried interfaces. It is known that analysis using x-rays and neutrons is one of the most powerful tools for exploring near-surface structures including interfaces buried under several layers. In particular, x-ray analysis using 3rd

  5. An ultra-cold neutron source at the MLNSC

    SciTech Connect

    Bowles, T.J.; Brun, T.; Hill, R.; Morris, C.; Seestrom, S.J.; Crow, L.; Serebrov, A.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors have carried out the research and development of an Ultra-Cold Neutron (UCN) source at the Manuel Lujan Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC). A first generation source was constructed to test the feasibility of a rotor source. The source performed well with an UCN production rate reasonably consistent with that expected. This source can now provide the basis for further development work directed at using UCN in fundamental physics research as well as possible applications in materials science.

  6. The experimental program at the WNR neutron source at LAMPF

    SciTech Connect

    Lisowski, P.W.

    1991-01-01

    There are two white neutron sources at Los Alamos National Laboratory which are used in broad scientific program over the energy range from thermal to about seven hundred MeV. Largely because of the increased intensity over such an unprecedented energy range, use of these two facilities for nuclear science research has grown from 36 experimenters in 1987 to 118 in 1990. This paper focuses on research underway or recently completed at the high-energy neutron source of the WNR facility. 18 refs., 6 figs.

  7. High-energy and thermal-neutron imaging and modeling with an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Claytor, Thomas N; Taddeucci, Terry N; Hills, Charles R; Summa, Deborah A; Davis, Anthony W; McDonald, Thomas E; Schwab, Mark J

    2004-10-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) operates two spallation neutron sources dedicated to research in materials science, condensed-matter physics, and fundamental and applied nuclear physics. Prior to 1995, all thermal neutron radiography at Los Alamos was done on a beam port attached to the Omega West reactor, a small 8MW research reactor used primarily for radioisotope production and prompt and delayed neutron activation analysis. After the closure of this facility, two largely independent radiography development efforts were begun at LANSCE using moderated cold and thermal neutrons from the Target-1 source and high-energy neutrons from the Target-4 source. Investigations with cold and thermal neutrons employed a neutron converter and film, a scintillation screen and CCD camera system, and a new high-resolution amorphous silicon (a-Si) flat-panel detector system. Recent work with high-energy neutrons (En > 1 MeV) has involved storage-phosphor image plates. Some comparison high-energy images were obtained with both image plates and the a-Si panel and showed equivalent image quality for approximately equal exposure times. PMID:15246402

  8. Second Einstein Telescope mock data and science challenge: Low frequency binary neutron star data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meacher, Duncan; Cannon, Kipp; Hanna, Chad; Regimbau, Tania; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    The Einstein Telescope is a conceived third-generation gravitational-wave detector that is envisioned to be an order of magnitude more sensitive than advanced LIGO, Virgo, and Kagra, which would be able to detect gravitational-wave signals from the coalescence of compact objects with waveforms starting as low as 1 Hz. With this level of sensitivity, we expect to detect sources at cosmological distances. In this paper we introduce an improved method for the generation of mock data and analyze it with a new low-latency compact binary search pipeline called gstlal. We present the results from this analysis with a focus on low-frequency analysis of binary neutron stars. Despite compact binary coalescence signals lasting hours in the Einstein Telescope sensitivity band when starting at 5 Hz, we show that we are able to discern various overlapping signals from one another. We also determine the detection efficiency for each of the analysis runs conducted and show a proof of concept method for estimating the number signals as a function of redshift. Finally, we show that our ability to recover the signal parameters has improved by an order of magnitude when compared to the results of the first mock data and science challenge. For binary neutron stars we are able to recover the total mass and chirp mass to within 0.5% and 0.05%, respectively.

  9. 196Pt(n,xn yp γ) reactions using spallation neutrons from En=1 to 250 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavukcu, E.; Bernstein, L. A.; Hauschild, K.; Becker, J. A.; Garrett, P. E.; McGrath, C. A.; McNabb, D. P.; Younes, W.; Chadwick, M. B.; Nelson, R. O.; Johns, G. D.; Mitchell, G. E.

    2001-11-01

    Neutron-induced reactions on 196Pt were studied over the neutron energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. A ``white'' neutron beam was provided by the spallation neutron source of the Weapons Neutron Research facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The prompt reaction γ rays were measured with the large-scale Compton-suppressed Ge spectrometer GEANIE. The incident neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight technique. Excitation functions for γ-ray transitions in 184,186,188,190-196Pt and 189,191,193Ir isotopes are compared with enhanced Hauser-Feshbach reaction modeling, as implemented in the reaction code GNASH. Overall, the model predictions agree well with the measured γ-ray yields. Discrepancies appear, however, due to inadequate discrete-level information in the calculations describing the preequilibrium process.

  10. Fast-neutron activation of long-lived nuclides in natural Pb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guiseppe, V. E.; Elliott, S. R.; Fields, N. E.; Hixon, D.

    2015-04-01

    We measured the production of the long-lived nuclides 207 Bi, 202 Pb, and 194 Hg in a sample of natural Pb due to high-energy neutron interactions using a neutron beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The activated sample was counted by a HPGe detector to measure the amount of radioactive nuclides present. These nuclides are critical in understanding potential backgrounds in low background experiments utilizing large amounts of Pb shielding due to cosmogenic neutron interactions in the Pb while residing on the Earth's surface. By scaling the LANSCE neutron flux to a cosmic neutron flux, we measure the sea level cosmic ray production rates of 8.0 ± 1.3 atoms/kg/day of 194 Hg, 120 ± 25 atoms/kg/day 202 Pb, and <0.17 ± 0.04 atoms/kg/day 207 Bi.

  11. Neutron and gamma dose and spectra measurements on the Little Boy replica

    SciTech Connect

    Hoots, S.; Wadsworth, D.

    1984-06-01

    The radiation-measurement team of the Weapons Engineering Division at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) measured neutron and gamma dose and spectra on the Little Boy replica at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in April 1983. This assembly is a replica of the gun-type atomic bomb exploded over Hiroshima in 1945. These measurements support the National Academy of Sciences Program to reassess the radiation doses due to atomic bomb explosions in Japan. Specifically, the following types of information were important: neutron spectra as a function of geometry, gamma to neutron dose ratios out to 1.5 km, and neutron attenuation in the atmosphere. We measured neutron and gamma dose/fission from close-in to a kilometer out, and neutron and gamma spectra at 90 and 30/sup 0/ close-in. This paper describes these measurements and the results. 12 references, 13 figures, 5 tables.

  12. Energy measurement of prompt fission neutrons in 239Pu(n,f) for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, Robert C; Devlin, Matthew J; Nelson, Ronald O; O' Donnell, John M; Chatillon, Audrey; Granier, Thierry; Taieb, Julien; Belier, Gilbert; Laurent, Benoit; Noda, Shusaku

    2010-01-01

    An experimental campaign was started in 2002 in the framework of a collaboration belween CEA-DAM and the Los Alamos National Laboratory to measure the prompt fission neutron spectra (PFNS) for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV with consistent error uncertainties over the whole energy range. The prompt neutron spectra in {sup 235,238}U(n,f) and {sup 237}Np(n,f) have been already studied successfully. A first attempt to characterize the prompt neutrons emitted during the fission of the {sup 239}Pu was done in 2007. This contribution will focus on the results obtained during the final experiment to measure the PFNS in {sup 239}Pu(n,f) performed in 2008. Prompt fission neutron spectra in the neutron-induced fission of {sup 239}Pu have been measured for incident neutron energies from 1 to 200 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Mean energies obtained from the spectra are discussed and compared to theoretical model calculation.

  13. Determination of proton and neutron spectra in the LANSCE spallation irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.; Fowler, M.M.; Dry, D.; Ferguson, P.D.; Mueller, G.; Corzine, R.K.

    1999-06-01

    Materials samples were recently irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the effect of irradiation on the mechanical and physical properties of materials. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including, high-energy protons, mixed protons and high-energy neutrons, and low-energy neutrons. The samples were irradiated for approximately six months during a ten month period using an 800 MeV proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.0 cm. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils were also extracted that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples. These were used to quantify the fluences in various locations.

  14. PREFACE: Workshop on 'Buried' Interface Science with X-rays and Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakurai, Kenji

    2007-06-01

    The 2007 workshop on `buried' interface science with X-rays and neutrons was held at the Institute of Materials Research, Tohoku University, in Sendai, Japan, on July 22-24, 2007. The workshop was the latest in a series held since 2001; Tsukuba (December 2001), Niigata (September 2002), Nagoya (July 2003), Tsukuba (July 2004), Saitama (March 2005), Yokohama (July 2006), Kusatsu (August 2006) and Tokyo (December 2006). The 2007 workshop had 64 participants and 34 presentations. There are increasing demands for sophisticated metrology in order to observe multilayered materials with nano-structures (dots, wires, etc), which are finding applications in electronic, magnetic, optical and other devices. Unlike many other surface-sensitive methods, X-ray and neutron analysis is known for its ability to see even `buried' function interfaces as well as the surface. It is highly reliable in practice, because the information, which ranges from the atomic to mesoscopic scale, is quantitative and reproducible. The non-destructive nature of this type of analytical method ensures that the same specimen can be measured by other techniques. However, we now realize that the method should be upgraded further to cope with more realistic problems in nano sciences and technologies. In the case of the reflectivity technique and other related methods, which have been the main topics in our workshops over the past 7 years, there are three important directions as illustrated in the Figure. Current X-ray methods can give atomic-scale information for quite a large area on a scale of mm2-cm2. These methods can deliver good statistics for an average, but sometimes we need to be able to see a specific part in nano-scale rather than an average structure. In addition, there is a need to see unstable changing structures and related phenomena in order to understand more about the mechanism of the functioning of nano materials. Quick measurements are therefore important. Furthermore, in order to apply

  15. Los Alamos offers Fellowships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico is calling for applications for postdoctoral appointments and research fellowships. The positions are available in geoscience as well as other scientific disciplines.The laboratory, which is operated by the University of California for the Department of Energy, awards J. Robert Oppenheimer Research Fellowships to scientists that either have or will soon complete doctoral degrees. The appointments are for two years, are renewable for a third year, and carry a stipend of $51,865 per year. Potential applicants should send a resume or employment application and a statement of research goals to Carol M. Rich, Div. 89, Human Resources Development Division, MS P290, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 by mid-November.

  16. Progress on the Europium Neutron-Capture Study using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J A; Macri, R A; Parker, W; Wilk, P; Wu, C Y; Bredeweg, T A; Esch, E; Haight, R C; O'Donnell, J M; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wouters, J M; Mitchell, G E; Sheets, S A; Becvar, F; Krticka, M

    2006-09-05

    The accurate measurement of neutron-capture cross sections of the Eu isotopes is important for many reasons including nuclear astrophysics and nuclear diagnostics. Neutron capture excitation functions of {sup 151,153}Eu targets were measured recently using a 4{pi} {gamma}-ray calorimeter array DANCE located at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center for E{sub n} = 0.1-100 keV. The progress on the data analysis efforts is given in the present paper. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distributions for the Eu targets and Be backing are significantly different. The {gamma}-ray multiplicity distribution is found to be the same for different neutron energies for both {sup 151}Eu and {sup 153}Eu. The statistical simulation to model the {gamma}-ray decay cascade is summarized.

  17. Lanl Neutron-Induced Fission Cross Section Measurement Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laptev, A. B.; Tovesson, F.; Hill, T. S.

    2014-09-01

    A well established program of neutron-induced fission cross section measurement at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is supporting the Fuel Cycle Research program (FC R&D). Combining measurements at two LANSCE facilities, the Lujan Center and the Weapons Neutron Research facility (WNR), cover neutron energies over 10 orders of magnitude: from sub-thermal up to 200 MeV. A parallel-plate fission ionization chamber was used as a fission fragment detector. The 235U(n,f) standard was used as the reference. Fission cross sections have been measured for multiple actinides. The new data presented here completes the suite of long-lived Uranium isotopes that were investigated with this experimental approach. The cross section data are presented in comparison with existing evaluations and previous measurements.

  18. The Status of Cross Section Measurements for Neutron-induced Reactions Needed for Cosmic Ray Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sisterson, J. M.

    2003-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions with lunar rocks and meteorites produce small amounts of radionuclides and stable isotopes. Advances in Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) allow production rates to be measured routinely in well-documented lunar rocks and meteorites. These measurements are analyzed using theoretical models to learn about the object itself and the history of the cosmic rays that fell on it. Good cross section measurements are essential input to the theoretical calculations. Most primary cosmic ray particles are protons so reliable cross sections for proton-induced reactions are essential. A cross section is deemed accurate if measurements made by different experimenters using different techniques result in consistent values. Most cross sections for proton induced reactions are now well measured. However, good cross section measurements for neutron-induced reactions are still needed. These cross sections are required to fully account for all galactic cosmic ray interactions at depth in an extraterrestrial object. When primary galactic cosmic ray (GCR) particles interact with an object many secondary neutrons are produced, which also initiate spallation reactions. Thus, the total GCR contribution to the overall cosmogenic nuclide archive has to include the contribution from the secondary neutron interactions. Few relevant cross section measurements have been reported for neutron-induced reactions at neutron energies greater than approximately 20 MeV. The status of the cross section measurements using quasi-monoenergetic neutron energies at iThemba LABS, South Africa and white neutron beams at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), Los Alamos are reported here.

  19. The Los Alamos primer

    SciTech Connect

    Serber, R.

    1992-01-01

    This book contains the 1943 lecture notes of Robert Serber. Serber was a protege of J. Robert Oppenheimer and member of the team that built the first atomic bomb - reveal what the Los Alamos scientists knew, and did not know, about the terrifying weapon they were building.

  20. Determination of mixed proton/neutron fluences in the LANSCE irradiation environment

    SciTech Connect

    James, M.R.; Maloy, S.A; Sommer, W.F.; Ferguson, P.; Fowler, M.M.; Corzine, K.

    1998-12-31

    In support of the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) program, several materials were exposed to a high-energy proton and spallation neutron environments. Large differences in mechanical property changes in this environment are expected compared to the typical fusion or fission systems. To make proper dose correlations, it is important to accurately quantify the fluences. Activation foils consisting of a stack of disks of Co, Ni, Fe, Al, Nb and Cu were irradiated concurrent with mechanical testing samples in the Los Alamos Spallation Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) facility. The irradiation consisted of an 800 MeV, 1 mA proton beam and a W target in the beam provided a source of spallation neutrons. The maximum proton fluence was around 3 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} and the maximum neutron fluence approximately 3 {times} 10{sup 20} n/cm{sup 2}. After irradiation, the foils were withdrawn and the radioactive isotopes analyzed using gamma spectroscopy. From initial estimates for the fluences and spectra derived from the Los Alamos High-Energy Transport (LAHET) Code System (LCS), comparisons to the measured levels of activation products were made. The Na-22 activation products in the Al foils were measured from different regions of the target in order to profile the spatial levels of the fluences. These tests gave empirical confirmation of the proton and neutron fluences of the irradiated samples throughout the target region.

  1. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    ScienceCinema

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-06-02

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  2. Los Alamos Team Demonstrates Bottle Scanner Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Espy, Michelle; Schultz, Larry

    2014-05-06

    Los Alamos scientists are demonstrating a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMR) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. By adding low-power X-ray data to the NMR mix, scientists believe they have unlocked a new detection technology. Funded in part by the Department of Homeland Security's Science and Technology Directorate, the new technology is called MagRay.

  3. Global Map of Thermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in low energy, or thermal, neutrons. Thermal neutrons are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen and the presence of carbon dioxide, in this case 'dry ice' frost. The red area at the top of the map indicates that about one meter (three feet) of carbon dioxide frost covers the surface, as it does every Mars winter in the polar regions. Soil enriched by hydrogen is indicated by the deep blue colors on the map, which show a low intensity of thermal neutrons. An enhancement of thermal neutrons close to the south pole, seen as a light green color, indicates the presence of residual carbon dioxide in the south polar cap, even though the annual frost dissipated from that region during southern summer.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  4. Development of the Probing In-Situ with Neutron and Gamma Rays (PING) Instrument for Planetary Science Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons, A.; Bodnarik, J.; Burger, D.; Evans, L.; Floyd, S; Lim, L.; McClanahan, T.; Namkung, M.; Nowicki, S.; Schweitzer, J.; Starr, R.; Trombka, J.

    2011-01-01

    The Probing In situ with Neutrons and Gamma rays (PING) instrument is a promising planetary science application of the active neutron-gamma ray technology that has been used successfully in oil field well logging and mineral exploration on Earth for decades. Similar techniques can be very powerful for non-invasive in situ measurements of the subsurface elemental composition on other planets. The objective of our active neutron-gamma ray technology program at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC) is to bring instruments using this technology to the point where they can be flown on a variety of surface lander or rover missions to the Moon, Mars, Venus, asteroids, comets and the satellites of the outer planets. PING combines a 14 MeV deuterium-tritium pulsed neutron generator with a gamma ray spectrometer and two neutron detectors to produce a landed instrument that can determine the elemental composition of a planet down to 30 - 50 cm below the planet's surface. The penetrating nature of.5 - 10 MeV gamma rays and 14 MeV neutrons allows such sub-surface composition measurements to be made without the need to drill into or otherwise disturb the planetary surface, thus greatly simplifying the lander design. We are currently testing a PING prototype at a unique outdoor neutron instrumentation test facility at NASA/GSFC that provides two large (1.8 m x 1.8 m x.9 m) granite and basalt test formations placed outdoors in an empty field. Since an independent trace elemental analysis has been performed on both the Columbia River basalt and Concord Gray granite materials, these samples present two known standards with which to compare PING's experimentally measured elemental composition results. We will present experimental results from PING measurements of both the granite and basalt test formations and show how and why the optimum PING instrument operating parameters differ for studying the two materials.

  5. "Measurements of the neutron spectrum in transit to Mars on the Mars Science Laboratory", Köhler et al.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jack

    2015-04-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft carried the Curiosity rover to Mars. While the dramatic, successful landing of Curiosity and its subsequent exploration of the Martian surface have justifiably generated great excitement, from the standpoint of the health of crewmembers on missions to Mars, knowledge of the environment between Earth and Mars is critical. This paper reports data taken during the cruise phase of the MSL by the Radiation Assessment Detector (RAD). The results are of great interest for several reasons. They are a direct measurement of the radiation environment during what will be a significant fraction of the duration of a proposed human mission to Mars; they were made behind the de facto shielding provided by various spacecraft components; and, in particular, they are a measurement of the contribution to radiation dose by neutrons. The neutron environment inside spacecraft is produced primarily by galactic cosmic ray ions interacting in shielding materials, and given the high biological effectiveness of neutrons and the increased contribution of neutrons to dose with increased depth in shielding, accurate knowledge of the neutron energy spectrum behind shielding is vital. The results show a relatively modest contribution from neutrons and gammas compared to that from charged particles, but also a discrepancy in both dose and dose rate between the data and simulations. The failure of the calculations to accurately reproduce the data is significant, given that future manned spacecraft will be more heavily shielded (and thus produce more secondary neutrons) and that spacecraft design will rely on simulations and model calculations of radiation transport. The methodology of risk estimation continues to evolve, and incorporates our knowledge of both the physical and biological effects of radiation. The relatively large uncertainties in the biological data, and the difficulties in reducing those uncertainties, makes it all the more important to

  6. Two detector arrays for fast neutrons at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haight, R. C.; Lee, H. Y.; Taddeucci, T. N.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Perdue, B. A.; Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Ullmann, J. L.; Laptev, A.; Bredeweg, T.; Jandel, M.; Nelson, R. O.; Wender, S. A.; White, M. C.; Wu, C. Y.; Kwan, E.; Chyzh, A.; Henderson, R.; Gostic, J.

    2012-03-01

    The neutron spectrum from neutron-induced fission needs to be known in designing new fast reactors, predicting criticality for safety analyses, and developing techniques for global security application. The experimental data base of fission neutron spectra is very incomplete and most present evaluated libraries are based on the approach of the Los Alamos Model. To validate these models and to provide improved data for applications, a program is underway to measure the fission neutron spectrum for a wide range of incident neutron energies using the spallation source of fast neutrons at the Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). In a double time-of-flight experiment, fission neutrons are detected by arrays of neutron detectors to increase the solid angle and also to investigate possible angular dependence of the fission neutrons. The challenge is to measure the spectrum from low energies, down to 100 keV or so, to energies over 10 MeV, where the evaporation-like spectrum decreases by 3 orders of magnitude from its peak around 1 MeV. For these measurements, we are developing two arrays of neutron detectors, one based on liquid organic scintillators and the other on 6Li-glass detectors. The range of fission neutrons detected by organic liquid scintillators extends from about 600 keV to well over 10 MeV, with the lower limit being defined by the limit of pulse-shape discrimination. The 6Li-glass detectors have a range from very low energies to about 1 MeV, where their efficiency then becomes small. Various considerations and tests are in progress to understand important contributing factors in designing these two arrays and they include selection and characterization of photomultiplier tubes (PM), the performance of relatively thin (1.8 cm) 6Li-glass scintillators on 12.5 cm diameter PM tubes, use of 17.5 cm diameter liquid scintillators with 12.5 cm PM tubes, measurements of detector efficiencies with tagged neutrons

  7. Neutron-Induced Charged Particle Studies at LANSCE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye Young; Haight, Robert C.

    2014-09-01

    Direct measurements on neutron-induced charged particle reactions are of interest for nuclear astrophysics and applied nuclear energy. LANSCE (Los Alamos Neutron Science Center) produces neutrons in energy of thermal to several hundreds MeV. There has been an effort at LANSCE to upgrade neutron-induced charged particle detection technique, which follows on (n,z) measurements made previously here and will have improved capabilities including larger solid angles, higher efficiency, and better signal to background ratios. For studying cross sections of low-energy neutron induced alpha reactions, Frisch-gridded ionization chamber is designed with segmented anodes for improving signal-to-noise ratio near reaction thresholds. Since double-differential cross sections on (n,p) and (n,a) reactions up to tens of MeV provide important information on deducing nuclear level density, the ionization chamber will be coupled with silicon strip detectors (DSSD) in order to stop energetic charged particles. In this paper, we will present the status of this development including the progress on detector design, calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations. This work is funded by the US Department of Energy - Los Alamos National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  8. LANSCE nuclear science facilities and activities

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear science activities at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) encompass measurements spanning the neutron energy range from thermal to 600 MeV. The neutron sources use spallation of the LANSCE 800 MeV pulsed proton beam with the time-of-flight technique to measure properties of neutron-induced reactions as a function of energy over this large energy range. Current experiments are conducted at the Lujan Center moderated neutron source, the unmoderated WNR target, and with a lead-slowing-down spectrometer. Instruments in use include the DANCE array of BaF{sub 2} scintillators for neutron capture studies, the FIGARO array of liquid scintillator neutron detectors, the GEANIE array of high-resolution HPGe x-ray and gamma-ray detectors, and a number of fission chambers, and other detectors. The LANL capabilities for production and handling of radioactive materials coupled with the neutron sources and detectors at LANSCE are enabling new and challenging measurements for a variety of applications including nuclear energy and nuclear astrophysics. An overview of recent research and examples of results is presented.

  9. High-energy neutron dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, Michele Rhea

    2001-12-01

    Fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients for the radiation protection quantity effective dose were calculated for neutrons, photons and protons with energies up to 2 GeV using the MCNPX code. The calculations were performed using the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory versions of the MIRD-V male and female anthropomorphic phantoms modified to include the skin and esophagus. The latest high-energy neutron evaluated cross-section libraries and the recommendations given in ICRP Publication 60 and ICRP Publication 74 were utilized to perform the calculations. Sets of fluence-to- effective dose conversion coefficients are given for anterior-posterior, posterior-anterior, left-lateral, right-lateral and rotational irradiation geometries. This is the first set of dose conversion coefficients over this energy range calculated for the L-LAT irradiation geometry. A unique set of high-energy neutron depth-dose benchmark experiments were performed at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center/Weapons Neutron Research (LANSCE/WNR) complex. The experiments consisted of filtered neutron beams with energies up to 800 MeV impinging on a 30 x 30 x 30 cm3 tissue-equivalent phantom. The absorbed dose was measured in the phantom at various depths with tissue-equivalent ion chambers. The phantom and the experimental set-up were modeled using MCNPX. Comparisons of the experimental and computational depth- dose distributions indicate that the absorbed dose calculated by MCNPX is within 13% for neutrons with energies up to 750 MeV. This experiment will serve as a benchmark experiment for the testing of high-energy radiation transport codes for the international radiation protection community.

  10. Economic Effects of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the Joint Institute for Neutron Sciences (JINS) on the State of Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    Univ of TN, Center for Business Research

    2002-12-18

    This report provides an analysis of the economic impacts arising from the construction and operation of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and Joint Institute of Neutron Science (JINS) facilities on the State of Tennessee. The study was conducted by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER) at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, in cooperation with the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the Science Alliance at UTK. Estimates provided are based on data provided by ORNL and the Office of Research at UTK. The estimates contained in the report quantify the income, employment, and sales tax revenue which will be generated by the activities of the SNS and JINS by accounting for the (1) direct impacts, those arising directly from the expenditures for the construction and operation of the facilities; (2) indirect impacts, those arising from the visitors to the facilities and from facility expenditures in Tennessee; and (3) multiplier impacts, those arising from the ripple effects created as new income is spent and respent in the state economy.

  11. Investigation of the Statistical Properties of Stable Eu Nuclei using Neutron-Capture Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Agvaanluvsan, U; Alpizar-Vicente, A; Becker, J A; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T A; Clement, R; Esch, E; Folden, III, C M; Hatarik, R; Haight, R C; Hoffman, D C; Krticka, M; Macri, R A; Mitchell, G E; Nitsche, H; O'Donnell, J M; Parker, W; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R S; Schwantes, J M; Sheets, S A; Ullmann, J L; Vieira, D J; Wilhelmy, J B; Wilk, P; Wouters, J M; Wu, C Y

    2005-10-04

    Neutron capture for incident neutron energies <1eV up to 100 keV has been measured for {sup 151,153}Eu targets. The highly efficient DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) array coupled with the intense neutron beam at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is used for the experiment. Stable Eu isotopes mass separated and electroplated on Be backings were used. Properties of well-resolved, strong resonances in two Eu nuclei are examined. The parameters for most of these resonances are known. Detailed multiplicity information for each resonance is obtained employing the high granularity of the DANCE array. The radiative decay cascades corresponding to each resonance are obtained in the experiment. The measurements are compared to simulation of these cascades which calculated with various models for the radiative strength function. Comparison between the experimental data and simulation provides an opportunity to investigate the average quantities.

  12. The early development of neutron diffraction: science in the wings of the Manhattan Project.

    PubMed

    Mason, T E; Gawne, T J; Nagler, S E; Nestor, M B; Carpenter, J M

    2013-01-01

    Although neutron diffraction was first observed using radioactive decay sources shortly after the discovery of the neutron, it was only with the availability of higher intensity neutron beams from the first nuclear reactors, constructed as part of the Manhattan Project, that systematic investigation of Bragg scattering became possible. Remarkably, at a time when the war effort was singularly focused on the development of the atomic bomb, groups working at Oak Ridge and Chicago carried out key measurements and recognized the future utility of neutron diffraction quite independent of its contributions to the measurement of nuclear cross sections. Ernest O. Wollan, Lyle B. Borst and Walter H. Zinn were all able to observe neutron diffraction in 1944 using the X-10 graphite reactor and the CP-3 heavy water reactor. Subsequent work by Wollan and Clifford G. Shull, who joined Wollan's group at Oak Ridge in 1946, laid the foundations for widespread application of neutron diffraction as an important research tool. PMID:23250059

  13. Nuclear Forensics at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Podlesak, David W; Steiner, Robert E.; Burns, Carol J.; LaMont, Stephen P.; Tandon, Lav

    2012-08-09

    The overview of this presentation is: (1) Introduction to nonproliferation efforts; (2) Scope of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (3) Facilities for radioanalytical work at LANL; (4) Radiochemical characterization capabilities; and (5) Bulk chemical and materials analysis capabilities. Some conclusions are: (1) Analytical chemistry measurements on plutonium and uranium matrices are critical to numerous defense and non-defense programs including safeguards accountancy verification measurements; (2) Los Alamos National Laboratory operates capable actinide analytical chemistry and material science laboratories suitable for nuclear material forensic characterization; (3) Actinide analytical chemistry uses numerous means to validate and independently verify that measurement data quality objectives are met; and (4) Numerous LANL nuclear facilities support the nuclear material handling, preparation, and analysis capabilities necessary to evaluate samples containing nearly any mass of an actinide (attogram to kilogram levels).

  14. The early development of neutron diffraction: Science in the wings of the Manhattan Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, Thom; Gawne, Timothy J; Nagler, Stephen E; Nestor, Margaret Boone {Bonnie}; Carpenter, John M

    2012-01-01

    Although neutron diffraction was first observed using radioactive decay sources shortly after the discovery of the neutron, it was only with the availability of higher intensity neutron beams from the first nuclear reactors, constructed as part of the Manhattan project, that systematic investigation of Bragg scattering became possible. Remarkably, at a time when the war effort was singularly focused on the development of the atomic bomb, groups working at Oak Ridge and Chicago carried out key measurements and recognized the future utility of neutron diffraction quite independent of its contributions to the measurements of nuclear cross sections. Ernest O. Wollan, Lyle B. Borst, and Walter H. Zinn were all able to observe neutron diffraction in 1944 using the X-10 graphite reactor and the CP-3 heavy water reactor.

  15. Global Map of Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show a global view of Mars in intermediate-energy, or epithermal, neutrons. Soil enriched by hydrogen is indicated by the deep blue colors on the map, which show a low intensity of epithermal neutrons. Progressively smaller amounts of hydrogen are shown in the colors light blue, green, yellow and red. The deep blue areas in the polar regions are believed to contain up to 50 percent water ice in the upper one meter (three feet) of the soil. Hydrogen in the far north is hidden at this time beneath a layer of carbon dioxide frost (dry ice). Light blue regions near the equator contain slightly enhanced near-surface hydrogen, which is most likely chemically or physically bound because water ice is not stable near the equator. The view shown here is a map of measurements made during the first three months of mapping using the neutron spectrometer instrument, part of the gamma ray spectrometer instrument suite. The central meridian in this projection is zero degrees longitude. Topographic features are superimposed on the map for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  16. Type A Accident Investigation Board report on the January 17, 1996, electrical accident with injury in Technical Area 21 Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    An electrical accident was investigated in which a crafts person received serious injuries as a result of coming into contact with a 13.2 kilovolt (kV) electrical cable in the basement of Building 209 in Technical Area 21 (TA-21-209) in the Tritium Science and Fabrication Facility (TSFF) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). In conducting its investigation, the Accident Investigation Board used various analytical techniques, including events and causal factor analysis, barrier analysis, change analysis, fault tree analysis, materials analysis, and root cause analysis. The board inspected the accident site, reviewed events surrounding the accident, conducted extensive interviews and document reviews, and performed causation analyses to determine the factors that contributed to the accident, including any management system deficiencies. Relevant management systems and factors that could have contributed to the accident were evaluated in accordance with the guiding principles of safety management identified by the Secretary of Energy in an October 1994 letter to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board and subsequently to Congress.

  17. Preparation of thin arsenic and radioarsenic targets for neutron capture studies

    SciTech Connect

    Fassbender, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    A simple method for the electrodeposition of elemental arsenic (As) on a metal backing from aqueous solutions has been developed. The method was successfully applied to stable As (As-75). Thin (2.5 mg {center_dot} cm{sup -2}) coherent, smooth layers of the metalloid on Ti foils (2.5 {micro}m thickness) were obtained. Electrodeposits served as targets for {sup 75}As(n,{gamma}) {sup 76}As neutron capture experiments at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Respective {sup 73}As(n,{gamma}) {sup 74}As experiments are planned for the near future, and {sup 73}As targets will be prepared in a similar fashion utilizing the introduced electrodeposition method. The preparation of an {sup 73}As (half-life 80.3 d) plating bath solution from proton irradiated germanium has been demonstrated. Germanium target irradiation was performed at the Los Alamos Isotope Production Facility (IPF).

  18. The early development of neutron diffraction: science in the wings of the Manhattan Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, T. E. Gawne, T. J.; Nagler, S. E.; Nestor, M. B.; Carpenter, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Early neutron diffraction experiments performed in 1944 using the first nuclear reactors are described. Although neutron diffraction was first observed using radioactive decay sources shortly after the discovery of the neutron, it was only with the availability of higher intensity neutron beams from the first nuclear reactors, constructed as part of the Manhattan Project, that systematic investigation of Bragg scattering became possible. Remarkably, at a time when the war effort was singularly focused on the development of the atomic bomb, groups working at Oak Ridge and Chicago carried out key measurements and recognized the future utility of neutron diffraction quite independent of its contributions to the measurement of nuclear cross sections. Ernest O. Wollan, Lyle B. Borst and Walter H. Zinn were all able to observe neutron diffraction in 1944 using the X-10 graphite reactor and the CP-3 heavy water reactor. Subsequent work by Wollan and Clifford G. Shull, who joined Wollan’s group at Oak Ridge in 1946, laid the foundations for widespread application of neutron diffraction as an important research tool.

  19. Neutron capture measurements on unstable nuclei at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Ullmann, J. L.; Haight, R. C.; Fowler, M. M.; Miller, G. G.; Rundberg, R. S.; Wilhelmy, J. B.

    1999-06-10

    Although neutron capture by stable isotopes has been extensively measured, there are very few measurements on unstable isotopes. The intense neutron flux at the Manual Lujan Jr. Neutron Scattering Center at LANSCE enables us to measure capture on targets with masses of about 1 mg over the energy range from 1 eV to 100 keV. These measurements are important not only for understanding the basic physics, but also for calculations of stellar nucleosynthesis and Science-Based Stockpile Stewardship. Preliminary measurements on {sup 169}Tm and {sup 171}Tm have been made with deuterated benzene detectors. A new detector array at the Lujan center and a new radioactive isotope separator will combine to give Los Alamos a unique capability for making these measurements.

  20. Split-target neutronics and the MLNSC spallation target system

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, G.J.; Ferguson, P.D.; Pitcher, E.J.; Court, J.D.

    1996-12-31

    The Manuel Lujan, Jr., Neutron Scattering Center (MLNSC) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is one of four operating Short-Pulse Spallation Sources worldwide. The MLNSC target system (composed of targets, moderators, and reflectors) was first installed in 1985. The target system employs a split tungsten spallation target with a void space in between (the flux-trap gap); this target system will be upgraded in 1998. The ability to efficiently split a spallation target allowed us to introduce the concept of flux-trap moderators and ultimately the notion of backscattering and upstream moderators. The upgraded MLNSC target system will employ both flux-trap and upstream/backscattering moderators to simultaneously service 16 neutron flight paths with high-intensity neutron beams for materials science research.

  1. Neutron beam testing of triblades

    SciTech Connect

    Michalak, Sarah E; Du Bois, Andrew J; Storlie, Curtis B; Rust, William N; Du Bois, David H; Modl, David G; Quinn, Heather M; Blanchard, Sean P; Manuzzato, Andrea

    2010-12-16

    Four IBM Triblades were tested in the Irradiation of Chips and Electronics facility at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Triblades include two dual-core Opteron processors and four PowerXCell 8i (Cell) processors. The Triblades were tested in their field configuration while running different applications, with the beam aimed at the Cell processor or the Opteron running the application. Testing focused on the Cell processors, which were tested while running five different applications and an idle condition. While neither application nor Triblade was statistically important in predicting the hazard rate, the hazard rate when the beam was aimed at the Opterons was significantly higher than when it was aimed at the Cell processors. In addition, four Cell blades (one in each Triblade) suffered voltage shorts, leading to their inoperability. The hardware tested is the same as that in the Roadrunner supercomputer.

  2. Skylab neutron environment experiment (Science Demonstration SD-34 (TV108)). Description and preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, G. J.

    1974-01-01

    Neutron and proton induced radioactivity at various locations within Skylab were measured. Samples of five metals were formed into activation packets and deployed at the following locations on the Skylab 4 mission: orbital workshop film vault, water storage tank, and two opposing orbital workshop internal locations. Radioactive nuclides were produced in the packets by nuclear interactions of high-energy protons and secondary neutrons within Skylab. Low-level gamma ray spectroscopy measurements were made on the returned packets to determine the incident neutron and proton fluxes and spectra and their variations with mass distribution.

  3. Radonuclide concentrations in bees and honey in the vicinity of Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Fresquez, P.R.; Armstrong, D.R.

    1996-06-01

    Honeybees are effective monitors of environmental pollution; they forage for P len and nectar over a large area ({congruent}7 km{sup 2}), accumulate contaminants from air, water, plants, and soil, and return to a fixed location (the hive) for sampling. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in fact, has maintained a network of honeybee colonies within and around LANL for 16 years (1979 to 1994); the objectives for maintaining this honeybee network were to (1) determine the bioavailability of radionuclides in the environment, and (2) the committed effective dose equivalent (CEDE) to people who may consume honey from these beehives (Los Alamos and White Rock/Pajarito Acres lownsites). Of all the radionuclides studied over the years, tritium (314) was consistently picked up by the bees and was most readily transferred to the honey. Tritium in honey collected from hives located within LANL, for example, ranged in concentration from 0.07 Bq mL{sup -1} (1.9 pCi mL{sup -1}) to 27.75 Bq mL{sup -1} (749.9 pCi mL{sup -1}) (LANL Neutron Science Center); the average concentration of {sup 3}H in honey Collected from hives located around the LANL area (perimeter) ranged in concentration from 0.34 Bq mL{sup -1} (9.3 pCi mL{sup -1}) (White Rock/Pajarito Acres townsite) to 3.67 Bq mL{sup -1} (99.3 pCi mL{sup -1}) (Los Alamos townsite). Overall, the CEDE-based on the average concentration of all radionuclides measured over the years-from consuming 5 kg (11 lbs) of honey collected from hives located within the townsites of Los Alamos and White Rock/Pajarito Acres, after regional (background) as been subtracted, was 0.074 {mu}Sv y{sup -1} (0.0074 mrem y{sup -1}) and 0.024 pSv y{sup -1} (0.0024 mrem y{sup -1}), respectively. The highest CEDE, based on the mean + 2 standard deviations (95% confidence level), was 0.334 fiSv y{sup -1} (0.0334 mrem y{sup -1}) (Los Alamos townsitc).

  4. The early development of neutron diffraction: science in the wings of the Manhattan Project

    PubMed Central

    Mason, T. E.; Gawne, T. J.; Nagler, S. E.; Nestor, M. B.; Carpenter, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Although neutron diffraction was first observed using radioactive decay sources shortly after the discovery of the neutron, it was only with the availability of higher intensity neutron beams from the first nuclear reactors, constructed as part of the Manhattan Project, that systematic investigation of Bragg scattering became possible. Remarkably, at a time when the war effort was singularly focused on the development of the atomic bomb, groups working at Oak Ridge and Chicago carried out key measurements and recognized the future utility of neutron diffraction quite independent of its contributions to the measurement of nuclear cross sections. Ernest O. Wollan, Lyle B. Borst and Walter H. Zinn were all able to observe neutron diffraction in 1944 using the X-10 graphite reactor and the CP-3 heavy water reactor. Subsequent work by Wollan and Clifford G. Shull, who joined Wollan’s group at Oak Ridge in 1946, laid the foundations for widespread application of neutron diffraction as an important research tool. PMID:23250059

  5. CONFERENCES AND SYMPOSIA: Plasma phenomena in nanostructures and neutron stars Scientific Session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (26 March 2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, V. V.; Istomin, Ya N.; Kosevich, Yu A.

    2008-08-01

    A scientific session of the Physical Sciences Division of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS) was held on 26 March 2008 at the conference hall of the P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS. The following reports were presented at the session: (1) Klimov V V (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Nanoplasmonics"; (2) Istomin Ya N (P N Lebedev Physical Institute, RAS, Moscow) "Electron-positron plasma generation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars"; (3) Kosevich Yu A (N N Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics, RAS, Moscow) "Multichannel propagation and scattering of phonons and photons in low-dimension nanostructures". An abridged version of these reports is given below. • Nanoplasmonics, V V Klimov Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 839-844 • Electron-positron plasma generation in the magnetospheres of neutron stars, Ya N Istomin Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 844-848 • Multichannel propagation and scattering of phonons and photons in low-dimension nanostructures, Yu A Kosevich Physics-Uspekhi, 2008, Volume 51, Number 8, Pages 848-859

  6. Los Alamos low-level waste performance assessment status

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, W.J.; Purtymun, W.D.; Dewart, J.M.; Rodgers, J.E.

    1986-06-01

    This report reviews the documented Los Alamos studies done to assess the containment of buried hazardous wastes. Five sections logically present the environmental studies, operational source terms, transport pathways, environmental dosimetry, and computer model development and use. This review gives a general picture of the Los Alamos solid waste disposal and liquid effluent sites and is intended for technical readers with waste management and environmental science backgrounds but without a detailed familiarization with Los Alamos. The review begins with a wide perspective on environmental studies at Los Alamos. Hydrology, geology, and meteorology are described for the site and region. The ongoing Laboratory-wide environmental surveillance and waste management environmental studies are presented. The next section describes the waste disposal sites and summarizes the current source terms for these sites. Hazardous chemical wastes and liquid effluents are also addressed by describing the sites and canyons that are impacted. The review then focuses on the transport pathways addressed mainly in reports by Healy and Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program. Once the source terms and potential transport pathways are described, the dose assessment methods are addressed. Three major studies, the waste alternatives, Hansen and Rogers, and the Pantex Environmental Impact Statement, contributed to the current Los Alamos dose assessment methodology. Finally, the current Los Alamos groundwater, surface water, and environmental assessment models for these mesa top and canyon sites are described.

  7. Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, C.L.

    1997-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

  8. Occurrences at Los Alamos National Laboratory: What can they tell us?

    SciTech Connect

    Richard A. Reichelt; A. Jeffery Eichorst; Marc E. Clay; Rita J. Henins; Judith D. DeHaven; Richard J. Brake

    2000-03-01

    The authors analyzed the evolution of institutional and facility response to groups of abnormal incidents at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The analysis is divided into three stages: (1) the LANL response to severe accidents from 1994 to 1996, (2) the LANL response to facility-specific clusters of low-consequence incidents from 1997 to 1999, and (3) the ongoing development of and response to a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program. The first stage is characterized by five severe accidents at LANL--a shooting fatality, a forklift accident, two electrical shock incidents, and an explosion in a nuclear facility. Each accident caused LANL and the Department of Energy (DOE) to launch in-depth investigations. A recurrent theme of the investigations was the failure of LANL and DOE to identify and act on precursor or low-consequence events that preceded the severe accidents. The second stage is characterized by LANL response to precursor or low-consequence incidents over a two-year period. In this stage, the Chemistry and Metallurgy Research Facility, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility, and the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center responded to an increase in low-consequence events by standing down their facilities. During the restart process, each facility collectively analyzed the low-consequence events and developed systemic corrective actions. The third stage is characterized by the development of a Laboratory-wide trending and analysis program, which involves proactive division-level analysis of incidents and development of systemic actions. The authors conclude that, while the stages show an encouraging evolution, the facility standdowns and restarts are overly costly and that the institutional trending and analysis program is underutilized. The authors therefore recommend the implementation of an institutional, mentored program of trending and analysis that identifies clusters of related low-consequence events, analyzes those events, and

  9. Status of optical model activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P.G.

    1995-12-01

    An update will be given of activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory aimed at developing optical model potentials for applied calculations. Recent work on a coupled-channels potential for neutron reactions on {sup 241,243}Am and spherical neutron potential updates for {sup 56}Fe and {sup 59}Co will be presented, together with examples of their application in nuclear reaction calculations with the GNASH code system. New potentials utilized in evaluations at Livermore for {sup 12}C, {sup 14}N and {sup 16}O are described and additional potentials from earlier analyses at Los Alamos of Ti, V, and Ni data are made available for possible inclusion in the Reference Input Parameter Library (RIPL) for nuclear model calculations of nuclear data. Specific activities directed at development of the optical potential segment of the RIPL will be summarized.

  10. Elastic and Inelastic Neutron Scattering with a C7LYC Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, G. L.; Brown, T.; Chowdhury, P.; Doucet, E.; Lister, C. J.; D'Olympia, N.; Devlin, M.; Mosby, S.

    2015-10-01

    A scintillator array of 16 1'' ×1'' Cs2LiYCl6 (CLYC) detectors has been commissioned for low energy nuclear science. Standard CLYC crystals detect both gamma rays and neutrons rays with excellent pulse shape discrimination, with thermal neutrons detected via the 6Li(n, α)t reaction. Our discovery of spectroscopy-grade response of CLYC for fast neutrons via the 35Cl(n,p) reaction, with a pulse height resolution of under 10 % in the < 8 MeV range, led to our present array of 7Li enriched C7LYC detectors, where the large thermal neutron response is essentially eliminated. While the intrinsic efficiency of C7LYC for fast neutron detection is low, the array can be placed near the target since a long TOF arm is no longer needed for neutron energy measurement, thus recovering efficiency through increased solid angle coverage. The array was recently deployed at Los Alamos to test its capability in measuring differential scattering cross sections as a function of energy for 56Fe and 238U. The incident energy from a white neutron source was measured via TOF, and the scattered neutron energy via the pulse height. Techniques, analysis and first results will be discussed. Supported by the NNSA Stewardship Science Academic Alliance Program under Grant DE-NA00013008.

  11. Charged particles produced in neutron reactions on nuclei from beryllium to gold

    SciTech Connect

    Haight, R.C.

    1997-08-01

    Charged-particle production in reactions of neutrons with nuclei has been studied over the past several years with the spallation source of neutrons from 1 to 50 MeV at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Target nuclides include 9Be, C, 27Al, Si, 56Fe, 59Co, 58,60Ni, 93Nb and 197Au. Proton, deuteron, triton, 3He and 4He emission spectra, angular distributions and production cross sections have been measured. Transitions from the compound nuclear reaction mechanism to precompound reactions are clearly seen in the data. The data are compared with data from the literature where available, with evaluated nuclear data libraries, and with calculations where the selection of the nuclear level density prescription is of great importance. Calculations normalized at En = 14 MeV can differ from the present data by a factor of 2 for neutron energies between 5 and 10 MeV.

  12. Measurement of Neutron Capture Cross Section of 62Ni in the keV-Region

    SciTech Connect

    Alpizar-Vicente, A. M.; Hatarik, R.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Esch, E.-I.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Greife, U.

    2006-03-13

    The neutron capture cross section of 62Ni, relative to gold as a standard, was determined in the energy range from 250 eV to 100 keV. This energy range covers the region between 5 keV to 20 keV, which is not available in ENDF. Capture events are detected with the 160-fold 4{pi} BaF2 Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. One of the challenges was to process the high count rate of 4 MHz, which required an optimization of the data acquisition software. The neutron energy was determined by the time-of-flight technique using a flight path of 20.25 m. The sample mass of the 96% enriched 62Ni target was 210 mg and it was mounted in a 1.5 {mu}m thick Mylar foil.

  13. Technical manpower needs and resources at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Freese, K.B.

    1984-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has begun a program to share its scientific and technological expertise with students and teachers in the surrounding area. The goal of the Laboratory's Educational Outreach Program is to stimulate an awareness of professional opportunities in the sciences and engineering.

  14. Los Alamos safeguards program overview and NDA in safeguards

    SciTech Connect

    Keepin, G.R.

    1988-01-01

    Over the years the Los Alamos safeguards program has developed, tested, and implemented a broad range of passive and active nondestructive analysis (NDA) instruments (based on gamma and x-ray detection and neutron counting) that are now widely employed in safeguarding nuclear materials of all forms. Here very briefly, the major categories of gamma ray and neutron based NDA techniques, give some representative examples of NDA instruments currently in use, and cite a few notable instances of state-of-the-art NDA technique development. Historical aspects and a broad overview of the safeguards program are also presented.

  15. Institute in Physical Science. A Category 1 Summer Inservice Program for Elementary and Secondary Teachers of Physical Science, Austin Metropolitan Community, Pharr-San Juan-Alamo ISD, and Region 1 Educational Service Center. Final Performance Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawley, Frank E.

    The Institute in Physical Science was developed to address the need for updated information and training in physics, chemistry, and technology among elementary and secondary teachers of physical science. Four major objectives were addressed: (1) improve teachers' understanding of fundamental concepts in physics and chemistry; (2) improve fifth-…

  16. Time-of-flight measurement of fast neutrons with Timepix detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergmann, B.; Nelson, R. O.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Pospisil, S.; Solc, J.; Takai, H.; Vykydal, Z.

    2014-05-01

    Timepix pixel detectors have been used to study the response of silicon hybrid pixel detectors to fast neutrons from a pulsed neutron beam at WNR FP30R, a 14 m long flight path, in the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. Neutrons with kinetic energies up to 600 MeV were available. In order to enhance the conversion of neutrons to energetic charged particles, several converter foils and filters were attached to the 300 μm thick silicon sensor, i.e. polyethylene, polyethylene with aluminum, 6LiF, 6LiF with aluminum, aluminum. The Time-of-Arrival mode of the Timepix detectors has permitted the application of the Time-of-Flight (TOF) technique for the assignment of the detected interactions in the form of clusters (groups of adjacent pixels) in the pixel matrix, to the kinetic energies of the incident neutrons. It was found that, for lower neutron energies ( ~ MeV range) the cluster rates below the polyethylene and the polyethylene and aluminum region, produced by recoil protons, are a good measure for the mean kinetic energies of neutrons. For energies above 50 MeV nuclear reactions in the silicon dominate the detector response. In this energy range the shape of the clusters indicates the neutron kinetic energy.

  17. CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ADVANCED GADOLINIUM NEUTRON ABSORBER ALLOY BY MEANS OF NEUTRON TRANSMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg W. Wachs

    2007-09-01

    Neutron transmission experiments were performed on samples of an advanced nickel-chromium-molybdenum-gadolinium (Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd) neutron absorber alloy. The primary purpose of the experiments was to demonstrate the thermal neutron absorbing capability of the alloy at specific gadolinium dopant levels. The new alloy is to be deployed for criticality control of highly enriched DOE SNF. For the transmission experiments, alloy test samples were fabricated with 0.0, 1.58 and 2.1 wt% natural gadolinium dispersed in a Ni-Cr-Mo base alloy. The transmission experiments were successfully carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measured data from the neutron transmission experiments were compared to calculated results derived from a simple exponential transmission formula using only radiative capture cross sections. Excellent agreement between the measured and calculated results demonstrated the expected strong thermal absorption capability of the gadolinium poison and in addition, verified the measured elemental composition of the alloy test samples. The good agreement also indirectly confirmed that the gadolinium was dispersed fairly uniformly in the alloy and the ENDF VII radiative capture cross section data were accurate.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory: 21st century solutions to urgent national challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Mcbranch, Duncan

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has been called upon to meet urgent national challenges for more than 65 years. The people, tools, and technologies at Los Alamos are a world class resource that has proved decisive through our history, and are needed in the future. We offer expertise in nearly every science, technology, and engineering discipline, a unique integrated capability for large-scale computing and experimentation, and the proven ability to deliver solutions involving the most complex and difficult technical systems. This white paper outlines some emerging challenges and why the nation needs Los Alamos, the premier National Security Science Laboratory, to meet these challenges.

  19. Neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am

    SciTech Connect

    Jandel, M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Bond, E. M.; Chadwick, M. B.; Clement, R. R.; Couture, A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Kawano, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Parker, W. E.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.

    2008-09-15

    The neutron capture cross section of {sup 241}Am for incident neutrons from 0.02 eV to 320 keV has been measured with the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments (DANCE) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The thermal neutron capture cross section was determined to be 665{+-}33 b. Our result is in good agreement with other recent measurements. Resonance parameters for E{sub n}<12 eV were obtained using an R-matrix fit to the measured cross section. The results are compared with values from the ENDF/B-VII.0, Mughabghab, JENDL-3.3, and JEFF-3.1 evaluations. {gamma}{sub n} neutron widths for the first three resonances are systematically larger by 5-15% than the ENDF/B-VII.0 values. The resonance integral above 0.5 eV was determined to be 1553{+-}7 b. Cross sections in the resolved and unresolved energy regions above 12 eV were calculated using the Hauser-Feshbach theory incorporating the width-fluctuation correction of Moldauer. The calculated results agree well with the measured data, and the extracted averaged resonance parameters in the unresolved resonance region are consistent with those for the resolved resonances.

  20. Los Alamos Science, Fall 1983 No. 9

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, N G

    1983-10-01

    Topics covered in this issue include: cellular automata, gene expression, gen-bank and its promise for molecular genetics, and frontiers of supercomputing. Abstracts have been prepared for the individual items. (GHT)

  1. α and 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotiades, N.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; Nelson, R. O.; Kunieda, S.; Kawano, T.

    2015-06-01

    Background: The cross sections for populating the residual nucleus in the reaction ZAX(n,x) Z -2 A -4Y exhibit peaks as a function of incident neutron energy corresponding to the (n ,n'α ) reaction and, at higher energy, to the (n ,2 p 3 n ) reaction. The relative magnitudes of these peaks vary with the Z of the target nucleus. Purpose: Study fast neutron-induced reactions on 60Ni. Locate experimentally the nuclear charge region along the line of stability where the cross sections for α emission and for 2 p 2 n emission in fast neutron-induced reactions are comparable as a further test of reaction models. Methods: Data were taken by using the Germanium Array for Neutron-Induced Excitations. The broad-spectrum pulsed neutron beam of the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center's Weapons Neutron Research facility provided neutrons in the energy range from 1 to 250 MeV. The time-of-flight technique was used to determine the incident-neutron energies. Results: Absolute partial cross sections for production of seven discrete Fe γ rays populated in 60Ni (n ,α /2 p x n γ ) reactions with 2 ≤x ≤5 were measured for neutron energies 1 MeVneutron energies while discrepancies appear at higher neutron energies. The cross section for producing an isotope in fast neutron-induced reactions on stable targets via α emission at the peak of the (n ,α ) and (n ,n'α ) reactions is comparable to that for 2 p 2 n and 2 p 3 n emission at higher incident energies in the nuclear charge region around Fe.

  2. Los Alamos contribution to target diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, J.M.; Baker, D.A.; Caldwell, S.E.

    1994-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will have a large suite of sophisticated target diagnostics. This will allow thoroughly diagnosed experiments to be performed both at the ignition and pre-ignition levels. As part of the national effort Los Alamos National Laboratory will design, construct and implement a number of diagnostics for the NIF. This paper describes Los Alamos contributions to the ``phase I diagnostics.`` Phase I represents the most fundamental and basic measurement systems that will form the core for most work on the NIF. The Los Alamos effort falls into four categories: moderate to hard X-ray (time resolved imaging neutron spectroscopy- primarily with neutron time of flight devices; burn diagnostics utilizing gamma ray measurements; testing measurement concepts on the TRIDENT laser system at Los Alamos. Because of the high blast, debris and radiation environment, the design of high resolution X-ray imaging systems present significant challenges. Systems with close target proximity require special protection and methods for such protection is described. The system design specifications based on expected target performance parameters is also described. Diagnosis of nuclear yield and burn will be crucial to the NIF operation. Nuclear reaction diagnosis utilizing both neutron and gamma ray detection is discussed. The Los Alamos TRIDENT laser system will be used extensively for the development of new measurement concepts and diagnostic instrumentation. Some its potential roles in the development of diagnostics for NIF are given.

  3. Polar Maps of Thermal and Epithermal Neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Observations by NASA's 2001 Mars Odyssey spacecraft show views of the polar regions of Mars in thermal neutrons (top) and epithermal neutrons (bottom). In these maps, deep blue indicates a low amount of neutrons, and red indicates a high amount. Thermal neutrons are sensitive to the presence of hydrogen and the presence of carbon dioxide, in this case 'dry ice' frost. The red area in the upper right map indicates that about one meter (three feet) of carbon dioxide frost covers the surface around the north pole, as it does every Mars winter in the polar regions. An enhancement of thermal neutrons close to the south pole, seen as a light green color on the upper left map, indicates the presence of residual carbon dioxide in the south polar cap, even though the annual frost dissipated from that region during southern summer. Soil enriched with hydrogen is indicated by the deep blue colors on the epithermal maps (bottom), showing a low intensity of epithermal neutrons. The deep blue areas in the polar regions are believed to contain up to 50 percent water ice in the upper one meter (three feet) of the soil. The views shown here are of measurements made during the first three months of mapping using the neutron spectrometer instrument, part of the gamma ray spectrometer instrument suite. Topographic features are superimposed on the map for geographic reference.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. Investigators at Arizona State University in Tempe, the University of Arizona in Tucson, and NASA's Johnson Space Center, Houston, operate the science instruments. The gamma-ray spectrometer was provided by the University of Arizona in collaboration with the Russian Aviation and Space Agency, which provided the high-energy neutron detector, and the Los Alamos National Laboratories, New Mexico, which provided the neutron spectrometer. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime

  4. Precision Neutron Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Monisha; Barron-Palos, L.; Bowman, J. D.; Chupp, T. E.; Crawford, C.; Danagoulian, A.; Klein, A.; Penttila, S. I.; Salas-Bacci, A. F.; Wilburn, W. S.

    2008-04-01

    Proposed PANDA and abBA experiments aim to measure the correlation coefficients in the polarized neutron beta decay at the SNS. The goal of these experiments is 0.1% measurement which will require neutron polarimetry at 0.1% level. The FnPB neutron beam will be polarized either using a ^3He spin filter or a supermirror polarizer and the neutron polarization will be measured using a ^3He spin filter. Experiment to establish the accuracy to which neutron polarization can be determined using ^3He spin fliters was performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory in Summer 2007 and the analysis is in progress. The details of the experiment and the results will be presented.

  5. Development of a new fast neutron spectrometer using 6Li-depleted Cs2LiYCl6 scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Olympia, Nathan W.

    A unique alternative to traditional methods of fast neutron spectroscopy was explored in this work using 6Li-depleted Cs 2LiYCl6:Ce (CLYC) scintillators. These inorganic scintillators were found to provide spectroscopic information on fast neutrons via the 35Cl(n,p)35S and 35Cl(n,alpha) 32P reactions and exhibit neutron/gamma pulse-shape discrimination. In additional to detailed characterizations of the material's response function, an array of 16 6Li-depleted CLYC detectors (C7LYC) was designed, constructed, and tested for future applications in neutron spectroscopy. Measurements of mono-energetic neutrons up to 20 MeV were carried out at the University of Kentucky and used to characterize the detector's response. Monte Carlo simulations of the response were carried out with MCNPX to investigate the various reaction mechanisms involved in the total response. Measurements of a continuous spallation neutron source with energies up to 700 MeV were carried out at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) using the time-of-flight method to measure the light output as a function of incident neutron energy and generate a detector response matrix. Spectral unfolding of C7LYC's response was investigated using the Maximum Likelihood Expectation Maximization method. The performance of the 16-detector array, SCANS, was studied to determine rate and energy dependent properties of the detectors, such as resolution, and pulse-shape discrimination, when exposed to fast neutrons and gamma-rays.

  6. Non-Statistical Effects in Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, P. E.; Guber, K. H.; Harvey, J. A.; Wiarda, D.; Bredeweg, T. A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wouters, J. M.; Reifarth, R.

    2009-01-28

    There have been many reports of non-statistical effects in neutron-capture measurements. However, reports of deviations of reduced-neutron-width ({gamma}{sub n}{sup 0}) distributions from the expected Porter-Thomas (PT) shape largely have been ignored. Most of these deviations have been reported for odd-A nuclides. Because reliable spin (J) assignments have been absent for most resonances for such nuclides, it is possible that reported deviations from PT might be due to incorrect J assignments. We recently developed a new method for measuring spins of neutron resonances by using the DANCE detector at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measurements made with a {sup 147}Sm sample allowed us to determine spins of almost all known resonances below 1 keV. Furthermore, analysis of these data revealed that the {gamma}{sub n}{sup 0} distribution was in good agreement with PT for resonances below 350 eV, but in disagreement with PT for resonances between 350 and 700 eV. Our previous (n,{alpha}) measurements had revealed that the {alpha} strength function also changes abruptly at this energy. There currently is no known explanation for these two non-statistical effects. Recently, we have developed another new method for determining the spins of neutron resonances. To implement this technique required a small change (to record pulse-height information for coincidence events) to a much simpler apparatus: A pair of C{sub 6}D{sub 6}{gamma}-ray detectors which we have employed for many years to measure neutron-capture cross sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Measurements with a {sup 95}Mo sample revealed that not only does the method work very well for determining spins, but it also makes possible parity assignments. Taken together, these new techniques at LANSCE and ORELA could be very useful for further elucidation of non-statistical effects.

  7. Non-Statistical Effects in Neutron Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Koehler, Paul Edward; Bredeweg, t a; Guber, Klaus H; Harvey, John A; O'Donnell, J. M.; Reifarth, R.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, D. J.; Wiarda, Dorothea; Wouters, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    There have been many reports of non-statistical effects in neutron-capture measurements. However, reports of deviations of reduced-neutron-width ({Gamma}n{sup 0}) distributions from the expected Porter-Thomas (PT) shape largely have been ignored. Most of these deviations have been reported for odd-A nuclides. Because reliable spin (J) assignments have been absent for most resonances for such nuclides, it is possible that reported deviations from PT might be due to incorrect J assignments. We recently developed a new method for measuring spins of neutron resonances by using the DANCE detector at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). Measurements made with a 147Sm sample allowed us to determine spins of almost all known resonances below 1 keV. Furthermore, analysis of these data revealed that the {Gamma}n{sup 0} distribution was in good agreement with PT for resonances below 350 eV, but in disagreement with PT for resonances between 350 and 700 eV. Our previous (n,{alpha}) measurements had revealed that the {alpha} strength function also changes abruptly at this energy. There currently is no known explanation for these two non-statistical effects. Recently, we have developed another new method for determining the spins of neutron resonances. To implement this technique required a small change (to record pulse-height information for coincidence events) to a much simpler apparatus: A pair of C6D6 ?-ray detectors which we have employed for many years to measure neutron-capture cross sections at the Oak Ridge Electron Linear Accelerator (ORELA). Measurements with a 95Mo sample revealed that not only does the method work very well for determining spins, but it also makes possible parity assignments. Taken together, these new techniques at LANSCE and ORELA could be very useful for further elucidation of non-statistical effects.

  8. Analysis of the Nuclear Structure of 186 Re Using Neutron-Induced Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matters, David; McClory, John; Carroll, James; Chiara, Chris; Fotiades, Nikolaos; Devlin, Matt; Nelson, Ron O.

    2015-04-01

    Evaluated nuclear structure data for 186 Re identifies the majority of spin-parity assignments as tentative, with approximate values associated with the energies of several levels and transitions. In particular, the absence of known transitions that feed the Jπ =8+ isomer motivates their discovery, which would have astrophysical implications and a potential application in the development of an isomer power source. Using the GErmanium Array for Neutron Induced Excitations (GEANIE) spectrometer at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Weapons Neutron Research (WNR) facility, the (n,2n γ) and (n,n' γ) reactions in a 99.52% enriched 187 Re target were used to measure γ-ray excitation functions in 186 Re and 187 Re, respectively. A preliminary analysis of the data obtained from the experiment reveals several new transitions in 186 Re and 187 Re.

  9. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2015-11-18

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  10. Preparation of iridium targets by electrodeposition for neutron capture cross section measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bond, Evelyn M.; Moody, W. Allen; Arnold, Charles; Bredeweg, Todd A.; Jandel, Marian; Rusev, Gencho Y.

    2016-03-01

    Here, the preparation of 191Ir and 193Ir electrodeposits for neutron capture cross-section measurements at the detector for advanced neutron capture experiments located at the at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is described. The electrodeposition of iridium in the desired thickness of 0.4–1 mg/cm2 is challenging. Better yields and thicknesses were obtained using electrodeposition from isopropyl alcohol solutions than from ammonium sulfate solutions. 191Ir and 193Ir targets were initially prepared using the standard single-sided electrodeposition cell. Iridium electrodepositions using a double-sided electrodeposition cell were developed and were optimized, resulting in thick, uniform iridium deposits. LA UR 15-22475.

  11. Preliminary neutron and X-ray crystallographic studies of equine cyanomethemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalevsky, A.Y.; Fisher, S.Z.; Seaver, S.; Mustyakimov, M.; Sukumar, N.; Langan, P.; Mueser, T.C.; Hanson, B.L.

    2010-08-18

    Room-temperature and 100 K X-ray and room-temperature neutron diffraction data have been measured from equine cyanomethemoglobin to 1.7 {angstrom} resolution using a home source, to 1.6 {angstrom} resolution on NE-CAT at the Advanced Photon Source and to 2.0 {angstrom} resolution on the PCS at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, respectively. The cyanomethemoglobin is in the R state and preliminary room-temperature electron and neutron scattering density maps clearly show the protonation states of potential Bohr groups. Interestingly, a water molecule that is in the vicinity of the heme group and coordinated to the distal histidine appears to be expelled from this site in the low-temperature structure.

  12. A Search for Exotic Spin-Dependent Interactions of the Neutron using Neutron Spin Rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddock, Chris; Nsr Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Many theories beyond the Standard Model lead at low energy to spin-dependent, weakly-coupled interactions of mesoscopic range. Laboratory constraints on such interactions are quite poor. We describe an experiment in progress at the LANSCE spallation neutron source at Los Alamos to search for exotic axial couplings of neutrons to matter from light vector boson exchange. The experiment makes use of a slow neutron polarimeter and a target with an oscillating mass density. Neutron Spin Rotation.

  13. High-energy response of the PRESCILA and WENDI-II neutron rem meters.

    PubMed

    Olsher, Richard H; McLean, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    WENDI-II was designed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) specifically as a wide-range rem meter, suitable for applications at particle accelerators, with response extension to 5 GeV. PRESCILA was also designed at LANL, mainly as a lightweight alternative to traditional rem meters, but has shown excellent response characteristics above 20 MeV. This Note summarises measurements performed over a span of 4 y to characterise the high-energy neutron response (>20 MeV) of these meters to several hundred million electron volts. High-energy quasi-monoenergetic beams utilised as part of this study were produced by the cyclotron facilities at the Université Catholique de Louvain (33 and 60 MeV) and the T. Svedberg Laboratory ( 46, 95, 143 and 173 MeV). In addition, measurements were also conducted at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, 800 MeV spallation neutron source, in broad energy fields with an average energy of 345 MeV. For the sake of completeness, data collected between 2.5 and 19 MeV in monoenergetic neutron fields at the German Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) facility are also included in this study. PMID:18381335

  14. RFQ development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Stokes, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The basic principles of the radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) linac are reviewed and a summary of past and present Los Alamos work is presented. Some beam-dynamics effects, important for RFQ design, are discussed. A design example is shown for xenon and a brief discussion of low-frequency RFQ structures is given.

  15. HEIMDAL: A thermal neutron powder diffractometer with high and flexible resolution combined with SANS and neutron imaging - Designed for materials science studies at the European Spallation Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, Sonja L.; Lefmann, Kim; Henry, Paul F.; Bertelsen, Mads; Schefer, Jürg; Christensen, Mogens

    2016-08-01

    HEIMDAL will be a multi length scale neutron scattering instrument for the study of structures covering almost nine orders of magnitude from 0.01 nm to 50 mm. The instrument is accepted for construction at the European Spallation Source (ESS) and features a variable resolution thermal neutron powder diffractometer (TNPD), combined with small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and neutron imaging (NI). The instrument uses a novel combination of a cold and a thermal guide to fulfill the diverse requirements for diffraction and SANS. With an instrument length of 170 m, HEIMDAL will take advantage of the high neutron flux of the long pulse at ESS, whilst maintaining a high q-resolution due to the long flight path. The q-range coverage is up to 20 Å-1 allowing low-resolution PDF analysis. With the addition of SANS, HEIMDAL will be able to cover a uniquely broad length scale within a single instrumental set-up. HEIMDAL will be able to accommodate modern materials research in a broad variety of fields, and the task of the instrument will be to study advanced functional materials in action, as in situ and in operandi at multiple length scales (0.01-100 nm) quasi simultaneously. The instrument combines state-of-the-art neutron scattering techniques (TNPD, SANS, and NI) with the goal of studying real materials, in real time, under real conditions. This article describes the instrument design ideas, calculations and results of simulations and virtual experiments.

  16. Using spallation neutron sources for defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Pynn, R.; Sterbenz, S.M.; Weinacht, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    Advanced characterization techniques and accelerated simulation are the cornerstones of the Energy Department`s science-based program to maintain confidence in the safety, reliability, and performance of the US nuclear deterrent in an era of no nuclear testing. Neutrons and protons provided by an accelerator-based facility have an important role to play in this program, impacting several of the key stockpile stewardship and management issues identified by the Department of Defense. Many of the techniques used for defense research at a spallation source have been used for many years for the basic research community, and to a lesser extent by industrial scientists. By providing access to a broad spectrum of researchers with different backgrounds, a spallation source such as the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center is able to promote synergistic interaction between defense, basic and industrial researchers. This broadens the scientific basis of the stockpile stewardship program in the short term and will provide spin-off to industrial and basic research in the longer term.

  17. Precision Polarization of Neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Elise; Barron-Palos, Libertad; Couture, Aaron; Crawford, Christopher; Chupp, Tim; Danagoulian, Areg; Estes, Mary; Hona, Binita; Jones, Gordon; Klein, Andi; Penttila, Seppo; Sharma, Monisha; Wilburn, Scott

    2009-05-01

    Determining polarization of a cold neutron beam to high precision is required for the next generation neutron decay correlation experiments at the SNS, such as the proposed abBA and PANDA experiments. Precision polarimetry measurements were conducted at Los Alamos National Laboratory with the goal of determining the beam polarization to the level of 10-3 or better. The cold neutrons from FP12 were polarized using optically polarized ^3He gas as a spin filter, which has a highly spin-dependent absorption cross section. A second ^ 3He spin filter was used to analyze the neutron polarization after passing through a resonant RF spin rotator. A discussion of the experiment and results will be given.

  18. Neutron filters for producing monoenergetic neutron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, J.A.; Hill, N.W.; Harvey, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Neutron transmission measurements have been made on high-purity, highly-enriched samples of /sup 58/Ni (99.9%), /sup 60/Ni (99.7%), /sup 64/Zn (97.9%) and /sup 184/W (94.5%) to measure their neutron windows and to assess their potential usefulness for producing monoenergetic beams of intermediate energies from a reactor. Transmission measurements on the Los Alamos Sc filter (44.26 cm Sc and 1.0 cm Ti) have been made to determine the characteristics of the transmitted neutron beam and to measure the total cross section of Sc at the 2.0 keV minimum. When corrected for the Ti and impurities, a value of 0.35 +- 0.03 b was obtained for this minimum.

  19. Nuclear-accident dosimetry: measurements at the Los Alamos SHEBA critical assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilik, D.G.; Martin, R.W.; Fuller, D.

    1981-07-01

    Criticality dosimeters were exposed to different degraded neutron and gamma-ray energy spectra from the Los Alamos Solution High Energy Burst Assembly (SHEBA). The liquid critical test assembly was operated in the continuous mode to provide a mixed source of neutron and gamma-ray radiation for the evaluation of Los Alamos criticality detector systems. Different neutron and gamma-ray spectra were generated by operating the reactor (a) shielded by 12 cm of Lucite, (b) unshielded, (c) shielded by 20 cm of concrete, and (d) shielded by 15 cm of steel. This report summarizes the dosimetry measurements conducted for these different configurations. In-air measurements were conducted with shielded and unshielded area and personnel dosimeters. Phantom measurements were made using personnel dosimeters. Combined blood-sodium and hair sulfur activation measurements of absorbed dose were also made. In addition, indium foils placed on phantoms were evaluated for the purpose of screening personnel for radiation exposure.

  20. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) Facility at BATAN for Nanostructure Studies in Materials Science and Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putra, E. Giri Rachman

    2010-01-01

    A 36 meter small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) BATAN spectrometer (SMARTer) which is the second largest SANS spectrometer nowadays in the Asia-Oceania region was constructed at the neutron scattering laboratory (NSL) in Serpong, Indonesia. Lots of works on replacing, upgrading and improving the control system, experimental methods, data collection and reduction in the last three years have been carried out to revitalize and then optimize the performance of SMARTer. At first, some standard samples were measured for the inter-laboratory comparison and several kinds of substances such as liquid, gel, powder, and solid-state thin film have been investigated recently of proposed research interest. The morphological changes from ellipsoidal into cylindrical (worm-like) micelles of self-assembly amphiphilic molecules, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and transformation of disordered into ordered spherical micelle system from unimer Gaussian coils of PEO-PPO-PEO triblock copolymers (Pluronics) in solution by salt addition were also observed. Particle size and its distribution of spherical polystyrene latex and silica nanoparticles in dilute solution have been simply distinguished by applying a spherical calculation model. Bragg peaks which correspond to a lamellar structure was revealed from a powder sample of silver behenate [CH3(CH2)20COOAg] nanoparticle and a solid-state PS-PEP, polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene-alt-propylene), diblock copolymer film. The growth mechanism and fractal structures from aggregation of nanoparticles such as Fe3O4 ferrofluids or titanium-silica aerogels were investigated directly using a SANS technique through a power-law scattering of fractal structures approximation fitted at their scattering profiles. Meanwhile, magnetic structure from metal-alloys, CuNiFe showing anisotropic magnetic scattering structure properties up to 1 Tesla of external magnetic field was also accomplished confirming the nanocrystalline and magnetic domain sizes. The detail

  1. RFQ development at Los Alamos

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.D.; Cornelius, W.D.; Purser, F.O.; Jameson, R.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    We report recent progress on the two radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) structures being developed at Los Alamos. First, we report on the second 425-MHz RFQ for H/sup -/ acceleration, which is being built in a research effort to understand and further develop the RFQ. Second, we discuss progress on the 80-MHz cw RFQ for deuterons, which is being built for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility.

  2. Review of Livermore-Led Neutron Capture Studies Using DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, W; Sheets, S; Agvaanluvsan, U; Becker, J; Becvar, F; Bredeweg, T; Clement, R; Couture, A; Esch, E; Haight, R; Jandel, M; Krticka, M; Mitchell, G; Macri, R; O'Donnell, J; Reifarth, R; Rundberg, R; Schwantes, J; Ullmann, J; Vieira, D; Wouters, J; Wilk, P

    2007-05-11

    We have made neutron capture cross-section measurements using the white neutron source at the Los Alamos Science Center, the DANCE detector array (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) and targets important for basic science and stockpile stewardship. In this paper, we review results from (n,{gamma}) reactions on {sup 94,95}Mo, {sup 152,154,157,160,nat}Gd, {sup 151,153}Eu and {sup 242m}Am for neutron energies from < 1eV up to {approx} 20 keV. We measured details of the {gamma}-ray cascade following neutron capture, for comparison with results of statistical model simulations. We determined the neutron energy dependent (n,{gamma}) cross section and gained information about statistical decay properties, including the nuclear level density and the photon strength function. Because of the high granularity of the detector array, it is possible to look at gamma cascades with a specified number of transitions (a specific multiplicity). We simulated {gamma}-ray cascades using a combination of the DICEBOX/GEANT computer codes. In the case of the deformed nuclei, we found evidence of a scissors-mode resonance. For the Eu, we also determined the (n,{gamma}) cross sections. For the {sup 94,95}Mo, we focused on the spin and parity assignments of the resonances and the determination of the photon strength functions for the compound nuclei {sup 95,96}Mo. Future plans include measurements on actinide targets; our immediate interest is in {sup 242m}Am.

  3. Application of neutron diffraction in characterization of texture evolution during high-temperature creep in magnesium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, Sven C; Sediako, Dimitry; Shook, S; Sediako, A

    2010-01-01

    A good combination of room-temperature and elevated temperature strength and ductility, good salt-spray corrosion resistance and exceUent diecastability are frequently among the main considerations in development of a new alloy. Unfortunately, there has been much lesser effort in development of wrought-stock alloys for high temperature applications. Extrudability and high temperature performance of wrought material becomes an important factor in an effort to develop new wrought alloys and processing technologies. This paper shows some results received in creep testing and studies of in-creep texture evolution for several wrought magnesium alloys developed for use in elevated-temperature applications. These studies were performed using E3 neutron spectrometer of the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre in Chalk River, ON, and HIPPO time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometer at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, NM.

  4. Gamma-Ray Emission Spectra as a Constraint on Calculations of 234 , 236 , 238U Neutron-Capture Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullmann, J. L.; Krticka, M.; Kawano, T.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Baramsai, B.; Couture, A.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Mosby, S.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Rundberg, R. S.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Wu, C. Y.; Chyzh, A.

    2015-10-01

    Calculations of the neutron-capture cross section at low neutron energies (10 eV through 100's of keV) are very sensitive to the nuclear level density and radiative strength function. These quantities are often poorly known, especially for radioactive targets, and actual measurements of the capture cross section are usually required. An additional constraint on the calculation of the capture cross section is provided by measurements of the cascade gamma spectrum following neutron capture. Recent measurements of 234 , 236 , 238U(n, γ) emission spectra made using the DANCE 4 π BaF2 array at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center will be presented. Calculations of gamma-ray spectra made using the DICEBOX code and of the capture cross section made using the CoH3 code will also be presented. These techniques may be also useful for calculations of more unstable nuclides. This work was performed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration by Los Alamos National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-06NA25396) and Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (Contract DE-AC52-07NA2734).

  5. Operational comparison of bubble (super heated drop) dosimetry with routine albedo TLD for a selected group of Pu-238 workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.L.; Hoffman, J.M.; Foltyn, E.M.; Buhl, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Personnel neutron dosimetry continues to be a difficult science due to the lack of availability of robust passive dosimeters that exhibit tissue- or near-tissue- equivalent response. This paper is an operational study that compares the use of albedo thermoluminescent dosimeters with bubble dosimeters to determine whether bubble dosimeters do provide a useful daily ALARA tool that can yield measurements close to the dose-of-record. A group of workers at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) working on the Radioisotopic Thermoelectric Generators (RTG) for the NASA Cassini space mission wore both bubble dosimeters and albedo dosimeters over a period from 1993 through 1996. The personal albedo dosimeter was processed on a monthly basis and used as the dose-of-record. The results of this study indicated that cumulative daily bubble dosimetry results agreed with whole-body albedo dosimetry results within about 37% on average.

  6. Testing Monte Carlo Simulations for Neutron Scattering in MoNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, A.; Garrett, S.; Seagren, T.; Taylor, N. E.; Rogers, W. F.; MoNA Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Monte Carlo simulations provide an important tool for nuclear physics research, both in preparing for experiments, and in interpreting experimental data. The Modular Neutron Array (MoNA) and the Large area multi-Institutional Scintillator Array (LISA) are used in conjunction with the Sweeper Magnet and charged particle detector chamber at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL) at Michigan State University to study the properties of exotic, neutron-rich nuclei. We use simulations to model our BC408 scintillator detectors and extract physics results from experimental data. We have developed specific simulations in preparation for an experiment we will conduct at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE), where we will direct a well-defined neutron beam onto a cluster of 16 MoNA detector bars and observe the scattering patterns of single neutrons. Simulations enable us to study the predicted light output generated by individual neutron scattering channels from Carbon and Hydrogen. The data we will generate in the LANSCE experiment will provide a large experimental database with which to test the reliability of our simulations. This is important since our understanding of nuclei far from stability is becoming increasingly reliant on simulations. this work supported by NSF Grants PHY-1101745 and PHY-1506402.

  7. High Speed Data Acquisition System for Three-Dimensional X-Ray and Neutron Computed Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, A.W.; Claytor, T.N.; Sheats, M.J.

    1999-07-01

    Computed tomography for nondestructive evaluation applications has been limited by system cost, resolution, and time requirements for three-dimensional data sets. FlashCT (Flat panel Amorphous Silicon High-Resolution Computed Tomography) is a system developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory to address these three problems. Developed around a flat panel amorphous silicon detector array, FlashCT is suitable for low to medium energy x-ray and neutron computed tomography at 127-micron resolution. Overall system size is small, allowing rapid transportation to a variety of radiographic sources. System control software was developed in LabVIEW for Windows NT to allow multithreading of data acquisition, data correction, and staging motor control. The system control software simplifies data collection and allows fully automated control of the data acquisition process, leading toward remote or unattended operation. The first generation of the FlashCT Data Acquisition System was completed in Au gust 1998, and since that time the system has been tested using x-ray sources ranging in energy from 60 kV to 20MV. The system has also been used to collect data for thermal neutron computed tomography at Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). System improvements have been proposed to provide faster data collection and greater dynamic range during data collection.

  8. Fundamental neutron physics at LANSCE

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, G.

    1995-10-01

    Modern neutron sources and science share a common origin in mid-20th-century scientific investigations concerned with the study of the fundamental interactions between elementary particles. Since the time of that common origin, neutron science and the study of elementary particles have evolved into quite disparate disciplines. The neutron became recognized as a powerful tool for studying condensed matter with modern neutron sources being primarily used (and justified) as tools for neutron scattering and materials science research. The study of elementary particles has, of course, led to the development of rather different tools and is now dominated by activities performed at extremely high energies. Notwithstanding this trend, the study of fundamental interactions using neutrons has continued and remains a vigorous activity at many contemporary neutron sources. This research, like neutron scattering research, has benefited enormously by the development of modern high-flux neutron facilities. Future sources, particularly high-power spallation sources, offer exciting possibilities for continuing this research.

  9. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays,more » fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.« less

  10. Cross section measurements at LANSCE for defense, science and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Ronald O.; Schwengner, R.; Zuber, K.

    2015-05-28

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) has three neutron sources that are used for nuclear science measurements. These sources are driven by an 800 MeV proton linear accelerator and cover an energy range from sub-thermal to hundreds of MeV. Research at the facilities is performed under the auspices of a US DOE user program under which research proposals are rated for merit by a program advisory committee and are scheduled based on merit and availability of beam time. A wide variety of instruments is operated at the neutron flight paths at LANSCE including neutron detector arrays, gamma-ray detector arrays, fission fragment detectors, and charged particle detectors. These instruments provide nuclear data for multiple uses that range from increasing knowledge in fundamental science to satisfying data needs for diverse applications such as nuclear energy, global security, and industrial applications. In addition, highlights of recent research related to cross sections measurements are presented, and future research initiatives are discussed.