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1

Alaska Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the Alaska Volcano Observatory, a joint program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). Users can access current information on volcanic activity in Alaska and the Kamchatka Penninsula, including weekly and daily reports and information releases about significant changes in any particluar volcano. An interactive map also directs users to summaries and activity notifications for selected volcanoes, or through links to webcams and webicorders (recordings of seismic activity). General information on Alaskan volcanoes includes descriptions, images, maps, bibliographies, and eruptive histories. This can be accessed through an interactive map or by clicking on an alphabetic listing of links to individual volcanoes. There is also an online library of references pertinent to Quaternary volcanism in Alaska and an image library.

2

AVO: Alaska Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site illustrates the Alaska Volcano Observatory's (AVO) objective to monitor Alaska's volcanoes for the purpose of forecasting volcanic activity and alleviating hazards. AVO's seismometers and satellite imagery allow visitors to obtain current information on selected volcanoes. Because AVO is responsible for volcanic emergencies, people in Alaska can visit the Web site to determine their vulnerability. The site also features AVO's research in geological mapping, modeling of magnetic systems, and development of new instrumentation for predication and interpretation of volcanic unrest. Everyone can appreciate the images of past volcanic eruptions.

3

Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring Station  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

An Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring station with Peulik Volcano behind. This is the main repeater for the Peulik monitoring network located on Whale Mountain, Beecharaof National Wildlife Refuge....

2009-12-08

4

Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and research opportunities for Russian and American students. AVO was a three-way partnership of the federal and state geological surveys and the state university from the start. This was not a flowering of ecumenism but was rather at the insistence of the Alaska congressional delegation. Such shared enterprises are not managerially convenient, but they do bring a diversity of roles, thinking, and expertise that would not otherwise be possible. Through AVO, the USGS performs its federally mandated role in natural hazard mitigation and draws on expertise available from its network of volcano observatories. The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys performs a similar role at the state level and, in the tradition of state surveys, provides important public communications, state data base, and mapping functions. The University of Alaska Fairbanks brought seismological, remote sensing, geodetic, petrological, and physical volcanological expertise, and uniquely within US academia was able to engage students directly in volcano observatory activities. Although this "model" cannot be adopted in total elsewhere, it has served to point the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in a direction of greater openness and inclusiveness.

Eichelberger, J. C.

2008-12-01

5

Alaska Volcano Observatory Seismic Network Data Availability  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) established in 1988 as a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, monitors active volcanoes in Alaska. Thirty-three volcanoes are currently monitored by a seismograph network consisting of 193 stations, of which 40 are three-component stations. The current state of AVO’s seismic network, and data processing and availability are summarized in the annual AVO seismological bulletin, Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaska Volcanoes, published as a USGS Data Series (most recent at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/467). Despite a rich seismic data set for 12 VEI 2 or greater eruptions, and over 80,000 located earthquakes in the last 21 years, the volcanic seismicity in the Aleutian Arc remains understudied. Initially, AVO seismic data were only provided via a data supplement as part of the annual bulletin, or upon request. Over the last few years, AVO has made seismic data more available with the objective of increasing volcano seismic research on the Aleutian Arc. The complete AVO earthquake catalog data are now available through the annual AVO bulletin and have been submitted monthly to the on-line Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) composite catalog since 2008. Segmented waveform data for all catalog earthquakes are available upon request and efforts are underway to make this archive web accessible as well. Continuous data were first archived using a tape backup, but the availability of low cost digital storage media made a waveform backup of continuous data a reality. Currently the continuous AVO waveform data can be found in several forms. Since late 2002, AVO has burned all continuous waveform data to DVDs, as well as storing these data in Antelope databases at the Geophysical Institute. Beginning in 2005, data have been available through a Winston Wave Server housed at the USGS in Anchorage. AVO waveform data were added to the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center (IRIS-DMC) beginning in 2008 and now includes continuous waveform data from all available AVO seismograph stations in real time. Data coverage is available through the DMC’s Metadata Aggregator.

Dixon, J. P.; Haney, M. M.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Searcy, C. K.; Stihler, S. D.; West, M. E.

2009-12-01

6

2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

2014-01-01

7

2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005-06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO...

C. A. Neal, J. P. Dixon, R. G. McGimsey

2007-01-01

8

Twenty years of Alaska Volcano Observatory's contributions to seismology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys observed its 20th anniversary in 2008. The AVO seismic network, inherited from AVO partners in 1988, consisted of three small-aperture subnetworks on Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano and Augustine Volcano and regional stations for a total of 23 short-period instruments (two with three-components). Twenty years later, the AVO network has expanded to 192 stations (23 three-component short-period, and 15 broadband) on 33 volcanoes spanning 2500 km across the Aleutian arc in one of the most remote and challenging environments in the world. The AVO seismic network provides for a unique data set. Within the seismically active Aleutian Arc, there are instrumented volcanoes which exhibit a variety of chemical compositions and eruptive styles. With each individual volcanic center similarly instrumented and all data analyzed in a consistent manner AVO has produced a data set suitable for making seismic comparisons across a wide suite of volcanoes. In twenty years, the AVO has captured data sets for eruptions at Augustine, Kasatochi, Okmok, Pavlof, Redoubt, Shishaldin, Spurr, and Venianinof. AVO data set also includes several volcanic-tectonic swarms, most notably at Akutan, Iliamna, Mageik, Martin, Shishaldin, and Tanaga. This broad approach to volcano seismology has led to a better understanding of precursory earthquake swarms, variations in background rates, triggered seismicity, the structure of volcanoes, volcanic tremor and deep long period earthquakes, among numerous other topics. The AVO also incorporates data from seismic stations operated by both the Alaska Earthquake Information Center and West Coast and Alaska Tsunami Warning Center to help locate some of the 70,000 earthquakes in the AVO catalog. In exchange AVO provides dense seismic data from the Aleutians which are routinely used to locate earthquakes throughout the north Pacific. In addition to seismic data, AVO also collects data from campaign and continuous GPS, web cameras, and pressure sensors.

Dixon, J. P.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.; West, M.

2008-12-01

9

1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

1995-01-01

10

2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

2014-01-01

11

Cascades Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Cascades Volcano Observatory of the U.S. Geological Survey has announced a WWW server offering information on volcanically-induced geologic and hydrologic hazards as well as images of volcanoes and volcanic phenomena. Includes links to ther components of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program such as the Alaska and Hawaii Volcano Observatory and the international Volcano Disaster Assistance Program.

12

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out volcano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in Alaska. The cooperating agencies of  

E-print Network

#12;The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out volcano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in Alaska. The cooperating agencies of AVO are the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI

13

2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O. A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

2014-01-01

14

Development of Alaska Volcano Observatory Seismic Networks, 1988-2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The number and quality of seismic stations and networks on Alaskan volcanoes have increased dramatically in the 20 years from 1988 to 2008. Starting with 28 stations on six volcanoes in 1988, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) now operates 194 stations in networks on 33 volcanoes spanning the 2000 km Aleutian Arc. All data are telemetered in real time to laboratory facilities in Fairbanks and Anchorage and recorded on digital acquisition systems. Data are used for both monitoring and research. The basic and standard network designs are driven by practical considerations including geography and terrain, access to commercial telecommunications services, and environmental vulnerability. Typical networks consist of 6 to 8 analog stations, whose data can be telemetered to fit on a single analog telephone circuit terminated ultimately in either Fairbanks or Anchorage. Towns provide access to commercial telecommunications and signals are often consolidated for telemetry by remote computer systems. Most AVO stations consist of custom made fiberglass huts that house the batteries, electronics, and antennae. Solar panels are bolted to the south facing side of the huts and the seismometers are buried nearby. The huts are rugged and have allowed for good station survivability and performance reliability. However, damage has occurred from wind, wind-blown pumice, volcanic ejecta, lightning, icing, and bears. Power is provided by multiple isolated banks of storage batteries charged by solar panels. Primary cells are used to provide backup power should the rechargable system fail or fall short of meeting the requirement. In the worst cases, snow loading blocks the solar panels for 7 months, so sufficient power storage must provide power for at least this long. Although primarily seismic stations, the huts and overall design allow additional instruments to be added, such as infrasound sensors, webcams, electric field meters, etc. Yearly maintenance visits are desirable, but some stations have operated for more than 10 years with no site visits. In the last five years AVO began upgrading select analog networks by adding telemetered broadband digital seismometers and GPS instruments.

Tytgat, G.; Paskievitch, J. F.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.

2008-12-01

15

2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

2014-01-01

16

1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

1997-01-01

17

2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

2011-01-01

18

2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

2011-01-01

19

2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

2008-01-01

20

A Summary of the History and Achievements of the Alaska Volcano Observatory.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanoes of the Aleutian Islands, Kamchatka and the Kurile Islands present a serious threat to aviation on routes from North America to the Far East. On March 27, 1986, an eruption of Augustine Volcano deposited ash over Anchorage and disrupted air traffic in south-central Alaska. The consequences of the colocation of an active volcano and the largest city in Alaska were clearly evident. That event led to a three-way partnership between the US Geological Survey, the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute and the Alaska State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys that now maintains a continuous watch through ground instrumentation and satellite imagery providing data from which warnings of eruptions can be issued to airline operators and pilots. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano in December 1989 was AVO's first big test. It spewed volcanic ash to a height of 14,000 m (45,000 feet) and managed to catch KLM 867, a Boeing 747 aircraft in its plume under dark conditions while approaching Anchorage Airport. Further details of the early days of the Alaska Volcano Observatory will be described, along with its recent successes and challenges.

Smith, R. W.

2008-12-01

21

1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

1996-01-01

22

Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to Public Inquiry Concerning the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano provided the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) with an opportunity to test its newly renovated Operations Center (Ops) at the Alaska Science Center in Anchorage. Because of the demand for interagency operations and public communication, Ops became the hub of Augustine monitoring activity, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, from January 10 through May 19, 2006. During this time, Ops was staffed by 17 USGS AVO staff, and over two dozen Fairbanks-based AVO staff from the Alaska Department of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute and USGS Volcano Hazards Program staff from outside Alaska. This group engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding agencies throughout the eruption. Before and during the eruption, reference sheets - ;including daily talking - were created, vetted, and distributed to prepare staff for questions about the volcano. These resources were compiled into a binder stationed at each Ops phone and available through the AVO computer network. In this way, AVO was able to provide a comprehensive, uniform, and timely response to callers and emails at all three of its cooperative organizations statewide. AVO was proactive in scheduling an Information Scientist for interviews on-site with Anchorage television stations and newspapers several times a week. Scientists available, willing, and able to speak clearly about the current activity were crucial to AVO's response. On January 19, 2006, two public meetings were held in Homer, 120 kilometers northeast of Augustine Volcano. AVO, the West Coast Alaska Tsunami Warning Center, and the Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management gave brief presentations explaining their roles in eruption response. Representatives from several local, state, and federal agencies were also available. In addition to communicating with the public by daily media interviews and phone calls to Ops, all activity reports, images, and selected data streams were posted in near real time on the AVO public website. Hundreds of emails were answered. The AVO website quickly became highly organized and the most up-to-date and comprehensive place for anyone with internet access to learn about the eruption and AVO's response. This was the first such organized response of AVO and may be the outgrowth of increased expectations of AVO by the public. From November 28, 2005, through May 16, 2006, staff logged and answered approximately 400 phone calls and 1000 emails about Augustine. AVO's interagency response plan and relationships with other key agencies helped in responding to requests from the media and the public for a wide variety of information. However, the most frequent questions from callers were about ash fall advisories and what to do in the event of an ash fall. This highlighted the need to produce coordinated, co-agency reporting of ash fall potential and recommended preparation.

Adleman, J. N.

2006-12-01

23

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out vol-cano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in  

E-print Network

#12;The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out vol- cano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in Alaska. The cooperating agencies of AVO are the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAFGI

24

1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

1999-01-01

25

2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.; Dixon, J. P.; Ushakov, Sergey

2008-01-01

26

Public Outreach and Communications of the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 2005-2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 2005-6 eruption of Augustine Volcano in the Cook Inlet region, Alaska, greatly increased public desire for volcano hazard information, as this eruption was the most significant in Cook Inlet since 1992. In response to this heightened concern, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) increased ongoing efforts to deliver specific eruption-focused information to communities nearest to the volcano, created a public communications strategy to assist staff with managing requests, and used the recently upgraded AVO Web site as a primary information-delivery path. During the eruption, AVO responded to a minimum of ~1,700 individual requests for information from the media, the public, and other organizations with responsibilities associated with volcanic activity in Alaska; requests were received both as phone calls to the observatory and e-mail stemming from the AVO Web site. Staff also delivered approximately two dozen Augustine-specific presentations and gave nearly three dozen tours of the AVO Anchorage Operations Center in Anchorage. This intensity of public interaction was markedly higher than during noneruptive periods. During the Augustine unrest and eruption, AVO also refined its internal communication procedures, instituted and maintained up-to-date and concise talking points concerning the most recent and relevant volcanic activity and hazards, and created a media management plan to assist staff in working with members of the media. These items aided staff in maintaining a consistent message concerning the eruption, potential hazards, and our response activities. The AVO Web site, with its accompanying database, is the backbone of AVO's external and internal communications. This was the first Cook Inlet volcanic eruption with a public expectation of real-time access to data, updates, and hazards information over the Internet. In March 2005, AVO improved the Web site from individual static pages to a dynamic, database-driven site. This new system provided quick and straightforward access to the latest information for (1) staff within the observatory, (2) emergency managers from State and local governments and organizations, (3) the media, and (4) the public. From mid-December 2005 through April 2006, the AVO Web site served more than 45 million Web pages and about 5.5 terabytes of data.

Adleman, Jennifer N.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Snedigar, Seth F.; Neal, Christina A.; Wallace, Kristi L.

2010-01-01

27

Use of new and old technologies and methods by the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The recent eruption of Augustine Volcano was the first significant volcanic event in Cook Inlet, Alaska since 1992. In contrast to eruptions at remote Alaskan volcanoes that mainly affect aviation, ash from previous eruptions of Augustine has affected communities surrounding Cook Inlet, home to over half of Alaska's population. The 2006 eruption validated much of AVO's advance preparation, underscored the

T. L. Murray; C. J. Nye; J. C. Eichelberger

2006-01-01

28

Use of new and old technologies and methods by the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The recent eruption of Augustine Volcano was the first significant volcanic event in Cook Inlet, Alaska since 1992. In contrast to eruptions at remote Alaskan volcanoes that mainly affect aviation, ash from previous eruptions of Augustine has affected communities surrounding Cook Inlet, home to over half of Alaska's population. The 2006 eruption validated much of AVO's advance preparation, underscored the need to quickly react when a problem or opportunity developed, and once again demonstrated that while technology provides us with wonderful tools, professional relationships, especially during times of crisis, are still important. Long-term multi-parametric instrumental monitoring and background geological and geophysical studies represent the most fundamental aspect of preparing for any eruption. Once significant unrest was detected, AVO augmented the existing real-time network with additional instrumentation including web cameras. GPS and broadband seismometers that recorded data on site were also quickly installed as their data would be crucial for post-eruption research. Prior to 2006, most of most of AVO's eruption response plans and protocols had focused on the threat to aviation rather than ground-based hazards. However, the relationships and protocols developed for the aviation threat were sufficient to be adapted to the ash fall hazard, though it is apparent that more work, both scientific and with response procedures, is needed. Similarly, protocols were quickly developed for warning of a flank- collapse induced tsunami. Information flow within the observatory was greatly facilitated by an internal web site that had been developed and refined specifically for eruption response. Because AVO is a partnership of 3 agencies (U.S. Geological Survey, University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys) with offices in both Fairbanks and Anchorage, web and internet-facing data servers provided reliable and rapid access to much of the information to each office. Information flow between the observatory and the public and emergency responders was accomplished through the AVO public web site, e-mail, faxes, public meetings, and frequent phone calls. AVO's newly renovated Operations Center in Anchorage provided a central 24/7 site to both receive and disseminate information and conduct media interviews. With selected real time data sets and hourly updates provided on the AVO public web site, many emergency responders and even private citizens tracked the eruption in near real time themselves.

Murray, T. L.; Nye, C. J.; Eichelberger, J. C.

2006-12-01

29

Hawaiian Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

As part of the US Geological Survey, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is charged with monitoring and researching volcanoes in Hawaii. The site provides current activity reports, hazard information, and a history of the two main volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. In addition, the site provides information on three other volcanoes that are either active or potentially active. Visitors can also learn about earthquakes in Hawaii and the particular hazards posed by volcanos. Captivating photos help bring the volcanoes to life. Visitors can patronize the Photo Gallery for additional volcano photos. Cross links to additional information and sites are provided on every page.

30

The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Network Installation  

Microsoft Academic Search

During June and July of 2005, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) installed eight permanent GPS stations on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. PBO worked closely with the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the Magmatic Systems Site Selection working group to install stations with a spatial distribution to monitor and detect both short and long term volcanic deformation

B. Pauk; M. Jackson; D. Mencin; J. Power; W. Gallaher; A. Basset; K. Kore; Z. Hargraves; T. Peterson

2005-01-01

31

Alaska Volcanoes Guidebook for Teachers.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Alaska's volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 1...

J. N. Adleman

2010-01-01

32

Yellowstone Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. It features news articles, monitoring information, status reports and information releases, and information on the volcanic history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field. Users can access monthly updates with alert levels and aviation warning codes and real-time data on ground deformation, earthquakes, and hydrology. There is also a list of online products and publications, and an image gallery.

2012-08-23

33

Mt. Erebus Volcano Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Mt. Erebus Volcano Observatory website offers a plethora of information about the geology, geochemistry, and geophysics research at Mt. Erebus in Antarctica. The site addresses the evolution of Erebus, lava and gas chemistry, seismology, and much more. Students can discover how Mount Erebus's environment changes by examining two day, 30 day, and 365 day records. The Photo Gallery is packed with incredible images of the landscape, geologic features, and the scientific monitoring. Users can view live footage as well as movies of volcanic eruptions and the inner and outer crater. Because the materials are not particularly technical, users can easily learn about volcanology and, more specifically, about scientists' efforts to better understand Mt. Erebus.

34

CONFIRMATION AND CALIBRATION OF COMPUTER MODELING OF TSUNAMIS PRODUCED BY AUGUSTINE VOLCANO, ALASKA  

E-print Network

CONFIRMATION AND CALIBRATION OF COMPUTER MODELING OF TSUNAMIS PRODUCED BY AUGUSTINE VOLCANO, ALASKA James E. Beget Geophysical Institute and Alaska Volcano Observatory University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, USA Zygmunt Kowalik Institute of Marine Sciences University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK, USA ABSTRACT

Kowalik, Zygmunt

35

Cascades Volcano Observatory: Educational Outreach  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Located in Vancouver, Washington, the Cascades Volcano Observatory monitors and reports on volcanic activity in the area and around the country. The related Educational Outreach Web site is provided by the US Geological Survey. Visitors will find information on current volcanic activity and news, what to do if a volcano erupts, volcano terminology, America's volcanic history, how the Cascade range got their names, volcano questions and answers, and much more. Other features of the site include activities and fun "stuff," posters and videos, and many outside links.

36

Evidence of magma intrusion at Fourpeaked volcano, Alaska in 20062007 from a rapid-response seismic network and volcanic gases  

E-print Network

Evidence of magma intrusion at Fourpeaked volcano, Alaska in 2006­2007 from a rapid a Alaska Volcano Observatory, University of Alaska Fairbanks, 903 Koyukuk Dr., Fairbanks, AK 99775, United: Fourpeaked volcano volcano-tectonic earthquakes volcanic gas earthquake swarms seismic network On September

West, Michael

37

Monitoring and analyses of volcanic activity using remote sensing data at the Alaska Volcano Observatory: Case study for Kamchatka, Russia, December 1997  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

There are about 100 potentially active volcanoes in the North Pacific Ocean region that includes Alaska, the Kamchatka Peninsula, and the Kurile Islands, but fewer than 25% are monitored seismically. The region averages about five volcanic eruptions per year, and more than 20,000 passengers and millions of dollars of cargo fly the air routes in this region each day. One of the primary public safety objectives of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) is to mitigate the hazard posed by volcanic ash clouds drifting into these busy air traffic routes. The AVO uses real-time remote sensing data (AVHRR, GOES, and GMS) in conjunction with other methods (primarily seismic) to monitor and analyze volcanic activity in the region. Remote sensing data can be used to detect volcanic thermal anomalies and to provide unique information on the location, movement, and composition of volcanic eruption clouds. Satellite images are routinely analyzed twice each day at AVO and many times per day during crisis situations. As part of its formal working relationship with the Kamchatka Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), the AVO provides satellite observations of volcanic activity in Kamchatka and distributes notices of volcanic eruptions from KVERT to non-Russian users in the international aviation community. This paper outlines the current remote sensing capabilities and operations of the AVO and describes the responsibilities and procedures of federal agencies and international aviation organizations for volcanic eruptions in the North Pacific region. A case study of the December 4, 1997, eruption of Bezymianny volcano, Russia, is used to illustrate how real-time remote sensing and hazard communication are used to mitigate the threat of volcanic ash to aircraft.

Schneider, D. J.; Dean, K., G.; Dehn, J.; Miller, T., P.; Kirianov, V. Yu.

38

Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at the beginning of each activity. A complete explanation, including the format of the Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations, is available at the beginning of each grade link at http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment/GLEHome.html.

Adleman, Jennifer N.

2011-01-01

39

Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick

2009-01-01

40

Decision Analysis Tools for Volcano Observatories  

Microsoft Academic Search

Staff at volcano observatories are predominantly engaged in scientific activities related to volcano monitoring and instrumentation, data acquisition and analysis. Accordingly, the academic education and professional training of observatory staff tend to focus on these scientific functions. From time to time, however, staff may be called upon to provide decision support to government officials responsible for civil protection. Recognizing that

T. H. Hincks; W. Aspinall; G. Woo

2005-01-01

41

Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Z.; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

1996-01-01

42

Cascades Volcano Observatory - Learn About Volcanoes: Frequently Asked Volcano Questions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page provides the answers to frequently asked questions about volcanoes. It is created by the United States Geological Survey. Topics addressed include: What Is A Volcano? Why Do Volcanoes Occur? How Do Volcanoes Erupt? Where Do Volcanoes Occur? When Will A Volcano Erupt? How Hot Is A Volcano? Can Lava Be Diverted? Do Volcanoes Affect Weather? What Types of Volcanoes are There? Which Eruptions Were The Deadliest? 20th Century Volcanic Eruptions and Their Impact. About 60 additional questions with answers are available under MORE FAQ's -Volcano Questions and Answers, and includes some sections on volcanoes of the western United States. Other links to volcano information are also available.

43

USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory: Maps and Graphics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The United States Geological Survey's website for the Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) has a host of graphics and maps for the professional volcano researcher or the amateur volcanologist. The maps and graphics are divided into four broad categories, and within each of those categories are dozens and dozens of maps and graphics. The categories include "Hazards, Features, Topics, and Types: Maps and Graphics", "Monitoring: Maps and Graphics", and "Volcano or Region: Maps and Graphics". Visitors should check out "Bachelor", which is in the "Volcano or Region" category, as there is an "Interactive Imagemap" of the Cascade Range Volcanoes. Clicking on any of the images of the volcanoes will reveal a beautiful, aerial photo of the volcano, along with a brief description of the history of the volcano. Additionally, there is a "Planning Your Visit" section that gives online and offline resources to look at before going to the actual volcano.

2010-02-19

44

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Klauea's Summit Eruption  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i?the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008....

2010-08-18

45

The eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, December 14,1989-August 31, 1990  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on explosive volcanic activity at Redoubt Volcano, 177 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, which generated numerous tephra plumes that disrupted air traffic above southern Alaska, damaged aircraft, and caused locally heavy tephra fall. Pyroclastic flows triggered debris flows that inundated part of an oil-tanker facility, temporarily suspending oil production in Cook Inlet. The newly established Alaska Volcano Observatory increased its monitoring effort and disseminated volcanic hazard information to government agencies, industry, and the public.

Brantley, S.R.

1990-12-01

46

The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory  

SciTech Connect

I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

Dvorak, John [University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy (United States)

2011-05-15

47

4D seismic structure beneath Spurr volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Mount Spurr is a large volcano located 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska. This dominantly andesitic stratovolcano with summit elevation of 3374 m is the highest volcano of the Aleutian Arc. Two historical eruptions of Spurr volcano have occurred in 1953 and 1992. Moreover, from July 2004 to February 2006 continuous non-eruptive activity was observed. Since 1988 the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) collects information about Alaska seismicity. In this work we present evolution of the seismic structure beneath Spurr volcano obtained from 4D seismic tomography. In total 222605 rays (129387 P and 93218 S rays) coming from 17068 earthquakes and registered by 26 station of AVO seismic network were used for the tomographic inversion. After analysis of the seismic and volcano activity, 5 time periods were chosen. Variations of P and S wave velocity anomalies and Vp/Vs ratio in this 5 time periods were obtained after simultaneous iterative inversion of one combined matrix. Smoothness of the velocity anomalies variation in space and time are controlled by two additional matrix block. Results reveal clear correlation of the seismic structure and volcanic activity. In the first (October 1989 - July 1996) and fourth (January 2004 - January 2007) time periods, characterized by high activity, a prominent vertical channel directly beneath volcano is observed on the vertical sections. This channel is characterized by very high values of Vp/Vs ratio (increased P wave and decreased S wave velocities). During the three other periods with no volcanic activity, when the relaxation of the media took place, seismic structure becomes more homogeneous without strong velocity anomalies. Special attention is paid to estimation of the model resolution in different time periods and analysis of possible artifacts due to different ray coverage in different periods. Therefore a lot synthetic and real data tests were performed.

Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

2013-04-01

48

High-precision earthquake location and three-dimensional P wave velocity determination at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Redoubt Volcano, Alaska poses significant volcanic hazard to the Cook Inlet region and overlying flight paths. During and following the most recent eruption in 1989–1990 the Alaska Volcano Observatory deployed up to 10 seismometers to improve real-time monitoring capabilities at Redoubt and continues to produce an annual earthquake catalog with associated arrival times for this volcano. We compute a three-dimensional

Heather R. DeShon; Clifford H. Thurber; Charlotte Rowe

2007-01-01

49

The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Network Installation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During June and July of 2005, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) installed eight permanent GPS stations on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. PBO worked closely with the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the Magmatic Systems Site Selection working group to install stations with a spatial distribution to monitor and detect both short and long term volcanic deformation in response to magmatic intrusions at depth and magma migration through the volcano's conduit system. All eight of the GPS stations were installed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by Evergreen Helicopters and logistical support from the Trident Seafood Corporation, the City of Akutan, and the Akutan Corporation. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all equipment be transported to each site from the village of Akutan by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and internal loads. Each station installed on the volcano consists of a standard short braced GPS monument, two solar panels mounted to an inclined structure, and a six foot high Plaschem enclosure with two solar panels mounted to one of the inclined sides. Each Plaschem houses 24 6 volt batteries that power a Trimble NetRS GPS receiver and one or two Intuicom radios. Data from each GPS receiver is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the village of Akutan that transmits the data over the internet to the UNAVCO data archive at ftp://data-out.unavco.or/pub/PBO_rinex where it is made freely available to the public.

Pauk, B.; Jackson, M.; Mencin, D.; Power, J.; Gallaher, W.; Basset, A.; Kore, K.; Hargraves, Z.; Peterson, T.

2005-12-01

50

Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes improves study efforts in Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes is greatly benefitting the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), and last year's eruption of the Okmok Volcano in the Aleutian Islands is a good case in point. The facility was able to issue and refine warnings of the eruption and related activity quickly, something that could not have been done using conventional seismic surveillance techniques, since seismometers have not been installed at these locations.AVO monitors about 100 active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) region, but only a handful are observed by costly and logistically complex conventional means. The region is remote and vast, about 5000 × 2500 km, extending from Alaska west to the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia (Figure 1). Warnings are transmitted to local communities and airlines that might be endangered by eruptions. More than 70,000 passenger and cargo flights fly over the region annually, and airborne volcanic ash is a threat to them. Many remote eruptions have been detected shortly after the initial magmatic activity using satellite data, and eruption clouds have been tracked across air traffic routes. Within minutes after eruptions are detected, information is relayed to government agencies, private companies, and the general public using telephone, fax, and e-mail. Monitoring of volcanoes using satellite image data involves direct reception, real-time monitoring, and data analysis. Two satellite data receiving stations, located at the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), are capable of receiving data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar orbiting satellites and from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped satellites.

Dean, K.; Servilla, M.; Roach, A.; Foster, B.; Engle, K.

51

Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program is the continuous series of international volcanological field schools organized in partnership with the Kamchatka State University. Each year more than 40 students and young scientists participate in our annual field trips to Katmai, Alaska and Mutnovsky, Kamchatka.

Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

2012-12-01

52

Kanaga Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

These images of the Kanaga Volcano show the symmetrical cone which is characteristic of stratovolcanoes. It is also possible to see how the current volcanic edifice has grown inside an older caldera, the remains of ancient Mount Kanaton. References and links to related sites are included.

53

Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mount Spurr volcano is an ice- and snow-covered stratovolcano complex located in the north-central Cook Inlet region about 100 kilometers west of Anchorage, Alaska. Mount Spurr volcano consists of a breached stratovolcano, a lava dome at the summit of Mount Spurr, and Crater Peak vent, a small stratocone on the south flank of Mount Spurr volcano. Historical eruptions of Crater Peak occurred in 1953 and 1992. These eruptions were relatively small but explosive, and they dispersed volcanic ash over areas of interior, south-central, and southeastern Alaska. Individual ash clouds produced by the 1992 eruption drifted east, north, and south. Within a few days of the eruption, the south-moving ash cloud was detected over the North Atlantic. Pyroclastic flows that descended the south flank of Crater Peak during both historical eruptions initiated volcanic-debris flows or lahars that formed temporary debris dams across the Chakachatna River, the principal drainage south of Crater Peak. Prehistoric eruptions of Crater Peak and Mount Spurr generated clouds of volcanic ash, pyroclastic flows, and lahars that extended to the volcano flanks and beyond. A flank collapse on the southeast side of Mount Spurr generated a large debris avalanche that flowed about 20 kilometers beyond the volcano into the Chakachatna River valley. The debris-avalanche deposit probably formed a large, temporary debris dam across the Chakachatna River. The distribution and thickness of volcanic-ash deposits from Mount Spurr volcano in the Cook Inlet region indicate that volcanic-ash clouds from most prehistoric eruptions were as voluminous as those produced by the 1953 and 1992 eruptions. Clouds of volcanic ash emitted from the active vent, Crater Peak, would be a major hazard to all aircraft using Ted Stevens Anchorage International Airport and other local airports and, depending on wind direction, could drift a considerable distance beyond the volcano. Ash fall from future eruptions could disrupt many types of economic and social activities, including oil and gas operations and shipping activities in the Cook Inlet area. Eruptions of Crater Peak could involve significant amounts of ice and snow that would lead to the formation of large lahars, formation of volcanic debris dams, and downstream flooding. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and shown on plate 1.

Waythomas, Christopher F.; Nye, Christopher J.

2001-01-01

54

Seismicity at Great Sitkin Volcano, Andreanof Islands, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1999, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) installed 6 telemetered, short-period seismic stations around Great Sitkin (GS) volcano as part of a 14-station volcano-monitoring network in the Andreanof Islands of Alaska. Since that time, AVO has located over 890 earthquakes within 10 km of GS, the third-highest seismicity rate of the 23 volcanoes monitored by AVO over the period 1999-present. GS has arguably the most diverse background seismicity of all 23 volcanoes. Recorded seismicity includes several minutes-to-hour-long tremor episodes, shallow and deep (> 10 km) long-period events, swarms of distal volcano-tectonic earthquakes, and two of the largest earthquakes (ML 4.3) ever recorded by AVO near a monitored volcano. The rate and character of seismicity suggests that magma may be moving in the GS system. Of particular interest are two earthquake swarms that occurred in March-April and May-July of 2002. The first began March 17, consisted of more than 320 events located 15-20 km west of GS at depths of 10-25 km, and lasted for over 5 weeks. The mainshock (ML 4.3) occurred ~20 hours after the swarm's onset. The second swarm began May 28, consisted of over 460 events located 5-8 km southeast of GS at depths of 5-15 km, and lasted for over two months. The mainshock (also ML 4.3) occurred ~9 hours after the swarm's onset. This second swarm was preceded by two tremor episodes on May 27, one lasting for 20 minutes, the second lasting for an hour. Although the spatial relationship between the tremor episodes and the second swarm is unclear, the close temporal relationship suggests a common seismogenic process that could be magmatic in origin. We use cross-correlation and relative relocation techniques to more precisely determine the location and depth extent of the swarms, and calculate Coulomb stress changes to investigate whether static stress adjustments associated with magma intrusion beneath GS could have caused the two swarms.

Moran, S. C.; Stihler, S. D.; Power, J. A.; Lockhart, A. B.; Plucinski, T. A.; Paskievitch, J. F.; Dixon, J. P.

2002-12-01

55

Volcanoes Galore!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here, you can check out videos and links to lots of nifty volcano stuff. Have fun! This is completely unrelated...but check it out anywho. sweet periodic table! Alaska Volcano Observatory Earthquakes and Volcanoes Check this one out for info on history\\'s most distructive volcano. Exploring Pompeii and Vesuvius Exploring the Environment: Volcanoes This will give you lots of background on how Volcanoes work, what the major parts are, and how they erupt. How Volcanoes Work A quick video on how to take a lava sample...hot! Lava Sampling on Kilauea Volcano, Hawai i A volcano in antartica? ...

Syracuse, Mr.

2008-06-11

56

Seismic Observations of Westdahl volcano and Western Unimak Island Alaska: 1999-2005  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Westdahl volcano is a large basaltic shield volcano on the western end of Unimak Island Alaska in the Aleutian Island Arc. The volcano is topped by three separate vents, Pogromni Volcano, Faris Peak, and Westdahl Peak. The volcano is frequently active with known eruptions from Westdahl Peak in 1964, 1978, and 1991-92 that produced large basaltic lava flows. InSAR measurements indicate that Westdahl Volcano has been inflating at a slowly declining rate since 1992 (Lu et al., 2003). The Alaska Volcano Observatory has operated a network of six short-period seismometers on Westdahl Peak since 1998. Complementing this network are similar networks centered on Shishaldin and Akutan Volcanoes. Since 1999 more than 300 earthquakes have been located within 20 km of Westdahl Volcano. A volcano specific velocity model was determined for the western half of Uminak Island by simultaneously inverting for the velocity model and hypocentral earthquake locations using the program VELEST. Earthquakes located with the new model reveal five clusters of hypocenters: (a) a shallow cluster beneath Westdahl Peak, that largely occurred during a 24-hour period on January 7, 2004, (b) a concentration of 68 earthquakes with hypocenters ranging in depth from zero to eight km beneath Faris Peak occurring continually since 1999, (c) a diffuse cluster of long-period events northwest of Westdahl and Faris Peaks, (d) a cluster of 12 earthquakes near Pinnacle Rock, 12 km southwest of Westdahl Peak in October 2003, and (e) a cluster of 43 hypocenters near Unimak Bight, 20 km east of Westdahl Peak, that occurred between January and April 2004. Focal mechanisms were derived for four earthquakes in the Faris Peak cluster and four additional earthquakes that locate off the volcanic edifice (the four mechanisms are in the Pinnacle Rock cluster, the Unimak Bight cluster, and 20 km southeast and 30 km northeast of the volcano). Focal mechanisms in the Faris Peak cluster showed normal faulting with nodal planes trending north-south to northwest-southeast. Mechanisms of the off-volcano earthquakes are generally characterized by normal faulting with nodal planes trending southwest-northeast. These events are consistent with a stress field dominated by the Aleutian subduction zone. The Faris Peak mechanisms are not consistent with the presumed regional stress field and may reflect volcanic process. Lu et al., (2003) proposed the observed inflation of Westdahl Volcano resulted from a slowly pressurizing magma source at 6 km depth beneath Westdahl Peak. The observed seismicity is consistent with this model. Lu, Z., T. Masterlark, D. Dzurisin, and R. Rykhus, 2003, Magma supply dynamics at Westdahl volcano, Alaska, modeled from satellite radar interferometry, Alaska, J. Geophys. Res. 108, 2354, doi:10.1029/2002JB002311, 2003.

Dixon, J. P.; Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.

2005-12-01

57

High precision relocation of earthquakes at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska Patrick Statz-Boyer a  

E-print Network

High precision relocation of earthquakes at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska Patrick Statz, University of Wisconsin­Madison, Madison, WI 53706, United States b USGS Alaska Science Center, Alaska commenced beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska. This activity lasted until early 1997, consisted of over 3000

58

The 2013 Eruptions of Pavlof and Mount Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Pavlof Volcano and Mount Veniaminof on the Alaska Peninsula erupted during the summer of 2013 and were monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) using seismic data, satellite and web camera images, a regional infrasound array and observer reports. An overview of the work of the entire AVO staff is presented here. The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano began on May 13 after a brief and subtle period of precursory seismicity. Two volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at depths of 6-8 km on April 24 preceded the onset of the eruption by 3 weeks. Given the low background seismicity at Pavlof, the VTs were likely linked to the ascent of magma. The onset of the eruption was marked by subtle pulsating tremor that coincided with elevated surface temperatures in satellite images. Activity during May and June was characterized by lava fountaining and effusion from a vent near the summit. Seismicity consisted of fluctuating tremor and numerous explosions that were detected on an infrasound array (450 km NE) and as ground-coupled airwaves at local and distant seismic stations (up to 650 km). Emissions of ash and sulfur dioxide were observed in satellite data extending as far as 300 km downwind at altitudes of 5-7 km above sea level. Ash collected in Sand Point (90 km E) were well sorted, 60-150 micron diameter juvenile glass shards, many of which had fluidal forms. Automated objective ash cloud detection and cloud height retrievals from the NOAA volcanic cloud alerting system were used to evaluate the hazard to aviation. A brief reconnaissance of Pavlof in July found that lava flows on the NW flank consist of rubbly, clast rich, 'a'a flows composed of angular blocks of agglutinate and rheomorphic lava. There are at least three overlapping flows, the longest of which extends about 5 km from the vent. Eruptive activity continued through early July, and has since paused or stopped. Historical eruptions of Mount Veniaminof volcano have been from an intracaldera cone within a 10-km summit caldera. Subtle pulsating tremor also signaled unrest at Veniaminof on June 7, a week prior to satellite observations of elevated surface temperatures within the caldera that indicated the presence of lava at the surface. Eruptive activity consisted of lava fountaining and effusion, and numerous explosive events that produced small ash clouds that typically reached only several hundred meters above the vent, and rarely were observed extending beyond the summit caldera. Seismicity was characterized by energetic tremor, and accompanied at times by numerous explosions that were heard by local residents at distances of 20-50 km, and detected as ground coupled airwaves at distant seismic stations (up to 200 km) and by an infrasound array (350 km distance). Because infrasound can propagate over great distances with little signal degradation or distortion, it was possible to correlate the ground-coupled airwaves between seismometers separated by 100's of km and thus identify their source. A helicopter fly over in July found that lava flows erupted from the intracaldera cone consist of 3-5 small lobes of rubbly spatter-rich lava up to 800 m in length on the southwest flank of the cone. The distal ends of the flows melted snow and ice adjacent to the cone to produce a water-rich plume, but there was no evidence for outflow of water from the caldera. Volcanic unrest has continued through early August, 2013.

Schneider, D. J.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K.; Haney, M. M.; Fee, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Read, C.

2013-12-01

59

Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2001-01-01

60

Perspective View of Okmok Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This perspective view shows the caldera of the Okmok volcano in Alaska's Aleutian Islands.

The shaded relief was generated from and draped over an Airsar-derived digital elevation mosaic.

Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2001-01-01

61

From: Volcano Watch, September 26, 1997 Volcano Watch, a weekly feature written by scientists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, is  

E-print Network

From: Volcano Watch, September 26, 1997 Volcano Watch, a weekly feature written by scientists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, is posted on the HVO Web site (http zone of Mauna Loa Volcano in historic time. The 1919 Alika eruption was the most voluminous historical

62

Bibliography for Hayes, Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, Augustine, Douglas, and Aniakchak volcanoes, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alaska has more than 40 active volcanoes, many of which are close to the major population centers of south-central Alaska. This bibliography was compiled to assist in the preparation of volcano hazard evaluations at Cook Inlet volcanoes. It lists articles, reports, and maps about the geology and hydrology of Hayes, Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, Augustine, and Douglas volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region as well as Aniakchak Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. References on the biology and archaeology of areas surrounding each volcano also are included because they may provide useful background information.

Lemke, K.J.; May, B.A.; Vanderpool, A.M.

1995-01-01

63

New Coastal Tsunami Gauges: Application at Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Recent eruptive activity at Augustine Volcano and its associated tsunami threat to lower Cook Inlet pointed out the need for a quickly deployable tsunami detector which could be installed on Augustine Island's coast. The detector's purpose would be to verify tsunami generation by direct observation of the wave at the source to support tsunami warning decisions along populated coastlines. To fill this need the Tsunami Mobile Alert Real-Time (TSMART) system was developed at NOAA's West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center with support from the University of Alaska Tsunami Warning and Environmental Observatory for Alaska program (TWEAK) and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). The TSMART system consists of a pressure sensor installed as near as possible to the low tide line. The sensor is enclosed in a water-tight hypalon bag filled with propylene-glycol to prevent silt damage to the sensor and freezing. The bag is enclosed in a perforated, strong plastic pipe about 16 inches long and 8 inches in diameter enclosed at both ends for protection. The sensor is cabled to a data logger/radio/power station up to 300 feet distant. Data are transmitted to a base station and made available to the warning center in real-time through the internet. This data telemetry system can be incorporated within existing AVO and Plate Boundary Observatory networks which makes it ideal for volcano-tsunami monitoring. A TSMART network can be utilized anywhere in the world within 120 miles of an internet connection. At Augustine, two test stations were installed on the east side of the island in August 2006. The sensors were located very near the low tide limit and covered with rock, and the cable was buried to the data logger station which was located well above high tide mark. Data logger, radio, battery and other electronics are housed in an enclosure mounted to a pole which also supports an antenna and solar panel. Radio signal is transmitted to a repeater station higher up on the island which then transmits the data to a base station in Homer, Alaska. Sea level data values are transmitted every 15 seconds and displayed at the tsunami warning center in Palmer, Alaska.

Burgy, M.; Bolton, D. K.

2006-12-01

64

Synthetic aperture radar interferometry of Okmok volcano, Alaska: Radar observations  

Microsoft Academic Search

ERS-1\\/ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar interferometry was used to study the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska. First, we derived an accurate digital elevation model (DEM) using a tandem ERS-1\\/ERS-2 image pair and the preexisting DEM. Second, by studying changes in interferometric coherence we found that the newly erupted lava lost radar coherence for 5-17 months after the eruption. This

Zhong Lu; Dörte Mann; Jeffrey T. Freymueller; David J. Meyer

2000-01-01

65

Database for volcanic processes and geology of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

This digital release contains information used to produce the geologic map published as Plate 1 in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1762 (Waitt and Begét, 2009). The main component of this digital release is a geologic map database prepared using geographic information systems (GIS) applications. This release also contains links to files to view or print the map plate, accompanying measured sections, and main report text from Professional Paper 1762. It should be noted that Augustine Volcano erupted in 2006, after the completion of the geologic mapping shown in Professional Paper 1762 and presented in this database. Information on the 2006 eruption can be found in U.S. Geological Survey Professional Paper 1769. For the most up to date information on the status of Alaska volcanoes, please refer to the U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website.

McIntire, Jacqueline; Ramsey, David W.; Thoms, Evan; Waitt, Richard B.; Beget, James E.

2012-01-01

66

The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Alaska Region an Overview of Network Operation, Maintenance and Improvement  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

UNAVCO has now completed its third year of operation of the 138 continuous GPS stations, 12 tiltmeters and 31 communications relays that comprise the Alaska Region of the Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory. Working in Alaska has been challenging due to the extreme environmental conditions encountered and logistics difficulties. Despite these challenges we have been able to complete each summer field season with network operation at 95% or better. Throughout the last three years we have analyzed both our successes and failures to improve the quality of our network and better serve the scientific community. Additionally, we continue to evaluate and deploy new technologies to improve station reliability and add to the data set available from our stations. 2011 was a busy year for the Alaska engineering team and some highlights from last year's maintenance season include the following. This spring we completed testing and deployment of the first Inmarsat BGAN satellite terminal for data telemetry at AC60 Shemya Island. Shemya Island is at the far western end of the Aleutian Islands and is one of the most remote and difficult to access stations in the PBO AK network. Until the installation of the BGAN, this station was offline with no data telemetry for almost one year. Since the installation of the BGAN in early April 2011 dataflow has been uninterrupted. This year we also completed the first deployments of Stardot NetCamSC webcams in the PBO Network. Currently, these are installed and operational at six GPS stations in Alaska, with plans to install several more next season in Alaska. Images from these cameras can be found at the station homepages linked to from the UNAVCO website. In addition to the hard work put in by PBO engineers this year, it is important that we recognize the contributions of our partners. In particular the Alaska Volcano Observatory, the Alaska Earthquake Information Center and others who have provided us with valuable engineering assistance and data telemetry in several locations. With their help we have reduced the number of stations that require manual data download to six in the entire Alaska network getting us closer to our goal of 100% auto data archival for the Alaska network.

Enders, M.; Boyce, E. S.; Bierma, R.; Walker, K.; Feaux, K.

2011-12-01

67

SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA  

E-print Network

SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM and digital elevation models to create a hazard index that characterizes slope stability on active volcanoes. Introduction Volcano monitoring in the Aleutians is of great importance due to the heavy amount of airplane

68

The Plate Boundary Observatory Permanent Global Positioning System Network on Augustine Volcano Before and After the 2006 Eruption  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In September of 2004, UNAVCO and the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) installed five permanent Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations on Augustine Volcano, supplementing one existing CGPS station operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. All six CGPS stations proved crucial to scientists for detecting and monitoring the precursory deformation of the volcano beginning in early May 2005, as well as for monitoring the many subsequent small inflationary and deflationary episodes that characterized the 2006 eruption. Following the eruption, in September of 2006, PBO added six additional permanent CGPS stations. The 2006 eruption and its precursors were the first significant activity of the volcano in 20 years and the PBO CGPS network provided an unprecedented opportunity to monitor and detect volcanic ground deformation on an erupting Alaskan stratovolcano. Data from the new CGPS stations coupled with the existing seismic stations provided scientists with the first real opportunity to use geodetic data and real time seismic data to assess the volcanic hazards before, during, and after an Alaskan eruption.

Pauk, Benjamin A.; Jackson, Michael; Feaux, Karl; Mencin, David; Bohnenstiehl, Kyle

2010-01-01

69

Volcanoes!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site presents a summary of current volcanic eruptions and images and videos of volcanoes on Earth. Discussions of the characteristics of volcanism on other worlds in our solar system are also presented and are accompanied by maps and imagery. Links to volcano observatories, parks, and monuments around the world are also included.

70

Snow and ice volume on Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska, 1981  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Mount Spurr (3,374 meters altitude) is an active volcano 130 kilometers west of Anchorage, Alaska, with an extensive covering of seasonal and perennial snow, and glaciers. Knowledge of the volume and distribution of snow and ice on a volcano aids in assessing hydrologic hazards such as floods, mudflows, and debris flows. In July 1981, ice thickness was measured at 68 locations on the five main glaciers of Mount Spurr: 64 of these measurements were made using a portable 1.7 megahertz monopulse ice-radar system, and 4 measurements were made using the helicopter altimeter where the glacier bed was exposed by ice avalanching. The distribution of snow and ice derived from these measurements is depicted on contour maps and in tables compiled by altitude and by drainage basins. Basal shear stresses at 20 percent of the measured locations ranged from 200 to 350 kilopascals, which is significantly higher than the 50 to 150 kilopascals commonly referred to in the literature as the 'normal' range for glaciers. Basal shear stresses higher than 'normal' have also been found on steep glaciers on volcanoes in the Cascade Range in the western United States. The area of perennial snow and ice coverage on Mount Spurr was 360 square kilometers in 1981, with an average thickness of 190?50 meters. Seasonal snow increases the volume about 1 percent and increases the area about 30 percent with a maximum in May or June. Runoff from Mount Spurr feeds the Chakachatna River and the Chichantna River (a tributary of the Beluga River). The Chakachatna River drainage contains 14 cubic kilometers of snow and ice and the Chichantna River drainage contains 53 cubic kilometers. The snow and ice volume on the mountain was 67?17 cubic kilometers, approximately 350 times more snow and ice than was on Mount St. Helens before its May 18, 1980, eruption, and 15 times more snow and ice than on Mount Rainier, the most glacierized of the measured volcanoes in the Cascade Range. On the basis of these relative quantities, hazard-producing glaciovolcanic phenomena at Mount Spurr could be significantly greater than similar phenomena at Cascade Volcanoes.

March, Rod S.; Mayo, Lawrence R.; Trabant, Dennis C.

1997-01-01

71

High precision relocation of earthquakes at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In August 1996, a period of elevated seismicity commenced beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska. This activity lasted until early 1997, consisted of over 3000 earthquakes, and was accompanied by elevated emissions of volcanic gases. No eruption occurred and seismicity returned to background levels where it has remained since. We use waveform alignment with bispectrum-verified cross-correlation and double-difference methods to relocate over 2000 earthquakes from 1996 to 2005 with high precision (~ 100??m). The results of this analysis greatly clarify the distribution of seismic activity, revealing distinct features previously hidden by location scatter. A set of linear earthquake clusters diverges upward and southward from the main group of earthquakes. The events in these linear clusters show a clear southward migration with time. We suggest that these earthquakes represent either a response to degassing of the magma body, circulation of fluids due to exsolution from magma or heating of ground water, or possibly the intrusion of new dikes beneath Iliamna's southern flank. In addition, we speculate that the deeper, somewhat diffuse cluster of seismicity near and south of Iliamna's summit indicates the presence of an underlying magma body between about 2 and 4??km depth below sea level, based on similar features found previously at several other Alaskan volcanoes. ?? 2009 Elsevier B.V.

Statz-Boyer, P.; Thurber, C.; Pesicek, J.; Prejean, S.

2009-01-01

72

An improved proximal tephrochronology for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Sediment cores from lakes in volcanically active regions can be used to reconstruct the frequency of tephra-fall events. We studied sediment cores from two lakes within 25 km of the summit of Redoubt Volcano, western Cook Inlet, to develop a robust age model for the Holocene tephrochronology, and to assess the extent to which the tephrostratigraphies were correlative between the two nearby lakes. Visually distinct tephra layers were correlated among cores from Bear and Cub lakes, located within 17 km of each other, to construct a composite age model, which incorporates two Pu-activity profiles and 27 radiocarbon ages, and extends the record back to 11,540 cal a BP. The age model was used to interpolate the ages and quantify the uncertainties of ages for all tephras at least 1 mm thick. Between - 55 and 3850 a BP, 31 tephras were deposited in Bear Lake and 41 tephras in Cub Lake. Bear Lake contains an additional 38 tephras deposited between 11,540 and 3850 a BP. During the period of overlap, (- 55 to 3850 a BP), 24 tephras are of significantly different ages, including nine from Bear Lake and 17 from Cub Lake. The presence of these unique tephras indicates that ejecta plumes erupted from Redoubt Volcano can be highly directional, and that sediment cores from more than one lake are needed for a comprehensive reconstruction of tephra-fall events. Unlike distal lakes in south Alaska, where geomorphic and limnological factors dominate the quality of the tephrostratigraphic record, the variability in tephra-fall trajectory near a Redoubt Volcano appears to be a major control on the number of tephras contained in the sediment of proximal lakes.

Schiff, Caleb J.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Ketterer, Michael E.

2010-06-01

73

Transient signal detection using GPS measurements: Transient inflation at Akutan volcano, Alaska, during early 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) networks record station position changes with millimeter-level accuracy and have revealed transient deformations on various spatial and temporal scales. However, the transient deformation may not be easily identified from the position time series because of the large number of sites in a network, low signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) and correlated noise in space and time. Here we apply state estimation and principal component analysis to the daily GPS position time series measured in Alaska sites of the Plate Boundary Observatory network. Our algorithm detects a transient signal, whose maximum displacement is ˜9 mm in horizontal and ˜11 mm in vertical, that occurred at Akutan volcano during the first half of 2008. A simple Mogi source inversion suggests inflation at shallow depth (˜3.9 km) beneath the volcano. Although the detection was not easy because the signal was aseismic, non-eruptive and weak (not apparent in raw daily time series), our detection method improves the SNR and therefore provides higher resolution for detecting the transient signal.

Ji, Kang Hyeun; Herring, Thomas A.

2011-03-01

74

NOAA Atmospheric Baseline Observatories in the Arctic: Alaska & Greenland  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates two year-round, long-term climate research facilities, known as Atmospheric Baseline Observatories (ABOs), in the Arctic Region. The Arctic ABOs are part of a core network to support the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's mission to acquire, evaluate, and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and solar radiation in a manner that allows the causes of change to be understood. The observatory at Barrow, Alaska (BRW) was established in 1973 and is now host to over 200 daily measurements. Located a few kilometers to the east of the village of Barrow at 71.3° N it is also the northernmost point in the United States. Measurement records from Barrow are critical to our understanding of the Polar Regions including exchange among tundra, atmosphere, and ocean. Multiple data sets are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, ozone, meteorology, and numerous others. The surface, in situ carbon dioxide record alone consists of over 339,000 measurements since the system was installed in July 1973. The observatory at Summit, Greenland (SUM) has been a partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Polar Programs since 2004, similar to that for South Pole. Observatory data records began in 1997 from this facility located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet at 72.58° N. Summit is unique as the only high-altitude (3200m), mid-troposphere, inland, Arctic observatory, largely free from outside local influences such as thawing tundra or warming surface waters. The measurement records from Summit help us understand long-range transport across the Arctic region, as well as interactions between air and snow. Near-real-time data are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, meteorology, ozone, and numerous others. This poster will highlight the two facilities, key partners at each, available data sets, and cooperative research opportunities.

Vasel, B. A.; Butler, J. H.; Schnell, R. C.; Crain, R.; Haggerty, P.; Greenland, S.

2013-12-01

75

Economic and engineering considerations for geothermal development in the Makushin Volcano Region of Unalaska Island, Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Large vapor-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs are suspected to exist in the region marked by fumarole fields on the southeast flank of Makushin Volcano on Unalaska Island, Alaska. In this paper, economic and engineering considerations with respect to potential hydrothermal development in the Makushin Volcano region are presented.

Reeder, J.W.; Economides, M.J.; Markle, D.R.

1982-10-01

76

The 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Reconnaissance Observations and Preliminary Physical Volcanology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The August 7, 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano was the first documented historical eruption of this small (3 x 3 km) island volcano with a 1 km2 lake filled crater in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Reports of previous Kasatochi eruptions are unconfirmed and lacking in detail and little is known about the eruptive history. Three explosively-generated ash plumes

C. F. Waythomas; D. J. Schneider; S. G. Prejean

2008-01-01

77

Redoubt Volcano, Southern Alaska: A Hazard Assessment Based on Eruptive Activity through 1968.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Redoubt Volcano is one of four composite volcanoes on the west side of Cook Inlet, Alaska, which have been active during Holocene time and which pose a hazard to the State's main population center. At least 30 large tephra-forming eruptions have occurred ...

A. B. Till, M. E. Yount, J. R. Riehle

1993-01-01

78

Determination and uncertainty of moment tensors for microearthquakes at Okmok Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Efforts to determine general moment tensors (MTs) for microearthquakes in volcanic areas are often hampered by small seismic networks, which can lead to poorly constrained hypocentres and inadequate modelling of seismic velocity heterogeneity. In addition, noisy seismic signals can make it difficult to identify phase arrivals correctly for small magnitude events. However, small volcanic earthquakes can have source mechanisms that deviate from brittle double-couple shear failure due to magmatic and/or hydrothermal processes. Thus, determining reliable MTs in such conditions is a challenging but potentially rewarding pursuit. We pursued such a goal at Okmok Volcano, Alaska, which erupted recently in 1997 and in 2008. The Alaska Volcano Observatory operates a seismic network of 12 stations at Okmok and routinely catalogues recorded seismicity. Using these data, we have determined general MTs for seven microearthquakes recorded between 2004 and 2007 by inverting peak amplitude measurements of P and S phases. We computed Green's functions using precisely relocated hypocentres and a 3-D velocity model. We thoroughly assessed the quality of the solutions by computing formal uncertainty estimates, conducting a variety of synthetic and sensitivity tests, and by comparing the MTs to solutions obtained using alternative methods. The results show that MTs are sensitive to station distribution and errors in the data, velocity model and hypocentral parameters. Although each of the seven MTs contains a significant non-shear component, we judge several of the solutions to be unreliable. However, several reliable MTs are obtained for a group of previously identified repeating events, and are interpreted as compensated linear-vector dipole events.

Pesicek, J.D.; Sileny, J.; Prejean, S.G.; Thurber, C.H.

2012-01-01

79

COVER Mount St. Augustine volcano, Alaska, in pyroclastic flow eruption, 29 August 1986. View is toward the volcano (hidden in douds) from Burr Point, 6  

E-print Network

#12;COVER Mount St. Augustine volcano, Alaska, in pyroclastic flow eruption, 29 August 1986. View is toward the volcano (hidden in douds) from Burr Point, 6 kilometers from the summit. A pyroclastic flow at the 350-meter level on the northern flank of the volcano is moving toward the camera at a speed of about

Kowalik, Zygmunt

80

Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground-based instruments are supplemented by remote sensing data sets. UNAVCO supports the acquisition of InSAR and LiDAR imaging data, with archiving and distribution of these data provided by UNAVCO and partner institutions. We provide descriptions and access information for geodetic data from the PBO volcano subnetworks and their applications to monitoring for scientific and public safety objectives. We also present notable examples of activity recorded by these instruments, including the 2004-2010 accelerated uplift episode at the Yellowstone caldera and the 2006 Augustine eruption.

Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

2013-12-01

81

Sustained long-period seismicity at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

From September 1999 through April 2004, Shishaldin Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, exhibited a continuous and extremely high level of background seismicity. This activity consisted of many hundreds to thousands of long-period (LP; 1-2 Hz) earthquakes per day, recorded by a 6-station monitoring network around Shishaldin. The LP events originate beneath the summit at shallow depths (0-3 km). Volcano tectonic events and tremor have rarely been observed in the summit region. Such a high rate of LP events with no eruption suggests that a steady state process has been occurring ever since Shishaldin last erupted in April-May 1999. Following the eruption, the only other signs of volcanic unrest have been occasional weak thermal anomalies and an omnipresent puffing volcanic plume. The LP waveforms are nearly identical for time spans of days to months, but vary over longer time scales. The observations imply that the spatially close source processes are repeating, stable and non-destructive. Event sizes vary, but the rate of occurrence remains roughly constant. The events range from magnitude ???0.1 to 1.8, with most events having magnitudes <1.0. The observations suggest that the conduit system is open and capable of releasing a large amount of energy, approximately equivalent to at least one magnitude 1.8-2.6 earthquake per day. The rate of observed puffs (1 per minute) in the steam plume is similar to the typical seismic rates, suggesting that the LP events are directly related to degassing processes. However, the source mechanism, capable of producing one LP event about every 0.5-5 min, is still poorly understood. Shishaldin's seismicity is unusual in its sustained high rate of LP events without accompanying eruptive activity. Every indication is that the high rate of seismicity will continue without reflecting a hazardous state. Sealing of the conduit and/or change in gas flux, however, would be expected to change Shishaldin's behavior. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Petersen, T.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; McNutt, S. R.

2006-01-01

82

The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano a `100-year' event  

E-print Network

The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano ­ a `100- year' event Suronoa1 Philippe in Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany d U.S. Geological Survey, Cascades Volcano Observatory, Kjeller, 2027, Norway k U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory, 4230 University Drive

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

83

Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by pryoclastic flow at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Pyroclastic flows entering the sea are plausible mechanisms for tsunami generation at volcanic island arcs worldwide. We evaluate tsunami generation by pyroclastic flow using an example from Aniakchak volcano in Alaska where evidence for tsunami inundation coincident with a major, caldera-forming eruption of the volcano ca. 3.5 ka has been described. Using a numerical model, we simulate the tsunami and compare the results to field estimates of tsunami run up.

Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.

2003-01-01

84

Three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The three-dimensional P and S wave structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the underlying crust to depths of 7-8 km is determined from 6219 P wave and 4008 S wave first-arrival times recorded by a 30-station seismograph network deployed on and around the volcano. First-arrival times are calculated using a finite-difference technique, which allows for flexible parameterization of the slowness

H. M. Benz; B. A. Chouet; P. B. Dawson; J. C. Lahr; R. A. Page; J. A. Hole

1996-01-01

85

An overview of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In March 2009, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska erupted for the first time since 1990. Explosions ejected plumes that disrupted international and domestic airspace, sent lahars more than 35 km down the Drift River to the coast, and resulted in tephra fall on communities over 100 km away. Geodetic data suggest that magma began to ascend slowly from deep in the crust and reached mid- to shallow-crustal levels as early as May, 2008. Heat flux at the volcano during the precursory phase melted ~ 4% of the Drift glacier atop Redoubt's summit. Petrologic data indicate the deeply sourced magma, low-silica andesite, temporarily arrested at 9-11 km and/or at 4-6 km depth, where it encountered and mixed with segregated stored high-silica andesite bodies. The two magma compositions mixed to form intermediate-silica andesite, and all three magma types erupted during the earliest 2009 events. Only intermediate- and high-silica andesites were produced throughout the explosive and effusive phases of the eruption. The explosive phase began with a phreatic explosion followed by a seismic swarm, which signaled the start of lava effusion on March 22, shortly prior to the first magmatic explosion early on March 23, 2009 (UTC). More than 19 explosions (or “Events”) were produced over 13 days from a single vent immediately south of the 1989-90 lava domes. During that period multiple small pyroclastic density currents flowed primarily to the north and into glacial ravines, three major lahars flooded the Drift River Terminal over 35 km down-river on the coast, tephra fall deposited on all aspects of the edifice and on several communities north and east of the volcano, and at least two, and possibly three lava domes were emplaced. Lightning accompanied almost all the explosions. A shift in the eruptive character took place following Event 9 on March 27 in terms of infrasound signal onsets, the character of repeating earthquakes, and the nature of tephra ejecta. More than nine additional explosions occurred in the next two days, followed by a hiatus in explosive activity between March 29 and April 4. During this hiatus effusion of a lava dome occurred, whose growth slowed on or around April 2. The final explosion pulverized the very poorly vesicular dome on April 4, and was immediately followed by the extrusion of the final dome that ceased growing by July 1, 2009, and reached 72 M m3 in bulk volume. The dome remains as of this writing. Effusion of the final dome in the first month produced blocky intermediate- to high-silica andesite lava, which then expanded by means of lava injection beneath a fracturing and annealing, cooling surface crust. In the first week of May, a seismic swarm accompanied extrusion of an intermediate- to high-silica andesite from the apex of the dome that was highly vesicular and characterized by lower P2O5 content. The dome remained stable throughout its growth period likely due to combined factors that include an emptied conduit system, steady degassing through coalesced vesicles in the effusing lava, and a large crater-pit created by the previous explosions. We estimate the total volume of erupted material from the 2009 eruption to be between ~ 80 M and 120 M m3 dense-rock equivalent (DRE). The aim of this report is to synthesize the results from various datasets gathered both during the eruption and retrospectively, and which are represented by the papers in this publication. We therefore provide an overall view of the 2009 eruption and an introduction to this special issue publication.

Bull, Katharine F.; Buurman, Helena

2013-06-01

86

Initiative for the creation of an integrated infrastructure of European Volcano Observatories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of European citizens. The recent Eyjafjallajökull eruption also demonstrated that indirect effects of volcanic activity can present a threat to the economy and the lives of hundreds of million of people living in the whole continental area even in the case of activity of volcanoes with sporadic eruptions. Furthermore, due to the wide political distribution of the European territories, major activities of "European" volcanoes may have a worldwide impact (e.g. on the North Atlantic Ocean, West Indies included, and the Indian Ocean). Our ability to understand volcanic unrest and forecast eruptions depends on the capability of both the monitoring systems to effectively detect the signals generated by the magma rising and on the scientific knowledge necessary to unambiguously interpret these signals. Monitoring of volcanoes is the main focus of volcano observatories, which are Research Infrastructures in the ESFRI vision, because they represent the basic resource for researches in volcanology. In addition, their facilities are needed for the design, implementation and testing of new monitoring techniques. Volcano observatories produce a large amount of monitoring data and represent extraordinary and multidisciplinary laboratories for carrying out innovative joint research. The current distribution of volcano observatories in Europe and their technological state of the art is heterogeneous because of different types of volcanoes, different social requirements, operational structures and scientific background in the different volcanic areas, so that, in some active volcanic areas, observatories are lacking or poorly instrumented. Moreover, as the recent crisis of the ash in the skies over Europe confirms, the assessment of the volcanic hazard cannot be limited to the immediate areas surrounding active volcanoes. The whole European Community would therefore benefit from the creation of a network of volcano observatories, which would enable strengthening and sharing the technological and scientific level of current infrastructures. Such a network could help to achieve the minimum goal of deploying an observatory in each active volcanic area, and lay the foundation for an efficient and effective volcanic monitoring system at the European level.

Puglisi, G.; Bachelery, P.; Ferreira, T. J. L.; Vogfjörd, K. S.

2012-04-01

87

The 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Reconnaissance Observations and Preliminary Physical Volcanology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The August 7, 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano was the first documented historical eruption of this small (3 x 3 km) island volcano with a 1 km2 lake filled crater in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Reports of previous Kasatochi eruptions are unconfirmed and lacking in detail and little is known about the eruptive history. Three explosively-generated ash plumes reaching altitudes of 15 to 20 km were observed in satellite data and were preceded by some of the most intense seismicity yet recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) seismic network. Eruptive products on Kasatochi Island observed on August 22 and 23 consist of pumice-bearing, lithic-rich pyroclastic-flow deposits overlain by a 1-2 m thick sequence of fine- grained pyroclastic-surge, and -fall deposits all exposed at the coastline. These deposits completely blanket Kasatochi Island to a depth of many meters. Pyroclastic flows entered the sea and extended the coastline 300-400 m beyond prominent wave cut cliffs and sea stacks. Tide gauge data from Adak Island, 80 km to the west, indicate a small tsunami with maximum water amplitude of 20 cm, was initiated during the eruption. Kasatochi volcano lacks a real-time seismic monitoring network. Seismic activity was detected by AVO instruments on Great Sitkin Island 40 km to the west, and thus the timing of eruptive events is approximate. The eruption began explosively at 2201 UTC on August 7, and was followed by at least two additional strong eruptive bursts at 0150 UTC and 0435 UTC, August 8. Satellite data show a significant ash cloud associated with the 0435 UTC event followed by at least 14 hours of continuous ash emission. The lack of a strong ash signature in satellite data suggest that the first two plumes were ash poor. Satellite data also show a large emission of SO2 that entered the stratosphere. Correlation of eruptive periods with deposits on the island is not yet possible, but it appears that pyroclastic flows were emplaced during all three explosive events and the surge and fall deposits accumulated during the continuous phase of the third event only. The role of external water is under investigation, and observations on August 22 and 23 indicated several streams flowing from the base of the crater walls into a shallow lake in the bottom of the 1 km2 crater. The surge and fall deposits exposed on Kasatochi Island contain abundant accretionary lapilli indicating water involvement during the emplacement of these deposits. Tephra deposits observed on islands southwest of Kasatochi range in thickness from 6 cm, 30 km from the volcano, to minor amounts on eastern Adak Island, 80 km to the southwest. A fishing boat about 13 km southwest of Kasatochi received about 12 cm of coarse ash to medium lapilli tephra fall. Tephra deposits observed at 5 locations southwest of Kasatochi consist of single beds of normally graded medium to coarse lapilli tephra fall. The lack of recognizable stratigraphic breaks in the tephra deposits suggests that they were the products of a single fall event, likely the third explosion that produced the most ash rich plume.

Waythomas, C. F.; Schneider, D. J.; Prejean, S. G.

2008-12-01

88

Volcano Alert Levels Used by USGS Volcano Observatories Alert Levels are intended to inform people on the ground about a volcano's status and are issued in conjunction with the Aviation Color Code. Notifications are issued for both increasing  

E-print Network

Volcano Alert Levels Used by USGS Volcano Observatories Alert Levels are intended to inform people. WARNING Hazardous eruption is imminent, underway, or suspected. The USGS Alert-Notification System a volcano's status and are issued in conjunction with an Alert Level. Notifications are issued for both

89

Spatial variation of seismic b-values beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska  

E-print Network

. Bridges , Stephen S. Gao Department of Geology, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA Received beneath Makushin Volcano, Unalaska Island, Alaska using an earthquake catalog of 491 events that occurred of seismic stations, and filled circles are the epicenters of the earthquakes used in the study. The blue

Gao, Stephen Shangxing

90

Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both classical Strombolian activity and an explosive Subplinian plume. Strombolian activity at Shishaldin occurred in two major phases following the Subplinian activity. In this paper, we use acoustic measurements to interpret the Strombolian activity.Acoustic measurements of the two Strombolian phases show a series of explosions that are modeled by the

S. Vergniolle; M. Boichu; J. Caplan-Auerbach

2004-01-01

91

A Versatile Time-Lapse Camera System Developed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for Use at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Volcanoes can be difficult to study up close. Because it may be days, weeks, or even years between important events, direct observation is often impractical. In addition, volcanoes are often inaccessible due to their remote location and (or) harsh environmental conditions. An eruption adds another level of complexity to what already may be a difficult and dangerous situation. For these reasons, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) have, for years, built camera systems to act as surrogate eyes. With the recent advances in digital-camera technology, these eyes are rapidly improving. One type of photographic monitoring involves the use of near-real-time network-enabled cameras installed at permanent sites (Hoblitt and others, in press). Time-lapse camera-systems, on the other hand, provide an inexpensive, easily transportable monitoring option that offers more versatility in site location. While time-lapse systems lack near-real-time capability, they provide higher image resolution and can be rapidly deployed in areas where the use of sophisticated telemetry required by the networked cameras systems is not practical. This report describes the latest generation (as of 2008) time-lapse camera system used by HVO for photograph acquisition in remote and hazardous sites on Kilauea Volcano.

Orr, Tim R.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

2008-01-01

92

Challenges to Integrating Geographically-Dispersed Data and Expertise at U.S. Volcano Observatories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the past 10 years the data and information available to volcano observatories to assess hazards and forecast activity has grown dramatically, a trend that will likely continue. Similarly, the ability of observatories to draw upon external specialists who can provide needed expertise is also increasing. Though technology easily provides the ability to move large amounts of information to the observatory, the challenge remains to efficiently and quickly integrate useful information and expertise into the decision-making process. The problem is further exacerbated by the use of new research techniques during times of heightened activity. Eruptive periods typically accelerate research into volcanic processes as scientists use the opportunity to test new hypotheses and develop new tools. Such experimental methods can be extremely insightful, but may be less easily integrated into the normal data streams that inform decisions. Similarly, there is an increased need for collaborative tools that allow efficient and effective communication between the observatory and external experts. Observatories will continue to be the central focus for integrating information, assessing hazards, and communicating with the public, but will increasingly draw on experts at other observatories, government agencies, academia and even the private sector, both foreign and domestic, to provide analysis and assistance. Fostering efficient communication among such a diverse and geographically dispersed group is a challenge. Addressing these challenges is one of the goals of the U.S. National Volcano Early Warning System, falling under the effort to improve interoperability among the five U.S. volcano observatories and their collaborators. In addition to providing the mechanisms to handle the flow of data, efforts will be directed at simplifying - though retaining the required nuance - information and merging data streams while developing tools that enable observatory staff to quickly integrate the data into the decision-making process. Also, advances in the use of collaborative tools and organizational structure will be required if observatories are to tap into the intellectual resources throughout the volcanological community. The last 10 years saw a continuing explosion in the quantity and quality of data and expertise available to address volcano hazards and volcanic activity; the challenge over the next 10 years will be for us to make the best use of it.

Murray, T. L.; Ewert, J. W.

2010-12-01

93

Causation or coincidence? The correlations in time and space of the 2008 eruptions of Cleveland, Kasatochi, and Okmok Volcanoes, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In mid-summer 2008, three significant volcanic eruptions occurred in the Andreanof Islands of the Aleutian Arc, Alaska. Okmok volcano began erupting on July 12, followed by Cleveland on July 21, and then by Kasatochi on August 7. In addition to this temporal correlation, there is also a geographic correlation: the eruptions occurred in a 525 km region representing only about 20% of the arc's length. Given these close proximities in space and time, it is natural to speculate about whether an underlying process is at work. Ultimately, the arc exists because of subduction, but the question remains if a more immediate trigger may be responsible for the concurrence. We began our inquiry into whether a link exists among the three eruptions by posing the following question: What is the probability that, by chance alone, Okmok, Kasatochi and Cleveland could simultaneously erupt? Answering this question requires both a statistical model for eruption frequency and empirical data of where and when eruptions have occurred in the past. We assume that eruptions follow a Poisson distribution, and estimate the expected number of eruptions per time interval for each volcano in the arc from the geologic record and observations contained in the Alaska Volcano Observatory's GeoDIVA database. We then perform a Monte Carlo experiment, simulating 10,000 years of eruptive activity at 30 day intervals. The results of the simulation indicate that the phenomenon of three eruptions beginning in a single month happens about once every 90 years. A spatial constraint requiring that the maximum separation among the volcanoes be less than 525 km increases this interval to about once every 900 years. Though these intervals are not so long as to rule out coincidence, they are long enough to warrant further investigation into the possibility of a common origin. Several candidates for a prospective cause are: (1) the Great Aleutian Earthquake of 1957, which includes the region of the three recent eruptions, may have triggered a period of increased volcanic activity that still persists; (2) a slow slip event, with associated non- volcanic tremor, have may have resulted in static stress changes favorable to volcanic eruptions; or (3) nearby volcanoes may interact with one another in such a way as to increase the chance of clustered eruptions. We consider each of these scenarios (as well as other more remote possibilities) and weigh their relative likelihoods against the probability of random correlation. In the end, no definitive answer emerges, though pure coincidence remains a simple and plausible explanation for this remarkable event.

Cervelli, P. F.; Cameron, C. E.

2008-12-01

94

Comparative Spectrograms Between the Popocatepetl Volcano Magnetic Station and the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory, Mexico  

Microsoft Academic Search

We present a comparative spectrogram analysis for the Popocatepetl Volcano magnetic station (70.943° N CoLat, 261.363° E, 4029 m) and the Teoloyucan Magnetic Observatory (70.254° N CoLat, 260.807º E, 2280 m) time series between 1997 and 2003. Instrumentation at both sites include a Geometrics G856 proton-precession magnetometer operating at a 60 second sampling rate and is complemented with the magnetic

G. Cifuentes-Nava; J. E. Hernandez-Quintero; E. Cabral-Cano; A. L. Martin-Del Pozzo; R. E. Chavez-Segura

2007-01-01

95

Rockfalls at Augustine Volcano, Alaska: 2003-2006  

Microsoft Academic Search

Rockfalls, avalanches and landslides have been frequently recorded in seismic data at Augustine Volcano for many years. Typical years such as 2003 or 2004 had several dozen such events that were strong enough to trigger the automatic event detection system. Typical events lasted about 30 sec, had frequencies >6 Hz, and were strongest on summit stations, suggesting that they were

N. Deroin; S. R. McNutt; C. Reyes; D. Sentman

2007-01-01

96

Preliminary volcano hazard assessment for the Emmons Lake volcanic center, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Emmons Lake volcanic center is a large stratovolcano complex on the Alaska Peninsula near Cold Bay, Alaska. The volcanic center includes several ice- and snow-clad volcanoes within a nested caldera structure that hosts Emmons Lake and truncates a shield-like ancestral Mount Emmons edifice. From northeast to southwest, the main stratovolcanoes of the center are: Pavlof Sister, Pavlof, Little Pavlof, Double Crater, Mount Hague, and Mount Emmons. Several small cinder cones and vents are located on the floor of the caldera and on the south flank of Pavlof Volcano. Pavlof Volcano, in the northeastern part of the center, is the most historically active volcano in Alaska (Miller and others, 1998) and eruptions of Pavlof pose the greatest hazards to the region. Historical eruptions of Pavlof Volcano have been small to moderate Strombolian eruptions that produced moderate amounts of near vent lapilli tephra fallout, and diffuse ash plumes that drifted several hundreds of kilometers from the vent. Cold Bay, King Cove, Nelson Lagoon, and Sand Point have reported ash fallout from Pavlof eruptions. Drifting clouds of volcanic ash produced by eruptions of Pavlof would be a major hazard to local aircraft and could interfere with trans-Pacific air travel if the ash plume achieved flight levels. During most historical eruptions of Pavlof, pyroclastic material erupted from the volcano has interacted with the snow and ice on the volcano producing volcanic mudflows or lahars. Lahars have inundated most of the drainages heading on the volcano and filled stream valleys with variable amounts of coarse sand, gravel, and boulders. The lahars are often hot and would alter or destroy stream habitat for many years following the eruption. Other stratocones and vents within the Emmons Lake volcanic center are not known to have erupted in the past 300 years. However, young appearing deposits and lava flows suggest there may have been small explosions and minor effusive eruptive activity within the caldera during this time interval. Mount Hague may have experienced minor steam eruptions. The greatest hazards in order of importance are described below and summarized on plate 1.

Waythomas, Christopher; Miller, Thomas P.; Mangan, Margaret T.

2006-01-01

97

Nonlinear estimation of geometric parameters in FEMs of volcano deformation: Integrating tomography models and geodetic data for Okmok volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The internal structure, loading processes, and effective boundary conditions of a volcano control the deformation observed at the Earth's surface. Using finite element models (FEMs), we simulate the response due to a pressurized magma chamber embedded in a domain having a distribution of elastic material properties. We present the Pinned Mesh Perturbation method (PMP) to automate the mesh generation process in response to perturbations of the position of a simulated magma chamber within an FEM domain. Using InSAR-observed deformation for the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska, as an example, we combine PMP with nested Monte Carlo methods to estimate a set of linear and nonlinear parameters that characterize the depressurization and location of the magma chamber beneath Okmok's caldera. The three-dimensional FEMs used in the PMP method simulate the distribution of material properties of tomography models and account for the irregular geometry of the topography and bathymetry. The estimated depth of an assumed spherical magma chamber is 3527-54+55 m below sea level and is sensitive to the distribution of material properties. This depth is consistent with lithostatic pressure constraints and very long period tremor observations. The fit of this FEM to the InSAR data is a significant improvement, at the 95% confidence level, compared to the fit of a corresponding FEM having homogeneous material properties. The methods presented here allow us to construct deformation models that integrate tomography models with geodetic observations, in an effort to achieve a deeper understanding of active volcanoes.

Masterlark, Timothy; Feigl, Kurt L.; Haney, Matthew; Stone, Jonathan; Thurber, Clifford; Ronchin, Erika

2012-02-01

98

On the absence of InSAR-detected volcano deformation spanning the 1995–1996 and 1999 eruptions of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite volcano located on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska, had a minor eruption in 1995–1996 and a VEI 3 sub-Plinian basaltic eruption in 1999. We used 21 synthetic aperture radar images acquired by ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, and RADARSAT-1 satellites to construct 12 coherent interferograms that span most of the 1993–2003 time

S. C. Moran; O. Kwoun; T. Masterlark; Z. Lu

2006-01-01

99

Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) gravity work for the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this funding has been to install two modified UCSD superconducting gravimeters at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). The research and development underlying the modifications was funded primarily by NOAA and in smaller part by this contract. Modification and installation of the instruments at HVO could not proceed prior to completion of this effort. Although considerable work remains to be done to guarantee optimum performance of all future instruments, three instruments have been assembled using present technology and their performance meets our most optimistic expectations. No instrumental drift has been measurable on them and current results allow us to set an upper limit on drift at about 0.5 {mu}Gal for a five month record at Miami. As longer simultaneous records from two instruments are obtained this limit will be set lower. They reveal substantial gravity variations due to rainfall as well as smaller ones which may be caused by activity within the volcano. 2 refs., 1 fig.

Goodkind, J.M.

1990-05-05

100

Rockfalls at Augustine Volcano, Alaska: 2003-2006  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Rockfalls, avalanches and landslides have been frequently recorded in seismic data at Augustine Volcano for many years. Typical years such as 2003 or 2004 had several dozen such events that were strong enough to trigger the automatic event detection system. Typical events lasted about 30 sec, had frequencies >6 Hz, and were strongest on summit stations, suggesting that they were rockfalls from the steep summit dome into the adjacent moat area. In 2005 both the rate and the occurrence pattern changed. Rockfall activity began in April 2006 and peaked in May and June, then continued through the fall and early winter. Overall there were more than 340 rockfalls in 2005, with both small and large events occurring. The 2005 rockfall activity increased at nearly the same time as earthquake activity and heating of the ground, suggesting that higher temperatures and steaming contributed to mechanical instabilities of the surface dome rocks. We examined relative amplitudes at station pairs and frequency contents to determine relative locations of the rockfalls by assuming that both higher amplitudes and higher frequencies are associated with events closer to a given station. When a low-light camera was installed at Augustine in January 2006 we were able to confirm these relations because there was a clear correlation between rockfalls, debris flows, and pyroclasic flows to the east (towards the camera) and high amplitudes and frequencies at east station AUE. Other events had high amplitudes and higher frequencies at west station AUW and no material was seen moving to the east. Still other events moved to the north and amplitudes were nearly the same at AUE and AUW. The systematic patterns in amplitude and frequency, verified by data from the low-light camera, make it possible to estimate mass flow in various directions using seismic data. Energy estimates of the rockfalls made from video images can be compared with energy estimates from magnitude-energy equations. The observer stations AUE and AUW show shifts in the frequency depending on whether the rockfalls are moving toward or away from them. Estimates of the seismic wave speeds from the rockfalls can be estimated using the Doppler equation, since the rockfalls are a moving frequency source. Also in progress is a program to estimate mass flow around the flanks of the volcano, using the amplitude ratios from stations around the volcano. The results from this work can be compared with geologic maps of deposits from the 2006 eruptions. The high rate of rockfalls in 2005 was also a new class of precursory signal that may be incorporated into long-term monitoring strategies at Augustine and elsewhere.

Deroin, N.; McNutt, S. R.; Reyes, C.; Sentman, D.

2007-12-01

101

Measurements of the Michigan Airglow Observatory from 1971 to 1973 at Ester Dome Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The Michigan Airglow Observatory (MAO) was located at Ester Dome Observatory, College, Alaska (latitude: 64 deg 53'N, longitude: 148 deg 03'W) since October, 1971. The MAO houses a 6-inch Fabry-Perot interferometer, a 2-channel monitoring photometer and a 4-channel tilting filter photometer. The Fabry-Perot interferometer was used extensively during the winter observing seasons of 1971-72 and 1972-73 to measure temperature and mass motions of the neutral atmosphere above approximately 90 kilometers altitude. Neutral wind data from the 1971-72 observing season as measured by observing the Doppler shift of the gamma 6300 A atomic oxygen emission line are presented.

Mcwatters, K. D.; Meriwether, J. W.; Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

1973-01-01

102

Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, August 3-8, 2000: data processing, geodetic coordinates and comparison with prior geodetic surveys  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between August 3 and 8,2000,the Alaska Volcano Observatory completed a Global Positioning System (GPS) survey at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine is a frequently active calcalkaline volcano located in the lower portion of Cook Inlet (fig. 1), with reported eruptions in 1812, 1882, 1909?, 1935, 1964, 1976, and 1986 (Miller et al., 1998). Geodetic measurements using electronic and optical surveying techniques (EDM and theodolite) were begun at Augustine Volcano in 1986. In 1988 and 1989, an island-wide trilateration network comprising 19 benchmarks was completed and measured in its entirety (Power and Iwatsubo, 1998). Partial GPS surveys of the Augustine Island geodetic network were completed in 1992 and 1995; however, neither of these surveys included all marks on the island.Additional GPS measurements of benchmarks A5 and A15 (fig. 2) were made during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996. The goals of the 2000 GPS survey were to:1) re-measure all existing benchmarks on Augustine Island using a homogeneous set of GPS equipment operated in a consistent manner, 2) add measurements at benchmarks on the western shore of Cook Inlet at distances of 15 to 25 km, 3) add measurements at an existing benchmark (BURR) on Augustine Island that was not previously surveyed, and 4) add additional marks in areas of the island thought to be actively deforming. The entire survey resulted in collection of GPS data at a total of 24 sites (fig. 1 and 2). In this report we describe the methods of GPS data collection and processing used at Augustine during the 2000 survey. We use this data to calculate coordinates and elevations for all 24 sites surveyed. Data from the 2000 survey is then compared toelectronic and optical measurements made in 1988 and 1989. This report also contains a general description of all marks surveyed in 2000 and photographs of all new marks established during the 2000 survey (Appendix A).

Pauk, Benjamin A.; Power, John A.; Lisowski, Mike; Dzurisin, Daniel; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Melbourne, Tim

2001-01-01

103

U. S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

A comprehensive overview of the U.S. Geological Survey's Volcano Hazards Program and current volcanic activity in the United States. The Volcano Hazards Program monitors volcanoes and collects the best possible scientific information on volcanoes in the United States and elsewhere to reduce the risk from volcanic activity. Site includes links to the Program's four volcano observatories in Alaska, the Cascades (Washington State) , Hawaii, and Long Valley (California). Other links include information on volcano hazards: types, effects, locations and historical eruptions, information on reducing volcanic risks, volcano monitoring, emergency planning, and warning schemes. Other resources available are a photoglossary, volcano fact sheets and videos, an educator's page, and updates and weekly reports on worldwide, U.S., and Russian volcano activity.

104

Volcanoes!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webquest provides a information and links explaining the different types of volcanoes, lava flow, volcano locations, and volcano damage. There are links for students to research their own questions and a vocabulary list. A teacher page contains associated lesson plan criteria. There are links to building volcano models, virtual volcano field trips, and a volcano quiz.

1998-09-01

105

Seismicity and seismic structure at Okmok Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Okmok volcano is an active volcanic caldera located on the northeastern portion of Umnak Island in the Aleutian arc, with recent eruptions in 1997 and 2008. The Okmok area had ~900 locatable earthquakes between 2003 and June 2008, and an additional ~600 earthquakes from the beginning of the 2008 eruption to mid 2009, providing an adequate dataset for seismic tomography. To image the seismic velocity structure of Okmok, we apply waveform cross-correlation using bispectrum verification and double-difference tomography to a subset of these earthquakes. We also perform P-wave attenuation tomography using a spectral decay technique. We examine the spatio-temporal characteristics of seismicity in the opening sequence of the 2008 eruption to investigate the path of magma migration during the establishment of a new eruptive vent. We also incorporate the new earthquake relocations and three-dimensional (3D) velocity model with first-motion polarities to compute focal mechanisms for selected events in the 2008 pre-eruptive and eruptive periods. Through these techniques we obtain precise relocations, a well-constrained 3D P-wave velocity model, and a marginally resolved S-wave velocity model. We image a main low Vp and Vs anomaly directly under the caldera consisting of a shallow zone at 0-2 km depth connected to a larger deeper zone that extends to about 6 km depth. We find that areas of low Qp are concentrated in the central to southwestern portion of the caldera and correspond fairly well with areas of low Vp. We interpret the deeper part of the low velocity anomaly (4-6 km depth) beneath the caldera as a magma body. This is consistent with results from ambient noise tomography and suggests that previous estimates of depth to Okmok's magma chamber based only on geodetic data may be too shallow. The distribution of events preceding the 2008 eruption suggest that a combination of overpressure in the zone surrounding the magma chamber and the introduction of new material from below were jointly responsible for the explosive eruption. Magma escaping from the top of the main magma chamber likely reacted with both a smaller shallow pod of magma and groundwater on its way up below the Cone D area. The earthquakes in the 2008 pre-eruptive and eruptive periods are found to have a mixture of strike-slip, oblique normal, and oblique thrust mechanisms, with a dominant P-axis orientation that is nearly perpendicular to the regional tectonic stress. This may indicate that the stresses related to magmatic activity locally dominated regional tectonic forces during this time period.

Ohlendorf, Summer J.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Pesicek, Jeremy D.; Prejean, Stephanie G.

2014-05-01

106

Andesites of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Crystal-rich andesites that erupted from Redoubt Volcano in 2009 range from 57.5 to 62.5 wt.% SiO2 and have phenocryst and phenocryst-melt relations consistent with staging in the upper crust. Early explosive products are low-silica andesites (LSA, < 58 wt.% SiO2) that ascended from deeper crustal levels during or before the 6 months of precursory activity, but a broad subsequent succession to more evolved and cooler products, and predominantly effusive dome growth, are interpreted to result from progressive mobilization and mixing with differentiated magmas tapped from pre-2009 Redoubt intrusions at ~ 3-6 km depth. Initial explosions on March 23-28 ejected predominantly LSA with a uniform phenocryst assemblage of high-Al amphibole, ~ An70 plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxene, FeTi oxides (890 to 960 °C), and traces of magmatic sulfide. Melt in the dominant microlite-poor LSA was compositionally uniform dacite (67-68 wt.% SiO2) but ranged to rhyolite with greater microlite growth. Minor amounts of intermediate- to high-silica andesite (ISA, HSA; 59-62.5 wt.% SiO2) also erupted during the early explosions and most carried rhyolitic melt (72-74 wt.% SiO2). A lava dome grew following the initial tephra-producing events but was destroyed by an explosion on April 4. Ejecta from the April 4 explosion consists entirely of ISA and HSA, as does a subsequent lava dome that grew April 4-July 1; LSA was absent. Andesites from the April 4 event and from the final dome had pre-eruptive temperatures of 725-840 °C (FeTi oxides) and highly evolved matrix liquids (77-80 wt.% SiO2), including in rare microlite-free pyroclasts. ISA has mixed populations of phenocrysts suggesting it is a hybrid between HSA and LSA. The last lavas from the 2009 eruption, effused May 1-July 1, are distinctly depleted in P2O5, consistent with low temperatures and high degrees of crystallization including apatite. Plagioclase-melt hygrometry and comparison to phase equilibrium experiments are consistent with pre-eruptive storage of all three magma types at 100-160 MPa (4-6 km depth), if they were close to H2O-saturation, coincident with the locus of shallow syn-eruptive seismicity. Deeper storage would be indicated if the magmas were CO2-rich. Relatively coarse-grained clinopyroxene-rich reaction rims on many LSA amphibole phenocrysts may result from slow ascent to, or storage at, depths shallow enough for the onset of appreciable H2O exsolution, consistent with pre-eruptive staging in the uppermost crust. We interpret that the 2009 LSA ascended from depth during the 8 or more months prior to the first eruption, but that the magma stalled and accumulated in the upper crust where its phenocryst rim and melt compositions were established. Ascent of LSA through stagnant mushy intrusions residual from earlier Redoubt activity mobilized differentiated magma pockets and interstitial liquids represented by HSA, and as LSA-HSA hybrids represented by ISA, that fed the subsequently erupted lava domes.

Coombs, Michelle L.; Sisson, Thomas W.; Bleick, Heather A.; Henton, Sarah M.; Nye, Chris J.; Payne, Allison L.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Larsen, Jessica F.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Bull, Katharine F.

2013-06-01

107

Volcano-ice interactions precursory to the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In late summer of 2008, after nearly 20 years of quiescence, Redoubt Volcano began to show signs of abnormal heat flow in its summit crater. In the months that followed, the excess heat triggered melting and ablation of Redoubt's glaciers, beginning at the summit and propagating to lower elevations as the unrest accelerated. A variety of morphological changes were observed, including the creation of ice cauldrons, areas of wide-spread subsidence, punctures in the ice carved out by steam, and deposition from debris flows. In this paper, we use visual observations, satellite data, and a high resolution digital elevation model of the volcanic edifice to calculate ice loss at Redoubt as a function of time. Our aim is to establish from this time series a proxy for heat flow that can be compared to other data sets collected along the same time interval. Our study area consists of the Drift glacier, which flows from the summit crater down the volcano's north slope, and makes up about one quarter of Redoubt's total ice volume of ~ 4 km3. The upper part of the Drift glacier covers the area of recent volcanism, making this part of ice mass most susceptible to the effect of volcanic heating. Moreover, melt water and other flows are channeled down the Drift glacier drainage by topography, leaving the remainder of Redoubt's ice mantle relatively unaffected. The rate of ice loss averaged around 0.1 m3/s over the last four months of 2008, accelerated to over twenty times this value by February 2009, and peaked at greater than 22 m3/s, just prior to the first major explosion on March 22, 2009. We estimate a cumulative ice loss over this period of about 35 million cubic meters (M m3).

Bleick, Heather A.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Bull, Katharine F.; Wessels, Rick L.

2013-06-01

108

International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and aptitude for the physical sciences, not necessarily volcanology. It will also serve as an entry point for students wishing to make extended exchange visits to the Russian Far East or Alaska, and to graduate students in volcanology wishing to undertake thesis research in North Pacific volcanism. The school represents the first educational effort of the newly established Japan Kamchatka Alaska Subduction Project (JKASP), which seeks to bring scientists of our three nations together in the study of one shared geophysical province, the Kuril-Kamchatka-Aleutian Arcs.

Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

2003-12-01

109

The Changing Role of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory within the Volcanological Community through its 100 year history  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

When Thomas Jaggar, Jr., founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912, he wanted to "keep and publish careful records, invite the whole world of science to co-operate, and interest the business man." After studying the disastrous volcanic eruption at Martinique and Naples and the destructive earthquakes at Messina and the Caribbean Ocean, he saw observatories with these goals as a way to understand and mitigate these hazards. Owing to frequent eruptions, ease of access, and continuous record of activity (since January 17, 1912), Kilauea Volcano has been the focus for volcanological study by government, academic, and international investigators. New volcano monitoring techniques have been developed and tested on Hawaiian volcanoes and exported worldwide. HVO has served as a training ground for several generations of volcanologists; many have contributed to volcano research and hazards mitigation around the world. In the coming years, HVO and the scientific community will benefit from recent upgrades in our monitoring network. HVO had the first regional seismic network in the US and it will be fully digital; continuous GPS, tilt, gravity, and strain data already complement the seismic data; an array of infrared and visual cameras simultaneously track geologic surface changes. Scientifically, HVO scientists and their colleagues are making great advances in understanding explosive basaltic eruptions, volcanic gas emission and dispersion and its hazards, and lava flow mechanics with these advanced instruments. Activity at Hawaiian volcanoes continues to provide unparalleled opportunities for research and education, made all the more valuable by HVO's scientific legacy.

Kauahikaua, J. P.; Poland, M. P.

2011-12-01

110

Deformation of the Augustine Volcano, Alaska, 1992-2005, measured by ERS and ENVISAT SAR interferometry  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Augustine Volcano is a conical-shaped, active stratovolcano located on an island of the same name in Cook Inlet, about 290 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. Augustine has experienced seven significant explosive eruptions - in 1812, 1883, 1908, 1935, 1963, 1976, 1986, and in January 2006. To measure the ground surface deformation of the Augustine Volcano before the 2006 eruption, we applied satellite radar interferometry using Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) images from three descending and three ascending satellite tracks acquired by European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS) 1 and 2 and the Environment Satellite (ENVISAT). Multiple interferograms were stacked to reduce artifacts caused by atmospheric conditions, and we used a singular value decomposition method to retrieve the temporal deformation history from several points on the island. Interferograms during 1992 and 2005 show a subsidence of about 1-3 cm/year, caused by the contraction of pyroclastic flow deposits from the 1986 eruption. Subsidence has decreased exponentially with time. Multiple interferograms between 1992 and 2005 show no significant inflation around the volcano before the 2006 eruption. The lack of a pre-eruption deformation signal suggests that the deformation signal from 1992 to August 2005 must have been very small and may.have been obscured by atmospheric delay artifacts. Copyright ?? The Society of Geomagnetism and Earth, Planetary and Space Sciences (SGEPSS); The Seismological Society of Japan; The Volcanological Society of Japan; The Geodetic Society of Japan; The Japanese Society for Planetary Sciences; TERRAPUB.

Lee, C.-W.; Lu, Z.; Kwoun, O.-I.; Won, J.-S.

2008-01-01

111

Three-Dimensional P-Wave Velocity Structure and Precise Earthquake Relocation at Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska  

E-print Network

Three-Dimensional P-Wave Velocity Structure and Precise Earthquake Relocation at Great Sitkin Volcano, Alaska by Jeremy D. Pesicek, Clifford H. Thurber, Heather R. DeShon,* Stephanie G. Prejean-difference tomography to increase the precision of earthquake locations and constrain regional 3D P-wave velocity

112

Causation or coincidence? The correlations in time and space of the 2008 eruptions of Cleveland, Kasatochi, and Okmok Volcanoes, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

In mid-summer 2008, three significant volcanic eruptions occurred in the Andreanof Islands of the Aleutian Arc, Alaska. Okmok volcano began erupting on July 12, followed by Cleveland on July 21, and then by Kasatochi on August 7. In addition to this temporal correlation, there is also a geographic correlation: the eruptions occurred in a 525 km region representing only about

P. F. Cervelli; C. E. Cameron

2008-01-01

113

Volcanoes!!  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

5th grade students will be able to explain what makes a volcano erupt. 5th grade students will be able to list the effects that volcanoes have on the environment and people. Read through the page to gather more knowledge about volcanoes. After reading this, you should be able to explain what makes a volcano erupt Volcano Facts View a model of a volcano erupting Visual Model of a volcano erupting Use the web tool to make your own volcano erupt. Adjust the gas level and size to make ...

Fucaloro, Kailey

2009-09-15

114

Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Create a poster about volcanoes Directions: Make a poster about volcanoes. (20 points) Include at least (1) large picture (15 points) on your poster complete with labels of every part (10 points). (15 points) Include at least three (3) facts about volcanoes. (5 points each) (15 points) Write at least a three sentence summary of your poster and volcanoes. (5 points) Use at ...

Walls, Mrs.

2011-01-30

115

Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas are the result of partial melting of this slab where thermal erosion and weakening of the crust occurs along the Pacific plate-Yakutat terrane transition. Additionally, flat slab subduction may be responsible for producing adakitic magmas by equilibration of the hydrous slab with ambient mantle temperatures. In contrast, it is possible that the adakitic signature at Hayes is from underplated mafic lower crust that melted as the result of pooling mantle melt at depth. Two volcanoes within the WVF, Mt. Drum and Mt. Churchill, are adakitic with an abundance of biotite and amphibole similar to Hayes volcano and have been suggested to have slab melt origins. Mt. Drum lavas have less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr but overlapping 206Pb/204Pb signatures while Mt. Churchill, which approximately overlies the eastern edge of the Yakutat terrane, has similar 87Sr/86Sr compositions, but more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb than Hayes. Mt. Spurr, the nearest CIV to Hayes volcano (90 km south), does not share its adakitic signature but exhibits overlapping, more heterogeneous isotopic compositions. Thus, understanding the petrogenetic history of Hayes volcano is essential not only to explain the development of an adakitic volcanic system but how this relates to regional, arc-wide volcanism.

McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

2012-12-01

116

Mid-Holocene Sector Collapse at Mount Spurr Volcano, South-Central Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Radiocarbon-dated volcanic mass-flow deposits on the southeast flank of Mount Spurr in south-central Alaska provide strong evidence for the timing of large-scale destruction of the south flank of the volcano by sector collapse at 4,769^ndash;4,610 yr B.P. The sector collapse created an avalanche caldera and produced an ~1-km3-volume clay-rich debris avalanche that flowed into the glacially scoured Chakachatna River valley, where it transformed into a lahar that extended an unknown distance beyond the debris avalanche. Hydrothermal alteration, an unbuttressed south flank of the volcano, and local structure have been identified as plausible factors contributing to the instability of the edifice. The sector collapse at Mount Spurr is one of the later known large-volume (>1 km,sup>3) flank failures recognized in the Aleutian Arc and one of the few known Alaskan examples of transformation of a debris avalanche into a lahar.

Waythomas, Christopher F.

2007-01-01

117

Storage and interaction of compositionally heterogeneous magmas from the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Compositional heterogeneity (56-64 wt% SiO2 whole-rock) in samples of tephra and lava from the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, raises questions about the physical nature of magma storage and interaction beneath this young and frequently active volcano. To determine conditions of magma storage and evolutionary histories of compositionally distinct magmas, we investigate physical and chemical characteristics of andesitic and dacitic magmas feeding the 1986 eruption. We calculate equilibrium temperatures and oxygen fugacities from Fe-Ti oxide compositions and find a continuous range in temperature from 877 to 947°C and high oxygen fugacities (?NNO=1-2) for all magmas. Melt inclusions in pyroxene phenocrysts analyzed by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and electron probe microanalysis are dacitic to rhyolitic and have water contents ranging from <1 to ˜7 wt%. Matrix glass compositions are rhyolitic and remarkably similar (˜75.9-76.6 wt% SiO2) in all samples. All samples have ˜25% phenocrysts, but lower-silica samples have much higher microlite contents than higher-silica samples. Continuous ranges in temperature and whole-rock composition, as well as linear trends in Harker diagrams and disequilibrium mineral textures, indicate that the 1986 magmas are the product of mixing between dacitic magma and a hotter, more mafic magma. The dacitic endmember is probably residual magma from the previous (1976) eruption of Augustine, and we interpret the mafic endmember to have been intruded from depth. Mixing appears to have continued as magmas ascended towards the vent. We suggest that the physical structure of the magma storage system beneath Augustine contributed to the sustained compositional heterogeneity of this eruption, which is best explained by magma storage and interaction in a vertically extensive system of interconnected dikes rather than a single coherent magma chamber and/or conduit. The typically short repose period (˜10 years) between Augustine's recent eruptive pulses may also inhibit homogenization, as short repose periods and chemically heterogeneous magmas are observed at several volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska.

Roman, Diana C.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Gardner, Cynthia A.; Wallace, Paul J.; Donovan, John J.

2006-01-01

118

Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments

Zhong Lu; Eric Fielding; Matthew R. Patrick; Charles M. Trautwein

2003-01-01

119

Volcanoes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

Kunar, L. N. S.

1975-01-01

120

Detecting small geothermal features at Northern Pacific volcanoes with ASTER thermal infrared data  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitor the eruptive state of volcanoes throughout the Aleutian, Kamchatkan, and Kurile arcs. This is accomplished in part by analyzing thermal infrared (TIR) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors at least twice per day for major thermal anomalies.

R. Wessels; S. Senyukov; A. Tranbenkova; M. S. Ramsey; D. J. Schneider

2004-01-01

121

Volcanoes  

SciTech Connect

This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

1989-01-01

122

Volcanoes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

Tilling, Robert I.

123

Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this lesson, students investigate the processes that build volcanoes, the types of rocks they create, the factors that influence different eruption types, and the threats volcanoes pose to their surrounding environments. They will also create a notebook of volcano characteristics and use what they have learned to identify physical features and eruption types in some real-life documented volcanic episodes.

2005-01-01

124

The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Response to the 2006 Augustine Alaskan Volcanic Eruption  

Microsoft Academic Search

During September of 2006, UNAVCO installed five permanent Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS stations on Augustine Volcano, in the lower Cook Inlet of Alaska. The installations were done at the request of the PBO Magmatic Systems committee in response to the January 11, 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. Prior to the eruption, PBO installed five permanent GPS stations on Augustine

B. Pauk; K. Feaux; M. Jackson; B. Friesen; M. Enders; A. Baldwin; K. Fournier; A. Marzulla

2006-01-01

125

Imaging eruption columns from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska using Doppler weather radar  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey deployed a dedicated volcano-monitoring Doppler weather radar system during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, enabling the collection of an unprecedented radar data set of seventeen explosive events. Radar reflectivity and radial Doppler velocity measurements were made of the column every 70-90 seconds at a vertical resolution of about 2 km. This temporal frequency is 3-6 times higher than what can be achieved by the national system of weather radars (i.e. NEXRAD), and allows for more robust comparisons with traditional geophysical monitoring data from seismic, pressure sensor, web camera and satellite images. The MiniMax-250C radar detected the eruption columns from explosive events with maximum altitudes of 9-19 km above sea level. We describe the preliminary results on imaging these eruption columns. Most of the explosive events were characterized by high radar reflectivity values of 50-60 dBZ in the central core of the eruption column and proximal cloud, which we interpret to be related to the rapid growth of tephra-ice aggregates. Time-series of radial Doppler velocity images documented the transition from turbulent mixing in the column to more uniform expansion of the proximal cloud. Vertical velocities of the eruption column top were estimated from observation of cloud rise in the reflectivity images and ranged from about 25-60 m/s. The duration of the eruptive events ranged from minutes to tens of minutes. Radar-derived duration estimates did not correlate well with seismic and pressure sensor derived durations. The observed maximum column heights were generally higher (perhaps 20% or more) than would be predicted for the mass eruption rate estimated from the mapped deposits.

Schneider, D. J.; Mastin, L. G.

2011-12-01

126

Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Volcanoes is part of an online series of modules entitled Exploring the Environment. Emphasizing an integrated approach to environmental Earth Science education through problem based-learning, this module asks students to look at four different situations involving volcanoes, research the situations, and make decisions about them. Information about the three volcanic areas under exploration (Mt. Hood, Kilauea, and Yellowstone) is given through maps, movies, and videos. Additional information covers plate tectonics, locations of volcanoes, volcano monitoring and hazards, how to deal with volcano threats, lavas, eruption types, and risk analysis. Once students have gone through the information, they make real-life decisions about building near volcanoes, and the possibility of eruptions in the near future. There are teacher resources, a reference for problem-based learning, and links for more information.

127

Relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise at Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Okmok and Redoubt are two of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. Leading up to its most recent eruption, Okmok, a shield volcano on Umnak Island, showed precursors to volcanic activity only five hours before it erupted explosively in July 2008. Redoubt, a stratovolcano located along the Cook Inlet, displayed several months of precursory activity leading up to its March 2009 eruption. Frequent activity at both volcanoes poses a major hazard due to heavy traffic along the North Pacific air routes. Additionally, Okmok is adjacent to several of the world's most productive fisheries and Redoubt is located only 110 miles SW of Anchorage, the major population center of Alaska. For these reasons, it is imperative that we improve our ability to detect early signs of unrest, which could potentially lead to eruptive activity at these volcanoes. We take advantage of continuous waveforms recorded on seismic networks at Redoubt and Okmok in an attempt to identify seismic precursors to the recent eruptions at both volcanoes. We perform seismic interferometry using ambient noise, following Brenguier et al. (2008), in order to probe the subsurface and determine temporal changes in relative seismic velocity from pre- through post-eruption, for the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions. In a preliminary investigation, we analyzed 6 months of noise cross-correlation functions averaged over 10-day intervals leading up to the 2009 eruption at Redoubt. During February 2009, station pairs RSO-DFR and RDN-RSO showed a decrease in seismic velocity of ~0.02%. By the beginning of March, the relative velocity changes returned to background levels. Stations RSO and RDN are located within the summit breach, and station DFR is to the north. Although these results are preliminary, it is interesting to note that the decrease in seismic velocity at both station pairs overlaps with the time period when Grapenthin et al. (2012) hypothesize magma in the mid-to-deep crustal reservoir was reheated and migrated to a second shallow reservoir between 2 and 4.5 km depth. This hypothesized shallow magma reservoir is within the sensitivity depth of our ambient noise analysis, and thus the decrease in seismic velocity may be associated with magma movement at shallow depths underneath Redoubt. At the onset of eruption, the relative velocity change at station pair RDN-RSO decreased by ~0.03% while that at RSO-DFR remained at background levels. Notably, this decrease in seismic velocity is observed only at the station pair with a propagation path that traverses the summit breach. Our investigation continues as we search for time variations in the ambient seismic noise signal preceding and following the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions and endeavor to identify what those changes may represent.

Bennington, N. L.; Haney, M. M.; De Angelis, S.; Thurber, C. H.

2013-12-01

128

The unusual mineralogy of the Hayes River rhyolite, Hayes Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hayes Volcano is an ice-covered volcanic massif located in the northern Cook Inlet region approximately 135 miles northwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The last major eruptive episode of Hayes, and the only known in any detail, occurred ~3,700 yr B.P. and produced the Hayes Tephra Set H, a series of dacitic fall deposits widespread throughout southcentral Alaska (Riehle et al., 1994, Quat. Res. 33, p. 91-108). An undated, early Holocene pyroclastic-flow deposit exposed beneath Tephra Set H in the Hayes River valley is unusual in the Aleutian-Alaska subduction zone in whole-rock composition and mineralogy. The deposit comprises rhyolite pumice (~75 wt% SiO2) that contain phenocrysts of plagioclase, sanidine, quartz, and biotite in vesicular, clear matrix glass, and <1% dense, white cognate inclusions with the same whole-rock composition and phenocryst assemblage as the pumice, but a crystalline matrix. Holocrystalline inclusions may represent portions of the magma body that rapidly quenched in the shallow subsurface as dikes or chamber rinds and were then excavated during explosive eruption. Rhyolite and inclusions are peraluminous (2-3 % normative corundum), high-K, enriched in incompatible elements, and depleted in Sr and Eu. In accord with its evolved and enriched composition the rhyolite pumice and inclusions contain an abundance of accessory phases, including apatite, monazite, xenotime, and zircon. Monazite are euhedral, as large as 500 um, ThO2-rich (up to 4 wt%) and contain significant amounts of Ag (200-500 ppm). Xenotime are generally smaller than the monazite and occur frequently as small blebs. Rhyolite pumices also contain Fe-sulfides, Cu, Sn, Ni, and barite. Sanidine phenocrysts in the pumice and inclusions are sharply zoned and highly enriched in the celsian component (up to 5 wt% BaO) and also show LREE enrichment. Inclusions contain abundant Mn-rich cordierite (~3 wt% Mn2O3) in the san-plag-qtz matrix, as well as Fe-Ti oxides that are relatively high in Mn2O3 (>1 wt%) and REE-enriched. Zircon saturation temperatures (716° C) and two-feldspar thermometry (630-700° C for phenocryst rims; 660° C for inclusion matrix microphenocrysts) suggest a cool magma that must have been volatile-rich given its relatively low phenocryst content (~25 %). A lack of crustal xenocrysts, and Pb, Sr, and Nd isotopes similar to other Cook Inlet volcanoes (McHugh et al., 2012 Fall AGU, V31A-2760) suggest that the rhyolite is not a crustal melt, and we suggest that it formed by low degrees of melting or high degree of crystallization of mafic arc-related rocks. At Hayes, concentrations of REE and metals resulted from extreme fractionation process(es), which active over extended time period may lead to the formation of mineral deposits.

Hayden, L. A.; Coombs, M. L.; McHugh, K.

2013-12-01

129

Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This resource provides general information about volcanoes. It illustrates the growth of a volcano, using Paricutin and Mt. St. Helens as examples of an active volcano and a lava dome. The terms extinct and dormant are also discussed. This site provides an explanation of why and how volcanoes form, zones of subduction, mid-ocean ridges, and hot spots. Deadly dangers associated with eruptions are discussed as is the use of a tiltmeter for prediction. The content center lesson describes a possible connection between the lost continent of Atlantis and the island of Santorini. Dissolved gasses in magma and the creation of a lava dome are both demonstrated in the hands-on section.

Johnson, Scott

130

Volcanoes  

MedlinePLUS

... They have been known to knock down entire forests. Volcanic eruptions can be accompanied by other natural hazards, including earthquakes , mudflows and flash floods , rock falls and landslides , acid rain, fire , and (under special conditions) tsunamis . Active volcanoes in ...

131

Temporal variation of seismic anisotropy at Okmok Volcano (Alaska) from regional earthquake sources  

Microsoft Academic Search

Volcanic eruptions in the Aleutian region provide a hazard potential due to tsunamis and high eruption clouds. Okmok volcano is historically the most active volcano in the Aleutians. We use shear wave splitting to examine variations in seismic properties prior to and after the 2008 eruption of Okmok. Magma movement beneath a volcano can influence the state of stress in

S. K. Kufner; J. H. Johnson; M. K. Savage

2010-01-01

132

Modeling and forecasting tephra hazards at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, during 2009 unrest and eruption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In late 2008, Redoubt Volcano, on the west coast of Alaska’s Cook Inlet, began a period of unrest that culminated in more than 19 small tephra-producing events between March 19 and April 4, 2009, followed by growth of a lava dome whose volume now exceeds 70 million cubic meters. The explosive events lasted from <1 to 31 minutes, sent tephra columns to heights of 19 km asl, and emitted dense-rock (DRE) tephra volumes up to several million cubic meters. Tephra fall affected transportation and infrastructure throughout Cook Inlet, including the Anchorage metropolitan area. The months of unrest that preceded the first explosive event allowed us to develop tools to forecast tephra hazards. As described in an accompanying abstract, colleagues at the University of Pisa produced automated, daily tephra-fall forecast maps using the 3-D VOL-CALPUFF model with input scenarios that represented likely event sizes and durations. Tephra-fall forecast maps were also generated every six hours for hypothetical events of 10M m3 volume DRE using the 2-D model ASHFALL, and relationships between hypothetical plume height and eruption rate were evaluated four times daily under then-current atmospheric conditions using the program PLUMERIA. Eruptive deposits were mapped and isomass contours constructed for the two largest events, March 24 (0340-0355Z) and April 4 (1358-1429Z), which produced radar-determined plume heights of 18.3 and 15.2 km asl (~15.6 and 12.5 km above the vent), and tephra volumes (DRE) of 6.3M and 3.1M m3, respectively. For the volumetric eruption rates calculated from mapped erupted volume and seismic duration (V=6.2×103 and 1.7×103 m3/s DRE), measured plume heights H above the vent fall within 10% of the empirical best-fit curve H=1.67V0.259 published in the book Volcanic Plumes by Sparks et al. (1997, eq. 5.1). The plume heights are slightly higher than (but still within 13% of) the 14.6 and 11.1 km predicted by PLUMERIA under the existing atmospheric conditions. We have also modeled these two events using the 3-D transient model FALL3D, which considers topographic effects on wind and tephra dispersal. Using the eruption rates and plume heights constrained by deposit mapping, seismic data, and Doppler radar, and an archived wind field obtained from the NOAA GDAS model for these dates, modeled isomass contours from the April 4 event closely resemble measured values, but modeled contours from the March 24 event extend only about half to three fourths as far from the volcano as measured. This discrepancy may result from inaccuracies in the modeled wind pattern, the grain-size distribution, or turbulent entrainment algorithms. The deposit pattern may also have been affected by a lateral blast which is thought to have accompanied this event.

Mastin, L. G.; Denlinger, R. P.; Wallace, K. L.; Schaefer, J. R.

2009-12-01

133

Anisotropy, repeating earthquakes, and seismicity associated with the 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis and double-difference relocation to examine temporal variations in seismic properties prior to and accompanying magmatic activity associated with the 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska. Using bispectrum cross-correlation, a multiplet of 25 earthquakes is identified spanning five years leading up to the eruption, each event having first motions compatible with a normal fault striking NE-SW. Cross-correlation differential times are used to relocate earthquakes occurring between January 2003 and February 2009. The bulk of the seismicity prior to the onset of the eruption on 12 July 2008 occurred southwest of the caldera beneath a geothermal field. Earthquakes associated with the onset of the eruption occurred beneath the northern portion of the caldera and started as deep as 13 km. Subsequent earthquakes occurred predominantly at 3 km depth, coinciding with the depth at which the magma body has been modeled using geodetic data. Automated SWS analysis of the Okmok catalog reveals radial polarization outside the caldera and a northwest-southeast polarization within. We interpret these polarizations in terms of a magma reservoir near the center of the caldera, which we model with a Mogi point source. SWS analysis using the same input processing parameters for each event in the multiplet reveals no temporal changes in anisotropy over the duration of the multiplet, suggesting either a short-term or small increase in stress just before the eruption that was not detected by GPS, or eruption triggering by a mechanism other than a change of stress in the system.

Johnson, Jessica H.; Prejean, Stephanie; Savage, Martha K.; Townend, John

2010-09-01

134

Variations in eruption style during the 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 1931 A.D. eruption of Aniakchak volcano, Alaska, progressed from subplinian to effusive eruptive style and from trachydacite to basaltic andesite composition from multiple vent locations. Eyewitness accounts and new studies of deposit stratigraphy provide a combined narrative of eruptive events. Additional field, compositional, grain size, componentry, density, and grain morphology data document the influences on changing eruptive style as the eruption progressed. The eruption began on 1 May 1931 A.D. when a large subplinian eruption column produced vesicular juvenile-rich tephra. Subsequent activity was more intermittent, as magma interacted with groundwater and phreatomagmatic ash and lithic-rich tephra was dispersed up to 600 km downwind. Final erupted products were more mafic in composition and the eruption became more strombolian in style. Stratigraphic evidence suggests that two trachydacitic lava flows were erupted from separate but adjacent vents before the phreatomagmatic phase concluded and that basaltic andesite lava from a third vent began to effuse near the end of explosive activity. The estimated total bulk volume of the eruption is 0.9 km3, which corresponds to approximately 0.3 km3 of magma. Eruption style changes are interpreted as follows: (1) a decrease in magma supply rate caused the change from subplinian to phreatomagmatic eruption; (2) a subsequent change in magma composition caused the transition from phreatomagmatic to strombolian eruption style. Additionally, the explosion and effusion of a similar magma composition from three separate vents indicates how the pre-existing caldera structure controlled the pathway of shallow magma ascent, thus influencing eruption style.

Nicholson, Robert S.; Gardner, James E.; Neal, Christina A.

2011-01-01

135

Doppler weather radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler C-band radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska that provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data captured during the Redoubt eruption. The MiniMax 250-C (MM-250C) radar detected seventeen of the nineteen largest explosive events between March 23 and April 4, 2009. Sixteen of these events reached the stratosphere (above 10 km) within 2-5 min of explosion onset. High column and proximal cloud reflectivity values (50 to 60 dBZ) were observed from many of these events, and were likely due to the formation of mm-sized accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Reflectivity data suggest that these pellets formed within the first few minutes of explosion onset. Rapid sedimentation of the mm-sized pellets was observed as a decrease in maximum detection cloud height. The volcanic cloud from the April 4 explosive event showed lower reflectivity values, due to finer particle sizes (related to dome collapse and related pyroclastic flows) and lack of significant pellet formation. Eruption durations determined by the radar were within a factor of two compared to seismic and pressure-sensor derived estimates, and were not well correlated. Ash dispersion observed by the radar was primarily in the upper troposphere below 10 km, but satellite observations indicate the presence of volcanogenic clouds in the stratosphere. This study suggests that radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

Schneider, David J.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

2013-06-01

136

The 1989 1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: impacts on aircraft operations  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The December 1989-June 1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano affected commercial and military air operations in the vicinity of Anchorage, Alaska. These effects were due to the direct impact of volcanic ash on jet aircraft, as well as to the rerouting and cancellations of flight operations owing to eruptive activity. Between December and February, five commercial jetliners were damaged from ash encounters. The most serious incident took place on December 15, 1989 when a Boeing 747-400 aircraft temporarily lost power of all four engines after encountering an ash cloud as the airplane descended for a landing in Anchorage. While there were no injuries to passengers, the damage to engines, avionics, and aircraft structure from this encounter is estimated at 80 million. Four additional encounters between jet aircraft and Redoubt ash clouds occurred in the Anchorage area on December 15 and 16, 1989 and February 21, 1990; none resulted in engine failure. Two additional encounters took place on December 17, 1989 when jet airliners encountered the Redoubt cloud over west Texas. At the time of these encounters, the cloud was up to 55 hours old and had traveled in excess of 2,900 nautical miles (5,300 km). Following the December 15 encounters, Anchorage International Airport remained open, however, most airline companies canceled operations for up to several days. As communications between Federal agencies and airlines improved, and as a better understanding of the nature and behavior of ash-rich eruption clouds was achieved, most airlines resumed normal service by early January 1990. The resulting loss of revenue at Anchorage International Airport during several months following the eruption is estimated to total 2.6 million. The impact on general aviation and military operations consisted mostly of cancellation and rerouting of flights.

Casadevall, Thomas J.

1994-08-01

137

Doppler weather radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler C-band radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska that provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data captured during the Redoubt eruption. The MiniMax 250-C (MM-250C) radar detected seventeen of the nineteen largest explosive events between March 23 and April 4, 2009. Sixteen of these events reached the stratosphere (above 10 km) within 2–5 min of explosion onset. High column and proximal cloud reflectivity values (50 to 60 dBZ) were observed from many of these events, and were likely due to the formation of mm-sized accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Reflectivity data suggest that these pellets formed within the first few minutes of explosion onset. Rapid sedimentation of the mm-sized pellets was observed as a decrease in maximum detection cloud height. The volcanic cloud from the April 4 explosive event showed lower reflectivity values, due to finer particle sizes (related to dome collapse and related pyroclastic flows) and lack of significant pellet formation. Eruption durations determined by the radar were within a factor of two compared to seismic and pressure-sensor derived estimates, and were not well correlated. Ash dispersion observed by the radar was primarily in the upper troposphere below 10 km, but satellite observations indicate the presence of volcanogenic clouds in the stratosphere. This study suggests that radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

Schneider, David J.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

2013-01-01

138

1989-90 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the First Test Case of a USGS Lahar-Detection System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This web page describes the lahars that swept down the Drift River Valley during the 1989-90 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the testing of a new experimental detection and warning system designed to track lahars and debris flows and to give warning to people downstream. In this case, an oil-storage facility in the Cook Inlet area was at risk. The seismometers used (acoustic-flow monitors) were sensitive to ground vibration at relatively high frequencies. On April 6, 1990 the system did detect and track lahars moving down a valley in real time. The amplitude and ground velocity data are diagrammed.

Clucas, R.; Brantley, S.; Major, J.

139

Formation and Significance of Magmatic Enclaves in From the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Deposits from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, record a complicated history of open system magmatic processes that produced a suite of intermediate (56.5 to 63.3% SiO2) lithologies containing rare and variably quenched basaltic to basaltic-andesite enclaves (49.5-57.3% SiO2). The eruption transitioned from an explosive phase (Jan 11-28) to a continuous phase (Jan 28-Feb 10) before ending following a month-long effusive phase in March. Whereas the explosive phase is dominated by a low-silica andesite (LSAS, 56.5-58.7% SiO2) lithology, high-silica andesite (HSA, 62.2-63.3% SiO2) is more common during the continuous phase and dense low-silica andesite (DLSA, 56.4-59.3% SiO2) occurs mostly during the effusive phase. Enclaves occur in all lithologies, although most commonly in DLSA and LSAS. Point-counting of enclaves in outcrop reveals an average abundance of <1 volume percent, however, some DLSA blocks contained in a unusually large pyroclastic flow deposit emplaced at the end of the explosive phase near Rocky Point contain up to 3 volume percent enclaves. Transitional-type enclaves exist, but the two main end-member types of magmatic enclaves are P-type ('primitive') and H-type ('hybrid'). P-type enclaves range from 2-5 cm in diameter and are black with highly vesicular, acicular, and glassy interiors surrounded by quenched and cuspate margins, range in composition from 49.5-52% SiO2, and contain abundant olivine and sparse plagioclase antecrysts. H-type enclaves range in diameter from 1 to 10 cm and are variably gray with poorly vesicular interiors and underdeveloped cuspate margins, range from 52-57.3% SiO2, and contain equant crystals in a glass-poor groundmass with abundant plagioclase antecrysts and rare olivine. Many H-type enclaves, which are the only enclave type observed in the HSA lithology, are indistinguishable from LSAS and DLSA samples in terms of whole-rock composition, mineral compositions, and texture. All enclaves plot linearly in major and minor element graphical space in terms of whole-rock composition, and glass compositions from P-type enclaves also plot linearly with the rest of the 2006 sample suite. Magnetite-ilmenite pairs in P-type enclaves record core temperatures ranging from 975-1120°C compared to 840-940°C for H-type enclaves (fO2 increases with decreasing temperature from NNO+0.5 to +2.0) and core to rim diffusion profiles in magnetite grains from P-type enclaves from explosive and effusive phases indicate an average timescale of 1-month between heating of crystals via basalt replenishment and eruption. A key finding from this study is that magmatic enclaves produced during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano record a complex and multi-step mixing and mingling scenario between intruding basalt and resident silicic mush, and possibly gabbroic cumulates/wall rock, that is inconsistent with any single currently employed mingling model (e.g., buoyant lift-off of vesiculated and undercooled basalt, prolonged undercooling of intruded basalt punctuated by subsequent intrusions, enclave dissagregation and ripening, or violent intrusion of bubbly basaltic plumes) that has been used to explain magmatic enclave formation at other arc systems characterized by lower magma temperature, higher crystallinity, and larger eruptive volumes (e.g., Unzen Volcano, Mt. Lassen, Soufriere Hills).

Browne, B. L.; Vitale, M. L.

2011-12-01

140

Interactive Volcano Studies and Education Using Virtual Globes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Internet-based virtual globe programs such as Google Earth provide a spatial context for visualization of monitoring and geophysical data sets. At the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Google Earth is being used to integrate satellite imagery, modeling of volcanic eruption clouds and seismic data sets to build new monitoring and reporting tools. However, one of the most useful information sources for environmental

J. Dehn; J. E. Bailey; P. Webley

2006-01-01

141

Comparison of magmatic structures beneath Redoubt (Alaska) and Toba (Northern Sumatra) volcanoes derived from local earthquake tomography studies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present the results of seismic tomography studies of two different volcanoes - Mt. Redoubt and Toba caldera. These two subduction related volcanoes have different ages and scales of eruption activity. Velocity model beneath the Redoubt volcano is based on tomographic inversion of P- and S- arrival time data from over 4000 local earthquakes recorded by 19 stations since 1989 to 2012 provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory (University of Fairbanks). Just below the volcano edifice we observe an anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio reaching 2.2 which is seen down to 2- 3 km depth. This indicates a presence of partially molten substance or fluid filled rocks. We can suggest that anomaly area matches with volcano magma chamber. One of the previous velocity models of Toba caldera was obtained by Koulakov et al. (2009) and was based on data recorded by temporary network from January to May 1995. In this study this "old" dataset was supplemented with "new" data recorded by a temporary network deployed in approximately same area by GFZ-Potsdam from May to November 2008. We have manually picked the arrival times from the local events recorded by the later experiment and then performed the tomography inversion for the combined dataset using the LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009). In the uppermost layers we observe strong low-velocity P- and S- anomalies within the Caldera which can be interpreted by the presence of think sediments filling the caldera. In the lower crust and uppermost mantle we observe a vertical anomaly of low P- and S-velocities which probably represent the path of conduits which link the caldera area with the slab. Similar to Redoubt volcano, resulting velocity model of Toba has an increased value of Vp/Vs ratio that indicates a presence of magma reservoir. Comparison of the tomographic results obtained for the completely different volcanic systems helps in understanding some basic principles of feeding the volcanoes. This study was partly supported by the Project #7.3 of BES RAS. 1. Koulakov I., T. Yudistira, B.-G. Luehr, and Wandono, 2009, P, S velocity and VP/VS ratio beneath the Toba caldera complex (Northern Sumatra) from local earthquake tomography, Geophys. J. Int., 177, p. 1121-1139. 2. Koulakov I., 2009, LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion. Benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 99, No. 1, pp. 194-214.

Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

2014-05-01

142

Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska 1. Origin of Strombolian activity  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both classical Strombolian activity and an explosive Subplinian plume. Strombolian activity at Shishaldin occurred in two major phases following the Subplinian activity. In this paper, we use acoustic measurements to interpret the Strombolian activity. Acoustic measurements of the two Strombolian phases show a series of explosions that are modeled by the vibration of a large overpressurised cylindrical bubble at the top of the magma column. Results show that the bubble does not burst at its maximum radius, as expected if the liquid film is stretched beyond its elasticity. But bursting occurs after one cycle of vibration, as a consequence of an instability of the air-magma interface close to the bubble minimum radius. During each Strombolian period, estimates of bubble length and overpressure are calculated. Using an alternate method based on acoustic power, we estimate gas velocity to be 30-60 m/s, in very good agreement with synthetic waveforms. Although there is some variation within these parameters, bubble length and overpressure for the first Strombolian phase are found to be ??? 82 ?? 11 m and 0.083 MPa. For the second Strombolian phase, bubble length and overpressure are estimated at 24 ?? 12 m and 0.15 MPa for the first 17 h after which bubble overpressure shows a constant increase, reaching a peak of 1.4 MPa, just prior to the end of the second Strombolian phase. This peak suggests that, at the time, the magma in the conduit may contain a relatively large concentration of small bubbles. Maximum total gas volume and gas fluxes at the surface are estimated to be 3.3 ?? 107 and 2.9 ?? 103 m3/s for the first phase and 1.0 ?? 108 and 2.2 ?? 103 m3/s for the second phase. This gives a mass flux of 1.2 ?? 103 and 8.7 ?? 102 kg/s, respectively, for the first and the second Strombolian phases. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Vergniolle, S.; Boichu, M.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

2004-01-01

143

Initial Results Using Natural Magnetulluric (MT) field Measurements to Determine the Ice Thickness in the Summit Caldera of Mt. Wrangell Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the initial results of a magnetulluric (MT) field survey made in June 2005 & 2006 on the ice surface in the summit caldera (4200 m) of Mt. Wrangell Volcano, Alaska. The purpose was to determine the ice thickness of Mt. Wrangell's summit caldera with on-site passive measurements of VLF\\/ELF signals. Measurements were made using a Zonge GDP 32II,

D. J. Solie; E. Wescott; C. S. Benson; S. Kanamori; D. Liu

2006-01-01

144

Volcanoes as possible indicators of tectonic stress orientation — Aleutians and Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

A new method for obtaining from volcanic surface features the orientations of the principal tectonic stresses is applied to Aleutian and Alaskan volcanoes. The underlying concept for this method is that flank eruptions for polygenetic volcanoes can be regarded as the result of a large-scale natural magmafracturing experiment. The method essentially relies on the recognition of the preferred orientation of

Kazuaki Nakamura; Klaus H. Jacob; John N. Davies

1977-01-01

145

Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

2005-01-01

146

Alaska  

article title:  Western Alaska     View Larger Image These views of western Alaska were acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) on ... available at JPL June 25, 2000 - Western Alaska with the Yukon River and forest fire smoke plume. project:  ...

2014-05-15

147

Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data.

Dawson, Phillip B.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Power, John

2011-02-01

148

Effects of recent volcanic eruptions on aquatic habitat in the Drift River, Alaska, USA: Implications at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Numerous drainages supporting productive salmon habitat are surrounded by active volcanoes on the west side of Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska. Eruptions have caused massive quantities of flowing water and sediment to enter the river channels emanating from glaciers and snowfields on these volcanoes. Extensive damage to riparian and aquatic habitat has commonly resulted, and benthic macroinvertebrate and salmonid communities can be affected. Because of the economic importance of Alaska's fisheries, detrimental effects on salmonid habitat can have significant economic implications. The Drift River drains glaciers on the northern and eastern flanks of Redoubt Volcano: During and following eruptions in 1989-1990, severe physical disturbances to the habitat features of the river adversely affected the fishery. Frequent eruptions at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes exemplify the potential effects of volcanic activity on Alaska's important commercial, sport, and subsistence fisheries. Few studies have documented the recovery of aquatic habitat following volcanic eruptions. The eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in 1989-1990 offered an opportunity to examine the recovery of the macroinvertebrate community. Macroinvertebrate community composition and structure in the Drift River were similar in both undisturbed and recently disturbed sites. Additionally, macroinvertebrate samples from sites in nearby undisturbed streams were highly similar to those from some Drift River sites. This similarity and the agreement between the Drift River macroinvertebrate community composition and that predicted by a qualitative model of typical macroinvertebrate communities in glacier-fed rivers indicate that the Drift River macroinvertebrate community is recovering five years after the disturbances associated with the most recent eruptions of Redoubt Volcano.

Dorava, J. M.; Milner, A. M.

1999-01-01

149

Application of photogrammetry to the study of volcano-glacier interactions on Mount Wrangell, Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Most Alaskan volcanoes are glacier covered and provide excellent opportunities to study interactions between glaciers and volcanoes. The present paper is concerned with such a study, taking into account the Mt. Wrangell (4317 m) which is the northernmost active volcano (solfatara activity) on the Pacific Rim (62 deg N; 144 deg W). While the first photographs on the summit of Mt. Wrangell were published more than 75 years ago, research there began in 1953 and 1954. Satellite images reveal activity at the summit of Mt. Wrangell. However, the resolution is not sufficient for conducting important measurements regarding ice volume losses. For this reason, vertical aerial photographs of the summit were obtained, and a field trip to the summit was conducted. Aspects of photogrammetry are discussed, taking into account questions of ground control, aerial photography, topographic mapping, digital cross sections, and orthophotos.

Benson, C. S.; Follett, A. B.

1986-01-01

150

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2011  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 4,364 earthquakes, of which 3,651 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity above background levels in 2011 at these instrumented volcanic centers. This catalog includes locations, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2011 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

2012-01-01

151

New Coastal Tsunami Gauges: Application at Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent eruptive activity at Augustine Volcano and its associated tsunami threat to lower Cook Inlet pointed out the need for a quickly deployable tsunami detector which could be installed on Augustine Island's coast. The detector's purpose would be to verify tsunami generation by direct observation of the wave at the source to support tsunami warning decisions along populated coastlines. To

M. Burgy; D. K. Bolton

2006-01-01

152

A distal earthquake cluster concurrent with the 2006 explosive eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Clustered earthquakes located 25??km northeast of Augustine Volcano began about 6??months before and ceased soon after the volcano's 2006 explosive eruption. This distal seismicity formed a dense cluster less than 5??km across, in map view, and located in depth between 11??km and 16??km. This seismicity was contemporaneous with sharply increased shallow earthquake activity directly below the volcano's vent. Focal mechanisms for five events within the distal cluster show strike-slip fault movement. Cluster seismicity best defines a plane when it is projected onto a northeast-southwest cross section, suggesting that the seismogenic fault strikes northwest. However, two major structural trends intersect near Augustine Volcano, making it difficult to put the seismogenic fault into a regional-geologic context. Specifically, interpretation of marine multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) data shows reverse faults, directly above the seismicity cluster, that trend northeast, parallel to the regional geologic strike but perpendicular to the fault suggested by the clustered seismicity. The seismogenic fault could be a reactivated basement structure.

Fisher, M. A.; Ruppert, N. A.; White, R. A.; Wilson, F. H.; Comer, D.; Sliter, R. W.; Wong, F. L.

2009-01-01

153

Seismic swarm associated with the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Alaska: Earthquake locations and source parameters  

Microsoft Academic Search

An energetic seismic swarm accompanied an eruption of Kasatochi Volcano in the central Aleutian volcanic arc in August of 2008. In retrospect, the first earthquakes in the swarm were detected about 1 month prior to the eruption onset. Activity in the swarm quickly intensified less than 48 h prior to the first large explosion and subsequently subsided with decline of

Natalia A. Ruppert; Stephanie Prejean; Roger A. Hansen

2011-01-01

154

The Middle Scoria sequence: A Holocene violent strombolian, subplinian and phreatomagmatic eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Middle Scoria deposit represents an explosive eruption of basaltic andesite magma (54 wt. % SiO2) from Okmok volcano during mid-Holocene time. The pattern of dispersal and characteristics of the ejecta indicate that the eruption opened explosively, with ash textural evidence for a limited degree of phreatomagmatism. The second phase of the eruption produced thick vesicular scoria deposits with grain

Lily J. Wong; Jessica F. Larsen

2009-01-01

155

Seismic investigations of subsurface volcanic structures and processes at Mount Spurr, Alaska and Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Seismological techniques are used to infer the subsurface structures and volcanic processes at two recently active volcanoes: Mount Spurr, Alaska, and Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies. The three-dimensional P-wave velocity structure of Mount Spurr is determined to depths of 10 km by tomographic inversion of 3,754 P-wave arrival times from local earthquakes. Results show a prominent low-velocity zone beneath the southeast flank of Crater Peak extending from the surface to 3--4 km below sea level, spatially coincident with an active geothermal system. Beneath Crater Peak an approximately 3-km-wide zone of relatively low velocities correlates with a near vertical band of seismicity, suggestive of a magma conduit. No large low-velocity zone indicative of a magma chamber occurs within the upper 10 km of the crust. In the three years bracketing the 1992 eruptions of Mount Spurr's Crater Peak vent, approximately 2,500 located events were classified as Volcano-Tectonic (VT) earthquakes, Long-Period (LP) events, or Hybrid events. An unusual mix of VT, LP, and hybrid events at 20 to 40 km depth began coincident with the onset of unrest and peaked shortly after eruptive activity ended. The classified seismic events are combined with geophysical and geological data to develop a simplified model of the magmatic plumbing system of Mount Spurr. The major components of this model are a deep magma source zone at 20--40 km depth, a smaller storage zone at about 10 km depth, and a pipe-like conduit that extends to the surface. The frequency-magnitude distribution of earthquakes measured by the b-value is determined as a function of space beneath Soufriere Hills Volcano, from data recorded between August 1, 1995 and March 31, 1996. A volume of high b-values (b > 3.0) with a 1.5 Ian radius is imaged between 0 and 1.5 Ian beneath English's Crater and Chance's Peak. This anomaly extends southwest to Gage's Soufriere. At depths greater than 2.5 km, volumes of comparatively low b-values ( b ˜ 1) are found beneath St. George's Hill, Windy Hill, and below 2.5 kin to the south of English's Crater.

Power, John A.

156

Glacier ice-volume modeling and glacier volumes on Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Assessment of ice volumes and hydrologic hazards on Redoubt Volcano began four months before the 1989-90 eruptions removed 0.29 cubic kilometer of perennial snow and ice from Drift glacier. A volume model was developed for evaluating glacier volumes on Redoubt Volcano. The volume model is based on third-order polynomial simulations of valley cross sections. The third-order polynomial is an interpolation from the valley walls exposed above glacier surfaces and takes advantage of ice-thickness measurements. The fortuitous 1989-90 eruptions removed the ice from a 4.5-kilometer length of Drift glacier, providing a unique opportunity for verification of the volume model. A 2.5-kilometer length was chosen in the denuded glacier valley and the ice volume was measured by digitally comparing two new maps: one derived from the most recent pre-eruption 1979 aerial photographs and the other from post-eruption 1990 aerial photographs. The measured volume in the reference reach was 99 x 106 cubic meters, about 1 percent less than was estimated by the volume model. The volume estimate produced by this volume model was much closer to the measured volume than was the volume estimated by other techniques. The verified volume model was used to evaluate the total volume of perennial snow and glacier ice on Redoubt Volcano, which was estimated to be 4.1?0.8 cubic kilometers. Substantial snow and ice covers on volcanoes exacerbate the hydrologic hazards associated with eruptions. The volume on Redoubt Volcano is about 23 times the volume that was present on Mount St. Helens before its 1980 eruption, which generated lahars and floods.

Trabant, Dennis C.; Hawkins, Daniel B.

1997-01-01

157

A Compilation of Gas Emission-Rate Data from Volcanoes of Cook Inlet (Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Fourpeaked, Griggs, Mageik, Martin, Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Veniaminof), Alaska, from 1995-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

INTRODUCTION This report presents gas emission rates from data collected during numerous airborne plume-measurement flights at Alaskan volcanoes since 1995. These flights began in about 1990 as means to establish baseline values of volcanic gas emissions during periods of quiescence and to identify anomalous levels of degassing that might signal the beginning of unrest. The primary goal was to make systematic measurements at the major volcanic centers around the Cook Inlet on at least an annual basis, and more frequently during periods of unrest and eruption. A secondary goal was to measure emissions at selected volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula. While the goals were not necessarily met in all cases due to weather, funding, or the availability of suitable aircraft, a rich dataset of quality measurements is the legacy of this continuing effort. An earlier report (Doukas, 1995) presented data for the period from 1990 through 1994 and the current report provides data through 2006. This report contains all of the available measurements for SO2, CO2, and H2S emission rates in Alaska determined by the U. S. Geological Survey from 1995 through 2006; airborne measurements for H2S began in Alaska in 2001. The results presented here are from Cook Inlet volcanoes at Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine and cover periods of unrest at Iliamna (1996) and Spurr (2004-2006) as well as the 2006 eruption of Augustine. Additional sporadic measurements at volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Martin, Mageik, Griggs, Veniaminof, Ukinrek Maars, Peulik, and Fourpeaked during its 2006 unrest) are also reported here.

Doukas, Michael P.; McGee, Kenneth A.

2007-01-01

158

Recent Results From Seafloor Instruments at the NeMO Observatory, Axial Volcano, Juan de Fuca Ridge  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

NeMO is a seafloor observatory at Axial Seamount, an active submarine volcano located on the Juan de Fuca Ridge (JdFR) in the NE Pacific. Axial Volcano was chosen for NeMO because it has the largest magma supply on the JdFR, and is therefore the best place to study volcanic events and the perturbations they cause to pre-existing hydrothermal systems. In fact, Axial volcano erupted in January 1998 and initially our field efforts were focused on mapping the new lava flows and documenting the impact of the eruption on the hydrothermal vents and biological communities. Since then, our emphasis has gradually shifted to long-term geophysical and geochemical monitoring of the volcano in anticipation of its next eruption. Recent results from seafloor monitoring instruments and recent geologic mapping will be presented, including the following: (1) NeMO Net, a state-of-the-art, two-way communication system currently deployed at Axial, which uses a moored surface buoy to link three instruments on the seafloor in near real-time to the internet. The buoy communicates with the seafloor instruments via acoustic modems and relays data to and from shore via the Orbcomm and Iridium satellite systems. The seafloor instruments include two Remote Access Samplers (RAS) located at two hydrothermal vents in the ASHES vent field, and a Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) located near the center of the caldera. The RAS samplers monitor temperature and chemistry at the vents and can take 48 fluid and particle samples over a year, but can also be commanded from shore to take a sample at any time in response to detected seismic or volcanic events. The BPR is monitoring vertical motion of the seafloor, looking for sudden inflation or deflation events that may signal the onset of an eruption or intrusion. Data from the three instruments is displayed on the web at http://www.pmel.noaa.gov/vents/nemo/realtime/. (2) Data from a RAS sampler that was deployed at Cloud vent in Axial caldera between 2001-2002. The RAS collected a time-series of temperature readings as well as hydrothermal fluid and particle samples from the vent over a year. (3) Data from a BPR that was deployed at the center of the caldera between 2000-2002, to monitor for sudden inflation or deflation events. (4) Data from annually repeated precise pressure measurements made from an ROV at a network of five seafloor benchmarks located inside and outside the caldera. These measurements look for any gradual volcanic inflation that would not be detectable with BPR instruments due to their long-term drift. (5) Previously recorded BPR data collected during the 1998 eruption by an instrument that became caught in the 1998 lava flow will also be examined for its implications for models of submarine lava flow emplacement and lava pillar formation.

Chadwick, W. W.; Butterfield, D. A.; Embley, R. W.; Meinig, C.; Stalin, S. E.; Nooner, S. L.; Zumberge, M. A.; Fox, C. G.

2002-12-01

159

Synthetic aperture radar interferometry coherence analysis over Katmai volcano group, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The feasibility of measuring volcanic deformation or monitoring deformation of active volcanoes using space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) interferometry depends on the ability to maintain phase coherence over appropriate time intervals. Using ERS 1 C band (lambda=5.66cm) SAR imagery, we studied the seasonal and temporal changes of the interferometric SAR coherence for fresh lava, weathered lava, tephra with weak water

Zhong Lu; Jeffrey T. Freymueller

1998-01-01

160

The Middle Scoria sequence: A Holocene violent strombolian, subplinian and phreatomagmatic eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Middle Scoria deposit represents an explosive eruption of basaltic andesite magma (54 wt. % SiO2) from Okmok volcano during mid-Holocene time. The pattern of dispersal and characteristics of the ejecta indicate that the\\u000a eruption opened explosively, with ash textural evidence for a limited degree of phreatomagmatism. The second phase of the\\u000a eruption produced thick vesicular scoria deposits with grain

Lily J. Wong; Jessica F. Larsen

2010-01-01

161

The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's current approach to forecasting lava flow hazards (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Hawaiian Volcanoes are best known for their frequent basaltic eruptions, which typically start with fast-moving channelized `a`a flows fed by high eruptions rates. If the flows continue, they generally transition into pahoehoe flows, fed by lower eruption rates, after a few days to weeks. Kilauea Volcano's ongoing eruption illustrates this--since 1986, effusion at Kilauea has mostly produced pahoehoe. The current state of lava flow simulation is quite advanced, but the simplicity of the models mean that they are most appropriately used during the first, most vigorous, days to weeks of an eruption - during the effusion of `a`a flows. Colleagues at INGV in Catania have shown decisively that MAGFLOW simulations utilizing satellite-derived eruption rates can be effective at estimating hazards during the initial periods of an eruption crisis. However, the algorithms do not simulate the complexity of pahoehoe flows. Forecasts of lava flow hazards are the most common form of volcanic hazard assessments made in Hawai`i. Communications with emergency managers over the last decade have relied on simple steepest-descent line maps, coupled with empirical lava flow advance rate information, to portray the imminence of lava flow hazard to nearby communities. Lavasheds, calculated as watersheds, are used as a broader context for the future flow paths and to advise on the utility of diversion efforts, should they be contemplated. The key is to communicate the uncertainty of any approach used to formulate a forecast and, if the forecast uses simple tools, these communications can be fairly straightforward. The calculation of steepest-descent paths and lavasheds relies on the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) used, so the choice of DEM is critical. In Hawai`i, the best choice is not the most recent but is a 1980s-vintage 10-m DEM--more recent LIDAR and satellite radar DEM are referenced to the ellipsoid and include vegetation effects. On low-slope terrain, steepest descent lines calculated on a geoid-based DEM may differ significantly from those calculated on an ellipsoid-based DEM. Good estimates of lava flow advance rates can be obtained from empirical compilations of historical advance rates of Hawaiian lava flows. In this way, rates appropriate for observed flow types (`a`a or pahoehoe, channelized or not) can be applied. Eruption rate is arguably the most important factor, while slope is also significant for low eruption rates. Eruption rate, however, remains the most difficult parameter to estimate during an active eruption. The simplicity of the HVO approach is its major benefit. How much better can lava-flow advance be forecast for all types of lava flows? Will the improvements outweigh the increased uncertainty propagated through the simulation calculations? HVO continues to improve and evaluate its lava flow forecasting tools to provide better hazard assessments to emergency personnel.

Kauahikaua, J. P.

2013-12-01

162

Gas emissions from failed and actual eruptions from Cook Inlet Volcanoes, Alaska, 1989-2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Cook Inlet volcanoes that experienced an eruption between 1989 and 2006 had mean gas emission rates that were roughly an order of magnitude higher than at volcanoes where unrest stalled. For the six events studied, mean emission rates for eruptions were ~13,000 t/d CO2 and 5200 t/d SO2, but only ~1200 t/d CO2 and 500 t/d SO2 for non-eruptive events (‘failed eruptions’). Statistical analysis suggests degassing thresholds for eruption on the order of 1500 and 1000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively. Emission rates greater than 4000 and 2000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively, almost exclusively resulted during eruptive events (the only exception being two measurements at Fourpeaked). While this analysis could suggest that unerupted magmas have lower pre-eruptive volatile contents, we favor the explanations that either the amount of magma feeding actual eruptions is larger than that driving failed eruptions, or that magmas from failed eruptions experience less decompression such that the majority of H2O remains dissolved and thus insufficient permeability is produced to release the trapped volatile phase (or both). In the majority of unrest and eruption sequences, increases in CO2 emission relative to SO2 emission were observed early in the sequence. With time, all events converged to a common molar value of C/S between 0.5 and 2. These geochemical trends argue for roughly similar decompression histories until shallow levels are reached beneath the edifice (i.e., from 20–35 to ~4–6 km) and perhaps roughly similar initial volatile contents in all cases. Early elevated CO2 levels that we find at these high-latitude, andesitic arc volcanoes have also been observed at mid-latitude, relatively snow-free, basaltic volcanoes such as Stromboli and Etna. Typically such patterns are attributed to injection and decompression of deep (CO2-rich) magma into a shallower chamber and open system degassing prior to eruption. Here we argue that the C/S trends probably represent tapping of vapor-saturated regions with high C/S, and then gradual degassing of remaining dissolved volatiles as the magma progresses toward the surface. At these volcanoes, however, C/S is often accentuated due to early preferential scrubbing of sulfur gases. The range of equilibrium degassing is consistent with the bulk degassing of a magma with initial CO2 and S of 0.6 and 0.2 wt.%, respectively, similar to what has been suggested for primitive Redoubt magmas.

Werner, C. A.; Doukas, M. P.; Kelly, P. J.

2011-01-01

163

Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

Zurer, Pamela S.

1984-01-01

164

The 7-8 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, central Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Kasatochi volcano in the central Aleutian Islands erupted unexpectedly on 7-8 August 2008. Kasatochi has received little study by volcanologists and has had no confirmed historical eruptions. The island is an important nesting area for seabirds and a long-term biological study site of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. After a notably energetic preeruptive earthquake swarm, the volcano erupted violently in a series of explosive events beginning in the early afternoon of 7 August. Each event produced ash-gas plumes that reached 14-18 km above sea level. The volcanic plume contained large amounts of SO2 and was tracked around the globe by satellite observations. The cumulative volcanic cloud interfered with air travel across the North Pacific, causing many flight cancelations that affected thousands of travelers. Visits to the volcano in 2008-2009 indicated that the eruption generated pyroclastic flows and surges that swept all flanks of the island, accumulated several tens of meters of pyroclastic debris, and increased the diameter of the island by about 800 m. Pyroclastic flow deposits contain abundant accidental lithic debris derived from the inner walls of the Kasatochi crater. Juvenile material is crystal-rich silicic andesite that ranges from slightly pumiceous to frothy pumice. Fine-grained pyroclastic surge and fall deposits with accretionary lapilli cover the lithic-rich pyroclastic flow deposits and mark a change in eruptive style from episodic explosive activity to more continuous ash emission with smaller intermittent explosions. Pyroclastic deposits completely cover the island, but wave erosion and gully development on the flanks have begun to modify the surface mantle of volcanic deposits.

Waythomas, Christopher F.; Scott, William E.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Schneider, David J.; Izbekov, Pavel; Nye, Christopher J.

2010-12-01

165

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes. Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001. This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; (2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (4) station parameters and velocity models used for earthquake locations; (5) a summary of daily station usage throughout the catalog period; and (6) all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations presented in this report.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

2002-01-01

166

A tectonic earthquake sequence preceding the April-May 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

On 4 March 1999, a shallow ML 5.2 earthquake occurred beneath Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc. This earthquake was located 10-15 km west of Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite stratovolcano. A Strombolian eruption began at Shishaldin roughly 1 month after the mainshock, culminating in a large explosive eruption on 19 April. We address the question of whether or not the eruption caused the mainshock by computing the Coulomb stress change caused by an inflating dike on fault planes oriented parallel to the mainshock focal mechanism. We found Coulomb stress increases of ???0.1 MPa in the region of the mainshock, suggesting that magma intrusion prior to the eruption could have caused the mainshock. Satellite and seismic data indicate that magma was moving upwards beneath Shishaldin well before the mainshock. indicating that, in an overall sense, the mainshock cannot be said to have caused the eruption. However, observations of changes at the volcano following the mainshock and several large aftershocks suggest that the earthquakes may, in turn, have influenced the course of the eruption.

Moran, S. C.; Stihler, S. D.; Power, J. A.

2002-01-01

167

Mapping recent lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, Alaska, using radar and optical satellite imagery  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Field mapping of young lava flows at Aleutian volcanoes is logistically difficult, and the utility of optical images from aircraft or satellites for this purpose is greatly reduced by persistent cloud cover. These factors have hampered earlier estimates of the areas and volumes of three young lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, including its most recent (1991-1992) flow. We combined information from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with multispectral Landsat-7 data to differentiate the 1991-1992 flow from the 1964 flow and a pre-1964 flow, and to calculate the flow areas (8.4, 9.2, and 7.3 km 2, respectively). By differencing a digital elevation model (DEM) from the 1970-1980s with a DEM from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000, we estimated the average thickness of the 1991-1992 flow to be 13 m, which reasonably agrees with field observations (5-10 m). Lava-flow maps produced in this way can be used to facilitate field mapping and flow-hazards assessment, and to study magma-supply dynamics and thus to anticipate future eruptive activity. Based on the recurrence interval of recent eruptions and the results of this study, the next eruption at Westdahl may occur before the end of this decade. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Lu, Z.; Rykhus, R.; Masterlark, T.; Dean, K.G.

2004-01-01

168

August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska-resetting an Island Landscape  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Kasatochi Island, the subaerial portion of a small volcano in the western Aleutian volcanic arc, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. Pyroclastic flows and surges swept the island repeatedly and buried most of it and the near-shore zone in decimeters to tens of meters of deposits. Several key seabird rookeries in taluses were rendered useless. The eruption lasted for about 24 hours and included two initial explosive pulses and pauses over a 6-hr period that produced ash-poor eruption clouds, a 10-hr period of continuous ash-rich emissions initiated by an explosive pulse and punctuated by two others, and a final 8-hr period of waning ash emissions. The deposits of the eruption include a basal muddy tephra that probably reflects initial eruptions through the shallow crater lake, a sequence of pumiceous and lithic-rich pyroclastic deposits produced by flow, surge, and fall processes during a period of energetic explosive eruption, and a fine-grained upper mantle of pyroclastic-fall and -surge deposits that probably reflects the waning eruptive stage as lake and ground water again gained access to the erupting magma. An eruption with similar impact on the island's environment had not occurred for at least several centuries. Since the 2008 eruption, the volcano has remained quiet other than emission of volcanic gases. Erosion and deposition are rapidly altering slopes and beaches. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

Scott, W.E.; Nye, C.J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Neal, C.A.

2010-01-01

169

The Electronic Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Electronic Volcano offers links to many types of information on active volcanoes, such as maps, photographs, full texts of dissertations and a few elusive documents. The Electronic Volcano will guide you to resources in libraries or resources on other information servers including catalogs of active volcanoes, datasets for literature citations, electronic and hard-copy journals, visual information, maps, observatories and institutions, and a volcano name and country index.

170

Geodetic Measurements and Numerical Modeling of the Deformation Cycle for Okmok Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Okmok Volcano is an active caldera located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Island arc. Okmok, having recently erupted in 1997 and 2008, is well suited for multidisciplinary studies of magma migration and storage because it hosts a good seismic network and has been the subject of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images that span the recent eruption cycle. Interferometric SAR can characterize surface deformation in space and time, while data from the seismic network provides important information about the interior processes and structure of the volcano. We conduct a complete time series analysis of deformation of Okmok with images collected by the ERS and Envisat satellites on more than 100 distinct epochs between 1993 and 2008. We look for changes in inter-eruption inflation rates, which may indicate inelastic rheologic effects. For the time series analysis, we analyze the gradient of phase directly, without unwrapping, using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT) [Feigl and Thurber, 2009]. This approach accounts for orbital and atmospheric effects and provides realistic estimates of the uncertainties of the model parameters. We consider several models for the source, including the prolate spheroid model and the Mogi model, to explain the observed deformation. Using a medium that is a homogeneous half space, we estimate the source depth to be centered at about 4 km below sea level, consistent with the findings of Masterlark et al. [2010]. As in several other geodetic studies, we find the source to be approximately centered beneath the caldera. To account for rheologic complexity, we next apply the Finite Element Method to simulate a pressurized cavity embedded in a medium with material properties derived from body wave seismic tomography. This approach allows us to address the problem of unreasonably large pressure values implied by a Mogi source with a radius of about 1 km by experimenting with larger sources. We also compare the time dependence of the source to published results that used GPS data.

Ohlendorf, S. J.; Feigl, K.; Thurber, C. H.; Lu, Z.; Masterlark, T.

2011-12-01

171

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2010  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3,405 earthquakes, of which 2,846 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity in 2010 at these monitored volcanic centers. Seismograph subnetworks with severe outages in 2009 were repaired in 2010 resulting in three volcanic centers (Aniakchak, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being relisted in the formal list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes locations and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2010 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

2011-01-01

172

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to an EARTHWORM detection system. AVO located 7430 earthquakes during 2002 in the vicinity of the monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2002; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2002.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

2003-01-01

173

Evolution of the December 14, 1989 precursory long-period event swarm at Redoubt volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The intermittency pattern and evolution in waveforms of long-period (LP) seismic events during the intense, 23-h swarm that preceded the December 14, 1989 eruption of Redoubt volcano are investigated. Utilizing cross correlation to exploit the high degree of similarity among waveforms, a substantially more complete event catalog is generated than was available from near realtime detection based on short-term/long-term amplitude ratios, which was saturated by the high rate of activity. The temporal magnitude distribution of the predominant LP events is found to have an unusual banded structure in which the average magnitude of each band slowly increases and then decreases through time. A bifurcation that appears in the uppermost band shortly after the peak in magnitudes is characterized by a quasi-periodicity in intermittency and magnitude that is reminiscent of one of the classic routes to chaotic behavior in some non-linear systems. The waveforms of the predominant events evolve slowly but unsteadily through time. These gradual changes appear to result from variations in the relative amplitudes of spectral peaks that remain stable in frequency, which suggests that they are due to differential excitation of a single, resonant source. Two other previously unrecognized, repetitive waveforms are also identified, but the signals from these secondary events are not clearly recorded at distances beyond the closest station. Similarities among the spectra of the predominant and secondary events suggest that the signals from these events also could represent different modes of exciting the same source. Significant changes in the rates and the sizes of the largest of these secondary events appear to coincide with the peak in the size distribution of the predominant LPs. At least some of the non-repetitive LP waveforms in the swarm appear to be the result of the superposition of signals from the rapid repetition of predominant LP source, thus placing a constraint on the repeat time of the triggering mechanism for this source. A lone hybrid event, which has a waveform character intermediate between the predominant LP events and high-frequency volcano-tectonic events, was also identified in the swarm; the occurrence of this event provides important evidence that the low-frequency character of the LP events is a source rather than a path or site effect. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Stephens, C. D.; Chouet, B. A.

2001-01-01

174

The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON): Hands-on Experiential K- 12 Learning in the North  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON) was initiated by Martin Jeffries (UAF polar scientist), Delena Norris-Tull (UAF education professor) and Ron Reihl (middle school science teacher, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District). The snow and ice measurement protocols were developed in 1999-2000 at the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska scientists and tested by home school teacher/students in winter 2001-2002 in Fairbanks, AK. The project was launched in 2002 with seven sites around the state (PFRR, Fairbanks, Barrow, Mystic Lake, Nome, Shageluk and Wasilla). The project reached its broadest distribution in 2005-2006 with 22 sites. The schools range from urban (Wasilla) to primarily Alaska native villages (Shageluk). They include public schools, charter schools, home schooled students and parents, informal educators and citizen scientists. The grade levels range from upper elementary to high school. Well over a thousand students have participated in ALISON since its inception. Equipment is provided to the observers at each site. Measurements include ice thickness (with a hot wire ice thickness gauge), snow depth and snow temperature (surface and base). Snow samples are taken and snow density derived. Snow variables are used to calculate the conductive heat flux through the ice and snow cover to the atmosphere. All data are available on the Web site. The students and teachers are scientific partners in the study of lake ice processes, contributing to new scientific knowledge and understanding while also learning science by doing science with familiar and abundant materials. Each autumn, scientists visit each location to work with the teachers and students, helping them to set up the study site, showing them how to make the measurements and enter the data into the computer, and discussing snow, ice and polar environmental change. A number of 'veteran' teachers are now setting up the study sites on their own. Each summer, a workshop in Fairbanks offers the teachers the opportunity to work and learn together, sharing their ALISON field experiences and transfer to the classroom, testing activities and materials, and adding to their content knowledge. This experiential learning project demonstrates that teachers and students can make scientifically valuable measurements when provided with easy-to-use equipment, clear directions and training. The project also shows that when provided with a stimulating learning opportunity, teachers and students find imaginative ways to extend the experience. For example, a number of students have made videos about their ALISON. Lesson plans using ALISON-related science concepts have been generated by ALISON teachers and others. Several ALISON teachers have published articles about the ALISON experience. ALISON teachers have been awarded prestigious Toyota Tapestry grants in support of their activities.

Morris, K.; Jeffries, M.

2008-12-01

175

ASTER Observations of 2000-2007 Thermal Features at Pavlof Volcano and Mt. Hague (Emmons Lake Volcanic Center), Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) is a 15 km by 30 km area of nested calderas, stratovolcanoes, lava domes, hyaloclastite rings, and cinder cones aligned along the arc axis. Pavlof Volcano is the most active volcano along the ELVC, with more than 40 historic eruptions since 1790. The most recent eruption of Pavlof Volcano began in August 2007 after almost

R. L. Wessels; D. Schneider; M. Ramsey; M. T. Mangan

2007-01-01

176

Precursory swarms of long-period events at Redoubt Volcano (1989-1990), Alaska: Their origin and use as a forecasting tool  

USGS Publications Warehouse

During the eruption of Redoubt Volcano from December 1989 through April 1990, the Alaska Volcano Observatory issued advance warnings of several tephra eruptions based on changes in seismic activity related to the occurrence of precursory swarms of long-period (LP) seismic events (dominant period of about 0.5 s). The initial eruption on December 14 occurred after 23 years of quiescence and was heralded by a 23-hour swarm of LP events that ended abruptly with the eruption. After a series of vent-clearing explosions over the next few days, dome growth began on December 21. Another swarm, with LP events similar to those of the first, began on the 26th and ended in a major tephra eruption on January 2. Eruptions continued over the next two weeks and then ceased until February 15, when a large eruption initiated a long phase of repetitive dome-building and dome-destroying episodes that continued into April. Warnings were issued before the major events on December 14 and January 2, but as the eruptive sequence continued after January 2, the energy of the swarms decreased and forecasting became more difficult. A significant but less intense swarm preceded the February 15 eruption, which was not forecast. This eruption destroyed the only seismograph on the volcanic edifice and stymied forecasting until March 4, when the first of three new stations was installed within 3 km of the active vent. From March 4 to the end of the sequence on April 21, there were eight eruptions, six of which were preceded by detectable swarms of LP events. Although weak, these swarms provided the basis for warnings issued before the eruptions on March 23 and April 6. The initial swarm on December 13 had the following features: (1) short duration (23 hours); (2) a rapidly accelerating rate of seismic energy release over the first 18 hours of the swarm, followed by a decline of activity during the 5 hours preceding the eruption; (3) a magnitude range from -0.4 to 1.6; (4) nearly identical LP signatures with a dominant period near 0.5 s; (5) dilatational first motions everywhere; and (6) a stationary source location at a depth of 1.4 km beneath the crater. This occurrence of long-period events suggests a model involving the interaction of magma with groundwater in which magmatic gases, steam and water drive a fixed conduit at a stationary point throughout the swarm. The initiation of that sequence of events is analogous to the failure of a pressure-relief valve connecting a lower, supercharged magma-dominated reservoir to a shallow hydrothermal system. A three-dimensional model of a vibrating fluid-filled crack recently developed by Chouet is found to be compatible with the seismic data and yields the following parameters for the LP source: crack length, 280-380 m; crack width, 140-190 m; crack thickness, 0.05-0.20 m; crack stiffness, 100-200; sound speed of fluid, 0.8-1.3 km/s; compressional-wave speed of rock, 5.1 km/s; density ratio of fluid to rock, ???0.4; and ratio of bulk modulus of fluid to rigidity of rock, 0.03-0.07. The fluid-filled crack is excited intermittently by an impulsive pressure drop that varies in magnitude within the range of 0.4 to 40 bar. Such disturbance appears to be consistent with a triggering mechanism associated with choked flow conditions in the crack. ?? 1994.

Chouet, B.A.; Page, R.A.; Stephens, C.D.; Lahr, J.C.; Power, J.A.

1994-01-01

177

Chemical versus temporal controls on the evolution of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas at two volcanoes in the Alaska-Aleutian arc  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska-Aleutian island arc is well known for erupting both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas. To investigate the relative roles of chemical and temporal controls in generating these contrasting liquid lines of descent we have undertaken a detailed study of tholeiitic lavas from Akutan volcano in the oceanic A1eutian arc and calc-alkaline products from Aniakchak volcano on the continental A1askan Peninsula. The differences do not appear to be linked to parental magma composition. The Akutan lavas can be explained by closed-system magmatic evolution, whereas curvilinear trace element trends and a large range in 87 Sr/86 Sr isotope ratios in the Aniakchak data appear to require the combined effects of fractional crystallization, assimilation and magma mixing. Both magmatic suites preserve a similar range in 226 Ra-230 Th disequilibria, which suggests that the time scale of crustal residence of magmas beneath both these volcanoes was similar, and of the order of several thousand years. This is consistent with numerical estimates of the time scales for crystallization caused by cooling in convecting crustal magma chambers. During that time interval the tholeiitic Akutan magmas underwent restricted, closed-system, compositional evolution. In contrast, the calc-alkaline magmas beneath Aniakchak volcano underwent significant open-system compositional evolution. Combining these results with data from other studies we suggest that differentiation is faster in calc-alkaline and potassic magma series than in tholeiitic series, owing to a combination of greater extents of assimilation, magma mixing and cooling.

George, R.; Turner, S.; Hawkesworth, C.; Bacon, C.R.; Nye, C.; Stelling, P.; Dreher, S.

2004-01-01

178

Estimating lava volume by precision combination of multiple baseline spaceborne and airborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar: The 1997 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques are used to calculate the volume of extrusion at Okmok volcano, Alaska by constructing precise digital elevation models (DEMs) that represent volcano topography before and after the 1997 eruption. The posteruption DEM is generated using airborne topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) data where a three-dimensional affine transformation is used to account for the misalignments between different DEM patches. The preeruption DEM is produced using repeat-pass European Remote Sensing satellite data; multiple interferograms are combined to reduce errors due to atmospheric variations, and deformation rates are estimated independently and removed from the interferograms used for DEM generation. The extrusive flow volume associated with the 1997 eruption of Okmok volcano is 0.154 ?? 0.025 km3. The thickest portion is approximately 50 m, although field measurements of the flow margin's height do not exceed 20 m. The in situ measurements at lava edges are not representative of the total thickness, and precise DEM data are absolutely essential to calculate eruption volume based on lava thickness estimations. This study is an example that demonstrates how InSAR will play a significant role in studying volcanoes in remote areas.

Lu, Z.; Fielding, E.; Patrick, M. R.; Trautwein, C. M.

2003-01-01

179

Alaska  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-five exploratory wells were drilled in Alaska in 1980. Five oil or gas discovery wells were drilled on the North Slope. One hundred and seventeen development and service wells were drilled and completed, primarily in the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk River fields on the North Slope. Geologic-geophysical field activity consisted of 115.74 crew months, an increase of almost 50% compared to 1979. These increases affected most of the major basins of the state as industry stepped up preparations for future lease sales. Federal acreage under lease increased slightly, while state lease acreage showed a slight decline. The year's oil production showed a increase of 16%, while gas production was down slightly. The federal land freeze in Alaska showed signs of thawing, as the US Department of Interior asked industry to identify areas of interest onshore for possible future leasing. National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska was opened to private exploration, and petroleum potential of the Arctic Wildlife Refuge will be studied. One outer continental shelf lease sale was held in the eastern Gulf of Alaska, and a series of state and federal lease sales were announced for the next 5 years. 5 figures, 5 tables.

Jones, B.C.; Sears, D.W.

1981-10-01

180

The Middle Scoria sequence: A Holocene violent strombolian, subplinian and phreatomagmatic eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Middle Scoria deposit represents an explosive eruption of basaltic andesite magma (54 wt. % SiO2) from Okmok volcano during mid-Holocene time. The pattern of dispersal and characteristics of the ejecta indicate that the eruption opened explosively, with ash textural evidence for a limited degree of phreatomagmatism. The second phase of the eruption produced thick vesicular scoria deposits with grain texture, size and dispersal characteristics that indicate it was violent strombolian to subplinian in style. The third eruptive phase produced deposits with a shift towards grain shapes that are dense, blocky, and poorly vesicular, and intermittent surge layers, indicating later transitions between magmatic (violent strombolian) to phreatomagmatic (vulcanian) eruptive styles. Isopach maps yield bulk volume estimates that range from 0.06 to 0.43 km3, with ~ 0.04 to 0.25 km3 total DRE. The associated column heights and mass discharge values calculated from isopleth maps of individual Middle Scoria layers are 8.5 - 14 km and 0.4 to 45 × 106 kg/s. The Middle Scoria tephras are enriched in plagioclase microlites that have the textural characteristics of rapid magma ascent and relatively high degrees of effective undercooling. Those textures probably reflect the rapid magma ascent accompanying the violent strombolian and subplinian phases of the eruption. In the later stages of the eruption, the plagioclase microlite number densities decrease and textures include more tabular plagioclase, indicating a slowing of the ascent rate. The findings on the Middle Scoria are consistent with other explosive mafic eruptions, and show that outside of the two large caldera-forming eruptions, Okmok is also capable of producing violent mafic eruptions, marked by varying degrees of phreatomagmatism.

Wong, Lily J.; Larsen, Jessica F.

2010-01-01

181

Real-Time C-Band Radar Observations of 1992 Eruption Clouds from Crater Peak, Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska  

E-print Network

, Alaska By William I. Rose, Alexander B. Kostinski, and Lee Kelley CONTENTS ABSTRACT Repeated aircraft hazards in Alaska related to volcanic clouds have resulted in the use of a mobile C-band radar devoted (Augustine, Redoubt, and Mount Spurr) have erupted in the Cook Inlet area of Alaska (fig. 1). Each

Rose, William I.

182

A space-borne, multi-parameter, Virtual Volcano Observatory for the real-time, anywhere-anytime support to decision-making during eruptive crises  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The EVOSS consortium of academic, industrial and institutional partners in Europe and Africa, has created a satellite-based volcano observatory, designed to support crisis management within the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) framework of the European Commission. Data from 8 different payloads orbiting on 14 satellite platforms (SEVIRI on-board MSG-1, -2 and -3, MODIS on-board Terra and Aqua, GOME-2 and IASI onboard MetOp-A, OMI on-board Aura, Cosmo-SkyMED/1, /2, /3 and /4, JAMI on-board MTSAT-1 and -2, and, until April 8th2012, SCHIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT) acquired at 5 different down-link stations, are disseminated to and automatically processed at 6 locations in 4 countries. The results are sent, in four separate geographic data streams (high-temperature thermal anomalies, volcanic Sulfur dioxide daily fluxes, volcanic ash and ground deformation), to a central facility called VVO, the 'Virtual Volcano Observatory'. This system operates 24H/24-7D/7 since September 2011 on all volcanoes in Europe, Africa, the Lesser Antilles, and the oceans around them, and during this interval has detected, measured and monitored all subaerial eruptions occurred in this region (44 over 45 certified, with overall detection and processing efficiency of ~97%). EVOSS borne realtime information is delivered to a group of 14 qualified end users, bearing the direct or indirect responsibility of monitoring and managing volcano emergencies, and of advising governments in Comoros, DR Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Montserrat, Uganda, Tanzania, France and Iceland. We present the full set of eruptions detected and monitored - from 2004 to present - by multispectral payloads SEVIRI onboard the geostationary platforms of the MSG constellation, for developing and fine tuning-up the EVOSS system along with its real-time, pre- and post-processing automated algorithms. The set includes 91% of subaerial eruptions occurred at 15 volcanoes (Piton de la Fournaise, Karthala, Jebel al Tair, Erta Ale, Manda Hararo, Dalafilla, Nabro, Ol Doinyo Lengai, Nyiamulagira, Nyiragongo, Etna, Stromboli, Eyjafjallajökull, Grimsvötn, Soufriere Hills) showing radiant fluxes above ~0.5 GW and/or SO2 columns in excess of ~6 DU. Porting of automated thermal algorithms on MTSAT's JAMI (orbiting at 145°E) was developed on the eruptions of Merapi, Semeru Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny and Shiveluch in 2006-2007, calibrated on the frequent activity of Batu Tara, and demonstrated on the 2012-2013 large eruption of Tolbachik.

Ferrucci, F.; Tampellini, M.; Loughlin, S. C.; Tait, S.; Theys, N.; Valks, P.; Hirn, B.

2013-12-01

183

The 1992 eruptions of Crater Peak vent, Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Sulfur dioxide scrubbing by liquid water masked SO2 emissions from shallow magma during the 1992 eruptions of Crater Peak and effectively prevented observation of SO2 emissions from shallow magma both before and after explosive eruptions and seismic crises. Airborne ultraviolet correlation spectrometer (COSPEC) measurements from July 22, 1991, to September 24, 1992, indicate only background to minor ( H2S(aq) + 3H+(aq) + 3HSO4-(aq). Sulfur dioxide hydrolysis also explains the increase in the sulfate content of Crater Peak lake water prior to the first eruption, the strong H2S odor during periods of background to low SO2 emission, the TOMS evidence for significant H2S emissions during the explosive eruptions, and the observed decline of SO2 during periods of volcanic tremor. Abundant, local sources of melt water and a high permeability for the Mount Spurr volcanic edifice are probably the chief factors responsible for masking SO2 emissions by scrubbing, and possibly for quenching shallow intrusions that were ascending. Large SO2 emissions unencumbered by scrubbing were only possible during the three explosive eruptions when magma penetrated through liquid water zones under Crater Peak and reached the surface. Nonexplosive SO2 emissions of as much as 750 t/d were possible, however, for a brief period when dry pathways to the surface existed from September 25 until about October 10, 1992. Airborne infrared spectrometer (MIRAN) measurements of CO2 emissions indicate that in addition to the degassing of magma through dry pathways, degassing through boiling water with the loss of SO2 by scrubbing was also important during that time. The CO2 emission data indicate that magma degassing was taking place, and CO2/SO2 values calculated from MIRAN and COSPEC data are in the range 10 to 100, which supports the hypothesis of SO2 loss by scrubbing. Because of its strong preference for the vapor phase during boiling, CO2 emissions from degassing magma are less likely to be masked by the presence of water, whereas SO2 emissions may be lost totally from interactions with water; thus misleading COSPEC results are obtained. We recommended prompt and early monitoring of CO2 when Cook Inlet volcanoes become restless.

Keith, Terry E.C.

1995-01-01

184

SAR-based Estimation of Glacial Extent and Velocity Fields on Isanotski Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global studies show that Earth's glaciers are losing mass at increasing rates, creating a challenge for communities that rely on them as natural resources. Field observation of glacial environments is limited by cost and inaccessibility. Optical remote sensing is often precluded by cloud cover and seasonal darkness. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) overcomes these obstacles by using microwave-frequency electromagnetic radiation to provide high resolution information on large spatial scales and in remote, atmospherically obscured environments. SAR is capable of penetrating clouds, operating in darkness, and discriminating between targets with ambiguous spectral signatures. This study evaluated the efficacy of two SAR Earth observation methods on small (< 7 km2) glaciers in rugged topography. The glaciers chosen for this study lie on Isanotski Volcano in Unimak Island, Aleutian Archipelago, USA. The local community on the island, the City of False Pass, relies on glacial melt for drinking water and hydropower. Two methods were used: (1) velocity field estimation based on Repeat Image Feature Tracking (RIFT) and (2) glacial boundary delineation based on interferometric coherence mapping. NASA Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle SAR (UAVSAR) single-polarized power images and JAXA Advanced Land Observing Satellite Phased Array type L-band SAR (ALOS PALSAR) single-look complex images were analyzed over the period 2008-2011. UAVSAR image pairs were coregistered to sub-pixel accuracy and processed with the Coregistration of Optically Sensed Images and Correlation (COSI-Corr) feature tracking module to derive glacial velocity field estimates. Maximum glacier velocities ranged from 28.9 meters/year to 58.3 meters/year. Glacial boundaries were determined from interferometric coherence of ALOS PALSAR data and subsequently refined with masking operations based on terrain slope and segment size. Accuracy was assessed against hand-digitized outlines from high resolution UAVSAR power images, yielding 83.0% producer's accuracy (errors of omission) and 86.1% user's accuracy (errors of commission). These results represent a refinement of a decades-old entry from the USGS National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The information gained from this study could strengthen management practices by helping decision makers understand the ecological and economic consequences of glacial change. This procedure could be repeated in similar locations worldwide to provide communities with accurate, quantitative information about their changing glacial resources.

Sousa, D.; Lee, A.; Parker, O. P.; Pressler, Y.; Guo, S.; Osmanoglu, B.; Schmidt, C.

2012-12-01

185

Preliminary Seismic, Infrasound and Lightning Observations of the July 2008 Eruptions of Okmok Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Okmok volcano began to erupt July 12, 2008, following an 11 year hiatus. The previous eruption in 1997 was from Cone A whereas the new activity occurred on the north flank of Cone D, a structure that had not been active for 800 years. Seismic activity at Okmok is monitored by a network of eight short-period and four broadband seismometers. The eruption was preceded by a swarm of earthquakes lasting just 5 hours, with events large enough to be located only occurring in the last hour. The bulk of these events occurred under Cone D with a few near Cone A. The eruption began with the onset of continuous tremor at 19:43 UT, which increased abruptly at 19:48 UT and lasted about 12 hours, strongest at about 22:00 UT. The tremor was strong enough to appear on stations out to 260 km distance. The ash cloud quickly grew to an elevation of 16 km or more. Infrasonic waves from the eruption were recorded on the I53US infrasound array in Fairbanks as three groups of waves starting at 21:44 UT, 01:14 UT July 13, and 05:41 UT July 13 and lasting 29-95 minutes. The time of flight is estimated to be 94 minutes along a great circle path. The waves were strongest between 0.1 and 0.5 Hz and had amplitudes of 0.1-0.3 Pa at the array. Low-pass filtered broadband seismic data showed extremely long-period waves with a period of 540 sec starting at about 22:45 UT. However, these waves, which were also visible in GOES satellite images and are thought to be gravity waves, have not yet been found in the infrasound data. Vigorous lightning was observed in the eruption column by observers at Fort Glenn, 12 km from the vent, on July 12 and several occasions after that. Unfortunately no instrumental data were obtained for the lightning.

McNutt, S. R.; Arnoult, K. M.; Szuberla, C. A.; Stihler, S. D.

2008-12-01

186

Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

Twenty-five exploratory wells were drilled in Alaska in 1980. Five oil or gas discovery wells were drilled on the North Slope. One hundred and seventeen development and service wells were drilled and completed, primarily in the Prudhoe Bay and Kuparuk River fields on the North Slope. Geologic-geophysical field activity consisted of 115.74 crew months, an increase of almost 50% compared

B. C. Jones; D. W. Sears

1981-01-01

187

Dante's Volcano  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This video contains two segments: one a 0:01:50 spot and the other a 0:08:21 feature. Dante 2, an eight-legged walking machine, is shown during field trials as it explores the inner depths of an active volcano at Mount Spurr, Alaska. A NASA sponsored team at Carnegie Mellon University built Dante to withstand earth's harshest conditions, to deliver a science payload to the interior of a volcano, and to report on its journey to the floor of a volcano. Remotely controlled from 80-miles away, the robot explored the inner depths of the volcano and information from onboard video cameras and sensors was relayed via satellite to scientists in Anchorage. There, using a computer generated image, controllers tracked the robot's movement. Ultimately the robot team hopes to apply the technology to future planetary missions.

1994-01-01

188

Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On March 29, 2007, the Shiveluch Volcano on the Russian Federation's Kamchatka Peninsula erupted. According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory the volcano underwent an explosive eruption between 01:50 and 2:30 UTC, sending an ash cloud skyward roughly 9,750 meters (32,000 feet), based on visual estimates. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this picture at 02:00 UTC on March 29. The top image shows the volcano and its surroundings. The bottom image shows a close-up view of the volcano at 250 meters per pixel. Satellites often capture images of volcanic ash plumes, but usually as the plumes are blowing away. Plumes have been observed blowing away from Shiveluch before. This image, however, is different. At the time the Aqua satellite passed overhead, the eruption was recent enough (and the air was apparently still enough) that the ash cloud still hovered above the summit. In this image, the bulbous cloud casts its shadow northward over the icy landscape. Volcanic ash eruptions inject particles into Earth's atmosphere. Substantial eruptions of light-reflecting particles can reduce temperatures and even affect atmospheric circulation. Large eruptions impact climate patterns for years. A massive eruption of the Tambora Volcano in Indonesia in 1815, for instance, earned 1816 the nickname 'the year without a summer.' Shiveluch is a stratovolcano--a steep-sloped volcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. One of Kamchatka's largest volcanoes, it sports a summit reaching 3,283 meters (10,771 feet). Shiveluch is also one of the peninsula's most active volcanoes, with an estimated 60 substantial eruptions in the past 10,000 years.

2007-01-01

189

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

2008-01-01

190

Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska 2. Precursor to the Subplinian phase  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both Strombolian and Subplinian basaltic activity. The Subplinian phase was preceded by a signal of low amplitude and constant frequency (??? 2 Hz) lasting 13 h. This "humming signal" is interpreted as the coalescence of the very shallow part of a foam building up in the conduit, which produces large gas bubbles before bursting. The acoustic waveform of the hum event is modelled by a Helmholtz resonator: gas is trapped into a rigid cavity and can only escape through a tiny upper hole producing sound waves. At Shishaldin, the radius of the hole (??? 5 m) is close to that of the conduit (??? 6 m), the cavity has a length of ??? 60 m, and gas presents only a small overpressure between (??? 1.2 ?? 10-3 and 4.5 ?? 10-3 MPa). Such an overpressure is obtained by the partial coalescence of a foam formed by bubbles with a diameter from ??? 2.3 mm at the beginning of the episode towards ??? 0.64 mm very close to the end of the phase. The intermittency between hum events is explained by the ripening of the foam induced by the H2O diffusion through the liquid films. The two extreme values, from 600 to 10 s, correspond to a bubble diameter from 2.2 to 0.3 mm at the beginning and end of the pre-Subplinian phase, respectively. The extremely good agreement between two independent estimates of bubble diameters in the shallow foam reinforces the validity of such an interpretation. The total gas volume lost at the surface during the humming events is at most 5.9 ?? 106 m3. At the very end of the pre-Subplinian phase, there is a single large bubble with an overpressure of ???0.42 MPa. The large overpressure suggests that it comes from significant depth, unlike other bubbles in the pre-Subplinian phase. This deep bubble may be responsible for the entire foam collapse, resulting in the Subplinian phase. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Vergniolle, S.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

2004-01-01

191

Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt-containing boundary layer. Sea salt-cored aggregates could form when ash particles travel over a maritime environment and sea salt aerosol could easily be incorporated in the plume from the surrounding atmosphere. When the particles are sampled, pressure drops within the DRUM impactor cause the water in the droplet to evaporate, leaving behind ash aggregated with salt

Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

2010-12-01

192

Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System  

USGS Publications Warehouse

As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at midlatitude or high-latitude volcanoes; (c) safety factors during unrest, which can limit where new instrumentation can safely be installed (particularly at near-vent sites that can be critical for precursor detection and eruption forecasting); and (d) the remoteness of many U.S. volcanoes (particularly those in the Aleutians and the Marianas Islands), where access is difficult or impossible most of the year. Given these difficulties, it is reasonable to anticipate that ground-based monitoring of eruptions at U.S. volcanoes will likely be performed primarily with instruments installed before unrest begins. 2. Given a growing awareness of previously undetected 2. phenomena that may occur before an eruption begins, at present the types and (or) density of instruments in use at most U.S. volcanoes is insufficient to provide reliable early warning of volcanic eruptions. As shown by the gap analysis of Ewert and others (2005), a number of U.S. volcanoes lack even rudimentary monitoring. At those volcanic systems with monitoring instrumentation in place, only a few types of phenomena can be tracked in near-real time, principally changes in seismicity, deformation, and large-scale changes in thermal flux (through satellite-based remote sensing). Furthermore, researchers employing technologically advanced instrumentation at volcanoes around the world starting in the 1990s have shown that subtle and previously undetectable phenomena can precede or accompany eruptions. Detection of such phenomena would greatly improve the ability of U.S. volcano observatories to provide accurate early warnings of impending eruptions, and is a critical capability particularly at the very high-threat volcanoes identified by Ewert and others (2005). For these two reasons, change from a reactive to a proactive volcano-monitoring strategy is clearly needed at U.S. volcanoes. Monitoring capabilities need to be expanded at virtually every volcanic center, regardless of its current state of

Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

2008-01-01

193

Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Alaska is the United States' only Arctic region. Its marine, tundra, boreal (northern) forest, and rainforest ecosystems differ from most of those in other states and are relatively intact. Alaska is home to millions of migratory birds, hundred of thousands of caribou, some of the nation's largest salmon runs, a significant proportion of he nation's marine mammals, and half of the nation's fish catch. Energy production is the main driver of the state's economy, providing more than 80% of state government revenue and thousands of jobs. Continuing pressure for oil, gas, and mineral development on land and offshore in ice-covered waters increases the demand for infrastructure, placing additional stresses on ecosystems. Land-based energy exploration will be affected by a shorter season when ice roads are viable, yet reduced sea ice extent may create more opportunity for offshore development. Climate also affects hydropower generation. Mining and fishing are the second and third largest industries in the state, with tourism rapidly increasing the 1990s. Fisheries are vulnerable to changes in fish abundance and distribution that result from both climate change and fishing pressure. Tourism might respond positively to warmer springs and autumns but negatively to less favorable conditions for winter activities and increased summer smoke from wildfire. Alaska is home to 40% (229 of 566) of the federally recognized tribes in the United States. The small number of jobs, high cost of living, and rapid social change make rural, predominantly Native, communities highly vulnerable to climate change through impacts on tradition hunting and fishing and cultural connection to the land and sad. Because most of these communities re not connected to the state's road system or electrical grid, the cost of living is high, and it is challenging to supply good, fuel, materials, health care, and other services. Climate impacts on these communities are magnified by additional social and economic stresses. However, Alaskan Native communities have for centuries dealt with scarcity and high environmental variability and thus have deep cultural reservoirs of flexibility and adaptability.

Chapin, F. Stuart, III; Trainor, Sarah F.; Cochran, Patricia; Huntington, Henry; Markon, Carl; McCammon, Molly; McGuire, A. David; Serreze, Mark

2014-01-01

194

Experimental constraints on the P/T conditions of high silica andesite storage preceding the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We present new experimental results to constrain the P/T storage conditions of the high silica andesite (HSA) prior to the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine Volcano forms a small island located in Alaska’s Cook Inlet, approximately 180 miles southwest of Anchorage. The 2006 eruption began January 11, 2006, and evolved from an initial phase of explosive activity, through continuous and effusive phases, ending approximately mid-March 2006. Lithologies erupted indicate pervasive hybridization between high- (HSA; 62.2-63.3 wt. % SiO2) and low-silica andesite (LSA; 56.6-58.7 wt% SiO2). This study focuses on experiments using the HSA as starting material to constrain magma storage conditions, based on amphibole stability. Experiments were conducted between 100-160 MPa and 800-900 °C, utilzing H2O saturated conditions and fO2 of Re-ReO. Both lightly crushed and sintered HSA were used as starting powders, seeded respectively with 5 wt. % amphibole and a mix of 5 wt. % amphibole and 20 wt. % plagioclase. Experiments with sintered starting material tended toward a bimodal distribution of experimental phenocrysts and microlites, whilst experiments of the lightly crushed material are more phenocryst rich. Preliminary results indicate that amphibole is stable at conditions of 120-140 MPa and 820-840 °C. These pressures correspond with depths of approximately 4.6-5.4 km, which are consistent with prior magma storage models for Augustine 1986 and 2006 magmas, as well as amphiboles found in other arc andesites (e.g., Redoubt and Soufriere Hills volcanoes). Experimental amphiboles are magnesio-hornblendes, which is in keeping with the natural HSA amphiboles. Experimental and natural hornblendes are similar in composition, with the main difference being a small FeO enrichment (2-3 wt%) and MgO depletion (1-2wt%) in the experimental grains. Further work will provide a more complete assessment of amphibole stability and composition, and will be applied towards refining the magma storage model for the Augustine 2006 eruption.

Henton, S.; Larsen, J. F.; Traxler, N.

2010-12-01

195

Areal distribution, thickness, mass, volume, and grain size of tephra-fall deposits from the 1992 eruptions of Crater Peak vent, Mt. Spurr Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Crater Peak flank vent of Mount Spurr volcano erupted June 27, August 18, and September 16- 17, 1992. The three eruptions were similar in intensity (vulcanian to subplinian eruption columns reaching up to 14 km Above Sea Level) and duration (3.5 to 4.0 hours) and produced tephra-fall deposits (12, 14, 15 x 10 6 m3 Dense Rock Equivalent [DRE]) discernible up to 1,000 km downwind. The June 27 ash cloud traveled north over the rugged, ice- and snow-covered Alaska Range. The August 18 ash cloud was carried southeastward over Anchorage, across Prince William Sound, and down the southeastern shoreline of the Gulf of Alaska. The September 16-17 ash plume was directed eastward over the Talkeetna and Wrangell mountains and into the Yukon Territory of Canada. Over 50 mass-per-unit-area (MPUA) samples were collected for each of the latter two fall deposits at distances ranging from about 2 km to 370 km downwind from the volcano. Only 10 (mostly proximal) samples were collected for the June fall deposit due to inaccessible terrain and funding constraints. MPUA data were plotted and contoured (isomass lines) to graphically display the distribution of each fall deposit. For the August and September eruptions, fallout was concentrated along a narrow (30 to 50 km wide) belt. The fallout was most concentrated (100,000 to greater than 250,000 g/m2) within about 80 km of the volcano. Secondary maxima occur at 200 km (2,620 g/m2) and 300 km (4,659 g/m2), respectively, down axis for the August and September deposits. The maxima contain bimodal grain size distributions (with peaks at 88.4 and 22.1 microns) indicating aggregation within the ash cloud. Combined tephra-volume for the 1992 Mount Spurr eruptions (41 x 10 6 m3 DRE) is comparable to that (tephra-fall only) of the 1989-90 eruptions of nearby Redoubt volcano (31-49 x 106 m3 DRE).

McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Riley, Colleen M.

2001-01-01

196

Toward an integrated coastal sea-ice observatory: System components and a case study at Barrow, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

The morphology, stability and duration of seasonal landfast sea ice in Alaska's coastal zone is changing alongside large-scale ice thinning and retreat. The extent and complexity of change at the local level requires an integrated observing approach to assess implications of such change for coastal ecosystems and communities that rely on or make use of the sea-ice cover. Barrow, Alaska

Matthew L. Druckenmiller; Hajo Eicken; Mark A. Johnson; Daniel J. Pringle; Christina C. Williams

2009-01-01

197

Initial Results Using Natural Magnetulluric (MT) field Measurements to Determine the Ice Thickness in the Summit Caldera of Mt. Wrangell Volcano, Alaska.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report the initial results of a magnetulluric (MT) field survey made in June 2005 & 2006 on the ice surface in the summit caldera (4200 m) of Mt. Wrangell Volcano, Alaska. The purpose was to determine the ice thickness of Mt. Wrangell's summit caldera with on-site passive measurements of VLF/ELF signals. Measurements were made using a Zonge GDP 32II, over a frequency range of roughly 1Hz 8 kHz. Included also are VLF field measurements of existing 24kHz US Navy signals made using a Geonics EM-16R in June 2004 & 2006. In 2006, measurements were coordinated with operation of the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program's (HAARP) RF transmitter to test whether ionospheric ELF waves, potentially excited by HAARP, could be measured at the summit of Mt. Wrangell. This work was done in coordination with the 2004- 06 Mt. Wrangell international ice coring and research efforts (Hokkaido University, Japan, Russian Academy of Science, Kamchatka, and the University of Alaska). Though estimated to be as much as 1000m thick, the thickness of the ice in the center of Mt. Wrangell's caldera is not known. Efforts over the past 45 years to determine the ice thickness have met with numerous difficulties, and none have been conclusive in the center region. Previous radio echo sounding efforts: Motyka & Benson, 1976(surface,); Clark & Benson, 1989 (airborne) and Kanamori & Shairaiwa, 2003 (surface) gave reasonable results near the rim of the caldera but were inconclusive in the center region where the depth is expected to be maximum In summer 2004 a single radio-echo measurement in the center by Kanamori gave a depth of roughly 750 meters. Seismic measurements in 2004 by Lüthi &Truffer suggest an ice thickness of roughly 700- 900 meters though data interpretation was problematic. The 2005 Resistivity vs. Depth results from a site in the center of the caldera, using a smoothed 1-d inverse model (Zonge) show a significant change in resistivity at a depth of between 700-800 meters, possibly indicating the bottom of the ice. Analysis of the same data set using a Bostick model shows a resistivity break at a slightly shallower depth 600 700 meters. This effort is part of a pilot project investigating whether the HAARP RF transmitter located in Gakona, Alaska can effectively generate ionospheric VLF/ELF signals that can be used as probe waves to determine the thickness of the ice and potentially deeper structure in the caldera of Mt. Wrangell Volcano, Alaska. This work is the exploratory phase of the project determining whether VLF/ELF signals can be successfully used to measure the ice thickness in the center of Mt. Wrangell's summit caldera.

Solie, D. J.; Wescott, E.; Benson, C. S.; Kanamori, S.; Liu, D.

2006-12-01

198

Hazard Information Management, Interagency Coordination, and Impacts of the 2005-2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Dissemination of volcano-hazard information in coordination with other Federal, State, and local agencies is a primary responsibility of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). During the 2005-6 eruption of Augustine Volcano in Alaska, AVO used existing interagency relationships and written protocols to provide hazard guidance before, during, and after eruptive events. The 2005-6 eruption was notable because of the potential for volcanogenic tsunami, which required establishment of a new procedure for alerts of possible landslideinduced tsunami in Cook Inlet. Despite repeated ash-cloud generating explosions and far-traveled ash clouds, impacts from the event were relatively minor. Primary economic losses occurred when air carriers chose to avoid flights into potentially unsafe conditions. Post-eruption evaluations by agencies involved in the response indicated weaknesses in information centralization and availability of specific information regarding ash fall hazards in real time.

Neal, Christina A.; Murray, Thomas L.; Power, John A.; Adleman, Jennifer N.; Whitmore, Paul M.; Osiensky, Jeffery M.

2010-01-01

199

Seismoacoustic analysis of Ultra-Long-Period Signals Generated in the Atmosphere during the 2009 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We investigate a novel recording of volcanically-generated atmospheric gravity waves on multiple (proximal) stations during the 2009 eruptive activity of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. From March 23 - April 4, 2009, 16 of the 19 ash-generating explosions reached the stratosphere (>10 km asl.), and a subset of these explosions produced significant ultra-long-period (ULP) seismic signals at periods greater than 250 s. The ULP signals were recorded on a temporary network of seismometers (0.033 - 50 Hz) and a single permanent infrasound sensor (0.1 - 50 Hz) all located within 12 kilometers of the active vent. The ULP signals have delayed arrivals following explosion onsets in both the seismic and infrasound data, indicating that they are generated in the atmosphere. The atmosphere sustains two types of ULP signals: acoustic waves and gravity waves. ULP acoustic waves are mostly controlled by the compressibility of the atmosphere, travel close to the speed of sound, and have a maximum period limited by the acoustic cut-off frequency of about 300 s. Gravity waves are buoyancy-controlled oscillations set up by the disruption of the normal density stratification of the atmosphere, typically have periods greater than 300 s and phase velocities of 10s of m/s. We observe a range in peak ULP energy (300 - 400+ s) that suggests both types of ULP signals were generated by the Redoubt explosions, but that gravity waves dominate for some of the explosions. Moreover, we see moveout velocities of 10s of m/s for some events and acoustic speeds for others since the ULP signals were recorded across the local network. In addition to signals on the vertical components, high amplitude signals are also recorded on the horizontal components. Since we are dealing with signals in the tilt-dominated portion of the seismometer response, the horizontal components are converted to tilt and we observe multiple tilt cycles at periods similar to the ULP signals. These signals indicate tilts of 10s-100s of microradians, which we attribute to oscillatory ground tilting caused by the passing gravity waves. In order to understand observed changes in the ULP signals between explosions (e.g., frequency content, duration, atmosphere-ground partitioning), we investigate the process of ULP transmission from the atmosphere to the ground, the role atmospheric conditions play in generating, modifying, and propagating ULP signals, and how plume dynamics (e.g., mass, thermal energy, ascent rate, particle size) affect ULP signal initiation and characteristics. We integrate Doppler radar observations of individual explosions, and numerical modeling of atmospheric eruption plume dynamics with ULP and broadband explosion characteristics to examine how the observed gravity wave signals relate to physical processes during eruption.

Lyons, J. J.; Haney, M. M.; Van Eaton, A. R.; Schwaiger, H. F.; Schneider, D. J.

2013-12-01

200

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2005  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Summary: The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Figure 1). The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents calculated earthquake hypocenters and seismic phase arrival data, and details changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2005. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at thirty-two volcanoes within Alaska in 2005 (Figure 1). The network was augmented by two new subnetworks to monitor the Semisopochnoi Island volcanoes and Little Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity at these volcanoes was still being studied at the end of 2005 and has not yet been added to the list of permanently monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. Following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at the Mount Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Korovin Volcano, formal monitoring of these volcanoes began in 2005. AVO located 9,012 earthquakes in 2005. Monitoring highlights in 2005 include: (1) seismicity at Mount Spurr remaining above background, starting in February 2004, through the end of the year and into 2006; (2) an increase in seismicity at Augustine Volcano starting in May 2005, and continuing through the end of the year into 2006; (3) volcanic tremor and seismicity related to low-level strombolian activity at Mount Veniaminof in January to March and September; and (4) a seismic swarm at Tanaga Volcano in October and November. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field in 2005; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2005; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2005.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.

2006-01-01

201

Interactive Volcano Studies and Education Using Virtual Globes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Internet-based virtual globe programs such as Google Earth provide a spatial context for visualization of monitoring and geophysical data sets. At the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Google Earth is being used to integrate satellite imagery, modeling of volcanic eruption clouds and seismic data sets to build new monitoring and reporting tools. However, one of the most useful information sources for environmental monitoring is under utilized. Local populations, who have lived near volcanoes for decades are perhaps one of the best gauges for changes in activity. Much of the history of the volcanoes is only recorded through local legend. By utilizing the high level of internet connectivity in Alaska, and the interest of secondary education in environmental science and monitoring, it is proposed to build a network of observation nodes around local schools in Alaska and along the Aleutian Chain. A series of interactive web pages with observations on a volcano's condition, be it glow at night, puffs of ash, discolored snow, earthquakes, sounds, and even current weather conditions can be recorded, and the users will be able to see their reports in near real time. The database will create a KMZ file on the fly for upload into the virtual globe software. Past observations and legends could be entered to help put a volcano's long-term activity in perspective. Beyond the benefit to researchers and emergency managers, students and teachers in the rural areas will be involved in volcano monitoring, and gain an understanding of the processes and hazard mitigation efforts in their community. K-12 students will be exposed to the science, and encouraged to participate in projects at the university. Infrastructure at the university can be used by local teachers to augment their science programs, hopefully encouraging students to continue their education at the university level.

Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

2006-12-01

202

Living With Volcanoes: The USGS Volcano Hazards Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report summarizes the Volcano Hazards Program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Topics include its goals and activities, some key accomplishments, and a plan for future operations. There are also discussions of active and potentially active volcanoes in the U.S., the role of the USGS volcano observatories, prediction of eruptions, and potential danger to aircraft from volcanic plumes.

2010-11-11

203

Living With Volcanoes: The USGS Volcano Hazards Program  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This report summarizes the Volcano Hazards Program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Topics include its goals and activities, some key accomplishments, and a plan for future operations. There are also discussions of active and potentially active volcanoes in the U.S., the role of the USGS volcano observatories, prediction of eruptions, and potential danger to aircraft from volcanic plumes.

204

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1999  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained a seismic monitoring program at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. Between 1994 and 1999, the AVO seismic monitoring program underwent significant changes with networks added at new volcanoes during each summer from 1995 through 1999. The existing network at Katmai –Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) was repaired in 1995, and new networks were installed at Makushin (1996), Akutan (1996), Pavlof (1996), Katmai - south (1996), Aniakchak (1997), Shishaldin (1997), Katmai - north (1998), Westdahl, (1998), Great Sitkin (1999) and Kanaga (1999). These networks added to AVO's existing seismograph networks in the Cook Inlet area and increased the number of AVO seismograph stations from 46 sites and 57 components in 1994 to 121 sites and 155 components in 1999. The 1995–1999 seismic network expansion increased the number of volcanoes monitored in real-time from 4 to 22, including Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Mount Snowy, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin, Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski volcano, Shisaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl volcano, Akutan volcano, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (see Figures 1-15). The network expansion also increased the number of earthquakes located from about 600 per year in1994 and 1995 to about 3000 per year between 1997 and 1999. Highlights of the catalog period include: 1) a large volcanogenic seismic swarm at Akutan volcano in March and April 1996 (Lu and others, 2000); 2) an eruption at Pavlof Volcano in fall 1996 (Garces and others, 2000; McNutt and others, 2000); 3) an earthquake swarm at Iliamna volcano between September and December 1996; 4) an earthquake swarm at Mount Mageik in October 1996 (Jolly and McNutt, 1999); 5) an earthquake swarm located at shallow depth near Strandline Lake; 6) a strong swarm of earthquakes near Becharof Lake; 7) precursory seismicity and an eruption at Shishaldin Volcano in April 1999 that included a 5.2 ML earthquake and aftershock sequence (Moran and others, in press; Thompson and others, in press). The 1996 calendar year is also notable as the seismicity rate was very high, especially in the fall when 3 separate areas (Strandline Lake, Iliamna Volcano, and several of the Katmai volcanoes) experienced high rates of located earthquakes. This catalog covers the period from January 1, 1994, through December 31,1999, and includes: 1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; 2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations and magnifications; 3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival; 4) velocity models used for earthquake locations; 5) phase arrival times recorded at individual stations; and 6) a summary of daily station usage from throughout the report period. We have made calculated hypocenters, station locations, system magnifications, velocity models, and phase arrival information available for download via computer network as a compressed Unix tar file.

Jolly, Arthur D.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Lahr, John C.; Paskievitch, John; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Moran, Seth C.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Hammond, William R.

2001-01-01

205

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2012  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2012, the Alaska Volcano Observatory located 4,787 earthquakes, of which 4,211 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by a seismograph network. There was significant seismic activity at Iliamna, Kanaga, and Little Sitkin volcanoes in 2012. Instrumentation highlights for this year include the implementation of the Advanced National Seismic System Quake Monitoring System hardware and software in February 2012 and the continuation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work in the summer of 2012. The operational highlight was the removal of Mount Wrangell from the list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes hypocenters, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2012 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Haney, Matt; Parker, Tom; Searcy, Cheryl; Prejean, Stephanie

2013-01-01

206

Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2008  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 7,097 earthquakes of which 5,318 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the AVO. Monitoring highlights in 2008 include the eruptions of Okmok Caldera, and Kasatochi Volcano, as well as increased unrest at Mount Veniaminof and Redoubt Volcano. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2008; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2008; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2008.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.

2009-01-01

207

Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR,  

E-print Network

finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account; thermoelastic properties; volcano 1. Introduction Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery can of Volcanology and Geothermal Research 150 (2006) 186­201 www.elsevier.com/locate/jvolgeores #12;imagery have

208

Supporting Sound Management of Our Coasts and Seas Kasatochi Volcano Alaska is noteworthy as a region of frequent seismic and  

E-print Network

) Western Region: Kasatochi Volcano Coastal and Ocean Science Fact Sheet 2010­3028 May 2010 Printed. Most notably, Kasatochi supported a colony of about 250,000 least and crested auklets, one of only seven such colonies in the Aleutian chain. The large numbers of seabirds attracted a variety of avian

209

ASTER Observations of 2000-2007 Thermal Features at Pavlof Volcano and Mt. Hague (Emmons Lake Volcanic Center), Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Emmons Lake Volcanic Center (ELVC) is a 15 km by 30 km area of nested calderas, stratovolcanoes, lava domes, hyaloclastite rings, and cinder cones aligned along the arc axis. Pavlof Volcano is the most active volcano along the ELVC, with more than 40 historic eruptions since 1790. The most recent eruption of Pavlof Volcano began in August 2007 after almost 11 years of quiescence. Mount Hague is a prominent intracaldera vent with no known historical eruptions that lies approximately 7 kilometers to the southwest of Pavlof. The southern crater of Mount Hague commonly fluctuates between a crater-filling lake to a dry crater floor with vigorously steaming fumaroles. Mount Hague has another fumarole field on the southeast flank at nearly the same elevation as the crater floor. To better document the behavior of persistent thermal features at these remote volcanoes, we have compiled temperature and dimension data using a seven-year long time series of satellite data. Over 25 daytime and 40 nighttime clear thermal infrared (TIR) images (90 m resolution) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) have recorded variations in the thermal activity at both volcanic vents since July 2000. All cloud-free ASTER TIR observations document persistent low- temperature features at both Pavlof Volcano and Mount Hague during this period. The size and temperature of each thermal feature varies throughout the study period. The data show that the 2518 m summit of Pavlof Volcano is occasionally snow-free in early summer whereas neighboring peaks at lower elevations are still snow-clad. FLIR data acquired near the summit of Pavlof in 2004 show that the majority of warm ground was at 20°C to 40°C. These warm areas commonly persist snow-free into the winter. Temperature variations observed at Mt Hague crater usually correlate to the size of the ephemeral crater lake. As the lake grows, the pixel-integrated ASTER TIR temperature increases. Measurements using higher resolution (15 m) daytime ASTER visible-near infrared (VNIR) images show that the crater lake size varies between 0 to 4.5 hectares each year. Combined field and satellite observations from the last seven years suggest that the changes to the lake size can occur within a few weeks each summer. When the lake is absent, the fumarole temperatures in the crater parallel the fumarole temperatures observed on the southeast flank of Mount Hague. Periods of vigorous steaming from the Hague crater may coincide with periods of little or no water filling the crater. Although the final data processing is ongoing, preliminary results show no correlation between the thermal activity at Pavlof Volcano with the activity at Mount Hague.

Wessels, R. L.; Schneider, D.; Ramsey, M.; Mangan, M. T.

2007-12-01

210

Tsunami generation by pyroclastic flow during the 3500-year B.P. caldera-forming eruption of Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

A discontinuous pumiceous sand, a few centimeters to tens of centimeters thick, is located up to 15?m above mean high tide\\u000a within Holocene peat along the northern Bristol Bay coastline of Alaska. The bed consists of fine-to-coarse, poorly to moderately\\u000a well-sorted, pumice-bearing sand near the top of a 2-m-thick peat sequence. The sand bed contains rip-up clasts of peat and

C. F. Waythomas; C. A. Neal

1998-01-01

211

The Ice Piston, Redoubt Volcano  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The Ice Piston with Ash, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. This photo was taken on March 21, 2009, the day before Redoubt first erupted. The glacier that filled the crater was collapsing because of the increase in ground temperature underneath....

2009-12-08

212

Volcano Lovers  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Why Files article explores volcanoes and volcanic eruptions. Topics covered include: Alaska's Pavlof and its threat to jet engines; Mexico City's restless neighbor, Popocatepetl (El Popo); underground volcanic processes; modern forecasting of eruptions; various volcanic phenomena and features; large flood basalt areas around the world; California's volcanically active area, Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain; Indonesia's Krakatau eruption in 1883, which was the world's largest historical eruption; Krakatau's ecological contribution to the study of colonization of sterile lands; and central Mexico's Paricutin which was witnessed emerging from a farmer's field in 1943. Three scientists were interviewed for this article.

Tenenbaum, David

1997-01-02

213

Volcano Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Volcano Live contains maps of volcanoes from around the world, a kids' page that provides volcano education links for teachers and students, a volcano glossary, volcano news, links to live video cams of volcanoes, geography and volcano information of countries around the world, and video clips of active volcanoes. There is also information for travelling to volcanoes, a volcano photo section, a section on the destruction of Pompeii, a volcanology section, and volcano safety rules.

Seach, John

214

Changes in the magma system during the 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska, based on GPS measurements  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano was preceded by 6-7 months of immediate precursory inflation, which followed ˜3 years of quiescence during which no significant magma was intruded at shallow depth. Although GPS data for the precursory period are too sparse to derive a unique source model, the data show that either the center of pressurization shifted from its 1997-2005 location during the immediate precursory time interval or the shape of the pressure source changed from a sphere to something else. Deflation during the eruption resulted from a decrease in pressure from a source estimated to be at 2.1 km below sea level using a Mogi model. Although source depth estimates from a Mogi model can be biased due to elastic layering or heterogeneity, the GPS data require the 2008 eruptive source to be shallower than the preeruptive inflation source. During the eruption, the GPS time series indicate three distinct pulses of deflation rather than a single, smoothly decaying process, with the initial pulse being the largest. Reinflation of the volcano commenced within at most 3 weeks after the end of ash emissions and was evident at a near-source site while a far-field site continued to deflate for an additional 4-5 weeks. The asynchronous transition from deflation to inflation, controlled by the distance of the site from the source, indicates that paired deep deflation and shallow inflation is required to explain the observations.

Freymueller, Jeffrey T.; Kaufman, Alexander M.

2010-12-01

215

At-sea observations of marine birds and their habitats before and after the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Kasatochi volcano, an island volcano in the Aleutian chain, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. The resulting ash and pyroclastic flows blanketed the island, covering terrestrial habitats. We surveyed the marine environment surrounding Kasatochi Island in June and July of 2009 to document changes in abundance or distribution of nutrients, fish, and marine birds near the island when compared to patterns observed on earlier surveys conducted in 1996 and 2003. Analysis of SeaWiFS satellite imagery indicated that a large chlorophyll-a anomaly may have been the result of ash fertilization during the eruption. We found no evidence of continuing marine fertilization from terrestrial runoff 10 months after the eruption. At-sea surveys in June 2009 established that the most common species of seabirds at Kasatochi prior to the eruption, namely crested auklets (Aethia cristatella) and least auklets (Aethia pusilla) had returned to Kasatochi in relatively high numbers. Densities from more extensive surveys in July 2009 were compared with pre-eruption densities around Kasatochi and neighboring Ulak and Koniuji islands, but we found no evidence of an eruption effect. Crested and least auklet populations were not significantly reduced by the initial explosion and they returned to attempt breeding in 2009, even though nesting habitat had been rendered unusable. Maps of pre- and post-eruption seabird distribution anomalies indicated considerable variation, but we found no evidence that observed distributions were affected by the 2008 eruption. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

Drew, G.S.; Dragoo, D.E.; Renner, M.; Piatt, J.F.

2010-01-01

216

The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano geodesy  

E-print Network

The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano Volcano Observatory, Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718-0051, United States b Department of Earth's active volcanoes. By their very nature, however, the magmatic reservoirs and conduits

217

A catastrophic flood caused by drainage of a caldera lake at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska, and implications for volcanic hazards assessment  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Aniakchak caldera, located on the Alaska Peninsula of southwest Alaska, formerly contained a large lake (estimated volume 3.7 ?? 109 m3) that rapidly drained as a result of failure of the caldera rim sometime after ca. 3400 yr B.P. The peak discharge of the resulting flood was estimated using three methods: (1) flow-competence equations, (2) step-backwater modeling, and (3) a dam-break model. The results of the dam-break model indicate that the peak discharge at the breach in the caldera rim was at least 7.7 ?? 104 m3 s-1, and the maximum possible discharge was ???1.1 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Flow-competence estimates of discharge, based on the largest boulders transported by the flood, indicate that the peak discharge values, which were a few kilometers downstream of the breach, ranged from 6.4 ?? 105 to 4.8 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Similar but less variable results were obtained by step-backwater modeling. Finally, discharge estimates based on regression equations relating peak discharge to the volume and depth of the impounded water, although limited by constraining assumptions, provide results within the range of values determined by the other methods. The discovery and documentation of a flood, caused by the failure of the caldera rim at Aniakchak caldera, underscore the significance and associated hydrologic hazards of potential large floods at other lake-filled calderas.

Waythomas, C. F.; Walder, J. S.; McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.

1996-01-01

218

Remote Monitoring of Persistent Thermal Features at Volcanoes: A Survey of Alaskan Volcanoes Using Satellite and Airborne Thermal Infrared  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Repeat thermal imaging of volcanoes is important for describing baseline thermal behavior in order to detect future volcanic unrest or eruption precursors. Over 15,000 ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) day and night thermal infrared (TIR) views of Alaskan volcanoes have been acquired since early 2000 revealing many persistent thermal features. This presentation will report results of our ongoing assessment of TIR data for detecting and measuring small (<100m) and/or low-temperature (30 - 100°C) thermal features on volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors the status of volcanoes throughout Alaska and relies heavily on satellite remote sensing. AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) and MODIS (Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensors provide frequent (10-20/day), low-resolution (1 - 8km/pixel) TIR data which are used to detect volcanic emissions and elevated surface temperatures. While these low-resolution data are critical for detecting eruptions and ash clouds, smaller low-temperature features, such as fumaroles, are typically not detected by AVHRR and MODIS TIR. This work augments the existing AVO long-term temperature measurements of background and eruption thermal features observed in low-resolution satellite data by using much higher spatial resolution satellite and ground-based TIR data. ASTER is programmed to acquire several images per year at every volcano on Earth. The ASTER Urgent Request Protocol (URP) provides additional acquisitions via a rapid response system that semi-automates additional volcano views when AVHRR or MODIS detects increased thermal output. ASTER is the only instrument that routinely acquires multiband (5 TIR bands, 8 -12 ?m) high spatial resolution (90-meter) TIR data over volcanic targets. Cloud-free level 2 kinetic temperature products from ASTER acquired from 2000 to 2012 allow us to produce thermal maps and temperature vs. time plots for each target volcano in Alaska. Retrospective analysis of archived ASTER TIR data has revealed subtle, small-scale variations in thermal activity at several Alaskan volcanoes. For example, ASTER TIR data of Pavlof Volcano and Mount Hague, 7 km to the west, show patterns of independent thermal activity. Temperatures slowly increased at Pavlof Volcano before the August 2007 eruption, while temperature slowly decreased on average in the intermittently water-filled Mount Hague crater. ASTER TIR of the Redoubt Volcano summit area detects a gradual increase in both the area and temperature of small gaps in the ice beginning nearly 16 months before the 2009 eruption. Thermal features at several other volcanoes persist at a fairly constant temperature within the error of atmospheric effects. While in some cases infrequent ASTER TIR views are able to detect subtle anomalies, robust, automated detection and early identification of thermal precursors at active volcanoes requires better spatial and temporal resolution. Field-based TIR sensors at select volcanoes provide these data and help validate satellite TIR data. However, new high-resolution multispectral TIR satellite sensors with frequent, at least daily, night and day acquisitions are needed to provide a consistent, long-term synoptic thermal view of every volcano and eruptive activity. The multispectral TIR sensor described in NASA's HyspIRI mission concept could provide essential spaceborne TIR that would help to meet this requirement.

Wessels, R.; Vaughan, R.; Patrick, M. R.; Ramsey, M.

2012-12-01

219

EarthScope: Activity at Augustine Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This bulletin provides information on the recent eruptive activity of Augustine Volcano in Alaska. Topics include some history of the volcano, its geologic setting as part of the Aleutian island arc, and earthquake locations as indicators of magma movement. The bulletin is also accompanied by a 360-degree rotation around the volcano and background information on the EarthScope Project.

2011-06-03

220

Timing, distribution, and character of tephra fall from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska - a progress report  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included one minor and 19 major tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). NEXRAD radar data show that plumes reached heights between 6.7 km (22,000 ft) and 19 km (62,000 ft) asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between <1 and 31 minutes based on the signal duration at a distal seismic station (86 km). From MODIS imagery and field data, we estimate that over 80,000 km2 received at least minor ash fall (>0.8 mm), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80-100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (< 0.8 mm) was reported as far as Fairbanks, 550 km NNE of the volcano. A preliminary total tephra-fall volume (dense-rock equivalent) for magmatic explosions is between 23 Mm3 and 40 Mm3 with a single event maximum of 6.3 Mm3. On March 15, a small (4.6 km, 15,000 ft asl) phreatic explosion containing minor, non-juvenile ash, erupted through the summit ice cap. The first five magmatic explosions (Events 1-5) occurred within a 6-hour period on March 23 (06:34-12:30 UTC). Plumes rose to heights between 5.5 km (18,000 ft) and 14.9 km (49,000 ft) asl during 2- to 20-min-duration explosions, and were dispersed mainly along a NNE trajectory. Trace ash fall was reported as far as Fairbanks. Owing to a shift in wind direction and heavy snowfall during these events, field discrimination among many of these layers was possible. All deposits include a significant percentage of accretionary lapilli, yet only Event 5 deposits contain coarse clasts including ice. The most voluminous tephra fall was deposited on March 24 (Event 6; 03:40 UTC) from a 15 minute explosion that sent a plume to 18 km (60,000) asl, and dispersed tephra to the WNW. Within 10 km of the vent, this deposit contains 1-10 cm pumice clasts in a matrix of 1-2 mm accretionary lapilli. An anomalous mass-per-unit-area contour extending to the NNW, defined by dense lapilli, may represent a blast trajectory associated with Event 6. Events 7-9 (March 26, 16:34-March 27, 07:47 UTC) sent plumes between 6.7 km (22,000 ft) and 19 km (62,000 ft) asl. Ash fell along a broad swath to the ESE, covering communities along the Kenai Peninsula with up to 1 mm of ash. Explosion durations were highly variable (<1, 11, and <1 min respectively). Deposits within 10 km of the vent include pumice clasts up to 3 cm in a matrix of 1-2 mm accretionary lapilli. Events 10-18 (March 27, 08:28 UTC-March 29, 3:23 UTC) sent plumes between 5 km (17,000 ft) and 15.5 km (51,000 ft) asl during short-duration explosions (2-10 min). Ash clouds dispersed along trajectories to the NE, ENE and N. Ash fall from Event 17 impacted the upper Kenai Peninsula and the city of Anchorage with up to 1 mm accumulation. The Ted Stevens International Airport temporarily closed on March 28-29. On April 4 (13:58 UTC), the last explosion to date, lasted 31 minutes and sent ash to 15 km (50,000 ft) asl. The cloud dispersed to the SE along a narrow trajectory and up to 1.5 mm of ash fell on the lower Kenai Peninsula and Seldovia.

Wallace, K. L.; Schaefer, J. R.

2009-12-01

221

High resolution satellite and airborne thermal infrared (TIR) imaging of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We use a combination of satellite and airborne high-resolution thermal infrared (TIR) image data to detect and measure changes at Redoubt Volcano before and during the 2008-2009 unrest. Changes in fumarole activity and reports of H2S odors were first noted at Redoubt late in the summer of 2008. The permanently ice-covered stratovolcano began to develop persistent areas of steaming through holes and crevasses in the ice-filled summit crater during the remainder of 2008 until late January 2009. On 23 January, mudflows began to sporadically discharge from below the summit fumaroles down the Drift Glacier and into the Drift River as the level of seismicity and gas emissions rose significantly. A phreatic explosion on 15 March was followed one week later (22 March- 4 April) by a series of at least 19 magmatic explosive events that produced high-altitude ash clouds, pyroclastic flows, and lahars. After 4 April the eruption extruded a large blocky lava dome that continued to grow until at least mid-June 2009. 202 satellite TIR images from ASTER and Landsats 5 and 7 were acquired over the volcano from September 2007 - August 2009. ASTER has five TIR bands at 90-m resolution while Landsat 5 and 7 have one broadband TIR band at 120-m and 60-m resolution, respectively. A survey of ASTER nighttime TIR data before September 2007 detected no obvious thermal features at the summit of Redoubt from 2000 to late 2007. A satellite thermal feature first appears in nighttime ASTER TIR in November 2007. The feature is observed intermittently until late spring 2008. Starting in October 2008, the time-series of high resolution satellite thermal infrared and airborne TIR shows the summit thermal features persisted with gradual increases in the temperatures and areal extent until the magmatic explosion on 22 March 2009. Ash plumes obscured the summit during the explosions. During the post-4 April dome-building phase of the eruption, the satellite TIR data show persistent high thermal emission from the slowly growing dome and the hot talus below. Airborne TIR (FLIR) images from 11 AVO field missions flown between November 2008 and August 2009 provide higher resolution details of the thermal features. The first FLIR data from November 2008 document two summit areas and a waterfall near the base of the volcano with elevated temperatures as high as 31°C above the background. A February 2009 FLIR survey showed that the thermal features persisted with more warm rock exposed and warmer temperatures. A 31 March FLIR survey captured a brief glimpse of a lava dome through a thick ash plume. FLIR surveys after 4 April document the gradual growth and distribution of active spalling and cracks on the current lava dome. The FLIR data also provided a way to measure the dimensions of the dome and the largest blocks. The most recent FLIR data from 20 August show that portions of the southeast flank of the dome still have temperatures over 350°C. Though July and August photogrammetry suggests that dome growth has stopped, incandescence detected in nighttime AVO webcam images suggest higher temperature lava has been exposed during small rock falls as recently as 23 August, 2009.

Wessels, R. L.; Bull, K. F.; McGimsey, R. G.; Diefenbach, A. K.; Coombs, M. L.; Schneider, D. J.

2009-12-01

222

Temporal and spatial variation of local stress fields before and after the 1992 eruptions of Crater Peak vent, Mount Spurr volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We searched for changes in local stress-field orientation at Mount Spurr volcano, Alaska, between August 1991 and December 2001. This study focuses on the stress-field orientation beneath Crater Peak vent, the site of three eruptions in 1992, and beneath the summit of Mount Spurr. Local stress tensors were calculated by inverting subsets of 140 fault-plane solutions for earthquakes beneath Crater Peak and 96 fault-plane solutions for earthquakes beneath Mount Spurr. We also calculated an upper-crustal regional stress tensor by inverting fault-plane solutions for 66 intraplate earthquakes located near Mount Spurr during 1991-2001. Prior to the 1992 eruptions, and for 11 months beginning with a posteruption seismic swarm, the axis of maximum compressive stress beneath Crater Peak was subhorizontal and oriented N67-76??E, approximately perpendicular to the regional axis of maximum compressive stress (N43??W). The strong temporal correlation between this horizontal stress-field rotation (change in position of the ??1/ ??3 axes relative to regional stress) and magmatic activity indicates that the rotation was related to magmatic activity, and we suggest that the Crater Peak stress-field rotation resulted from pressurization of a network of dikes. During the entire study period, the stress field beneath the summit of Mount Spurr also differed from the regional stress tensor and was characterized by a vertical axis of maximum compressive stress. We suggest that slip beneath Mount Spurr's summit occurs primarily on a major normal fault in response to a combination of gravitational loading, hydrothermal circulation, and magmatic processes beneath Crater Peak. Online material: Regional and local fault-plane solutions.

Roman, D.C.; Moran, S.C.; Power, J.A.; Cashman, K.V.

2004-01-01

223

Deep magmatic degassing versus scrubbing: Elevated CO2 emissions and C/S in the lead-up to the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We report CO2, SO2, and H2S emission rates and C/S ratios during the five months leading up to the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. CO2emission rates up to 9018 t/d and C/S ratios ?30 measured in the months prior to the eruption were critical for fully informed forecasting efforts. Observations of ice-melt rates, meltwater discharge, and water chemistry suggest that surface waters represented drainage from surficial, perched reservoirs of condensed magmatic steam and glacial meltwater. These fluids scrubbed only a few hundred tonnes/day of SO2, not the >2100 t/d SO2expected from degassing of magma in the mid- to upper crust (3-6.5 km), where petrologic analysis shows the final magmatic equilibration occurred. All data are consistent with upflow of a CO2-rich magmatic gas for at least 5 months prior to eruption, and minimal scrubbing of SO2by near-surface groundwater. The high C/S ratios observed could reflect bulk degassing of mid-crustal magma followed by nearly complete loss of SO2in a deep magmatic-hydrothermal system. Alternatively, high C/S ratios could be attributed to decompressional degassing of low silica andesitic magma that intruded into the mid-crust in the 5 months prior to eruption, thereby mobilizing the pre-existing high silica andesite magma or mush in this region. The latter scenario is supported by several lines of evidence, including deep long-period earthquakes (-28 to -32 km) prior to and during the eruption, and far-field deformation following the onset of eruptive activity.

Werner, Cynthia; Evans, William C.; Kelly, Peter J.; McGimsey, Robert; Pfeffer, Melissa; Doukas, Michael; Neal, Christina

2012-03-01

224

Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes  

SciTech Connect

Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

Barrat, J. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (USA))

1989-01-01

225

Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

1986-05-01

226

Punctuated Evolution of Volcanology: An Observatory Perspective  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanology from the perspective of crisis prediction and response-the primary function of volcano observatories-is influenced both by steady technological advances and singular events that lead to rapid changes in methodology and procedure. The former can be extrapolated somewhat, while the latter are surprises or shocks. Predictable advances include the conversion from analog to digital systems and the exponential growth of computing capacity and data storage. Surprises include eruptions such as 1980 Mount St Helens, 1985 Nevado del Ruiz, 1989-1990 Redoubt, 1991 Pinatubo, and 2010 Eyjafjallajokull; the opening of GPS to civilian applications, and the advent of an open Russia. Mount St Helens switched the rationale for volcanology in the USGS from geothermal energy to volcano hazards, Ruiz and Pinatubo emphasized the need for international cooperation for effective early warning, Redoubt launched the effort to monitor even remote volcanoes for purposes of aviation safety, and Eyjafjallajokull hammered home the need for improved ash-dispersion and engine-tolerance models; better GPS led to a revolution in volcano geodesy, and the new Russian Federation sparked an Alaska-Kamchatka scientific exchange. The pattern has been that major funding increases for volcano hazards occur after these unpredictable events, which suddenly expose a gap in capabilities, rather than out of a calculated need to exploit technological advances or meet a future goal of risk mitigation. It is up to the observatory and national volcano hazard program to leverage these sudden funding increases into a long-term, sustainable business model that incorporates both the steadily increasing costs of staff and new technology and prepares for the next volcano crisis. Elements of the future will also include the immediate availability on the internet of all publically-funded volcano data, and subscribable, sophisticated hazard alert systems that run computational, fluid dynamic eruption models. These models will be coupled with risk assessments in which the parameters are adjusted to an emerging situation, while accessing global eruption databases in order to construct eruption event trees with statistically sound probabilities. Design of these alert systems will necessarily require the joint input of scientists and emergency management leaders. All of this can be visualized now, and programs such as VHub, WOVOdat, and NVEWS are working towards its eventual reality. Technological advances will make possible in a crisis the tapping of a global pool of expertise, which may have the effect of diminishing the importance of observatories as physical entities-however, familiarity with the nearby, monitored volcanoes and impacted populations will always require their presence. What is also clear about the future is that there must be more international communication and cooperation. We do this quite well scientifically, but not so well in terms of observatory operations or best practices. While parallel paths can be stimulating through diversity and competition, there is no need for every national program to separately invent the wheel. Changes will also need to be made in institutional expectations of scientists, which currently overemphasize solitary achievement at the expense of community efforts.

Burton, W. C.; Eichelberger, J. C.

2010-12-01

227

Evidence for Deep Tectonic Tremor in the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We search for, characterize, and locate tremor not associated with volcanoes along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone using continuous seismic data recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and Alaska Earthquake Information Center from 2005 to the present. Visual inspection of waveform spectra and time series reveal dozens of 10 to 20-minute bursts of tremor throughout the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone (Peterson, 2009). Using autocorrelation methods, we show that these tremor signals are composed of hundreds of repeating low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) as has been found in other circum-Pacific subduction zones. We infer deep sources based on phase arrival move-out times of less than 4 seconds across multiple monitoring networks (max. inter-station distances of 50 km), which are designed to monitor individual volcanoes. We find tremor activity is localized in 7 segments: Cook Inlet, Shelikof Strait, Alaska Peninsula, King Cove, Unalaska-Dutch Harbor, Andreanof Islands, and the Rat Islands. Locations along the Cook Inlet, Shelikof Straight and Alaska Peninsula are well constrained due to adequate station coverage. LFE hypocenters in these regions are located on the plate interface and form a sharp edge near the down-dip limit of the 1964 M 9.2 rupture area. Although the geometry, age, thermal structure, frictional and other relevant properties of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction are poorly known, it is likely these characteristics differ along its entire length, and also differ from other subduction zones where tremor has been found. LFE hypocenters in the remaining areas are also located down-dip of the most recent M 8+ megathrust earthquakes, between 60-75 km depth and almost directly under the volcanic arc. Although these locations are less well constrained, our preliminary results suggest LFE/tremor activity marks the down-dip rupture limit for megathrust earthquakes in this subduction zone. Also, we cannot rule out the possibility that our observations could be related deep magmatic processes.

Brown, J. R.; Prejean, S. G.; Beroza, G. C.; Gomberg, J. S.; Haeussler, P. J.

2010-12-01

228

Mount St. Helens VolcanoCam  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This webcam shows a static image of Mount St. Helens taken from the Johnston Ridge Observatory. The Observatory and VolcanoCam are located at an elevation of approximately 4,500 feet, about five miles from the volcano. The observer is looking approximately south-southeast across the North Fork Toutle River Valley. The VolcanoCam image automatically updates approximately every five minutes. Other features include current conditions reports, weather updates, an image achive, and eruption movies. In addition, there are frequently asked questions, and information about using the VolcanoCam image and funding for the VolcanoCam.

229

Depths of Magma Reservoirs Inferred from Preeruptive Dissolved Volatiles in the Most Recent Postcaldera Eruptions of Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Aniakchak volcano, 670 km southwest of Anchorage in the Aleutian arc, erupted rhyodacite and andesite in its caldera-forming eruption ~3500 B.P. Numerous small-volume postcaldera eruptions produced basaltic andesite to dacite. Chemical analyses of melt inclusions (MI) trapped in phenocrysts in pumice and scoria yield estimates of dissolved magmatic volatile concentrations before Aniakchak's three most recent eruptions. Preeruptive H2O and CO2 concentrations constrain magma storage depths. Valid depth estimates require that MI are representative of magma storage environment, MI did not leak or crystallize, and crystals grew in vapor-saturated host magma. MI were analyzed in plagioclase from the compositionally similar dacitic eruptions of Half Cone ( ~400 B.P.; n=13) and 1931 (n=20), and in olivine (Fo71-74) from the intervening basaltic andesitic eruption of Blocky Cone (n=22). Although microscopic textures show that phenocrysts had complex growth histories, compositional data suggest that many intact MI preserve magma storage depth information. Concentrations of major elements, S, Cl, and F in MI were determined by electron microprobe. H2O and CO2 were measured by infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). CO2 below the ~20 ppm FTIR detection limit in all MI, and co-variation of S and H2O, indicate crystallization during passive, open-system degassing at a range of depths in the upper crust. Halogen concentrations increase with differentiation in both dacitic and basaltic andesitic MI. Concentrations of Cl ( ~1800 ppm) and F (400-500 ppm) in dacitic MI are typical of evolved arc magmas and could have been generated by fractional crystallization of basaltic andesite of Blocky Cone. Because these elements are not strongly partitioned into hydrous vapor relative to silicate melt and are incompatible in observed crystals, they become enriched in residual melts as crystallization proceeds. Weighted mean H2O values for dacites (2.9, 4.1 wt.%) yield trapping pressures of 60 MPa (2.8 km) for the 400 B.P. and 110 MPa (5.1 km) for the 1931 magmas. MI from basaltic andesite of Blocky Cone show a large range in H2O concentrations (up to 2.7 wt.%) and only the highest are likely to represent magmatic conditions at depth. These MI indicate depths similar to the 400 B.P. dacite, suggesting that basaltic andesitic magma ascended to ~3 km, where significant phenocryst growth took place, perhaps in response to ejection of a relatively large amount of dacitic magma in the preceding Half Cone and nearby Vent Mountain eruptions. Aniakchak rock and mineral chemistries show that many postcaldera eruptions ejected dacite plus recharge andesite or basaltic andesite. The MI data indicate that mixing to form coeval hybrid andesites occurred at depths <5 km.

Bacon, C. R.

2002-05-01

230

Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2009  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between January 1 and December 31, 2009, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 8,829 earthquakes, of which 7,438 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. Monitoring highlights in 2009 include the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, as well as unrest at Okmok Caldera, Shishaldin Volcano, and Mount Veniaminof. Additionally severe seismograph subnetwork outages resulted in four volcanoes (Aniakchak, Fourpeaked, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being removed from the formal list of monitored volcanoes in late 2009. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2009; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2009; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2009, and a dataless SEED volume for the AVO seismograph network.

Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

2010-01-01

231

Particle aggregation in volcanic clouds from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska: Observations of Doppler weather radar, satellite images and tephra-fall deposits  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The combined use of weather radar and thermal infrared satellite images provides complementary evidence that can be used to observe and interpret tephra-fall processes. Radar is ideal for characterizing coarse-grained tephra in the eruption column and proximal cloud, while thermal infrared satellite data are better able to characterize the fine-grained distal volcanic cloud. We present observations of radar, satellite images, and character of the tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. Accretionary tephra-ice pellets (up to 9 mm in diameter) comprised of fine-grained ash (less than 63 micron diameter) were abundant in the many of the proximal tephra-fall deposits. The eruption column and proximal cloud from seventeen explosive events were observed using the MiniMax-250C (MM-250C) volcano-monitoring Doppler weather radar located 80 km from the vent. Radar reflectivity and radial Doppler velocity measurements were made of the column, every 70-90 seconds at a vertical resolution of about 2 km. Radar reflectivity is highly dependent upon particle size and to a lesser extent, concentration. At 80 km distance, the minimum detectable particle diameter for the MM-250C was about 0.2 mm for a mass concentration of 100 g/m3. Thus, the radar was able to observe the aggregate pellets, and not the fine-grained ash. Most of the explosive events were characterized by high radar reflectivity values of 50-60 dBZ in the central core of the eruption column and proximal cloud, which we interpret to be related to the rapid growth of accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Tephra-fall deposits extended for distances of several hundred kilometers and mapped to a minimum mass density of 10 g/m2. However, the MM-250C radar data were only able to observe the dispersed cloud for tens of kilometers from the source, which was well within the 1000 g/m2 isomass contour. Fine-grained ash was prematurely removed from the eruption cloud in proximal locations due to aggregate formation. The relative lack of fine-grained ash may account for the poor thermal infrared brightness temperature signals observed in satellite images for many of the distal volcanic clouds from the 2009 eruption, and possibly from the 1989-90 eruption as well. Time-series of radial Doppler velocity images documented the transition from turbulent mixing in the column to larger scale entrainment within the proximal cloud. Large scale entrainment begins to develop within minutes of eruption onset. Most of the eruption clouds from the explosive events reached the stratosphere, but the large scale entrainment appears to be better developed in the tropospheric portion of the cloud.

Schneider, D. J.; Wallace, K. L.; Mastin, L. G.

2012-12-01

232

A numerical investigation of choked flow dynamics and its application to the triggering mechanism of long-period events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

We use numerical simulations of transonic flow through a crack to study the dynamics of the formation of shock waves downstream from a nozzle-like constriction inside the crack. The model solves the full set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions via an explicit multifield finite difference representation. The crack walls are assumed to be perfectly rigid, and elastic coupling to the solid is not considered. The simulations demonstrate how the behavior of unsteady shock waves near the walls can produce recurring step-like pressure transients in the flow, which in turn induce resonance of the fluid-filled crack. The motion of the shock waves is governed primarily by smooth, low-amplitude pressure fluctuations at the outlet of the crack. The force induced on the walls scales with the amplitude of the shock, which is a function of the magnitude of the inlet pressure, aperture of the constriction, and thickness of the boundary layer. The applied force also scales in proportion to the spatial extent of the shock excursion, which depends on the fluctuation rate of outlet pressure. Using the source parameters of long-period (LP) events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, as a guide for our simulations, we infer that coupling of the shock to the walls occurs for crack inlet to outlet pressure ratios pipo > 2.31 and that the position of the shock front becomes most sensitive to outlet pressure fluctuations for flow regimes with pipo > 2.48. For such regimes, fluctuations of outlet pressure of up to ??0.5 MPa at rates up to 3 MPa/s are sufficient to induce pressure transients with magnitudes up to 12.5 MPa over 0.1-2.5 m of the walls within ???0.5 s. These flow parameters may be adequate for triggering the LP events in the precursory swarm to the December 14, 1989, eruption of Redoubt. According to the flow model the recurrence rate and amplitudes of LP events are inferred to be a manifestation of the response of a shallow hydrothermal reservoir to the sustained injection of superheated steam from a magma column roofing below this reservoir.

Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

1997-01-01

233

Super Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Deep beneath the surface of Earth lies one of the most destructive and yet least understood of the natural forces on the planet: the super volcano. This radio broadcast presents discussions with scientists at Yellowstone National Park who are investigating this potentially devastating natural phenomenon. Yellowstone National Park is one of the largest supervolcanoes in the world. It last erupted 640,000 years ago and scientists are now predicting that the next eruption may not be far off. To discover more, a new volcanic observatory has been built in the park to monitor the extreme volcanic activity going on beneath the surface of this much visited destination. The broadcast is 30 minutes in length.

234

Integrating SAR with Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Operational Near Real-Time Volcano Monitoring  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanic eruptions are among the most significant hazards to human society, capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have become established in operational forecasting, monitoring, and managing of volcanic hazards. Monitoring organizations, like the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), are nowadays heavily relying on remote sensing data from a variety of optical and thermal sensors to provide time-critical hazard information. Despite the high utilization of these remote sensing data to detect and monitor volcanic eruptions, the presence of clouds and a dependence on solar illumination often limit their impact on decision making processes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are widely believed to be superior to optical sensors in operational monitoring situations, due to the weather and illumination independence of their observations and the sensitivity of SAR to surface changes and deformation. Despite these benefits, the contributions of SAR to operational volcano monitoring have been limited in the past due to (1) high SAR data costs, (2) traditionally long data processing times, and (3) the low temporal sampling frequencies inherent to most SAR systems. In this study, we present improved data access, data processing, and data integration techniques that mitigate some of the above mentioned limitations and allow, for the first time, a meaningful integration of SAR into operational volcano monitoring systems. We will introduce a new database interface that was developed in cooperation with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and allows for rapid and seamless data access to all of ASF's SAR data holdings. We will also present processing techniques that improve the temporal frequency with which hazard-related products can be produced. These techniques take advantage of modern signal processing technology as well as new radiometric normalization schemes, both enabling the combination of multiple observation geometries in change detection procedures. Additionally, it will be shown how SAR-based hazard information can be integrated with data from optical satellites, thermal sensors, webcams and models to create near-real time volcano hazard information. We will introduce a prototype monitoring system that integrates SAR-based hazard information into the near real-time volcano hazard monitoring system of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. This prototype system was applied to historic eruptions of the volcanoes Okmok and Augustine, both located in the North Pacific. We will show that for these historic eruptions, the addition of SAR data lead to a significant improvement in activity detection and eruption monitoring, and improved the accuracy and timeliness of eruption alerts.

Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Arko, S. A.; McAlpin, D. B.

2013-12-01

235

Alaska Science Forum  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Alaska Science Forum Web site is provided by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The forum consists of articles written about various science subjects by scientists from the Geophysical Institute. Categories include the aurora, earthquakes, fun science facts, historic Alaska, mountains, rocks and geology, volcanoes, weather, and more. One of the latest articles, by Ned Rozell, is titled: Bogs, Permafrost and the Global Carbon Equation. Each of the articles is listed along with the author's name and a direct link to the online publication, most of which are fairly short and geared towards nonscientists making reading easy and interesting. [JAB

236

PUBLICATIONS OF THE VOLCANO HAZARDS PROGRAM 1999-2003  

E-print Network

PUBLICATIONS OF THE VOLCANO HAZARDS PROGRAM 1999-2003 2003 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS;3 Volcano Hazards Bibliography 1999-2003 Adleman, Jennifer, 2002, The great eruption of 1912: Alaska Park

Torgersen, Christian

237

Pattern Recognition from Long Period Earthquake Swarms, Redoubt Volcano, AK  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Long-period earthquake swarms are common indicators of volcanic unrest and can be used to predict eruptions. However, not all earthquake swarms lead to an eruption but may die off instead. Variabilities in characteristics of swarms can false predict eruptions. During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano in Alaska, there were five long-period earthquake swarms, three of which preceded explosive eruptions and two that did not. These data were used to find the variable characteristics that could determine whether or not an eruption is imminent. Data were recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory throughout the eruption. Band-pass filtering removed unwanted frequencies outside the long-period earthquake range of about 0.5-5.0 Hz. The onset of long-period earthquakes were cataloged and used to find features that varied between swarms. Duration times of individual events were calculated using the Arias Intensity. The power spectrum of the autocorrelation was used to determine central frequencies and shape factor values for each swarm. Earthquake swarms that preceded eruptions had shorter duration times, higher central frequencies, and lower shape factor values than swarms that did not precede eruptions. Features that did not change based on eruption outcome included the time between events and the peak frequency from a low-order autocorrelation power spectrum.

Carlisle, C.

2012-12-01

238

Deep low-frequency earthquakes in tectonic tremor along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We characterize and locate tremor not associated with volcanoes along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone using continuous seismic data recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the Alaska Earthquake Information Center from 2005 to present. Visual inspection of waveform spectra and time series reveal dozens of 10 to 20 min bursts of tremor along the length of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone. We use autocorrelation to demonstrate that these tremor signals are composed of hundreds of repeating low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs). The tremor activity we characterize is localized in four segments, from east to west: Kodiak Island, Shumagin Gap, Unalaska, and Andreanof Islands. Although the geometry, age, thermal structure, frictional, and other relevant properties of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone are poorly known, these characteristics are likely to differ systematically from east to west. Locations near Kodiak Island are the most reliable because station coverage is more complete. LFE hypocenters in this region are located on the plate interface near the down-dip limit of the 1964 Mw 9.2 Alaska earthquake rupture area. LFE hypocenters in the remaining areas along the arc are also located down-dip of the most recent Mw 8+ megathrust earthquakes. Although these locations are less well constrained, our results support the hypothesis that tremor activity marks the down-dip rupture limit for great megathrust earthquakes in this subduction zone. Lastly, there is no correlation between the presence of tremor and particular aspects of over-riding or subducting plate geology or coupling. It appears that LFEs are a fundamental characteristic of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone.

Brown, Justin R.; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Beroza, Gregory C.; Gomberg, Joan S.; Haeussler, Peter J.

2013-03-01

239

Reunion Island Volcano Erupts  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

On January 16, 2002, lava that had begun flowing on January 5 from the Piton de la Fournaise volcano on the French island of Reunion abruptly decreased, marking the end of the volcano's most recent eruption. These false color MODIS images of Reunion, located off the southeastern coast of Madagascar in the Indian Ocean, were captured on the last day of the eruption (top) and two days later (bottom). The volcano itself is located on the southeast side of the island and is dark brown compared to the surrounding green vegetation. Beneath clouds (light blue) and smoke, MODIS detected the hot lava pouring down the volcano's flanks into the Indian Ocean. The heat, detected by MODIS at 2.1 um, has been colored red in the January 16 image, and is absent from the lower image, taken two days later on January 18, suggesting the lava had cooled considerably even in that short time. Earthquake activity on the northeast flank continued even after the eruption had stopped, but by January 21 had dropped to a sufficiently low enough level that the 24-hour surveillance by the local observatory was suspended. Reunion is essentially all volcano, with the northwest portion of the island built on the remains of an extinct volcano, and the southeast half built on the basaltic shield of 8,630-foot Piton de la Fournaise. A basaltic shield volcano is one with a broad, gentle slope built by the eruption of fluid basalt lava. Basalt lava flows easily across the ground remaining hot and fluid for long distances, and so they often result in enormous, low-angle cones. The Piton de la Fournaise is one of Earth's most active volcanoes, erupting over 150 times in the last few hundred years, and it has been the subject of NASA research because of its likeness to the volcanoes of Mars. Image courtesy Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC

2002-01-01

240

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS Since about 1700, when written records began  

E-print Network

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS Since about 1700, when written records began to be kept for Alaska, more than 230 eruptions have been reported from volcanoes there. Most Peninsula, and Cook Inlet. In 1988, the Alaska Volcano Observa- tory (AVO)--a cooperative effort of the U

Torgersen, Christian

241

Volcano Live  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The volocanologist John Seach provides the latest volcano news and information on volcanoes all across the world. The website provides fun hands-on activities, tutorials in volcano safety and volcanology, and a glossary. Students can discover the geography of many areas of the world and how it impacts the likelihood of volcanic eruptions. Users can find links to numerous volcano cameras and maps. The amazing images of volcanoes from Seach's expeditions are a great addition to this informative site.

242

New Millennium Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The New Millennium Observatory (NeMO) is a seafloor observatory at Axial Seamount, an active underwater volcano located about 250 miles off the coast of the northwest United States. The observatory studies the relationships between submarine volcanic activity, the chemistry of seafloor hotsprings, and the biological communities that depend on them. Materials available at the NeMO web site include updates from observatory expeditions, videos and animations, and an interactive feature that lets users pilot a simulated remotely operated vehicle to explore the seamount. The NeMO curriculum page features a unit, with activities, in which students investigate a swarm of small earthquakes and the disappearance of an instrument. A volcanic eruption occurred at Axial in January 1998, destroying some hydrothermal vent sites and creating new ones. Since then NeMO scientists have been assessing the impact of the eruption and documenting the ongoing changes in Axial's summit caldera.

2004-09-24

243

USGS Photo glossary of volcano terms  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website, part of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, can help users distinguish among various types of volcanoes, vents, eruption types, and ejected material. The site features an extensive list of volcanic vocabulary, along with photographs and text for each entry. Users can also check out the latest U.S. volcanic activity reported by the USGS volcano observatories, which are linked to the page.

Usgs

244

Magnetotelluric Investigations of the Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii  

Microsoft Academic Search

A collaborative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Electromagnetic Instruments and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory has undertaken a three-dimensional (3D) magnetotelluric (MT) study of the Kilauea volcano in Hawaii. The survey objectives are 1): to produce a high quality 3D MT data set over the central caldera and the eastern and southwestern rift zones, 2) to

G. Hoversten; G. A. Newman; E. Gasperikova; J. P. Kauahikaua

2002-01-01

245

Alaska Museum of Natural History  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Ever wanted to have your own volcano laboratory, but didn't want to clean up all that lava? Be a super-scientist and create your own volcano online. The Alaska Museum of Natural History is dedicated to the study and exhibition of Alaskaâs natural history and to promoting and developing educational programs which benefit students and enrich the curricula of schools and universities. The Museum focuses on Alaska's unique geological, cultural, and ecological history. In addition to Make Your Own Volcano, the website offers extensive links, resources and educational modules including Kids Activity Sheets, Dinosaurs of Alaska, the Broken Mammoth Archeological Site, and Dinosaur Tracks, which explores the information that can be gleaned from the study of footprints.

246

Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano  

SciTech Connect

On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

2008-11-01

247

Standardisation of the USGS Volcano Alert Level System (VALS): analysis and ramifications  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The standardisation of volcano early warning systems (VEWS) and volcano alert level systems (VALS) is becoming increasingly common at both the national and international level, most notably following UN endorsement of the development of globally comprehensive early warning systems. Yet, the impact on its effectiveness, of standardising an early warning system (EWS), in particular for volcanic hazards, remains largely unknown and little studied. This paper examines this and related issues through evaluation of the emergence and implementation, in 2006, of a standardised United States Geological Survey (USGS) VALS. Under this upper-management directive, all locally developed alert level systems or practices at individual volcano observatories were replaced with a common standard. Research conducted at five USGS-managed volcano observatories in Alaska, Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley and Yellowstone explores the benefits and limitations this standardisation has brought to each observatory. The study concludes (1) that the process of standardisation was predominantly triggered and shaped by social, political, and economic factors, rather than in response to scientific needs specific to each volcanic region; and (2) that standardisation is difficult to implement for three main reasons: first, the diversity and uncertain nature of volcanic hazards at different temporal and spatial scales require specific VEWS to be developed to address this and to accommodate associated stakeholder needs. Second, the plural social contexts within which each VALS is embedded present challenges in relation to its applicability and responsiveness to local knowledge and context. Third, the contingencies of local institutional dynamics may hamper the ability of a standardised VALS to effectively communicate a warning. Notwithstanding these caveats, the concept of VALS standardisation clearly has continuing support. As a consequence, rather than advocating further commonality of a standardised VALS, we recommend adoption of a less prescriptive VALS that is scalable and sufficiently flexible for use by local stakeholders via standardised communication products designed to accommodate local contingency, while also adhering to national policy.

Fearnley, C. J.; McGuire, W. J.; Davies, G.; Twigg, J.

2012-11-01

248

Decade Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In the 1990s, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior started the Decade Volcano Project. As part of their work, they designated sixteen volcanoes particularly worthy of study "because of their explosive histories and close proximity to human populations." The group recently teamed up with National Geographic to create a guide to these volcanoes via this interactive map. Navigating through the map, visitors can learn about Mount Rainier, Colima, Galeras, Santorini, and other prominent volcanoes. For each volcano, there's a brief sketch that gives the date of its last eruption, its elevation, nearby population centers, and a photograph.

249

Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 1. Intereruption deformation, 1997-2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Starting soon after the 1997 eruption at Okmok volcano and continuing until the start of the 2008 eruption, magma accumulated in a storage zone centered ˜3.5 km beneath the caldera floor at a rate that varied with time. A Mogi-type point pressure source or finite sphere with a radius of 1 km provides an adequate fit to the deformation field portrayed in time-sequential interferometric synthetic aperture radar images. From the end of the 1997 eruption through summer 2004, magma storage increased by 3.2-4.5 × 107 m3, which corresponds to 75-85% of the magma volume erupted in 1997. Thereafter, the average magma supply rate decreased such that by 10 July 2008, 2 days before the start of the 2008 eruption, magma storage had increased by 3.7-5.2 × 107 m3 or 85-100% of the 1997 eruption volume. We propose that the supply rate decreased in response to the diminishing pressure gradient between the shallow storage zone and a deeper magma source region. Eventually the effects of continuing magma supply and vesiculation of stored magma caused a critical pressure threshold to be exceeded, triggering the 2008 eruption. A similar pattern of initially rapid inflation followed by oscillatory but generally slowing inflation was observed prior to the 1997 eruption. In both cases, withdrawal of magma during the eruptions depressurized the shallow storage zone, causing significant volcano-wide subsidence and initiating a new intereruption deformation cycle.

Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel; Biggs, Juliet; Wicks, Charles; McNutt, Steve

2010-05-01

250

Volcano Types  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site lists the basic types of volcanoes: scoria cone, shield volcano, and stratovolcano. Each is described in terms of shape, composition, and eruption type, and links are available to additional information. Subordinate types listed include fissure eruptions, spatter cones, hornitos, and hydrovolcanic eruptions. The site also explains when a volcano is considered active, dormant, or extinct. In addition, generic features such as vent, central vent, edifice, magma chamber, parasitic cones, and fumaroles are listed and described.

Camp, Victor

251

VOLCANO DEFORMATION AND SUBDAILY GPS PRODUCTS Ronni Grapenthin  

E-print Network

VOLCANO DEFORMATION AND SUBDAILY GPS PRODUCTS By Ronni Grapenthin RECOMMENDED: Advisory Committee and Mathematics Dean of the Graduate School Date #12;VOLCANO DEFORMATION AND SUBDAILY GPS PRODUCTS A DISSERTATION for the Degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY By Ronni Grapenthin, Dipl.-Inf. Fairbanks, Alaska August 2012 #12;iii

Grapenthin, Ronni

252

2009 ERUPTION OF REDOUBT VOLCANO: Lahars, Oil, and the Role of Science in Hazards Mitigation (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In March, 2009, Redoubt Volcano erupted for the third time in 45 years. More than 19 explosions produced ash plumes to 60,000 ft asl, lahar flows of mud and ice down the Drift river ~30 miles to the coast, and tephra fall up to 1.5 mm onto surrounding communities. The eruption had severe impact on many operations. Airlines were forced to cancel or divert hundreds of international and domestic passenger and cargo flights, and Anchorage International airport closed for over 12 hours. Mudflows and floods down the Drift River to the coast impacted operations at the Drift River Oil Terminal (DROT) which was forced to shut down and ultimately be evacuated. Prior mitigation efforts to protect the DROT oil tank farm from potential impacts associated with a major eruptive event were successful, and none of the 148,000 barrels of oil stored at the facility was spilled or released. Nevertheless, the threat of continued eruptive activity at Redoubt, with the possibility of continued lahar flows down the Drift River alluvial fan, required an incident command post be established so that the US Coast Guard, Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation, and the Cook Inlet Pipeline Company could coordinate a response to the potential hazards. Ultimately, the incident command team relied heavily on continuous real-time data updates from the Alaska Volcano Observatory, as well as continuous geologic interpretations and risk analysis by the USGS Volcanic Hazards group, the State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, all members of the collaborative effort of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The great success story that unfolded attests to the efforts of the incident command team, and their reliance on real-time scientific analysis from scientific experts. The positive results also highlight how pre-disaster mitigation and monitoring efforts, in concert with hazards response planning, can be used in a cooperative industry / multi-agency effort to positively affect hazards mitigation. The final outcomes from this potentially disastrous event included: 1) no on-site personnel were injured; 2) no detrimental environmental impacts associated with the oil terminal occurred; and 3) incident command personnel, together with numerous industry representatives, were able to make well-informed, although costly decisions that resulted in safe removal of the oil from the storage facilities. The command team’s efforts also furthered the process of restarting the Cook Inlet oil production after a forced five month shutdown.

Swenson, R.; Nye, C. J.

2009-12-01

253

Earthquake classification, location, and error analysis in a volcanic environment: implications for the magmatic system of the 1989-1990 eruptions at redoubt volcano, Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Determination of the precise locations of seismic events associated with the 1989-1990 eruptions of Redoubt Volcano posed a number of problems, including poorly known crustal velocities, a sparse station distribution, and an abundance of events with emergent phase onsets. In addition, the high relief of the volcano could not be incorporated into the hypoellipse earthquake location algorithm. This algorithm was modified to allow hypocenters to be located above the elevation of the seismic stations. The velocity model was calibrated on the basis of a posteruptive seismic survey, in which four chemical explosions were recorded by eight stations of the permanent network supplemented with 20 temporary seismographs deployed on and around the volcanic edifice. The model consists of a stack of homogeneous horizontal layers; setting the top of the model at the summit allows events to be located anywhere within the volcanic edifice. Detailed analysis of hypocentral errors shows that the long-period (LP) events constituting the vigorous 23-hour swarm that preceded the initial eruption on December 14 could have originated from a point 1.4 km below the crater floor. A similar analysis of LP events in the swarm preceding the major eruption on January 2 shows they also could have originated from a point, the location of which is shifted 0.8 km northwest and 0.7 km deeper than the source of the initial swarm. We suggest this shift in LP activity reflects a northward jump in the pathway for magmatic gases caused by the sealing of the initial pathway by magma extrusion during the last half of December. Volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes did not occur until after the initial 23-hour-long swarm. They began slowly just below the LP source and their rate of occurrence increased after the eruption of 01:52 AST on December 15, when they shifted to depths of 6 to 10 km. After January 2 the VT activity migrated gradually northward; this migration suggests northward propagating withdrawal of magma from a plexus of dikes and/or sills located in the 6 to 10 km depth range. Precise relocations of selected events prior to January 2 clearly resolve a narrow, steeply dipping, pencil-shaped concentration of activity in the depth range of 1-7 km, which illuminates the conduit along which magma was transported to the surface. A third event type, named hybrid, which blends the characteristics of both VT and LP events, originates just below the LP source, and may reflect brittle failure along a zone intersecting a fluid-filled crack. The distribution of hybrid events is elongated 0.2-0.4 km in an east-west direction. This distribution may offer constraints on the orientation and size of the fluid-filled crack inferred to be the source of the LP events. ?? 1994.

Lahr, J. C.; Chouet, B. A.; Stephens, C. D.; Power, J. A.; Page, R. A.

1994-01-01

254

Eruption dynamics of the 7.7 ka Driftwood pumice-fall suggest mafic injection is a common eruption mechanism for Makushin Volcano, Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Makushin Volcano on Unalaska Island, AK is potentially the most threatening volcano in the Aleutian chain, being close to the largest Aleutian towns of Dutch Harbor and Unalaska. This study reports the eruption chronology and triggering mechanism for the most recent highly explosive event, the 7.7 ka Driftwood Pumice-fall event. The Driftwood Pumice reaches thicknesses of over 2 m, and isopach contours estimate a total deposit volume of 0.3-0.9 km3, covering an area of at least 8100 km2. These reconstructions show an eruption on the scale of the 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption, with a VEI of 4-5. In the field, the deposit was divided into four stratigraphic horizons from bottom to top, and tephra within these layers becomes systematically more mafic upward through the section, ranging from a basal low-SiO2 dacite (64 wt.% SiO2) to an upper medium-SiO2 andesite (61.5 wt.% SiO2). High-Ca plagioclase (An75-83) and high-Mg olivine (Mg69-75) grains within the pumice are in great disequilibrium with the dacitic glass (64-69 wt.% SiO2), suggesting their origin in a more mafic magma. Geochemical trends, disequilibrium mineral populations, and mineral zonation patterns within these plagioclase and olivine xenocrysts show evidence of magma mixing between a bulk siliceous magma chamber and a mafic injection. The amount of the mafic component increases upward within the deposit, ranging from 0-25% throughout the section. The mafic injection is calculated to have been ~110-200 °C hotter than the siliceous magma chamber. The thermal pulse provided by the injection likely initiated convection and volatile exsolution within the siliceous magma body, ultimately causing the Driftwood Pumice eruption. Diffusion rates based on the thickness of lower-Mg rim zonations (<10 µm thick rims of Mg64) in the olivine xenocrysts show a lag-time of ~1 year between the basaltic injection and the resulting eruption. Similar delays between mafic injections and eruptions are seen in numerous other volcanic systems where magma mixing has been cited as the eruption trigger. The Driftwood Pumice is stratigraphically sandwiched between numerous smaller ashfalls, many of which consist of light-dark ash couplets. The color and compositional differences between the layers of these ash couplets are similar to differences within the Driftwood Pumice horizons, though the Driftwood Pumice is significantly thicker than the couplets. The repeated occurrences of light tephra overlain by dark, more mafic tephra suggest that magma mixing via a mafic injection is a common mechanism for sparking Makushin eruptions.

Lerner, A.; Crowley, P.; Hazlett, R. W.; Nicolaysen, K. E.

2010-12-01

255

Ground surface deformation patterns, magma supply, and magma storage at Okmok volcano, Alaska, from InSAR analysis: 2. Coeruptive deflation, July-August 2008  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A hydrovolcanic eruption near Cone D on the floor of Okmok caldera, Alaska, began on 12 July 2008 and continued until late August 2008. The eruption was preceded by inflation of a magma reservoir located beneath the center of the caldera and ˜3 km below sea level (bsl), which began immediately after Okmok's previous eruption in 1997. In this paper we use data from several radar satellites and advanced interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) techniques to produce a suite of 2008 coeruption deformation maps. Most of the surface deformation that occurred during the eruption is explained by deflation of a Mogi-type source located beneath the center of the caldera and 2-3 km bsl, i.e., essentially the same source that inflated prior to the eruption. During the eruption the reservoir deflated at a rate that decreased exponentially with time with a 1/e time constant of ˜13 days. We envision a sponge-like network of interconnected fractures and melt bodies that in aggregate constitute a complex magma storage zone beneath Okmok caldera. The rate at which the reservoir deflates during an eruption may be controlled by the diminishing pressure difference between the reservoir and surface. A similar mechanism might explain the tendency for reservoir inflation to slow as an eruption approaches until the pressure difference between a deep magma production zone and the reservoir is great enough to drive an intrusion or eruption along the caldera ring-fracture system.

Lu, Zhong; Dzurisin, Daniel

2010-05-01

256

Observations of deep long-period (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-period (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. Observed wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML 2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a period of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences. At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These observations suggest a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.

Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; White, R. A.; Moran, S. C.

2004-01-01

257

Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2005  

E-print Network

seismicity at Long Valley Caldera: Journal of Geophysical Research, v. 110, B04302, doi:10.1029/2004JB003211 caldera-forming eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska: Bulletin of Volcanology, v. 67, p. 497-525. Calvert, A, determined from waveform inversions of very long period signals: Journal of Geophysical Researc

Torgersen, Christian

258

The recent warming of permafrost in Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports results of an experiment initiated in 1977 to determine the effects of climate on permafrost in Alaska. Permafrost observatories with boreholes were established along a north–south transect of Alaska in undisturbed permafrost terrain. The analysis and interpretation of annual temperature measurements in the boreholes and daily temperature measurements of the air, ground and permafrost surfaces made with

T. E. Osterkamp

2005-01-01

259

The recent warming of permafrost in Alaska  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reports results of an experiment initiated in 1977 to determine the effects of climate on permafrost in Alaska. Permafrost observatories with boreholes were established along a north south transect of Alaska in undisturbed permafrost terrain. The analysis and interpretation of annual temperature measurements in the boreholes and daily temperature measurements of the air, ground and permafrost surfaces made

T. E. Osterkamp

2005-01-01

260

The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results  

USGS Publications Warehouse

A mass of snow and ice 400-m-wide and 105-m-thick began melting in the summit crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between November 2004 and early May 2005, presumably owing to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system, or possibly from magma intrusion and degassing. In early May 2005, an estimated 3.8??106 m3 of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water, with an accompanying acidic aerosol component, exited the crater through a tunnel at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 km downstream, the acidic waters of the flood inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying Mother Goose Lake from surface to depth (approximately 0.5 km3 in volume at a pH of 2.9 to 3.1), killing all aquatic life, and preventing the annual salmon run. Over 2 months later, crater lake water sampled 8 km downstream of the outlet after considerable dilution from glacial meltwater was a weak sulfuric acid solution (pH = 3.2, SO4 = 504 mg/L, Cl = 53.6 mg/L, and F = 7.92 mg/L). The acid flood waters caused severe vegetation damage, including plant death and leaf kill along the flood path. The crater lake drainage was accompanied by an ambioructic flow of acidic aerosols that followed the flood path, contributing to defoliation and necrotic leaf damage to vegetation in a 29 km2 area along and above affected streams, in areas to heights of over 150 m above stream level. Moss species killed in the event contained high levels of sulfur, indicating extremely elevated atmospheric sulfurcontent. The most abundant airborne phytotoxic constituent was likely sulfuric acid aerosols that were generated during the catastrophic partial crater lake drainage event. Two mechanisms of acidic aerosol formation are proposed: (1) generation of aerosol mist through turbulent flow of acidic water and (2) catastrophic gas exsolution. This previously undocumented phenomenon of simultaneous vegetationdamaging acidic aerosols accompanying drainage of an acidic crater lake has important implications for the study of hazards associated with active volcanic crater lakes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

Schaefer, J.R.; Scott, W.E.; Evans, W.C.; Jorgenson, J.; McGimsey, R.G.; Wang, B.

2008-01-01

261

Alaska: A Bird's Eye View  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this Web-based, interactive story, Tutangiaq (Too-tang-geye-ack - nicknamed 2T), a Canada Goose, flies across Alaska looking for his family. As he flies, he tells students about the 49th state. Students learn several facts about the state, including how Alaska was purchased from the Russians,. They can also compare the size of Alaska to other states. 2T takes a flight across the volcanic chain in Alaska and helps students interactively explore how scientists monitor volcanoes from satellite images in near-real time. At the coast, the bird also meets his Walrus friend who shows him how the sea ice edge has receded and gives an example of an adverse effect on marine life. Finally, 2T arrives in Fairbanks where children use satellite imagery to help him find and unite with his family.

2003-07-01

262

Volcano Preparedness  

MedlinePLUS

... your local emergency officials. Mudflows Mudflows are powerful “rivers” of mud that can move 20 to 40 ... cannot see the volcano during an eruption. Avoid river valleys and low lying areas. Trying to watch ...

263

Cascade Volcanoes  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

The volcanoes from closest to farthest are Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Jefferson. This picture is taken from Middle Sister looking north in the Cascade Range, Three Sisters Wilderness Area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon....

2009-12-08

264

University of Tokyo: Volcano Research Center (VRC)  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This website discusses the Volcano Research Center's (VRC) work to improve predictions of volcanic eruptions by conducting research on volcanic processes. Users can find out about Asama, Kirishima, Izu-Oshima, and other VRC volcano observatories. The website features information on many continuing and recent eruptions in Japan. Visitors can view many images of volcanic eruptions and disaster relief missions. Researchers can learn about the international cooperative drilling operation at the Unzen Volcano to understand the eruption mechanisms and magnetic activity. This site is also reviewed in the February 20, 2004 _NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

265

ASAR IMAGES A DIVERSE SET OF DEFORMATION PATTERNS AT KLAUEA VOLCANO, HAWAI`I  

E-print Network

ASAR IMAGES A DIVERSE SET OF DEFORMATION PATTERNS AT KLAUEA VOLCANO, HAWAI`I Michael P. Poland(1) (1) U.S. Geological Survey, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, 51 Crater Rim Road, Hawai`i National Park. On Klauea volcano, a transition from minor to broad-scale summit inflation was observed by interferograms

266

Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys  

E-print Network

volcano by volume in the Cascade Range [Donnelly-Nolan, 1988]. The broad MLV shield with its 7 Ã? 12 km, 0Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys Daniel Dzurisin U.S. Geological Survey, David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (USGS

267

Natural Resources Canada: Volcanoes of Canada  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Natural Resources Canada has launched yet another impressive and educational Web site. At this site you can learn all you wanted to know about Canadian volcanoes and volcanology. The site offers an introduction to volcanoes, in-depth sections on types, eruptions, hazards, and risks. You can also discover interesting facts, such as how eruptions in Alaska and the Western coast of the US impact agriculture and air travel in Canada. In addition to text, the site offers a wonderful interactive Map of Canadian Volcanoes. The Catalogue of Canadian Volcanoes is also an excellent reference tool. Available in English and French, this site is easy to understand and ideal for science students as well as anyone interested in volcanology. This site is also reviewed in the August 22, 2003 NSDL Physical Sciences Report.

268

Carnegie Observatories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Carnegie Observatories were founded in 1902 by George Ellery Hale. Their first facility was the MOUNT WILSON OBSERVATORY, located in the San Gabriel Mountains above Pasadena, California. Originally a solar observatory, it moved into stellar, galactic and extragalactic research with the construction of the 60 in (1.5 m), and 100 in (2.5 m) telescopes, each of which was the largest in the world...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

269

Volcanoes: Local Hazard, Global Issue  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this module, students can explore two ways that volcanoes affect Earth: by directly threatening people and the environments adjacent to them, and by ejecting aerosols into the atmosphere. The module consists of three investigations in which they will study the local effects of volcanism using images of Mount St. Helens, examine how the effects of volcanic activity can be remotely sensed and monitored from space using NASA data for Mount Spurr in Alaska, and see how geography and spatial perspective are useful in addressing global issues in the tracking and mapping of aerosol hazards such as the ash cloud emitted by the 1989 eruption on Redoubt Volcano. Each investigation is complete with overview, a list of materials and supplies, content preview, classroom procedures, worksheets, background, and evaluation.

270

Amateur Observatories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A roundup of amateur observatories in this country and abroad, with construction and location details, concluding with a detailed description and architect's drawing of the author's own observatory at Worcester Park, Surrey. The text of the 1996 Presidential Address to the British Astronomical Association.

Gavin, M.

1997-08-01

271

Astronomical observatories  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

Ponomarev, D. N.

1983-01-01

272

Alaska Diabetes Alaska Diabetes  

E-print Network

The plan was based on the recommendations of Alaskans from village clinics, universities, community health centers, non-profit organizations, elementary, middle, and high schools, state and municipal agencies, faithbased institutions, public health agencies, hospitals, health professional organizations, public and private health insurance agencies, peer review organizations, and Alaskans with diabetes. The Alaska Diabetes Strategic Plan establishes a unified course of action to reduce the burden (i.e., premature mortality, morbidity, and economic costs) of this disease among the 18,700 adult Alaskans already diagnosed with diabetes. The plan also addresses the prevention of diabetes in the general population through education, policy and lifestyle modifications. The rapidly increasing prevalence of this disease in Alaska calls for creative and cost-effective strategies. Implementing these strategies calls for action and cooperation by multiple partners statewide. Putting this plan into action presents a challenging opportunity to influence the health of current and future Alaskans. It is

Barbara Stillwater Rn

2005-01-01

273

GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native and minority students into the geosciences. View them as they explore the permafrost tunnel in Fairbanks, sand dunes in Anchorage, Portage Glacier, Matanuska-Susitna Glacier, and the Trans-Alaska pipeline damage from the earthquake of 2002.

Wartes, D.

2012-12-01

274

Internet Geography: Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site is part of GeoNet Internet Geography, a resource for pre-collegiate British geography students and their instructors. This page focuses on various aspects of volcanoes, including the main features of a volcano, types of volcanoes, the Ring of Fire, locations of volcanoes, volcanic flows, and case studies about specific volcanoes.

275

What Are Volcano Hazards?  

MedlinePLUS

... Hawaii, California, Oregon, and Washington. Volcanoes produce a wide variety of hazards that can kill people and ... a volcano is not erupting. Volcanoes produce a wide variety of natural hazards that can kill people ...

276

Neutrino Observatories  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online article, from Cosmic Horizons: Astronomy at the Cutting Edge, takes an in-depth look at the new generation of astronomy equipment. It provides an overview of the discovery of neutrinos, subatomic particles, and their role in the developing field of physics, studies that showed that nuclear reactions, including those that power the stars, produce an enormous number of neutrinos, the creation of neutrino observatories deep underground and the stunning and unexpected advances these observatories have already made.

277

Earthquake waveform similarity and evolution at Augustine Volcano from 1993 to 2006  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Temporal changes in waveform characteristics and earthquake locations associated with the 2006 Augustine eruption and preeruptive seismicity provide constraints on eruptive processes within the edifice. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur within the upper 1 to 2 km at Augustine between and during eruptive cycles, and we use the Alaska Volcano Observatory hypocenter and waveform catalog from 1993 to 2006 to constrain changes in event similarity and location over time. Waveform crosscorrelation with bispectrum verification improves the pick accuracy of the catalog data to yield better locations and allows for identification of families of similar earthquakes. Event waveform similarity is low at Augustine, with ~60 to 70 percent of events failing to form event families of more than 10 events. The remaining earthquakes form event families over multiple time scales. Events prior to the 2006 eruption exhibit a high degree of similarity over multiple years. Earthquakes recorded during the precursory and explosive phases of the 2006 eruption form swarms of similar earthquakes over periods of days or hours. Seismicity rate and event similarity decrease rapidly during the explosive and effusive eruption phases. The largest recorded swarms accompany reports of increased steaming and explosive eruptions at the summit. Relative relocation of some event families indicates upward migration of activity over time, consistent with magma transport by way of an ascending dike. Multiple regions of the edifice generate seismicity simultaneously, however, suggesting the edifice contains a network of fractures and/or dikes.

DeShon, Heather R.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Power, John A.

2010-01-01

278

Thermal precursors in satellite images of the 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano  

Microsoft Academic Search

Shishaldin Volcano, Unimak Island Alaska, began showing signs of thermal unrest in satellite images on 9 February 1999. A thermal anomaly and small steam plume were detected at the summit of the volcano in short-wave thermal infrared AVHRR (advanced very high resolution radiometer) satellite data. This was followed by over 2 months of changes in the observed thermal character of

Jonathan Dehn; Kenneson G. Dean; Kevin Engle; Pavel Izbekov

2002-01-01

279

Volcano Deformation and Gravity Workshop Synopsis and Outcomes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The 2008 Volcano Deformation and Temporal Gravity Change Workshop; Vancouver, Washington, 13-15 May 2008; A volcano workshop was held in Washington State, near the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Cascades Volcano Observatory. The workshop, hosted by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program (VHP), included more than 40 participants from the United States, the European Union, and Canada. Goals were to promote (1) collaboration among scientists working on active volcanoes and (2) development of new tools for studying volcano deformation. The workshop focused on conventional and emerging techniques, including the Global Positioning System (GPS), borehole strain, interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), gravity, and electromagnetic imaging, and on the roles of aqueous and magmatic fluids.

Dzurisin, Daniel; Lu, Zhong

2009-01-01

280

Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2001-01-01

281

Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2001-01-01

282

Interagency collaboration on an active volcano: a case study at Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park (HAVO) includes two active Hawai‘i shield volcanoes – Mauna Loa, the largest active volcano on earth that most recently erupted for three weeks in 1984, and K?lauea, which has been erupting continuously for more than 31 years. Unlike the steep-sided volcanoes around the rim of the Pacific Ocean, all Hawaiian volcanoes have gentle-sloped flanks that result from copious eruptions of fluid lavas with infrequent interludes of explosive activity. Each of the Hawaiian volcanoes erupts from its summit area – K?lauea and Mauna Loa both have summit calderas (large subsided craters)—and from one or more rift zones (a sequence of vents aligned radially away from the summit). Because Kilauea and Mauna Loa are included within the National Park, there is a natural intersection of missions for the National Park Service (NPS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). HAVO staff and the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory scientists have worked closely together to monitor and forecast multiple eruptions from each of these volcanoes since HAVO’s founding in 1916.

Kauahikaua, James P.; Orlando, Cindy

2014-01-01

283

Hayden Planetarium: Virtual Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This online Hayden Planetarium resource explains the concept of the Virtual Observatory and contains links to the following eight sites: International Virtual Observatory Alliance, National Virtual Observatory, National Virtual Observatory Education and Outreach, Astrophysical Virtual Observatory, Canadian Virtual Observatory, AstroGrid, SkyView, and Theory in a Virtual Observatory.

284

Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

1988-01-01

285

One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

2012-01-01

286

One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii  

USGS Publications Warehouse

In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

2012-01-01

287

Earth Layers and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Why do we have volcanoes? Use the information on the websites to answer the questions on the worksheet. Worksheet First, review the layers of the earth. Labeling the layers game Next, go through the maze and read the information given. Magic School Bus volcano game Now, study the different shapes of volcanoes. Click enter, then volcano types in the menu. Read about the 3 types of volcanoes. Discovery Kids Games Finally, watch ...

Brookeshallow

2011-04-13

288

Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawaii  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) on-line publication highlights the volcanic hazards facing the people living on the Island of Hawaii. These hazards include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, earthquakes and tsunamis. This report discusses these hazards, the volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Kilauea, and the work of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to monitor and issue warnings to the people affected by these hazards.

Heliker, Christina; Stauffer, Peter; Hendley Ii., James

289

Crisis GIS: Preparing for the Next Volcanic Crisis in the United States  

Microsoft Academic Search

Geographic Information Systems (GIS) specialists from the Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), including personnel at Menlo Park, California, the Cascades Volcano Observatory in Vancouver, Washington, the Alaska Volcano Observatory in Anchorage and Fairbanks, Alaska, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in Hawaii National Park, Hawaii, and the Smithsonian Institution Global Volcanism Program in Washington, DC, are developing

D. W. Ramsey; J. E. Robinson; S. P. Schilling; J. R. Schaefer; P. Kimberly; F. A. Trusdell; M. C. Guffanti; G. C. Mayberry; C. E. Cameron; J. G. Smith; J. A. McIntire; S. Snedigar; J. W. Ewert

2004-01-01

290

Detecting small geothermal features at Northern Pacific volcanoes with ASTER thermal infrared data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) monitor the eruptive state of volcanoes throughout the Aleutian, Kamchatkan, and Kurile arcs. This is accomplished in part by analyzing thermal infrared (TIR) data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors at least twice per day for major thermal anomalies. The AVHRR and MODIS 1-km spatial resolution data have been very useful for detecting large and/or high-temperature thermal signatures such as Strombolian activity as well as lava and pyroclastic flows. Such anomalies commonly indicate a major eruptive event is in progress. However, in order to observe and quantify small and/or lower temperature thermal features such as fumaroles and lava domes, higher spatial resolution data with better radiometric and spectral resolution are required. We have reviewed 2600 available night and day time TIR scenes acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) over the volcanoes of the northern Pacific. The current archive spans from March, 2000 to present. ASTER is the only instrument that routinely acquires high spatial resolution (30 - 90 m) night time data over volcanic targets. These data sets typically contain 5 TIR (8-12 microns) with 90 meter spatial resolution and 6 shortwave infrared (SWIR) bands (1-3 microns) with 30 meter spatial resolution. After the general survey of the volcanic arcs, we have focused our efforts on several targets. Mt. Hague, in the Emmons Lake complex on the Alaska Peninsula, has had mostly cloud-free ASTER observations for twenty night time TIR and six daytime TIR since August 2000. A small lake in the lower crater of Mt. Hague has had a history of appearing and disappearing over the last few years. The ASTER data combined with several recent field observations allow us to track the changes in lake area and associated temperatures. With more frequent observations, we hope to determine the mechanism of these changes. The 1975-76 craters and lava flows of New Tolbachik Volcano in central Kamchatka appear as persistent thermal features in clear night time ASTER TIR data with ASTER TIR temperatures as high as 22° C. Handheld FLIR TIR images (~0.5m pixels) from August 2004 show temperatures >176° C on the lava flow and >226° C in the crater wall. Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in southern Kamchatka also have several persistent thermal features in the ASTER data from late 2001 until at least November 2003. These features correlate to a vigorous fumarole field and crater lakes. The Mutnovsky thermal features were also observed in AVHRR data by KEMSD in March, June, and July 2003. The goal of this work is to better detect changes in current volcano activity or precursors to new activity. Our ongoing survey of the ASTER TIR data has created a database of many small (<90 m) or low temperature (20 to 38° C) thermal features at several volcanoes in the northern Pacific region. We will attempt to observe each of the identified features at least annually using ASTER data as it becomes available over each target.

Wessels, R.; Senyukov, S.; Tranbenkova, A.; Ramsey, M. S.; Schneider, D. J.

2004-12-01

291

Dunsink Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Designed by Henry Ussher, the first astronomy professor of Trinity College Dublin, Dunsink Observatory (1783) incorporated modern designs such as ventilation in the observation room and a free-standing telescope support column. Among the past directors were the mathematician W R Hamilton (1827-65) and stellar dynamicist H C Plummer (1912-21). The main remaining instrument is a Grubb 12 ft (3.66 m...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

292

Grand Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Various concepts have been recently presented for a 100 m class astronomical observatory. The science virtues of such an observatory are many: resolving planets orbiting around other stars, resolving the surface features of other stars, extending our temporal reach back toward the beginning (at and before stellar and galactic development), improving on the Next Generation Space Telescope, and other (perhaps as yet) undiscovered purposes. This observatory would be a general facility instrument with wide spectral range from at least the near ultraviolet to the mid infrared. The concept espoused here is based on a practical, modular design located in a place where temperatures remain (and instruments could operate) within several degrees of absolute zero with no shielding or cooling. This location is the bottom of a crater located near the north or south pole of the moon, most probably the South Polar Depression. In such a location the telescope would never see the sun or the earth, hence the profound cold and absence of stray light. The ideal nature of this location is elaborated herein. It is envisioned that this observatory would be assembled and maintained remotely through the use of expert robotic systems. A base station would be located above the crater rim with (at least occasional) direct line-of-sight access to the earth. Certainly it would be advantageous, but not absolutely essential, to have humans travel to the site to deal with unexpected contingencies. Further, observers and their teams could eventually travel there for extended observational campaigns. Educational activities, in general, could be furthered thru extended human presence. Even recreational visitors and long term habitation might follow.

Young, Eric W.

2002-01-01

293

The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Response to the 2006 Augustine Alaskan Volcanic Eruption  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During September of 2006, UNAVCO installed five permanent Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) GPS stations on Augustine Volcano, in the lower Cook Inlet of Alaska. The installations were done at the request of the PBO Magmatic Systems committee in response to the January 11, 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. Prior to the eruption, PBO installed five permanent GPS stations on Augustine in 2004. The five existing stations on the volcano were instrumental in detecting precursory deformation of the volcano's flanks prior to and during the eruption. During the course of the first explosive phase of the eruption, two existing PBO stations, AV03 and AV05 were subsequently destroyed by separate pyroclastic flows. The existing station AV04 was heavily damaged by a separate pyroclastic flow during the continuous phase of the eruption and was repaired during September as well. Existing stations AV01 and AV02 were not affected or damaged by the eruption and remained operating during the entire eruptive phase and subsequent debris flows. All five new stations, and maintenance on the three remaining existing stations, were completed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by Maritime Helicopters. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all equipment be transported to each site from an established base camp by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and internal loads. Each new and existing station installed on the volcano consists of a standard short braced GPS monument, two solar panels mounted to an inclined structure, and a six foot high Plaschem enclosure with two solar panels mounted to one of the inclined sides. Each Plaschem houses 24 12 volt batteries that power a Trimble NetRS GPS receiver and one or two Intuicom radios and are recharged by the solar panels. Data from each GPS receiver is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the town of Homer that transmits the data over the internet to the UNAVCO data archive at ftp://data-out.unavco.or/pub/PBO_rinex where it is made freely available to the public.

Pauk, B.; Feaux, K.; Jackson, M.; Friesen, B.; Enders, M.; Baldwin, A.; Fournier, K.; Marzulla, A.

2006-12-01

294

Bathymetric constraints on the tectonic and volcanic evolution of Deception Island Volcano, South Shetland Islands  

E-print Network

Bathymetric constraints on the tectonic and volcanic evolution of Deception Island Volcano, South Shetland Islands A.H. BARCLAY1 *, W.S.D. WILCOCK2 and J.M. IBA´ N~ EZ3 1 Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory@ldeo.columbia.edu Abstract: Deception Island is the largest volcano in the actively extending Bransfield Basin, a marginal

Wilcock, William

295

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS U.S. Geological Survey's Alert-Notification System for Volcanic Activity  

E-print Network

U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS U.S. Geological Survey's Alert, reprinted 2014 The Need for a National Volcano Alert System Under the Stafford Act (Public Law 93 of potential volcanic disasters. The USGS, through its five volcano observatories, determines the alert levels

Torgersen, Christian

296

Alaska GeoFORCE, A New Geologic Adventure in Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. A program of rigorous academic activity combines with social, cultural, and recreational activities. Students are purposely stretched beyond their comfort levels academically and socially to prepare for the big step from home or village to a large culturally western urban campus. This summer RAHI is launching a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science as the hook because most kids get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, but it includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students will be recruited, initially from the Arctic North Slope schools, in the 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The carrot on the end of the stick is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips are focused on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska is being launched by UAF in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska will be managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Insitute (RAHI) that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for almost 30 years. The Texas program, with adjustments for differences in culture and environment, will be replicated in Alaska, with plans to begin with 40 rising 9th graders during the summer of 2012. The program will continue to add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacty of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th.

Wartes, D.

2011-12-01

297

Types of Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This volcano resource introduces the six-type classification system and points out weaknesses of the classic three-type system. The six types of volcanoes are shield volcanoes, strato volcanoes, rhyolite caldera complexes, monogenetic fields, flood basalts, and mid-ocean ridges. For each type of volcano there is a description of both structure and dynamics along with examples of each. You can account for more than ninty percent of all volcanoes with these six types. Additionally, any system will be more useful if you use modifiers from the other potential classification schemes with the morphological types.

298

Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano  

article title:  Ash from Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland Stretches over the North Atlantic   ... that occurred in late March 2010, the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in Iceland began erupting again on April 14, 2010. The resulting ash ...

2013-04-17

299

Overlap in the 2011 AVO and AEIC earthquake catalogs Michael West  

E-print Network

, The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3500 earthquakes along the Alaska-Aleutian volcanic arc. The Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) located 25,000 earthquakes during the same time. While AEIC covers the entire state of Alaska

West, Michael

300

Volcanoes: Annenberg Media Project  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Volcanoes is an exhibit from the Annenberg Media Project that provides a wealth of information about volcanoes and includes sections such as Melting Rocks, the Dynamic Earth, and Forecasting. Interactive exercises enable the user to learn how rock turns into magma, how to locate volcanoes, and how to decide if building a project near a volcano is safe. Quicktime videos are used for each of the six categories to illustrate the points outlined in the text.

1997-01-01

301

Where are the Volcanoes?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This formative assessment item discusses common misconceptions about volcano location around the world. Resources include background and content information as well as alignment to the National Science Education Standards. The probe could easily be modified to be used with a study of earthquakes instead of volcanoes. Teachers can access other resources including facts about volcanoes and lesson ideas.

Fries-Gaither, Jessica

302

How Volcanoes Work  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This educational resource describes the science behind volcanoes and volcanic processes. Topics include volcanic environments, volcano landforms, eruption dynamics, eruption products, eruption types, historical eruptions, and planetary volcanism. There are two animations, over 250 images, eight interactive tests, and a volcano crossword puzzle.

2011-04-18

303

Monitoring Active Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication discusses the historic and current monitoring of active volcanoes around the globe. Techniques to measure deviations in pressure and stress induced by subterranean magma movement, as well as other technologies, explain the ways in which researchers monitor and predict volcanoes. Case studies of volcanoes such as Mt. St. Helens, El Chichon, Mauna Loa, and others are discussed.

Tilling, Robert

304

A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

Olds, Henry, Jr.

1983-01-01

305

Volcano Vents  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

[figure removed for brevity, see original site]

Released 5 May 2003

This low-relief shield volcano imaged with the THEMIS visible camera has two large vents which have erupted several individual lava flows. The positions of the origins of many of the flows indicate that it is probable that the vents are secondary structures that formed only after the shield was built up by eruptions from a central caldera.

Image information: VIS instrument. Latitude 17.6, Longitude 243.6 East (116.4 West). 19 meter/pixel resolution.

Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. The Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) was developed by Arizona State University, Tempe, in collaboration with Raytheon Santa Barbara Remote Sensing. The THEMIS investigation is led by Dr. Philip Christensen at Arizona State University. Lockheed Martin Astronautics, Denver, is the prime contractor for the Odyssey project, and developed and built the orbiter. Mission operations are conducted jointly from Lockheed Martin and from JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

2003-01-01

306

MATLAB tools for improved characterization and quantification of volcanic incandescence in Webcam imagery; applications at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Webcams are now standard tools for volcano monitoring and are used at observatories in Alaska, the Cascades, Kamchatka, Hawai'i, Italy, and Japan, among other locations. Webcam images allow invaluable documentation of activity and provide a powerful comparative tool for interpreting other monitoring datastreams, such as seismicity and deformation. Automated image processing can improve the time efficiency and rigor of Webcam image interpretation, and potentially extract more information on eruptive activity. For instance, Lovick and others (2008) provided a suite of processing tools that performed such tasks as noise reduction, eliminating uninteresting images from an image collection, and detecting incandescence, with an application to dome activity at Mount St. Helens during 2007. In this paper, we present two very simple automated approaches for improved characterization and quantification of volcanic incandescence in Webcam images at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai`i. The techniques are implemented in MATLAB (version 2009b, Copyright: The Mathworks, Inc.) to take advantage of the ease of matrix operations. Incandescence is a useful indictor of the location and extent of active lava flows and also a potentially powerful proxy for activity levels at open vents. We apply our techniques to a period covering both summit and east rift zone activity at Kilauea during 2008?2009 and compare the results to complementary datasets (seismicity, tilt) to demonstrate their integrative potential. A great strength of this study is the demonstrated success of these tools in an operational setting at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) over the course of more than a year. Although applied only to Webcam images here, the techniques could be applied to any type of sequential images, such as time-lapse photography. We expect that these tools are applicable to many other volcano monitoring scenarios, and the two MATLAB scripts, as they are implemented at HVO, are included in the appendixes. These scripts would require minor to moderate modifications for use elsewhere, primarily to customize directory navigation. If the user has some familiarity with MATLAB, or programming in general, these modifications should be easy. Although we originally anticipated needing the Image Processing Toolbox, the scripts in the appendixes do not require it. Thus, only the base installation of MATLAB is needed. Because fairly basic MATLAB functions are used, we expect that the script can be run successfully by versions earlier than 2009b.

Patrick, Matthew R.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Antolik, Loren

2010-01-01

307

UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER, statewide African-Americans and Alaska Natives could expect to spend 7 days longer in predisposition might have explained some of the disparate outcomes. Preclearance under the Voting Rights Act Alaska

Pantaleone, Jim

308

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER Winter 2008 paired state judicial systems with Russian courts. The Alaska Justice Forum asked Judge David Mannheimer of the Alaska Court of Appeals and Marla Greenstein, Executive Director of the Commission on Judicial Conduct

Pantaleone, Jim

309

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER Winter 2007 of the first general study on offender recidivism in Alaska (page 5). � A look at incarceration rates in the U.S. as a whole and in Alaska, with a comparison of U.S. rates with rates of other nations (page 7). Total justice

Pantaleone, Jim

310

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER Fall 2007 of a Criminal Conviction: A Brief Overview of Collateral Consequences in Alaska Deborah Periman "It is not concerns. The recent case of a former University ofAlaskaAnchorage student de- nied admission to the School

Pantaleone, Jim

311

Summer 2006, volume 3:2 Alaska Satellite Facility  

E-print Network

Summer 2006, volume 3:2 Alaska Satellite Facility In the past decade, synthetic aperture radar associated with volcanoes, earthquakes, glaciers, and other geological processes. Though InSAR can only imageSAR is extremely useful for mapping deformation in poorly accessible or unmonitored parts of the world. One

312

Frequency based satellite monitoring of small scale explosive activity at remote North Pacific volcanoes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Monitoring of volcanoes in the North Pacific can be an expensive and sometimes dangerous task, specifically for those located in Alaska (USA) and Kamchatka (Russia). An active frequency detection method previously used at Stromboli, Italy, uses the thermal- and mid-infrared wavelength bands from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data to detect anomalies at a volcano. This method focuses on small scale explosive activity, often referred to as Strombolian activity which can produce small spatter fields near a volcano's active vent. In the North Pacific, there are a number of volcanoes which exhibit small scale explosive activity and three are the focus of this study: Chuginadak (Mt. Cleveland) and Shishaldin in Alaska, and Karymsky Volcano in Kamchatka. Satellite images from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used to monitor the frequency of thermal features as well as the occurrence of ash plumes at each volcano. This data was then used to produce a time series spanning 2005-2010 for all three volcanoes. During this time period, each volcano underwent a series of eruptive cycles including background levels of activity, heightened frequency of small explosions (identified as precursory activity), and heightened activity typified by ash plume-producing eruptions. Each location has a unique precursory signal, both in timing and magnitude. The use of a previously developed method on a new sample set of volcanoes has proved the validity of this method as a monitoring tool for volcanoes with small scale explosive activity. This method should be applied to a larger set of volcanoes to continue the development and database production for its use as a volcano monitoring tool.

Worden, Anna; Dehn, Jonathan; Webley, Peter

2014-10-01

313

EarthScope: A distributed, multi-purpose geophysical observatory for the structure and dynamics of the North American continent  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

EarthScope, a broad-based geophysics program funded by the US National Science Foundation, takes a multidisciplinary approach to studying the structure and evolution of the North American continent and the physical processes controlling earthquakes and volcanoes. The integrated observing systems that make up the EarthScope facilities provide data streams that address fundamental questions at a variety of scales including the active nucleation zone of earthquakes, individual faults and volcanoes, the deformation along the plate boundary, and the structure of the continent and planet. EarthScope data are freely and openly available to maximize participation from the national and international scientific community and to provide ongoing educational outreach to students and the public. EarthScope facilities include the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD), the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), and the USArray. With leadership from the U.S. academic research community, consortium members, and through collaboration with other national and international organizations, IRIS operates, maintains, and manages the USArray facility and UNAVCO manages the PBO and SAFOD facilities. USArray consists of a portable array of 400 broadband seismometers that traverse North America and Alaska over a 15- year period; a pool of broadband, short-period, and active source seismometers available for deployment in areas where a denser observations are required; and seven permanent and 20 portable magnetotelluric (MT) instruments. SAFOD consists of a 3.1 km instrumented and core-sampled borehole that crosses the seismogenic zone of the San Andreas fault, designed to directly reveal the physical and chemical processes controlling earthquake generation. The PBO is a permanent network of continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations, borehole tensor strainmeters, long baseline laser strainmeters, and a pool of campaign GPS units that provide deformation data for fundamental studies of the dynamics of plate motions, earthquakes, and volcanoes. Distributed EarthScope data management systems ensure that all data collected by the USArray, PBO, SAFOD, and partner organizations are archived and distributed to the science community, educators, and the public free of charge and without delay. Our presentation will review the construction and operations of the EarthScope facility and provide science highlights that illustrate the transformational power of openly available, integrated community data sets. We will compare and contrast the EarthScope facility with other international geographically distributed Earth science observatories such as GEONET, AUscope, and EPOS.

Jackson, Mike E.; Woodward, R.

2010-05-01

314

Global Volcano Model  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

2012-04-01

315

Investigating Geothermal Activity, Volcanic Systems, and Deep Tectonic Tremor on Akutan Island, Alaska, with Array Seismology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In addition to hosting one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc, Akutan Island, Alaska, is the site of a significant geothermal resource within Hot Springs Bay Valley (HSBV). We deployed 15 broadband (30 s to 50 Hz) seismometers in and around HSBV during July 2012 as part of an effort to establish a baseline for background seismic activity in HSBV prior to geothermal production on the island. The stations recorded data on-site and were retrieved in early September 2012. Additional targets for the array include the tracking of deep tectonic tremor known to occur within the Aleutian subduction zone and the characterization of volcano-tectonic (VT) and deep long period (DLP) earthquakes from Akutan Volcano. Because 13 of the stations in the array sit within an area roughly 1.5 km by 1.5 km, we plan to apply methods based on stacking and beamforming to analyze the waveforms of extended signals lacking clear phase arrivals (e.g., tremor). The average spacing of the seismometers, roughly 350 m, provides sensitivity to frequencies between 2-8 Hz. The stacking process also increases the signal-to-noise ratio of small amplitude signals propagating across the array (e.g., naturally occurring geothermal seismicity). As of August 2012, several episodes of tectonic tremor have been detected in the vicinity of Akutan Island during the array deployment based on recordings from nearby permanent stations operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). This is the first small-aperture array deployed in the Aleutian Islands and the results should serve as a guide for future array deployments along the Aleutian Arc as part of the upcoming EarthScope and GeoPRISMS push into Alaska. We demonstrate the power of array methods based on stacking at Akutan Volcano using a sequence of DLP earthquakes from June 11, 2012 that were recorded on the permanent AVO stations. We locate and characterize the lowest frequency portion of the signals at 0.5 Hz. At these low frequencies, the traditional "sparse" local network at Akutan effectively becomes a small-aperture array relative to the wavelength. We exploit the coherency among the stations and locate the DLPs by using a novel stacking method. The crux of the method involves scanning over all possible source locations and relative polarity combinations between the local stations to find the one that maximizes the stacked power at a well-defined region in the subsurface. As a result, the method is applicable even in the presence of mixed polarities. We discover that two of the stations at Akutan have DLP waveforms with opposite polarities compared to the other stations. Accounting for this polarity variation gives a DLP source location at 10 km depth, to the west-southwest of the Akutan summit caldera. These results give clear evidence for non-isotropic radiation patterns associated with DLPs and show the promise of array methods based on waveform stacking for providing future insights into the origin of volcanic as well as geothermal and tectonic seismicity.

Haney, M. M.; Prejean, S. G.; Ghosh, A.; Power, J. A.; Thurber, C. H.

2012-12-01

316

University of Alaska Graduate Survey  

E-print Network

University of Alaska Graduate Survey 2012 Prepared for: University of Alaska March 2013 #12;University of Alaska Graduate Survey 2012 Prepared for: University of Alaska Prepared by: Juneau · Anchorage.............................................................................................. 7 Satisfaction with University of Alaska

Ickert-Bond, Steffi

317

Volcanoes, Observations and Impact  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanoes are critical geologic hazards that challenge our ability to make long-term forecasts of their eruptive behaviors. They also have direct and indirect impacts on human lives and society. As is the case with many geologic phenomena, the time scales over which volcanoes evolve greatly exceed that of a human lifetime. On the other hand, the time scale over which a volcano can move from inactivity to eruption can be rather short: months, weeks, days, and even hours. Thus, scientific study and monitoring of volcanoes is essential to mitigate risk. There are thousands of volcanoes on Earth, and it is impractical to study and implement ground-based monitoring at them all. Fortunately, there are other effective means for volcano monitoring, including increasing capabilities for satellite-based technologies.

Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie

318

Volcanoes generate devastating waves  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the

Lockridge

1988-01-01

319

Non-Volcanic Tremor in the Alaska/Aleutian Subduction Zone and its Relation to Slow-Slip Events  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the fall of 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) recorded an unprecedented increase in seismic and volcanic activity across the eastern Aleutian arc. McNutt and Marzocchi (Bull. Seism. Soc. Am. 2004) speculate a widespread deformation pulse or strain transient occurred, and may be the most likely candidate for causing such nearly simultaneous events. A similar increase in activity is recorded in the summer of 2006 in the Rat Island and Andreanof Islands regions. This activity includes four >6.0 magnitude earthquakes, over a dozen >5.0 magnitude earthquakes, swarms of earthquakes at Kliuchef volcano, and several strong non-volcanic tremor episodes. In both cases, one possible explanation for the increase in activity is the occurrence of an aseismic slip event along the seismogenic zone, similar to the slow-slip event that occurred in south central Alaska between 1998 and 2000 (Ohta et al., Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 2006). Testing this hypothesis is difficult because there are no continuous GPS data for these regions during the times of increased activity. However, the occurrence of non-volcanic tremor has been associated with slow slip events in Cascadia and Japan and can be used as a potential indicator for slow slip events when continuous GPS data are unavailable. In order for such a method to be robust the non-volcanic tremor of the area must be well defined. We use a combination of broadband seismic data collected during the 1999-2001 BEAAR Passcal experiment as well as broadband and short period data collected from selected stations in the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC) and AVO seismic networks to identify episodes of non-volcanic tremor. The majority of the seismic signals observed consist of a series of bursts lasting between 10 and 15 minutes with frequencies ranging from 1-6 Hz. Similar signals lasting up to several hours are also observed, but less frequently. Locations of non-volcanic tremor episodes that occurred simultaneously with the 1998-2000 slow- slip event were recorded over a broad area (>100km) roughly centered above the 40-50 km contour of the subducting Pacific plate in south-central Alaska. This study is a first step toward characterizing the non- volcanic tremor observed in the Alaskan/Aleutian subduction zone and its potential link to slow-slip events.

Peterson, C.; Christensen, D.; McNutt, S.; Freymueller, J.

2006-12-01

320

Geologic map of the Gulkana B-1 quadrangle, south-central Alaska  

SciTech Connect

The quadrangle includes the Capital Mountain Volcano and the northern part of Mount Sanford Volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of south-central Alaska. The Capital Mountain volcano is a relatively small, andesitic shield volcano of Pleistocene age, which contains a 4-km-diameter summit caldera and a spectacular post-caldera radial dike swam. Lava flows from the younger Pleistocene Mount Sanford Volcano overlap the south side of the Capital Mountain Volcano. Copper-stained fractures in basaltic andesite related to a dike-filled rift of the North Sanford eruptive center are the only sign of mineralization in the quadrangle. Rock glaciers, deposits of Holocene and Pleistocene valley glaciers and Pleistocene Copper River basin glaciers mantle much of the volcanic bedrock below elevations of 5,500 ft.

Richter, D.H.; Ratte, J.C.; Schmoll, H.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Smith, J.G.; Yehle, L.A.

1989-01-01

321

Interdisciplinary studies of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile  

USGS Publications Warehouse

High-silica rhyolite magma fuels Earth's largest and most explosive eruptions. Recurrence intervals for such highly explosive eruptions are in the 100- to 100,000-year time range, and there have been few direct observations of such eruptions and their immediate impacts. Consequently, there was keen interest within the volcanology community when the first large eruption of high-silica rhyolite since that of Alaska's Novarupta volcano in 1912 began on 1 May 2008 at Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, a 3-kilometer-diameter caldera volcano with a prehistoric record of rhyolite eruptions [Naranjo and Stern, 2004semi; Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), 2008semi; Carn et al., 2009; Castro and Dingwell, 2009; Lara, 2009; Muñoz et al., 2009]. Vigorous explosions occurred through 8 May 2008, after which explosive activity waned and a new lava dome was extruded.

Pallister, John S.; Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Holitt, Richard P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Eichelberger, John C.; Luis, Lara; Moreno, Hugo; Muñoz, Jorge; Castro, Jonathan M.; Iroumé, Andrés; Andreoli, Andrea; Jones, Julia; Swanson, Fred; Crisafulli, Charlie

2010-01-01

322

Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano  

... to capture a series of images of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano and its erupting ash plume. Figure 1 is a view from MISR's nadir ... The companion image, Figure 2, is a stereo anaglyph (see  Volcano Plume Heights Anaglyph ) generated from the nadir and 46-degree ...

2013-04-17

323

Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano  

... height map   Ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano, viewed here in imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ... natural-color, nadir (vertical) view of the scene, with the volcano itself located outside the upper left corner of the image. The ash ...

2013-04-17

324

Chaiten Volcano Still Active  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Boston Globe news article shows 12 stunning pictures of the Chaiten Volcano erupting in Chile, its first activity in over 9,000 years. The most recent eruptive phase of the volcano began on May 2, 2008, and is ongoing. The site also has a blog of open, public commentary.

325

Anatomy of a Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive from NOVA Online provides a detailed look at the inner workings of one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes, Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Users can click on highlighted points on a crossection of the volcano to see photos and read about its features and eruptive products.

326

Anatomy of a Volcano  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This interactive lesson from NOVA Online provides a detailed look at the inner workings of one of the world's most dangerous volcanoes, Nyiragongo in the Democratic Republic of Congo. Users can click on highlighted points on a crossection of the volcano to see photos and read about its features and eruptive products.

2010-12-14

327

Northern Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's North Slope has begun its spring retreat. This true color MODIS image from March 18, 2002, shows the pack ice in the Chuckchi Sea (left) and Beaufort Sea (top) backing away from its winter position snug up against Alaska's coasts, beginning its retreat into the Arctic Ocean. While not as pronounced in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as other part of the Arctic, scientists studying Arctic sea ice over the course of the century have documented dramatic changes in the extent of Arctic sea ice. It retreats farther in the summer and does not advance as far in the winter than it did a half-century ago. Both global warming and natural variation in regional weather systems have been proposed as causes. Along the coastal plain of the North Slope, gray-brown tracks (see high-resolution image) hint at melting rivers. South of the North Slope, the rugged mountains of the Brooks Range make a coast-to-coast arc across the state. Coming in at the lower right of the image, the Yukon River traces a frozen white path westward across half the image before veering south and out of view. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

2002-01-01

328

Volcanoes. A planetary perspective.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this book, the author gives an account of the familiar violent aspects of volcanoes and the various forms that eruptions can take. He explores why volcanoes exist at all, why volcanoes occur where they do, and how examples of major historical eruptions can be interpreted in terms of physical processes. Throughout he attempts to place volcanism in a planetary perspective, exploring the pre-eminent role of submarine volcanism on Earth and the stunning range of volcanic phenomena revealed by spacecraft exploration of the solar system.

Francis, P.

329

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Winter 2000 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 16, No. 4 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Alaska Natives, page 4 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE � An examination of victimization of Alaska Natives

Pantaleone, Jim

330

Volcano deformation and subdaily GPS products  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcanic unrest is often accompanied by hours to months of deformation of the ground that is measurable with high-precision GPS. Although GPS receivers are capable of near continuous operation, positions are generally estimated for daily intervals, which I use to infer characteristics of a volcano’s plumbing system. However, GPS based volcano geodesy will not be useful in early warning scenarios unless positions are estimated at high rates and in real time. Visualization and analysis of dynamic and static deformation during the 2011 Tohokuoki earthquake in Japan motivates the application of high-rate GPS from a GPS seismology perspective. I give examples of dynamic seismic signals and their evolution to the final static offset in 30 s and 1 s intervals, which demonstrates the enhancement of subtle rupture dynamics through increased temporal resolution. This stresses the importance of processing data at recording intervals to minimize signal loss. Deformation during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, suggested net deflation by 0.05 km³ in three distinct phases. Mid-crustal aseismic precursory inflation began in May 2008 and was detected by a single continuous GPS station about 28 km NE of Redoubt. Deflation during the explosive and effusive phases was sourced from a vertical ellipsoidal reservoir at about 7-11.5 km. From this I infer a model for the temporal evolution of a complex plumbing system of at least 2 sources during the eruption. Using subdaily GPS positioning solutions I demonstrate that plumes can be detected and localized by utilizing information on phase residuals. The GPS network at Bezymianny Volcano, Kamchatka, records network wide subsidence at rapid rates between 8 and 12 mm/yr from 2005-2010. I hypothesize this to be caused by continuous deflation of a ˜30 km deep sill under Kluchevskoy Volcano. Interestingly, 1-2 explosive events per year cause little to no deformation at any site other than the summit site closest to the vent. I derive evidence for a very shallow source, likely within the edifice. This work shows that network design and individual plumbing system characteristics affect the ability to detect motion on subdaily and even weekly time scales, which stresses the importance of network scale considerations.

Grapenthin, Ronni

331

Vent of Sand Volcano  

USGS Multimedia Gallery

Vent of sand volcano produced by liquefaction is about 4 ft across in strawberry field near Watsonville. Strip spanning vent is conduit for drip irrigation system. Furrow spacing is about 1.2 m (4 ft) on center....

2009-01-26

332

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV ?-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV ?-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from ?-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

Mostafá, Miguel A.

2014-05-01

333

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) observatory is a large field of view, continuously operated, TeV ?-ray experiment under construction at 4,100 m a.s.l. in Mexico. The HAWC observatory will have an order of magnitude better sensitivity, angular resolution, and background rejection than its predecessor, the Milagro experiment. The improved performance will allow us to detect both the transient and steady emissions, to study the Galactic diffuse emission at TeV energies, and to measure or constrain the TeV spectra of GeV ?-ray sources. In addition, HAWC will be the only ground-based instrument capable of detecting prompt emission from ?-ray bursts above 50 GeV. The HAWC observatory will consist of an array of 300 water Cherenkov detectors (WCDs), each with four photomultiplier tubes. This array is currently under construction on the flanks of the Sierra Negra volcano near the city of Puebla, Mexico. The first 30 WCDs (forming an array approximately the size of Milagro) were deployed in Summer 2012, and 100 WCDs will be taking data by May, 2013. We present in this paper the motivation for constructing the HAWC observatory, the status of the deployment, and the first results from the constantly growing array.

Mostafá, Miguel A.

2014-10-01

334

Earthquakes in Alaska  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Earthquake risk is high in much of the southern half of Alaska, but it is not the same everywhere. This map shows the overall geologic setting in Alaska that produces earthquakes. The Pacific plate (darker blue) is sliding northwestward past southeastern Alaska and then dives beneath the North American plate (light blue, green, and brown) in southern Alaska, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands. Most earthquakes are produced where these two plates come into contact and slide past each other. Major earthquakes also occur throughout much of interior Alaska as a result of collision of a piece of crust with the southern margin.

Haeussler, Peter J.; Plafker, George

1995-01-01

335

Volcano Watch Satellite Images  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center displays these satellite images of the world's ten most active volcanoes. Users can view images of the Colima Volcano in Central Mexico or Mount Etna in Sicily, Italy. The latest images are updated every half-hour. Also, a Java animation feature splices together the last four images to show a simulation over a two-hour period.

336

Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

2006-01-01

337

What is a volcano?  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In a volcano, magma, generated at a source in a planetary interior, flows upward with varying amounts of physicochemical evolution, intruding the encasing rocks. Once near the top of the lithosphere, that is at a major rigid-fluid, high-low-density interface, the magma erupts, piercing this interface. While gas, vapors and thinnest particles mix up with the atmosphere and stratosphere, larger drops and particles will eventually accumulate on top of the interface to form volcanic deposits, giving rise in the area around the crater to a volcanic edifice. In turn, these deposits may be intruded or modified by magma, eruptions, geothermal fluids, tectonics, erosion, landsliding and all other kinds of geologic processes. In this view, volcanism is a self-similar process that ranges many orders of magnitude in space and time scales from small cinder cones to large ocean ridges. For instance, at Amiata Volcano, Italy, many of the above mentioned processes have interacted. The volcano is deeply dissected by volcanic spreading, to the point of loosing its original cone-like shape; large diapirs and thrust-related structure have formed in the clay- and gypsum-rich substratum all around the volcano generating dismembered lava flows. In addition, the spreading have created the conditions for the existence of mercury mineralization and geothermal reservoirs. All this complexity that, in our opinion must be considered volcanic is not easy described by commonly used definitions of volcanoes. In fact, former definitions of "volcano", for instance that from the Glossary of Geology (1997) "a vent in the surface of the Earth through which magma and associated gases and ash erupt" or "the form or structure, usually conical, that is produced by the ejected material" are clearly insufficient and cannot capture the geologic complexity of a real volcanic environment. All definitions, that we encountered, tend to consider volcanoes from the point of view of a single discipline, each of them neglecting relevant aspects belonging to other disciplines. For the two cases mentioned above a volcano is seen only from the point of view of eruptive activity or of morphology. We attempt to look at "volcano" holistically to provide a more comprehensive definition. We define a volcano as a geologic environment that, at any scale, is characterized by three elements: magma, eruption and edifice. It is sufficient that only one of these elements is proven, as long as the others can be inferred to exist, to have existed, or that will exist.

Borgia, A.; Merle, O.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Aubert, M.

2007-05-01

338

Alaska and Yukon Fires  

article title:  Smoke Signals from the Alaska and Yukon Fires     View ... Image Large lightning-induced fires were active in Alaska and the Yukon Territory from mid-June to mid-July, 2004. Thick smoke ...

2014-05-15

339

Alaska Natives & the Land.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

340

Alaska Native Hispanic or  

E-print Network

fCOLLEGEo CHARLESTON American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Enrolled American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native

Kunkle, Tom

341

Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska  

E-print Network

· · · · · · #12;V1 Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska 404 Alaskan Frontiers & Glaciers V1 PRSRTSTD U, rugged remote towns, amazing wildlife--this is Alaska, America's last frontier. Revel in its wild the Inside Passage along Canada's scenic western coast to Alaska and the small wilderness outpost

Raina, Ramesh

342

Alaska's Economy: What's Ahead?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This review describes Alaska's economic boom of the early 1980s, the current recession, and economic projections for the 1990s. Alaska's economy is largely influenced by oil prices, since petroleum revenues make up 80% of the state government's unrestricted general fund revenues. Expansive state spending was responsible for most of Alaska's…

Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions, 1987

1987-01-01

343

Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

Science and Children, 1980

1980-01-01

344

Earth Observatory Glossary  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Earth Observatory Glossary defines words from space science, ecology and Earth science. It is part of the NASA Earth Observatory site, which provides new satellite imagery and scientific information about Earth with a focus on climate and environmental change. The new glossary mode allows users to browse the Earth Observatory site with special terms highlighted that, when selected, will take you to the appropriate entry in the glossary.

345

Earthquakes and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This activity has students compare maps of plate tectonics with population density maps and to analyze what these maps imply about the relationship between population and seismic hazards. Students will read about and discuss the theory of plate tectonics, map the regions of the United States that are most susceptible to earthquakes and those that have volcanoes, and list the states that lie on plate boundaries. In addition, they will look at a population density map to determine if people avoid living in areas at high risk for earthquakes and volcanoes. Students will also research specific volcanoes or earthquake zones and write pretend letters to residents of these areas describing the risks. This site also contains suggestions for assessment and ideas for extending the lesson.

2001-01-01

346

Erupting Volcano Mount Etna  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Expedition Five crew members aboard the International Space Station (ISS) captured this overhead look at the smoke and ash regurgitated from the erupting volcano Mt. Etna on the island of Sicily, Italy in October 2002. Triggered by a series of earthquakes on October 27, 2002, this eruption was one of Etna's most vigorous in years. This image shows the ash plume curving out toward the horizon. The lighter-colored plumes down slope and north of the summit seen in this frame are produced by forest fires set by flowing lava. At an elevation of 10,990 feet (3,350 m), the summit of the Mt. Etna volcano, one of the most active and most studied volcanoes in the world, has been active for a half-million years and has erupted hundreds of times in recorded history.

2002-01-01

347

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE #12;UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Dear Student, Congratulations on taking the first step toward becoming a college student. At the University of Alaska Anchorage, you Director of Admissions University of Alaska Anchorage Welcome to the UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA Anchorage! #12

Duddleston, Khrys

348

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Fall 1999 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 16, No. 3 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see DWI Alaska 338 95.5 % Other (14 states) 16 4.5 Missing data 46 Table 2. Characteristics of DWI Arrestees

Pantaleone, Jim

349

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Fall 1998 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 15, No. 3 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Inmate in 1997 (page 2). An examination of probation revocation and ethnicity in Alaska (page 3). Current

Pantaleone, Jim

350

The Worlds Deadliest Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this interactive site the student attempts to rate the eruption of a volcano according to the Volcanic Explosive Index (VEI). After seeing the step by step eruption of an actual volcano, the student is introduced to VEI scale, which includes a description of the eruption, volume of ejected material, plume height, eruption type, duration, total known eruptions with that VEI, and an example. Each factor is linked to a section where it is explained in detail. After evaluating all of the factors and rating them, the student selects a VEI number and clicks for feedback. The correct answer is given with an explanation.

351

W M Keck Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The W M Keck Observatory, located on the island of Hawaii, operates the world's two largest optical\\/infrared telescopes, each with a primary mirror 10 m in diameter, near the 4200 m summit of Mauna Kea. Made possible through grants totaling more than $140 million from the W M Keck Foundation, the observatory is operated by the California Institute of Technology,

P. Murdin

2001-01-01

352

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is a 1000 tonne heavy water Cerenkov detector built to observe neutrinos from the sun and from supernovae. It is located deep underground to reduce the cosmic background radiation to negligible levels. The observatory is nearing completion and will commence full data taking early in 1999. Some aspects of its design and construction, and some of

R. L. Helmer; R. L. Hahn; J. K. Rowley; A. L. Carter; B. Hollebone; D. Kessler; I. Blevis; F. Dalnoki-Veress; A. DeKok; J. Farine; D. R. Grant; C. K. Hargrove; G. Laberge; I. Levine; K. McFarlane; H. Mes; A. T. Noble; V. M. Novikov; M. O'Neill; M. Shatkay; C. Shewchuk; D. Sinclair; E. T. H. Clifford; R. Deal; E. D. Earle; E. Gaudette; G. Milton; B. Sur; J. Bigu; J. H. M. Cowan; D. L. Cluff; E. D. Hallman; R. U. Haq; J. Hewett; J. G. Hykawy; G. Jonkmans; R. Michaud; A. Roberge; J. Roberts; E. Saettler; M. H. Schwendener; H. Seifert; D. Sweezey; R. Tafirout; C. J. Virtue; D. N. Beck; Y. D. Chan; X. Chen; M. R. Dragowsky; F. W. Dycus; J. Gonzalez; M. C. P. Isaac; Y. Kajiyama; G. W. Koehler; K. T. Lesko; M. C. Moebus; E. B. Norman; C. E. Okada; A. W. P. Poon; P. Purgalis; A. Schuelke; A. R. Smith; R. G. Stokstad; S. Turner; I. Zlimen; J. M. Anaya; T. J. Bowles; S. J. Brice; E.-I. Esch; M. M. Fowler; A. Goldschmidt; A. Hime; A. F. McGirt; G. G. Miller; W. A. Teasdale; J. B. Wilhelmy; J. M. Wouters; J. D. Anglin; M. Bercovitch; W. F. Davidson; R. S. Storey; S. Biller; R. A. Black; R. J. Boardman; M. G. Bowler; J. Cameron; B. Cleveland; A. P. Ferraris; G. Doucas; H. Heron; C. Howard; N. A. Jelley; A. B. Knox; M. Lay; W. Locke; J. Lyon; S. Majerus; M. Moorhead; M. Omori; N. W. Tanner; R. K. Taplin; M. Thorman; D. L. Wark; J. C. Barton; P. T. Trent; R. Kouzes; M. M. Lowry; A. L. Bell; E. Bonvin; M. Boulay; M. Dayon; F. Duncan; L. S. Erhardt; H. C. Evans; G. T. Ewan; R. Ford; A. Hallin; A. Hamer; P. M. Hart; P. J. Harvey; D. Haslip; C. A. W. Hearns; R. Heaton; J. D. Hepburn; C. J. Jillings; E. P. Korpach; H. W. Lee; J. R. Leslie; M.-Q. Liu; H. B. Mak; A. B. McDonald; J. D. MacArthur; W. McLatchie; B. A. Moffat; S. Noel; T. J. Radcliffe; B. C. Robertson; P. Skensved; R. L. Stevenson; X. Zhu; S. Gil; J. Heise; R. J. Komar; C. W. Nally; H. S. Ng; C. E. Waltham; R. C. Allen; G. Bühler; H. H. Chen; G. Aardsma; T. Andersen; K. Cameron; M. C. Chon; R. H. Hanson; P. Jagam; J. Karn; J. Law; R. W. Ollerhead; J. J. Simpson; N. Tagg; J.-X. Wang; C. Alexander; E. W. Beier; J. C. Cook; D. F. Cowen; E. D. Frank; W. Frati; P. T. Keener; J. R. Klein; G. Mayers; D. S. McDonald; M. S. Neubauer; F. M. Newcomer; R. J. Pearce; R. G. V. de Water; R. V. Berg; P. Wittich; Q. R. Ahmad; J. M. Beck; M. C. Browne; T. H. Burritt; P. J. Doe; C. A. Duba; S. R. Elliott; J. E. Franklin; J. V. Germani; P. Green; A. A. Hamian; K. M. Heeger; M. Howe; R. M. Drees; A. Myers; R. G. H. Robertson; M. W. E. Smith; T. D. Steiger; T. V. Wechel; J. F. Wilkerson

2000-01-01

353

The Norwegian Naval Observatories  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

2007-07-01

354

European Southern Observatory  

E-print Network

Observatory Multi-Conjugate AO concept 1-2' FoV, Near IR, medium Strehl ratio AO using NGSs 6 Visible Shack Deformable Mirror at M6 Computing power: 2000 x NAOS Or 10 x VLT AO Facility On-axis, NIR, medium Strehl ratio AO using NGSs #12;5 European Southern Observatory SCAO Wavefront sensor pick-up arm Patrolling

Liske, Jochen

355

Geology of Kilauea volcano  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

Moore, R.B. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. (Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

1993-08-01

356

The Three Little Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this worksheet students identify and label the characteristic features of shield, cinder cone and composite volcanoes. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA Why Files: The Case of the Mysterious Red Light. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

357

Santa Maria Volcano, Guatemala  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The eruption of Santa Maria volcano in 1902 was one of the largest eruptions of the 20th century, forming a large crater on the mountain's southwest flank. Since 1922, a lava-dome complex, Santiaguito, has been forming in the 1902 crater. Growth of the dome has produced pyroclastic flows as recently as the 2001-they can be identified in this image. The city of Quezaltenango (approximately 90,000 people in 1989) sits below the 3772 m summit. The volcano is considered dangerous because of the possibility of a dome collapse such as one that occurred in 1929, which killed about 5000 people. A second hazard results from the flow of volcanic debris into rivers south of Santiaguito, which can lead to catastrophic flooding and mud flows. More information on this volcano can be found at web sites maintained by the Smithsonian Institution, Volcano World, and Michigan Tech University. ISS004-ESC-7999 was taken 17 February 2002 from the International Space Station using a digital camera. The image is provided by the Earth Sciences and Image Analysis Laboratory at Johnson Space Center. Searching and viewing of additional images taken by astronauts and cosmonauts is available at the NASA-JSC Gateway to

2002-01-01

358

The Super Volcano Game  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

How would you handle a volcano diasater? In this game, you've just been appointed chief of the Emergency Management Agency for Bluebear County. Everyone is counting on you to handle the eruption of Mount Spur. Download this game to find out. Before you play, make sure Flash is installed on your computer.

Corporation, British B.

359

The Volcano Adventure Guide  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information that includes tour itineraries, maps, transportation details, and warnings of possible non-volcanic dangers. Three appendices direct the reader to a wealth of further volcano resources in a volume that will fascinate amateur enthusiasts and professional volcanologists alike. Rosaly Lopes is a planetary geology and volcanology specialist at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California. In addition to her curatorial and research work, she has lectured extensively in England and Brazil and written numerous popular science articles. She received a Latinas in Science Award from the Comision Feminil Mexicana Nacional in 1991 and since 1992, has been a co-organizer of the United Nations/European Space Agency/The Planetary Society yearly conferences on Basic Science for the Benefit of Developing Countries.

Lopes, Rosaly

2005-02-01

360

Lower-Crustal and Upper-Mantle Seismicity beneath Aleutian Arc Volcanoes: A Temporal Link for Magmatic Processes between the Lower-Crust and the Surface  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Since 1989 the Alaska Volcano Observatory has identified more than 1,200 seismic events at upper-mantle to mid-crustal depths beneath 27 active Aleutian arc volcanic centers. Epicenters typically scatter broadly around the volcanoes at distances of as much as 25 km from the closest volcanic vent. Hypocenters for these events range typically from 15 to 45 km and the average depth is 25.1 km (?1 = 8.1 km). Magnitudes of located events range from -0.25 to 2.9 and the average magnitude is 1.22 (?1 = 0.5). Seismicity at these depths is unusual as it is generally considered below the brittle-ductile transition and suggests the involvement of pressurized fluids. These events provide some of the only direct evidence of the time history of magmatic processes in the lower-crust and upper-mantle, a portion of the magma pathway that is traditionally difficult to observe. The waveforms of these events exhibit the full range in frequency content typically seen in volcanic environments from broad spectrum (1 to 15 Hz) brittle failure, volcano-tectonic earthquakes, to peaked spectra (1 to 4 Hz), fluid resonance or long-period events. Most of the events are long-period or low-frequency in character and often have extended codas. These events occur both as solitary events and in sequences lasting from 2 to 30 minutes containing 3 to 10 individual events. Within the sequences individual events are often separated by volcanic tremor that shares the same spectral character as the seismic events themselves. All Aleutian arc volcanoes with suitable instrumentation and long-term monitoring exhibit some level of mid-crustal to upper-mantle seismicity. Spurr, Westdahl, Aniakchak and Akutan have the highest rates of upper-mantle to mid-crustal seismicity. Recent eruptions at Redoubt (2009) and Shishaldin (1999) were preceded by increases in lower-crustal seismicity as were episodes of unrest at Mount Spurr (2005), Trident (2008) and Little Sitkin (2012). The 1992 eruption of Mount Spurr initiated an increase in mid- to lower-crustal seismicity that continued until 1997. The time history of these sequences suggests a link between upper-crustal volcanic unrest and magmatic processes in upper-mantle or lower-crust that occurs at time scales of weeks to months. Tracking seismicity in the mid- to lower-crust and upper mantle may provide a means to extend forecasts of hazardous volcanic activity to an earlier stage in the eruption cycle.

Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; Ketner, D. M.; Haney, M. M.; Prejean, S. G.; Parker, T. J.

2013-12-01

361

CALIPSO Borehole Instrumentation Project at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat, BWI: Data Acquisition, Telemetry, Integration, and Archival Systems  

Microsoft Academic Search

The CALIPSO Project (Caribbean Andesite Lava Island-volcano Precision Seismo-geodetic Observatory) has greatly enhanced the monitoring and scientific infrastructure at the Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat with the recent installation of an integrated array of borehole and surface geophysical instrumentation at four sites. Each site was designed to be sufficiently hardened to withstand extreme meteorological events (e.g. hurricanes) and only require minimum

G. S. Mattioli; A. T. Linde; I. S. Sacks; P. E. Malin; E. Shalev; D. Elsworth; D. Hidayat; B. Voight; S. R. Young; P. N. Dunkley; R. Herd; G. Norton

2003-01-01

362

FIRE_CI1_SRB_ALASKA  

FIRE_CI1_SRB_ALASKA Project Title:  FIRE I CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Guide Documents:  SRB Data Set Guide - Alaska, Canada, So Pole, Switz Readme Files:  Readme SRB Alaska Header SRB Alaska Table of Contents SRB Alaska ...

2014-05-06

363

ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE  

E-print Network

, the loved ones of a murder victim seeking justice, the couple tangled in a divorce, the adult child seeking these decisions have on parents and children. The Alaska Family Law Self-Help Center estimates that 25 per- cent

Pantaleone, Jim

364

The Virtual Observatory: I  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

Hanisch, R. J.

2014-11-01

365

Creating Griffith Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its temporary Director.

Cook, Anthony

2013-01-01

366

Catalog of earthquakes in southern Alaska, April-June 1980  

SciTech Connect

This earthquake catalog presents origin times, focal coordinates and magnitudes for 1302 shocks occurring in the second quarter of 1980. Readings from a total of 65 stations were used to locate the shocks, including 12 stations operated by the NOAA Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (ATWC, formerly Palmer Observatory), 6 stations operated by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska (U. of A.), and 4 stations operated in southwest Yukon Territory by the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, Canada. The shocks included in this catalog are as small as magnitude 1.0 and most are smaller than magnitude 3.0. 19 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

Fogleman, K.A.; Stephens, C.D.; Lahr, J.C.; Roger, J.A.; Cancilla, R.S.; Tam, R.; Freiberg, J.A.; Melnick, J.P.

1983-01-01

367

The Alaska Climate Research Center  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The University of Fairbanks's Alaska Climate Research Center offers a host of materials about its climate research and about Alaska's climate in general. The website supplies abstracts of the Center's research projects such as _The Urban Heat Island Effect at Fairbanks, Alaska_ and _Radiation Climatology of Alaska_. Researchers can find data and statistics on Alaska's temperature, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, pressure, and wind. The website provides Climographs for various areas throughout the state. Students can discover how latitude, continentiality, and elevation affect Alaska's climate.

368

Dartmouth Flood Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Dartmouth Flood Observatory produced this website as "a research tool for detection, mapping, measurement, and analysis of extreme flood events world-wide using satellite remote sensing." Users can learn about the Observatory's use of microwave and optical satellite imaging to determine flooding and extreme low flow conditions for various places throughout the world. Students and researchers can discover how the observatory monitors wetland hydrology for various places. Researchers can find archives of large flooding events from 1985 to the present. The web site features a variety of maps and satellite images of floods. This site is also reviewed in the May 28, 2004 _NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

369

Astrophysical Virtual Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

At this website, the European Commission and six European organizations discuss the creation of the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory Project (AVO) for European astronomy. Visitors can discover the function of a Virtual Observatory (VO) as "an international astronomical community-based initiative" aimed at allowing "global electronic access to the available astronomical data archives of space and ground-based observatories." Users can learn about the current problems associated with combining astronomical data collected all over the world and how a VO can streamline this data. The website supplies numerous images illustrating galactic scenarios, AVO prototypes, and AVO goals.

370

North Pole Environmental Observatory  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) is a collection of the University of Washington's year-round un-manned scientific platforms in the Central Basin of the Arctic Ocean. Researchers will find images, data, and other information about the three types of measurement systems: Drifting Buoys, Oceanographic Mooring, and Aerial Surveys of Hydrographic Casts. Viewers can find links to the weather and other atmospheric conditions at the observatory. The site also provides links to news coverage pertaining to NPEO. Students can study the circulation patterns of the Freshwater Switchyard of the Arctic Ocean. Everyone can learn about the international research team's yearly expeditions to the observatory.

371

Volcanic Tsunami Generation in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many of the worlds active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines, and during eruptions the transfer of mass from volcano to sea is a potential source mechanism for tsunamis. Flows of granular material off of volcanoes, such as pyroclastic flow, debris avalanche, and lahar, often deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean that have a large potential tsunami hazard. The deposits of both hot and cold volcanic grain flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by granular subaerial volcanic flows using examples from Aniakchak volcano in southwestern Alaska, and Augustine volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Evidence for far-field tsunami inundation coincident with a major caldera-forming eruption of Aniakchak volcano ca. 3.5 ka has been described and is the basis for one of our case studies. We perform a numerical simulation of the tsunami using a large volume pyroclastic flow as the source mechanism and compare our results to field measurements of tsunami deposits preserved along the north shore of Bristol Bay. Several attributes of the tsunami simulation, such as water flux and wave amplitude, are reasonable predictors of tsunami deposit thickness and generally agree with the field evidence for tsunami inundation. At Augustine volcano, geological investigations suggest that as many as 14 large volcanic-rock avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during the 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. By analogy with the 1883 event, previous studies concluded that tsunamis could have been generated many times in the past. If so, geological evidence of tsunamis, such as tsunami deposits on land, should be found in the area around Augustine Island. Paradoxically, unequivocal evidence for tsunami inundation has been found. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region and a future tsunami from the volcano would have devastating consequences to villages, towns, oil-production facilities, and the fishing industry, especially if it occurred at high tide (the tidal range in this area is about 5 m). Numerical simulation experiments of tsunami generation, propagation and inundation using a subaerial debris avalanche source at Augustine volcano indicate only modest wave generation because of the shallow water surrounding the volcano (maximum water depth about 25 m). Lahar flows produced during eruptions at snow and ice clad volcanoes in the Aleutian arc also deliver copious amounts of sediment to the sea. These flows only rarely transform to subaqueous debris flows that may become tsunamigenic. However, the accumulation of loose, unconsolidated sediment on the continental shelf may lead to subaqueous debris flows and landslides if these deposits become mobilized by large earthquakes. Tsunamis produced by this mechanism could potentially reach coastlines all along the Pacific Rim. Finally, recent work in the western Aleutian Islands indicates that many of the island volcanoes in this area have experienced large-scale flank collapse. Because these volcanoes are surrounded by deep water, the tsunami hazard associated with a future sector collapse could be significant.

Waythomas, C. F.; Watts, P.

2003-12-01

372

Third International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Kamchatka State University, Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia) and University of Alaska Fairbanks have developed an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. The concept of the field school envisages joint field studies by young Russian scientists and their peers from the United States and Japan. Beyond providing first-hand experience with some of Earth's most remarkable volcanic features, the intent is to foster greater interest in language study, cultures, and ultimately in international research collaborations. The students receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of active volcanic systems, as well experience in working productively in a harsh environment. Each year, the class is offered in both Alaska and Kamchatka. The Alaska session is held in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, product of the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. A highlight in 2005 was the discovery of a new 70-m crater atop Trident Volcano. Also this year, we added the Great Tolbachik Eruption of 1975-76 to the itinerary of the Kamchatka school. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of New Tolbachik volcanoes and Plosky Tolbachik, Tolbachik lava flows; fumarole fields of Mutnovsky volcano, and a geothermal area and 60 MWe power plant. Students who attended both the Alaska and Kamchatka sessions could ponder the implications of great lateral separation of active vents - 10 km at Katmai and 30 km at Tolbachik - with multiple magmas and non-eruptive caldera collapse at the associated stratocones. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. The field school is a strong stimulus for growth of young volcanologists and cooperation among Russia, USA and Japan, leading naturally to longer student exchange visits and to joint research projects.

Melnikov, D.; Eichelberger, J.; Gordeev, E.; Malcolm, J.; Shipman, J.; Izbekov, P.

2005-12-01

373

Multiparameter Volcano Surveillance of Villarrica Volcano (South-Central Chile)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Villarrica is one of the most active volcanoes in Chile and one of the few in the world known to have an active lava lake within its crater. This snow-covered volcano generates frequent strombolian eruptions and lava flows and, at times, the melting of snow can cause massive lahars. Besides this, continuous degassing and high-level seismicity are the most common types of activity recorded at the volcano. In order to investigate the mechanisms driving the persistent degassing and seismic activity at the volcano, we use a multiparameter approach based on the combined study of high time-resolved gas and seismic data. These data are respectively acquired by means of 3 stationary NOVAC-type scanning Mini-DOAS and 7 additional seismometers (short period and broad bands), installed at the volcano since March 2009, that complement the existing OVDAS (Observatorio Volcanológico de los Andes del Sur) volcano monitoring network. On the basis of the combination of gas and seismological measurements we aim at gaining insight into volcano-magmatic processes, and factors playing a role on onset of volcanic unrest and eruptive activity. Since the gas monitoring network has been installed at the volcano a correlation between SO2 emissions and seismic activity (LP events) has been recognized. A possible role played by regional tectonics on detected changes in volcano degassing and seismicity, and consequently on the volcanic activity, is also investigated.

Garofalo, Kristin; Peña, Paola; Dzierma, Yvonne; Hansteen, Thor; Rabbel, Wolfgang; Gil, Fernando

2010-05-01

374

An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities in the United States: Framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

"A National Volcano Early Warning System-NVEWS-is being formulated by the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) to establish a proactive, fully integrated, national-scale monitoring effort that ensures the most threatening volcanoes in the United States are properly monitored in advance of the onset of unrest and at levels commensurate with the threats posed." At this website, users can download the USGS's 62 page report detailing the current monitoring system and the proposed changes to the level of monitoring at each volcano. Visitors can discover why monitoring is needed through the descriptions of the damage volcanoes have caused in the United States since 1980 and their future threats.

375

Advancing the Gemini Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gemini Science and User Meeting; San Francisco, California, 17-20 July 2012 More than 100 astronomers gathered in San Francisco to discuss results from the Gemini Observatory and to plan for its future. The Gemini Observatory consists of twin 8.1 meter diameter optical/infrared telescopes located on mountaintops in Hawai'i and Chile. Gemini was built and is operated by an international partnership that currently includes the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada, Chile, Australia, Brazil, and Argentina.

Hammel, Heidi B.; Levenson, Nancy A.

2012-11-01

376

Big Bear Solar Observatory  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO) is located at the end of a causeway in a mountain lake more than 2 km above sea level. The site has more than 300 sunny days a year and a natural inversion caused by the lake which makes for very clean images. BBSO is the only university observatory in the US making high-resolution observations of the Sun. Its daily images are posted at http://www.bbso.njit.e...

Murdin, P.

2000-11-01

377

Spatial Databases for CalVO Volcanoes: Current Status and Future Directions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) California Volcano Observatory (CalVO) aims to advance scientific understanding of volcanic processes and to lessen harmful impacts of volcanic activity in California and Nevada. Within CalVO's area of responsibility, ten volcanoes or volcanic centers have been identified by a national volcanic threat assessment in support of developing the U.S. National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) as posing moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. To better understand the extent of potential hazards at these and other volcanoes and volcanic centers, the USGS Volcano Science Center (VSC) is continually compiling spatial databases of volcano information, including: geologic mapping, hazards assessment maps, locations of geochemical and geochronological samples, and the distribution of volcanic vents. This digital mapping effort has been ongoing for over 15 years and early databases are being converted to match recent datasets compiled with new data models designed for use in: 1) generating hazard zones, 2) evaluating risk to population and infrastructure, 3) numerical hazard modeling, and 4) display and query on the CalVO as well as other VSC and USGS websites. In these capacities, spatial databases of CalVO volcanoes and their derivative map products provide an integrated and readily accessible framework of VSC hazards science to colleagues, emergency managers, and the general public.

Ramsey, D. W.

2013-12-01

378

Earthquakes and Volcanoes  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit provides an introduction for younger students on earthquakes, volcanoes, and how they are related. Topics include evidence of continental drift, types of plate boundaries, types of seismic waves, and how to calculate the distance to the epicenter of an earthquake. There is also information on how earthquake magnitude and intensity are measured, and how seismic waves can reveal the Earth's internal structure. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

Medina, Philip

2011-06-27

379

Volcanoes and Climate Change  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Major volcanic eruptions alter the Earth's radiative balance, as volcanic ash and gas clouds absorb terrestrial radiation and scatter a significant amount of the incoming solar radiation, an effect known as "radiative forcing" that can last from two to three years following a volcanic eruption. This results in reduced temperatures in the troposphere, and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. This site uses text, photographs, and links to related sites to describe volcano-induced climate change.

380

Gelatin Volcanoes: Student Page  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This is the Student Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. The Student Page contains the activity preparation instructions and materials list, key words, and a photograph of the experimental setup. There is also an extension activity question that has students predict what will happen when the experiment is run using an elongated model. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

381

GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10.8 and IR 12.0. The GlobVolcano information system and its current experimentation represent a

Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

2010-05-01

382

Volcanoes generate devastating waves  

SciTech Connect

Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

1988-01-01

383

Pairing the Volcano  

E-print Network

Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

Ionica, Sorina

2011-01-01

384

Sulfur volcanoes on Io?  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The unusual rheological properties of sulfur are discussed in order to determine the distinctive volcanic flow morphologies which indicate the presence of sulfur volcanoes on the Saturnian satellite Io. An analysis of high resolution Voyager imagery reveals three features which are considered to be possible sulfur volcanoes: Atar Patera, Daedalus Patera, and Kibero Patera. All three features are distinguished by circular-to-oval central masses surrounded by irregular widespread flows. The central zones of the features are interpreted to be domes formed of high temperature sulfur. To confirm the interpretations of the satellite data, molten sulfur was extruded in the laboratory at a temperature of 210 C on a flat surface sloping 0.5 deg to the left. At this temperature, the sulfur formed a viscous domelike mass over the event. As parts of the mass cooled to 170 C the viscosity decreased to a runny stage, forming breakout flows. It is concluded that a case can be made for sulfur volcanoes on Io sufficient to warrant further study, and it is recommended that the upcoming Galileo mission examine these phenomena.

Greeley, R.; Fink, J. H.

1984-01-01

385

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM  

E-print Network

Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Winter 2001 UNIVERSITY OFALASKAANCHORAGE Vol. 17, No. 4 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Circle in Alaska (page 2). � Justice Center paralegal students participate in service learning project (page 4

Pantaleone, Jim

386

ALASKA CRUISE SHIP INITIATIVE  

EPA Science Inventory

During the course of the annual vacation season, luxury cruise ships carrying up to 3000 passengers visit the coastal cities and small towns of Alaska. Alaska is the first state to impose regulations requiring such vessels to submit to inspection and monitoring of gray water and...

387

Alaska drilling\\/production  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alaska overtook Louisiana in 1979 to become the number 2 oil producing state in the US. The Prudhoe Bay field, largest ever discovered in the US, supplied most of the oil, and it was transported to market along the Trans-Alaska Pipeline system with an assist from drag reduction additives. Wildcatters are continuing to search for new fields from lower Cook

Rintoul

1980-01-01

388

Renewable Energy in Alaska  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

Not Available

2013-03-01

389

Alaska Historical Society  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This visually arresting site from the Alaska Historical Society is a superb resource for teachers of history and social studies, or for anyone fascinated by the 49th state. Discover AlaskaâÂÂs History is a great place to start. After perusing the FAQs, readers may wish to look at the subheading, For Teachers and Students, where Alaskan history has been divided into easily digestible categories such as 1989 Exxon Valdez Oil Spill, Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964, and Alaska Statehood and Constitutional Convention 1955/1956, with corresponding articles and links. The For Researchers section offers links to helpful resources around the web. The weekly AHS Blog is a well-composed and informative romp through AlaskaâÂÂs past, with posts covering canneries and gold camps, baseball and boats.