Sample records for alaska volcano observatory

  1. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Murray, Tom; Read, Cyrus

    2008-01-01

    Steam plume from the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska. Explosive ash-producing eruptions from Alaska's 40+ historically active volcanoes pose hazards to aviation, including commercial aircraft flying the busy North Pacific routes between North America and Asia. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors these volcanoes to provide forecasts of eruptive activity. AVO is a joint program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). AVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Augustine volcano and AVO at http://www.avo.alaska.edu.

  2. Alaska Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the Alaska Volcano Observatory, a joint program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAFGI), and the State of Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys (ADGGS). Users can access current information on volcanic activity in Alaska and the Kamchatka Penninsula, including weekly and daily reports and information releases about significant changes in any particluar volcano. An interactive map also directs users to summaries and activity notifications for selected volcanoes, or through links to webcams and webicorders (recordings of seismic activity). General information on Alaskan volcanoes includes descriptions, images, maps, bibliographies, and eruptive histories. This can be accessed through an interactive map or by clicking on an alphabetic listing of links to individual volcanoes. There is also an online library of references pertinent to Quaternary volcanism in Alaska and an image library.

  3. AVO: Alaska Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site illustrates the Alaska Volcano Observatory's (AVO) objective to monitor Alaska's volcanoes for the purpose of forecasting volcanic activity and alleviating hazards. AVO's seismometers and satellite imagery allow visitors to obtain current information on selected volcanoes. Because AVO is responsible for volcanic emergencies, people in Alaska can visit the Web site to determine their vulnerability. The site also features AVO's research in geological mapping, modeling of magnetic systems, and development of new instrumentation for predication and interpretation of volcanic unrest. Everyone can appreciate the images of past volcanic eruptions.

  4. Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring Station

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    An Alaska Volcano Observatory Monitoring station with Peulik Volcano behind. This is the main repeater for the Peulik monitoring network located on Whale Mountain, Beecharaof National Wildlife Refuge....

  5. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. C. Eichelberger

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the

  6. Alaska Volcano Observatory at 20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 in the wake of the 1986 Augustine eruption through a congressional earmark. Even within the volcanological community, there was skepticism about AVO. Populations directly at risk in Alaska were small compared to Cascadia, and the logistical costs of installing and maintaining monitoring equipment were much higher. Questions were raised concerning the technical feasibility of keeping seismic stations operating through the long, dark, stormy Alaska winters. Some argued that AVO should simply cover Augustine with instruments and wait for the next eruption there, expected in the mid 90s (but delayed until 2006), rather than stretching to instrument as many volcanoes as possible. No sooner was AVO in place than Redoubt erupted and a fully loaded passenger 747 strayed into the eruption cloud between Anchorage and Fairbanks, causing a powerless glide to within a minute of impact before the pilot could restart two engines and limp into Anchorage. This event forcefully made the case that volcano hazard mitigation is not just about people and infrastructure on the ground, and is particularly important in the heavily traveled North Pacific where options for flight diversion are few. In 1996, new funding became available through an FAA earmark to aggressively extend volcano monitoring far into the Aleutian Islands with both ground-based networks and round-the-clock satellite monitoring. Beyond the Aleutians, AVO developed a monitoring partnership with Russians volcanologists at the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky. The need to work together internationally on subduction phenomena that span borders led to formation of the Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) consortium. JKASP meets approximately biennially in Sapporo, Petropavlovsk, and Fairbanks. In turn, these meetings and support from NSF and the Russian Academy of Sciences led to new international education and research opportunities for Russian and American students. AVO was a three-way partnership of the federal and state geological surveys and the state university from the start. This was not a flowering of ecumenism but was rather at the insistence of the Alaska congressional delegation. Such shared enterprises are not managerially convenient, but they do bring a diversity of roles, thinking, and expertise that would not otherwise be possible. Through AVO, the USGS performs its federally mandated role in natural hazard mitigation and draws on expertise available from its network of volcano observatories. The Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys performs a similar role at the state level and, in the tradition of state surveys, provides important public communications, state data base, and mapping functions. The University of Alaska Fairbanks brought seismological, remote sensing, geodetic, petrological, and physical volcanological expertise, and uniquely within US academia was able to engage students directly in volcano observatory activities. Although this "model" cannot be adopted in total elsewhere, it has served to point the USGS Volcano Hazards Program in a direction of greater openness and inclusiveness.

  7. 2011 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Maharrey, J. Zebulon; Neal, Christina A.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near three separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2011. The year was highlighted by the unrest and eruption of Cleveland Volcano in the central Aleutian Islands. AVO annual summaries no longer report on activity at Russian volcanoes.

  8. 1994 Volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Doukas, Michael P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1995-01-01

    During 1994, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, or false alarms at nine volcanic centers-- Mount Sanford, Iliamna, the Katmai group, Kupreanof, Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Mount Cleveland and Kanaga (table 1). Of these volcanoes, AVO has a real time, continuously recording seismic network only at Iliamna, which is located in the Cook Inlet area of south-central Alaska (fig. 1). AVO has dial-up access to seismic data from a 5-station network in the general region of the Katmai group of volcanoes. The remaining unmonitored volcanoes are located in sparsely populated areas of the Wrangell Mountains, the Alaska Peninsula, and the Aleutian Islands (fig. 1). For these volcanoes, the AVO monitoring program relies chiefly on receipt of pilot reports, observations of local residents and analysis of satellite imagery.

  9. 2012 volcanic activity in Alaska: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Herrick, Julie A.; Neal, Christina A.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Dixon, James P.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, or suspected unrest at 11 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2012. Of the two verified eruptions, one (Cleveland) was clearly magmatic and the other (Kanaga) was most likely a single phreatic explosion. Two other volcanoes had notable seismic swarms that probably were caused by magmatic intrusions (Iliamna and Little Sitkin). For each period of clear volcanic unrest, AVO staff increased monitoring vigilance as needed, reviewed eruptive histories of the volcanoes in question to help evaluate likely outcomes, and shared observations and interpretations with the public. 2012 also was the 100th anniversary of Alaska’s Katmai-Novarupta eruption of 1912, the largest eruption on Earth in the 20th century and one of the most important volcanic eruptions in modern times. AVO marked this occasion with several public events.

  10. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Cascades Volcano Observatory of the U.S. Geological Survey has announced a WWW server offering information on volcanically-induced geologic and hydrologic hazards as well as images of volcanoes and volcanic phenomena. Includes links to ther components of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program such as the Alaska and Hawaii Volcano Observatory and the international Volcano Disaster Assistance Program.

  11. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out volcano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in Alaska. The cooperating agencies of

    E-print Network

    #12;The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out volcano monitoring with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruptions Response Team (KVERT). Cover photo: Iliamna Volcano and Umbrella Glacier as viewed from the valley of West Glacier Creek. View is toward the northeast. #12;Preliminary Volcano

  12. 2010 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; Herrick, Julie; Girina, O.A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at 12 volcanic centers in Alaska during 2010. The most notable volcanic activity consisted of intermittent ash emissions from long-active Cleveland volcano in the Aleutian Islands. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of an ongoing collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  13. 2009 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Girina, Olga A.; Chibisova, Marina; Rybin, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, volcanic unrest, and reports of unusual activity at or near eight separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2009. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, one of three active volcanoes on the western side of Cook Inlet and near south-central Alaska's population and commerce centers, which comprise about 62 percent of the State's population of 710,213 (2010 census). AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at ten volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  14. 1996 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    1997-01-01

    During 1996, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity, anomalous seismicity, or suspected volcanic activity at 10 of the approximately 40 active volcanic centers in the state of Alaska. As part of a formal role in KVERT (the Kamchatkan Volcano Eruption Response Team), AVO staff also disseminated information about eruptions and other volcanic unrest at six volcanic centers on the Kamchatka Peninsula and in the Kurile Islands, Russia.

  15. 2008 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Nuzhdaev, Anton A.; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest or suspected unrest at seven separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2008. Significant explosive eruptions at Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes in July and August dominated Observatory operations in the summer and autumn. AVO maintained 24-hour staffing at the Anchorage facility from July 12 through August 28. Minor eruptive activity continued at Veniaminof and Cleveland Volcanoes. Observed volcanic unrest at Cook Inlet's Redoubt Volcano presaged a significant eruption in the spring of 2009. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication regarding eruptions or unrest at nine volcanoes in Russia as part of a collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  16. 2007 Volcanic activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Dixon, James P.; Malik, Nataliya; Chibisova, Marina

    2011-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2007. The year was highlighted by the eruption of Pavlof, one of Alaska's most frequently active volcanoes. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the autumn of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of steam and volcanic gas into 2007. Redoubt Volcano showed the first signs of the unrest that would unfold in 2008-09. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  17. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out vol-cano monitoring, eruption notification, and volcanic hazards assessments in

    E-print Network

    #12;The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) was established in 1988 to carry out vol- cano monitoring with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Erup- tions Response Team (KVERT). Cover photograph: Redoubt Volcano and low-level steam and ash plume, 1989. View is to the northwest. (Photograph by Jon J. Major, Cascades Volcano Observatory

  18. 2006 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neal, Christina A.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Dixon, James P.; Manevich, Alexander; Rybin, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptions, possible eruptions, and volcanic unrest at or near nine separate volcanic centers in Alaska during 2006. A significant explosive eruption at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet marked the first eruption within several hundred kilometers of principal population centers in Alaska since 1992. Glaciated Fourpeaked Mountain, a volcano thought to have been inactive in the Holocene, produced a phreatic eruption in the fall of 2006 and continued to emit copious amounts of volcanic gas into 2007. AVO staff also participated in hazard communication and monitoring of multiple eruptions at seven volcanoes in Russia as part of its collaborative role in the Kamchatka and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Teams.

  19. Hazard communication by the Alaska Volcano Observatory Concerning the 2008 Eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, J. N.; Cameron, C. E.; Neal, T. A.; Shipman, J. S.

    2008-12-01

    The significant explosive eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes in 2008 tested the hazard communication systems at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) including a rigorous test of the new format for written notices of volcanic activity. AVO's Anchorage-based Operations facility (Ops) at the USGS Alaska Science Center serves as the hub of AVO's eruption response. From July 12 through August 28, 2008 Ops was staffed around the clock (24/7). Among other duties, Ops staff engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding federal and state agencies and issued Volcanic Activity Notices (VAN) and Volcano Observatory Notifications for Aviation (VONA), recently established and standardized products to announce eruptions, significant activity, and alert level and color code changes. In addition to routine phone communications with local, national and international media, on July 22, AVO held a local press conference in Ops to share observations and distribute video footage collected by AVO staff on board a U.S. Coast Guard flight over Okmok. On July 27, AVO staff gave a public presentation on the Okmok eruption in Unalaska, AK, 65 miles northeast of Okmok volcano and also spoke with local public safety and industry officials, observers and volunteer ash collectors. AVO's activity statements, photographs, and selected data streams were posted in near real time on the AVO public website. Over the six-week 24/7 period, AVO staff logged and answered approximately 300 phone calls in Ops and approximately 120 emails to the webmaster. Roughly half the logged calls were received from interagency cooperators including NOAA National Weather Service's Alaska Aviation Weather Unit and the Center Weather Service Unit, both in Anchorage. A significant number of the public contacts were from mariners reporting near real-time observations and photos of both eruptions, as well as the eruption of nearby Cleveland Volcano on July 21. As during the 2006 eruption of Augustine volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska, the number of calls to Ops, emails to the webmaster, and the amount of data served via the AVO website greatly increased during elevated volcanic activity designated by the USGS aviation color code and volcano alert level. Lessons learned include, Ops staffing requirements during periods of high call volume, the need for ash fall hazard information in multiple languages, and the value of real-time observations of remote Aleutian eruptions made by local mariners. An important theme of public inquiries concerned the amount and potential climate impacts of the significant sulfur dioxide gas and ash plumes emitted by Okmok and Kasatochi, including specific questions on the amount of sulfur dioxide discharged during each eruption. The significant plumes produced at the onset of the Okmok and Kasatochi eruptions also had lengthy national and international aviation impacts and yet-to-be resolved hemispherical or possible global, climactic effects.

  20. Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory to Public Inquiry Concerning the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adleman, J. N.

    2006-12-01

    The 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano provided the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) with an opportunity to test its newly renovated Operations Center (Ops) at the Alaska Science Center in Anchorage. Because of the demand for interagency operations and public communication, Ops became the hub of Augustine monitoring activity, twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, from January 10 through May 19, 2006. During this time, Ops was staffed by 17 USGS AVO staff, and over two dozen Fairbanks-based AVO staff from the Alaska Department of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute and USGS Volcano Hazards Program staff from outside Alaska. This group engaged in communicating with the public, media, and other responding agencies throughout the eruption. Before and during the eruption, reference sheets - ;including daily talking - were created, vetted, and distributed to prepare staff for questions about the volcano. These resources were compiled into a binder stationed at each Ops phone and available through the AVO computer network. In this way, AVO was able to provide a comprehensive, uniform, and timely response to callers and emails at all three of its cooperative organizations statewide. AVO was proactive in scheduling an Information Scientist for interviews on-site with Anchorage television stations and newspapers several times a week. Scientists available, willing, and able to speak clearly about the current activity were crucial to AVO's response. On January 19, 2006, two public meetings were held in Homer, 120 kilometers northeast of Augustine Volcano. AVO, the West Coast Alaska Tsunami Warning Center, and the Kenai Peninsula Borough Office of Emergency Management gave brief presentations explaining their roles in eruption response. Representatives from several local, state, and federal agencies were also available. In addition to communicating with the public by daily media interviews and phone calls to Ops, all activity reports, images, and selected data streams were posted in near real time on the AVO public website. Hundreds of emails were answered. The AVO website quickly became highly organized and the most up-to-date and comprehensive place for anyone with internet access to learn about the eruption and AVO's response. This was the first such organized response of AVO and may be the outgrowth of increased expectations of AVO by the public. From November 28, 2005, through May 16, 2006, staff logged and answered approximately 400 phone calls and 1000 emails about Augustine. AVO's interagency response plan and relationships with other key agencies helped in responding to requests from the media and the public for a wide variety of information. However, the most frequent questions from callers were about ash fall advisories and what to do in the event of an ash fall. This highlighted the need to produce coordinated, co-agency reporting of ash fall potential and recommended preparation.

  1. 1995 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.

    1996-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity (SVA) at 6 volcanic centers in 1995: Mount Martin (Katmai Group), Mount Veniaminof, Shishaldin, Makushin, Kliuchef/Korovin, and Kanaga. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) on the 1995 eruptions of 2 Russian volcanoes: Bezymianny and Karymsky. This report summarizes volcanic activity in Alaska during 1995 and the AVO response, as well as information on the 2 Kamchatkan eruptions. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a "significant" investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of phone calls throughout the year reporting steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1995 response record.

  2. 1997 volcanic activity in Alaska and Kamchatka: summary of events and response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    1999-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) monitors over 40 historically active volcanoes along the Aleutian Arc. Twenty are seismically monitored and for the rest, the AVO monitoring program relies mainly on pilot reports, observations of local residents and ship crews, and daily analysis of satellite images. In 1997, AVO responded to eruptive activity or suspect volcanic activity at 11 volcanic centers: Wrangell, Sanford, Shrub mud volcano, Iliamna, the Katmai group (Martin, Mageik, Snowy, and Kukak volcanoes), Chiginagak, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Okmok, Cleveland, and Amukta. Of these, AVO has real-time, continuously recording seismic networks at Iliamna, the Katmai group, and Pavlof. The phrase “suspect volcanic activity” (SVA), used to characterize several responses, is an eruption report or report of unusual activity that is subsequently determined to be normal or enhanced fumarolic activity, weather-related phenomena, or a non-volcanic event. In addition to responding to eruptive activity at Alaska volcanoes, AVO also disseminated information for the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) about the 1997 activity of 5 Russian volcanoes--Sheveluch, Klyuchevskoy, Bezymianny, Karymsky, and Alaid (SVA). This report summarizes volcanic activity and SVA in Alaska during 1997 and the AVO response, as well as information on the reported activity at the Russian volcanoes. Only those reports or inquiries that resulted in a “significant” investment of staff time and energy (here defined as several hours or more for reaction, tracking, and follow-up) are included. AVO typically receives dozens of reports throughout the year of steaming, unusual cloud sightings, or eruption rumors. Most of these are resolved quickly and are not tabulated here as part of the 1997 response record.

  3. 2005 Volcanic Activity in Alaska, Kamchatka, and the Kurile Islands: Summary of Events and Response of the Alaska Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.; Dixon, J.P.; Ushakov, Sergey

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) responded to eruptive activity or suspected volcanic activity at or near 16 volcanoes in Alaska during 2005, including the high profile precursory activity associated with the 2005?06 eruption of Augustine Volcano. AVO continues to participate in distributing information about eruptive activity on the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia, and in the Kurile Islands of the Russian Far East, in conjunction with the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and the Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT), respectively. In 2005, AVO helped broadcast alerts about activity at 8 Russian volcanoes. The most serious hazard posed from volcanic eruptions in Alaska, Kamchatka, or the Kurile Islands is the placement of ash into the atmosphere at altitudes traversed by jet aircraft along the North Pacific and Russian Trans East air routes. AVO, KVERT, and SVERT work collaboratively with the National Weather Service, Federal Aviation Administration, and the Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers to provide timely warnings of volcanic eruptions and the production and movement of ash clouds.

  4. Public Outreach and Communications of the Alaska Volcano Observatory during the 2005-2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.; Cameron, Cheryl E.; Snedigar, Seth F.; Neal, Christina A.; Wallace, Kristi L.

    2010-01-01

    The 2005-6 eruption of Augustine Volcano in the Cook Inlet region, Alaska, greatly increased public desire for volcano hazard information, as this eruption was the most significant in Cook Inlet since 1992. In response to this heightened concern, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) increased ongoing efforts to deliver specific eruption-focused information to communities nearest to the volcano, created a public communications strategy to assist staff with managing requests, and used the recently upgraded AVO Web site as a primary information-delivery path. During the eruption, AVO responded to a minimum of ~1,700 individual requests for information from the media, the public, and other organizations with responsibilities associated with volcanic activity in Alaska; requests were received both as phone calls to the observatory and e-mail stemming from the AVO Web site. Staff also delivered approximately two dozen Augustine-specific presentations and gave nearly three dozen tours of the AVO Anchorage Operations Center in Anchorage. This intensity of public interaction was markedly higher than during noneruptive periods. During the Augustine unrest and eruption, AVO also refined its internal communication procedures, instituted and maintained up-to-date and concise talking points concerning the most recent and relevant volcanic activity and hazards, and created a media management plan to assist staff in working with members of the media. These items aided staff in maintaining a consistent message concerning the eruption, potential hazards, and our response activities. The AVO Web site, with its accompanying database, is the backbone of AVO's external and internal communications. This was the first Cook Inlet volcanic eruption with a public expectation of real-time access to data, updates, and hazards information over the Internet. In March 2005, AVO improved the Web site from individual static pages to a dynamic, database-driven site. This new system provided quick and straightforward access to the latest information for (1) staff within the observatory, (2) emergency managers from State and local governments and organizations, (3) the media, and (4) the public. From mid-December 2005 through April 2006, the AVO Web site served more than 45 million Web pages and about 5.5 terabytes of data.

  5. Tephra Studies by the Alaska Volcano Observatory: Present and Future Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.

    2004-12-01

    Tephra from Aleutian arc volcanoes constitutes an important volcanic hazard for Alaska, western Canada, and some parts of the conterminous U.S. where even small amounts of airborne ash may have dire consequences for jet aircraft traversing North Pacific and western U.S. air routes. Motivated by the need to address volcanic ash hazards on a regional scale, we have initiated a program of tephra studies within the auspices of the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) of the U.S. Geological Survey. A concentrated focus on tephra problems and a new laboratory facility within AVO will help facilitate studies of Quaternary age tephra at Alaskan volcanoes by providing a regional center for laboratory analyses of volcanic ash and standardized web-based reporting and archiving of tephra data. In its first year of operation, the laboratory has been engaged in research at Veniaminof, Mt. Spurr, and Augustine volcanoes, has sponsored research on Holocene tephra deposits of upper Cook Inlet, and has initiated analytical studies of tephra deposits on Adak and Kanaga Islands in the western Aleutians. The objective of these studies is to develop multiparameter techniques for characterization and correlation of tephra deposits, establish radiocarbon-controlled tephrostratigraphic frameworks, and to evaluate the magnitude and frequency of tephra-producing eruptions. In the upper Cook Inlet region of Alaska, we and our colleagues have begun developing a comprehensive record of ash fall by systematically selecting and coring shallow lakes and evaluating the tephra preserved in the lacustrine sediment. Sediment cores from these lakes contain numerous tephra deposits of Holocene age in datable context that can be correlated with proximal tephra deposits on the flanks of their source volcanoes. By combining tephra data from lacustrine deposits and natural exposures we hope to develop a robust geologic catalog of tephra deposits that will enable long-distance correlation of tephras, provide greater detail on the chronology of eruptions, and establish a longer-term context for tephra hazards. Future work will be focused on improving correlation of tephras, identification of source volcanoes, developing reference datasets, and developing a web-served database of tephra data.

  6. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Orr, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    Lava from Kilauea volcano flowing through a forest in the Royal Gardens subdivision, Hawai'i, in February 2008. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) monitors the volcanoes of Hawai'i and is located within Hawaiian Volcanoes National Park. HVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Kilauea and HVO at http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov.

  7. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    As part of the US Geological Survey, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) is charged with monitoring and researching volcanoes in Hawaii. The site provides current activity reports, hazard information, and a history of the two main volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. In addition, the site provides information on three other volcanoes that are either active or potentially active. Visitors can also learn about earthquakes in Hawaii and the particular hazards posed by volcanos. Captivating photos help bring the volcanoes to life. Visitors can patronize the Photo Gallery for additional volcano photos. Cross links to additional information and sites are provided on every page.

  8. USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory is perched on the rim of Kilauea Volcano's summit caldera (next to the Thomas A. Jaggar Museum in Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park), providing a spectacular view of the active vent in Halema‘uma‘u Crater....

  9. Cascades Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Driedger, Carolyn; Pallister, John

    2008-01-01

    Washington's Mount St. Helens volcano reawakens explosively on October 1, 2004, after 18 years of quiescence. Scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) study and observe Mount St. Helens and other volcanoes of the Cascade Range in Washington, Oregon, and northern California that hold potential for future eruptions. CVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Mount St. Helens and CVO at http://vulcan.wr.usgs.gov/.

  10. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Lowenstern, Jacob

    2008-01-01

    Eruption of Yellowstone's Old Faithful Geyser. Yellowstone hosts the world's largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features, which are the surface expression of magmatic heat at shallow depths in the crust. The Yellowstone system is monitored by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO), a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah. YVO is one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about Yellowstone and YVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo.

  11. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. It features news articles, monitoring information, status reports and information releases, and information on the volcanic history of the Yellowstone Plateau Volcanic Field. Users can access monthly updates with alert levels and aviation warning codes and real-time data on ground deformation, earthquakes, and hydrology. There is also a list of online products and publications, and an image gallery.

  12. Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes improves study efforts in Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Dean; M. Servilla; A. Roach; B. Foster; K. Engle

    1998-01-01

    Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes is greatly benefitting the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), and last year's eruption of the Okmok Volcano in the Aleutian Islands is a good case in point. The facility was able to issue and refine warnings of the eruption and related activity quickly, something that could not have been done using conventional seismic surveillance techniques, since

  13. Long Valley Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the homepage of the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Long Valley Volcano Observatory (LVO). It features a variety of information on the Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain in Long Valley Caldera, California. Materials include a current conditions page with status reports, updates and information releases. There is also monitoring data on seismic activity, ground deformation, gases and tree kill, and hydrologic studies. Topical studies include a reference on the most recent eruption in the Inyo chain (about 250 years ago), and information on the Long Valley Exploratory Well. There are also links to USGS fact sheets and other references about the caldera.

  14. Volcano seismicity in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurman, Helena

    I examine the many facets of volcano seismicity in Alaska: from the short-lived eruption seismicity that is limited to only the few weeks during which a volcano is active, to the seismicity that occurs in the months following an eruption, and finally to the long-term volcano seismicity that occurs in the years in which volcanoes are dormant. I use the rich seismic dataset that was recorded during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano to examine eruptive volcano seismicity. I show that the progression of magma through the conduit system at Redoubt could be readily tracked by the seismicity. Many of my interpretations benefited greatly from the numerous other datasets collected during the eruption. Rarely was there volcanic activity that did not manifest itself in some way seismically, however, resulting in a remarkably complete chronology within the seismic record of the 2009 eruption. I also use the Redoubt seismic dataset to study post-eruptive seismicity. During the year following the eruption there were a number of unexplained bursts of shallow seismicity that did not culminate in eruptive activity despite closely mirroring seismic signals that had preceded explosions less than a year prior. I show that these episodes of shallow seismicity were in fact related to volcanic processes much deeper in the volcanic edifice by demonstrating that earthquakes that were related to magmatic activity during the eruption were also present during the renewed shallow unrest. These results show that magmatic processes can continue for many months after eruptions end, suggesting that volcanoes can stay active for much longer than previously thought. In the final chapter I characterize volcanic earthquakes on a much broader scale by analyzing a decade of continuous seismic data across 46 volcanoes in the Aleutian arc to search for regional-scale trends in volcano seismicity. I find that volcanic earthquakes below 20 km depth are much more common in the central region of the arc than they are in the eastern and western regions. I tie these observations to trends in magma geochemistry and regional tectonic features, and present two hypotheses to explain what could control volcanism in the Aleutian arc.

  15. CONFIRMATION AND CALIBRATION OF COMPUTER MODELING OF TSUNAMIS PRODUCED BY AUGUSTINE VOLCANO, ALASKA

    E-print Network

    Kowalik, Zygmunt

    CONFIRMATION AND CALIBRATION OF COMPUTER MODELING OF TSUNAMIS PRODUCED BY AUGUSTINE VOLCANO, ALASKA James E. Beget Geophysical Institute and Alaska Volcano Observatory University of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK into Cook Inlet from Augustine Volcano. The modeling predicts travel times of ca. 50-75 minutes

  16. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Geological Survey (U.S.)

    In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, Yellowstone National Park, and the University of Utah entered into an agreement that effectively established the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory. Some of the objectives of the Observatory are "to provide seismic, geodetic, and hydrologic monitoring that enables reliable and timely warnings of possible renewed volcanism and related hazards" and "to improve scientific understanding of tectonic and magmatic processes that influence ongoing seismicity and hydrothermal activity." The Web site itself is divided into several major sections that covering collectively all current volcanic and seismic activity in the region, volcanic history in the area, and frequently asked questions. The section dedicated to volcanic monitoring includes real-time and non real-time data on current conditions, along with a monthly summary. The volcanic history section offers a long-form essay (including representative photos) that provides a general overview of the region's turbulent volcanic and seismic history. Finally, the helpful FAQ section covers such topics as the frequency of volcanic eruptions at Yellowstone and the relationship between volcanism and the geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone. [KMG

  17. Alaska volcanoes guidebook for teachers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Adleman, Jennifer N.

    2011-01-01

    Alaska’s volcanoes, like its abundant glaciers, charismatic wildlife, and wild expanses inspire and ignite scientific curiosity and generate an ever-growing source of questions for students in Alaska and throughout the world. Alaska is home to more than 140 volcanoes, which have been active over the last 2 million years. About 90 of these volcanoes have been active within the last 10,000 years and more than 50 of these have been active since about 1700. The volcanoes in Alaska make up well over three-quarters of volcanoes in the United States that have erupted in the last 200 years. In fact, Alaska’s volcanoes erupt so frequently that it is almost guaranteed that an Alaskan will experience a volcanic eruption in his or her lifetime, and it is likely they will experience more than one. It is hard to imagine a better place for students to explore active volcanism and to understand volcanic hazards, phenomena, and global impacts. Previously developed teachers’ guidebooks with an emphasis on the volcanoes in Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (Mattox, 1994) and Mount Rainier National Park in the Cascade Range (Driedger and others, 2005) provide place-based resources and activities for use in other volcanic regions in the United States. Along the lines of this tradition, this guidebook serves to provide locally relevant and useful resources and activities for the exploration of numerous and truly unique volcanic landscapes in Alaska. This guidebook provides supplemental teaching materials to be used by Alaskan students who will be inspired to become educated and prepared for inevitable future volcanic activity in Alaska. The lessons and activities in this guidebook are meant to supplement and enhance existing science content already being taught in grade levels 6–12. Correlations with Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations adopted by the Alaska State Department of Education and Early Development (2006) for grades six through eleven are listed at the beginning of each activity. A complete explanation, including the format of the Alaska State Science Standards and Grade Level Expectations, is available at the beginning of each grade link at http://www.eed.state.ak.us/tls/assessment/GLEHome.html.

  18. Eruption of Alaska volcano breaks historic pattern

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina A.; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick

    2009-01-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (~2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud "thunder," lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  19. Eruption of Alaska Volcano Breaks Historic Pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica; Neal, Christina; Webley, Peter; Freymueller, Jeff; Haney, Matthew; McNutt, Stephen; Schneider, David; Prejean, Stephanie; Schaefer, Janet; Wessels, Rick

    2009-05-01

    In the late morning of 12 July 2008, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) received an unexpected call from the U.S. Coast Guard, reporting an explosive volcanic eruption in the central Aleutians in the vicinity of Okmok volcano, a relatively young (˜2000-year-old) caldera. The Coast Guard had received an emergency call requesting assistance from a family living at a cattle ranch on the flanks of the volcano, who reported loud “thunder,” lightning, and noontime darkness due to ashfall. AVO staff immediately confirmed the report by observing a strong eruption signal recorded on the Okmok seismic network and the presence of a large dark ash cloud above Okmok in satellite imagery. Within 5 minutes of the call, AVO declared the volcano at aviation code red, signifying that a highly explosive, ash-rich eruption was under way.

  20. Cascades Volcano Observatory: Educational Outreach

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Vancouver, Washington, the Cascades Volcano Observatory monitors and reports on volcanic activity in the area and around the country. The related Educational Outreach Web site is provided by the US Geological Survey. Visitors will find information on current volcanic activity and news, what to do if a volcano erupts, volcano terminology, America's volcanic history, how the Cascade range got their names, volcano questions and answers, and much more. Other features of the site include activities and fun "stuff," posters and videos, and many outside links.

  1. Use of SAR data to study active volcanoes in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dean, K.G.; Engle, K.; Lu, Z.; Eichelberger, J.; Neal, T.; Doukas, M.

    1996-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data of Westdahl, Veniaminof, and Novarupta volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska were analyzed to investigate recent surface volcanic processes. These studies support ongoing monitoring and research by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in the North Pacific Ocean Region. Landforms and possible crustal deformation before, during, or after eruptions were detected and analyzed using data from the European Remote Sensing Satellites (ERS), Japanese Earth Resources Satellite (JERS) and the U. S. Seasat platforms. Field observations collected by scientists from the AVO were used to verify the results from the analysis of SAR data.

  2. High precision relocation of earthquakes at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska Patrick Statz-Boyer a

    E-print Network

    High precision relocation of earthquakes at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska Patrick Statz Volcano Observatory, Anchorage, AK 99508, United States a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 27 October 2008 Accepted 20 April 2009 Available online 7 May 2009 Keywords: volcano

  3. Thomas A. Jaggar, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Thomas A. Jaggar founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912 and served as its Director until 1940.  Shown here in 1925, Jaggar is at work in HVO's first building, which, at the time, was located on the northeast rim of K?lauea Volcano’s summit caldera, near the present-day Volc...

  4. The eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, December 14,1989-August 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Brantley, S.R.

    1990-12-01

    This paper reports on explosive volcanic activity at Redoubt Volcano, 177 km southwest of Anchorage, Alaska, which generated numerous tephra plumes that disrupted air traffic above southern Alaska, damaged aircraft, and caused locally heavy tephra fall. Pyroclastic flows triggered debris flows that inundated part of an oil-tanker facility, temporarily suspending oil production in Cook Inlet. The newly established Alaska Volcano Observatory increased its monitoring effort and disseminated volcanic hazard information to government agencies, industry, and the public.

  5. Cascades Volcano Observatory - Learn About Volcanoes: Frequently Asked Volcano Questions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page provides the answers to frequently asked questions about volcanoes. It is created by the United States Geological Survey. Topics addressed include: What Is A Volcano? Why Do Volcanoes Occur? How Do Volcanoes Erupt? Where Do Volcanoes Occur? When Will A Volcano Erupt? How Hot Is A Volcano? Can Lava Be Diverted? Do Volcanoes Affect Weather? What Types of Volcanoes are There? Which Eruptions Were The Deadliest? 20th Century Volcanic Eruptions and Their Impact. About 60 additional questions with answers are available under MORE FAQ's -Volcano Questions and Answers, and includes some sections on volcanoes of the western United States. Other links to volcano information are also available.

  6. USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory: Maps and Graphics

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The United States Geological Survey's website for the Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO) has a host of graphics and maps for the professional volcano researcher or the amateur volcanologist. The maps and graphics are divided into four broad categories, and within each of those categories are dozens and dozens of maps and graphics. The categories include "Hazards, Features, Topics, and Types: Maps and Graphics", "Monitoring: Maps and Graphics", and "Volcano or Region: Maps and Graphics". Visitors should check out "Bachelor", which is in the "Volcano or Region" category, as there is an "Interactive Imagemap" of the Cascade Range Volcanoes. Clicking on any of the images of the volcanoes will reveal a beautiful, aerial photo of the volcano, along with a brief description of the history of the volcano. Additionally, there is a "Planning Your Visit" section that gives online and offline resources to look at before going to the actual volcano.

  7. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Kilauea's Summit Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i?the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008....

  8. The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Monitors Klauea's Summit Eruption

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (foreground) is located on the caldera rim of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i?the most active volcano in the world.  The observatory's location provides an excellent view of summit eruptive activity, which began in 2008....

  9. Alaska - Kamchatka Connection in Volcano Monitoring, Research, and Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Gordeev, E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Neal, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The Aleutian-Kamchatka portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans ~4400 km. This segment contains more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three important components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) a series of volcanological schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT), formed in 1993 under the auspices of both IVS and KBGS. Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in June 2009 in Fairbanks, Alaska and brought together more than 150 scientists and students. The key educational component of our collaborative program is the continuous series of international volcanological schools organized in partnership with the Kamchatka State University. Each year more than 40 students and young scientists participate in our annual field trips to Katmai, Alaska and Mutnovsky, Kamchatka.

  10. 4D seismic structure beneath Spurr volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovlev, Andrey; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Mount Spurr is a large volcano located 125 km west of Anchorage, Alaska. This dominantly andesitic stratovolcano with summit elevation of 3374 m is the highest volcano of the Aleutian Arc. Two historical eruptions of Spurr volcano have occurred in 1953 and 1992. Moreover, from July 2004 to February 2006 continuous non-eruptive activity was observed. Since 1988 the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) collects information about Alaska seismicity. In this work we present evolution of the seismic structure beneath Spurr volcano obtained from 4D seismic tomography. In total 222605 rays (129387 P and 93218 S rays) coming from 17068 earthquakes and registered by 26 station of AVO seismic network were used for the tomographic inversion. After analysis of the seismic and volcano activity, 5 time periods were chosen. Variations of P and S wave velocity anomalies and Vp/Vs ratio in this 5 time periods were obtained after simultaneous iterative inversion of one combined matrix. Smoothness of the velocity anomalies variation in space and time are controlled by two additional matrix block. Results reveal clear correlation of the seismic structure and volcanic activity. In the first (October 1989 - July 1996) and fourth (January 2004 - January 2007) time periods, characterized by high activity, a prominent vertical channel directly beneath volcano is observed on the vertical sections. This channel is characterized by very high values of Vp/Vs ratio (increased P wave and decreased S wave velocities). During the three other periods with no volcanic activity, when the relaxation of the media took place, seismic structure becomes more homogeneous without strong velocity anomalies. Special attention is paid to estimation of the model resolution in different time periods and analysis of possible artifacts due to different ray coverage in different periods. Therefore a lot synthetic and real data tests were performed.

  11. 2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. PARKING LOT AT JAGGAR MUSEUM, VOLCANO OBSERVATORY. VIEW OF MEDIAN. NOTE VOLCANIC STONE CURBING (EDGING) TYPICAL OF MOST PARKING AREAS; TRIANGLING AT END NOT TYPICAL. MAUNA LOA VOLCANO IN BACK. - Crater Rim Drive, Volcano, Hawaii County, HI

  12. Don Swanson at Ash Outcrop Near Volcano Observatory

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Don Swanson (USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory) shows scientists in the CSAV International class how layers of ash outside of HVO indicate past explosive eruptions of Kilauea. Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, Hawaii Island, Hawaii...

  13. The origin of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Dvorak, John [University of Hawaii's Institute for Astronomy (United States)

    2011-05-15

    I first stepped through the doorway of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1976, and I was impressed by what I saw: A dozen people working out of a stone-and-metal building perched at the edge of a high cliff with a spectacular view of a vast volcanic plain. Their primary purpose was to monitor the island's two active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. I joined them, working for six weeks as a volunteer and then, years later, as a staff scientist. That gave me several chances to ask how the observatory had started.

  14. High-precision earthquake location and three-dimensional P wave velocity determination at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heather R. DeShon; Clifford H. Thurber; Charlotte Rowe

    2007-01-01

    Redoubt Volcano, Alaska poses significant volcanic hazard to the Cook Inlet region and overlying flight paths. During and following the most recent eruption in 1989–1990 the Alaska Volcano Observatory deployed up to 10 seismometers to improve real-time monitoring capabilities at Redoubt and continues to produce an annual earthquake catalog with associated arrival times for this volcano. We compute a three-dimensional

  15. The Earthscope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Network Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, B.; Jackson, M.; Mencin, D.; Power, J.; Gallaher, W.; Basset, A.; Kore, K.; Hargraves, Z.; Peterson, T.

    2005-12-01

    During June and July of 2005, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) installed eight permanent GPS stations on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. PBO worked closely with the Alaska Volcano Observatory and the Magmatic Systems Site Selection working group to install stations with a spatial distribution to monitor and detect both short and long term volcanic deformation in response to magmatic intrusions at depth and magma migration through the volcano's conduit system. All eight of the GPS stations were installed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by Evergreen Helicopters and logistical support from the Trident Seafood Corporation, the City of Akutan, and the Akutan Corporation. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all equipment be transported to each site from the village of Akutan by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and internal loads. Each station installed on the volcano consists of a standard short braced GPS monument, two solar panels mounted to an inclined structure, and a six foot high Plaschem enclosure with two solar panels mounted to one of the inclined sides. Each Plaschem houses 24 6 volt batteries that power a Trimble NetRS GPS receiver and one or two Intuicom radios. Data from each GPS receiver is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the village of Akutan that transmits the data over the internet to the UNAVCO data archive at ftp://data-out.unavco.or/pub/PBO_rinex where it is made freely available to the public.

  16. Alaska - Russian Far East connection in volcano research and monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.; Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Neal, C. A.; Chebrov, V. N.; Girina, O. A.; Demyanchuk, Y. V.; Rybin, A. V.

    2012-12-01

    The Kurile-Kamchatka-Alaska portion of the Pacific Rim of Fire spans for nearly 5400 km. It includes more than 80 active volcanoes and averages 4-6 eruptions per year. Resulting ash clouds travel for hundreds to thousands of kilometers defying political borders. To mitigate volcano hazard to aviation and local communities, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) and the Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (IVS), in partnership with the Kamchatkan Branch of the Geophysical Survey of the Russian Academy of Sciences (KBGS), have established a collaborative program with three integrated components: (1) volcano monitoring with rapid information exchange, (2) cooperation in research projects at active volcanoes, and (3) volcanological field schools for students and young scientists. Cooperation in volcano monitoring includes dissemination of daily information on the state of volcanic activity in neighboring regions, satellite and visual data exchange, as well as sharing expertise and technologies between AVO and the Kamchatkan Volcanic Eruption Response Team (KVERT) and Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT). Collaboration in scientific research is best illustrated by involvement of AVO, IVS, and KBGS faculty and graduate students in mutual international studies. One of the most recent examples is the NSF-funded Partnerships for International Research and Education (PIRE)-Kamchatka project focusing on multi-disciplinary study of Bezymianny volcano in Kamchatka. This international project is one of many that have been initiated as a direct result of a bi-annual series of meetings known as Japan-Kamchatka-Alaska Subduction Processes (JKASP) workshops that we organize together with colleagues from Hokkaido University, Japan. The most recent JKASP meeting was held in August 2011 in Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky and brought together more than 130 scientists and students from Russia, Japan, and the United States. The key educational component of our collaborative program is the continuous series of international volcanological field schools organized in partnership with the Kamchatka State University. Each year more than 40 students and young scientists participate in our annual field trips to Katmai, Alaska and Mutnovsky, Kamchatka.

  17. Kanaga Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    These images of the Kanaga Volcano show the symmetrical cone which is characteristic of stratovolcanoes. It is also possible to see how the current volcanic edifice has grown inside an older caldera, the remains of ancient Mount Kanaton. References and links to related sites are included.

  18. Volcanoes Galore!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mr. Syracuse

    2008-06-11

    Here, you can check out videos and links to lots of nifty volcano stuff. Have fun! This is completely unrelated...but check it out anywho. sweet periodic table! Alaska Volcano Observatory Earthquakes and Volcanoes Check this one out for info on history\\'s most distructive volcano. Exploring Pompeii and Vesuvius Exploring the Environment: Volcanoes This will give you lots of background on how Volcanoes work, what the major parts are, and how they erupt. How Volcanoes Work A quick video on how to take a lava sample...hot! Lava Sampling on Kilauea Volcano, Hawai i A volcano in antartica? ...

  19. Temporal Changes of Vp/Vs Ratios in the Volcano-Tectonic Seismic Swarm Zones of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, E.; Hong, T.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that the P and S wave velocity ratios, Vp/Vs, reflect the physical and chemical properties of medium including temperature, density, and rock composition. Temporal variations of Vp/Vs ratios in volcanic regions may allow us to infer the changes in medium and magma properties beneath volcanoes. Redoubt volcano is an active volcano that is located at 175 km southwest from Anchorage. The size of volcano is about 10 km in diameter, and the volume is around 30-35 km2. The volcano has erupted several times since 1902, and most recently in 2009. The eruptions were generally explosive, and produced lava and pyroclastic flows. Seismic events in the volcano-tectonic (VT) seismic swarm zones of Redoubt volcano are well monitored by Alaska Volcanic Observatory (AVO). We investigate the Vp/Vs ratios in the VT seismic swarm zones from observed P and S arrival times. The hypocentral information is collected from the AVO seismic catalogue. Seismic data with high signal-to-noise ratios for earthquakes with epicentral distance less than 10 km are selected for analysis. A total of 6425 P and S travel-time pairs is collected. The Vp/Vs ratios are estimated using a modified Wadati method that is based on the S-P differential travel times versus P travel times. The VT seismic swarm zones are discretized by 0.1°-by-0.1° cells. Tomographic Vp/Vs ratio models are calculated before and after the recent eruption. The average Vp/Vs ratio of the study region is determined to be 1.90, which is significantly higher than that of Poisson solids. Also, systematic temporal changes in Vp/Vs ratios are observed around the volcano before and after the eruption.

  20. Three Short Videos by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessells, Stephen; Lowenstern, Jake; Venezky, Dina

    2009-01-01

    This is a collection of videos of unscripted interviews with Jake Lowenstern, who is the Scientist in Charge of the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). YVO was created as a partnership among the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and University of Utah to strengthen the long-term monitoring of volcanic and earthquake unrest in the Yellowstone National Park region. Yellowstone is the site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world and the first National Park. YVO is one of the five USGS Volcano Observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety. These video presentations give insights about many topics of interest about this area. Title: Yes! Yellowstone is a Volcano An unscripted interview, January 2009, 7:00 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions to explain volcanic features at Yellowstone: 'How do we know Yellowstone is a volcano?', 'What is a Supervolcano?', 'What is a Caldera?','Why are there geysers at Yellowstone?', and 'What are the other geologic hazards in Yellowstone?' Title: Yellowstone Volcano Observatory An unscripted interview, January 2009, 7:15 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions about the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory: 'What is YVO?', 'How do you monitor volcanic activity at Yellowstone?', 'How are satellites used to study deformation?', 'Do you monitor geysers or any other aspect of the Park?', 'Are earthquakes and ground deformation common at Yellowstone?', 'Why is YVO a relatively small group?', and 'Where can I get more information?' Title: Yellowstone Eruptions An unscripted interview, January 2009, 6.45 Minutes Description: USGS Scientist-in-Charge of Yellowstone Volcano Observatory, Jake Lowenstern, answers the following questions to explain volcanic eruptions at Yellowstone: When was the last supereruption at Yellowstone?', 'Have any eruptions occurred since the last supereruption?', 'Is Yellowstone overdue for an eruption?', 'What does the magma below indicate about a possible eruption?', 'What else is possible?', and 'Why didn't you think the Yellowstone Lake earthquake swarm would lead to an eruption?'

  1. Repeating coupled earthquakes at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caplan-Auerbach, Jacqueline; Petersen, Tanja

    2005-07-01

    Since it last erupted in 1999, Shishaldin Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has produced hundreds to thousands of long-period (1-2 Hz; LP) earthquakes every day with no other sign of volcanic unrest. In 2002, the earthquakes also exhibited a short-period (4-7 Hz; SP) signal occurring between 3 and 15 s before the LP phase. Although the SP phase contains higher frequencies than the LP phase, its spectral content is still well below that expected of brittle failure events. The SP phase was never observed without the LP phase, although LP events continued to occur in the absence of the precursory signal. The two-phased events are termed "coupled events", reflecting a triggered relationship between two discrete event types. Both phases are highly repetitive in time series, suggestive of stable, non-destructive sources. Waveform cross-correlation and spectral coherence are used to extract waveforms from the continuous record and determine precise P-wave arrivals for the SP phase. Although depths are poorly constrained, the SP phase is believed to lie at shallow (<4 km) depths just west of Shishaldin's summit. The variable timing between the SP and LP arrivals indicates that the trigger mechanism between the phases itself moves at variable speeds. A model is proposed in which the SP phase results from fluid moving within the conduit, possibly around an obstruction and the LP phase results from the coalescence of a shallow gas bubble. The variable timing is attributed to changes in gas content within the conduit. The destruction of the conduit obstacle on November 21, 2002 resulted in the abrupt disappearance of the SP phase.

  2. Repeating coupled earthquakes at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Petersen, T.

    2005-01-01

    Since it last erupted in 1999, Shishaldin Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, has produced hundreds to thousands of long-period (1-2 Hz; LP) earthquakes every day with no other sign of volcanic unrest. In 2002, the earthquakes also exhibited a short-period (4-7 Hz; SP) signal occurring between 3 and 15 s before the LP phase. Although the SP phase contains higher frequencies than the LP phase, its spectral content is still well below that expected of brittle failure events. The SP phase was never observed without the LP phase, although LP events continued to occur in the absence of the precursory signal. The two-phased events are termed "coupled events", reflecting a triggered relationship between two discrete event types. Both phases are highly repetitive in time series, suggestive of stable, non-destructive sources. Waveform cross-correlation and spectral coherence are used to extract waveforms from the continuous record and determine precise P-wave arrivals for the SP phase. Although depths are poorly constrained, the SP phase is believed to lie at shallow (<4 km) depths just west of Shishaldin's summit. The variable timing between the SP and LP arrivals indicates that the trigger mechanism between the phases itself moves at variable speeds. A model is proposed in which the SP phase results from fluid moving within the conduit, possibly around an obstruction and the LP phase results from the coalescence of a shallow gas bubble. The variable timing is attributed to changes in gas content within the conduit. The destruction of the conduit obstacle on November 21, 2002 resulted in the abrupt disappearance of the SP phase.

  3. Seismicity and structure of Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes, Alaska, using joint body and surface wave tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, E. M.; Maceira, M.; Zhang, H.; Thurber, C. H.

    2015-02-01

    Joint inversions of seismic data recover models that simultaneously fit multiple constraints while playing upon the strengths of each data type. Here we jointly invert 14 years of local earthquake body wave arrival times from the Alaska Volcano Observatory catalog and Rayleigh wave dispersion curves based upon ambient noise measurements for local Vp, Vs, and hypocentral locations at Akutan and Makushin Volcanoes using a new joint inversion algorithm. The velocity structure and relocated seismicity of both volcanoes are significantly more complex than many other volcanoes studied using similar techniques. Seismicity is distributed among several areas beneath or beyond the flanks of both volcanoes, illuminating a variety of volcanic and tectonic features. The velocity structures of the two volcanoes are exemplified by the presence of narrow high-Vp features in the near surface, indicating likely current or remnant pathways of magma to the surface. A single broad low-Vp region beneath each volcano is slightly offset from each summit and centered at approximately 7 km depth, indicating a potential magma chamber, where magma is stored over longer time periods. Differing recovery capabilities of the Vp and Vs data sets indicate that the results of these types of joint inversions must be interpreted carefully.

  4. The 2013 Eruptions of Pavlof and Mount Veniaminof Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, D. J.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K.; Haney, M. M.; Fee, D.; Pavolonis, M. J.; Read, C.

    2013-12-01

    Pavlof Volcano and Mount Veniaminof on the Alaska Peninsula erupted during the summer of 2013 and were monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) using seismic data, satellite and web camera images, a regional infrasound array and observer reports. An overview of the work of the entire AVO staff is presented here. The 2013 eruption of Pavlof Volcano began on May 13 after a brief and subtle period of precursory seismicity. Two volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes at depths of 6-8 km on April 24 preceded the onset of the eruption by 3 weeks. Given the low background seismicity at Pavlof, the VTs were likely linked to the ascent of magma. The onset of the eruption was marked by subtle pulsating tremor that coincided with elevated surface temperatures in satellite images. Activity during May and June was characterized by lava fountaining and effusion from a vent near the summit. Seismicity consisted of fluctuating tremor and numerous explosions that were detected on an infrasound array (450 km NE) and as ground-coupled airwaves at local and distant seismic stations (up to 650 km). Emissions of ash and sulfur dioxide were observed in satellite data extending as far as 300 km downwind at altitudes of 5-7 km above sea level. Ash collected in Sand Point (90 km E) were well sorted, 60-150 micron diameter juvenile glass shards, many of which had fluidal forms. Automated objective ash cloud detection and cloud height retrievals from the NOAA volcanic cloud alerting system were used to evaluate the hazard to aviation. A brief reconnaissance of Pavlof in July found that lava flows on the NW flank consist of rubbly, clast rich, 'a'a flows composed of angular blocks of agglutinate and rheomorphic lava. There are at least three overlapping flows, the longest of which extends about 5 km from the vent. Eruptive activity continued through early July, and has since paused or stopped. Historical eruptions of Mount Veniaminof volcano have been from an intracaldera cone within a 10-km summit caldera. Subtle pulsating tremor also signaled unrest at Veniaminof on June 7, a week prior to satellite observations of elevated surface temperatures within the caldera that indicated the presence of lava at the surface. Eruptive activity consisted of lava fountaining and effusion, and numerous explosive events that produced small ash clouds that typically reached only several hundred meters above the vent, and rarely were observed extending beyond the summit caldera. Seismicity was characterized by energetic tremor, and accompanied at times by numerous explosions that were heard by local residents at distances of 20-50 km, and detected as ground coupled airwaves at distant seismic stations (up to 200 km) and by an infrasound array (350 km distance). Because infrasound can propagate over great distances with little signal degradation or distortion, it was possible to correlate the ground-coupled airwaves between seismometers separated by 100's of km and thus identify their source. A helicopter fly over in July found that lava flows erupted from the intracaldera cone consist of 3-5 small lobes of rubbly spatter-rich lava up to 800 m in length on the southwest flank of the cone. The distal ends of the flows melted snow and ice adjacent to the cone to produce a water-rich plume, but there was no evidence for outflow of water from the caldera. Volcanic unrest has continued through early August, 2013.

  5. Examining 2008 Eruption of Okmok Volcano in Alaska

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Professor Michael Ort (Northern Arizona University) and graduate student Joel Unema examine deposits from the 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano in Alaska as part of their research to reconstruct the complex history of the eruption.  Dr. Ort has an ARRA-funded cooperative agreement with the USGS th...

  6. Preliminary Geology of Gareloi Volcano, Western Aleutian Islands (Alaska)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B. L.; Coombs, M.; Larsen, J.

    2004-12-01

    Gareloi Island consists of Gareloi volcano (1573 m elevation), and is located nearly 2000 km west of Anchorage and 120 km west of Adak in the western Aleutian (Andreanof) Islands. A geologic mapping operation was combined with the installation of a seismic monitoring network in September of 2003 by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. This work provided the first direct observations of Gareloi volcano since Robert Coats' four-day visit in 1945. Gareloi volcano is a stratovolcano 10 km by 8 km in diameter at its base with two summit craters separated by a narrow saddle. The southern crater is a 300-m-wide amphitheater formed by the partial collapse of its southern crater wall, and contains several active fumaroles. The northern crater is enclosed, although the intra-crater eruptive stratigraphy is abruptly interrupted by near-vertical local unconformities on the northwest wall, suggesting the occurrence of a sector collapse sometime in the past. Gareloi volcano is principally composed of intercalated trachytic lava flows, ranging from 0.5 m to more than 10 m in thickness. Two prominent valleys composed of thick lava flow packages on the SW flank are clearly U-shaped, suggesting that the oldest sequence of lava flows is of at least late Pleistocene age. Lavas erupted during the Pleistocene and Holocene range from basaltic trachyandesite to basaltic andesite in composition and contain plagioclase and clinopyroxene, with minor olivine, and rare hornblende. An explosive eruption in 1929 formed a SSE trending fissure of thirteen aligned craters, ranging from 80 to 1600 m in diameter. These craters extend from sea level up to the amphitheater of the southern crater (1160 m). Fall deposits from the 1929 eruption are interbedded with thin, laterally discontinuous pyroclastic flow deposits that are mainly limited to the island's southeastern flanks. Despite an abrupt change in color from light beige pumice clasts at the base of the 1929 fall deposit to black scoria at the top, the unit is homogeneous trachyandesite. Following the explosive phase of the eruption, 4 blocky trachyandesite lava flows emerged from craters below 600 m asl. All 1929 eruptive products contain plagioclase and clinopyroxene with scarce olivine. An effusive eruption during the 1980's from the center of the south crater amphitheater produced an elaborate blocky lava flow that extends 800 m in elevation down the SE flank. This lava flow is basaltic trachyandesite, and contains abundant coarsely sieved plagioclase phenocrysts with minor clinopyroxene and olivine. The majority of Gareloi lavas contain anomalously high concentrations of K, Na, and Rb and low concentrations of Mg compared to reported findings from other Aleutian lavas, including those of the western portion of the arc. This suggests that Gareloi magmas may be unique with respect to their source region and possibly storage conditions compared to other Aleutian volcanoes.

  7. Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska (January 12, 2006)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Since last spring, the U.S. Geological Survey's Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) has detected increasing volcanic unrest at Augustine Volcano in Cook Inlet, Alaska near Anchorage. Based on all available monitoring data, AVO regards that an eruption similar to 1976 and 1986 is the most probable outcome. During January, activity has been episodic, and characterized by emission of steam and ash plumes, rising to altitudes in excess of 9,000 m (30,000 ft), and posing hazards to aircraft in the vicinity. An ASTER image was acquired at 12:42 AST on January 12, 2006, during an eruptive phase of Augustine. The perspective rendition shows the eruption plume derived from the ASTER image data. ASTER's stereo viewing capability was used to calculate the 3-dimensional topography of the eruption cloud as it was blown to the south by prevailing winds. From a maximum height of 3060 m (9950 ft), the plume cooled and its top descended to 1900 m (6175 ft). The perspective view shows the ASTER data draped over the plume top topography, combined with a base image acquired in 2000 by the Landsat satellite, that is itself draped over ground elevation data from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission. The topographic relief has been increased 1.5 times for this illustration. Comparison of the ASTER plume topography data with ash dispersal models and weather radar data will allow the National Weather Service to validate and improve such models. These models are used to forecast volcanic ash plume trajectories and provide hazard alerts and warnings to aircraft in the Alaska region.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: Roughly 25 km (15 miles) across; scale varies in this perspective view Location: 59.3 deg. North latitude, 153.4 deg. West longitude Orientation: View from southwest towards the northeast Vertical Exaggeration: 2 Eruption plume and Elevation: 30 m ASTER, (1-arcsecond) Image Data: Landsat bands 7, 4 and 2 Ground Topography Data: SRTM 90 m data, acquired January 2000 Date Acquired: ASTER: January 12, 2006; Landsat: September 17, 2000

  8. Bibliography for Hayes, Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, Augustine, Douglas, and Aniakchak volcanoes, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lemke, K.J.; May, B.A.; Vanderpool, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    Alaska has more than 40 active volcanoes, many of which are close to the major population centers of south-central Alaska. This bibliography was compiled to assist in the preparation of volcano hazard evaluations at Cook Inlet volcanoes. It lists articles, reports, and maps about the geology and hydrology of Hayes, Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, Augustine, and Douglas volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region as well as Aniakchak Volcano on the Alaska Peninsula. References on the biology and archaeology of areas surrounding each volcano also are included because they may provide useful background information.

  9. Chasing lava: a geologist's adventures at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffield, Wendell A.

    2003-01-01

    A lively account of the three years (1969-1972) spent by geologist Wendell Duffield working at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory at Kilauea, one of the world's more active volcanoes. Abundantly illustrated in b&w and color, with line drawings and maps, as well. Volcanologists and general readers alike will enjoy author Wendell Duffield's report from Kilauea--home of Pele, the goddess of fire and volcanoes. Duffield's narrative encompasses everything from the scientific (his discovery that the movements of cooled lava on a lava lake mimic the movements of the earth's crust, providing an accessible model for understanding plate tectonics) to the humorous (his dog's discovery of a snake on the supposedly snake-free island) to the life-threatening (a colleague's plunge into molten lava). This charming account of living and working at Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanoes, is sure to be a delight.

  10. From: Volcano Watch, September 26, 1997 Volcano Watch, a weekly feature written by scientists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, is

    E-print Network

    From: Volcano Watch, September 26, 1997 Volcano Watch, a weekly feature written by scientists at the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, is posted on the HVO Web site (http zone of Mauna Loa Volcano in historic time. The 1919 Alika eruption was the most voluminous historical

  11. New Coastal Tsunami Gauges: Application at Augustine Volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgy, M.; Bolton, D. K.

    2006-12-01

    Recent eruptive activity at Augustine Volcano and its associated tsunami threat to lower Cook Inlet pointed out the need for a quickly deployable tsunami detector which could be installed on Augustine Island's coast. The detector's purpose would be to verify tsunami generation by direct observation of the wave at the source to support tsunami warning decisions along populated coastlines. To fill this need the Tsunami Mobile Alert Real-Time (TSMART) system was developed at NOAA's West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center with support from the University of Alaska Tsunami Warning and Environmental Observatory for Alaska program (TWEAK) and the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). The TSMART system consists of a pressure sensor installed as near as possible to the low tide line. The sensor is enclosed in a water-tight hypalon bag filled with propylene-glycol to prevent silt damage to the sensor and freezing. The bag is enclosed in a perforated, strong plastic pipe about 16 inches long and 8 inches in diameter enclosed at both ends for protection. The sensor is cabled to a data logger/radio/power station up to 300 feet distant. Data are transmitted to a base station and made available to the warning center in real-time through the internet. This data telemetry system can be incorporated within existing AVO and Plate Boundary Observatory networks which makes it ideal for volcano-tsunami monitoring. A TSMART network can be utilized anywhere in the world within 120 miles of an internet connection. At Augustine, two test stations were installed on the east side of the island in August 2006. The sensors were located very near the low tide limit and covered with rock, and the cable was buried to the data logger station which was located well above high tide mark. Data logger, radio, battery and other electronics are housed in an enclosure mounted to a pole which also supports an antenna and solar panel. Radio signal is transmitted to a repeater station higher up on the island which then transmits the data to a base station in Homer, Alaska. Sea level data values are transmitted every 15 seconds and displayed at the tsunami warning center in Palmer, Alaska.

  12. The story of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory -- A remarkable first 100 years of tracking eruptions and earthquakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Babb, Janet L.; Kauahikaua, James P.; Tilling, Robert I.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2012 marks the centennial of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). With the support and cooperation of visionaries, financiers, scientists, and other individuals and organizations, HVO has successfully achieved 100 years of continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes. As we celebrate this milestone anniversary, we express our sincere mahalo—thanks—to the people who have contributed to and participated in HVO’s mission during this past century. First and foremost, we owe a debt of gratitude to the late Thomas A. Jaggar, Jr., the geologist whose vision and efforts led to the founding of HVO. We also acknowledge the pioneering contributions of the late Frank A. Perret, who began the continuous monitoring of K?lauea in 1911, setting the stage for Jaggar, who took over the work in 1912. Initial support for HVO was provided by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and the Carnegie Geophysical Laboratory, which financed the initial cache of volcano monitoring instruments and Perret’s work in 1911. The Hawaiian Volcano Research Association, a group of Honolulu businessmen organized by Lorrin A. Thurston, also provided essential funding for HVO’s daily operations starting in mid-1912 and continuing for several decades. Since HVO’s beginning, the University of Hawai?i (UH), called the College of Hawaii until 1920, has been an advocate of HVO’s scientific studies. We have benefited from collaborations with UH scientists at both the Hilo and Mänoa campuses and look forward to future cooperative efforts to better understand how Hawaiian volcanoes work. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has operated HVO continuously since 1947. Before then, HVO was under the administration of various Federal agencies—the U.S. Weather Bureau, at the time part of the Department of Agriculture, from 1919 to 1924; the USGS, which first managed HVO from 1924 to 1935; and the National Park Service from 1935 to 1947. For 76 of its first 100 years, HVO has been part of the USGS, the Nation’s premier Earth science agency. It currently operates under the direction of the USGS Volcano Science Center, which now supports five volcano observatories covering six U.S. areas—Hawai?i (HVO), Alaska and the Northern Mariana Islands (Alaska Volcano Observatory), Washington and Oregon (Cascades Volcano Observatory), California (California Volcano Observatory), and the Yellowstone region (Yellowstone Volcano Observatory). Although the National Park Service (NPS) managed HVO for only 12 years, HVO has enjoyed a close working relationship with Hawai?i Volcanoes National Park (named Hawaii National Park until 1961) since the park’s founding in 1916. Today, as in past years, the USGS and NPS work together to ensure the safety and education of park visitors. We are grateful to all park employees, particularly Superintendent Cindy Orlando and Chief Ranger Talmadge Magno and their predecessors, for their continuing support of HVO’s mission. HVO also works closely with the Hawai?i County Civil Defense. During volcanic and earthquake crises, we have appreciated the support of civil defense staff, especially that of Harry Kim and Quince Mento, who administered the agency during highly stressful episodes of K?lauea's ongoing eruption. Our work in remote areas on Hawai?i’s active volcanoes is possible only with the able assistance of Hawai?i County and private pilots who have safely flown HVO staff to eruption sites through the decades. A special mahalo goes to David Okita, who has been HVO’s principal helicopter pilot for more than two decades. Many commercial and Civil Air Patrol pilots have also assisted HVO by reporting their observations during various eruptive events. Hawai?i’s news media—print, television, radio, and online sources—do an excellent job of distributing volcano and earthquake information to the public. Their assistance is invaluable to HVO, especially during times of crisis. HVO’s efforts

  13. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  14. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  15. SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM, AND AEROMAGNETIC DATA

    E-print Network

    SLOPE STABILITY ANALYSIS OF THE ILIAMNA VOLCANO, ALASKA, USING ASTER TIR, SRTM DEM and digital elevation models to create a hazard index that characterizes slope stability on active volcanoes. Introduction Volcano monitoring in the Aleutians is of great importance due to the heavy amount of airplane

  16. Magma supply dynamics at Westdahl volcano, Alaska, modeled from satellite radar interferometry

    E-print Network

    Magma supply dynamics at Westdahl volcano, Alaska, modeled from satellite radar interferometry of satellite radar interferograms that span the time period from 1991 to 2000 shows that Westdahl volcano for other frequently active volcanoes with stable magma sources and relatively simple magma storage systems

  17. The Plate Boundary Observatory Permanent Global Positioning System Network on Augustine Volcano Before and After the 2006 Eruption

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauk, Benjamin A.; Jackson, Michael; Feaux, Karl; Mencin, David; Bohnenstiehl, Kyle

    2010-01-01

    In September of 2004, UNAVCO and the National Science Foundation (NSF) funded EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) installed five permanent Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) stations on Augustine Volcano, supplementing one existing CGPS station operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. All six CGPS stations proved crucial to scientists for detecting and monitoring the precursory deformation of the volcano beginning in early May 2005, as well as for monitoring the many subsequent small inflationary and deflationary episodes that characterized the 2006 eruption. Following the eruption, in September of 2006, PBO added six additional permanent CGPS stations. The 2006 eruption and its precursors were the first significant activity of the volcano in 20 years and the PBO CGPS network provided an unprecedented opportunity to monitor and detect volcanic ground deformation on an erupting Alaskan stratovolcano. Data from the new CGPS stations coupled with the existing seismic stations provided scientists with the first real opportunity to use geodetic data and real time seismic data to assess the volcanic hazards before, during, and after an Alaskan eruption.

  18. Evidence for dike emplacement beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska in 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roman, D.C.; Power, J.A.; Moran, S.C.; Cashman, K.V.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; Gerlach, T.M.

    2004-01-01

    Two earthquake swarms, comprising 88 and 2833 locatable events, occurred beneath Iliamna Volcano, Alaska, in May and August of 1996. Swarm earthquakes ranged in magnitude from -0.9 to 3.3. Increases in SO2 and CO2 emissions detected during the fall of 1996 were coincident with the second swarm. No other physical changes were observed in or around the volcano during this time period. No eruption occurred, and seismicity and measured gas emissions have remained at background levels since mid-1997. Earthquake hypocenters recorded during the swarms form a cluster in a previously aseismic volume of crust located to the south of Iliamna's summit at a depth of -1 to 4 km below sea level. This cluster is elongated to the NNW-SSE, parallel to the trend of the summit and southern vents at Iliamna and to the regional axis of maximum compressive stress determined through inversion of fault-plane solutions for regional earthquakes. Fault-plane solutions calculated for 24 swarm earthquakes located at the top of the new cluster suggest a heterogeneous stress field acting during the second swarm, characterized by normal faulting and strike-slip faulting with p-axes parallel to the axis of regional maximum compressive stress. The increase in earthquake rates, the appearance of a new seismic volume, and the elevated gas emissions at Iliamna Volcano indicate that new magma intruded beneath the volcano in 1996. The elongation of the 1996-1997 earthquake cluster parallel to the direction of regional maximum compressive stress and the accelerated occurrence of both normal and strike-slip faulting in a small volume of crust at the top of the new seismic volume may be explained by the emplacement and inflation of a subvertical planar dike beneath the summit of Iliamna and its southern satellite vents. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Volcanoes!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site presents a summary of current volcanic eruptions and images and videos of volcanoes on Earth. Discussions of the characteristics of volcanism on other worlds in our solar system are also presented and are accompanied by maps and imagery. Links to volcano observatories, parks, and monuments around the world are also included.

  20. An improved proximal tephrochronology for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, Caleb J.; Kaufman, Darrell S.; Wallace, Kristi L.; Ketterer, Michael E.

    2010-06-01

    Sediment cores from lakes in volcanically active regions can be used to reconstruct the frequency of tephra-fall events. We studied sediment cores from two lakes within 25 km of the summit of Redoubt Volcano, western Cook Inlet, to develop a robust age model for the Holocene tephrochronology, and to assess the extent to which the tephrostratigraphies were correlative between the two nearby lakes. Visually distinct tephra layers were correlated among cores from Bear and Cub lakes, located within 17 km of each other, to construct a composite age model, which incorporates two Pu-activity profiles and 27 radiocarbon ages, and extends the record back to 11,540 cal a BP. The age model was used to interpolate the ages and quantify the uncertainties of ages for all tephras at least 1 mm thick. Between - 55 and 3850 a BP, 31 tephras were deposited in Bear Lake and 41 tephras in Cub Lake. Bear Lake contains an additional 38 tephras deposited between 11,540 and 3850 a BP. During the period of overlap, (- 55 to 3850 a BP), 24 tephras are of significantly different ages, including nine from Bear Lake and 17 from Cub Lake. The presence of these unique tephras indicates that ejecta plumes erupted from Redoubt Volcano can be highly directional, and that sediment cores from more than one lake are needed for a comprehensive reconstruction of tephra-fall events. Unlike distal lakes in south Alaska, where geomorphic and limnological factors dominate the quality of the tephrostratigraphic record, the variability in tephra-fall trajectory near a Redoubt Volcano appears to be a major control on the number of tephras contained in the sediment of proximal lakes.

  1. The 2008 Eruption of Kasatochi Volcano, Central Aleutian Islands, Alaska: Reconnaissance Observations and Preliminary Physical Volcanology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. F. Waythomas; D. J. Schneider; S. G. Prejean

    2008-01-01

    The August 7, 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano was the first documented historical eruption of this small (3 x 3 km) island volcano with a 1 km2 lake filled crater in the central Aleutian Islands of Alaska. Reports of previous Kasatochi eruptions are unconfirmed and lacking in detail and little is known about the eruptive history. Three explosively-generated ash plumes

  2. Economic and engineering considerations for geothermal development in the Makushin Volcano Region of Unalaska Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Reeder, J.W.; Economides, M.J.; Markle, D.R.

    1982-10-01

    Large vapor-dominated hydrothermal reservoirs are suspected to exist in the region marked by fumarole fields on the southeast flank of Makushin Volcano on Unalaska Island, Alaska. In this paper, economic and engineering considerations with respect to potential hydrothermal development in the Makushin Volcano region are presented.

  3. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory Akutan Alaskan Volcano Tiltmeter Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauk, B. A.; Gallaher, W.; Dittmann, T.; Smith, S.

    2007-12-01

    During August of 2007, the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) successfully installed four Applied Geomechanics Lily Self Leveling Borehole Tiltmeters on Akutan Volcano, in the central Aleutian islands of Alaska. All four stations were collocated with existing PBO Global Positioning Systems (GPS) stations installed on the volcano in 2005. The tiltmeters will aid researchers in detecting and measuring flank deformation associated with future magmatic intrusions of the volcano. All four of the tiltmeters were installed by PBO field crews with helicopter support provided by JL Aviation and logistical support from the Trident Seafood Corporation, the City of Akutan, and the Akutan Corporation. Lack of roads and drivable trails on the remote volcanic island required that all drilling equipment be transported to each site from the village of Akutan by slinging gear beneath the helicopter and with internal loads. Each tiltmeter hole was drilled to a depth of approximately 30 feet with a portable hydraulic/pneumatic drill rig. The hole was then cased with splined 2.75 inch PVC. The PVC casing was cemented in place with grout and the tiltmeters were installed and packed with fine grain sand to stabilize the tiltmeters inside the casing. The existing PBO NetRS GPS receivers were configured to collect the tiltmeter data through a spare receiver serial port at one sample per minute and 1 hour files. Data from the GPS receivers and tiltmeters is telemetered directly or through a repeater radio to a base station located in the village of Akutan that transmits the data using satellite based communications to connect to the internet and to the UNAVCO Facility data archive where it is made freely available to the public.

  4. COVER Mount St. Augustine volcano, Alaska, in pyroclastic flow eruption, 29 August 1986. View is toward the volcano (hidden in douds) from Burr Point, 6

    E-print Network

    Kowalik, Zygmunt

    #12;COVER Mount St. Augustine volcano, Alaska, in pyroclastic flow eruption, 29 August 1986. View is toward the volcano (hidden in douds) from Burr Point, 6 kilometers from the summit. A pyroclastic flow at the 350-meter level on the northern flank of the volcano is moving toward the camera at a speed of about

  5. Three distinct regimes of volcanic tremor associated with the eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska 1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Glenn; McNutt, Stephen; Tytgat, Guy

    2002-07-01

    Tremor signals associated with the eruption of Shishaldin Volcano on 19 and 23 April 1999 were the strongest recorded anywhere in the Aleutian Arc by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) in its 10-year history. Reduced displacements (DR) reached 23 cm2 on 19 April and 43 cm2 on 23 April. During the activity, DR and spectral data with a frequency resolution of 0.1 Hz were computed and put on the World Wide Web every 10 min. These data are analyzed here. The general temporal patterns of seismicity of these eruption events were similar, but the eruptions and their effects quite different. The 19 April event is known to have culminated in a sub-Plinian phase, which ejected ash to an altitude of 16 km. Despite higher amplitudes and the largest hotspot from satellite data, the 23 April event produced little ash reaching only 6 km altitude. For several hours prior to the sub-Plinian phase on 19 April, tremor with a peak frequency of 1.3 Hz intensified. During the sub-Plinian phase the peak frequency increased to 4-8 Hz. However, in 15 h after the eruption, three episodes of stronger tremor occurred with a lower 1.0-Hz peak, alternating with weaker tremor with a 1.3-Hz peak. These transitions correspond to DR= 8 cm2. Although these strong tremor episodes produced higher DR levels than the sub-Plinian phase, data from a pressure sensor show that only strong Strombolian explosions occurred. The suite of observations suggests three distinct tremor regimes that may correspond to slug flow, bubbly flow, and sustained strong eruptions, or a cyclic change in source parameters (e.g., geometry, sound speed, or ascent rate). This behavior occurred at Shishaldin only during the April 1999 sequence, and we are not aware of similar behavior at other volcanoes.

  6. Volcano Alert Levels Used by USGS Volcano Observatories Alert Levels are intended to inform people on the ground about a volcano's status and are issued in conjunction with the Aviation Color Code. Notifications are issued for both increasing

    E-print Network

    Volcano Alert Levels Used by USGS Volcano Observatories Alert Levels are intended to inform people on the ground about a volcano's status and are issued in conjunction with the Aviation Color Code. Notifications outcomes. Term Description NORMAL Volcano is in typical background, noneruptive state or, after a change

  7. NOAA Atmospheric Baseline Observatories in the Arctic: Alaska & Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel, B. A.; Butler, J. H.; Schnell, R. C.; Crain, R.; Haggerty, P.; Greenland, S.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates two year-round, long-term climate research facilities, known as Atmospheric Baseline Observatories (ABOs), in the Arctic Region. The Arctic ABOs are part of a core network to support the NOAA Global Monitoring Division's mission to acquire, evaluate, and make available accurate, long-term records of atmospheric gases, aerosol particles, and solar radiation in a manner that allows the causes of change to be understood. The observatory at Barrow, Alaska (BRW) was established in 1973 and is now host to over 200 daily measurements. Located a few kilometers to the east of the village of Barrow at 71.3° N it is also the northernmost point in the United States. Measurement records from Barrow are critical to our understanding of the Polar Regions including exchange among tundra, atmosphere, and ocean. Multiple data sets are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, ozone, meteorology, and numerous others. The surface, in situ carbon dioxide record alone consists of over 339,000 measurements since the system was installed in July 1973. The observatory at Summit, Greenland (SUM) has been a partnership with the National Science Foundation (NSF) Division of Polar Programs since 2004, similar to that for South Pole. Observatory data records began in 1997 from this facility located at the top of the Greenland ice sheet at 72.58° N. Summit is unique as the only high-altitude (3200m), mid-troposphere, inland, Arctic observatory, largely free from outside local influences such as thawing tundra or warming surface waters. The measurement records from Summit help us understand long-range transport across the Arctic region, as well as interactions between air and snow. Near-real-time data are available for carbon cycle gases, halogenated gases, solar radiation, aerosol properties, meteorology, ozone, and numerous others. This poster will highlight the two facilities, key partners at each, available data sets, and cooperative research opportunities.

  8. Observing active deformation of volcanoes in North America: Geodetic data from the Plate Boundary Observatory and associated networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puskas, C. M.; Phillips, D. A.; Mattioli, G. S.; Meertens, C. M.; Hodgkinson, K. M.; Crosby, C. J.; Enders, M.; Feaux, K.; Mencin, D.; Baker, S.; Lisowski, M.; Smith, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), operated by UNAVCO, records deformation of the geologically diverse North America western plate boundary, with subnetworks of instruments concentrated at selected active and potentially active volcanoes. These sensors record deformation and earthquakes and allow monitoring agencies and researchers to analyze changes in ground motion and seismicity. The intraplate volcanoes at Yellowstone and Long Valley are characterized by uplift/subsidence cycles, high seismicity, and hydrothermal activity but there have been no historic eruptions at either volcano. PBO maintains dense GPS networks of 20-25 stations at each of these volcanoes, with an additional 5 boreholes at Yellowstone containing tensor strainmeters, short-period seismometers, and borehole tiltmeters. Subduction zone volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc have had multiple historic eruptions, and PBO maintains equipment at Augustine (8 GPS), Akutan (8 GPS, 4 tiltmeters), and Unimak Island (14 GPS, 8 tiltmeters). The Unimak stations are at the active Westdahl and Shishaldin edifices and the nearby, inactive Isanotski volcano. In the Cascade Arc, PBO maintains networks at Mount St. Helens (15 GPS, 4 borehole strainmeters and seismometers, 8 borehole tiltmeters), Shasta (7 GPS, 1 borehole strainmeter and seismometer), and Lassen Peak (8 GPS). Data from many of these stations in the Pacific Northwest and California are also provided as realtime streams of raw and processed data. Real-time GPS data, along with high-rate GPS data, will be an important new resource for detecting and studying future rapid volcanic deformation events and earthquakes. UNAVCO works closely with the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, archiving data from USGS GPS stations in Alaska, Cascadia, and Long Valley. The PBO and USGS networks combined provide more comprehensive coverage than PBO alone, particularly of the Cascade Arc, where the USGS maintains a multiple instruments near each volcano. Ground-based instruments are supplemented by remote sensing data sets. UNAVCO supports the acquisition of InSAR and LiDAR imaging data, with archiving and distribution of these data provided by UNAVCO and partner institutions. We provide descriptions and access information for geodetic data from the PBO volcano subnetworks and their applications to monitoring for scientific and public safety objectives. We also present notable examples of activity recorded by these instruments, including the 2004-2010 accelerated uplift episode at the Yellowstone caldera and the 2006 Augustine eruption.

  9. A 500-year-long record of tephra falls from Redoubt Volcano and other volcanoes in upper Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begét, James E.; Stihler, Scott D.; Stone, David B.

    1994-08-01

    Volcanic ash layers preserved in glacial-lacustrine sediments at Skilak Lake on the Kenai Peninsula of southcentral Alaska constitute a record of eruptions at Redoubt Volcano and other Alaskan volcanoes which affected the upper Cook Inlet area during the last 500 years. High-resolution magnetic susceptibility profiling delineates similar sequences of tephra layers in several 1-m-long lake sediment cores. Electron microprobe analyses of glass shards from the tephras indicate correlation of some ash layers with known reference tephras from the source volcanoes, while other ash layers record previously unknown prehistoric eruptions. Skilak Lake cores contain ash from the historic 1912 Katmai eruption, the 1902 Redoubt eruption, and the 1883 Mount St. Augustine eruption as well as prehistoric ash layers erupted from Crater Peak at Mt. Spurr ca. 250-350 years ago, from Redoubt Volcano at ca. 300-400 years ago and again at ca. 350-450 years ago, and a 500-year-old ash from Mount St. Augustine. Still older tephras from Redoubt Volcano and Crater Peak at Mt. Spurr are found lower in the cores. The cores indicate that volcanoes in the Cook Inlet area have erupted every 10-35 years during the 20th century, and ash falls have occurred at Skilak Lake at least once every 50-100 years for the last 500 years, with Redoubt, Spurr, and Augustine Volcanoes being the most important sources of tephra.

  10. Holocene Tephrochronology from Lake Sediments, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiff, C. J.; Kaufman, D. S.; Wallace, K. L.

    2006-12-01

    Lake sediments in volcanically active areas provide a geological archive of tephra-fall events because sedimentation often occurs continuously and organic material for 14C dating is commonly available; lake sediments, therefore, contain valuable information about tephra fall and associated hazards. Recovering tephra-fall records from lakes requires careful site selection, core recovery, and tephra age assignments. A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22 km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last ca. 8750 cal yr BP. A previous core taken from a shallow site at Bear Lake contains 38 tephra layers suggesting that a deeper site in lakes provides a more complete sediment record as shallow sites are susceptible to remobilization and have lower sedimentation rates. We use 12 AMS 14C ages, along with the 137Cs and 210Pb activities of the top 8.5 cm of sediment, to evaluate different models to determine the age-depth relation of sediment, and to determine the age of each tephra deposit. The selected age model is based on a cubic smooth spline function that was passed through the adjusted tephra-free depth of each dated layer; the age model provides an example of how best to date lake sediment in a volcanically active area where presumably instantaneous tephra deposition compounds a simple age-depth relationship. Using the age model we find that tephra-fall frequency at Bear Lake was among the highest during the past ~500 yr, with eight tephras deposited compared to an average of 3.7 per 500 yr over the last 8500 yr. Other periods of increased tephra fall occurred ca. 2500-3500, 4500-5000, and 7000-7500 cal yr BP. Our record suggests that Bear Lake experienced extended periods (1000-2000 yr) of increased tephra fall between shorter periods (500-1000 yr) of quiescence. The Bear Lake sediment core affords the most comprehensive tephrochronology from the base of the Redoubt Volcano to date, with an average tephra-fall frequency of once every 130 yr and places recent eruptive activity in context of Holocene volcanism.

  11. Sustained long-period seismicity at Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, T.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; McNutt, S.R.

    2006-01-01

    From September 1999 through April 2004, Shishaldin Volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska, exhibited a continuous and extremely high level of background seismicity. This activity consisted of many hundreds to thousands of long-period (LP; 1-2 Hz) earthquakes per day, recorded by a 6-station monitoring network around Shishaldin. The LP events originate beneath the summit at shallow depths (0-3 km). Volcano tectonic events and tremor have rarely been observed in the summit region. Such a high rate of LP events with no eruption suggests that a steady state process has been occurring ever since Shishaldin last erupted in April-May 1999. Following the eruption, the only other signs of volcanic unrest have been occasional weak thermal anomalies and an omnipresent puffing volcanic plume. The LP waveforms are nearly identical for time spans of days to months, but vary over longer time scales. The observations imply that the spatially close source processes are repeating, stable and non-destructive. Event sizes vary, but the rate of occurrence remains roughly constant. The events range from magnitude ???0.1 to 1.8, with most events having magnitudes <1.0. The observations suggest that the conduit system is open and capable of releasing a large amount of energy, approximately equivalent to at least one magnitude 1.8-2.6 earthquake per day. The rate of observed puffs (1 per minute) in the steam plume is similar to the typical seismic rates, suggesting that the LP events are directly related to degassing processes. However, the source mechanism, capable of producing one LP event about every 0.5-5 min, is still poorly understood. Shishaldin's seismicity is unusual in its sustained high rate of LP events without accompanying eruptive activity. Every indication is that the high rate of seismicity will continue without reflecting a hazardous state. Sealing of the conduit and/or change in gas flux, however, would be expected to change Shishaldin's behavior. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano a `100-year' event

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The 2010 explosive eruption of Java's Merapi volcano ­ a `100- year' event Suronoa1 Philippe in Geosciences, Telegrafenberg, 14473 Potsdam, Germany d U.S. Geological Survey, Cascades Volcano Observatory, Kjeller, 2027, Norway k U.S. Geological Survey, Alaska Volcano Observatory, 4230 University Drive

  13. Geodetic observations during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska Ronni Grapenthin , Jeffrey T. Freymueller, Alexander Max Kaufman

    E-print Network

    Grapenthin, Ronni

    Geodetic observations during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska Ronni Grapenthin history: Received 8 October 2011 Accepted 12 April 2012 Available online xxxx Keywords: Redoubt Volcano Eruption Geodesy Plume detection Source modeling In March 2009 Redoubt Volcano, about 160 km to the SW

  14. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by pryoclastic flow at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.

    2003-01-01

    Pyroclastic flows entering the sea are plausible mechanisms for tsunami generation at volcanic island arcs worldwide. We evaluate tsunami generation by pyroclastic flow using an example from Aniakchak volcano in Alaska where evidence for tsunami inundation coincident with a major, caldera-forming eruption of the volcano ca. 3.5 ka has been described. Using a numerical model, we simulate the tsunami and compare the results to field estimates of tsunami run up.

  15. Three-dimensional P and S wave velocity structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. M. Benz; B. A. Chouet; P. B. Dawson; J. C. Lahr; R. A. Page; J. A. Hole

    1996-01-01

    The three-dimensional P and S wave structure of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the underlying crust to depths of 7-8 km is determined from 6219 P wave and 4008 S wave first-arrival times recorded by a 30-station seismograph network deployed on and around the volcano. First-arrival times are calculated using a finite-difference technique, which allows for flexible parameterization of the slowness

  16. Storage and interaction of compositionally heterogeneous magmas from the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diana C. Roman; Katharine V. Cashman; Cynthia A. Gardner; Paul J. Wallace; John J. Donovan

    2006-01-01

    Compositional heterogeneity (56–64 wt% SiO2 whole-rock) in samples of tephra and lava from the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, raises questions about the\\u000a physical nature of magma storage and interaction beneath this young and frequently active volcano. To determine conditions\\u000a of magma storage and evolutionary histories of compositionally distinct magmas, we investigate physical and chemical characteristics\\u000a of andesitic and dacitic

  17. Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Vergniolle; M. Boichu; J. Caplan-Auerbach

    2004-01-01

    The 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both classical Strombolian activity and an explosive Subplinian plume. Strombolian activity at Shishaldin occurred in two major phases following the Subplinian activity. In this paper, we use acoustic measurements to interpret the Strombolian activity.Acoustic measurements of the two Strombolian phases show a series of explosions that are modeled by the

  18. Initiative for the creation of an integrated infrastructure of European Volcano Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.; Bachelery, P.; Ferreira, T. J. L.; Vogfjörd, K. S.

    2012-04-01

    Active volcanic areas in Europe constitute a direct threat to millions of European citizens. The recent Eyjafjallajökull eruption also demonstrated that indirect effects of volcanic activity can present a threat to the economy and the lives of hundreds of million of people living in the whole continental area even in the case of activity of volcanoes with sporadic eruptions. Furthermore, due to the wide political distribution of the European territories, major activities of "European" volcanoes may have a worldwide impact (e.g. on the North Atlantic Ocean, West Indies included, and the Indian Ocean). Our ability to understand volcanic unrest and forecast eruptions depends on the capability of both the monitoring systems to effectively detect the signals generated by the magma rising and on the scientific knowledge necessary to unambiguously interpret these signals. Monitoring of volcanoes is the main focus of volcano observatories, which are Research Infrastructures in the ESFRI vision, because they represent the basic resource for researches in volcanology. In addition, their facilities are needed for the design, implementation and testing of new monitoring techniques. Volcano observatories produce a large amount of monitoring data and represent extraordinary and multidisciplinary laboratories for carrying out innovative joint research. The current distribution of volcano observatories in Europe and their technological state of the art is heterogeneous because of different types of volcanoes, different social requirements, operational structures and scientific background in the different volcanic areas, so that, in some active volcanic areas, observatories are lacking or poorly instrumented. Moreover, as the recent crisis of the ash in the skies over Europe confirms, the assessment of the volcanic hazard cannot be limited to the immediate areas surrounding active volcanoes. The whole European Community would therefore benefit from the creation of a network of volcano observatories, which would enable strengthening and sharing the technological and scientific level of current infrastructures. Such a network could help to achieve the minimum goal of deploying an observatory in each active volcanic area, and lay the foundation for an efficient and effective volcanic monitoring system at the European level.

  19. Tsunamis generated by eruptions from mount st. Augustine volcano, alaska.

    PubMed

    Kienle, J; Kowalik, Z; Murty, T S

    1987-06-12

    During an eruption of the Alaskan volcano Mount St. Augustine in the spring of 1986, there was concern about the possibility that a tsunami might be generated by the collapse of a portion of the volcano into the shallow water of Cook Inlet. A similar edifice collapse of the volcano and ensuing sea wave occurred during an eruption in 1883. Other sea waves resulting in great loss of life and property have been generated by the eruption of coastal volcanos around the world. Although Mount St. Augustine remained intact during this eruptive cycle, a possible recurrence of the 1883 events spurred a numerical simulation of the 1883 sea wave. This simulation, which yielded a forecast of potential wave heights and travel times, was based on a method that could be applied generally to other coastal volcanos. PMID:17793232

  20. Historically Active Volcanoes in Alaska - A Quick Reference

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) fact sheet summarizes historical data (from 1760 to 1999) on 41 Alaskan volcanoes, using information drawn from the more thorough and comprehensive USGS Open-File Report 98-582. Summaries include the volcano type, location (latitude and longitude), location on USGS quadrangle map, and any information available about the dates of eruptions and type of volcanic activity that occurred. Some volcanoes covered include Trident, Redoubt, Wrangell, Katmai, Cleveland, Kiska and more. A downloadable, printable version is available.

  1. Causation or coincidence? The correlations in time and space of the 2008 eruptions of Cleveland, Kasatochi, and Okmok Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervelli, P. F.; Cameron, C. E.

    2008-12-01

    In mid-summer 2008, three significant volcanic eruptions occurred in the Andreanof Islands of the Aleutian Arc, Alaska. Okmok volcano began erupting on July 12, followed by Cleveland on July 21, and then by Kasatochi on August 7. In addition to this temporal correlation, there is also a geographic correlation: the eruptions occurred in a 525 km region representing only about 20% of the arc's length. Given these close proximities in space and time, it is natural to speculate about whether an underlying process is at work. Ultimately, the arc exists because of subduction, but the question remains if a more immediate trigger may be responsible for the concurrence. We began our inquiry into whether a link exists among the three eruptions by posing the following question: What is the probability that, by chance alone, Okmok, Kasatochi and Cleveland could simultaneously erupt? Answering this question requires both a statistical model for eruption frequency and empirical data of where and when eruptions have occurred in the past. We assume that eruptions follow a Poisson distribution, and estimate the expected number of eruptions per time interval for each volcano in the arc from the geologic record and observations contained in the Alaska Volcano Observatory's GeoDIVA database. We then perform a Monte Carlo experiment, simulating 10,000 years of eruptive activity at 30 day intervals. The results of the simulation indicate that the phenomenon of three eruptions beginning in a single month happens about once every 90 years. A spatial constraint requiring that the maximum separation among the volcanoes be less than 525 km increases this interval to about once every 900 years. Though these intervals are not so long as to rule out coincidence, they are long enough to warrant further investigation into the possibility of a common origin. Several candidates for a prospective cause are: (1) the Great Aleutian Earthquake of 1957, which includes the region of the three recent eruptions, may have triggered a period of increased volcanic activity that still persists; (2) a slow slip event, with associated non- volcanic tremor, have may have resulted in static stress changes favorable to volcanic eruptions; or (3) nearby volcanoes may interact with one another in such a way as to increase the chance of clustered eruptions. We consider each of these scenarios (as well as other more remote possibilities) and weigh their relative likelihoods against the probability of random correlation. In the end, no definitive answer emerges, though pure coincidence remains a simple and plausible explanation for this remarkable event.

  2. A Versatile Time-Lapse Camera System Developed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory for Use at Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Orr, Tim R.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2008-01-01

    Volcanoes can be difficult to study up close. Because it may be days, weeks, or even years between important events, direct observation is often impractical. In addition, volcanoes are often inaccessible due to their remote location and (or) harsh environmental conditions. An eruption adds another level of complexity to what already may be a difficult and dangerous situation. For these reasons, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) have, for years, built camera systems to act as surrogate eyes. With the recent advances in digital-camera technology, these eyes are rapidly improving. One type of photographic monitoring involves the use of near-real-time network-enabled cameras installed at permanent sites (Hoblitt and others, in press). Time-lapse camera-systems, on the other hand, provide an inexpensive, easily transportable monitoring option that offers more versatility in site location. While time-lapse systems lack near-real-time capability, they provide higher image resolution and can be rapidly deployed in areas where the use of sophisticated telemetry required by the networked cameras systems is not practical. This report describes the latest generation (as of 2008) time-lapse camera system used by HVO for photograph acquisition in remote and hazardous sites on Kilauea Volcano.

  3. Seismic instrumentation plan for the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thelen, Weston A.

    2014-01-01

    The installation of new seismic stations is only the first part of building a volcanic early warning capability for seismicity in the State of Hawaii. Additional personnel will likely be required to study the volcanic processes at work under each volcano, analyze the current seismic activity at a level sufficient for early warning, build new tools for monitoring, maintain seismic computing resources, and maintain the new seismic stations.

  4. Development of a New Permafrost Observatory at Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Yoshikawa, K.; Brewer, M. C.; Brown, J.; Jin, H.

    2002-12-01

    A realistic way to establish long-term permafrost temperature records is to reoccupy the sites where high quality permafrost temperature records were obtained for some period of time in the past. One such ideal place is Barrow, Alaska. During the past year a Permafrost Observatory was established at Barrow. The overall goal of the project is to establish a long-term permafrost observatory under the auspices of the International Arctic Research Center (IARC), and to compare present permafrost temperatures with relevant measurements obtained by Max Brewer over the 12-year period during the 1950s to early 1960s. Comparison between permafrost temperature profiles obtained at the same location ("Special # 2" site) by Max Brewer on October 9, 1950, and on October 9, 2001, shows that at the 15-meters depth, permafrost temperature is warmer at present by more than 1°C. This noticeable, but still moderate increase for such a long period of time can be explained using results of our previous analysis of long-term permafrost temperature variations at Barrow. This analysis was based on application of our high-resolution numerical model using the Barrow National Weather Service climate data. This modeling approach employs a "permafrost temperature reanalysis". In this model, variations in the air temperature and snow cover thickness and properties are the driving forces of the permafrost temperature dynamics. This analysis shows that the thermal conditions at the permafrost surface were very similar during the 1940s and 1990s (except for unprecedented warm extremes of 1998 and 1999). Much colder permafrost temperatures (up to 2 to 3°C colder) were typical for Barrow during 1970s. The historical permafrost data provide a unique opportunity to independently test our model and modeling results. To compare calculated temperatures with measured data we used the time interval between September 1951 and October 1952. The results of this comparison were much better than expected. For the entire period, in the depth interval between two and 18 meters the differences between calculated and measured permafrost temperatures were typically smaller than 0.3°C. They practically never exceeded 1°C in the upper two meters of soil.

  5. US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The US Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program website presents its objectives "to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes and to lessen the harmful impacts of volcanic activity." The public can explore information on volcano monitoring, warning schemes, and emergency planning. Students and educators can find out about the types, effects, location, and history of volcano hazards. The website offers recent online volcano reports and maps, volcano factsheets, videos, and a photo glossary. Teachers can find online versions of many educational volcano-related books and videos. The website features the volcanic observatories in Alaska, the Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley, and Yellowstone.

  6. Earth's Active Volcanoes by Geographic Region

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site describes active volcanoes from around the world by using the volcano links from the Michigan Technological University and the homepages of observatories at active volcanoes. Each volcano section contains photo images, maps, and reference text. Some sections contain bibliographies, volcano reports, and video clips of lahars. The volcanoes are organized by the following geographic regions: Africa and surrounding islands; the Southwest Pacific, Southeast Asia, and India; East Asia including Japan and Kamchatka; Antarctica; the North Atlantic and Iceland; the Mediterranean; South America and surrounding islands; Central Pacific, South Pacific and New Zealand; Alaska and the Northern Pacific Region; North America; and Central America.

  7. Record of late holocene debris avalanches and lahars at Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Miller, T.P.; Beget, J.E.

    2000-01-01

    Iliamna Volcano is a 3053-meter high, glaciated stratovolcano in the southern Cook Inlet region of Alaska and is one of seven volcanoes in this region that have erupted multiple times during the past 10,000 yr. Prior to our studies of Iliamna Volcano, little was known about the frequency, magnitude, and character of Holocene volcanic activity. Here we present geologic evidence of the most recent eruptive activity of the volcano and provide the first outline of Late Holocene debris-avalanche and lahar formation. Iliamna has had no documented historical eruptions but our recent field investigations indicate that the volcano has erupted at least twice in the last 300 yr. Clay-rich lahar deposits dated by radiocarbon to ???1300 and ???90 yr BP are present in two major valleys that head on the volcano. These deposits indicate that at least two large, possibly deep-seated, flank failures of the volcanic edifice have occurred in the last 1300 yr. Noncohesive lahar deposits likely associated with explosive pyroclastic eruptions date to 2400-1300,>1500,???300, and <305 yr BP. Debris-avalanche deposits from recent and historical small-volume slope failures of the hydrothermally altered volcanic edifice cover most of the major glaciers on the volcano. Although these deposits consist almost entirely of hydrothermally altered rock debris and snow and ice, none of the recently generated debris avalanches evolved to lahars. A clay-rich lahar deposit that formed <90??60 radiocarbon yr BP and entered the Johnson River Valley southeast of the volcano cannot be confidently related to an eruption of Iliamna Volcano, which has had no known historical eruptions. This deposit may record an unheralded debris avalanche and lahar. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Modeled tephra ages from lake sediments, base of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caleb J. Schiff; Darrell S. Kaufman; Kristi L. Wallace; Al Werner; Teh-Lung Ku; Thomas A. Brown

    2008-01-01

    A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last 8750calyr, comprising 15% of the total thickness of recovered sediment. Using 12 AMS 14C ages, along with the 137Cs and 210Pb activities of recent sediment, we evaluated different models to determine the age–depth relation of the core,

  9. Modeled tephra ages from lake sediments, base of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C J Schiff; D S Kaufman; K L Wallace; A Werner; T L Ku; T A Brown

    2007-01-01

    A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22 km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last 8750 cal yr, comprising 15% of the total thickness of recovered sediment. Using 12 AMS ¹C ages, along with the ¹³Cs and ²¹°Pb activities of recent sediment, we evaluated different models to determine the age-depth relation

  10. Research paper Modeled tephra ages from lake sediments, base of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caleb J. Schiff; Darrell S. Kaufman; Kristi L. Wallace; Teh-Lung Ku; Thomas A. Browne

    A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22 km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last 8750 cal yr, comprising 15% of the total thickness of recovered sediment. Using 12 AMS 14C ages, along with the 137 Cs and 210Pb activities of recent sediment, we evaluated different models to determine the age-depth

  11. An improved proximal tephrochronology for Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Caleb J. Schiff; Darrell S. Kaufman; Kristi L. Wallace; Michael E. Ketterer

    2010-01-01

    Sediment cores from lakes in volcanically active regions can be used to reconstruct the frequency of tephra-fall events. We studied sediment cores from two lakes within 25km of the summit of Redoubt Volcano, western Cook Inlet, to develop a robust age model for the Holocene tephrochronology, and to assess the extent to which the tephrostratigraphies were correlative between the two

  12. Seismic observations of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska — 1989-2010 and a conceptual model of the Redoubt magmatic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; Chouet, B. A.; Haney, M. M.; Ketner, D. M.

    2013-06-01

    Seismic activity at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, has been closely monitored since 1989 by a network of five to ten seismometers within 22 km of the volcano's summit. Major eruptions occurred in 1989-1990 and 2009 and were characterized by large volcanic explosions, episodes of lava dome growth and failure, pyroclastic flows, and lahars. Seismic features of the 1989-1990 eruption were 1) weak precursory tremor and a short, 23-hour-long, intense swarm of repetitive shallow long-period (LP) events centered 1.4 km below the crater floor, 2) shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) and hybrid earthquakes that separated early episodes of dome growth, 3) 13 additional swarms of LP events at shallow depths precursory to many of the 25 explosions that occurred over the more than 128 day duration of eruptive activity, and 4) a persistent cluster of VT earthquakes at 6 to 9 km depth. In contrast the 2009 eruption was preceded by a pronounced increase in deep-LP (DLP) events at lower crustal depths (25 to 38 km) that began in mid-December 2008, two months of discontinuous shallow volcanic tremor that started on January 23, 2009, a strong phreatic explosion on March 15, and a 58-hour-long swarm of repetitive shallow LP events. The 2009 eruption consisted of at least 23 major explosions between March 23 and April 5, again accompanied by shallow VT earthquakes, several episodes of shallow repetitive LP events and dome growth continuing until mid July. Increased VT earthquakes at 4 to 9 km depth began slowly in early April, possibly defining a mid-crustal magma source zone. Magmatic processes associated with the 2009 eruption seismically activated the same portions of the Redoubt magmatic system as the 1989-1990 eruption, although the time scales and intensity vary considerably among the two eruptions. The occurrence of precursory DLP events suggests that the 2009 eruption may have involved the rise of magma from lower crustal depths. Based on the evolution of seismicity during the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions the Redoubt magmatic system is envisioned to consist of a shallow system of cracks extending 1 to 2 km below the crater floor, a magma storage or source region at roughly 3 to 9 km depth, and a diffuse magma source region at 25 to 38 km depth. Close tracking of seismic activity allowed the Alaska Volcano Observatory to successfully issue warnings prior to many of the hazardous explosive events that occurred in 2009.

  13. Seismic observations of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska - 1989-2010 and a conceptual model of the Redoubt magmatic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, John A.; Stihler, Scott D.; Chouet, Bernard A.; Haney, Matthew M.; Ketner, D.M.

    2013-01-01

    Seismic activity at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, has been closely monitored since 1989 by a network of five to ten seismometers within 22 km of the volcano's summit. Major eruptions occurred in 1989-1990 and 2009 and were characterized by large volcanic explosions, episodes of lava dome growth and failure, pyroclastic flows, and lahars. Seismic features of the 1989-1990 eruption were 1) weak precursory tremor and a short, 23-hour-long, intense swarm of repetitive shallow long-period (LP) events centered 1.4 km below the crater floor, 2) shallow volcano-tectonic (VT) and hybrid earthquakes that separated early episodes of dome growth, 3) 13 additional swarms of LP events at shallow depths precursory to many of the 25 explosions that occurred over the more than 128 day duration of eruptive activity, and 4) a persistent cluster of VT earthquakes at 6 to 9 km depth. In contrast the 2009 eruption was preceded by a pronounced increase in deep-LP (DLP) events at lower crustal depths (25 to 38 km) that began in mid-December 2008, two months of discontinuous shallow volcanic tremor that started on January 23, 2009, a strong phreatic explosion on March 15, and a 58-hour-long swarm of repetitive shallow LP events. The 2009 eruption consisted of at least 23 major explosions between March 23 and April 5, again accompanied by shallow VT earthquakes, several episodes of shallow repetitive LP events and dome growth continuing until mid July. Increased VT earthquakes at 4 to 9 km depth began slowly in early April, possibly defining a mid-crustal magma source zone. Magmatic processes associated with the 2009 eruption seismically activated the same portions of the Redoubt magmatic system as the 1989-1990 eruption, although the time scales and intensity vary considerably among the two eruptions. The occurrence of precursory DLP events suggests that the 2009 eruption may have involved the rise of magma from lower crustal depths. Based on the evolution of seismicity during the 1989-1990 and 2009 eruptions the Redoubt magmatic system is envisioned to consist of a shallow system of cracks extending 1 to 2 km below the crater floor, a magma storage or source region at roughly 3 to 9 km depth, and a diffuse magma source region at 25 to 38 km depth. Close tracking of seismic activity allowed the Alaska Volcano Observatory to successfully issue warnings prior to many of the hazardous explosive events that occurred in 2009.

  14. Aseismic inflation of Westdahl volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Wicks, C.; Dzurisin, D.; Thatcher, W.; Freymueller, J.T.; McNutt, S.R.; Mann, D.

    2000-01-01

    Westdahl volcano, located at the west end of Unimak Island in the central Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, is a broad shield that produced moderate-sized eruptions in 1964, 1978-79, and 1991-92. Satellite radar interferometry detected about 17 cm of volcano-wide inflation from September 1993 to October 1998. Multiple independent interferograms reveal that the deformation rate has not been steady; more inflation occurred from 1993 to 1995 than from 1995 to 1998. Numerical modeling indicates that a source located about 9 km beneath the center of the volcano inflated by about 0.05 km3 from 1993 to 1998. On the basis of the timing and volume of recent eruptions at Westdahl and the fact that it has been inflating for more than 5 years, the next eruption can be expected within the next several years.

  15. Preliminary Volcano-Hazard Assessment for the Tanaga Volcanic Cluster, Tanaga Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coombs, Michelle L.; McGimsey, Robert G.; Browne, Brandon L.

    2007-01-01

    Summary of Volcano Hazards at Tanaga Volcanic Cluster The Tanaga volcanic cluster lies on the northwest part of Tanaga Island, about 100 kilometers west of Adak, Alaska, and 2,025 kilometers southwest of Anchorage, Alaska. The cluster consists of three volcanoes-from west to east, they are Sajaka, Tanaga, and Takawangha. All three volcanoes have erupted in the last 1,000 years, producing lava flows and tephra (ash) deposits. A much less frequent, but potentially more hazardous phenomenon, is volcanic edifice collapse into the sea, which likely happens only on a timescale of every few thousands of years, at most. Parts of the volcanic bedrock near Takawangha have been altered by hydrothermal activity and are prone to slope failure, but such events only present a local hazard. Given the volcanic cluster's remote location, the primary hazard from the Tanaga volcanoes is airborne ash that could affect aircraft. In this report, we summarize the major volcanic hazards associated with the Tanaga volcanic cluster.

  16. On the absence of InSAR-detected volcano deformation spanning the 1995–1996 and 1999 eruptions of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. C. Moran; O. Kwoun; T. Masterlark; Z. Lu

    2006-01-01

    Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite volcano located on Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc of Alaska, had a minor eruption in 1995–1996 and a VEI 3 sub-Plinian basaltic eruption in 1999. We used 21 synthetic aperture radar images acquired by ERS-1, ERS-2, JERS-1, and RADARSAT-1 satellites to construct 12 coherent interferograms that span most of the 1993–2003 time

  17. Characterization and Discrimination of Holocene Tephra Deposits at Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, K. L.

    2002-12-01

    Correlation of distal tephra deposits with their respective sources is known to be problematic in the Cook Inlet region of Alaska. Existing correlations are heavily weighted on glass shard geochemistry, which is not always the most distinguishing characteristic in a region where eruption frequency is high and volcanoes are closely spaced. A multi-parameter approach to characterizing tephra deposits enhances the potential for recognition and long-distance correlation and provides an improved means of identifying source volcanoes. Previous studies were focused on providing a regional inventory of tephra deposits in the Cook Inlet region. These studies show that tephra erupted from Mount Spurr volcano and its satellite vent Crater Peak, are well preserved in this region (35 deposits in 6000 years) yet correlations using major-element glass geochemistry between distal tephra and proximal reference samples are often inconclusive. Tephra deposits preserved on the proximal (<10 km) flanks of Mount Spurr volcano and Crater Peak, constitute a record of explosive eruptions from these sources during the past ~5,000 years. This study provides detailed descriptions of all preserved tephra deposits from three proximal locations on the southern and southeastern flank of Mount Spurr volcano. These data suffice as a reference dataset for Mount Spurr volcano and Crater Peak tephra and include: 1) field characteristics (precise field location, photographs, unit thickness, grain shape, sorting, maximum grain size, and Munsell color), 2) mineral assemblages, 3) glass shard characteristics (photomicrographs and backscatter images), 4) major-element glass geochemistry, and 5) radiocarbon ages. Because no single set of parameters is known to characterize a tephra, a multi-parameter approach provides a more robust means of identifying source volcanoes in the Cook Inlet region and likely at other Aleutian arc regions. These data will be presented in a digital format for collaboration purposes so that they can be easily accessed, and manipulated to facilitate the likelihood and accuracy of future correlations.

  18. Rockfalls at Augustine Volcano, Alaska: 2003-2006

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deroin, N.; McNutt, S. R.; Reyes, C.; Sentman, D.

    2007-12-01

    Rockfalls, avalanches and landslides have been frequently recorded in seismic data at Augustine Volcano for many years. Typical years such as 2003 or 2004 had several dozen such events that were strong enough to trigger the automatic event detection system. Typical events lasted about 30 sec, had frequencies >6 Hz, and were strongest on summit stations, suggesting that they were rockfalls from the steep summit dome into the adjacent moat area. In 2005 both the rate and the occurrence pattern changed. Rockfall activity began in April 2006 and peaked in May and June, then continued through the fall and early winter. Overall there were more than 340 rockfalls in 2005, with both small and large events occurring. The 2005 rockfall activity increased at nearly the same time as earthquake activity and heating of the ground, suggesting that higher temperatures and steaming contributed to mechanical instabilities of the surface dome rocks. We examined relative amplitudes at station pairs and frequency contents to determine relative locations of the rockfalls by assuming that both higher amplitudes and higher frequencies are associated with events closer to a given station. When a low-light camera was installed at Augustine in January 2006 we were able to confirm these relations because there was a clear correlation between rockfalls, debris flows, and pyroclasic flows to the east (towards the camera) and high amplitudes and frequencies at east station AUE. Other events had high amplitudes and higher frequencies at west station AUW and no material was seen moving to the east. Still other events moved to the north and amplitudes were nearly the same at AUE and AUW. The systematic patterns in amplitude and frequency, verified by data from the low-light camera, make it possible to estimate mass flow in various directions using seismic data. Energy estimates of the rockfalls made from video images can be compared with energy estimates from magnitude-energy equations. The observer stations AUE and AUW show shifts in the frequency depending on whether the rockfalls are moving toward or away from them. Estimates of the seismic wave speeds from the rockfalls can be estimated using the Doppler equation, since the rockfalls are a moving frequency source. Also in progress is a program to estimate mass flow around the flanks of the volcano, using the amplitude ratios from stations around the volcano. The results from this work can be compared with geologic maps of deposits from the 2006 eruptions. The high rate of rockfalls in 2005 was also a new class of precursory signal that may be incorporated into long-term monitoring strategies at Augustine and elsewhere.

  19. Global Positioning System (GPS) survey of Augustine Volcano, Alaska, August 3-8, 2000: data processing, geodetic coordinates and comparison with prior geodetic surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pauk, Benjamin A.; Power, John A.; Lisowski, Mike; Dzurisin, Daniel; Iwatsubo, Eugene Y.; Melbourne, Tim

    2001-01-01

    Between August 3 and 8,2000,the Alaska Volcano Observatory completed a Global Positioning System (GPS) survey at Augustine Volcano, Alaska. Augustine is a frequently active calcalkaline volcano located in the lower portion of Cook Inlet (fig. 1), with reported eruptions in 1812, 1882, 1909?, 1935, 1964, 1976, and 1986 (Miller et al., 1998). Geodetic measurements using electronic and optical surveying techniques (EDM and theodolite) were begun at Augustine Volcano in 1986. In 1988 and 1989, an island-wide trilateration network comprising 19 benchmarks was completed and measured in its entirety (Power and Iwatsubo, 1998). Partial GPS surveys of the Augustine Island geodetic network were completed in 1992 and 1995; however, neither of these surveys included all marks on the island.Additional GPS measurements of benchmarks A5 and A15 (fig. 2) were made during the summers of 1992, 1993, 1994, and 1996. The goals of the 2000 GPS survey were to:1) re-measure all existing benchmarks on Augustine Island using a homogeneous set of GPS equipment operated in a consistent manner, 2) add measurements at benchmarks on the western shore of Cook Inlet at distances of 15 to 25 km, 3) add measurements at an existing benchmark (BURR) on Augustine Island that was not previously surveyed, and 4) add additional marks in areas of the island thought to be actively deforming. The entire survey resulted in collection of GPS data at a total of 24 sites (fig. 1 and 2). In this report we describe the methods of GPS data collection and processing used at Augustine during the 2000 survey. We use this data to calculate coordinates and elevations for all 24 sites surveyed. Data from the 2000 survey is then compared toelectronic and optical measurements made in 1988 and 1989. This report also contains a general description of all marks surveyed in 2000 and photographs of all new marks established during the 2000 survey (Appendix A).

  20. Headless Debris Flows From Mount Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGimsey, R. G.; Neal, C. A.; Waythomas, C. F.; Wessels, R.; Coombs, M. L.; Wallace, K. L.

    2004-12-01

    Sometime between June 20 and July 15, 2004-and contemporaneous with an increase of seismicity beneath the volcano, and elevated gas emissions-a sudden release of impounded water from the summit area of Mt. Spurr volcano produced about a dozen separate debris flow lobes emanating from crevasses and bergschrunds in the surface ice several hundred meters down the east-southeast flank from the summit. These debris flows were first observed by AVO staff on a July 15 overflight and appeared to represent a single flooding event; subsequent snow cover and limited accessibility have prevented direct investigation of these deposits. Observed from the air, they are dark, elongate lobate deposits, up to several hundred meters long and tens of meters wide, draping the steep (up to ~45 degree) slopes and cascading over and into crevasses. A water-rich phase from the flows continued down slope of the termini of several lobate deposits, eroding linear rills into the snow and ice down slope. We infer that the dark material composing these flows is likely remobilized coarse lapilli from the June 1992 tephra fall produced by an eruption of Crater Peak, a satellite vent of Mt. Spurr located 3.5 km to the south. Between 1 and 2 meters of basaltic andesite tephra fell directly on the Spurr summit during the 1992 eruption. The exact mechanism for sudden release of water-laden remobilized tephra flows from the summit basin is not clear. However, observations in early August, 2004, of an 80 m x 110-m-wide pit in the summit area snow and ice suggest the possibility of a partial roof collapse of a summit meltwater basin, likely associated with subglacial melting due to recent heat flux. Such a collapse could have led to the hydraulic surge of meltwater, and rapid mixing with tephra to produce slurries. These slurries traveled down slope beneath the ice surface to emerge through existing crevasses and other easy points of exit on the steep inclines. Mount Spurr is an ice- and snow covered, Quaternary andesitic volcanic complex, comprising a centrally located dome (or stratocone) in a breached, 5-km-wide, glacier-filled caldera that dissects ancestral Mt. Spurr volcano. The summit of Mt. Spurr is 130 km west of Anchorage, AK and reaches 3,374 m in elevation. The summit dome complex is topographically asymmetric, with a steeper southwest side and a more gradually sloping northeast flank To our knowledge, this is the first time such debris flows have been observed near the summit of Mt. Spurr. However, the existence of ponded water near the summit may not be unique to 2004. A review of historical photographs and descriptions of the Spurr summit area indicates a dynamic environment that responds to complex variations in snowfall accumulation, solar radiation, and geothermal heat flux. Other authors have noted variations in summit snow pack and the ephemeral appearance of a snow-filled depression and possibly a water-filled pit in 1964 aerial photographs of the summit. The formation of these debris flows near the summit of Mt. Spurr in conjunction with elevated seismicity below the summit and the development of a collapse pit in summit ice cap suggest that increasing geothermal heat flux, possibly in combination with above normal temperatures and long periods of clear, sunny weather in the region is responsible.

  1. Reevaluation of tsunami formation by debris avalanche at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.

    2000-01-01

    Debris avalanches entering the sea at Augustine Volcano, Alaska have been proposed as a mechanism for generating tsunamis. Historical accounts of the 1883 eruption of the volcano describe 6- to 9-meter-high waves that struck the coastline at English Bay (Nanwalek), Alaska about 80 kilometers east of Augustine Island. These accounts are often cited as proof that volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano are significant hazards to the coastal zone of lower Cook Inlet. This claim is disputed because deposits of unequivocal tsunami origin are not evident at more than 50 sites along the lower Cook Inlet coastline where they might be preserved. Shallow water (<25 m) around Augustine Island, in the run-out zone for debris avalanches, limits the size of an avalanche-caused wave. If the two most recent debris avalanches, Burr Point (A.D. 1883) and West Island (<500 yr. B.P.) were traveling at velocities in the range of 50 to 100 meters per second, the kinetic energy of the avalanches at the point of impact with the ocean would have been between 1014 and 1015 joules. Although some of this energy would be dissipated through boundary interactions and momentum transfer between the avalanche and the sea, the initial wave should have possessed sufficient kinetic energy to do geomorphic work (erosion, sediment transport, formation of wave-cut features) on the coastline of lowwer Cook Inlet. Because widespread evidence of the effects of large waves cannot be found, it appears that the debris avalanches could not have been traveling very fast when they entered the sea, or they happened during low tide and displaced only small volumes of water. In light of these results, the hazard from volcanigenic tsunamis from Augustine Volcano appears minor, unless a very large debris avalanche occurs at high tide.

  2. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) gravity work for the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Goodkind, J.M.

    1990-05-05

    The objective of this funding has been to install two modified UCSD superconducting gravimeters at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). The research and development underlying the modifications was funded primarily by NOAA and in smaller part by this contract. Modification and installation of the instruments at HVO could not proceed prior to completion of this effort. Although considerable work remains to be done to guarantee optimum performance of all future instruments, three instruments have been assembled using present technology and their performance meets our most optimistic expectations. No instrumental drift has been measurable on them and current results allow us to set an upper limit on drift at about 0.5 {mu}Gal for a five month record at Miami. As longer simultaneous records from two instruments are obtained this limit will be set lower. They reveal substantial gravity variations due to rainfall as well as smaller ones which may be caused by activity within the volcano. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Petrology of the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izbekov, P. E.

    2008-12-01

    Kasatochi volcano, a 3 × 3 km island in the Andreanof Islands group in the central Aleutians, erupted explosively with little warning on August 7, 2008. For two days the eruption sent ash clouds to an altitude of nearly 45000 ft asl. Within two weeks, immediately after the activity at Kasatochi decreased, the island was visited by AVO scientist Chris Waythomas, who was able to collect a suite of samples from pyroclastic flow deposits formed during the climatic phase of the eruption. Pumiceous juvenile blocks appear to be one of the predominant lithologies in the pyroclastic flows. The whole rock composition of magmas erupted during the climatic phase shows little variation, e.g. 58.46 - 59.19 wt. % SiO2, 6.98 - 7.09 wt. % CaO, and 1.00 - 1.07 wt.% K2O. The erupted andesite is crystalline-rich, with phenocryst content of nearly 40 vol. %. The mineral assemblage includes plagioclase, ortho- and clinopyroxenes, hornblende, and Ti-magnetite. The matrix glass is clear, compositionally uniform (68.5± 0.8 wt.% SiO2) and contains elongated microlites of plagioclase, pyroxenes, and amphibole. Most mineral phases appear to be chemically and texturally homogeneous with little or no signs of disequilibrium. Hornblende phenocrysts have no reaction rims that form in response to syn-eruptive ascent and decompression of magmas. Ongoing petrological investigations will use compositions of mineral and glass phases in the erupted products to constrain pre- and syn-eruptive magma conditions during the 2008 Kasatochi event.

  4. Seismicity and seismic structure at Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, Summer J.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Pesicek, Jeremy D.; Prejean, Stephanie G.

    2014-05-01

    Okmok volcano is an active volcanic caldera located on the northeastern portion of Umnak Island in the Aleutian arc, with recent eruptions in 1997 and 2008. The Okmok area had ~900 locatable earthquakes between 2003 and June 2008, and an additional ~600 earthquakes from the beginning of the 2008 eruption to mid 2009, providing an adequate dataset for seismic tomography. To image the seismic velocity structure of Okmok, we apply waveform cross-correlation using bispectrum verification and double-difference tomography to a subset of these earthquakes. We also perform P-wave attenuation tomography using a spectral decay technique. We examine the spatio-temporal characteristics of seismicity in the opening sequence of the 2008 eruption to investigate the path of magma migration during the establishment of a new eruptive vent. We also incorporate the new earthquake relocations and three-dimensional (3D) velocity model with first-motion polarities to compute focal mechanisms for selected events in the 2008 pre-eruptive and eruptive periods. Through these techniques we obtain precise relocations, a well-constrained 3D P-wave velocity model, and a marginally resolved S-wave velocity model. We image a main low Vp and Vs anomaly directly under the caldera consisting of a shallow zone at 0-2 km depth connected to a larger deeper zone that extends to about 6 km depth. We find that areas of low Qp are concentrated in the central to southwestern portion of the caldera and correspond fairly well with areas of low Vp. We interpret the deeper part of the low velocity anomaly (4-6 km depth) beneath the caldera as a magma body. This is consistent with results from ambient noise tomography and suggests that previous estimates of depth to Okmok's magma chamber based only on geodetic data may be too shallow. The distribution of events preceding the 2008 eruption suggest that a combination of overpressure in the zone surrounding the magma chamber and the introduction of new material from below were jointly responsible for the explosive eruption. Magma escaping from the top of the main magma chamber likely reacted with both a smaller shallow pod of magma and groundwater on its way up below the Cone D area. The earthquakes in the 2008 pre-eruptive and eruptive periods are found to have a mixture of strike-slip, oblique normal, and oblique thrust mechanisms, with a dominant P-axis orientation that is nearly perpendicular to the regional tectonic stress. This may indicate that the stresses related to magmatic activity locally dominated regional tectonic forces during this time period.

  5. The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON): Hands-on Experiential K- 12 Learning in the North

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Morris; M. Jeffries

    2008-01-01

    The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON) was initiated by Martin Jeffries (UAF polar scientist), Delena Norris-Tull (UAF education professor) and Ron Reihl (middle school science teacher, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District). The snow and ice measurement protocols were developed in 1999-2000 at the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska scientists and

  6. Measurements of the Michigan Airglow Observatory from 1971 to 1973 at Ester Dome Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcwatters, K. D.; Meriwether, J. W.; Hays, P. B.; Nagy, A. F.

    1973-01-01

    The Michigan Airglow Observatory (MAO) was located at Ester Dome Observatory, College, Alaska (latitude: 64 deg 53'N, longitude: 148 deg 03'W) since October, 1971. The MAO houses a 6-inch Fabry-Perot interferometer, a 2-channel monitoring photometer and a 4-channel tilting filter photometer. The Fabry-Perot interferometer was used extensively during the winter observing seasons of 1971-72 and 1972-73 to measure temperature and mass motions of the neutral atmosphere above approximately 90 kilometers altitude. Neutral wind data from the 1971-72 observing season as measured by observing the Doppler shift of the gamma 6300 A atomic oxygen emission line are presented.

  7. International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska: Experiencing Language, Culture, Environment, and Active Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, J. C.; Gordeev, E.; Ivanov, B.; Izbekov, P.; Kasahara, M.; Melnikov, D.; Selyangin, O.; Vesna, Y.

    2003-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University of Education, University of Alaska Fairbanks, and Hokkaido University are developing an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. An experimental first session was held on Mutnovsky and Gorely Volcanoes in Kamchatka during August 2003. Objectives of the school are to:(1) Acquaint students with the chemical and physical processes of explosive volcanism, through first-hand experience with some of the most spectacular volcanic features on Earth; (2) Expose students to different concepts and approaches to volcanology; (3) Expand students' ability to function in a harsh environment and to bridge barriers in language and culture; (4) Build long-lasting collaborations in research among students and in teaching and research among faculty in the North Pacific region. Both undergraduate and graduate students from Russia, the United States, and Japan participated. The school was based at a mountain hut situated between Gorely and Mutnovsky Volcanoes and accessible by all-terrain truck. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of both volcanoes, flank lava flows, fumarole fields, ignimbrite exposures, and a geothermal area and power plant. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. Although subjects were taught at the undergraduate level, lectures led to further discussion with more advanced students. Graduate students participated by describing their research activities to the undergraduates. A final session at a geophysical field station permitted demonstration of instrumentation and presentations requiring sophisticated graphics in more comfortable surroundings. Plans are underway to make this school an annual offering for academic credit in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska and in Kamchatka. The course will be targeted at undergraduates with a strong interest in and aptitude for the physical sciences, not necessarily volcanology. It will also serve as an entry point for students wishing to make extended exchange visits to the Russian Far East or Alaska, and to graduate students in volcanology wishing to undertake thesis research in North Pacific volcanism. The school represents the first educational effort of the newly established Japan Kamchatka Alaska Subduction Project (JKASP), which seeks to bring scientists of our three nations together in the study of one shared geophysical province, the Kuril-Kamchatka-Aleutian Arcs.

  8. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. G. Rinkleff; C. F. Cahill

    2010-01-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual

  9. Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska2. Precursor to the Subplinian phase

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Vergniolle; J. Caplan-Auerbach

    2004-01-01

    The 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both Strombolian and Subplinian basaltic activity. The Subplinian phase was preceded by a signal of low amplitude and constant frequency (c2 Hz) lasting 13 h. This bhumming signalQ is interpreted as the coalescence of the very shallow part of a foam building up in the conduit, which produces large gas bubbles

  10. The EarthScope Plate Boundary Observatory: Bringing Low Latency Data From Unimak Island, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. Feaux; D. Mencin; M. Jackson; W. Gallaher; B. Pauk; S. Smith

    2008-01-01

    The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), part of the NSF-funded EarthScope project, will complete the installation of a fourteen station GPS network on Unimak Island, Alaska in August, 2008. The primary data communications goal of the project is to design and implement a robust data communications network capable of downloading 15-sec daily GPS files and streaming 1 Hz GPS data, via

  11. The New USGS Volcano Hazards Program Web Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venezky, D. Y.; Graham, S. E.; Parker, T. J.; Snedigar, S. F.

    2008-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Volcano Hazard Program (VHP) has launched a revised web site that uses a map-based interface to display hazards information for U.S. volcanoes. The web site is focused on better communication of hazards and background volcano information to our varied user groups by reorganizing content based on user needs and improving data display. The Home Page provides a synoptic view of the activity level of all volcanoes for which updates are written using a custom Google® Map. Updates are accessible by clicking on one of the map icons or clicking on the volcano of interest in the adjacent color-coded list of updates. The new navigation provides rapid access to volcanic activity information, background volcano information, images and publications, volcanic hazards, information about VHP, and the USGS volcano observatories. The Volcanic Activity section was tailored for emergency managers but provides information for all our user groups. It includes a Google® Map of the volcanoes we monitor, an Elevated Activity Page, a general status page, information about our Volcano Alert Levels and Aviation Color Codes, monitoring information, and links to monitoring data from VHP's volcano observatories: Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The YVO web site was the first to move to the new navigation system and we are working on integrating the Long Valley Observatory web site next. We are excited to continue to implement new geospatial technologies to better display our hazards and supporting volcano information.

  12. Volcanoes!!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Kailey Fucaloro

    2009-09-15

    5th grade students will be able to explain what makes a volcano erupt. 5th grade students will be able to list the effects that volcanoes have on the environment and people. Read through the page to gather more knowledge about volcanoes. After reading this, you should be able to explain what makes a volcano erupt Volcano Facts View a model of a volcano erupting Visual Model of a volcano erupting Use the web tool to make your own volcano erupt. Adjust the gas level and size to make ...

  13. Low pressure fractionation in arc volcanoes: an example from Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Daley, E.E.; Swanson, S.E.

    1985-01-01

    Augustine Volcano, situated between the Cook and Katmai segments of the Eastern Aleutian Volcanic Arc, has erupted 5 times since its discovery in 1778. Eruptions are characterized by early vent-clearing eruptions with accompanying pyroclastic flows followed by dome-building and more pyroclastic flows. Bulk rock chemistry of historic and prehistoric lavas shows little variability. The lavas are calc-alkaline, low to medium K, porphyritic acid andesites, rare basalt, and minor dacite pumice. FeO*/MgO averages 1.6 over this silica range. Plagioclase phenocrysts show complicated zoning patterns, but olivine, orthopyroxene, and clinopyroxene phenocrysts show little compositional variation. Hornblende, where present, is ubiquitously oxidized and was clearly out of equilibrium during the last stages of fractionation. Evolved liquid compositions of vitriophyric domes are rhyolitic, and of pumices are slightly less evolved suggesting that individual eruptions become more fractionated with time. Comparison of glass compositions with experimental results is consistent with low pressure fractionation of a relatively dry silicate melt. Disequilibrium of amphiboles and the evolved nature of glasses indicate that shallow level fractionation plays a significant role in the evolution of Augustine magmas. This model is consistent with a shallow magma chamber inferred from geophysical models of the Augustine system and also with its simple, predictable eruption pattern.

  14. Preliminary volcano-hazard assessment for the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fierstein, Judy; Hildreth, Wes

    2000-01-01

    The world’s largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century broke out at Novarupta (fig. 1) in June 1912, filling with hot ash what came to be called the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes and spreading downwind more fallout than all other historical Alaskan eruptions combined. Although almost all the magma vented at Novarupta, most of it had been stored beneath Mount Katmai 10 km away, which collapsed during the eruption. Airborne ash from the 3-day event blanketed all of southern Alaska, and its gritty fallout was reported as far away as Dawson, Ketchikan, and Puget Sound (fig. 21). Volcanic dust and sulfurous aerosol were detected within days over Wisconsin and Virginia; within 2 weeks over California, Europe, and North Africa; and in latter-day ice cores recently drilled on the Greenland ice cap. There were no aircraft in Alaska in 1912—fortunately! Corrosive acid aerosols damage aircraft, and ingestion of volcanic ash can cause abrupt jet-engine failure. Today, more than 200 flights a day transport 20,000 people and a fortune in cargo within range of dozens of restless volcanoes in the North Pacific. Air routes from the Far East to Europe and North America pass over and near Alaska, many flights refueling in Anchorage. Had this been so in 1912, every airport from Dillingham to Dawson and from Fairbanks to Seattle would have been enveloped in ash, leaving pilots no safe option but to turn back or find refuge at an Aleutian airstrip west of the ash cloud. Downwind dust and aerosol could have disrupted air traffic anywhere within a broad swath across Canada and the Midwest, perhaps even to the Atlantic coast. The great eruption of 1912 focused scientific attention on Novarupta, and subsequent research there has taught us much about the processes and hazards associated with such large explosive events (Fierstein and Hildreth, 1992). Moreover, work in the last decade has identified no fewer than 20 discrete volcanic vents within 15 km of Novarupta (Hildreth and others, 1999, 2000, 2001; Hildreth and Fierstein, 2000), only half of which had been named previously—the four stratovolcanoes Mounts Katmai, Mageik, Martin, and Griggs; the cone cluster called Trident Volcano; Snowy Mountain; and the three lava domes Novarupta, Mount Cerberus, and Falling Mountain. The most recent eruptions were from Trident Volcano (1953–74), but there have been at least eight other, probably larger, explosive events from the volcanoes of this area in the past 10,000 years. This report summarizes what has been learned about the volcanic histories and styles of eruption of all these volcanoes. Many large earthquakes occurred before and during the 1912 eruption, and the cluster of Katmai volcanoes remains seismically active. Because we expect an increase in seismicity before eruptions, seismic monitoring efforts to detect volcanic unrest and procedures for eruption notification and dissemination of information are included in this report. Most at risk from future eruptions of the Katmai volcanic cluster are (1) air-traffic corridors of the North Pacific, including those approaching Anchorage, one of the Pacific’s busiest international airports, (2) several regional airports and military air bases, (3) fisheries and navigation on the Naknek Lake system and Shelikof Strait, (4) pristine wildlife habitat, particularly that of the Alaskan brown bear, and (5) tourist facilities in and near Katmai National Park.

  15. Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Walls

    2011-01-30

    Create a poster about volcanoes Directions: Make a poster about volcanoes. (20 points) Include at least (1) large picture (15 points) on your poster complete with labels of every part (10 points). (15 points) Include at least three (3) facts about volcanoes. (5 points each) (15 points) Write at least a three sentence summary of your poster and volcanoes. (5 points) Use at ...

  16. The Changing Role of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory within the Volcanological Community through its 100 year history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauahikaua, J. P.; Poland, M. P.

    2011-12-01

    When Thomas Jaggar, Jr., founded the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in 1912, he wanted to "keep and publish careful records, invite the whole world of science to co-operate, and interest the business man." After studying the disastrous volcanic eruption at Martinique and Naples and the destructive earthquakes at Messina and the Caribbean Ocean, he saw observatories with these goals as a way to understand and mitigate these hazards. Owing to frequent eruptions, ease of access, and continuous record of activity (since January 17, 1912), Kilauea Volcano has been the focus for volcanological study by government, academic, and international investigators. New volcano monitoring techniques have been developed and tested on Hawaiian volcanoes and exported worldwide. HVO has served as a training ground for several generations of volcanologists; many have contributed to volcano research and hazards mitigation around the world. In the coming years, HVO and the scientific community will benefit from recent upgrades in our monitoring network. HVO had the first regional seismic network in the US and it will be fully digital; continuous GPS, tilt, gravity, and strain data already complement the seismic data; an array of infrared and visual cameras simultaneously track geologic surface changes. Scientifically, HVO scientists and their colleagues are making great advances in understanding explosive basaltic eruptions, volcanic gas emission and dispersion and its hazards, and lava flow mechanics with these advanced instruments. Activity at Hawaiian volcanoes continues to provide unparalleled opportunities for research and education, made all the more valuable by HVO's scientific legacy.

  17. Magma supply dynamics at Westdahl volcano, Alaska, modeled from satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Masterlark, T.; Dzurisin, D.; Rykhus, R.; Wicks, C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    A group of satellite radar interferograms that span the time period from 1991 to 2000 shows that Westdahl volcano, Alaska, deflated during its 1991-1992 eruption and is reinflating at a rate that could produce another eruption within the next several years. The rates of inflation and deflation are approximated by exponential decay functions having time constants of about 6 years and a few days, respectively. This behavior is consistent with a deep, constant-pressure magma source connected to a shallow reservoir by a magma-filled conduit. An elastic deformation model indicates that the reservoir is located about 6 km below sea level and beneath Westdahl Peak. We propose that the magma flow rate through the conduit is governed by the pressure gradient between the deep source and the reservoir. The pressure gradient, and hence the flow rate, are greatest immediately after eruptions. Pressurization of the reservoir decreases both the pressure gradient and the flow rate, but eventually the reservoir ruptures and an eruption or intrusion ensues. The eruption rate is controlled partly by the pressure gradient between the reservoir and surface, and therefore it, too, decreases with time. When the supply of eruptible magma is exhausted, the eruption stops, the reservoir begins to repressurize at a high rate, and the cycle repeats. This model might also be appropriate for other frequently active volcanoes with stable magma sources and relatively simple magma storage systems.

  18. Modeled tephra ages from lake sediments, base of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Schiff, C J; Kaufman, D S; Wallace, K L; Werner, A; Ku, T L; Brown, T A

    2007-02-25

    A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from Bear Lake, Alaska, located 22 km southeast of Redoubt Volcano, contains 67 tephra layers deposited over the last 8750 cal yr, comprising 15% of the total thickness of recovered sediment. Using 12 AMS {sup 14}C ages, along with the {sup 137}Cs and {sup 210}Pb activities of recent sediment, we evaluated different models to determine the age-depth relation of sediment, and to determine the age of each tephra deposit. The age model is based on a cubic smooth spline function that was passed through the adjusted tephra-free depth of each dated layer. The estimated age uncertainty of the 67 tephras averages {+-} 105 yr (1{sigma}). Tephra-fall frequency at Bear Lake was among the highest during the past 500 yr, with eight tephras deposited compared to an average of 3.7 per 500 yr over the last 8500 yr. Other periods of increased tephra fall occurred 2500-3500, 4500-5000, and 7000-7500 cal yr. Our record suggests that Bear Lake experienced extended periods (1000-2000 yr) of increased tephra fall separated by shorter periods (500-1000 yr) of apparent quiescence. The Bear Lake sediment core affords the most comprehensive tephrochronology from the base of the Redoubt Volcano to date, with an average tephra-fall frequency of once every 130 yr.

  19. Detecting hidden volcanic explosions from Mt. Cleveland Volcano, Alaska with infrasound and ground-couples airwaves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    De Angelis, Slivio; Fee, David; Haney, Matthew; Schneider, David

    2012-01-01

    In Alaska, where many active volcanoes exist without ground-based instrumentation, the use of techniques suitable for distant monitoring is pivotal. In this study we report regional-scale seismic and infrasound observations of volcanic activity at Mt. Cleveland between December 2011 and August 2012. During this period, twenty explosions were detected by infrasound sensors as far away as 1827 km from the active vent, and ground-coupled acoustic waves were recorded at seismic stations across the Aleutian Arc. Several events resulting from the explosive disruption of small lava domes within the summit crater were confirmed by analysis of satellite remote sensing data. However, many explosions eluded initial, automated, analyses of satellite data due to poor weather conditions. Infrasound and seismic monitoring provided effective means for detecting these hidden events. We present results from the implementation of automatic infrasound and seismo-acoustic eruption detection algorithms, and review the challenges of real-time volcano monitoring operations in remote regions. We also model acoustic propagation in the Northern Pacific, showing how tropospheric ducting effects allow infrasound to travel long distances across the Aleutian Arc. The successful results of our investigation provide motivation for expanded efforts in infrasound monitoring across the Aleutians and contributes to our knowledge of the number and style of vulcanian eruptions at Mt. Cleveland.

  20. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas are the result of partial melting of this slab where thermal erosion and weakening of the crust occurs along the Pacific plate-Yakutat terrane transition. Additionally, flat slab subduction may be responsible for producing adakitic magmas by equilibration of the hydrous slab with ambient mantle temperatures. In contrast, it is possible that the adakitic signature at Hayes is from underplated mafic lower crust that melted as the result of pooling mantle melt at depth. Two volcanoes within the WVF, Mt. Drum and Mt. Churchill, are adakitic with an abundance of biotite and amphibole similar to Hayes volcano and have been suggested to have slab melt origins. Mt. Drum lavas have less radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr but overlapping 206Pb/204Pb signatures while Mt. Churchill, which approximately overlies the eastern edge of the Yakutat terrane, has similar 87Sr/86Sr compositions, but more radiogenic 206Pb/204Pb than Hayes. Mt. Spurr, the nearest CIV to Hayes volcano (90 km south), does not share its adakitic signature but exhibits overlapping, more heterogeneous isotopic compositions. Thus, understanding the petrogenetic history of Hayes volcano is essential not only to explain the development of an adakitic volcanic system but how this relates to regional, arc-wide volcanism.

  1. ASTER Urgent Response to the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Science and Decision Support Gained From Frequent High-resolution, Satellite Thermal Infrared Imaging of Volcanic Events

    Microsoft Academic Search

    R. L. Wessels; M. S. Ramsey; D. S. Schneider; M. Coombs; J. Dehn; V. J. Realmuto

    2006-01-01

    Augustine Volcano, Alaska explosively erupted on January 11, 2006 after nearly eight months of increasing seismicity, deformation, gas emission, and small phreatic explosions. The volcano produced a total of 13 explosive eruptions during the last three weeks of January 2006. A new summit lava dome and two short, blocky lava flows grew during February and March 2006. A series of

  2. Volcanoes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunar, L. N. S.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the forces responsible for the eruptions of volcanoes and gives the physical and chemical parameters governing the type of eruption. Explains the structure of the earth in relation to volcanoes and explains the location of volcanic regions. (GS)

  3. Volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, R.W.; Decker, B.

    1989-01-01

    This book describes volcanoes although the authors say they are more to be experienced than described. This book poses more question than answers. The public has developed interest and awareness in volcanism since the first edition eight years ago, maybe because since the time 120 volcanoes have erupted. Of those, the more lethal eruptions were from volcanoes not included in the first edition's World's 101 Most Notorious Volcanoes.

  4. Systematic Search for Background Seismicity Rate Changes and Correlations at Alaskan Volcanoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    K. R. Kore; S. R. McNutt; D. H. Christensen

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have noted a correlation between large earthquakes and localized seismicity rate changes, particularly those associated with volcanic systems. In this study, we analyzed the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) seismicity catalog from late 1989 through mid-2004 for patterns of background seismicity rate changes at the individual monitored volcanoes throughout the Aleutian Arc. We expand the recent studies to include

  5. Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilling, Robert I.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, this booklet provides a non-technical introduction to the subject of volcanoes. Separate sections examine the nature and workings of volcanoes, types of volcanoes, volcanic geological structures such as plugs and maars, types of eruptions, volcanic-related activity such as geysers…

  6. Eruptive history and petrology of Mount Drum volcano, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richter, D.H.; Moll-Stalcup, E. J.; Miller, T.P.; Lanphere, M.A.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Smith, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    Mount Drum is one of the youngest volcanoes in the subduction-related Wrangell volcanic field (80x200 km) of southcentral Alaska. It lies at the northwest end of a series of large, andesite-dominated shield volcanoes that show a northwesterly progression of age from 26 Ma near the Alaska-Yukon border to about 0.2 Ma at Mount Drum. The volcano was constructed between 750 and 250 ka during at least two cycles of cone building and ring-dome emplacement and was partially destroyed by violent explosive activity probably after 250 ka. Cone lavas range from basaltic andesite to dacite in composition; ring-domes are dacite to rhyolite. The last constructional activity occured in the vicinity of Snider Peak, on the south flank of the volcano, where extensive dacite flows and a dacite dome erupted at about 250 ka. The climactic explosive eruption, that destroyed the top and a part of the south flank of the volcano, produced more than 7 km3 of proximal hot and cold avalanche deposits and distal mudflows. The Mount Drum rocks have medium-K, calc-alkaline affinities and are generally plagioclase phyric. Silica contents range from 55.8 to 74.0 wt%, with a compositional gap between 66.8 and 72.8 wt%. All the rocks are enriched in alkali elements and depleted in Ta relative to the LREE, typical of volcanic arc rocks, but have higher MgO contents at a given SiO2, than typical orogenic medium-K andesites. Strontium-isotope ratios vary from 0.70292 to 0.70353. The compositional range of Mount Drum lavas is best explained by a combination of diverse parental magmas, magma mixing, and fractionation. The small, but significant, range in 87Sr/86Sr ratios in the basaltic andesites and the wide range of incompatible-element ratios exhibited by the basaltic andesites and andesites suggests the presence of compositionally diverse parent magmas. The lavas show abundant petrographic evidence of magma mixing, such as bimodal phenocryst size, resorbed phenocrysts, reaction rims, and disequilibrium mineral assemblages. In addition, some dacites and andesites contain Mg and Ni-rich olivines and/or have high MgO, Cr, Ni, Co, and Sc contents that are not in equilibrium with the host rock and indicate mixing between basalt or cumulate material and more evolved magmas. Incompatible element variations suggest that fractionation is responsible for some of the compositional range between basaltic andesite and dacite, but the rhyolites have K, Ba, Th, and Rb contents that are too low for the magmas to be generated by fractionation of the intermediate rocks. Limited Sr-isotope data support the possibility that the rhyolites may be partial melts of underlying volcanic rocks. ?? 1994 Springer-Verlag.

  7. Earthquake Triggering by Fluid Overpressure at Trident and Novarupta Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prejean, S. G.; Thurber, C. H.; Murphy, R. A.; Pesicek, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    In 2008 the region of Trident and Novarupta volcanoes (TN) in the Katmai volcanic cluster, Alaska, experienced a swarm of small shallow earthquakes in association with a series of deep (>25 km) long-period (DLP) earthquakes. We captured the latter half of the swarm with a dense array of 10 temporary broadband seismometers deployed within the larger-scale permanent network of 20 stations. This level of seismic coverage is exceptional for a remote Alaskan volcano. We computed ~100 first motion fault plane solutions for brittle failure earthquakes in the Katmai region. Roughly 30% of the earthquakes located in the TN area have high quality P-wave polarities that are inconsistent with the best fitting double-couple fault plane solutions. We computed full moment tensors for a subset of these events following Julian and Foulger (Bull. Seis. Soc. Am., v.86, 972-980, 1996) based on P-wave amplitudes and P to SH amplitude ratios. Ray parameters and path-averaged Q corrections used in the inversions were derived from three dimensional velocity and attenuation models. Computed fault plane solutions in the TN region are highly diverse, unlike those of some neighboring Katmai area volcanoes. Results suggest that this area is a normal to strike-slip faulting environment where the vertical effective stress and most compressive horizontal effective stress were roughly equal in magnitude at the time of the swarm. Moment tensor results indicate that the majority of these earthquakes have positive isotropic components, indicative of volume increase, and CLVD components with major dipoles directed outward. These moment tensors are similar to those calculated at several geothermal areas globally and are consistent with simultaneous shear faulting and hydraulic fracturing, as water or gas rapidly intrudes into tensile cracks. Taken together, these observations suggest that earthquakes in the 2008 swarm occur on a complex network of normal and strike-slip faults in a high pore pressure volume of crust at roughly 4 km depth between the summit of Trident volcano and the Novarupta vent. Tomography results are generally consistent with this interpretation, as the earthquakes occur in a linear zone near a low velocity, high attenuation anomaly. High fault plane solution diversity in the swarm, moment tensor results, and the temporal association with DLP events suggest that the earthquakes were triggered by increased pore fluid pressure resulting from renewed fluid movement at depth.

  8. Two Millennia of Edifice Instability at Augustine Volcano, Alaska and Implications for Future Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebert, L.; Beget, J.

    2006-12-01

    Augustine volcano, a ca. 1250-m-high lava-dome complex in the southern Cook Inlet, Alaska, has collapsed repeatedly during the late Holocene, producing debris-avalanche deposits that ring the island and extend offshore. About a dozen collapses have occurred in the past 2.2 ka, producing the highest-known collapse frequency (ca. 150-200 yr) at any volcano. Most debris avalanches at Augustine had volumes between 0.1 and 1 cu. km and reached about 7-10 km from the summit; typically about half that distance involved submarine travel into Cook Inlet. The most recent collapse took place in October 1883, forming the Burr Point debris- avalanche deposit on the north side of the volcano. Emplacement of the avalanche extended the shoreline about 2 km and produced a tsunami that impacted English Bay on the Kenai Peninsula. The collapse was accompanied by pumiceous pyroclastic flows that reached the sea and a subplinian explosive eruption that deposited ash across Cook Inlet. An earlier NW-flank collapse about 300 years ago was preceded by one of the largest known Augustine debris avalanches about 1540 +/- 110 AD. This collapse formed a new 2 x 3.5 km wide island (West Island) off the WNW coast of Augustine Island and was accompanied by a lateral blast that overrode the avalanche deposit and extended out to sea. The margins of West Island display extensive tsunami modification. Debris avalanches older than 1 ka were concentrated on the southern and eastern flanks of the volcano. Documented magmatic eruptions have accompanied several edifice-collapse events at Augustine, although syn-eruptive collapse has not been confirmed in all cases. The small size of the volcano and high magma production rates (0.0025 cu. km/yr) result in rapid reconstruction of the volcano after each collapse. The repeated cycles of collapse and regrowth have produced a subaerial and submarine apron of debris-avalanche, pyroclastic-flow, and other volcaniclastic deposits several times the volume of the edifice itself. The orientation of previous collapses shows a crude pattern of clockwise migration beginning on the east side. This may in part reflect the influence of the prior failure plane on collapse direction. Although future collapse is possible in any direction, the pattern of past collapses suggests that an elevated risk may exist for a future edifice failure to the northeast. The highest tsunami hazard exists from debris avalanches directed to the northeast, east, and south, where the shoreline lies only about 3.5-4.5 km from the summit. Risk to populated areas is contingent on factors including debris avalanche dynamics, thickness, volume, and emplacement direction, as well as timing with respect to Cook Inlet tides.

  9. Tephra-Producing Eruptions of Holocene Age at Akutan Volcano, Alaska; Frequency, Magnitude, and Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Wallace, K. L.; Schwaiger, H.

    2012-12-01

    Akutan Volcano in the eastern Aleutian Islands of Alaska is one of the most historically active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc (43 eruptions in about the past 250 years). Explosive eruptions pose major hazards to aircraft flying north Pacific air routes and to local infrastructure on Akutan and neighboring Unalaska Island. Air travel, infrastructure, and population in the region have steadily increased during the past several decades, and thus it is important to better understand the frequency, magnitude, and characteristics of tephra-producing eruptions. The most recent eruption was a VEI 2 event on March 8-May 21, 1992 that resulted in minor ash emissions and trace amounts of proximal fallout. Nearly continuous low-level emission of ash and steam is typical of historical eruptions, and most of the historical events have been similar in magnitude to the 1992 event. The most recent major eruption occurred about 1600 yr. B.P. and likely produced the ca. 2-km diameter summit caldera and inundated valleys that head on the volcano with pyroclastic-flow and lahar deposits that are tens of meters thick. The 1600 yr. B.P. eruption covered most of Akutan Island with up to 2.5 m of coarse scoriaceous tephra fall, including deposits 0.5-1 m thick near the City of Akutan. Tephra-fall deposits associated with this eruption exhibit a continuous sequence of black, fine to coarse scoriaceous lapilli overlain by a lithic-rich facies and finally a muddy aggregate-rich facies indicating water involvement during the latter stages of the eruption. Other tephra deposits of Holocene age on Akutan Island include more than a dozen discrete fine to coarse ash beds and 3-6 beds of scoriaceous, coarse lapilli tephra indicating that there have been several additional major eruptions (>VEI 3) of Akutan Volcano during the Holocene. Radiocarbon dates on these events are pending. In addition to tephra falls from Akutan, other fine ash deposits are found on the island that originated from other Aleutian arc volcanoes. Tephra deposits from typical VEI 2 historical eruptions are not well preserved on the island so tephra-fall frequency estimated from stratigraphic studies is underestimated. Akutan Island is home to the largest seafood processing plant in North America and has a workforce of more than one thousand people. Other infrastructure consists of a recently constructed paved airfield on neighboring Akun Island (25 km east of the active vent) and a new boat harbor at the head of Akutan Harbor. Plans to develop greenhouses, tourism, and increased cold storage capacity on Akutan and Akun Islands also are evolving. To support the power demands of the development efforts, The City of Akutan is considering the utilization of geothermal resources on the island that are located in Hot Springs Bay valley northwest of the city. All of the existing and planned infrastructure, water supply, and residential areas are about 12 km downwind (east) of the volcano and are at risk from ash-producing eruptions. The historical eruptive history suggests that VEI 2 eruptions are plausible in the near future and the Holocene tephra-fall record indicates that large eruptions (VEI 4 or larger) occur about every few thousand years. Numerical modeling of tephra fallout based on the record of ash-producing eruptions will be used to improve tephra-fall hazard assessments for the area.

  10. Infrasound Observations of the Recent Explosive Eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi Volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnoult, K. M.; Olson, J. V.; Szuberla, C. A.; Garces, M.; Fee, D.; McNutt, S. R.; Hedlin, M. A.

    2008-12-01

    Infrasonic signals produced by the 2008 eruptions of Okmok and Kasatochi volcanoes, Alaska, demonstrated the potential for acoustic remote sensing of eruptions that may pose a hazard to aviation. During its recent period of eruptive activity, Kasatochi Volcano produced at least five explosive eruptions that were recorded by seismometers and infrasound arrays. These eruptions ejected significant ash into the stratosphere and caused numerous flight delays and cancellations. Seismometers located along the Aleutian Islands recorded explosive episodes with start times of 22:01 UT on 7 August 2008, and 01:50, 04:35, 07:12, and 11:48 UT on 8 August 2008. Infrasound arrays located in Fairbanks, Alaska (I53US, 2104 km from Kasatochi), and in Kona, Hawaii (I59US, 3996 km from Kasatochi) also recorded these explosions at times consistent with the seismic observations. The volcanic signals recorded by I53US and I59US had high signal to noise ratios and reached pressure levels of 2.0 Pa peak-to-peak at both arrays during the second explosive eruption. A single infrasound microphone located on Mt. Shishaldin (818 km from Kasatochi) recorded the onsets of explosions 1, 4, and 5 at approximately the times expected; however, due to technical problems, it did not record explosions 2 and 3. Based on seismic observations, the durations of the five explosive eruptions were approximately 68, 27, 35, 46, and 26 minutes, respectively. The corresponding coherent signal durations recorded by the I53US and I59US infrasound arrays were considerably longer: 104, 48, 39, 118, and 31 minutes for I53US and 155, 101, 81, 114, and 187 minutes for I59US. The eruptive events of Okmok Volcano that occurred 12-13 Jul 2008 were also recorded by infrasound arrays I53US and I59US. Although a large ash cloud was produced by Okmok Volcano, the pressure levels of the Okmok infrasound signals, relative to those from Kasatochi, were much less (< 0.5 Pa peak-to-peak at I53US). Three groups of infrasound signals were observed at I53US with arrival times of 21:44 UT on 12 July 2008, and 01:14 and 05:41 UT on 13 July 2008. Their durations were 43, 95, and 29 minutes, respectively. The data from other IMS infrasound arrays will be used to study source and propagation effects. Of particularly interest will be the data from I56US in Newport, Washington (4060 km from Kasatochi, 3547 km from Okmok) and I57US in Pinon Flat, California (5067 km from Kasatochi, 4585 km from Okmok). The relationships between the infrasound signals and the physical characteristics of the ash injections will be investigated.

  11. ASTER Urgent Response to the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Science and Decision Support Gained From Frequent High-resolution, Satellite Thermal Infrared Imaging of Volcanic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wessels, R. L.; Ramsey, M. S.; Schneider, D. S.; Coombs, M.; Dehn, J.; Realmuto, V. J.

    2006-12-01

    Augustine Volcano, Alaska explosively erupted on January 11, 2006 after nearly eight months of increasing seismicity, deformation, gas emission, and small phreatic explosions. The volcano produced a total of 13 explosive eruptions during the last three weeks of January 2006. A new summit lava dome and two short, blocky lava flows grew during February and March 2006. A series of 7 daytime and 15 nighttime Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) scenes were acquired in response to this new activity. This response was facilitated by a new ASTER Urgent Request Protocol system. The ASTER data provided several significant observations as a part of a much larger suite of real-time or near-real-time data from other satellite (AVHRR, MODIS), airborne (FLIR, visual, gas), and ground-based (seismometers, radiometers) sensors used at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). ASTER is well-suited to volcanic observations because of its 15-m to 90-m spatial resolution, its ability to be scheduled and point off-nadir, and its ability to collect visible-near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) data during both the day and night. Aided by the volcano's high latitude (59.4°N) ASTER was able to provide frequent repeat imaging as short as one day between scenes with an average 6-day repeat during the height of activity. These data provided a time series of high-resolution VNIR, shortwave infrared (SWIR - detects temperatures from about 200°C to > 600°C averaged over a 30-m pixel), and TIR (detects temperatures up to about 100°C averaged over a 90-m pixel) data of the volcano and its eruptive products. Frequent satellite imaging of volcanoes is necessary to record rapid changes in activity and to avoid recurring cloud cover. Of the 22 ASTER scenes acquired between October 30, 2005 and May 30, 2006, the volcano was clear to partly cloudy in 13 scenes. The most useful pre-eruption ASTER Urgent Request image was acquired on December 20. These data showed a broad area of slightly elevated TIR radiances that correlated with new snow-free areas and fumaroles at the summit. Thin cirrus cloud cover prevented quantitative TIR temperature extraction. During the night of February 1, 2006, ASTER imaged an ash-rich plume and fresh pyroclastic-flow deposits near the end of a 6-day continuous phase of the eruption. A decorrelation stretch of ASTER TIR bands 14, 13, and 11 suggests that the eruption plume was a mixture of ash and SO2. The 90-m TIR sensor was able to detect subtle surface radiance differences between the cooler distal ends of the pyroclastic-flow deposits and the warmer proximal areas. These temperature differences were controlled by both the age (hours) and thickness of the deposits. The SWIR data show a region of ~ 700 m x 300 m of hot pixels centered at the summit dome with a maximum brightness temperature of 619°C. ASTER data spanning February 22 through March 14 documented the continued growth of the summit domes and lava flows and gradual cooling of the block and ash deposits.

  12. Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Though it's not quite spring, waters in the Gulf of Alaska (right) appear to be blooming with plant life in this true-color MODIS image from March 4, 2002. East of the Alaska Peninsula (bottom center), blue-green swirls surround Kodiak Island. These colors are the result of light reflecting off chlorophyll and other pigments in tiny marine plants called phytoplankton. The bloom extends southward and clear dividing line can be seen west to east, where the bloom disappears over the deeper waters of the Aleutian Trench. North in Cook Inlet, large amounts of red clay sediment are turning the water brown. To the east, more colorful swirls stretch out from Prince William Sound, and may be a mixture of clay sediment from the Copper River and phytoplankton. Arcing across the top left of the image, the snow-covered Brooks Range towers over Alaska's North Slope. Frozen rivers trace white ribbons across the winter landscape. The mighty Yukon River traverses the entire state, beginning at the right edge of the image (a little way down from the top) running all the way over to the Bering Sea, still locked in ice. In the high-resolution image, the circular, snow-filled calderas of two volcanoes are apparent along the Alaska Peninsula. In Bristol Bay (to the west of the Peninsula) and in a couple of the semi-clear areas in the Bering Sea, it appears that there may be an ice algae bloom along the sharp ice edge (see high resolution image for better details). Ground-based observations from the area have revealed that an under-ice bloom often starts as early as February in this region and then seeds the more typical spring bloom later in the season.

  13. Relative velocity changes using ambient seismic noise at Okmok and Redoubt volcanoes, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennington, N. L.; Haney, M. M.; De Angelis, S.; Thurber, C. H.

    2013-12-01

    Okmok and Redoubt are two of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc. Leading up to its most recent eruption, Okmok, a shield volcano on Umnak Island, showed precursors to volcanic activity only five hours before it erupted explosively in July 2008. Redoubt, a stratovolcano located along the Cook Inlet, displayed several months of precursory activity leading up to its March 2009 eruption. Frequent activity at both volcanoes poses a major hazard due to heavy traffic along the North Pacific air routes. Additionally, Okmok is adjacent to several of the world's most productive fisheries and Redoubt is located only 110 miles SW of Anchorage, the major population center of Alaska. For these reasons, it is imperative that we improve our ability to detect early signs of unrest, which could potentially lead to eruptive activity at these volcanoes. We take advantage of continuous waveforms recorded on seismic networks at Redoubt and Okmok in an attempt to identify seismic precursors to the recent eruptions at both volcanoes. We perform seismic interferometry using ambient noise, following Brenguier et al. (2008), in order to probe the subsurface and determine temporal changes in relative seismic velocity from pre- through post-eruption, for the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions. In a preliminary investigation, we analyzed 6 months of noise cross-correlation functions averaged over 10-day intervals leading up to the 2009 eruption at Redoubt. During February 2009, station pairs RSO-DFR and RDN-RSO showed a decrease in seismic velocity of ~0.02%. By the beginning of March, the relative velocity changes returned to background levels. Stations RSO and RDN are located within the summit breach, and station DFR is to the north. Although these results are preliminary, it is interesting to note that the decrease in seismic velocity at both station pairs overlaps with the time period when Grapenthin et al. (2012) hypothesize magma in the mid-to-deep crustal reservoir was reheated and migrated to a second shallow reservoir between 2 and 4.5 km depth. This hypothesized shallow magma reservoir is within the sensitivity depth of our ambient noise analysis, and thus the decrease in seismic velocity may be associated with magma movement at shallow depths underneath Redoubt. At the onset of eruption, the relative velocity change at station pair RDN-RSO decreased by ~0.03% while that at RSO-DFR remained at background levels. Notably, this decrease in seismic velocity is observed only at the station pair with a propagation path that traverses the summit breach. Our investigation continues as we search for time variations in the ambient seismic noise signal preceding and following the 2008 Okmok and 2009 Redoubt eruptions and endeavor to identify what those changes may represent.

  14. Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-12-17

    Students investigate the processes that build volcanoes, the factors that influence different eruption types, and the threats volcanoes pose to their surrounding communities. They use what they have learned to identify physical features and eruption types of several actual volcanic episodes.

  15. Preeruptive inflation and surface interferometric coherence characteristics revealed by satellite radar interferometry at Makushin Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Power, J.A.; McConnell, V.S.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.

    2002-01-01

    Pilot reports in January 1995 and geologic field observations from the summer of 1996 indicate that a relatively small explosive eruption of Makushin, one of the more frequently active volcanoes in the Aleutian arc of Alaska, occured on 30 January 1995. Several independent radar interferograms that each span the time period from October 1993 to September 1995 show evidence of ???7 cm of uplift centered on the volcano's east flank, which we interpret as preeruptive inflation of a ???7-km-deep magma source (??V = 0.022 km3). Subsequent interferograms for 1995-2000, a period that included no reported eruptive activity, show no evidence of additional ground deformation. Interferometric coherence at C band is found to persist for 3 years or more on lava flow and other rocky surfaces covered with short grass and sparsely distributed tall grass and for at least 1 year on most pyroclastic deposits. On lava flow and rocky surfaces with dense tall grass and on alluvium, coherence lasts for a few months. Snow and ice surfaces lose coherence within a few days. This extended timeframe of coherence over a variety of surface materials makes C band radar interferometry an effective tool for studying volcano deformation in Alaska and other similar high-latitude regions.

  16. Measuring and Modeling Changes in Permafrost Temperature at the UAF Permafrost Observatory in Barrow, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V. E.; Yoshikawa, K.; Marchenko, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    In 2001, a Permafrost Observatory was established within the Barrow Environmental Observatory in Barrow, Alaska under the auspices of the International Arctic Research Center of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The observatory was established at the locations where permafrost temperatures were measured during the 1950s and early 1960s by M. Brewer of the U.S. Geological Survey to compare present permafrost temperatures with those obtained by M. Brewer. Those measurements were of very high quality, with a precision of generally 0.01°C. Comparison of permafrost temperature profiles obtained at the same location by Brewer on October 9, 1950 and by the UAF research group on October 9, 2001 shows that at the 15-meter depth (which is slightly above the depth of annual temperature variations) the permafrost temperature was warmer by 1.2°C in 2001 then in 1950. Since 2001, permafrost temperature at this depth increased additionally by 0.5°C. Most of this latest increase happened after 2005. Similar permafrost temperature dynamics during the last ten years was observed at the UAF Permafrost Observatories in the Prudhoe Bay region and could be explained both by an increase in air temperatures and in the snow depth at these locations. A site-specific numerical model for the Barrow permafrost temperature regime was developed in the GI Permafrost Lab. The model was calibrated using data from shallow (down to one meter) soil temperatures obtained by K. Hinkel at a Barrow site with surface conditions similar to the Brewer site. No data from the Brewer sites were used for the calibration. Comparison of the modeling results and the Brewer's measured data shows an excellent agreement. The daily air temperatures and snow cover thickness during the entire period of measurements (1924-2011) at the Barrow meteorological station were used as input data for this calibrated model. As a result, a time series of daily ground temperatures for the depths between 0 and 200 meters were obtained. Analysis of this time series will be used in this presentation to reveal the effect of changes in air temperature and in snow depth on permafrost temperature and on the active layer thickness. Possible changes in these parameters as a result of the predicted changes in climate during the 21st century will be also presented.

  17. Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Scott Johnson

    This resource provides general information about volcanoes. It illustrates the growth of a volcano, using Paricutin and Mt. St. Helens as examples of an active volcano and a lava dome. The terms extinct and dormant are also discussed. This site provides an explanation of why and how volcanoes form, zones of subduction, mid-ocean ridges, and hot spots. Deadly dangers associated with eruptions are discussed as is the use of a tiltmeter for prediction. The content center lesson describes a possible connection between the lost continent of Atlantis and the island of Santorini. Dissolved gasses in magma and the creation of a lava dome are both demonstrated in the hands-on section.

  18. Investigation of volcanic processes using seismology and geodesy at Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, Summer Joi

    Okmok Volcano, Alaska is a frequently active system with eruptions in 1997 and 2008 that differed in style and vent location. We conduct various seismic and geodetic studies of Okmok, focusing on better characterizing the volcano's subsurface structure and changes leading up to the 2008 eruption. In the first study, we perform ambient noise interferometry using cross-correlation of noise between station pairs to investigate changes in Okmok's seismic properties preceding and following the 2008 eruption. In the second, we test the influence of phase-weighted versus linear stacking on the quality of ambient noise tomography (ANT). In the third, we perform a joint inversion of body-wave arrivals and surface wave dispersion to solve for three-dimensional P-wave and S-wave velocity structure and hypocenter locations. Finally, we conduct time series analysis with temporal adjustment of Okmok's deformation between 1997 and 2008 using wrapped phase observations from interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR). We find two prominent signals in relative seismic velocity in the intereruptive period, strongest on station pairs with paths beneath the caldera. These are a seasonal variation, believed to be due to precipitation and snow loading, overprinted by a gradual increase in velocity until the 2008 eruption. The increase, contrary to typical observations preceding eruptions, may be due to viscoelastic effects decreasing the stresses above the pressurized magma chamber during the late intereruptive period. We find that phase-weighted stacking improves the signal-to-noise ratio of Green's functions and the quality of dispersion curves, group velocity maps, and the resulting S velocity model with respect to linearly stacking. The ANT-derived S model shows two major low velocity zones (LVZs) at depths that agree with previous studies, but their lateral extent is unrealistically large. Joint inversion of body-wave and surface-wave data produces an optimal P model similar to the body-wave-only model, but the S model improves noticeably and suggests slightly greater depth extent of the lower LVZ. From temporal adjustment on InSAR-estimated variations in source strength, we find an adequate fit to a parameterization consisting of twoexponential decay steps, suggesting that viscoelastic processes play a role in deformation during intereruptive periods.

  19. Ground deformation associated with the March 1996 earthquake swarm at Akutan volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Power, J.A.; Dzurisin, D.

    2000-01-01

    In March 1996 an intense swarm of volcano-tectonic earthquakes (???3000 felt by local residents, Mmax = 5.1, cumulative moment of 2.7 ??1018 N m) beneath Akutan Island in the Aleutian volcanic arc, Alaska, produced extensive ground cracks but no eruption of Akutan volcano. Synthetic aperture radar interferograms that span the time of the swarm reveal complex island-wide deformation: the western part of the island including Akutan volcano moved upward, while the eastern part moved downward. The axis of the deformation approximately aligns with new ground cracks on the western part of the island and with Holocene normal faults that were reactivated during the swarm on the eastern part of the island. The axis is also roughly parallel to the direction of greatest compressional stress in the region. No ground movements greater than 2.83 cm were observed outside the volcano's summit caldera for periods of 4 years before or 2 years after the swarm. We modeled the deformation primarily as the emplacement of a shallow, east-west trending, north dipping dike plus inflation of a deep, Mogi-type magma body beneath the volcano. The pattern of subsidence on the eastern part of the island is poorly constrained. It might have been produced by extensional tectonic strain that both reactivated preexisting faults on the eastern part of the island and facilitated magma movement beneath the western part. Alternatively, magma intrusion beneath the volcano might have been the cause of extension and subsidence in the eastern part of the island. We attribute localized subsidence in an area of active fumaroles within the Akutan caldera, by as much as 10 cm during 1992-1993 and 1996-1998, to fluid withdrawal or depressurization of the shallow hydrothermal system. Copyright 2000 by the American Geophysical Union.

  20. Modeling and forecasting tephra hazards at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, during 2009 unrest and eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastin, L. G.; Denlinger, R. P.; Wallace, K. L.; Schaefer, J. R.

    2009-12-01

    In late 2008, Redoubt Volcano, on the west coast of Alaska’s Cook Inlet, began a period of unrest that culminated in more than 19 small tephra-producing events between March 19 and April 4, 2009, followed by growth of a lava dome whose volume now exceeds 70 million cubic meters. The explosive events lasted from <1 to 31 minutes, sent tephra columns to heights of 19 km asl, and emitted dense-rock (DRE) tephra volumes up to several million cubic meters. Tephra fall affected transportation and infrastructure throughout Cook Inlet, including the Anchorage metropolitan area. The months of unrest that preceded the first explosive event allowed us to develop tools to forecast tephra hazards. As described in an accompanying abstract, colleagues at the University of Pisa produced automated, daily tephra-fall forecast maps using the 3-D VOL-CALPUFF model with input scenarios that represented likely event sizes and durations. Tephra-fall forecast maps were also generated every six hours for hypothetical events of 10M m3 volume DRE using the 2-D model ASHFALL, and relationships between hypothetical plume height and eruption rate were evaluated four times daily under then-current atmospheric conditions using the program PLUMERIA. Eruptive deposits were mapped and isomass contours constructed for the two largest events, March 24 (0340-0355Z) and April 4 (1358-1429Z), which produced radar-determined plume heights of 18.3 and 15.2 km asl (~15.6 and 12.5 km above the vent), and tephra volumes (DRE) of 6.3M and 3.1M m3, respectively. For the volumetric eruption rates calculated from mapped erupted volume and seismic duration (V=6.2×103 and 1.7×103 m3/s DRE), measured plume heights H above the vent fall within 10% of the empirical best-fit curve H=1.67V0.259 published in the book Volcanic Plumes by Sparks et al. (1997, eq. 5.1). The plume heights are slightly higher than (but still within 13% of) the 14.6 and 11.1 km predicted by PLUMERIA under the existing atmospheric conditions. We have also modeled these two events using the 3-D transient model FALL3D, which considers topographic effects on wind and tephra dispersal. Using the eruption rates and plume heights constrained by deposit mapping, seismic data, and Doppler radar, and an archived wind field obtained from the NOAA GDAS model for these dates, modeled isomass contours from the April 4 event closely resemble measured values, but modeled contours from the March 24 event extend only about half to three fourths as far from the volcano as measured. This discrepancy may result from inaccuracies in the modeled wind pattern, the grain-size distribution, or turbulent entrainment algorithms. The deposit pattern may also have been affected by a lateral blast which is thought to have accompanied this event.

  1. Operational use of InSAR for volcano observatories : experience from Montserrat

    Microsoft Academic Search

    G. Wadge; B. Scheuchl; L. Cabey; M. D. Palmer; C. Riley; A. Smith; N. F. Stevens

    Volcanoes as targets for InSAR vary greatly in the quality of their returned phase signal. There are two end-member volcano types from this perspective. Basaltic, low-relief shield volcanoes with frequent effusive eruptions and shallow magma reservoirs generally give excellent coherence and large magnitude ground deformations (~1m) that can be easily detected and modelled. However, their individual (lava flow) deposits tend

  2. 1989-90 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the First Test Case of a USGS Lahar-Detection System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    R. Clucas

    This web page describes the lahars that swept down the Drift River Valley during the 1989-90 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, and the testing of a new experimental detection and warning system designed to track lahars and debris flows and to give warning to people downstream. In this case, an oil-storage facility in the Cook Inlet area was at risk. The seismometers used (acoustic-flow monitors) were sensitive to ground vibration at relatively high frequencies. On April 6, 1990 the system did detect and track lahars moving down a valley in real time. The amplitude and ground velocity data are diagrammed.

  3. Water under-saturated phase equilibria of basaltic andesites from Westdahl volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, E. L.; Larsen, J.

    2008-12-01

    The two most abundant gases released from magmatic systems are typically H2O and CO2, however, most phase equilibria studies examining crystallization applied to natural magmatic systems over the past 200 years have relied on H2O-saturated conditions. We will present the results of new phase equilibria experiments run using natural basaltic andesite starting materials from the 1991-1992 eruption of Westdahl volcano, Alaska, examining both H2O-saturated and undersaturated conditions, using a fixed ratio of XH2O ~0.7 and XCO2 ~0.3 in the total volatile budget. The experiments were conducted at total pressures (PTotal) of 0-200 MPa and 900-1050 °C, and fO2 set to the Ni-NiO buffer. Experiments were loaded into gold and Au75Pd25 capsules, and run in a TZM alloy pressure vessel for 48 hours before rapid quenching while still at pressure. After quenching, samples were polished and examined by microprobe and reflective microscopy. Identified mineral phases include plagioclase, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides, and minor orthopyroxene in both water-saturated and under- saturated experiments. A ~25 to 50 °C shift in temperature, at similar pressures is observed in the plagioclase and pyroxene stability curves when CO2 is added. Solubility models predict relatively low amounts of CO2 dissolved in the melt at similar conditions. Thus, our experiments indicate a significant effect of CO2 on the crystallization of mafic magmas at crustal pressures in volcanic arcs.

  4. Doppler weather radar observations of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schneider, David J.; Hoblitt, Richard P.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) deployed a transportable Doppler C-band radar during the precursory stage of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska that provided valuable information during subsequent explosive events. We describe the capabilities of this new monitoring tool and present data captured during the Redoubt eruption. The MiniMax 250-C (MM-250C) radar detected seventeen of the nineteen largest explosive events between March 23 and April 4, 2009. Sixteen of these events reached the stratosphere (above 10 km) within 2–5 min of explosion onset. High column and proximal cloud reflectivity values (50 to 60 dBZ) were observed from many of these events, and were likely due to the formation of mm-sized accretionary tephra-ice pellets. Reflectivity data suggest that these pellets formed within the first few minutes of explosion onset. Rapid sedimentation of the mm-sized pellets was observed as a decrease in maximum detection cloud height. The volcanic cloud from the April 4 explosive event showed lower reflectivity values, due to finer particle sizes (related to dome collapse and related pyroclastic flows) and lack of significant pellet formation. Eruption durations determined by the radar were within a factor of two compared to seismic and pressure-sensor derived estimates, and were not well correlated. Ash dispersion observed by the radar was primarily in the upper troposphere below 10 km, but satellite observations indicate the presence of volcanogenic clouds in the stratosphere. This study suggests that radar is a valuable complement to traditional seismic and satellite monitoring of explosive eruptions.

  5. Emplacement of the final lava dome of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bull, Katharine F.; Anderson, Steven W.; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Wessels, Rick L.; Henton, Sarah M.

    2013-06-01

    After more than 8 months of precursory activity and over 20 explosions in 12 days, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska began to extrude the fourth and final lava dome of the 2009 eruption on April 4. By July 1 the dome had filled the pre-2009 summit crater and ceased to grow. By means of analysis and annotations of time-lapse webcam imagery, oblique-image photogrammetry techniques and capture and analysis of forward-looking infrared (FLIR) images, we tracked the volume, textural, effusive-style and temperature changes in near-real time over the entire growth period of the dome. The first month of growth (April 4-May 4) produced blocky intermediate- to high-silica andesite lava (59-62.3 wt.% SiO2) that initially formed a round dome, expanding by endogenous growth, breaking the surface crust in radial fractures and annealing them with warmer, fresh lava. On or around May 1, more finely fragmented and scoriaceous andesite lava (59.8-62.2 wt.% SiO2) began to appear at the top of the dome coincident with increased seismicity and gas emissions. The more scoriaceous lava spread radially over the dome surface, while the dome continued to expand from endogenous growth and blocky lava was exposed on the margins and south side of the dome. By mid-June the upper scoriaceous lava had covered 36% of the dome surface area. Vesicularity of the upper scoriaceous lava range from 55 to 66%, some of the highest vesicularity measurements recorded from a lava dome. We suggest that the stability of the final lava dome primarily resulted from sufficient fracturing and clearing of the conduit by preceding explosions that allowed efficient degassing of the magma during effusion. The dome was thus able to grow until it was large enough to exceed the magmastatic pressure in the chamber, effectively shutting off the eruption.

  6. Anisotropy, repeating earthquakes, and seismicity associated with the 2008 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Jessica H.; Prejean, Stephanie; Savage, Martha K.; Townend, John

    2010-01-01

    We use shear wave splitting (SWS) analysis and double-difference relocation to examine temporal variations in seismic properties prior to and accompanying magmatic activity associated with the 2008 eruption of Okmok volcano, Alaska. Using bispectrum cross-correlation, a multiplet of 25 earthquakes is identified spanning five years leading up to the eruption, each event having first motions compatible with a normal fault striking NE–SW. Cross-correlation differential times are used to relocate earthquakes occurring between January 2003 and February 2009. The bulk of the seismicity prior to the onset of the eruption on 12 July 2008 occurred southwest of the caldera beneath a geothermal field. Earthquakes associated with the onset of the eruption occurred beneath the northern portion of the caldera and started as deep as 13 km. Subsequent earthquakes occurred predominantly at 3 km depth, coinciding with the depth at which the magma body has been modeled using geodetic data. Automated SWS analysis of the Okmok catalog reveals radial polarization outside the caldera and a northwest-southeast polarization within. We interpret these polarizations in terms of a magma reservoir near the center of the caldera, which we model with a Mogi point source. SWS analysis using the same input processing parameters for each event in the multiplet reveals no temporal changes in anisotropy over the duration of the multiplet, suggesting either a short-term or small increase in stress just before the eruption that was not detected by GPS, or eruption triggering by a mechanism other than a change of stress in the system.

  7. Permafrost Observatory near Gakona, Alaska. Local-Scale Features in Permafrost Distribution and Temperatures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanovsky, V.; Yoshikawa, K.; Sergueev, D.; Shur, Y.

    2005-12-01

    During the summer of 2004, the Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks (GI UAF) established the Gakona Permafrost Observatory. This project is funded by the Office of Naval Research and the National Science Foundation. The Observatory is located in a large intermountain depression in the Copper River Basin. Permafrost in this area is widespread, in spite of its location near the southern boundary of the discontinuous permafrost zone. Together with the recently established Barrow Permafrost Observatory and with other GI UAF Permafrost Observatories, the Gakona Observatory will provide critically needed information on the permafrost response to recent and projected climate warming. The positioning of this observatory near the southern limits of permafrost distribution in Alaska makes this location very advantageous. With the growing possibility of near-future climate warming, permafrost integrity at this location will be affected first and will show significant changes in the very near future. In fact, at some locations within the area of observations permafrost already started to degrade and closed and, possibly, open taliks have been formed. Mean annual air temperature in this area was increasing from -3.5 C in the early 1950s to -1.6 C in the early 2000s. Several 10 m deep boreholes within the area with natural and disturbed surface conditions were equipped with thermistor strings and loggers to automatically monitor ground temperature dynamics with one-hour time resolution. Air temperature, snow depth, and soil liquid water content at four different depths together with 30 m deep temperature profile are also measured hourly at one location in the black spruce forest. The temperature data obtained in the first year of the project at this location show that permafrost temperature within the depth interval between 3 and 30 meters is practically constant at -0.6 C during the entire year. Obtained data also show that the partial thaw of permafrost from the top down is already underway and tightly relates to distinguish surface micro-topographical features. These features are elongated depressions (0.5 to 1.5 m deep and 10 to 100 m wide) with no trees and no moss on the ground surface. The depth to the permafrost table within these depressions are different at different locations and vary between 2 and 8 meters according to a survey by Duane Miller & Associates and to our temperature measurements in several boreholes. Repeated measurements of the permafrost table location within one of these depressions show increase in depth from approximately 3.5 m in 1989 to 5 m in 2004. As part of our initial survey, we applied geophysical methods (DC Resistivity and Ground Penetrating Radar) to investigate permafrost distribution in vertical and horizontal directions within the research area. Results obtained using DC Resistivity survey (Syscal Pro R1 switch 72 channel resistivity system) show that permafrost in the forest is stable and contain a limited amount of unfrozen water (resistivity is 600 ohm-m and higher, up to 1800 ohm-m). The lower boundary of permafrost locates at the depth of 50 to 60 meters. A talik (possibly open) was discovered under one of the mentioned above elongated depressions. The lateral extent of this talik is only 10 meters at the surface increasing with depth to several tens of meters.

  8. Lahar Inundation of the Drift River Valley During the 2009 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Scott, W. E.; Pierson, T. C.; Major, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska began its most recent eruption on March 15 and erupted explosively at least 20 times between then and April 4, 2009. The 3110 m high, snow-and-ice-clad stratovolcano includes a circular, ice-filled summit crater that is breached to the north. The volcano supports about 4 km3 of ice and snow and about 1 km3 of this makes up Drift glacier on the north side of the volcano. Explosive eruptions between March 22 and April 4, which included the destruction of at least two lava domes, triggered two large lahars in the Drift River valley on March 23 and April 4, and several smaller lahars between March 24 and March 31. The heights of mud lines, character of deposits examined in the field, areas of deposition, and estimates of flow width, depth, and velocity revealed that the lahars on March 23 and April 4 were the largest mass flows of the eruption. In the ~1.5-km-wide upper Drift River valley, flow depths averaged about 10 m, flow velocities, although not measured directly, were at least 10-14 m/s, and peak discharges were on the order of 105 m3/s. Depositional areas (about 12.5 km2) and volumes (0.063-0.088 km3) were similar. Despite these similarities, the two lahars had very different compositions and origins. The March 23 lahar was a flowing slurry of snow and ice that entrained tablular blocks of river ice, seasonal snow in the valley, and glacier ice eroded from Drift glacier. Its deposit was up to 5 m thick, and contained roughly 30% sediment, rock debris and water, and 70% or more river and glacier ice. It was frozen soon after it was emplaced and later buried by the April 4 lahar. Juvenile material has not yet been found in the deposit. The lahar of April 4, in contrast, was a hyperconcentrated flow, as interpreted from massive to faintly and horizontally stratified sand to fine gravel deposits up to 4 m thick. Gravel clasts were predominantly juvenile andesite. We infer the March 23 lahar to have been initiated by a rapid series of vent-clearing explosions that blasted up through at least 50 m of crater-filling glacier ice and snow, producing a voluminous release of meltwater from the crater. The resulting flood eroded and entrained snow, fragments of glacier and river ice, and liquid water along its flow path. Small-volume pyroclastic flows, possibly associated with minor eruption-column collapses, may have contributed additional meltwater to the lahar. Meltwater generated by subglacial hydrothermal activity and stored beneath Drift glacier may have been ejected or released rapidly as well. Juvenile clasts in the April 4 deposit indicate that this lahar was initiated when hot dome-collapse pyroclastic flows scoured snow, ice, and rock debris from the upper Drift glacier and produced a meltwater flood that further entrained sediment. The two lahars, comparable in volume to the largest lahars of the 1989-90 Redoubt eruption, produced about 5-7 m of channel aggradation in the lower Drift River valley and inundated an oil storage and transfer facility located there.

  9. Interactive Volcano Studies and Education Using Virtual Globes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Dehn; J. E. Bailey; P. Webley

    2006-01-01

    Internet-based virtual globe programs such as Google Earth provide a spatial context for visualization of monitoring and geophysical data sets. At the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Google Earth is being used to integrate satellite imagery, modeling of volcanic eruption clouds and seismic data sets to build new monitoring and reporting tools. However, one of the most useful information sources for environmental

  10. Volcanoes

    MedlinePLUS

    ... by authorities and evacuate immediately from the volcano area to avoid flying debris, hot gases, lateral blast and lava flow. Be aware of mudflows . The danger from a mudflow increases near stream channels and with ... and low-lying areas. Remember to help your neighbors who may require ...

  11. Comparison of magmatic structures beneath Redoubt (Alaska) and Toba (Northern Sumatra) volcanoes derived from local earthquake tomography studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasatkina, Ekaterina; Koulakov, Ivan; West, Michael

    2014-05-01

    We present the results of seismic tomography studies of two different volcanoes - Mt. Redoubt and Toba caldera. These two subduction related volcanoes have different ages and scales of eruption activity. Velocity model beneath the Redoubt volcano is based on tomographic inversion of P- and S- arrival time data from over 4000 local earthquakes recorded by 19 stations since 1989 to 2012 provided by the Alaskan Volcano Observatory (University of Fairbanks). Just below the volcano edifice we observe an anomaly of high Vp/Vs ratio reaching 2.2 which is seen down to 2- 3 km depth. This indicates a presence of partially molten substance or fluid filled rocks. We can suggest that anomaly area matches with volcano magma chamber. One of the previous velocity models of Toba caldera was obtained by Koulakov et al. (2009) and was based on data recorded by temporary network from January to May 1995. In this study this "old" dataset was supplemented with "new" data recorded by a temporary network deployed in approximately same area by GFZ-Potsdam from May to November 2008. We have manually picked the arrival times from the local events recorded by the later experiment and then performed the tomography inversion for the combined dataset using the LOTOS code (Koulakov, 2009). In the uppermost layers we observe strong low-velocity P- and S- anomalies within the Caldera which can be interpreted by the presence of think sediments filling the caldera. In the lower crust and uppermost mantle we observe a vertical anomaly of low P- and S-velocities which probably represent the path of conduits which link the caldera area with the slab. Similar to Redoubt volcano, resulting velocity model of Toba has an increased value of Vp/Vs ratio that indicates a presence of magma reservoir. Comparison of the tomographic results obtained for the completely different volcanic systems helps in understanding some basic principles of feeding the volcanoes. This study was partly supported by the Project #7.3 of BES RAS. 1. Koulakov I., T. Yudistira, B.-G. Luehr, and Wandono, 2009, P, S velocity and VP/VS ratio beneath the Toba caldera complex (Northern Sumatra) from local earthquake tomography, Geophys. J. Int., 177, p. 1121-1139. 2. Koulakov I., 2009, LOTOS code for local earthquake tomographic inversion. Benchmarks for testing tomographic algorithms, Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, Vol. 99, No. 1, pp. 194-214.

  12. Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska 1. Origin of Strombolian activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vergniolle, S.; Boichu, M.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both classical Strombolian activity and an explosive Subplinian plume. Strombolian activity at Shishaldin occurred in two major phases following the Subplinian activity. In this paper, we use acoustic measurements to interpret the Strombolian activity. Acoustic measurements of the two Strombolian phases show a series of explosions that are modeled by the vibration of a large overpressurised cylindrical bubble at the top of the magma column. Results show that the bubble does not burst at its maximum radius, as expected if the liquid film is stretched beyond its elasticity. But bursting occurs after one cycle of vibration, as a consequence of an instability of the air-magma interface close to the bubble minimum radius. During each Strombolian period, estimates of bubble length and overpressure are calculated. Using an alternate method based on acoustic power, we estimate gas velocity to be 30-60 m/s, in very good agreement with synthetic waveforms. Although there is some variation within these parameters, bubble length and overpressure for the first Strombolian phase are found to be ??? 82 ?? 11 m and 0.083 MPa. For the second Strombolian phase, bubble length and overpressure are estimated at 24 ?? 12 m and 0.15 MPa for the first 17 h after which bubble overpressure shows a constant increase, reaching a peak of 1.4 MPa, just prior to the end of the second Strombolian phase. This peak suggests that, at the time, the magma in the conduit may contain a relatively large concentration of small bubbles. Maximum total gas volume and gas fluxes at the surface are estimated to be 3.3 ?? 107 and 2.9 ?? 103 m3/s for the first phase and 1.0 ?? 108 and 2.2 ?? 103 m3/s for the second phase. This gives a mass flux of 1.2 ?? 103 and 8.7 ?? 102 kg/s, respectively, for the first and the second Strombolian phases. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Volcanoes as possible indicators of tectonic stress orientation — Aleutians and Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kazuaki Nakamura; Klaus H. Jacob; John N. Davies

    1977-01-01

    A new method for obtaining from volcanic surface features the orientations of the principal tectonic stresses is applied to Aleutian and Alaskan volcanoes. The underlying concept for this method is that flank eruptions for polygenetic volcanoes can be regarded as the result of a large-scale natural magmafracturing experiment. The method essentially relies on the recognition of the preferred orientation of

  14. Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation in the United States, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Diefenbach, Angela K.; Ewert, John W.; Ramsey, David W.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Schilling, Steven P.

    2010-01-01

    The United States is one of the most volcanically active countries in the world. According to the global volcanism database of the Smithsonian Institution, the United States (including its Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands) is home to about 170 volcanoes that are in an eruptive phase, have erupted in historical time, or have not erupted recently but are young enough (eruptions within the past 10,000 years) to be capable of reawakening. From 1980 through 2008, 30 of these volcanoes erupted, several repeatedly. Volcano monitoring in the United States is carried out by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Hazards Program, which operates a system of five volcano observatories-Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), Cascades Volcano Observatory (CVO), Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), Long Valley Observatory (LVO), and Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO). The observatories issue public alerts about conditions and hazards at U.S. volcanoes in support of the USGS mandate under P.L. 93-288 (Stafford Act) to provide timely warnings of potential volcanic disasters to the affected populace and civil authorities. To make efficient use of the Nation's scientific resources, the volcano observatories operate in partnership with universities and other governmental agencies through various formal agreements. The Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) was established in 2001 to promote scientific cooperation among the Federal, academic, and State agencies involved in observatory operations. Other groups also contribute to volcano monitoring by sponsoring long-term installation of geophysical instruments at some volcanoes for specific research projects. This report describes a database of information about permanently installed ground-based instruments used by the U.S. volcano observatories to monitor volcanic activity (unrest and eruptions). The purposes of this Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation Database (VMID) are to (1) document the Nation's existing, ground-based, volcano-monitoring capabilities, (2) answer queries within a geospatial framework about the nature of the instrumentation, and (3) provide a benchmark for planning future monitoring improvements. The VMID is not an archive of the data collected by monitoring instruments, nor is it intended to keep track of whether a station is temporarily unavailable due to telemetry or equipment problems. Instead, it is a compilation of basic information about each instrument such as location, type, and sponsoring agency. Typically, instruments installed expressly for volcano monitoring are emplaced within about 20 kilometers (km) of a volcanic center; however, some more distant instruments (as far away as 100 km) can be used under certain circumstances and therefore are included in the database. Not included is information about satellite-based and airborne sensors and temporarily deployed instrument arrays, which also are used for volcano monitoring but do not lend themselves to inclusion in a geospatially organized compilation of sensor networks. This Open-File Report is provided in two parts: (1) an Excel spreadsheet (http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2009/1165/) containing the version of the Volcano-Monitoring Instrumentation Database current through 31 December 2008 and (2) this text (in Adobe PDF format), which serves as metadata for the VMID. The disclaimer for the VMID is in appendix 1 of the text. Updated versions of the VMID will be posted on the Web sites of the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (http://www.cusvo.org/) and the USGS Volcano Hazards Program http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/activity/data/index.php.

  15. Volcanic Ash From 1989 Mt. Redoubt Eruption, Alaska

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory has recently installed a state of the art scanning electronic microscope (SEM) at its facility in Anchorage using ARRA funding.  The SEM will be used to analyze volcanic deposits for their composition, texture, and other valuable information that will enable us to...

  16. Volcanoes in the Infrared

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-11-04

    In this video adapted from KUAC-TV and the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, satellite imagery and infrared cameras are used to study and predict eruptions of volcanoes in the Aleutian Islands, Alaska.

  17. Argon geochronology of late Pleistocene to Holocene Westdahl volcano, Unimak Island, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvert, Andrew T.; Moore, Richard B.; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2005-01-01

    High-precision 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of selected lavas from Westdahl Volcano places time constraints on several key prehistoric eruptive phases of this large active volcano. A dike cutting old pyroclastic-flow and associated lahar deposits from a precursor volcano yields an age of 1,654+/-11 k.y., dating this precursor volcano as older than early Pleistocene. A total of 11 geographically distributed lavas with ages ranging from 47+/-14 to 127+/-2 k.y. date construction of the Westdahl volcanic center. Lava flows cut by an apparent caldera-rim structure yielded ages of 81+/-5 and 121+/-8 k.y., placing a maximum date of 81 ka on caldera formation. Late Pleistocene and Holocene lavas fill the caldera, but most of them are obscured by the large summit icecap.

  18. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J.S.

    2006-01-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  19. Numerical simulation of tsunami generation by cold volcanic mass flows at Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.; Watts, P.; Walder, J. S.

    2006-07-01

    Many of the world's active volcanoes are situated on or near coastlines. During eruptions, diverse geophysical mass flows, including pyroclastic flows, debris avalanches, and lahars, can deliver large volumes of unconsolidated debris to the ocean in a short period of time and thereby generate tsunamis. Deposits of both hot and cold volcanic mass flows produced by eruptions of Aleutian arc volcanoes are exposed at many locations along the coastlines of the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean, and Cook Inlet, indicating that the flows entered the sea and in some cases may have initiated tsunamis. We evaluate the process of tsunami generation by cold granular subaerial volcanic mass flows using examples from Augustine Volcano in southern Cook Inlet. Augustine Volcano is the most historically active volcano in the Cook Inlet region, and future eruptions, should they lead to debris-avalanche formation and tsunami generation, could be hazardous to some coastal areas. Geological investigations at Augustine Volcano suggest that as many as 12-14 debris avalanches have reached the sea in the last 2000 years, and a debris avalanche emplaced during an A.D. 1883 eruption may have initiated a tsunami that was observed about 80 km east of the volcano at the village of English Bay (Nanwalek) on the coast of the southern Kenai Peninsula. Numerical simulation of mass-flow motion, tsunami generation, propagation, and inundation for Augustine Volcano indicate only modest wave generation by volcanic mass flows and localized wave effects. However, for east-directed mass flows entering Cook Inlet, tsunamis are capable of reaching the more populated coastlines of the southwestern Kenai Peninsula, where maximum water amplitudes of several meters are possible.

  20. Effects of recent volcanic eruptions on aquatic habitat in the Drift River, Alaska, USA: Implications at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dorava, J.M.; Milner, A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Numerous drainages supporting productive salmon habitat are surrounded by active volcanoes on the west side of Cook Inlet in south-central Alaska. Eruptions have caused massive quantities of flowing water and sediment to enter the river channels emanating from glaciers and snowfields on these volcanoes. Extensive damage to riparian and aquatic habitat has commonly resulted, and benthic macroinvertebrate and salmonid communities can be affected. Because of the economic importance of Alaska's fisheries, detrimental effects on salmonid habitat can have significant economic implications. The Drift River drains glaciers on the northern and eastern flanks of Redoubt Volcano: During and following eruptions in 1989-1990, severe physical disturbances to the habitat features of the river adversely affected the fishery. Frequent eruptions at other Cook Inlet region volcanoes exemplify the potential effects of volcanic activity on Alaska's important commercial, sport, and subsistence fisheries. Few studies have documented the recovery of aquatic habitat following volcanic eruptions. The eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in 1989-1990 offered an opportunity to examine the recovery of the macroinvertebrate community. Macroinvertebrate community composition and structure in the Drift River were similar in both undisturbed and recently disturbed sites. Additionally, macroinvertebrate samples from sites in nearby undisturbed streams were highly similar to those from some Drift River sites. This similarity and the agreement between the Drift River macroinvertebrate community composition and that predicted by a qualitative model of typical macroinvertebrate communities in glacier-fed rivers indicate that the Drift River macroinvertebrate community is recovering five years after the disturbances associated with the most recent eruptions of Redoubt Volcano.

  1. Determining the seismic source mechanism and location for an explosive eruption with limited observational data: Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dawson, P.B.; Chouet, B.A.; Power, J.

    2011-01-01

    Waveform inversions of the very-long-period components of the seismic wavefield produced by an explosive eruption that occurred on 11 January, 2006 at Augustine Volcano, Alaska constrain the seismic source location to near sea level beneath the summit of the volcano. The calculated moment tensors indicate the presence of a volumetric source mechanism. Systematic reconstruction of the source mechanism shows the source consists of a sill intersected by either a sub-vertical east-west trending dike or a sub-vertical pipe and a weak single force. The trend of the dike may be controlled by the east-west trending Augustine-Seldovia arch. The data from the network of broadband sensors is limited to fourteen seismic traces, and synthetic modeling confirms the ability of the network to recover the source mechanism. The synthetic modeling also provides a guide to the expected capability of a broadband network to resolve very-long-period source mechanisms, particularly when confronted with limited observational data. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2012-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2011, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 4,364 earthquakes, of which 3,651 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity above background levels in 2011 at these instrumented volcanic centers. This catalog includes locations, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2011 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  3. Gas emissions from failed and actual eruptions from Cook Inlet Volcanoes, Alaska, 1989–2006

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cynthia A. Werner; Mike P. Doukas; Peter J. Kelly

    2011-01-01

    Cook Inlet volcanoes that experienced an eruption between 1989 and 2006 had mean gas emission rates that were roughly an order\\u000a of magnitude higher than at volcanoes where unrest stalled. For the six events studied, mean emission rates for eruptions\\u000a were ?13,000 t\\/d CO2 and 5200 t\\/d SO2, but only ?1200 t\\/d CO2 and 500 t\\/d SO2 for non-eruptive events (‘failed eruptions’). Statistical analysis

  4. A distal earthquake cluster concurrent with the 2006 explosive eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fisher, M.A.; Ruppert, N.A.; White, R.A.; Wilson, F.H.; Comer, D.; Sliter, R.W.; Wong, F.L.

    2009-01-01

    Clustered earthquakes located 25??km northeast of Augustine Volcano began about 6??months before and ceased soon after the volcano's 2006 explosive eruption. This distal seismicity formed a dense cluster less than 5??km across, in map view, and located in depth between 11??km and 16??km. This seismicity was contemporaneous with sharply increased shallow earthquake activity directly below the volcano's vent. Focal mechanisms for five events within the distal cluster show strike-slip fault movement. Cluster seismicity best defines a plane when it is projected onto a northeast-southwest cross section, suggesting that the seismogenic fault strikes northwest. However, two major structural trends intersect near Augustine Volcano, making it difficult to put the seismogenic fault into a regional-geologic context. Specifically, interpretation of marine multichannel seismic-reflection (MCS) data shows reverse faults, directly above the seismicity cluster, that trend northeast, parallel to the regional geologic strike but perpendicular to the fault suggested by the clustered seismicity. The seismogenic fault could be a reactivated basement structure.

  5. Glacier ice-volume modeling and glacier volumes on Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trabant, Dennis C.; Hawkins, Daniel B.

    1997-01-01

    Assessment of ice volumes and hydrologic hazards on Redoubt Volcano began four months before the 1989-90 eruptions removed 0.29 cubic kilometer of perennial snow and ice from Drift glacier. A volume model was developed for evaluating glacier volumes on Redoubt Volcano. The volume model is based on third-order polynomial simulations of valley cross sections. The third-order polynomial is an interpolation from the valley walls exposed above glacier surfaces and takes advantage of ice-thickness measurements. The fortuitous 1989-90 eruptions removed the ice from a 4.5-kilometer length of Drift glacier, providing a unique opportunity for verification of the volume model. A 2.5-kilometer length was chosen in the denuded glacier valley and the ice volume was measured by digitally comparing two new maps: one derived from the most recent pre-eruption 1979 aerial photographs and the other from post-eruption 1990 aerial photographs. The measured volume in the reference reach was 99 x 106 cubic meters, about 1 percent less than was estimated by the volume model. The volume estimate produced by this volume model was much closer to the measured volume than was the volume estimated by other techniques. The verified volume model was used to evaluate the total volume of perennial snow and glacier ice on Redoubt Volcano, which was estimated to be 4.1?0.8 cubic kilometers. Substantial snow and ice covers on volcanoes exacerbate the hydrologic hazards associated with eruptions. The volume on Redoubt Volcano is about 23 times the volume that was present on Mount St. Helens before its 1980 eruption, which generated lahars and floods.

  6. A Compilation of Gas Emission-Rate Data from Volcanoes of Cook Inlet (Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Fourpeaked, Griggs, Mageik, Martin, Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Veniaminof), Alaska, from 1995-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.; McGee, Kenneth A.

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report presents gas emission rates from data collected during numerous airborne plume-measurement flights at Alaskan volcanoes since 1995. These flights began in about 1990 as means to establish baseline values of volcanic gas emissions during periods of quiescence and to identify anomalous levels of degassing that might signal the beginning of unrest. The primary goal was to make systematic measurements at the major volcanic centers around the Cook Inlet on at least an annual basis, and more frequently during periods of unrest and eruption. A secondary goal was to measure emissions at selected volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula. While the goals were not necessarily met in all cases due to weather, funding, or the availability of suitable aircraft, a rich dataset of quality measurements is the legacy of this continuing effort. An earlier report (Doukas, 1995) presented data for the period from 1990 through 1994 and the current report provides data through 2006. This report contains all of the available measurements for SO2, CO2, and H2S emission rates in Alaska determined by the U. S. Geological Survey from 1995 through 2006; airborne measurements for H2S began in Alaska in 2001. The results presented here are from Cook Inlet volcanoes at Spurr, Crater Peak, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine and cover periods of unrest at Iliamna (1996) and Spurr (2004-2006) as well as the 2006 eruption of Augustine. Additional sporadic measurements at volcanoes on the Alaska Peninsula (Douglas, Martin, Mageik, Griggs, Veniaminof, Ukinrek Maars, Peulik, and Fourpeaked during its 2006 unrest) are also reported here.

  7. Constraints on P-T Conditions and Evolution of Granulite and Ultramafic Xenoliths From Prindle Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, E. D.; Edwards, B. R.; Russell, J. K.

    2004-12-01

    Prindle volcano is an isolated, inactive basanitic cone located just across the Alaska-Yukon border (Lat. 63.72 °N; Long. 141.82 °W) at the northern edge of the northern Cordilleran volcanic province. The cone contains crustal and mantle xenoliths, including crustal granulites. The basement to Prindle volcano comprises Mesozoic metamorphic rocks (greenschist to amphibolite facies), but no granulites have been detected. The crustal xenoliths contain orthopyroxene (opx)-plagioclase (pl)-quartz (qtz) +/- mesoperthite (msp) and clinopyroxene (cpx). Geothermometry using opx-cpx yields T's ranging from 770 to 1015 C at 10 kbar. Integrated feldspar geothermometry yields 855 to 964 C at 10 kbar. Pl-cpx-qtz geobarometry yields P's ~10-11 kbar. Opx-cpx geothermometry on mantle ultramafic rocks yields 915-970 C at 15 kbar. Isochemical P-T phase diagrams for spinel lherzolite suggest a maximum P of 11.5 kbar at 950 C, but experimental work suggests higher pressures, ~15 kbar (+). Present Moho conditions are estimated to be 900 +/- 100 C and ~10 kbar. The calculated liquidus for the host basanite lava is ~1450 C at 15 kbar. Our results suggest that the crustal xenoliths were metamorphosed under relatively dry conditions with crustal thicknesses not significantly greater than present day; however, rocks at the present-day surface are high-pressure amphibolites. Geothermal gradients during Mesozoic metamorphism are near the higher estimates of the present geothermal gradient, ~25 +/- 3°C /km. P-T constraints from mantle xenoliths are consistent with present day geothermal gradients. Basanite liquidus temperatures, which are significantly higher than the lherzolite temperatures, are consistent with an asthenospheric source region.

  8. Gas emissions from failed and actual eruptions from Cook Inlet Volcanoes, Alaska, 1989-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Werner, C.A.; Doukas, M.P.; Kelly, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Cook Inlet volcanoes that experienced an eruption between 1989 and 2006 had mean gas emission rates that were roughly an order of magnitude higher than at volcanoes where unrest stalled. For the six events studied, mean emission rates for eruptions were ~13,000 t/d CO2 and 5200 t/d SO2, but only ~1200 t/d CO2 and 500 t/d SO2 for non-eruptive events (‘failed eruptions’). Statistical analysis suggests degassing thresholds for eruption on the order of 1500 and 1000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively. Emission rates greater than 4000 and 2000 t/d for CO2 and SO2, respectively, almost exclusively resulted during eruptive events (the only exception being two measurements at Fourpeaked). While this analysis could suggest that unerupted magmas have lower pre-eruptive volatile contents, we favor the explanations that either the amount of magma feeding actual eruptions is larger than that driving failed eruptions, or that magmas from failed eruptions experience less decompression such that the majority of H2O remains dissolved and thus insufficient permeability is produced to release the trapped volatile phase (or both). In the majority of unrest and eruption sequences, increases in CO2 emission relative to SO2 emission were observed early in the sequence. With time, all events converged to a common molar value of C/S between 0.5 and 2. These geochemical trends argue for roughly similar decompression histories until shallow levels are reached beneath the edifice (i.e., from 20–35 to ~4–6 km) and perhaps roughly similar initial volatile contents in all cases. Early elevated CO2 levels that we find at these high-latitude, andesitic arc volcanoes have also been observed at mid-latitude, relatively snow-free, basaltic volcanoes such as Stromboli and Etna. Typically such patterns are attributed to injection and decompression of deep (CO2-rich) magma into a shallower chamber and open system degassing prior to eruption. Here we argue that the C/S trends probably represent tapping of vapor-saturated regions with high C/S, and then gradual degassing of remaining dissolved volatiles as the magma progresses toward the surface. At these volcanoes, however, C/S is often accentuated due to early preferential scrubbing of sulfur gases. The range of equilibrium degassing is consistent with the bulk degassing of a magma with initial CO2 and S of 0.6 and 0.2 wt.%, respectively, similar to what has been suggested for primitive Redoubt magmas.

  9. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Moran, Seth C.; Paskievitch, John; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2002-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog reflects the status and evolution of the seismic monitoring program, and presents the basic seismic data for the time period January 1, 2000, through December 31, 2001. For an interpretation of these data and previously recorded data, the reader should refer to several recent articles on volcano related seismicity on Alaskan volcanoes in Appendix G. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-three volcanoes in real time in 2000-2001. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). AVO located 1551 and 1428 earthquakes in 2000 and 2001, respectively, on and around these volcanoes. Highlights of the catalog period (Table 1) include: volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano between January and February 2000 and between May and June 2000; an eruption at Mount Cleveland between February and May 2001; episodes of possible tremor at Makushin Volcano starting March 2001 and continuing through 2001, and two earthquake swarms at Great Sitkin Volcano in 2001. This catalog includes: (1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; (2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (4) station parameters and velocity models used for earthquake locations; (5) a summary of daily station usage throughout the catalog period; and (6) all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations presented in this report.

  10. Volcanoes: Nature's Caldrons Challenge Geochemists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zurer, Pamela S.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews various topics and research studies on the geology of volcanoes. Areas examined include volcanoes and weather, plate margins, origins of magma, magma evolution, United States Geological Survey (USGS) volcano hazards program, USGS volcano observatories, volcanic gases, potassium-argon dating activities, and volcano monitoring strategies.…

  11. UNIT, ALASKA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana Arts and Science Center, Baton Rouge.

    THE UNIT DESCRIBED IN THIS BOOKLET DEALS WITH THE GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. THE UNIT IS PRESENTED IN OUTLINE FORM. THE FIRST SECTION DEALS PRINCIPALLY WITH THE PHYSICAL GEOGRAPHY OF ALASKA. DISCUSSED ARE (1) THE SIZE, (2) THE MAJOR LAND REGIONS, (3) THE MOUNTAINS, VOLCANOES, GLACIERS, AND RIVERS, (4) THE NATURAL RESOURCES, AND (5) THE CLIMATE. THE…

  12. Mapping recent lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, Alaska, using radar and optical satellite imagery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Rykhus, R.; Masterlark, T.; Dean, K.G.

    2004-01-01

    Field mapping of young lava flows at Aleutian volcanoes is logistically difficult, and the utility of optical images from aircraft or satellites for this purpose is greatly reduced by persistent cloud cover. These factors have hampered earlier estimates of the areas and volumes of three young lava flows at Westdahl Volcano, including its most recent (1991-1992) flow. We combined information from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images with multispectral Landsat-7 data to differentiate the 1991-1992 flow from the 1964 flow and a pre-1964 flow, and to calculate the flow areas (8.4, 9.2, and 7.3 km 2, respectively). By differencing a digital elevation model (DEM) from the 1970-1980s with a DEM from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) in February 2000, we estimated the average thickness of the 1991-1992 flow to be 13 m, which reasonably agrees with field observations (5-10 m). Lava-flow maps produced in this way can be used to facilitate field mapping and flow-hazards assessment, and to study magma-supply dynamics and thus to anticipate future eruptive activity. Based on the recurrence interval of recent eruptions and the results of this study, the next eruption at Westdahl may occur before the end of this decade. ?? 2004 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A tectonic earthquake sequence preceding the April-May 1999 eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Stihler, S.D.; Power, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    On 4 March 1999, a shallow ML 5.2 earthquake occurred beneath Unimak Island in the Aleutian Arc. This earthquake was located 10-15 km west of Shishaldin Volcano, a large, frequently active basaltic-andesite stratovolcano. A Strombolian eruption began at Shishaldin roughly 1 month after the mainshock, culminating in a large explosive eruption on 19 April. We address the question of whether or not the eruption caused the mainshock by computing the Coulomb stress change caused by an inflating dike on fault planes oriented parallel to the mainshock focal mechanism. We found Coulomb stress increases of ???0.1 MPa in the region of the mainshock, suggesting that magma intrusion prior to the eruption could have caused the mainshock. Satellite and seismic data indicate that magma was moving upwards beneath Shishaldin well before the mainshock. indicating that, in an overall sense, the mainshock cannot be said to have caused the eruption. However, observations of changes at the volcano following the mainshock and several large aftershocks suggest that the earthquakes may, in turn, have influenced the course of the eruption.

  14. August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Aleutian Islands, Alaska-resetting an Island Landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, W.E.; Nye, C.J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Neal, C.A.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi Island, the subaerial portion of a small volcano in the western Aleutian volcanic arc, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. Pyroclastic flows and surges swept the island repeatedly and buried most of it and the near-shore zone in decimeters to tens of meters of deposits. Several key seabird rookeries in taluses were rendered useless. The eruption lasted for about 24 hours and included two initial explosive pulses and pauses over a 6-hr period that produced ash-poor eruption clouds, a 10-hr period of continuous ash-rich emissions initiated by an explosive pulse and punctuated by two others, and a final 8-hr period of waning ash emissions. The deposits of the eruption include a basal muddy tephra that probably reflects initial eruptions through the shallow crater lake, a sequence of pumiceous and lithic-rich pyroclastic deposits produced by flow, surge, and fall processes during a period of energetic explosive eruption, and a fine-grained upper mantle of pyroclastic-fall and -surge deposits that probably reflects the waning eruptive stage as lake and ground water again gained access to the erupting magma. An eruption with similar impact on the island's environment had not occurred for at least several centuries. Since the 2008 eruption, the volcano has remained quiet other than emission of volcanic gases. Erosion and deposition are rapidly altering slopes and beaches. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  15. The Electronic Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Electronic Volcano offers links to many types of information on active volcanoes, such as maps, photographs, full texts of dissertations and a few elusive documents. The Electronic Volcano will guide you to resources in libraries or resources on other information servers including catalogs of active volcanoes, datasets for literature citations, electronic and hard-copy journals, visual information, maps, observatories and institutions, and a volcano name and country index.

  16. The Hawaiian Volcano Observatory's current approach to forecasting lava flow hazards (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauahikaua, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Hawaiian Volcanoes are best known for their frequent basaltic eruptions, which typically start with fast-moving channelized `a`a flows fed by high eruptions rates. If the flows continue, they generally transition into pahoehoe flows, fed by lower eruption rates, after a few days to weeks. Kilauea Volcano's ongoing eruption illustrates this--since 1986, effusion at Kilauea has mostly produced pahoehoe. The current state of lava flow simulation is quite advanced, but the simplicity of the models mean that they are most appropriately used during the first, most vigorous, days to weeks of an eruption - during the effusion of `a`a flows. Colleagues at INGV in Catania have shown decisively that MAGFLOW simulations utilizing satellite-derived eruption rates can be effective at estimating hazards during the initial periods of an eruption crisis. However, the algorithms do not simulate the complexity of pahoehoe flows. Forecasts of lava flow hazards are the most common form of volcanic hazard assessments made in Hawai`i. Communications with emergency managers over the last decade have relied on simple steepest-descent line maps, coupled with empirical lava flow advance rate information, to portray the imminence of lava flow hazard to nearby communities. Lavasheds, calculated as watersheds, are used as a broader context for the future flow paths and to advise on the utility of diversion efforts, should they be contemplated. The key is to communicate the uncertainty of any approach used to formulate a forecast and, if the forecast uses simple tools, these communications can be fairly straightforward. The calculation of steepest-descent paths and lavasheds relies on the accuracy of the digital elevation model (DEM) used, so the choice of DEM is critical. In Hawai`i, the best choice is not the most recent but is a 1980s-vintage 10-m DEM--more recent LIDAR and satellite radar DEM are referenced to the ellipsoid and include vegetation effects. On low-slope terrain, steepest descent lines calculated on a geoid-based DEM may differ significantly from those calculated on an ellipsoid-based DEM. Good estimates of lava flow advance rates can be obtained from empirical compilations of historical advance rates of Hawaiian lava flows. In this way, rates appropriate for observed flow types (`a`a or pahoehoe, channelized or not) can be applied. Eruption rate is arguably the most important factor, while slope is also significant for low eruption rates. Eruption rate, however, remains the most difficult parameter to estimate during an active eruption. The simplicity of the HVO approach is its major benefit. How much better can lava-flow advance be forecast for all types of lava flows? Will the improvements outweigh the increased uncertainty propagated through the simulation calculations? HVO continues to improve and evaluate its lava flow forecasting tools to provide better hazard assessments to emergency personnel.

  17. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sánchez, John; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.; Paskievitch, John

    2003-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996; Jolly and others, 2001; Dixon and others, 2002). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the basic seismic data and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1, 2002 through December 31, 2002. Appendix G contains a list of publications pertaining to seismicity of Alaskan volcanoes based on these and previously recorded data. The AVO seismic network was used to monitor twenty-four volcanoes in real time in 2002. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai Volcanic Group (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin Volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (Figure 1). Monitoring highlights in 2002 include an earthquake swarm at Great Sitkin Volcano in May-June; an earthquake swarm near Snowy Mountain in July-September; low frequency (1-3 Hz) tremor and long-period events at Mount Veniaminof in September-October and in December; and continuing volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2002 were the installation of a subnetwork on Okmok Volcano, the establishment of telemetry for the Mount Veniaminof subnetwork, and the change in the data acquisition system to an EARTHWORM detection system. AVO located 7430 earthquakes during 2002 in the vicinity of the monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2002; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2002.

  18. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Moran, Seth C.; Sanchez, John J.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Estes, Steve; Paskievitch, John

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988. The primary objectives of this program are the near real time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents the calculated earthquake hypocenter and phase arrival data, and changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2003. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at twenty-seven volcanoes within Alaska in 2003. These include Mount Wrangell, Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Katmai volcanic cluster (Snowy Mountain, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin), Aniakchak Crater, Mount Veniaminof, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski Peaks, Shishaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl Peak, Akutan Peak, Makushin Volcano, Okmok Caldera, Great Sitkin Volcano, Kanaga Volcano, Tanaga Volcano, and Mount Gareloi. Monitoring highlights in 2003 include: continuing elevated seismicity at Mount Veniaminof in January-April (volcanic unrest began in August 2002), volcanogenic seismic swarms at Shishaldin Volcano throughout the year, and low-level tremor at Okmok Caldera throughout the year. Instrumentation and data acquisition highlights in 2003 were the installation of subnetworks on Tanaga and Gareloi Islands, the installation of broadband installations on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera, and the establishment of telemetry for the Okmok Caldera subnetwork. AVO located 3911 earthquakes in 2003. This catalog includes: (1) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2003; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2003.

  19. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2011-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2010, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 3,405 earthquakes, of which 2,846 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. There was no significant seismic activity in 2010 at these monitored volcanic centers. Seismograph subnetworks with severe outages in 2009 were repaired in 2010 resulting in three volcanic centers (Aniakchak, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being relisted in the formal list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes locations and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2010 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  20. Glacier Destruction and Lahar Generation during the 2009 Eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Two large lahars with volumes of 0.4-0.6 km3 and several smaller lahars with volumes of 0.05-0.1 km3 inundated the Drift River valley on the north flank of Redoubt Volcano during its 2009 eruption. Significant lahars were produced on March 22-23 during the initial explosive phase of the eruption following about 8 months of precursory unrest that included increased fumarolic melting of glacier ice and snow in the summit crater and upper Drift glacier. From the beginning of unrest in late July 2008 through March 20, 2009 about 3-7 x 106 m3 of glacier ice and snow were lost from upper Drift glacier as a result of fumarolic emissions and associated melting. Water and debris outflow during this period was minor and posed no downstream flow hazard beyond the base of the volcano. On March 22-23, explosive eruptions from a summit crater vent destroyed a significant amount of ice in upper Drift glacier and produced a funnel-shaped explosion crater within the larger summit crater. Glacier ice, 50-100 m thick, in the gorge below the vent was stripped to bedrock by pyroclastic flows and melt water. By the next available clear views of the volcano on March 26, about 0.5-1.0 x 108 m3 of ice had been removed from upper Drift glacier including part of the ice field in the summit crater. Melt water liberated by eruptive activity on March 22-23 also eroded or removed most of the river ice and snowpack present in the Drift River valley which may have added an additional 0.1-0.2 km3 of water to the lahars produced during that time. Additional explosions from March 26-April 4 caused further melting of Drift glacier and produced small lahars, but the extent of ice loss and lahar inundation during this period could not be determined because clouds obscured the volcano and much of the Drift River valley. The final explosive event and lahar of the eruption occurred on April 4 when pyroclastic flows produced by lava dome collapse swept over upper Drift glacier and a portion of its piedmont lobe. This event removed about 0.5-1.0 x 108 m3 of glacier ice and initiated a lahar, just slightly larger than the March 22-23 lahar, that inundated an area of about 125 km2 in the Drift River valley from the piedmont lobe to the Cook Inlet coastline about 35 km distant. Pre-eruptive Drift glacier ice volume was about 1 km3 and the total ice removed by the 2009 eruption was 0.1-0.2 km3 or about 10-20% of the total. The total amount of Drift glacier ice removed during the 1989-90 eruption was about 0.1 km3, roughly half of that removed during the 2009 eruption. The largest and most energetic event of the 1989-90 Redoubt eruption on January 2, 1990 removed about 0.25 x 108 m3 of ice from Drift glacier and initiated a lahar of about 0.2 km3, the largest of that eruption. Both the March 22-23 and April 4, 2009 events resulted in greater ice loss and larger lahars than did the January 2, 1990 event. The upper part of Drift glacier is narrow and confined by steep valley walls that restrict the lateral spreading of pyroclastic debris generated by lava dome collapse. This enhances the efficiency of ice melt by funneling pyroclastic flows over the glacier and mechanical erosion and thermal interaction leads to the production of large volumes of melt water and correspondingly large lahars downstream.

  1. Geodetic Measurements and Numerical Modeling of the Deformation Cycle for Okmok Volcano, Alaska: 1993-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohlendorf, S. J.; Feigl, K.; Thurber, C. H.; Lu, Z.; Masterlark, T.

    2011-12-01

    Okmok Volcano is an active caldera located on Umnak Island in the Aleutian Island arc. Okmok, having recently erupted in 1997 and 2008, is well suited for multidisciplinary studies of magma migration and storage because it hosts a good seismic network and has been the subject of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images that span the recent eruption cycle. Interferometric SAR can characterize surface deformation in space and time, while data from the seismic network provides important information about the interior processes and structure of the volcano. We conduct a complete time series analysis of deformation of Okmok with images collected by the ERS and Envisat satellites on more than 100 distinct epochs between 1993 and 2008. We look for changes in inter-eruption inflation rates, which may indicate inelastic rheologic effects. For the time series analysis, we analyze the gradient of phase directly, without unwrapping, using the General Inversion of Phase Technique (GIPhT) [Feigl and Thurber, 2009]. This approach accounts for orbital and atmospheric effects and provides realistic estimates of the uncertainties of the model parameters. We consider several models for the source, including the prolate spheroid model and the Mogi model, to explain the observed deformation. Using a medium that is a homogeneous half space, we estimate the source depth to be centered at about 4 km below sea level, consistent with the findings of Masterlark et al. [2010]. As in several other geodetic studies, we find the source to be approximately centered beneath the caldera. To account for rheologic complexity, we next apply the Finite Element Method to simulate a pressurized cavity embedded in a medium with material properties derived from body wave seismic tomography. This approach allows us to address the problem of unreasonably large pressure values implied by a Mogi source with a radius of about 1 km by experimenting with larger sources. We also compare the time dependence of the source to published results that used GPS data.

  2. Peninsular terrane basement ages recorded by Paleozoic and Paleoproterozoic zircon in gabbro xenoliths and andesite from Redoubt volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, Charles R.; Vazquez, Jorge A.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Historically Sactive Redoubt volcano is an Aleutian arc basalt-to-dacite cone constructed upon the Jurassic–Early Tertiary Alaska–Aleutian Range batholith. The batholith intrudes the Peninsular tectonostratigraphic terrane, which is considered to have developed on oceanic basement and to have accreted to North America, possibly in Late Jurassic time. Xenoliths in Redoubt magmas have been thought to be modern cumulate gabbros and fragments of the batholith. However, new sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) U-Pb ages for zircon from gabbro xenoliths from a late Pleistocene pyroclastic deposit are dominated by much older, ca. 310 Ma Pennsylvanian and ca. 1865 Ma Paleoproterozoic grains. Zircon age distributions and trace-element concentrations indicate that the ca. 310 Ma zircons date gabbroic intrusive rocks, and the ca. 1865 Ma zircons also are likely from igneous rocks in or beneath Peninsular terrane basement. The trace-element data imply that four of five Cretaceous–Paleocene zircons, and Pennsylvanian low-U, low-Th zircons in one sample, grew from metamorphic or hydrothermal fluids. Textural evidence of xenocrysts and a dominant population of ca. 1865 Ma zircon in juvenile crystal-rich andesite from the same pyroclastic deposit show that this basement has been assimilated by Redoubt magma. Equilibration temperatures and oxygen fugacities indicated by Fe-Ti–oxide minerals in the gabbros and crystal-rich andesite suggest sources near the margins of the Redoubt magmatic system, most likely in the magma accumulation and storage region currently outlined by seismicity and magma petrology at ?4–10 km below sea level. Additionally, a partially melted gabbro from the 1990 eruption contains zircon with U-Pb ages between ca. 620 Ma and ca. 1705 Ma, as well as one zircon with a U-Th disequilibrium model age of 0 ka. The zircon ages demonstrate that Pennsylvanian, and probably Paleoproterozoic, igneous rocks exist in, or possibly beneath, Peninsular terrane basement. Discovery of Pennsylvanian gabbro similar in age to Skolai arc plutons 500 km to the northeast indicates that the Peninsular terrane, along with the Wrangellia and Alexander terranes, has been part of the Wrangellia composite terrane since at least Pennsylvanian time. Moreover, the zircon data suggest that a Paleoproterozoic continental fragment may be present in the mid-to-upper crust in southern Alaska.

  3. Chemical versus temporal controls on the evolution of tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas at two volcanoes in the Alaska-Aleutian arc

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, R.; Turner, S.; Hawkesworth, C.; Bacon, C.R.; Nye, C.; Stelling, P.; Dreher, S.

    2004-01-01

    The Alaska-Aleutian island arc is well known for erupting both tholeiitic and calc-alkaline magmas. To investigate the relative roles of chemical and temporal controls in generating these contrasting liquid lines of descent we have undertaken a detailed study of tholeiitic lavas from Akutan volcano in the oceanic A1eutian arc and calc-alkaline products from Aniakchak volcano on the continental A1askan Peninsula. The differences do not appear to be linked to parental magma composition. The Akutan lavas can be explained by closed-system magmatic evolution, whereas curvilinear trace element trends and a large range in 87 Sr/86 Sr isotope ratios in the Aniakchak data appear to require the combined effects of fractional crystallization, assimilation and magma mixing. Both magmatic suites preserve a similar range in 226 Ra-230 Th disequilibria, which suggests that the time scale of crustal residence of magmas beneath both these volcanoes was similar, and of the order of several thousand years. This is consistent with numerical estimates of the time scales for crystallization caused by cooling in convecting crustal magma chambers. During that time interval the tholeiitic Akutan magmas underwent restricted, closed-system, compositional evolution. In contrast, the calc-alkaline magmas beneath Aniakchak volcano underwent significant open-system compositional evolution. Combining these results with data from other studies we suggest that differentiation is faster in calc-alkaline and potassic magma series than in tholeiitic series, owing to a combination of greater extents of assimilation, magma mixing and cooling.

  4. Proximal Tsunami Deposits Produced During the 1883 Eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keskinen, M. J.; Beget, J.

    2006-12-01

    In 1883 a debris avalanche from Augustine Volcano flowed into Cook Inlet and generated a distal tsunami that in some localities was as much as 6-8 m high at distances of 80 km from the volcano (Beget and Kowalik, 2006). Waves generated by the landslide also propagated back to Augustine Island, and left proximal tsunami deposits on the 1883 debris avalanche and nearby parts of Augustine Island. Near the center of the 1883 debris avalanche the tsunami deposits are locally more than 2 m thick, consist mainly of marine mud with admixtures of sand, rounded pumice and shells, and are found in both laminated and massive exposures overlying hummocks on Augustine Island and adjacent Tsunami Island. Sand-dominated proximal tsunami deposits are much thinner and more discontinuous, and occur only at the margins of the 1883 landslide, and in more distal sites around Augustine Island and elsewhere around Cook Inlet. The mud-dominated and sand- dominated facies found in the proximal tsunami deposits reflect local sediment entrainment by waves travelling via different paths back to Augustine Island. The tsunami deposits record local waves that were at least 21 m high near the center of the landslide. The tsunami deposit heights systematically decrease both to the east and west away from the center of the debris avalanche, and indicate wave run-up heights of ca. 12 m at the landslide margins, and ca. 8 m at West Island. The tsunami deposits, together with evidence from erosional features and driftwood found on 1883 hummocks are used to retrodict a mareogram for the Augustine 1883 event. The 1883 maregram is similar to maregrams produced by other landslide tsunamis, and proves that the 1883 debris avalanche generated the tsunami. The 1883 mareogram also constitutes an independent test of various numerical models which purport to reconstruct the1883 tsunami. The field data from proximal tsunami deposits on Augustine Island is in agreement with numerical models that successfully simulate waves consistent with eyewitness acounts and contemporary reports of 6-8 m wave heights at English Bay (modern Nanwalek) and other sites along the lowermost Kenai Peninsula of Cook Inlet.

  5. Hydrothermal activity and carbon-dioxide discharge at Shrub and upper Klawasi mud volcanoes, Wrangell Mountains, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorey, Michael L.; Werner, Cindy; McGimsey, Robert G.; Evans, William C.

    2000-01-01

    Shrub mud volcano, one of three mud volcanoes of the Klawasi group in the Copper River Basin, Alaska, has been discharging warm mud and water and CO2?rich gas since 1996. A field visit to Shrub in June 1999 found the general level of hot-spring discharge to be similar, but somewhat more widespread, than in the previous two years. Evidence of recent animal and vegetation deaths from CO2 exposure were confined to localized areas around various gas and fluid vents. Maximum fluid temperatures in each of three main discharge areas, ranging from 48-54?C, were equal to or higher than those measured in the two previous years; such temperatures are significantly higher than those observed intermittently over the past 30 years. At Upper Klawasi mud volcano, measured temperatures of 23-26?C and estimated rates of gas and water discharge in the summit crater lake were also similar to those observed in the previous two years. Gas discharging at Shrub and Upper Klawasi is composed of over 98% CO2 and minor amounts of meteoric gases (N2, O2, Ar) and gases partly of deeper origin (CH4 and He). The rate of CO2 discharge from spring vents and pools at Shrub is estimated to be ~10 metric tonnes per day. This discharge, together with measured concentrations of bicarbonate, suggest that a total CO2 upflow from depth of 20-40 metric tonnes per day at Shrub.Measurements were made of diffuse degassing rates from soil at one ~300 m2 area near the summit of Shrub that included vegetation kill suggestive of high CO2 concentrations in the root zone. Most of measured gas flow rates in this area were significantly higher than background values, and a CO2 concentration of 26 percent was measured at a depth of 10 cm where the gas flow rate was highest. Although additional measurements of diffuse gas flow were made elsewhere at Shrub, no other areas of vegetation kill related to diffuse degassing and high soil-gas CO2 concentrations could be seen from the air.Chemical and isotopic compositions of the gas and water discharging at Shrub and Upper Klawasi indicate derivation from a combination of mantle (magmatic) and crustal (marine sedimentary rock) sources and suggest a common fluid reservoir at depth. In particular, both the total dissolved carbon and values of 13C in CO2 are similar for fluids and gas sampled at each area, and do not appear to have changed with the onset of increased spring temperatures and fluid discharge at Shrub. This suggests that the underlying cause of the recent changes in discharge rate and temperature at Shrub is not an increase in the rate of input of magmatic heat and volatiles, but rather increases in the permeability of the upflow conduits that connect the gas-rich reservoir to the surface.

  6. Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka Peninsula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    On March 29, 2007, the Shiveluch Volcano on the Russian Federation's Kamchatka Peninsula erupted. According to the Alaska Volcano Observatory the volcano underwent an explosive eruption between 01:50 and 2:30 UTC, sending an ash cloud skyward roughly 9,750 meters (32,000 feet), based on visual estimates. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying onboard NASA's Aqua satellite took this picture at 02:00 UTC on March 29. The top image shows the volcano and its surroundings. The bottom image shows a close-up view of the volcano at 250 meters per pixel. Satellites often capture images of volcanic ash plumes, but usually as the plumes are blowing away. Plumes have been observed blowing away from Shiveluch before. This image, however, is different. At the time the Aqua satellite passed overhead, the eruption was recent enough (and the air was apparently still enough) that the ash cloud still hovered above the summit. In this image, the bulbous cloud casts its shadow northward over the icy landscape. Volcanic ash eruptions inject particles into Earth's atmosphere. Substantial eruptions of light-reflecting particles can reduce temperatures and even affect atmospheric circulation. Large eruptions impact climate patterns for years. A massive eruption of the Tambora Volcano in Indonesia in 1815, for instance, earned 1816 the nickname 'the year without a summer.' Shiveluch is a stratovolcano--a steep-sloped volcano composed of alternating layers of solidified ash, hardened lava, and volcanic rocks. One of Kamchatka's largest volcanoes, it sports a summit reaching 3,283 meters (10,771 feet). Shiveluch is also one of the peninsula's most active volcanoes, with an estimated 60 substantial eruptions in the past 10,000 years.

  7. The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON): Hands-on Experiential K- 12 Learning in the North

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, K.; Jeffries, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Alaska Lake Ice and Snow Observatory Network (ALISON) was initiated by Martin Jeffries (UAF polar scientist), Delena Norris-Tull (UAF education professor) and Ron Reihl (middle school science teacher, Fairbanks North Star Borough School District). The snow and ice measurement protocols were developed in 1999-2000 at the Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) by Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska scientists and tested by home school teacher/students in winter 2001-2002 in Fairbanks, AK. The project was launched in 2002 with seven sites around the state (PFRR, Fairbanks, Barrow, Mystic Lake, Nome, Shageluk and Wasilla). The project reached its broadest distribution in 2005-2006 with 22 sites. The schools range from urban (Wasilla) to primarily Alaska native villages (Shageluk). They include public schools, charter schools, home schooled students and parents, informal educators and citizen scientists. The grade levels range from upper elementary to high school. Well over a thousand students have participated in ALISON since its inception. Equipment is provided to the observers at each site. Measurements include ice thickness (with a hot wire ice thickness gauge), snow depth and snow temperature (surface and base). Snow samples are taken and snow density derived. Snow variables are used to calculate the conductive heat flux through the ice and snow cover to the atmosphere. All data are available on the Web site. The students and teachers are scientific partners in the study of lake ice processes, contributing to new scientific knowledge and understanding while also learning science by doing science with familiar and abundant materials. Each autumn, scientists visit each location to work with the teachers and students, helping them to set up the study site, showing them how to make the measurements and enter the data into the computer, and discussing snow, ice and polar environmental change. A number of 'veteran' teachers are now setting up the study sites on their own. Each summer, a workshop in Fairbanks offers the teachers the opportunity to work and learn together, sharing their ALISON field experiences and transfer to the classroom, testing activities and materials, and adding to their content knowledge. This experiential learning project demonstrates that teachers and students can make scientifically valuable measurements when provided with easy-to-use equipment, clear directions and training. The project also shows that when provided with a stimulating learning opportunity, teachers and students find imaginative ways to extend the experience. For example, a number of students have made videos about their ALISON. Lesson plans using ALISON-related science concepts have been generated by ALISON teachers and others. Several ALISON teachers have published articles about the ALISON experience. ALISON teachers have been awarded prestigious Toyota Tapestry grants in support of their activities.

  8. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2007, AVO located 6,664 earthquakes of which 5,660 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by the Alaska Volcano Observatory. Monitoring highlights in 2007 include: the eruption of Pavlof Volcano, volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarms at the Augustine, Illiamna, and Little Sitkin volcanic centers, and the cessation of episodes of unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, Mount Veniaminof and the northern Atka Island volcanoes (Mount Kliuchef and Korovin Volcano). This catalog includes descriptions of : (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2007; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2007; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2007.

  9. Particle morphologies and formation mechanisms of fine volcanic ash aerosol collected from the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinkleff, P. G.; Cahill, C. F.

    2010-12-01

    Fine volcanic ash aerosol (35-0.09um) erupted in 2006 by Augustine Volcano, southwest of Anchorage, Alaska was collected by a DRUM cascade impactor and analyzed by scanning electron microscopy for individual particle chemistry and morphology. Results of these analyses show ash particles occur as either individual glass shard and mineral phase (plagioclase, magnetite, ilmenite, hornblende, etc.) particles or aggregates thereof. Individual glass shard ash particles are angular, uniformly-sized, consist of calc-alkaline whole-rock elements (Si, Al, Fe, Na, and Ca) and are not collocated on the sample media with non-silicate, Cl and S bearing sea salt particles. Aggregate particles occur as two types: pure ash aggregates and sea salt-cored aggregates. Pure ash aggregates are made up of only ash particles and contain no other constituents. Sea salt-cored aggregates are ash particles commingled with sea salts. Determining the formation processes of the different ash particle types need further investigation but some possibilities are proposed here. Individual ash particles may exist when the ambient air is generally dry, little electrical charge exists on ash particles, the eruptive cloud is generally dry, or the number of individual particles exceeds the scavenging capacity of the water droplets present. Another possibility is that ash aggregates may break apart as relative humidity drops over time and causes ash-laden water droplets to evaporate and subsequently break apart. Pure ash aggregates may form when the ambient air and plume is relatively dry but the ash has a significant charge to cause ash to aggregate. Or they could form during long-range transport when turbulent or Brownian motion can cause ash particles to collide and coagulate. Pure ash aggregates could also form as a result of water droplet scavenging and subsequent evaporation of water droplets, leaving behind only ash. In this case, droplets would not have interacted with a sea salt-containing boundary layer. Sea salt-cored aggregates could form when ash particles travel over a maritime environment and sea salt aerosol could easily be incorporated in the plume from the surrounding atmosphere. When the particles are sampled, pressure drops within the DRUM impactor cause the water in the droplet to evaporate, leaving behind ash aggregated with salt

  10. Acoustic measurements of the 1999 basaltic eruption of Shishaldin volcano, Alaska 2. Precursor to the Subplinian phase

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vergniolle, S.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 1999 eruption of Shishaldin volcano (Alaska, USA) displayed both Strombolian and Subplinian basaltic activity. The Subplinian phase was preceded by a signal of low amplitude and constant frequency (??? 2 Hz) lasting 13 h. This "humming signal" is interpreted as the coalescence of the very shallow part of a foam building up in the conduit, which produces large gas bubbles before bursting. The acoustic waveform of the hum event is modelled by a Helmholtz resonator: gas is trapped into a rigid cavity and can only escape through a tiny upper hole producing sound waves. At Shishaldin, the radius of the hole (??? 5 m) is close to that of the conduit (??? 6 m), the cavity has a length of ??? 60 m, and gas presents only a small overpressure between (??? 1.2 ?? 10-3 and 4.5 ?? 10-3 MPa). Such an overpressure is obtained by the partial coalescence of a foam formed by bubbles with a diameter from ??? 2.3 mm at the beginning of the episode towards ??? 0.64 mm very close to the end of the phase. The intermittency between hum events is explained by the ripening of the foam induced by the H2O diffusion through the liquid films. The two extreme values, from 600 to 10 s, correspond to a bubble diameter from 2.2 to 0.3 mm at the beginning and end of the pre-Subplinian phase, respectively. The extremely good agreement between two independent estimates of bubble diameters in the shallow foam reinforces the validity of such an interpretation. The total gas volume lost at the surface during the humming events is at most 5.9 ?? 106 m3. At the very end of the pre-Subplinian phase, there is a single large bubble with an overpressure of ???0.42 MPa. The large overpressure suggests that it comes from significant depth, unlike other bubbles in the pre-Subplinian phase. This deep bubble may be responsible for the entire foam collapse, resulting in the Subplinian phase. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Technical-Information Products for a National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Guffanti, Marianne; Brantley, Steven R.; Cervelli, Peter F.; Nye, Christopher J.; Serafino, George N.; Siebert, Lee; Venezky, Dina Y.; Wald, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Technical outreach - distinct from general-interest and K-12 educational outreach - for volcanic hazards is aimed at providing usable scientific information about potential or ongoing volcanic activity to public officials, businesses, and individuals in support of their response, preparedness, and mitigation efforts. Within the context of a National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) (Ewert et al., 2005), technical outreach is a critical process, transferring the benefits of enhanced monitoring and hazards research to key constituents who have to initiate actions or make policy decisions to lessen the hazardous impact of volcanic activity. This report discusses recommendations of the Technical-Information Products Working Group convened in 2006 as part of the NVEWS planning process. The basic charge to the Working Group was to identify a web-based, volcanological 'product line' for NVEWS to meet the specific hazard-information needs of technical users. Members of the Working Group were: *Marianne Guffanti (Chair), USGS, Reston VA *Steve Brantley, USGS, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory HI *Peter Cervelli, USGS, Alaska Volcano Observatory, Anchorage AK *Chris Nye, Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and Alaska Volcano Observatory, Fairbanks AK *George Serafino, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Camp Springs MD *Lee Siebert, Smithsonian Institution, Washington DC *Dina Venezky, USGS, Volcano Hazards Team, Menlo Park CA *Lisa Wald, USGS, Earthquake Hazards Program, Golden CO

  12. A space-borne, multi-parameter, Virtual Volcano Observatory for the real-time, anywhere-anytime support to decision-making during eruptive crises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrucci, F.; Tampellini, M.; Loughlin, S. C.; Tait, S.; Theys, N.; Valks, P.; Hirn, B.

    2013-12-01

    The EVOSS consortium of academic, industrial and institutional partners in Europe and Africa, has created a satellite-based volcano observatory, designed to support crisis management within the Global Monitoring for Environment and Security (GMES) framework of the European Commission. Data from 8 different payloads orbiting on 14 satellite platforms (SEVIRI on-board MSG-1, -2 and -3, MODIS on-board Terra and Aqua, GOME-2 and IASI onboard MetOp-A, OMI on-board Aura, Cosmo-SkyMED/1, /2, /3 and /4, JAMI on-board MTSAT-1 and -2, and, until April 8th2012, SCHIAMACHY on-board ENVISAT) acquired at 5 different down-link stations, are disseminated to and automatically processed at 6 locations in 4 countries. The results are sent, in four separate geographic data streams (high-temperature thermal anomalies, volcanic Sulfur dioxide daily fluxes, volcanic ash and ground deformation), to a central facility called VVO, the 'Virtual Volcano Observatory'. This system operates 24H/24-7D/7 since September 2011 on all volcanoes in Europe, Africa, the Lesser Antilles, and the oceans around them, and during this interval has detected, measured and monitored all subaerial eruptions occurred in this region (44 over 45 certified, with overall detection and processing efficiency of ~97%). EVOSS borne realtime information is delivered to a group of 14 qualified end users, bearing the direct or indirect responsibility of monitoring and managing volcano emergencies, and of advising governments in Comoros, DR Congo, Djibouti, Ethiopia, Montserrat, Uganda, Tanzania, France and Iceland. We present the full set of eruptions detected and monitored - from 2004 to present - by multispectral payloads SEVIRI onboard the geostationary platforms of the MSG constellation, for developing and fine tuning-up the EVOSS system along with its real-time, pre- and post-processing automated algorithms. The set includes 91% of subaerial eruptions occurred at 15 volcanoes (Piton de la Fournaise, Karthala, Jebel al Tair, Erta Ale, Manda Hararo, Dalafilla, Nabro, Ol Doinyo Lengai, Nyiamulagira, Nyiragongo, Etna, Stromboli, Eyjafjallajökull, Grimsvötn, Soufriere Hills) showing radiant fluxes above ~0.5 GW and/or SO2 columns in excess of ~6 DU. Porting of automated thermal algorithms on MTSAT's JAMI (orbiting at 145°E) was developed on the eruptions of Merapi, Semeru Kliuchevskoi, Bezymianny and Shiveluch in 2006-2007, calibrated on the frequent activity of Batu Tara, and demonstrated on the 2012-2013 large eruption of Tolbachik.

  13. Yellowstone Volcano Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    U.S. Geological Survey

    This source is a clearinghouse of scientific information about the Yellowstone volcanic system. Topics include recent seismic and thermal activity, volcanic history, references and maps, a photo gallery, and FAQs. This website contains both general information that would be useful for anyone that is seeking information on the Yellowstone volcanic system, as well as more specific resources for geology students or teachers.

  14. Instrumentation Recommendations for Volcano Monitoring at U.S. Volcanoes Under the National Volcano Early Warning System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, Seth C.; Freymueller, Jeff T.; LaHusen, Richard G.; McGee, Kenneth A.; Poland, Michael P.; Power, John A.; Schmidt, David A.; Schneider, David J.; Stephens, George; Werner, Cynthia A.; White, Randall A.

    2008-01-01

    As magma moves toward the surface, it interacts with anything in its path: hydrothermal systems, cooling magma bodies from previous eruptions, and (or) the surrounding 'country rock'. Magma also undergoes significant changes in its physical properties as pressure and temperature conditions change along its path. These interactions and changes lead to a range of geophysical and geochemical phenomena. The goal of volcano monitoring is to detect and correctly interpret such phenomena in order to provide early and accurate warnings of impending eruptions. Given the well-documented hazards posed by volcanoes to both ground-based populations (for example, Blong, 1984; Scott, 1989) and aviation (for example, Neal and others, 1997; Miller and Casadevall, 2000), volcano monitoring is critical for public safety and hazard mitigation. Only with adequate monitoring systems in place can volcano observatories provide accurate and timely forecasts and alerts of possible eruptive activity. At most U.S. volcanoes, observatories traditionally have employed a two-component approach to volcano monitoring: (1) install instrumentation sufficient to detect unrest at volcanic systems likely to erupt in the not-too-distant future; and (2) once unrest is detected, install any instrumentation needed for eruption prediction and monitoring. This reactive approach is problematic, however, for two reasons. 1. At many volcanoes, rapid installation of new ground-1. based instruments is difficult or impossible. Factors that complicate rapid response include (a) eruptions that are preceded by short (hours to days) precursory sequences of geophysical and (or) geochemical activity, as occurred at Mount Redoubt (Alaska) in 1989 (24 hours), Anatahan (Mariana Islands) in 2003 (6 hours), and Mount St. Helens (Washington) in 1980 and 2004 (7 and 8 days, respectively); (b) inclement weather conditions, which may prohibit installation of new equipment for days, weeks, or even months, particularly at midlatitude or high-latitude volcanoes; (c) safety factors during unrest, which can limit where new instrumentation can safely be installed (particularly at near-vent sites that can be critical for precursor detection and eruption forecasting); and (d) the remoteness of many U.S. volcanoes (particularly those in the Aleutians and the Marianas Islands), where access is difficult or impossible most of the year. Given these difficulties, it is reasonable to anticipate that ground-based monitoring of eruptions at U.S. volcanoes will likely be performed primarily with instruments installed before unrest begins. 2. Given a growing awareness of previously undetected 2. phenomena that may occur before an eruption begins, at present the types and (or) density of instruments in use at most U.S. volcanoes is insufficient to provide reliable early warning of volcanic eruptions. As shown by the gap analysis of Ewert and others (2005), a number of U.S. volcanoes lack even rudimentary monitoring. At those volcanic systems with monitoring instrumentation in place, only a few types of phenomena can be tracked in near-real time, principally changes in seismicity, deformation, and large-scale changes in thermal flux (through satellite-based remote sensing). Furthermore, researchers employing technologically advanced instrumentation at volcanoes around the world starting in the 1990s have shown that subtle and previously undetectable phenomena can precede or accompany eruptions. Detection of such phenomena would greatly improve the ability of U.S. volcano observatories to provide accurate early warnings of impending eruptions, and is a critical capability particularly at the very high-threat volcanoes identified by Ewert and others (2005). For these two reasons, change from a reactive to a proactive volcano-monitoring strategy is clearly needed at U.S. volcanoes. Monitoring capabilities need to be expanded at virtually every volcanic center, regardless of its current state of

  15. Volcano Monitoring Using Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cameron, W.; Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2009-12-01

    At the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), remote sensing is an important component of its daily monitoring of volcanoes. AVO’s remote sensing group (AVORS) primarily utilizes three satellite datasets; Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data, from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Satellites (POES), Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Terra and Aqua satellites, and NOAA’s Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) data. AVHRR and MODIS data are collected by receiving stations operated by the Geographic Information Network of Alaska (GINA) at the University of Alaska’s Geophysical Institute. An additional AVHRR data feed is supplied by NOAA’s Gilmore Creek satellite tracking station. GOES data are provided by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Monterey Bay. The ability to visualize these images and their derived products is critical for the timely analysis of the data. To this end, AVORS has developed javascript web interfaces that allow the user to view images and metadata. These work well for internal analysts to quickly access a given dataset, but they do not provide an integrated view of all the data. To do this AVORS has integrated its datasets with Keyhole Markup Language (KML) allowing them to be viewed by a number of virtual globes or other geobrowsers that support this code. Examples of AVORS’ use of KML include the ability to browse thermal satellite image overlays to look for signs of volcanic activity. Webcams can also be viewed interactively through KML to confirm current activity. Other applications include monitoring the location and status of instrumentation; near real-time plotting of earthquake hypocenters; mapping of new volcanic deposits using polygons; and animated models of ash plumes, created by a combination of ash dispersion modeling and 3D visualization packages.

  16. Voluminous ice-rich and water-rich lahars generated during the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, Christopher F.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Major, Jon J.; Scott, William E.

    2013-06-01

    Redoubt Volcano in south-central Alaska began erupting on March 15, 2009, and by April 4, 2009, had produced at least 20 explosive events that generated multiple plumes of ash and numerous lahars. The 3108-m-high, snow- and ice-clad stratovolcano has an ice-filled summit crater that is breached to the north. The volcano supports about 4 km3 of ice and snow and about 1 km3 of this makes up the Drift glacier on the north side of the volcano. Explosive eruptions between March 23 and April 4, which included the destruction of at least two lava domes, triggered significant lahars in the Drift River valley on March 23 and April 4, and several smaller lahars between March 24 and March 31. Mud-line high-water marks, character of deposits, areas of inundation, and estimates of flow velocity revealed that the lahars on March 23 and April 4 were the largest of the eruption. In the 2-km-wide upper Drift River valley, average flow depths were at least 2-5 m. Average peak-flow velocities were likely between 10 and 15 ms- 1, and peak discharges were on the order of 104-105 m3 s- 1. The area inundated by lahars on March 23 was at least 100 km2 and on April 4 about 125 km2. Two substantial lahars emplaced on March 23 and one on April 4 had volumes on the order of 107-108 m3 and were similar in size to the largest lahar of the 1989-90 eruption. The two principal March 23 lahars were primarily flowing slurries of snow and ice derived from Drift glacier and the Drift River valley where seasonal snow and tabular blocks of river ice were entrained and incorporated into the lahars. Despite morphologic evidence of two lahars, only a single deposit up to 5 m thick was found in most places and it contained about 80-95% of poorly sorted, massive to imbricate assemblages of snow and ice clasts. The deposit was frozen soon after it was emplaced and later eroded and buried by the April 4 lahar. The lahar of April 4, in contrast, was primarily a hyperconcentrated flow, as interpreted from 1- to 6-m-thick deposits of massive to horizontally stratified sand to fine gravel. Rock material in the April 4 lahar deposit is predominantly juvenile andesite, whereas rock material in the March 23 deposit is rare and not obviously juvenile. We infer that the lahars generated on March 23 were initiated by a rapid succession of vent-clearing explosions that blasted through about 50-100 m of crater-filling glacier ice and snow, producing a voluminous release of meltwater from Drift glacier. The resulting surge of water entrained snow, fragments of glacier and river ice, and river water along its flow path. Small-volume pyroclastic flows, possibly associated with destruction of a small dome or minor eruption-column collapses, may have contributed additional meltwater to the March 23 lahars. Meltwater generated by subglacial hydrothermal activity and stored beneath Drift glacier may have been ejected or released rapidly as well. The April 4 lahar was initiated when hot dome-collapse pyroclastic flows entrained and swiftly melted snow and ice on Drift glacier. The resulting meltwater incorporated pyroclastic debris and rock material from Drift glacier to form the largest lahar of the 2009 eruption. The peak discharge of the April 4 lahar was in the range of 60,000-160,000 m3 s- 1. For comparison, the largest lahar of the 1989-90 eruption had a peak discharge of about 80,000 m3 s- 1. Lahars generated by the 2009 eruption led to significant channel aggradation in the lower Drift River valley and caused extensive inundation at an oil storage and transfer facility located there. The April 4, 2009, lahar was 6-30 times larger than the largest meteorological floods known or estimated in the Drift River drainage.

  17. Areal distribution, thickness, mass, volume, and grain size of tephra-fall deposits from the 1992 eruptions of Crater Peak vent, Mt. Spurr Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGimsey, Robert G.; Neal, Christina A.; Riley, Colleen M.

    2001-01-01

    The Crater Peak flank vent of Mount Spurr volcano erupted June 27, August 18, and September 16- 17, 1992. The three eruptions were similar in intensity (vulcanian to subplinian eruption columns reaching up to 14 km Above Sea Level) and duration (3.5 to 4.0 hours) and produced tephra-fall deposits (12, 14, 15 x 10 6 m3 Dense Rock Equivalent [DRE]) discernible up to 1,000 km downwind. The June 27 ash cloud traveled north over the rugged, ice- and snow-covered Alaska Range. The August 18 ash cloud was carried southeastward over Anchorage, across Prince William Sound, and down the southeastern shoreline of the Gulf of Alaska. The September 16-17 ash plume was directed eastward over the Talkeetna and Wrangell mountains and into the Yukon Territory of Canada. Over 50 mass-per-unit-area (MPUA) samples were collected for each of the latter two fall deposits at distances ranging from about 2 km to 370 km downwind from the volcano. Only 10 (mostly proximal) samples were collected for the June fall deposit due to inaccessible terrain and funding constraints. MPUA data were plotted and contoured (isomass lines) to graphically display the distribution of each fall deposit. For the August and September eruptions, fallout was concentrated along a narrow (30 to 50 km wide) belt. The fallout was most concentrated (100,000 to greater than 250,000 g/m2) within about 80 km of the volcano. Secondary maxima occur at 200 km (2,620 g/m2) and 300 km (4,659 g/m2), respectively, down axis for the August and September deposits. The maxima contain bimodal grain size distributions (with peaks at 88.4 and 22.1 microns) indicating aggregation within the ash cloud. Combined tephra-volume for the 1992 Mount Spurr eruptions (41 x 10 6 m3 DRE) is comparable to that (tephra-fall only) of the 1989-90 eruptions of nearby Redoubt volcano (31-49 x 106 m3 DRE).

  18. Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapin, F. Stuart, III; Trainor, Sarah F.; Cochran, Patricia; Huntington, Henry; Markon, Carl J.; McCammon, Molly; McGuire, A. David; Serreze, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Alaska is the United States' only Arctic region. Its marine, tundra, boreal (northern) forest, and rainforest ecosystems differ from most of those in other states and are relatively intact. Alaska is home to millions of migratory birds, hundred of thousands of caribou, some of the nation's largest salmon runs, a significant proportion of he nation's marine mammals, and half of the nation's fish catch. Energy production is the main driver of the state's economy, providing more than 80% of state government revenue and thousands of jobs. Continuing pressure for oil, gas, and mineral development on land and offshore in ice-covered waters increases the demand for infrastructure, placing additional stresses on ecosystems. Land-based energy exploration will be affected by a shorter season when ice roads are viable, yet reduced sea ice extent may create more opportunity for offshore development. Climate also affects hydropower generation. Mining and fishing are the second and third largest industries in the state, with tourism rapidly increasing the 1990s. Fisheries are vulnerable to changes in fish abundance and distribution that result from both climate change and fishing pressure. Tourism might respond positively to warmer springs and autumns but negatively to less favorable conditions for winter activities and increased summer smoke from wildfire. Alaska is home to 40% (229 of 566) of the federally recognized tribes in the United States. The small number of jobs, high cost of living, and rapid social change make rural, predominantly Native, communities highly vulnerable to climate change through impacts on tradition hunting and fishing and cultural connection to the land and sad. Because most of these communities re not connected to the state's road system or electrical grid, the cost of living is high, and it is challenging to supply good, fuel, materials, health care, and other services. Climate impacts on these communities are magnified by additional social and economic stresses. However, Alaskan Native communities have for centuries dealt with scarcity and high environmental variability and thus have deep cultural reservoirs of flexibility and adaptability.

  19. Exploring Geology on the World-Wide Web--Volcanoes and Volcanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmrich, Steven Henry; Gore, Pamela J. W.

    1996-01-01

    Focuses on sites on the World Wide Web that offer information about volcanoes. Web sites are classified into areas of Global Volcano Information, Volcanoes in Hawaii, Volcanoes in Alaska, Volcanoes in the Cascades, European and Icelandic Volcanoes, Extraterrestrial Volcanism, Volcanic Ash and Weather, and Volcano Resource Directories. Suggestions…

  20. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; McNutt, Stephen R.

    2006-01-01

    Summary: The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained seismic monitoring networks at historically active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Figure 1). The primary objectives of the seismic program are the real-time seismic monitoring of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. This catalog presents calculated earthquake hypocenters and seismic phase arrival data, and details changes in the seismic monitoring program for the period January 1 through December 31, 2005. The AVO seismograph network was used to monitor the seismic activity at thirty-two volcanoes within Alaska in 2005 (Figure 1). The network was augmented by two new subnetworks to monitor the Semisopochnoi Island volcanoes and Little Sitkin Volcano. Seismicity at these volcanoes was still being studied at the end of 2005 and has not yet been added to the list of permanently monitored volcanoes in the AVO weekly update. Following an extended period of monitoring to determine the background seismicity at the Mount Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, and Korovin Volcano, formal monitoring of these volcanoes began in 2005. AVO located 9,012 earthquakes in 2005. Monitoring highlights in 2005 include: (1) seismicity at Mount Spurr remaining above background, starting in February 2004, through the end of the year and into 2006; (2) an increase in seismicity at Augustine Volcano starting in May 2005, and continuing through the end of the year into 2006; (3) volcanic tremor and seismicity related to low-level strombolian activity at Mount Veniaminof in January to March and September; and (4) a seismic swarm at Tanaga Volcano in October and November. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field in 2005; (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2005; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, and location quality statistics; daily station usage statistics; and all HYPOELLIPSE files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2005.

  1. Monitoring and modeling ice-rock avalanches from ice-capped volcanoes: A case study of frequent large avalanches on Iliamna Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huggel, C.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Waythomas, C.F.; Wessels, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Iliamna is an andesitic stratovolcano of the Aleutian arc with regular gas and steam emissions and mantled by several large glaciers. Iliamna Volcano exhibits an unusual combination of frequent and large ice-rock avalanches in the order of 1 ?? 106??m3 to 3 ?? 107??m3 with recent return periods of 2-4??years. We have reconstructed an avalanche event record for the past 45??years that indicates Iliamna avalanches occur at higher frequency at a given magnitude than other mass failures in volcanic and alpine environments. Iliamna Volcano is thus an ideal site to study such mass failures and its relation to volcanic activity. In this study, we present different methods that fit into a concept of (1) long-term monitoring, (2) early warning, and (3) event documentation and analysis of ice-rock avalanches on ice-capped active volcanoes. Long-term monitoring methods include seismic signal analysis, and space-and airborne observations. Landsat and ASTER satellite data was used to study the extent of hydrothermally altered rocks and surface thermal anomalies at the summit region of Iliamna. Subpixel heat source calculation for the summit regions where avalanches initiate yielded temperatures of 307 to 613??K assuming heat source areas of 1000 to 25??m2, respectively, indicating strong convective heat flux processes. Such heat flow causes ice melting conditions and is thus likely to reduce the strength at the base of the glacier. We furthermore demonstrate typical seismic records of Iliamna avalanches with rarely observed precursory signals up to two hours prior to failure, and show how such signals could be used for a multi-stage avalanche warning system in the future. For event analysis and documentation, space- and airborne observations and seismic records in combination with SRTM and ASTER derived terrain data allowed us to reconstruct avalanche dynamics and to identify remarkably similar failure and propagation mechanisms of Iliamna avalanches for the past 45??years. Simple avalanche flow modeling was able to reasonably replicate Iliamna avalanches and can thus be applied for hazard assessments. Hazards at Iliamna Volcano are low due to its remote location; however, we emphasize the transfer potential of the methods presented here to other ice-capped volcanoes with much higher hazards such as those in the Cascades or the Andes. ?? 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Interactive Volcano Studies and Education Using Virtual Globes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehn, J.; Bailey, J. E.; Webley, P.

    2006-12-01

    Internet-based virtual globe programs such as Google Earth provide a spatial context for visualization of monitoring and geophysical data sets. At the Alaska Volcano Observatory, Google Earth is being used to integrate satellite imagery, modeling of volcanic eruption clouds and seismic data sets to build new monitoring and reporting tools. However, one of the most useful information sources for environmental monitoring is under utilized. Local populations, who have lived near volcanoes for decades are perhaps one of the best gauges for changes in activity. Much of the history of the volcanoes is only recorded through local legend. By utilizing the high level of internet connectivity in Alaska, and the interest of secondary education in environmental science and monitoring, it is proposed to build a network of observation nodes around local schools in Alaska and along the Aleutian Chain. A series of interactive web pages with observations on a volcano's condition, be it glow at night, puffs of ash, discolored snow, earthquakes, sounds, and even current weather conditions can be recorded, and the users will be able to see their reports in near real time. The database will create a KMZ file on the fly for upload into the virtual globe software. Past observations and legends could be entered to help put a volcano's long-term activity in perspective. Beyond the benefit to researchers and emergency managers, students and teachers in the rural areas will be involved in volcano monitoring, and gain an understanding of the processes and hazard mitigation efforts in their community. K-12 students will be exposed to the science, and encouraged to participate in projects at the university. Infrastructure at the university can be used by local teachers to augment their science programs, hopefully encouraging students to continue their education at the university level.

  3. Remote Telemetered and Time-Lapse Cameras at Augustine Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paskievitch, John; Read, Cyrus; Parker, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Before and during the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) installed a network of telemetered and nontelemetered cameras in Homer, Alaska, and on Augustine Island. On December 1, 2005, a network camera was installed at the Homer Field Station, a University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute (UAF/GI) facility on a bluff near Homer, where telemetered Augustine data are received. The camera placed there provides observations of the volcano from a distance of 126 km (78 miles) in daylight hours during clear sky conditions. On January 9, 2006, a radio-telemetered network camera was installed on the lower eastern flank of the volcano at 'Mound,' 4.4 km (2.7 miles) from the summit. The proximity of this camera provided for near-field images of the volcano. A nontelemetered camera with onsite recording was installed 3.8 km (2.4 miles) north of the volcano's summit near Burr Point on December 17, 2005. This camera recorded high-resolution images at a rate of 4 images per hour through much of the eruptive sequence. A low-light camera was installed on February 8, 2006, at the Homer facility to augment the extreme low-light camera installed by the UAF/GI (Sentman and others, this volume). On September 10, 2006, a second radio-telemetered network camera was installed at Lagoon camp on the west side of Augustine Island, 5.4 km (3.3 miles) west-northwest of the summit. The installation of these camera systems proved valuable for assessing volcanic activity, determining ground hazards and on-island weather for visiting field teams, and deciphering depositional history after the eruption.

  4. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jolly, Arthur D.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Lahr, John C.; Paskievitch, John; Tytgat, Guy; Estes, Steve; Lockhart, Andrew B.; Moran, Seth C.; McNutt, Stephen R.; Hammond, William R.

    2001-01-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska - Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, has maintained a seismic monitoring program at potentially active volcanoes in Alaska since 1988 (Power and others, 1993; Jolly and others, 1996). The primary objectives of this program are the seismic surveillance of active, potentially hazardous, Alaskan volcanoes and the investigation of seismic processes associated with active volcanism. Between 1994 and 1999, the AVO seismic monitoring program underwent significant changes with networks added at new volcanoes during each summer from 1995 through 1999. The existing network at Katmai –Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS) was repaired in 1995, and new networks were installed at Makushin (1996), Akutan (1996), Pavlof (1996), Katmai - south (1996), Aniakchak (1997), Shishaldin (1997), Katmai - north (1998), Westdahl, (1998), Great Sitkin (1999) and Kanaga (1999). These networks added to AVO's existing seismograph networks in the Cook Inlet area and increased the number of AVO seismograph stations from 46 sites and 57 components in 1994 to 121 sites and 155 components in 1999. The 1995–1999 seismic network expansion increased the number of volcanoes monitored in real-time from 4 to 22, including Mount Spurr, Redoubt Volcano, Iliamna Volcano, Augustine Volcano, Mount Snowy, Mount Griggs, Mount Katmai, Novarupta, Trident Volcano, Mount Mageik, Mount Martin, Aniakchak Crater, Pavlof Volcano, Mount Dutton, Isanotski volcano, Shisaldin Volcano, Fisher Caldera, Westdahl volcano, Akutan volcano, Makushin Volcano, Great Sitkin volcano, and Kanaga Volcano (see Figures 1-15). The network expansion also increased the number of earthquakes located from about 600 per year in1994 and 1995 to about 3000 per year between 1997 and 1999. Highlights of the catalog period include: 1) a large volcanogenic seismic swarm at Akutan volcano in March and April 1996 (Lu and others, 2000); 2) an eruption at Pavlof Volcano in fall 1996 (Garces and others, 2000; McNutt and others, 2000); 3) an earthquake swarm at Iliamna volcano between September and December 1996; 4) an earthquake swarm at Mount Mageik in October 1996 (Jolly and McNutt, 1999); 5) an earthquake swarm located at shallow depth near Strandline Lake; 6) a strong swarm of earthquakes near Becharof Lake; 7) precursory seismicity and an eruption at Shishaldin Volcano in April 1999 that included a 5.2 ML earthquake and aftershock sequence (Moran and others, in press; Thompson and others, in press). The 1996 calendar year is also notable as the seismicity rate was very high, especially in the fall when 3 separate areas (Strandline Lake, Iliamna Volcano, and several of the Katmai volcanoes) experienced high rates of located earthquakes. This catalog covers the period from January 1, 1994, through December 31,1999, and includes: 1) earthquake origin times, hypocenters, and magnitudes with summary statistics describing the earthquake location quality; 2) a description of instruments deployed in the field and their locations and magnifications; 3) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival; 4) velocity models used for earthquake locations; 5) phase arrival times recorded at individual stations; and 6) a summary of daily station usage from throughout the report period. We have made calculated hypocenters, station locations, system magnifications, velocity models, and phase arrival information available for download via computer network as a compressed Unix tar file.

  5. Toward an integrated coastal sea-ice observatory: System components and a case study at Barrow, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Matthew L. Druckenmiller; Hajo Eicken; Mark A. Johnson; Daniel J. Pringle; Christina C. Williams

    2009-01-01

    The morphology, stability and duration of seasonal landfast sea ice in Alaska's coastal zone is changing alongside large-scale ice thinning and retreat. The extent and complexity of change at the local level requires an integrated observing approach to assess implications of such change for coastal ecosystems and communities that rely on or make use of the sea-ice cover. Barrow, Alaska

  6. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Haney, Matt; Parker, Tom; Searcy, Cheryl; Prejean, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2012, the Alaska Volcano Observatory located 4,787 earthquakes, of which 4,211 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes monitored by a seismograph network. There was significant seismic activity at Iliamna, Kanaga, and Little Sitkin volcanoes in 2012. Instrumentation highlights for this year include the implementation of the Advanced National Seismic System Quake Monitoring System hardware and software in February 2012 and the continuation of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work in the summer of 2012. The operational highlight was the removal of Mount Wrangell from the list of monitored volcanoes. This catalog includes hypocenters, magnitudes, and statistics of the earthquakes located in 2012 with the station parameters, velocity models, and other files used to locate these earthquakes.

  7. Summit crater lake observations, and the location, chemistry, and pH of water samples near Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska: 2004-2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Janet R.; Scott, William E.; Evans, William C.; Wang, Bronwen; McGimsey, Robert G.

    2013-01-01

    Mount Chiginagak is a hydrothermally active volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, approximately 170 km south–southwest of King Salmon, Alaska (fig. 1). This small stratovolcano, approximately 8 km in diameter, has erupted through Tertiary to Permian sedimentary and igneous rocks (Detterman and others, 1987). The highest peak is at an elevation of 2,135 m, and the upper ~1,000 m of the volcano are covered with snow and ice. Holocene activity consists of debris avalanches, lahars, and lava flows. Pleistocene pyroclastic flows and block-and-ash flows, interlayered with andesitic lava flows, dominate the edifice rocks on the northern and western flanks. Historical reports of activity are limited and generally describe “steaming” and “smoking” (Coats, 1950; Powers, 1958). Proximal tephra collected during recent fieldwork suggests there may have been limited Holocene explosive activity that resulted in localized ash fall. A cluster of fumaroles on the north flank, at an elevation of ~1,750 m, commonly referred to as the “north flank fumarole” have been emitting gas throughout historical time (location shown in fig. 2). The only other thermal feature at the volcano is the Mother Goose hot springs located at the base of the edifice on the northwestern flank in upper Volcano Creek, at an elevation of ~160 m (fig. 2, near sites H1, H3, and H4). Sometime between November 2004 and May 2005, a ~400-m-wide, 100-m-deep lake developed in the snow- and ice-filled summit crater of the volcano (Schaefer and others, 2008). In early May 2005, an estimated 3 million cubic meters (3×106 m3) of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water exited the crater through tunnels at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. More than 27 km downstream, these acidic flood waters reached approximately 1.3 m above normal water levels and inundated a fertile, salmon-spawning drainage, acidifying the entire water column of Mother Goose Lake from its surface waters to its maximum depth of 45 m (resulting pH ~2.9), and preventing the annual salmon run in the King Salmon River. A simultaneous release of gas and acidic aerosols from the crater caused widespread vegetation damage along the flow path. Since 2005, we have been monitoring the crater lake water that continues to flow into Mother Goose Lake by collecting surface water samples for major cation and anion analysis, measuring surface-water pH of affected drainages, and photo-documenting the condition of the summit crater lake. This report describes water sampling locations, provides a table of chemistry and pH measurements, and documents the condition of the summit crater between 2004 and 2011. In September 2013, the report was updated with results of water-chemistry samples collected in 2011 and 2012, which were added as an addendum.

  8. Living With Volcanoes: The USGS Volcano Hazards Program

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This report summarizes the Volcano Hazards Program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS). Topics include its goals and activities, some key accomplishments, and a plan for future operations. There are also discussions of active and potentially active volcanoes in the U.S., the role of the USGS volcano observatories, prediction of eruptions, and potential danger to aircraft from volcanic plumes.

  9. A geologic evaluation of proposed lava diversion barriers for the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory, Mauna Loa Volcano, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, H.J.

    1982-01-01

    Lava flow diversion barriers should protect the Mauna Loa Observatory from flows of reasonable magnitude if properly constructed. The a'a flow upon which the observatory is constructed represents a flow of reasonable magnitude. Proper construction of the barriers includes obtaining riprap from a zone exterior to the proposed V-shaped barrier so as to produce an exterior relief near 9.2 m for most of the barrier, construction of a channel about 8 m deep and 40 m wide along the east part of the barrier, and proper positioning of an isolated initiating barrier. Calculations suggest that the barriers should be able to handle peak volume flow rates near 800 m/s and possibly larger ones. Peak volume flow rates for the a'a flow upon which the observatory is constructed are estimated.

  10. Magma flux at Okmok Volcano, Alaska, from a joint inversion of continuous GPS, campaign GPS, and interferometric synthetic aperture radar

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Juliet Biggs; Zhong Lu; Tom Fournier; Jeffrey T. Freymueller

    2010-01-01

    Volcano deformation is usually measured using satellite geodetic techniques including interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR), campaign GPS, and continuous GPS. Differences in the spatial and temporal sampling of each system mean that most appropriate inversion scheme to determine the source parameters from each data set is different. Most studies either compare results from independent inversions or subsample the data sets

  11. GPS monitoring of Hawaiian Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory uses a variety of ground- and satellite-based techniques to monitor Hawai‘i’s active volcanoes.  Here, an HVO scientist sets up a portable GPS receiver to track surface changes during an island-wide survey of Hawai‘i’s volcanoes. &n...

  12. Emission rates of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide from Redoubt Volcano, Alaska during the 1989-1990 eruptions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Casadevall, T.J.; Doukas, M.P.; Neal, C.A.; McGimsey, R.G.; Gardner, C.A.

    1994-01-01

    Airborne measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates in the gas plume emitted from fumaroles in the summit crater of Redoubt Volcano were started on March 20, 1990 using the COSPEC method. During the latter half of the period of intermittent dome growth and destruction, between March 20 and mid-June 1990, sulfur dioxide emission rates ranged from approximately 1250 to 5850 t/d, rates notably higher than for other convergent-plate boundary volcanoes during periods of active dome growth. Emission rates following the end of dome growth from late June 1990 through May 1991 decreased steadily to less than 75 t/d. The largest mass of sulfur dioxide was released during the period of explosive vent clearing when explosive degassing on December 14-15 injected at least 175,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2 into the atmosphere. Following the explosive eruptions of December 1989, Redoubt Volcano entered a period of intermittent dome growth from late December 1989 to mid-June 1990 during which Redoubt emitted a total mass of SO2 ranging from 572,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes to 680,000 ?? 90,000 tonnes. From mid-June 1990 through May 1991, the volcano was in a state of posteruption degassing into the troposphere, producing approximately 183,000 ?? 50,000 tonnes of SO2. We estimate that Redoubt Volcano released a minimum mass of sulfur dioxide of approximately 930,000 tonnes. While COSPEC data were not obtained frequently enough to enable their use in eruption prediction, SO2 emission rates clearly indicated a consistent decline in emission rates between March through October 1990 and a continued low level of emission rates through the first half of 1991. Values from consecutive daily measurements of sulfur dioxide emission rates spanning the March 23, 1990 eruption decreased in the three days prior to eruption. That decrease was coincident with a several-fold increase in the frequency of shallow seismic events, suggesting partial sealing of the magma conduit to gas loss that resulted in pressurization of the shallow magma system and an increase in earthquake activity. Unlike the short-term SO2 decrease in March 1990, the long-term decrease of sulfur dioxide emission rates from March 1990 through May 1991 was coincident with low rates of seismic energy release and was interpreted to reflect gradual depressurization of the shallow magma reservoir. The long-term declines in seismic energy release and in SO2 emission rates led AVO scientists to conclude on April 19, 1991 that the potential for further eruptive activity from Redoubt Volcano had diminished, and on this basis, the level of concern color code for the volcano was changed from code yellow (Volcano is restless; earthquake activity is elevated; activity may include extrusion of lava) to code green (Volcano is in its normal 'dormant' state). ?? 1994.

  13. A volcanic activity alert-level system for aviation: review of its development and application in Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2013-01-01

    An alert-level system for communicating volcano hazard information to the aviation industry was devised by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) during the 1989–1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano. The system uses a simple, color-coded ranking that focuses on volcanic ash emissions: Green—normal background; Yellow—signs of unrest; Orange—precursory unrest or minor ash eruption; Red—major ash eruption imminent or underway. The color code has been successfully applied on a regional scale in Alaska for a sustained period. During 2002–2011, elevated color codes were assigned by AVO to 13 volcanoes, eight of which erupted; for that decade, one or more Alaskan volcanoes were at Yellow on 67 % of days and at Orange or Red on 12 % of days. As evidence of its utility, the color code system is integrated into procedures of agencies responsible for air-traffic management and aviation meteorology in Alaska. Furthermore, it is endorsed as a key part of globally coordinated protocols established by the International Civil Aviation Organization to provide warnings of ash hazards to aviation worldwide. The color code and accompanying structured message (called a Volcano Observatory Notice for Aviation) comprise an effective early-warning message system according to the United Nations International Strategy for Disaster Reduction. The aviation color code system currently is used in the United States, Russia, New Zealand, Iceland, and partially in the Philippines, Papua New Guinea, and Indonesia. Although there are some barriers to implementation, with continued education and outreach to Volcano Observatories worldwide, greater use of the aviation color code system is achievable.

  14. A Stratigraphic, Granulometric, and Textural Comparison of recent pyroclastic density current deposits exposed at West Island and Burr Point, Augustine Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, C. A.; Browne, B. L.

    2011-12-01

    Augustine Volcano (Alaska) is the most active volcano in the eastern Aleutian Islands, with 6 violent eruptions over the past 200 years and at least 12 catastrophic debris-avalanche deposits over the past ~2,000 years. The frequency and destructive nature of these eruptions combined with the proximity of Augustine Volcano to commercial ports and populated areas represents a significant hazard to the Cook Inlet region of Alaska. The focus of this study examines the relationship between debris-avalanche events and the subsequent emplacement of pyroclastic density currents by comparing the stratigraphic, granulometric, and petrographic characteristics of pyroclastic deposits emplaced following the 1883 A.D. Burr Point debris-avalanche and those emplaced following the ~370 14C yr B.P. West Island debris-avalanche. Data from this study combines grain size and componentry analysis of pyroclastic deposits with density, textural, and compositional analysis of juvenile clasts contained in the pyroclastic deposits. The 1883 A.D. Burr Point pyroclastic unit immediately overlies the 1883 debris avalanche deposit and underlies the 1912 Katmai ash. It ranges in thickness from 4 to 48 cm and consists of fine to medium sand-sized particles and coarser fragments of andesite. In places, this unit is normally graded and exhibits cross-bedding. Many of these samples are fines-enriched, with sorting coefficients ranging from -0.1 to 1.9 and median grain size ranging from 0.1 to 2.4 mm. The ~370 14C yr B.P. West Island pyroclastic unit is sandwiched between the underlying West Island debris-avalanche deposit and the overlying 1912 Katmai Ash deposit, and at times a fine-grained gray ash originating from the 1883 eruption. West Island pyroclastic deposit is sand to coarse-sand-sized and either normally graded or massive with sorting coefficients ranging from 0.9 to 2.8 and median grain sizes ranging from 0.4 to 2.6 mm. Some samples display a bimodal distribution of grain sizes, while most display a fines-depleted distribution. Juvenile andesite clasts exist as either subrounded to subangular fragments with abundant vesicles that range in color from white to brown or dense clasts characterized by their porphyritic and glassy texture. Samples from neither eruption correlate in sorting or grain size with distance from the vent. Stratigraphic and granulometric data suggest differences in the manner in which these two pyroclastic density currents traveled and groundmass textures are interpreted as recording differences in how the two magmas ascended and erupted, whereas juvenile Burr Point clasts resemble other lava flows erupted from Augustine Volcano, vesicular and glassy juvenile West Island clasts bear resemblance to clasts derived from so-called "blast-generated" pyroclastic density deposits at Mt. St. Helens in 1980 and Bezymianny in 1956.

  15. The Ice Piston, Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The Ice Piston with Ash, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska. This photo was taken on March 21, 2009, the day before Redoubt first erupted. The glacier that filled the crater was collapsing because of the increase in ground temperature underneath....

  16. Volcano Lovers

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    David Tenenbaum

    1997-01-02

    This Why Files article explores volcanoes and volcanic eruptions. Topics covered include: Alaska's Pavlof and its threat to jet engines; Mexico City's restless neighbor, Popocatepetl (El Popo); underground volcanic processes; modern forecasting of eruptions; various volcanic phenomena and features; large flood basalt areas around the world; California's volcanically active area, Long Valley Caldera and Mammoth Mountain; Indonesia's Krakatau eruption in 1883, which was the world's largest historical eruption; Krakatau's ecological contribution to the study of colonization of sterile lands; and central Mexico's Paricutin which was witnessed emerging from a farmer's field in 1943. Three scientists were interviewed for this article.

  17. Volcano Live

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    John Seach

    Volcano Live contains maps of volcanoes from around the world, a kids' page that provides volcano education links for teachers and students, a volcano glossary, volcano news, links to live video cams of volcanoes, geography and volcano information of countries around the world, and video clips of active volcanoes. There is also information for travelling to volcanoes, a volcano photo section, a section on the destruction of Pompeii, a volcanology section, and volcano safety rules.

  18. Magmatic inflation at a dormant stratovolcano: 1996-1998 activity at Mount Peulik volcano, Alaska, revealed by satellite radar interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Z.; Wicks, C., Jr.; Dzurisin, D.; Power, J.A.; Moran, S.C.; Thatcher, W.

    2002-01-01

    A series of ERS radar interferograms that collectively span the time interval from July 1992 to August 2000 reveal that a presumed magma body located 6.6 ??? 0.5 km beneath the southwest flank of the Mount Peulik volcano inflated 0.051 ??? 0.005 km3 between October 1996 and September 1998. Peulik has been active only twice during historical time, in 1814 and 1852, and the volcano was otherwise quiescent during the 1990s. The inflation episode spanned at least several months because separate interferograms show that the associated ground deformation was progressive. The average inflation rate of the magma body was ???0.003 km3/month from October 1996 to September 1997, peaked at 0.005 km3/month from 26 June to 9 October 1997, and dropped to ???0.001 km3/month from October 1997 to September 1998. An intense earthquake swarm, including three ML 4.8 - 5.2 events, began on 8 May 1998 near Becharof Lake, ???30 km northwest of Peulik. More than 400 earthquakes with a cumulative moment of 7.15 ?? 1017 N m were recorded in the area through 19 October 1998. Although the inflation and earthquake swarm occured at about the same time, the static stress changes that we calculated in the epicentral area due to inflation beneath Peulik appear too small to provide a causal link. The 1996-1998 inflation episode at Peulik confirms that satellite radar interferometry can be used to detect magma accumulation beneath dormant volcanoes at least several months before other signs of unrest are apparent. This application represents a first step toward understanding the eruption cycle at Peulik and other stratovolcanoes with characteristically long repose periods.

  19. EarthScope: Activity at Augustine Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This bulletin provides information on the recent eruptive activity of Augustine Volcano in Alaska. Topics include some history of the volcano, its geologic setting as part of the Aleutian island arc, and earthquake locations as indicators of magma movement. The bulletin is also accompanied by a 360-degree rotation around the volcano and background information on the EarthScope Project.

  20. Disruption of Drift glacier and origin of floods during the 1989-1990 eruptions of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Trabant, D.C.; Waitt, R.B.; Major, J.J.

    1994-01-01

    Melting of snow and glacier ice during the 1989-1990 eruption of Redoubt Volcano caused winter flooding of the Drift River. Drift glacier was beheaded when 113 to 121 ?? 106 m3 of perennial snow and ice were mechanically entrained in hot-rock avalanches and pyroclastic flows initiated by the four largest eruptions between 14 December 1989 and 14 March 1990. The disruption of Drift glacier was dominated by mechanical disaggregation and entrainment of snow and glacier ice. Hot-rock avalanches, debris flows, and pyroclastic flows incised deep canyons in the glacier ice thereby maintaining a large ice-surface area available for scour by subsequent flows. Downvalley flow rheologies were transformed by the melting of snow and ice entrained along the upper and middle reaches of the glacier and by seasonal snowpack incorporated from the surface of the lower glacier and from the river valley. The seasonal snowpack in the Drift River valley contributed to lahars and floods a cumulative volume equivalent to about 35 ?? 106 m3 of water, which amounts to nearly 30% of the cumulative flow volume 22 km downstream from the volcano. The absence of high-water marks in depressions and of ice-collapse features in the glacier indicated that no large quantities of meltwater that could potentially generate lahars were stored on or under the glacier; the water that generated the lahars that swept Drift River valley was produced from the proximal, eruption-induced volcaniclastic flows by melting of snow and ice. ?? 1994.

  1. At-sea observations of marine birds and their habitats before and after the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drew, G.S.; Dragoo, D.E.; Renner, M.; Piatt, J.F.

    2010-01-01

    Kasatochi volcano, an island volcano in the Aleutian chain, erupted on 7-8 August 2008. The resulting ash and pyroclastic flows blanketed the island, covering terrestrial habitats. We surveyed the marine environment surrounding Kasatochi Island in June and July of 2009 to document changes in abundance or distribution of nutrients, fish, and marine birds near the island when compared to patterns observed on earlier surveys conducted in 1996 and 2003. Analysis of SeaWiFS satellite imagery indicated that a large chlorophyll-a anomaly may have been the result of ash fertilization during the eruption. We found no evidence of continuing marine fertilization from terrestrial runoff 10 months after the eruption. At-sea surveys in June 2009 established that the most common species of seabirds at Kasatochi prior to the eruption, namely crested auklets (Aethia cristatella) and least auklets (Aethia pusilla) had returned to Kasatochi in relatively high numbers. Densities from more extensive surveys in July 2009 were compared with pre-eruption densities around Kasatochi and neighboring Ulak and Koniuji islands, but we found no evidence of an eruption effect. Crested and least auklet populations were not significantly reduced by the initial explosion and they returned to attempt breeding in 2009, even though nesting habitat had been rendered unusable. Maps of pre- and post-eruption seabird distribution anomalies indicated considerable variation, but we found no evidence that observed distributions were affected by the 2008 eruption. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  2. A catastrophic flood caused by drainage of a caldera lake at Aniakchak Volcano, Alaska, and implications for volcanic hazards assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waythomas, C.F.; Walder, J.S.; McGimsey, R.G.; Neal, C.A.

    1996-01-01

    Aniakchak caldera, located on the Alaska Peninsula of southwest Alaska, formerly contained a large lake (estimated volume 3.7 ?? 109 m3) that rapidly drained as a result of failure of the caldera rim sometime after ca. 3400 yr B.P. The peak discharge of the resulting flood was estimated using three methods: (1) flow-competence equations, (2) step-backwater modeling, and (3) a dam-break model. The results of the dam-break model indicate that the peak discharge at the breach in the caldera rim was at least 7.7 ?? 104 m3 s-1, and the maximum possible discharge was ???1.1 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Flow-competence estimates of discharge, based on the largest boulders transported by the flood, indicate that the peak discharge values, which were a few kilometers downstream of the breach, ranged from 6.4 ?? 105 to 4.8 ?? 106 m3 s-1. Similar but less variable results were obtained by step-backwater modeling. Finally, discharge estimates based on regression equations relating peak discharge to the volume and depth of the impounded water, although limited by constraining assumptions, provide results within the range of values determined by the other methods. The discovery and documentation of a flood, caused by the failure of the caldera rim at Aniakchak caldera, underscore the significance and associated hydrologic hazards of potential large floods at other lake-filled calderas.

  3. The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano geodesy

    E-print Network

    The changing shapes of active volcanoes: History, evolution, and future challenges for volcano Volcano Observatory, Crater Rim Drive, Hawaii National Park, HI 96718-0051, United States b Department of Earth's active volcanoes. By their very nature, however, the magmatic reservoirs and conduits

  4. Long Valley Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Hill, David

    2008-01-01

    The ~300-year-old lava on Paoha Island in Mono Lake was produced by the most recent eruption in the Long Valley Caldera area in east-central California. The Long Valley Caldera was formed by a massive volcanic eruption 760,000 years ago. The region is monitored by the Long Valley Observatory (LVO), one of five USGS Volcano Hazards Program observatories that monitor U.S. volcanoes for science and public safety. Learn more about the Long Valley Caldera region and LVO at http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/lvo.

  5. Thickness distribution of a cooling pyroclastic flow deposit on Augustine Volcano, Alaska: Optimization using InSAR, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masterlark, T.; Lu, Zhiming; Rykhus, R.

    2006-01-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) imagery documents the consistent subsidence, during the interval 1992-1999, of a pyroclastic flow deposit (PFD) emplaced during the 1986 eruption of Augustine Volcano, Alaska. We construct finite element models (FEMs) that simulate thermoelastic contraction of the PFD to account for the observed subsidence. Three-dimensional problem domains of the FEMs include a thermoelastic PFD embedded in an elastic substrate. The thickness of the PFD is initially determined from the difference between post- and pre-eruption digital elevation models (DEMs). The initial excess temperature of the PFD at the time of deposition, 640 ??C, is estimated from FEM predictions and an InSAR image via standard least-squares inverse methods. Although the FEM predicts the major features of the observed transient deformation, systematic prediction errors (RMSE=2.2 cm) are most likely associated with errors in the a priori PFD thickness distribution estimated from the DEM differences. We combine an InSAR image, FEMs, and an adaptive mesh algorithm to iteratively optimize the geometry of the PFD with respect to a minimized misfit between the predicted thermoelastic deformation and observed deformation. Prediction errors from an FEM, which includes an optimized PFD geometry and the initial excess PFD temperature estimated from the least-squares analysis, are sub-millimeter (RMSE=0.3 mm). The average thickness (9.3 m), maximum thickness (126 m), and volume (2.1 ?? 107 m3) of the PFD, estimated using the adaptive mesh algorithm, are about twice as large as the respective estimations for the a priori PFD geometry. Sensitivity analyses suggest unrealistic PFD thickness distributions are required for initial excess PFD temperatures outside of the range 500-800 ??C. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Mount St. Helens and Kilauea volcanoes

    SciTech Connect

    Barrat, J. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (USA))

    1989-01-01

    Mount St. Helens' eruption has taught geologists invaluable lessons about how volcanoes work. Such information will be crucial in saving lives and property when other dormant volcanoes in the northwestern United States--and around the world--reawaken, as geologists predict they someday will. Since 1912, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey's Hawaiian Volcano Observatory have pioneered the study of volcanoes through work on Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcanoes on the island of Hawaii. In Vancouver, Wash., scientists at the Survey's Cascades Volcano Observatory are studying the after-effects of Mount St. Helens' catalysmic eruption as well as monitoring a number of other now-dormant volcanoes in the western United States. This paper briefly reviews the similarities and differences between the Hawaiian and Washington volcanoes and what these volcanoes are teaching the volcanologists.

  7. The 2008 eruption of Okmok Volcano, Alaska: Petrological and geochemical constraints on the subsurface magma plumbing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Jessica F.; ?liwi?ski, Maciej G.; Nye, Christopher; Cameron, Cheryl; Schaefer, Janet R.

    2013-08-01

    The July-August 2008 phreatomagmatic eruption of Okmok Volcano produced ~ 0.26 km3 (DRE) of phenocryst-poor (1 to 2 vol.%) basaltic andesite ejecta, compositionally distinct from the basalt erupted during 1997 (51.90 wt.% SiO2). Analyzed juvenile products are tan to dark gray vesicular lapilli (scoria), and dense, purple-black bombs. Whole-rock compositions cluster tightly (54.97 ± 0.25 wt.% SiO2). The eruption also produced mafic ash containing basaltic groundmass glasses (52 wt.% SiO2) and olivine-hosted melt inclusions (down to 47 wt.% SiO2). The scoria and early-erupted ash contain compositionally similar plagioclase, clinopyroxene, and olivine phenocrysts. Olivine phenocrysts in the scoria and ash are not in equilibrium with the basaltic andesite whole-rock composition. Olivine-hosted melt inclusions yield 0.11 (± 0.04) to 3.61 (± 1.24) wt.% total H2O by ?-FTIR, with an average of 1.23 ± 0.68 (1?) wt.%. Three inclusions contain CO2 = 37 to 49 ppm with the rest below detection. Solubility model-derived inclusion entrapment/re-equilibration depths extend from near surface to 4.6 (± 2.5) km, in agreement with recent geophysical studies. The 2008 eruption was triggered by an influx of melt-rich basalt originating from the 3 to 6 km storage region beneath the center of the caldera, which intersected a shallower, more evolved magma body beneath Cone D. Our study concludes that the Okmok magma system is “mush-column” like, containing multiple magma bodies with a common and frequent replenishment source, but segregated with unique geochemical signatures.

  8. Characterization of pyroclastic deposits and pre-eruptive soils following the 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, B.; Michaelson, G.; Ping, C.-L.; Plumlee, G.; Hageman, P.

    2010-01-01

    The 78 August 2008 eruption of Kasatochi Island volcano blanketed the island in newly generated pyroclastic deposits and deposited ash into the ocean and onto nearby islands. Concentrations of water soluble Fe, Cu, and Zn determined from a 1:20 deionized water leachate of the ash were sufficient to provide short-term fertilization of the surface ocean. The 2008 pyroclastic deposits were thicker in concavities at bases of steeper slopes and thinner on steep slopes and ridge crests. By summer 2009, secondary erosion had exposed the pre-eruption soils along gulley walls and in gully bottoms on the southern and eastern slopes, respectively. Topographic and microtopographic position altered the depositional patterns of the pyroclastic flows and resulted in pre-eruption soils being buried by as little as 1 m of ash. The different erosion patterns gave rise to three surfaces on which future ecosystems will likely develop: largely pre-eruptive soils; fresh pyroclastic deposits influenced by shallowly buried, pre-eruptive soil; and thick (>1 m) pyroclastic deposits. As expected, the chemical composition differed between the pyroclastic deposits and the pre-eruptive soils. Pre-eruptive soils hold stocks of C and N important for establishing biota that are lacking in the fresh pyroclastic deposits. The pyroclastic deposits are a source for P and K but have negligible nutrient holding capacity, making these elements vulnerable to leaching loss. Consequently, the pre-eruption soils may also represent an important long-term P and K source. ?? 2010 Regents of the University of Colorado.

  9. Geochemistry, isotopic composition and origin of fluids emanating from mud volcanoes in the Copper River Basin, Alaska. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Motyka, R.J.; Hawkins, D.B.; Poreda, R.J.; Jeffries, A.

    1986-05-01

    Two compositionally different groups of mud volcanoes exist in the Copper River Basin: the Tolsona group which discharges Na-Ca rich, HCO/sub 3/-SO/sub 4/ poor saline waters accompanied by small amounts of gas, composed predominately of CH/sub 4/ and N/sub 2/; and the Klawasi group which discharges Ca poor, Na-HCO/sub 3/ rich saline waters accompanied by enormous amounts of CO/sub 2/. The Tolsona-type water chemistry and isotopic composition could have been produced through the following processes: dilution of original interstitial seawaters with paleo-meteoric waters, possibly during a period of uplift in the mid-Cretaceous; loss of HCO/sub 3/ and SO/sub 4/ and modification of other constituent concentrations by shale-membrane filtration; further depletion of Mg, K, HCO/sub 3/, and SO/sub 4/, and enrichment in Ca and Sr through dolomitization, hydrolysis, and clay-forming processes; and leaching of B, I, Li, and SiO/sub 2/ from marine sediments. Compared to the Tolsona waters, the Klawasi waters are strongly enriched in Li, Na, K, Mg, HCO/sub 3/, SO/sub 4/, B, SiO/sub 2/ and delta/sup 18/O and strongly depleted in Ca, Sr and D. The Klawasi wates also contain high concentrations of arsenic (10 to 48 ppM). The differences in fluid chemistry between Klawasi and Tolsona can be explained as the result of the interaction of fluids derived from a magmatic intrusion and contact decarbonation of limestone beds underlying the Klawasi area with overlying Tolsona-type formation waters.

  10. Three Dimensional Analysis of Mafic Pumice from the 1999 sub-Plinian eruption of Shishaldin Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szramek, L. A.

    2012-12-01

    Fragmentation, the transition that occurs from magma with gas to gas with tephra, is thought to be recorded in vesicular pumice. This requires that the vesicularity of the pumice is frozen at the time of fragmentation. In mafic systems, this assumption is likely invalid. The kinetics of a mafic systems should allow for post-fragmentation deformation of the melt. Past studies have shown that mafic pumice from Shishaldin have crystallized post-fragmentation, increasing as much as 50%. Kinetics of crystal growth are slower than the kinetics of vesicle growth, therefore I expect a similar pattern of increase in vesicularity with distance from the rim to be found. This study examines how the vesicularity of mafic pumice varies with distance from the rim. I have excluded any vesicles that connect to the outside of each pumice. CT data has been gathered on 3 mafic pumice from the 1999 sub Plinian eruption of Shishaldin volcano. The size of each vesicle has been determined with BLOB 3D. A freeware program from the UTCT Lab. Determination of the exterior of each pumice was determined via the program Aviso. This exterior information was converted into a distance form rim gray scale distance map. This distance data, along with the size data, will be combined to determine how post-fragmentation deformation of the melt effects the growth a vesicles. I expect to find that the rims of the three pumice have similar vesicle sizes whereas the interior will have larger vesicle sizes. If this is found, it will mean that vesicle information is recording pre/during/post fragmentation information. If the rims of the vesicles are similar, then that suggests they are recording information from the time of fragmentation. This will allow a better understanding of how vesicles form in natural systems. The next phase of this project is too look at how this data is recorded in a two-dimensional sample.

  11. Evidence for Deep Tectonic Tremor in the Alaska-Aleutian Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, J. R.; Prejean, S. G.; Beroza, G. C.; Gomberg, J. S.; Haeussler, P. J.

    2010-12-01

    We search for, characterize, and locate tremor not associated with volcanoes along the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone using continuous seismic data recorded by the Alaska Volcano Observatory and Alaska Earthquake Information Center from 2005 to the present. Visual inspection of waveform spectra and time series reveal dozens of 10 to 20-minute bursts of tremor throughout the Alaska-Aleutian subduction zone (Peterson, 2009). Using autocorrelation methods, we show that these tremor signals are composed of hundreds of repeating low-frequency earthquakes (LFEs) as has been found in other circum-Pacific subduction zones. We infer deep sources based on phase arrival move-out times of less than 4 seconds across multiple monitoring networks (max. inter-station distances of 50 km), which are designed to monitor individual volcanoes. We find tremor activity is localized in 7 segments: Cook Inlet, Shelikof Strait, Alaska Peninsula, King Cove, Unalaska-Dutch Harbor, Andreanof Islands, and the Rat Islands. Locations along the Cook Inlet, Shelikof Straight and Alaska Peninsula are well constrained due to adequate station coverage. LFE hypocenters in these regions are located on the plate interface and form a sharp edge near the down-dip limit of the 1964 M 9.2 rupture area. Although the geometry, age, thermal structure, frictional and other relevant properties of the Alaska-Aleutian subduction are poorly known, it is likely these characteristics differ along its entire length, and also differ from other subduction zones where tremor has been found. LFE hypocenters in the remaining areas are also located down-dip of the most recent M 8+ megathrust earthquakes, between 60-75 km depth and almost directly under the volcanic arc. Although these locations are less well constrained, our preliminary results suggest LFE/tremor activity marks the down-dip rupture limit for megathrust earthquakes in this subduction zone. Also, we cannot rule out the possibility that our observations could be related deep magmatic processes.

  12. Alaska Museum of Natural History

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Ever wanted to have your own volcano laboratory, but didn't want to clean up all that lava? Be a super-scientist and create your own volcano online. The Alaska Museum of Natural History is dedicated to the study and exhibition of Alaska’s natural history and to promoting and developing educational programs which benefit students and enrich the curricula of schools and universities. The Museum focuses on Alaska's unique geological, cultural, and ecological history. In addition to Make Your Own Volcano, the website offers extensive links, resources and educational modules including Kids Activity Sheets, Dinosaurs of Alaska, the Broken Mammoth Archeological Site, and Dinosaur Tracks, which explores the information that can be gleaned from the study of footprints.

  13. Catalog of earthquake hypocenters at Alaskan volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl K.

    2010-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2009, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 8,829 earthquakes, of which 7,438 occurred within 20 kilometers of the 33 volcanoes with seismograph subnetworks. Monitoring highlights in 2009 include the eruption of Redoubt Volcano, as well as unrest at Okmok Caldera, Shishaldin Volcano, and Mount Veniaminof. Additionally severe seismograph subnetwork outages resulted in four volcanoes (Aniakchak, Fourpeaked, Korovin, and Veniaminof) being removed from the formal list of monitored volcanoes in late 2009. This catalog includes descriptions of: (1) locations of seismic instrumentation deployed during 2009; (2) earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems; (3) seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations; (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2009; and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2009, and a dataless SEED volume for the AVO seismograph network.

  14. Earthquake triggering at alaskan volcanoes following the 3 November 2002 denali fault earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moran, S.C.; Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; Sanchez, J.J.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.

    2004-01-01

    The 3 November 2002 Mw 7.9 Denali fault earthquake provided an excellent opportunity to investigate triggered earthquakes at Alaskan volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory operates short-period seismic networks on 24 historically active volcanoes in Alaska, 247-2159 km distant from the mainshock epicenter. We searched for evidence of triggered seismicity by examining the unfiltered waveforms for all stations in each volcano network for ???1 hr after the Mw 7.9 arrival time at each network and for significant increases in located earthquakes in the hours after the mainshock. We found compelling evidence for triggering only at the Katmai volcanic cluster (KVC, 720-755 km southwest of the epicenter), where small earthquakes with distinct P and 5 arrivals appeared within the mainshock coda at one station and a small increase in located earthquakes occurred for several hours after the mainshock. Peak dynamic stresses of ???0.1 MPa at Augustine Volcano (560 km southwest of the epicenter) are significantly lower than those recorded in Yellowstone and Utah (>3000 km southeast of the epicenter), suggesting that strong directivity effects were at least partly responsible for the lack of triggering at Alaskan volcanoes. We describe other incidents of earthquake-induced triggering in the KVC, and outline a qualitative magnitude/distance-dependent triggering threshold. We argue that triggering results from the perturbation of magmatic-hydrothermal systems in the KVC and suggest that the comparative lack of triggering at other Alaskan volcanoes could be a result of differences in the nature of magmatic-hydrothermal systems.

  15. Pleistocene-Recent Growth and Collapse of an Island arc Volcano: Precise 40Ar\\/39Ar Dating of Seguam Island, Central Aleutian arc, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    B. R. Jicha; B. Singer

    2003-01-01

    Quantifying the long term growth of arc volcanoes can be done through geologic mapping supported by K-Ar or 40Ar\\/39Ar age determinations, and is essential to connect rates of geochemical and petrologic processes to a volcano's eruptive history. Yet, few island arcs have benefitted from K-Ar or 40Ar\\/39Ar dating. No 40Ar\\/39Ar data is published from the 24 active volcanoes in the

  16. Punctuated Evolution of Volcanology: An Observatory Perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burton, W. C.; Eichelberger, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanology from the perspective of crisis prediction and response-the primary function of volcano observatories-is influenced both by steady technological advances and singular events that lead to rapid changes in methodology and procedure. The former can be extrapolated somewhat, while the latter are surprises or shocks. Predictable advances include the conversion from analog to digital systems and the exponential growth of computing capacity and data storage. Surprises include eruptions such as 1980 Mount St Helens, 1985 Nevado del Ruiz, 1989-1990 Redoubt, 1991 Pinatubo, and 2010 Eyjafjallajokull; the opening of GPS to civilian applications, and the advent of an open Russia. Mount St Helens switched the rationale for volcanology in the USGS from geothermal energy to volcano hazards, Ruiz and Pinatubo emphasized the need for international cooperation for effective early warning, Redoubt launched the effort to monitor even remote volcanoes for purposes of aviation safety, and Eyjafjallajokull hammered home the need for improved ash-dispersion and engine-tolerance models; better GPS led to a revolution in volcano geodesy, and the new Russian Federation sparked an Alaska-Kamchatka scientific exchange. The pattern has been that major funding increases for volcano hazards occur after these unpredictable events, which suddenly expose a gap in capabilities, rather than out of a calculated need to exploit technological advances or meet a future goal of risk mitigation. It is up to the observatory and national volcano hazard program to leverage these sudden funding increases into a long-term, sustainable business model that incorporates both the steadily increasing costs of staff and new technology and prepares for the next volcano crisis. Elements of the future will also include the immediate availability on the internet of all publically-funded volcano data, and subscribable, sophisticated hazard alert systems that run computational, fluid dynamic eruption models. These models will be coupled with risk assessments in which the parameters are adjusted to an emerging situation, while accessing global eruption databases in order to construct eruption event trees with statistically sound probabilities. Design of these alert systems will necessarily require the joint input of scientists and emergency management leaders. All of this can be visualized now, and programs such as VHub, WOVOdat, and NVEWS are working towards its eventual reality. Technological advances will make possible in a crisis the tapping of a global pool of expertise, which may have the effect of diminishing the importance of observatories as physical entities-however, familiarity with the nearby, monitored volcanoes and impacted populations will always require their presence. What is also clear about the future is that there must be more international communication and cooperation. We do this quite well scientifically, but not so well in terms of observatory operations or best practices. While parallel paths can be stimulating through diversity and competition, there is no need for every national program to separately invent the wheel. Changes will also need to be made in institutional expectations of scientists, which currently overemphasize solitary achievement at the expense of community efforts.

  17. Petrology and geochemistry of ca. 2100-1000 a.B.P. magmas of Augustine volcano, Alaska, based on analysis of prehistoric pumiceous tephra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tappen, Christine M.; Webster, James D.; Mandeville, Charles W.; Roderick, David

    2009-05-01

    Geochemical and textural features of whole-rock samples, phenocrysts, matrix glasses, and silicate melt inclusions from five prehistoric pumiceous tephra units of Augustine volcano, Alaska, were investigated to interpret processes of magma storage and evolution. The bulk-rock compositions of the tephra (designated G, erupted ca. 2100 a.B.P.; I ca. 1700 a.B.P.; H ca. 1400 a.B.P.; and C1 and C2 ca. 1000 a.B.P.) are silicic andesite; they contain rhyolitic matrix glasses and silicate melt inclusions with 74-79 wt.% SiO 2. The rocks are comprised of microlite-bearing matrix glass and phenocrysts of plagioclase, orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnesio-hornblende, titanomagnetite, and ilmenite ± Al-rich amphibole with minor to trace apatite and rare sulfides and quartz. The felsic melt inclusions in plagioclase, pyroxenes, and amphibole are variably enriched in volatile components and contain 1.6-8.0 wt.% H 2O, 2100-5400 ppm Cl, < 40-1330 ppm CO 2, and 30-390 ppm S. Constraints from Fe-Ti oxides imply that magma evolution occurred at 796 ± 6 °C to 896 ± 8 °C and log ƒ O2 of NNO + 2.2 to + 2.6. This is consistent with conditions recorded for 1976, 1986, and 2006 eruptive materials and implies that magmatic and eruptive processes have varied little during the past 2100 years. Prehistoric Augustine magmas represented by these silicic andesites evolved via fractional crystallization, magma mingling and mixing, and/or chemical contamination due to magma-volcanic rock interaction. The occurrence of fractional crystallization is supported by the abundance of normally zoned phenocrysts, the presence of felsic matrix glass and melt inclusions within andesitic rock samples, trace-element data, and by geochemical modeling. The modeling constrains the influence of crystal fractionation on melt differentiation and is consistent with the evolution of the melt phase from felsic andesite to rhyodacite compositions. Magma mixing, mingling, and/or contamination by magma-volcanic rock interaction are indicated by abundant reversely zoned phenocrysts, rare mixed pumice-bearing rock samples, and abundant resorption-growth features in plagioclase.

  18. A numerical investigation of choked flow dynamics and its application to the triggering mechanism of long-period events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrissey, Meghan M.; Chouet, Bernard A.

    1997-04-01

    We use numerical simulations of transonic flow through a crack to study the dynamics of the formation of shock waves downstream from a nozzle-like constriction inside the crack. The model solves the full set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions via an explicit multifield finite difference representation. The crack walls are assumed to be perfectly rigid, and elastic coupling to the solid is not considered. The simulations demonstrate how the behavior of unsteady shock waves near the walls can produce recurring step-like pressure transients in the flow, which in turn induce resonance of the fluid-filled crack. The motion of the shock waves is governed primarily by smooth, low-amplitude pressure fluctuations at the outlet of the crack. The force induced on the walls scales with the amplitude of the shock, which is a function of the magnitude of the inlet pressure, aperture of the constriction, and thickness of the boundary layer. The applied force also scales in proportion to the spatial extent of the shock excursion, which depends on the fluctuation rate of outlet pressure. Using the source parameters of long-period (LP) events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, as a guide for our simulations, we infer that coupling of the shock to the walls occurs for crack inlet to outlet pressure ratios pi/po>2.31 and that the position of the shock front becomes most sensitive to outlet pressure fluctuations for flow regimes with pi/po>2.48. For such regimes, fluctuations of outlet pressure of up to ±0.5 MPa at rates up to 3 MPa/s are sufficient to induce pressure transients with magnitudes up to 12.5 MPa over 0.1-2.5 m of the walls within ˜0.5 s. These flow parameters may be adequate for triggering the LP events in the precursory swarm to the December 14, 1989, eruption of Redoubt. According to the flow model the recurrence rate and amplitudes of L.P events are inferred to be a manifestation of the response of a shallow hydrothermal reservoir to the sustained injection of superheated steam from a magma column roofing below this reservoir.

  19. A numerical investigation of choked flow dynamics and its application to the triggering mechanism of long-period events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morrissey, M.M.; Chouet, B.A.

    1997-01-01

    We use numerical simulations of transonic flow through a crack to study the dynamics of the formation of shock waves downstream from a nozzle-like constriction inside the crack. The model solves the full set of Navier-Stokes equations in two dimensions via an explicit multifield finite difference representation. The crack walls are assumed to be perfectly rigid, and elastic coupling to the solid is not considered. The simulations demonstrate how the behavior of unsteady shock waves near the walls can produce recurring step-like pressure transients in the flow, which in turn induce resonance of the fluid-filled crack. The motion of the shock waves is governed primarily by smooth, low-amplitude pressure fluctuations at the outlet of the crack. The force induced on the walls scales with the amplitude of the shock, which is a function of the magnitude of the inlet pressure, aperture of the constriction, and thickness of the boundary layer. The applied force also scales in proportion to the spatial extent of the shock excursion, which depends on the fluctuation rate of outlet pressure. Using the source parameters of long-period (LP) events at Redoubt Volcano, Alaska, as a guide for our simulations, we infer that coupling of the shock to the walls occurs for crack inlet to outlet pressure ratios pipo > 2.31 and that the position of the shock front becomes most sensitive to outlet pressure fluctuations for flow regimes with pipo > 2.48. For such regimes, fluctuations of outlet pressure of up to ??0.5 MPa at rates up to 3 MPa/s are sufficient to induce pressure transients with magnitudes up to 12.5 MPa over 0.1-2.5 m of the walls within ???0.5 s. These flow parameters may be adequate for triggering the LP events in the precursory swarm to the December 14, 1989, eruption of Redoubt. According to the flow model the recurrence rate and amplitudes of LP events are inferred to be a manifestation of the response of a shallow hydrothermal reservoir to the sustained injection of superheated steam from a magma column roofing below this reservoir.

  20. An experiment to detect and locate lightning associated with eruptions of Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoblitt, R.P.

    1994-01-01

    A commercially-available lightning-detection system was temporarily deployed near Cook Inlet, Alaska in an attempt to remotely monitor volcanogenic lightning associated with eruptions of Redoubt Volcano. The system became operational on February 14, 1990; lightning was detected in 11 and located in 9 of the 13 subsequent eruptions. The lightning was generated by ash clouds rising from pyroclastic density currents produced by collapse of a lava dome emplaced near Redoubt's summit. Lightning discharge (flash) location was controlled by topography, which channeled the density currents, and by wind direction. In individual eruptions, early flashes tended to have a negative polarity (negative charge is lowered to ground) while late flashes tended to have a positive polarity (positive charge is lowered to ground), perhaps because the charge-separation process caused coarse, rapid-settling particles to be negatively charged and fine, slow-settling particles to be positively charged. Results indicate that lightning detection and location is a useful adjunct to seismic volcano monitoring, particularly when poor weather or darkness prevents visual observation. The simultaneity of seismicity and lightning near a volcano provides the virtual certainty that an ash cloud is present. This information is crucial for aircraft safety and to warn threatened communities of impending tephra falls. The Alaska Volcano Observatory has now deployed a permanent lightning-detection network around Cook Inlet. ?? 1994.

  1. Remotely Triggered Seismicity at Alaskan Volcanoes Following the Mw 7.9 Denali Fault Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Sanchez, J. J.; Power, J. A.; Stihler, S. D.; McNutt, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    The November 3, 2002, Mw 7.9 Denali Fault earthquake provided the largest source yet to investigate triggered earthquakes at Alaskan volcanoes. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) operates short-period seismic networks on 24 historically active volcanoes in Alaska, 280 - 2100 km distant from the mainshock epicenter. The magnitude detection thresholds for these networks range from M 0.1 to M 1.5. Previous instances of triggered seismicity in Alaska have been recorded in the Katmai Volcanic Cluster, where a number of triggered events occurred following two large earthquakes on December 6, 1999 (60 km distant, Mw 7.0), and January 10, 2001 (35 km distant, Mw 6.8). We searched for evidence of triggered seismicity by examining the unfiltered waveforms for all stations in each volcano network for ~1 hour following the Mw 7.9 arrival. We looked for events within the mainshock coda with discrete P and S arrivals and/or arrivals on multiple stations. We also looked at filtered waveforms for time periods of several hours before and after the mainshock. We only found compelling evidence for triggering at the Katmai Volcanic Cluster (720-755 km SW of the mainshock), where two small earthquakes with distinct P and S arrivals appeared in the mainshock coda at one station. There was also a small increase in located earthquakes at Katmai over a period of several hours following the mainshock. Although it is certainly possible that triggered earthquakes occurred at other volcanoes while networks were clipped, our analysis indicates that any triggering was minimal. This is in striking contrast to triggered seismicity recorded at Yellowstone, Mammoth Mountain, The Geysers, Coso and possibly Mount Rainier following the Denali earthquake. The comparative lack of triggering could be a result of differences in size and/or activity of geothermal systems, directivity of the mainshock, the dominant frequency at each system, and/or local site conditions.

  2. Integrating SAR with Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Operational Near Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Arko, S. A.; McAlpin, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most significant hazards to human society, capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have become established in operational forecasting, monitoring, and managing of volcanic hazards. Monitoring organizations, like the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), are nowadays heavily relying on remote sensing data from a variety of optical and thermal sensors to provide time-critical hazard information. Despite the high utilization of these remote sensing data to detect and monitor volcanic eruptions, the presence of clouds and a dependence on solar illumination often limit their impact on decision making processes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are widely believed to be superior to optical sensors in operational monitoring situations, due to the weather and illumination independence of their observations and the sensitivity of SAR to surface changes and deformation. Despite these benefits, the contributions of SAR to operational volcano monitoring have been limited in the past due to (1) high SAR data costs, (2) traditionally long data processing times, and (3) the low temporal sampling frequencies inherent to most SAR systems. In this study, we present improved data access, data processing, and data integration techniques that mitigate some of the above mentioned limitations and allow, for the first time, a meaningful integration of SAR into operational volcano monitoring systems. We will introduce a new database interface that was developed in cooperation with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and allows for rapid and seamless data access to all of ASF's SAR data holdings. We will also present processing techniques that improve the temporal frequency with which hazard-related products can be produced. These techniques take advantage of modern signal processing technology as well as new radiometric normalization schemes, both enabling the combination of multiple observation geometries in change detection procedures. Additionally, it will be shown how SAR-based hazard information can be integrated with data from optical satellites, thermal sensors, webcams and models to create near-real time volcano hazard information. We will introduce a prototype monitoring system that integrates SAR-based hazard information into the near real-time volcano hazard monitoring system of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. This prototype system was applied to historic eruptions of the volcanoes Okmok and Augustine, both located in the North Pacific. We will show that for these historic eruptions, the addition of SAR data lead to a significant improvement in activity detection and eruption monitoring, and improved the accuracy and timeliness of eruption alerts.

  3. Super Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Deep beneath the surface of Earth lies one of the most destructive and yet least understood of the natural forces on the planet: the super volcano. This radio broadcast presents discussions with scientists at Yellowstone National Park who are investigating this potentially devastating natural phenomenon. Yellowstone National Park is one of the largest supervolcanoes in the world. It last erupted 640,000 years ago and scientists are now predicting that the next eruption may not be far off. To discover more, a new volcanic observatory has been built in the park to monitor the extreme volcanic activity going on beneath the surface of this much visited destination. The broadcast is 30 minutes in length.

  4. PUBLICATIONS OF THE VOLCANO HAZARDS PROGRAM 1999-2003

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    PUBLICATIONS OF THE VOLCANO HAZARDS PROGRAM 1999-2003 2003 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY #12;2 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS;3 Volcano Hazards Bibliography 1999-2003 Adleman, Jennifer, 2002, The great eruption of 1912: Alaska Park

  5. Alaska Science Forum

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Alaska Science Forum Web site is provided by the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. The forum consists of articles written about various science subjects by scientists from the Geophysical Institute. Categories include the aurora, earthquakes, fun science facts, historic Alaska, mountains, rocks and geology, volcanoes, weather, and more. One of the latest articles, by Ned Rozell, is titled: Bogs, Permafrost and the Global Carbon Equation. Each of the articles is listed along with the author's name and a direct link to the online publication, most of which are fairly short and geared towards nonscientists making reading easy and interesting. [JAB

  6. Nicaraguan Volcanoes

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-18

    article title:  Nicaraguan Volcanoes     View Larger Image Nicaraguan volcanoes, February 26, 2000 . The true-color image at left is a ... February 26, 2000 - Plumes from the San Cristobal and Masaya volcanoes. project:  MISR category:  gallery ...

  7. Aniakchak Crater, Alaska Peninsula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Walter R.

    1925-01-01

    The discovery of a gigantic crater northwest of Aniakchak Bay (see fig. 11) closes what had been thought to be a wide gap in the extensive series of volcanoes occurring at irregular intervals for nearly 600 miles along the axial line of the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands. In this belt there are more active and recently active volcanoes than in all the rest of North America. Exclusive of those on the west side of Cook Inlet, which, however, belong to the same group, this belt contains at least 42 active or well-preserved volcanoes and about half as many mountains suspected or reported to be volcanoes. The locations of some of these mountains and the hot springs on the Alaska Peninsula and the Aleutian Islands are shown on a map prepared by G. A. Waring. Attention has been called to these volcanoes for nearly two centuries, but a record of their activity since the discovery of Alaska is far from being complete, and an adequate description of them as a group has never been written. Owing to their recent activity or unusual scenic beauty, some of the best known of the group are Mounts Katmai, Bogoslof, and Shishaldin, but there are many other beautiful and interesting cones and craters.

  8. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS Since about 1700, when written records began

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS Since about 1700, when written records began to be kept for Alaska, more than 230 eruptions have been reported from volcanoes there. Most Peninsula, and Cook Inlet. In 1988, the Alaska Volcano Observa- tory (AVO)--a cooperative effort of the U

  9. Volcano Live

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The volocanologist John Seach provides the latest volcano news and information on volcanoes all across the world. The website provides fun hands-on activities, tutorials in volcano safety and volcanology, and a glossary. Students can discover the geography of many areas of the world and how it impacts the likelihood of volcanic eruptions. Users can find links to numerous volcano cameras and maps. The amazing images of volcanoes from Seach's expeditions are a great addition to this informative site.

  10. Predicting and validating the tracking of a Volcanic Ash Cloud during the 2006 Eruption of Mt. Augustine Volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Webley, Peter W.; Atkinson, D.; Collins, Richard L.; Dean, K.; Fochesatto, J.; Sassen, Kenneth; Cahill, Catherine F.; Prata, A.; Flynn, Connor J.; Mizutani, K.

    2008-11-01

    On 11 January 2006, Mount Augustine volcano in southern Alaska began erupting after 20-year repose. The Anchorage Forecast Office of the National Weather Service (NWS) issued an advisory on 28 January for Kodiak City. On 31 January, Alaska Airlines cancelled all flights to and from Anchorage after multiple advisories from the NWS for Anchorage and the surrounding region. The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) had reported the onset of the continuous eruption. AVO monitors the approximately 100 active volcanoes in the Northern Pacific. Ash clouds from these volcanoes can cause serious damage to an aircraft and pose a serious threat to the local communities, and to transcontinental air traffic throughout the Arctic and sub-Arctic region. Within AVO, a dispersion model has been developed to track the dispersion of volcanic ash clouds. The model, Puff, was used operational by AVO during the Augustine eruptive period. Here, we examine the dispersion of a volcanic ash cloud from Mount Augustine across Alaska from 29 January through the 2 February 2006. We present the synoptic meteorology, the Puff predictions, and measurements from aerosol samplers, laser radar (or lidar) systems, and satellites. UAF aerosol samplers revealed the presence of volcanic aerosols at the surface at sites where Puff predicted the ash clouds movement. Remote sensing satellite data showed the development of the ash cloud in close proximity to the volcano and a sulfur-dioxide cloud further from the volcano consistent with the Puff predictions. Lidars showed the presence of volcanic aerosol with consistent characteristics aloft over Alaska and were capable of detecting the aerosol, even in the presence of scattered clouds and where the cloud is too thin/disperse to be detected by remote sensing satellite data. The lidar measurements revealed the different trajectories of ash consistent with the Puff predictions. Dispersion models provide a forecast of volcanic ash cloud movement that might be undetectable by any other means but are still a significant hazard. Validation is the key to assessing the accuracy of any future predictions. The study highlights the use of multiple and complementary observations used in detecting the trajectory ash cloud, both at the surface and aloft within the atmosphere.

  11. USGS Photo glossary of volcano terms

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    USGS

    This website, part of the USGS Volcano Hazards Program, can help users distinguish among various types of volcanoes, vents, eruption types, and ejected material. The site features an extensive list of volcanic vocabulary, along with photographs and text for each entry. Users can also check out the latest U.S. volcanic activity reported by the USGS volcano observatories, which are linked to the page.

  12. CSAV Deformation Module Field Trip on Kilauea Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Hawaiian Volcano Observatory geologist Michael Poland explaining to international volcano scientists that faulting in this area of Kilauea Volcano can be quantified by looking at the magnitude of fracture opening versus the age of lavas, and that 30 meters of extension has occurred in the past ~600 ...

  13. Alaska Seismic Network Upgrade and Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandru, J. M.; Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S. A.; Fowler, M.

    2009-12-01

    AEIC (Alaska Earthquake Information Center) has begun the task of upgrading the older regional seismic monitoring sites that have been in place for a number of years. Many of the original sites (some dating to the 1960's) are still single component analog technology. This was a very reasonable and ultra low power reliable system for its day. However with the advanced needs of today's research community, AEIC has begun upgrading to Broadband and Strong Motion Seismometers, 24 bit digitizers and high-speed two-way communications, while still trying to maintain the utmost reliability and maintaining low power consumption. Many sites have been upgraded or will be upgraded from single component to triaxial broad bands and triaxial accerometers. This provided much greater dynamic range over the older antiquated technology. The challenge is compounded by rapidly changing digital technology. Digitizersand data communications based on analog phone lines utilizing 9600 baud modems and RS232 are becoming increasingly difficult to maintain and increasingly expensive compared to current methods that use Ethernet, TCP/IP and UDP connections. Gaining a reliable Internet connection can be as easy as calling up an ISP and having a DSL connection installed or may require installing our own satellite uplink, where other options don't exist. LANs are accomplished with a variety of communications devices such as spread spectrum 900 MHz radios or VHF radios for long troublesome shots. WANs are accomplished with a much wider variety of equipment. Traditional analog phone lines are being used in some instances, however 56K lines are much more desirable. Cellular data links have become a convenient option in semiurban environments where digital cellular coverage is available. Alaska is slightly behind the curve on cellular technology due to its low population density and vast unpopulated areas but has emerged into this new technology in the last few years. Partnerships with organizations such as ANSS, Alaska Volcano Observatory, Bradley Lake Dam, Red Dog Mine, The Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO), Alaska Tsunami Warning Center, and City and State Emergency Managers has helped link vast networks together so that the overall data transition can be varied. This lessens the likelihood of having a single point of failure for an entire network. Robust communication is key to retrieving seismic data. AEIC has gone through growing pains learning how to harden our network and encompassing the many types of telemetry that can be utilized in today's world. Redundant telemetry paths are a goal that is key to retrieving data, however at times this is not feasible with the vast size and terrain in Alaska. We will demonstrate what has worked for us and what our network consists of.

  14. Standardisation of the USGS Volcano Alert Level System (VALS): analysis and ramifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fearnley, C. J.; McGuire, W. J.; Davies, G.; Twigg, J.

    2012-11-01

    The standardisation of volcano early warning systems (VEWS) and volcano alert level systems (VALS) is becoming increasingly common at both the national and international level, most notably following UN endorsement of the development of globally comprehensive early warning systems. Yet, the impact on its effectiveness, of standardising an early warning system (EWS), in particular for volcanic hazards, remains largely unknown and little studied. This paper examines this and related issues through evaluation of the emergence and implementation, in 2006, of a standardised United States Geological Survey (USGS) VALS. Under this upper-management directive, all locally developed alert level systems or practices at individual volcano observatories were replaced with a common standard. Research conducted at five USGS-managed volcano observatories in Alaska, Cascades, Hawaii, Long Valley and Yellowstone explores the benefits and limitations this standardisation has brought to each observatory. The study concludes (1) that the process of standardisation was predominantly triggered and shaped by social, political, and economic factors, rather than in response to scientific needs specific to each volcanic region; and (2) that standardisation is difficult to implement for three main reasons: first, the diversity and uncertain nature of volcanic hazards at different temporal and spatial scales require specific VEWS to be developed to address this and to accommodate associated stakeholder needs. Second, the plural social contexts within which each VALS is embedded present challenges in relation to its applicability and responsiveness to local knowledge and context. Third, the contingencies of local institutional dynamics may hamper the ability of a standardised VALS to effectively communicate a warning. Notwithstanding these caveats, the concept of VALS standardisation clearly has continuing support. As a consequence, rather than advocating further commonality of a standardised VALS, we recommend adoption of a less prescriptive VALS that is scalable and sufficiently flexible for use by local stakeholders via standardised communication products designed to accommodate local contingency, while also adhering to national policy.

  15. Iceland Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-23

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, Volcano Ash Cloud     View larger ... Europe and captured this image of the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano ash cloud as it continued to drift over the continent. Unlike other ...

  16. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Janet R. Schaefer; William E. Scott; William C. Evans; Janet Jorgenson; Robert G. McGimsey; Bronwen Wang

    2008-01-01

    A mass of snow and ice 400-m-wide and 105-m-thick began melting in the summit crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between November 2004 and early May 2005, presumably owing to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system, or possibly from magma intrusion and degassing. In early May 2005, an estimated 3.8 × 106 m3 of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic

  17. Decade Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In the 1990s, the International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior started the Decade Volcano Project. As part of their work, they designated sixteen volcanoes particularly worthy of study "because of their explosive histories and close proximity to human populations." The group recently teamed up with National Geographic to create a guide to these volcanoes via this interactive map. Navigating through the map, visitors can learn about Mount Rainier, Colima, Galeras, Santorini, and other prominent volcanoes. For each volcano, there's a brief sketch that gives the date of its last eruption, its elevation, nearby population centers, and a photograph.

  18. Galactic Super Volcano Similar to Iceland Volcano - Duration: 2 minutes, 2 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This composite image from NASAs Chandra X-ray Observatory with radio data from the Very Large Array shows a cosmic volcano being driven by a black hole in the center of the M87 galaxy. This eruptio...

  19. New Millennium Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2004-09-24

    The New Millennium Observatory (NeMO) is a seafloor observatory at Axial Seamount, an active underwater volcano located about 250 miles off the coast of the northwest United States. The observatory studies the relationships between submarine volcanic activity, the chemistry of seafloor hotsprings, and the biological communities that depend on them. Materials available at the NeMO web site include updates from observatory expeditions, videos and animations, and an interactive feature that lets users pilot a simulated remotely operated vehicle to explore the seamount. The NeMO curriculum page features a unit, with activities, in which students investigate a swarm of small earthquakes and the disappearance of an instrument. A volcanic eruption occurred at Axial in January 1998, destroying some hydrothermal vent sites and creating new ones. Since then NeMO scientists have been assessing the impact of the eruption and documenting the ongoing changes in Axial's summit caldera.

  20. In Brief: U.S. Volcano Early Warning System; Bill provides clear mandate for NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2005-05-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey on 29 April released a comprehensive review of the 169 U.S. volcanoes, and established a framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System that is being formulated by the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories. The framework proposes an around-the-clock Volcano Watch Office and improved instrumentation and monitoring at targeted volcanoes. The report, authored by USGS scientists John Ewert, Marianne Guffanti, and Thomas Murray, notes that although a few U.S. volcanoes are well-monitored, half of the most threatening volcanoes are monitored at a basic level and some hazardous volcanoes have no ground-based monitoring.

  1. What controls earthquakes at Aleutian arc volcanoes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buurman, H.; West, M. E.; Cameron, C.

    2012-12-01

    Alaska has around 100 Holocene active volcanoes spread over 3000 km of the Aleutian arc, from Mount Wrangell in southcentral Alaska to Buldir Island in the western Aleutian islands. The range in volcanic styles across the arc is as great as the distance that it spans, and so too is the accompanying volcano seismicity. This study examines whether there are systematic influences on volcano seismicity across the Aleutian arc that can account for distinctive patterns in earthquake behaviour, such as the paucity of deep (>20 km depth) volcanic earthquakes in the Cook Inlet region compared to volcanic earthquakes at the westernmost portion of the Alaska Peninsula. We investigate whether physical factors such as volcano size, geographic location relative to the subduction zone, the regional setting - including the type of crust and the distance between the vent and the ocean - and the local angle and rate of subduction affect volcano seismicity. We use continuous seismic data recorded over a 10-year period at 47 volcanoes to characterise patterns in seismicity. Our analyses consider the number and locations of hypocenters, waveform characteristics such as frequency content and magnitude, and the frequency and style of volcanic unrest during the study period.

  2. Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2008 U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    Publications of the Volcano Hazards Program 2008 U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey #12;1 The Volcano Hazards Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is part of the Geologic of publication with no attempt to assign them to Fiscal Year. #12;2 Volcano Hazards Bibliography 2008 Alaska

  3. Erupting Volcanoes!

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This lesson presents volcanoes through the making of volcano models. While students are constructing their physical representations of volcanoes, they will be filled with questions about volcanoes as well as how to build their models. This process will provide students with a tangible reference for learning about volcanoes and give them a chance to problem-solve as they build their models. Students will be able to observe how the eruption changes the original form of their volcano model. In this way, students see first hand how this type of phenomenon creates physical change. While students at this level may struggle to understand larger and more abstract geographical concepts, they will work directly with material that will help them build a foundation for understanding concepts of phenomena that sculpt the Earth.

  4. Deadly Volcanos

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This interactive slide show provides accounts of eight of history's most deadly volcanic eruptions. These eruptions are from both ancient and modern times, and include such volcanos as Mount Vesuvius, Tambora, Krakatau, Nevado del Ruiz, and Mount Pinatubo. Each slide features an illustration from the event, a written description with the name of the volcano, date, number of casualties, an account of the eruption, and a map showing the location of the volcano.

  5. Intra-caldera Events: A Look at the Hydrovolcanic Deposit Stratigraphically Located Between two Caldera-Forming Eruptions of Okmok Volcano, Umnak Island, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, L. J.

    2002-12-01

    Within the 10 km diameter caldera that characterizes Okmok Volcano, a field of post-caldera cones and deposits demonstrate many features associated with water-magma interactions. A unit deposited prior to the formation of the present caldera provides evidence for large explosive hydrovolcanic eruptions in the past as well. This unit is referred to as the Middle Scoria Unit as it is stratigraphically located between the ~9000 BP Okmok I and 2050 BP Okmok II caldera-forming events. Here, we present data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, and eruptive mechanisms of the Middle Scoria Unit, which averages a thickness of 2.5 meters. The basal layer of the Middle Scoria consists of moderately well sorted, highly inflated juvenile clasts of basaltic composition (53.88 wt.% SiO2) that average 3 to 5 cm in size. Capping the base is a sequence of layers alternating between oxidized reddish lithic fragments and poorly vesicular scoria averaging 1 mm to 3 cm in size. The contacts between the scoria and lithic layers are less discrete in the top section, with a higher proportion of mixing averaging up to 75% for a clast-rich layer. The upper layers of the unit also show reverse grading and contain dense, poorly vesicular scoria fragments and lithic fragments of 2 mm to 1.5 cm in size. The Middle Scoria unit has been found on the neighboring Unalaska Island, approximately 30 km to the East, revealing a wide dispersal. Our results indicate that this eruption began as a highly explosive, purely magmatic and rare basaltic Plinian eruption. With time, the eruptive series evolved to incorporate external water, as demonstrated by the successions of oxidized lithic lapilli and poorly vesicular scoria layers. Our preliminary interpretations of the Middle Scoria indicate that Okmok Volcano may be capable of highly explosive basaltic Plinian and hydrovolcanic eruptions.

  6. 2009 ERUPTION OF REDOUBT VOLCANO: Lahars, Oil, and the Role of Science in Hazards Mitigation (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, R.; Nye, C. J.

    2009-12-01

    In March, 2009, Redoubt Volcano erupted for the third time in 45 years. More than 19 explosions produced ash plumes to 60,000 ft asl, lahar flows of mud and ice down the Drift river ~30 miles to the coast, and tephra fall up to 1.5 mm onto surrounding communities. The eruption had severe impact on many operations. Airlines were forced to cancel or divert hundreds of international and domestic passenger and cargo flights, and Anchorage International airport closed for over 12 hours. Mudflows and floods down the Drift River to the coast impacted operations at the Drift River Oil Terminal (DROT) which was forced to shut down and ultimately be evacuated. Prior mitigation efforts to protect the DROT oil tank farm from potential impacts associated with a major eruptive event were successful, and none of the 148,000 barrels of oil stored at the facility was spilled or released. Nevertheless, the threat of continued eruptive activity at Redoubt, with the possibility of continued lahar flows down the Drift River alluvial fan, required an incident command post be established so that the US Coast Guard, Alaska Dept. of Environmental Conservation, and the Cook Inlet Pipeline Company could coordinate a response to the potential hazards. Ultimately, the incident command team relied heavily on continuous real-time data updates from the Alaska Volcano Observatory, as well as continuous geologic interpretations and risk analysis by the USGS Volcanic Hazards group, the State Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys and the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute, all members of the collaborative effort of the Alaska Volcano Observatory. The great success story that unfolded attests to the efforts of the incident command team, and their reliance on real-time scientific analysis from scientific experts. The positive results also highlight how pre-disaster mitigation and monitoring efforts, in concert with hazards response planning, can be used in a cooperative industry / multi-agency effort to positively affect hazards mitigation. The final outcomes from this potentially disastrous event included: 1) no on-site personnel were injured; 2) no detrimental environmental impacts associated with the oil terminal occurred; and 3) incident command personnel, together with numerous industry representatives, were able to make well-informed, although costly decisions that resulted in safe removal of the oil from the storage facilities. The command team’s efforts also furthered the process of restarting the Cook Inlet oil production after a forced five month shutdown.

  7. ECONOMIC DISRUPTIONS BY REDOUBT VOLCANO: ASSESSMENT METHODOLOGY AND ANECDOTAL EMPIRICAL EVIDENCE

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bradford H. Tuck; Lee Huskey

    1994-01-01

    The eruptions of Redoubt Volcano in 1989-90 imposed significant economic costs on Alaska residents, airlines and other businesses serving Alaska, government agencies, and travelers going to or coming from Alaska. This paper pre- sents a set of principles, or guidelines, for the classification and aggregation of costs and benefits associated with the eruptions. These costs include both market-measured costs and

  8. Ambient noise recovery of surface wave Green's functions: Application at Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballmer, S.; Wolfe, C. J.; Okubo, P.; Haney, M. M.; Thurber, C. H.

    2010-12-01

    Hazard assessment of Hawaiian volcanoes critically depends on the understanding of their evolution and dynamics. Previous studies suggest that ambient seismic noise analyses may aid in volcano research and monitoring. Green’s functions derived from ambient noise have been used to perform tomography of the shallow structures (< 5 km depth) at other volcanoes [1, 2]. Moreover, these Green’s functions have been used to monitor very small shallow velocity perturbations prior to eruptions [3]. This promising technique, however, has not yet been applied to any Hawaiian volcano. Here, we examine data from the USGS Hawaii Volcano Observatory short-period seismic network to assess the potential of such ambient noise analyses to constrain spatial velocity heterogeneity and temporal perturbations at Kilauea and Mauna Loa volcanoes. We have obtained continuous seismic data from May 2007 through April 2008. This time period includes two important volcanic events. 1) The Father’s Day dike intrusion into Kilauea’s east rift zone that occurred on June 17, 2007. 2) The Kilauea summit eruption of March 19, 2008 and the high summit activity (that includes high tremor levels) that has since followed. The success of any noise study of temporal velocity perturbations will depend critically on whether stable Green’s functions can be recovered. However, for applications at Hawaii it is possible that during some time frames high volcanic tremor levels may distort ambient noise records and hence limit the results. Using the technical approach described in [2], we plan to examine numerous station pairs to determine the times when stable Green’s functions can be extracted from noise (0.1-1 Hz) that is typically made up of Rayleigh waves created by wind-generated ocean waves. As a first step, we investigate the period around the 2007 dike intrusion to evaluate the applicability of noise interferometry to Kilauea volcano. [1] Brenguier, F., N. M. Shapiro, M. Campillo, A. Nercessian, and V. Ferrazzini, 3-D surface wave tomography of the Piton de la Fournaise volcano using seismic noise observations, Geophys. Res. Lett., 34, doi:10.1029/2006GL028586, 2007. [2] Masterlark, T., M. Haney, H. Dickinson, T. Fournier, and C. Searcy, Rheologic and structural controls on the deformation of Okmok volcano, Alaska: FEMs, InSAR, and ambient noise tomography, J. Geophys. Res., 115, B02409, 2010. [3] Brenguier, F. N. M. Shapiro, M. Campillo, V. Ferrazzini, Z. Duputel, O. Coutant, and A. Nercessian, Towards forecasting volcanic eruptions using seismic noise, Nature Geosci., 1, 126-130, 2008.

  9. PBO-Style Seismic and Geodetic Monitoring at Frequently-Active Aleutian Arc Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, T. L.; Power, J. A.; Freymueller, J. T.; Tytgat, G.; Moran, S. C.; Lisowski, M.; Johnston, M. J.; Pauk, B. A.; Caplan-Auerbach, J.; Paskievitch, J. F.; Plucinski, T. A.; McNutt, S. R.; Petersen, T.; Mann, D.

    2002-12-01

    A major goal of EarthScope and the Plate Boundary Observatory (PBO) is to obtain real-time data on the dynamics of magma transport and the physical processes surrounding magmatic intrusions before, during, and after eruption. To accomplish this the PBO has selected five active Aleutian arc volcanic centers for instrumentation; Augustine, Pavlof, Unimak Island (the location of Isanotski, Shishaldin, Fisher Caldera, and Westdahl Volcano), Akutan, and Okmok. Six of these volcanoes have erupted within the last 20 years and four are known to be actively deforming. The frequency of eruptive activity at these volcanoes, as well as diverse chemistry of erupted products, makes these volcanic centers unique natural laboratories within the North American plate boundary system for studying active volcanism. During the summer of 2002 the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) began deployment of PBO-style networks consisting of continuous GPS receivers collocated with broadband seismometers at Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera. Five GPS receivers were installed in 2002, and are recording on-site. Three GPS receivers on Okmok radio data approximately 70 km to Dutch Harbor. The radio system provides full duplex serial communication between the instruments at each remote site and the central recording system in Dutch Harbor. Planned 2003 work includes adding broadband seismometers to the existing sites and adding three more sites for a total of four telemetered broadband-GPS sites on each volcano. These deployments complement short-period seismic networks that were deployed on Akutan Volcano and Okmok Caldera in 1996 and 2002 and campaign GPS measurements begun in 1996 and 2000, respectively. The instruments installed this year and the addition of the broadband seismometers in 2003 will greatly improve our ability to study volcanic processes. Once the existing networks are enhanced by additional instrumentation through PBO, they will provide the opportunity to study the mechanics and geometry of magmatic intrusions, the implications of long-period and very-long-period seismic events, strain transients associated with magma transport, the degree of remote and static triggering of magmatic intrusions and earthquake swarms, and the interplay between magmatic systems and regional tectonics.

  10. Character, mass, distribution, and origin of tephra-fall deposits from the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, Alaska—Highlighting the significance of particle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, Kristi L.; Schaefer, Janet R.; Coombs, Michelle L.

    2013-06-01

    The 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano included 20 tephra-producing explosions between March 15, 2009 and April 4, 2009 (UTC). Next-Generation radar (NEXRAD) data show that plumes reached heights between 4.6 km and 19 km asl and were distributed downwind along nearly all azimuths of the volcano. Explosions lasted between < 1 and 31 min based on the signal duration at a distal seismic station (86 km). From Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) imagery and field data, we estimate that over 80,000 km2 received at least minor ash fall (> 0.8 mm thick), including communities along the Kenai Peninsula (80-100 km) and the city of Anchorage (170 km). Trace ash (< 0.8 mm) was reported as far as Fairbanks, 550 km NNE of the volcano. We estimate the total mass of tephra-fall deposits at 54.6 × 109 kg with a total DRE volume of 20.6 × 106 m3. On March 15, a small (4.6 km asl) phreatic explosion containing minor, non-juvenile ash, erupted through the summit ice cap. The first five magmatic explosions (events 1-5) occurred within a 6-hour period on March 23. Plumes rose to heights between 5.5 km and 14.9 km asl during 2- to 20-minute-duration explosions, and were dispersed mainly along a NNE trajectory. Trace ash fall was reported as far as Fairbanks. Owing to a shift in wind direction and heavy snowfall during these events, field discrimination among many of these layers was possible. All deposits comprise a volumetrically significant amount of particle aggregates, yet only event 5 deposits contain coarse clasts including glacier ice. The most voluminous tephra fall was deposited on March 24 (event 6) from a 15 minute explosion that sent a plume to 18.3 km asl, and dispersed tephra to the WNW. Within 10 km of the vent, this deposit contains 1-11 cm pumice clasts in a matrix of 1-2 mm aggregate lapilli. A small dome was presumably emplaced between March 23 and March 26 and was subsequently destroyed during 1-14 minute magmatic explosions of events 7-8 (March 26) that sent plumes between 8.2 km and 19 km asl. Ash fell along a broad swath to the ESE, covering communities along the Kenai Peninsula with up to 1 mm of ash. Proximal deposits are largely composed of aggregate lapilli of 1-2 mm with very little coarse juvenile material. Events 9-18 (March 27) sent plumes between 5.2 km and 15.5 km asl during < 1-11-minute-long explosions. Ash clouds dispersed along trajectories to the NE, ENE and N and event 17 deposited up to 1 mm of ash on upper Kenai Peninsula and Anchorage. A moderate-size dome was emplaced between March 29 and April 4 and was subsequently destroyed during event 19 on April 4 which lasted 31 min and sent ash to 15.2 km asl. The proximal deposit is principally composed of dense dome rock, unlike earlier events, indicating that event 19 was likely caused by dome failure. The cloud dispersed to the SE along a narrow trajectory and up to 1-2 mm of ash fell on the lower Kenai Peninsula. Particle size data showing a preponderance of fine ash, even in the most proximal locations, along with the abundance of aggregate lapilli documented in most samples, confirms that particle aggregation played a significant role in the 2009 eruption and induced premature fallout of fine ash.

  11. In Brief: U.S. Volcano Early Warning System; Bill provides clear mandate for NOAA

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Randy Showstack

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey on 29 April released a comprehensive review of the 169 U.S. volcanoes, and established a framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System that is being formulated by the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories. The framework proposes an around-the-clock Volcano Watch Office and improved instrumentation and monitoring at targeted volcanoes. The report, authored by USGS scientists

  12. Volcano Landslides

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Information given in this United States Geological Survey (USGS) publication includes a description of volcano landslides, how they are generated, and their effects on surrounding areas. Case studies of specific volcano landslides are linked from this page, including Mt. St. Helens, Otake in Japan, Huila in Columbia, Mt. Rainier, and Casita in Nicaragua.

  13. Chikurachki Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-16

    ... plume from the April 22, 2003, eruption of the Chikurachki volcano is portrayed in these views from the Multi-angle Imaging ... the volcanically active Kuril Island group, the Chikurachki volcano is an active stratovolcano on Russia's Paramushir Island (just south of ...

  14. Redoubt Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Ascending eruption cloud from Redoubt Volcano as viewed to the west from the Kenai Peninsula. The mushroom-shaped plume rose from avalanches of hot debris (pyroclastic flows) that cascaded down the north flank of the volcano. A smaller, white steam plume rises from the summit crater. ...

  15. Eruption dynamics of the 7.7 ka Driftwood pumice-fall suggest mafic injection is a common eruption mechanism for Makushin Volcano, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerner, A.; Crowley, P.; Hazlett, R. W.; Nicolaysen, K. E.

    2010-12-01

    Makushin Volcano on Unalaska Island, AK is potentially the most threatening volcano in the Aleutian chain, being close to the largest Aleutian towns of Dutch Harbor and Unalaska. This study reports the eruption chronology and triggering mechanism for the most recent highly explosive event, the 7.7 ka Driftwood Pumice-fall event. The Driftwood Pumice reaches thicknesses of over 2 m, and isopach contours estimate a total deposit volume of 0.3-0.9 km3, covering an area of at least 8100 km2. These reconstructions show an eruption on the scale of the 1980 Mt. St. Helens eruption, with a VEI of 4-5. In the field, the deposit was divided into four stratigraphic horizons from bottom to top, and tephra within these layers becomes systematically more mafic upward through the section, ranging from a basal low-SiO2 dacite (64 wt.% SiO2) to an upper medium-SiO2 andesite (61.5 wt.% SiO2). High-Ca plagioclase (An75-83) and high-Mg olivine (Mg69-75) grains within the pumice are in great disequilibrium with the dacitic glass (64-69 wt.% SiO2), suggesting their origin in a more mafic magma. Geochemical trends, disequilibrium mineral populations, and mineral zonation patterns within these plagioclase and olivine xenocrysts show evidence of magma mixing between a bulk siliceous magma chamber and a mafic injection. The amount of the mafic component increases upward within the deposit, ranging from 0-25% throughout the section. The mafic injection is calculated to have been ~110-200 °C hotter than the siliceous magma chamber. The thermal pulse provided by the injection likely initiated convection and volatile exsolution within the siliceous magma body, ultimately causing the Driftwood Pumice eruption. Diffusion rates based on the thickness of lower-Mg rim zonations (<10 µm thick rims of Mg64) in the olivine xenocrysts show a lag-time of ~1 year between the basaltic injection and the resulting eruption. Similar delays between mafic injections and eruptions are seen in numerous other volcanic systems where magma mixing has been cited as the eruption trigger. The Driftwood Pumice is stratigraphically sandwiched between numerous smaller ashfalls, many of which consist of light-dark ash couplets. The color and compositional differences between the layers of these ash couplets are similar to differences within the Driftwood Pumice horizons, though the Driftwood Pumice is significantly thicker than the couplets. The repeated occurrences of light tephra overlain by dark, more mafic tephra suggest that magma mixing via a mafic injection is a common mechanism for sparking Makushin eruptions.

  16. Observations of deep long-period (DLP) seismic events beneath Aleutian arc volcanoes; 1989-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Power, J.A.; Stihler, S.D.; White, R.A.; Moran, S.C.

    2004-01-01

    Between October 12, 1989 and December 31, 2002, the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) located 162 deep long-period (DLP) events beneath 11 volcanic centers in the Aleutian arc. These events generally occur at mid- to lower-crustal depths (10-45 km) and are characterized by emergent phases, extended codas, and a strong spectral peak between 1.0 and 3.0 Hz. Observed wave velocities and particle motions indicate that the dominant phases are P- and S-waves. DLP epicenters often extend over broad areas (5-20 km) surrounding the active volcanoes. The average reduced displacement of Aleutian DLPs is 26.5 cm2 and the largest event has a reduced displacement of 589 cm2 (or ML 2.5). Aleutian DLP events occur both as solitary events and as sequences of events with several occurring over a period of 1-30 min. Within the sequences, individual DLPs are often separated by lower-amplitude volcanic tremor with a similar spectral character. Occasionally, volcano-tectonic earthquakes that locate at similar depths are contained within the DLP sequences. At most, Aleutian volcanoes DLPs appear to loosely surround the main volcanic vent and occur as part of background seismicity. A likely explanation is that they reflect a relatively steady-state process of magma ascent over broad areas in the lower and middle portions of the crust. At Mount Spurr, DLP seismicity was initiated by the 1992 eruptions and then slowly declined until 1997. At Shishaldin Volcano, a short-lived increase in DLP seismicity occurred about 10 months prior to the April 19, 1999 eruption. These observations suggest a link between eruptive activity and magma flux in the mid- to lower-crust and uppermost mantle.

  17. Evaluation of gases, condensates, and SO2 emissions from Augustine volcano, Alaska: the degassing of a Cl-rich volcanic system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Symonds, R.B.; Rose, W.I.; Gerlach, T.M.; Briggs, P.H.; Harmon, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    After the March-April 1986 explosive eruption a comprehensive gas study at Augustine was undertaken in the summers of 1986 and 1987. Airborne COSPEC measurements indicate that passive SO2 emission rates declined exponentially during this period from 380??45 metric tons/day (T/D) on 7/24/86 to 27??6 T/D on 8/24/87. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that the Augustine magma reservoir has become more degassed as volcanic activity decreased after the spring 1986 eruption. Gas samples collected in 1987 from an 870??C fumarole on the andesitic lava dome show various degrees of disequilibrium due to oxidation of reduced gas species and condensation (and loss) of H2O in the intake tube of the sampling apparatus. Thermochemical restoration of the data permits removal of these effects to infer an equilibrium composition of the gases. Although not conclusive, this restoration is consistent with the idea that the gases were in equilibrium at 870??C with an oxygen fugacity near the Ni-NiO buffer. These restored gas compositions show that, relative to other convergent plate volcanoes, the Augustine gases are very HCl rich (5.3-6.0 mol% HCl), S rich (7.1 mol% total S), and H2O poor (83.9-84.8 mol% H2O). Values of ??D and ??18O suggest that the H2O in the dome gases is a mixture of primary magmatic water (PMW) and local seawater. Part of the Cl in the Augustine volcanic gases probably comes from this shallow seawater source. Additional Cl may come from subducted oceanic crust because data by Johnston (1978) show that Cl-rich glass inclusions in olivine crystals contain hornblende, which is evidence for a deep source (>25km) for part of the Cl. Gas samples collected in 1986 from 390??-642??C fumaroles on a ramp surrounding the inner summit crater have been oxidized so severely that restoration to an equilibrium composition is not possible. H and O isotope data suggest that these gases are variable mixtures of seawater, FMW, and meteoric steam. These samples are much more H2O-rich (92%-97% H2O) than the dome gases, possibly due to a larger meteoric steam component. The 1986 samples also have higher Cl/S, S/C, and F/Cl ratios, which imply that the magmatic component in these gases is from the more degassed 1976 magma. Thus, the 1987 samples from the lava dome are better indicators than the 1986 samples of degassing within the Augustine magma reservoir, even though they were collected a year later and contain a significant seawater component. Future gas studies at Augustine should emphasize fumaroles on active lava domes. Condensates collected from the same lava-dome fumarole have enrichments ot 107-102 in Cl, Br, F, B, Cd, As, S, Bi, Pb, Sb, Mo, Zn, Cu, K, Li, Na, Si, and Ni. Lower-temperature (200??-650??C) fumaroles around the volcano are generally less enriched in highly volatile elements. However, these lower-termperature fumaroles have higher concentration of rock-forming elements, probably derived from the wall rock. ?? 1990 Springer-Verlag.

  18. Model Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson, students will explore volcanoes by constructing models and reflect upon their learning through drawing sketches of their models. Once they have finished making their models, they will experiment with making their volcanoes erupt. They will observe how eruption changes the original form of their volcano models. In this way, students see first hand how this type of phenomena creates physical change. While students at this level may struggle to understand larger and more abstract geographical concepts, they will work directly with material that will help them build a foundation for understanding concepts of phenomena that sculpt the earth.

  19. Alaska: A Bird's Eye View

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2003-07-01

    In this Web-based, interactive story, Tutangiaq (Too-tang-geye-ack - nicknamed 2T), a Canada Goose, flies across Alaska looking for his family. As he flies, he tells students about the 49th state. Students learn several facts about the state, including how Alaska was purchased from the Russians,. They can also compare the size of Alaska to other states. 2T takes a flight across the volcanic chain in Alaska and helps students interactively explore how scientists monitor volcanoes from satellite images in near-real time. At the coast, the bird also meets his Walrus friend who shows him how the sea ice edge has receded and gives an example of an adverse effect on marine life. Finally, 2T arrives in Fairbanks where children use satellite imagery to help him find and unite with his family.

  20. The 2005 catastrophic acid crater lake drainage, lahar, and acidic aerosol formation at Mount Chiginagak volcano, Alaska, USA: Field observations and preliminary water and vegetation chemistry results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, J.R.; Scott, W.E.; Evans, William C.; Jorgenson, J.; McGimsey, R.G.; Wang, B.

    2008-01-01

    A mass of snow and ice 400-m-wide and 105-m-thick began melting in the summit crater of Mount Chiginagak volcano sometime between November 2004 and early May 2005, presumably owing to increased heat flux from the hydrothermal system, or possibly from magma intrusion and degassing. In early May 2005, an estimated 3.8??106 m3 of sulfurous, clay-rich debris and acidic water, with an accompanying acidic aerosol component, exited the crater through a tunnel at the base of a glacier that breaches the south crater rim. Over 27 km downstream, the acidic waters of the flood inundated an important salmon spawning drainage, acidifying Mother Goose Lake from surface to depth (approximately 0.5 km3 in volume at a pH of 2.9 to 3.1), killing all aquatic life, and preventing the annual salmon run. Over 2 months later, crater lake water sampled 8 km downstream of the outlet after considerable dilution from glacial meltwater was a weak sulfuric acid solution (pH = 3.2, SO4 = 504 mg/L, Cl = 53.6 mg/L, and F = 7.92 mg/L). The acid flood waters caused severe vegetation damage, including plant death and leaf kill along the flood path. The crater lake drainage was accompanied by an ambioructic flow of acidic aerosols that followed the flood path, contributing to defoliation and necrotic leaf damage to vegetation in a 29 km2 area along and above affected streams, in areas to heights of over 150 m above stream level. Moss species killed in the event contained high levels of sulfur, indicating extremely elevated atmospheric sulfurcontent. The most abundant airborne phytotoxic constituent was likely sulfuric acid aerosols that were generated during the catastrophic partial crater lake drainage event. Two mechanisms of acidic aerosol formation are proposed: (1) generation of aerosol mist through turbulent flow of acidic water and (2) catastrophic gas exsolution. This previously undocumented phenomenon of simultaneous vegetationdamaging acidic aerosols accompanying drainage of an acidic crater lake has important implications for the study of hazards associated with active volcanic crater lakes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Cascade Volcanoes

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The volcanoes from closest to farthest are Mt. Washington, Three Fingered Jack, Mt. Jefferson. This picture is taken from Middle Sister looking north in the Cascade Range, Three Sisters Wilderness Area, Deschutes National Forest, Oregon....

  2. Volcano Preparedness

    MedlinePLUS

    ... your local emergency officials. Mudflows Mudflows are powerful “rivers” of mud that can move 20 to 40 ... cannot see the volcano during an eruption. Avoid river valleys and low lying areas. Trying to watch ...

  3. Volcano Hazards Program Webcams

    MedlinePLUS

    Volcano Hazards Program Webcams Below is a list of webcams of U.S. volcanoes. All webcams are operated ... the webcam. Pu`u `O`o vent, Kilauea Volcano (HVO) Halema`uma`u from HVO, Kilauea Volcano ( ...

  4. University of Tokyo: Volcano Research Center (VRC)

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website discusses the Volcano Research Center's (VRC) work to improve predictions of volcanic eruptions by conducting research on volcanic processes. Users can find out about Asama, Kirishima, Izu-Oshima, and other VRC volcano observatories. The website features information on many continuing and recent eruptions in Japan. Visitors can view many images of volcanic eruptions and disaster relief missions. Researchers can learn about the international cooperative drilling operation at the Unzen Volcano to understand the eruption mechanisms and magnetic activity. This site is also reviewed in the February 20, 2004 _NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

  5. Decadal Persistence of Cycles in Lava Lake Motion at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica

    E-print Network

    Kingsbury, Nick

    Decadal Persistence of Cycles in Lava Lake Motion at Erebus Volcano, Antarctica Nial Petersa Studies of Erebus volcano's active lava lake have shown that many of its observable properties (gas) dataset of thermal infrared images collected by the Mount Erebus Volcano Observatory between 2004 and 2011

  6. ASAR IMAGES A DIVERSE SET OF DEFORMATION PATTERNS AT KLAUEA VOLCANO, HAWAI`I

    E-print Network

    ASAR IMAGES A DIVERSE SET OF DEFORMATION PATTERNS AT KLAUEA VOLCANO, HAWAI`I Michael P. Poland(1) (1) U.S. Geological Survey, Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, 51 Crater Rim Road, Hawai`i National Park. On Klauea volcano, a transition from minor to broad-scale summit inflation was observed by interferograms

  7. Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys

    E-print Network

    Steady subsidence of Medicine Lake volcano, northern California, revealed by repeated leveling surveys Daniel Dzurisin U.S. Geological Survey, David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory (USGS; published 27 December 2002. [1] Leveling surveys of a 193-km circuit across Medicine Lake volcano (MLV

  8. Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence for a stalled intrusion in 1975 and connection to a deep magma source

    E-print Network

    Long-term changes in quiescent degassing at Mount Baker Volcano, Washington, USA; Evidence , D.S. Tucker d , M.P. Doukas a a USGS Cascades Volcano Observatory, United States b USGS Menlo Park, United States c USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, United States d Western Washington University, United

  9. Investigating Magma Withdrawal Dynamics During Plinian Eruptions Through Mineral and Eruptive Stratigraphies: Examples From the Chemically Zoned 400 yr BP Eruption of Half Cone Volcano, Aniakchak National Park, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browne, B.

    2006-12-01

    Half Cone volcano is the eviscerated remnant of a post-caldera composite volcano on the northwest floor of Aniakchak caldera (Alaska). The pyroclastic deposit produced during the 400 yr BP cataclysmic eruption of Half Cone is divisible in two volumetrically subequal fall units as well as a late-stage, lithic-rich, near-vent series of pyroclastic density current deposits and lava flow. The base of the deposit, known as the Pink Pumice, is composed of highly vesicular, crystal poor, and oxidized dacite pumice clasts (63-67% SiO2). Two stratigraphic horizons exist within this unit represented in outcrop by distinctly coarser-grained pumice and lithic clasts compared to the Pink Pumice's uppermost, middle, and lowermost levels. Overlying the Pink Pumice is the Brown Pumice layer, a brown-colored crystal-rich andesitic pumice fall (58-62% SiO2) with an abruptly coarse-grained base that normally grades upward. Although the contact between the Pink and Brown Pumice layers is abrupt in outcrop due to changes in color, vesicularity, and crystal content, whole-rock compositions plot along a linear continuum that ranges from andesite to rhyodacite. Isopach and isopleth mapping of the Pink Pumice indicate eruption column heights of 22-26 km for the coarser horizons, compared to only 12-15 km for uppermost, middle, and lowermost levels. Similar mapping of the upper and lower Brown Pumice indicate a declining plume from 20-24 km at the base to less than 15 km at the top. Granulometric analysis of lithic clasts coupled with electron microbeam analyses of individual phenocrysts and glass from the Pink and Brown Pumice indicate diverse lithic and mineral populations at horizons indicative of greater mass flux (plume height) compared to other levels in the deposit. Coarser-grained horizons contain granitic (quartz, feldspar, and mica) lithic fragments, oscillatory zoned plagioclase with An58-78 cores and An57-64 rims, and Fe-Ti oxide pairs yielding temperatures of 850- 890C. In contrast, levels indicative of lower eruption energy contain few granitic lithics, nearly unzoned plagioclase ranging from An58 to An62, and Fe-Ti oxide pairs that yield temperatures of 850-865C. Interestingly, glass compositions linger from 69-74% SiO2 throughout the Pink and Brown Pumice regardless of stratigraphic horizon. These observations suggest that (1) the magma chamber feeding the 400 yr BP eruption of Half Cone resulted via differentiation crystallization of an andesite liquid as evidenced by uniform glass compositions through the Pink and Brown Pumice stratigraphy coupled by increased crystal content in the Brown Pumice; (2) the magma chamber was intermittently tapped at deeper or shallower depths due to fluctuating mass flux, resulting in the eruption of heterogeneous mineral and lithic populations during periods characterized by higher mass flux compared to more uniform mineral and lithic populations during periods of lower mass flux; and (3) the combination of microbeam analyses of individual phenocrysts with granulometric and stratigraphic analyses is an effective tool in the investigation of magma withdrawal dynamics during Plinian eruptions.

  10. Natural Resources Canada: Volcanoes of Canada

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Natural Resources Canada has launched yet another impressive and educational Web site. At this site you can learn all you wanted to know about Canadian volcanoes and volcanology. The site offers an introduction to volcanoes, in-depth sections on types, eruptions, hazards, and risks. You can also discover interesting facts, such as how eruptions in Alaska and the Western coast of the US impact agriculture and air travel in Canada. In addition to text, the site offers a wonderful interactive Map of Canadian Volcanoes. The Catalogue of Canadian Volcanoes is also an excellent reference tool. Available in English and French, this site is easy to understand and ideal for science students as well as anyone interested in volcanology. This site is also reviewed in the August 22, 2003 NSDL Physical Sciences Report.

  11. Volcano Baseball

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    American Association for the Advancement of Science

    2009-01-01

    In this game, learners are volcanoes that must complete several steps to erupt. Starting at home plate, learners draw cards until they have enough points to move to first base. This process repeats for each learner at each base, and each base demonstrates a different process in a volcano's eruption. The first learner to make it back to home plate erupts and is the winner. This is a good introduction to volcanoes. When learners set up a free account at Kinetic City, they can answer bonus questions at the end of the activity as a quick assessment. As a larger assessment, learners can complete the Smart Attack game after they've completed several activities.

  12. U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS U.S. Geological Survey's Alert-Notification System for Volcanic Activity

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    U.S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY--REDUCING THE RISK FROM VOLCANO HAZARDS U.S. Geological Survey's Alert's 170 active volcanoes (red triangles) for signs of unrest and for issuing timely warnings of hazardous at the five volcano observatories operated by the USGS Volcano Hazards Program and also by State

  13. Volcanoes: Local Hazard, Global Issue

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this module, students can explore two ways that volcanoes affect Earth: by directly threatening people and the environments adjacent to them, and by ejecting aerosols into the atmosphere. The module consists of three investigations in which they will study the local effects of volcanism using images of Mount St. Helens, examine how the effects of volcanic activity can be remotely sensed and monitored from space using NASA data for Mount Spurr in Alaska, and see how geography and spatial perspective are useful in addressing global issues in the tracking and mapping of aerosol hazards such as the ash cloud emitted by the 1989 eruption on Redoubt Volcano. Each investigation is complete with overview, a list of materials and supplies, content preview, classroom procedures, worksheets, background, and evaluation.

  14. Volcano Hazards Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Venezky, Dina Y.; Myers, Bobbie; Driedger, Carolyn

    2008-01-01

    Diagram of common volcano hazards. The U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Hazards Program (VHP) monitors unrest and eruptions at U.S. volcanoes, assesses potential hazards, responds to volcanic crises, and conducts research on how volcanoes work. When conditions change at a monitored volcano, the VHP issues public advisories and warnings to alert emergency-management authorities and the public. See http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/ to learn more about volcanoes and find out what's happening now.

  15. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lucia Tampellini; Raffaella Ratti; Sven Borgström; Frank Martin Seifert; Aline Peltier; Edouard Kaminski; Marco Bianchi; Wendy Branson; Fabrizio Ferrucci; Barbara Hirn; Paul van der Voet; J. van Geffen

    2010-01-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types

  16. Volcano Seismology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    BERNARD CHOUET

    2003-01-01

    -- A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with

  17. Klyuchevskaya Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The Klyuchevskaya Volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula continued its ongoing activity by releasing another plume on May 24, 2007. The same day, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite captured this image, at 01:00 UTC. In this image, a hotspot marks the volcano's summit. Outlined in red, the hotspot indicates where MODIS detected unusually warm surface temperatures. Blowing southward from the summit is the plume, which casts its shadow on the clouds below. Near the summit, the plume appears gray, and it lightens toward the south. With an altitude of 4,835 meters (15,863 feet), Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) is both the highest and most active volcano on the Kamchatka Peninsula. As part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Klyuchevskaya is estimated to have experienced more than 100 flank eruptions in the past 3,000 years. Since its formation 6,000 years ago, the volcano has seen few periods of inactivity. NASA image courtesy the MODIS Rapid Response Team at NASA GSFC. The Rapid Response Team provides daily images of this region.

  18. GeoFORCE Alaska, A Successful Summer Exploring Alaska's Geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wartes, D.

    2012-12-01

    Thirty years old this summer, RAHI, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute is a statewide, six-week, summer college-preparatory bridge program at the University of Alaska Fairbanks for Alaska Native and rural high school juniors and seniors. This summer, in collaboration with the University of Texas Austin, the Rural Alaska Honors Institute launched a new program, GeoFORCE Alaska. This outreach initiative is designed to increase the number and diversity of students pursuing STEM degree programs and entering the future high-tech workforce. It uses Earth science to entice kids to get excited about dinosaurs, volcanoes and earthquakes, and includes physics, chemistry, math, biology and other sciences. Students were recruited from the Alaska's Arctic North Slope schools, in 8th grade to begin the annual program of approximately 8 days, the summer before their 9th grade year and then remain in the program for all four years of high school. They must maintain a B or better grade average and participate in all GeoFORCE events. The culmination is an exciting field event each summer. Over the four-year period, events will include trips to Fairbanks and Anchorage, Arizona, Oregon and the Appalachians. All trips focus on Earth science and include a 100+ page guidebook, with tests every night culminating with a final exam. GeoFORCE Alaska was begun by the University of Alaska Fairbanks in partnership with the University of Texas at Austin, which has had tremendous success with GeoFORCE Texas. GeoFORCE Alaska is managed by UAF's long-standing Rural Alaska Honors Institute, that has been successfully providing intense STEM educational opportunities for Alaskan high school students for over 30 years. The program will add a new cohort of 9th graders each year for the next four years. By the summer of 2015, GeoFORCE Alaska is targeting a capacity of 160 students in grades 9th through 12th. Join us to find out more about this exciting new initiative, which is enticing young Alaska Native and minority students into the geosciences. View them as they explore the permafrost tunnel in Fairbanks, sand dunes in Anchorage, Portage Glacier, Matanuska-Susitna Glacier, and the Trans-Alaska pipeline damage from the earthquake of 2002.

  19. Michigan Tech Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Michigan Tech Volcanoes Page encourages collaborative, interdisciplinary work on active volcanos, and links to resources for the Santa Maria Decade Volcano in Guatemala and for Central America's most frequently active volcano, Fuego. Also includes images of Pinatubo Volcano [one nice one taken from the Space Shuttle Endeavor] and some movies of laharic activity.

  20. Smithsonian Volcano Data on Google Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venzke, E.; Siebert, L.; Luhr, J. F.

    2006-12-01

    Interactive global satellite imagery datasets such as hosted by Google Earth provide a dynamic platform for educational outreach in the Earth Sciences. Users with widely varied backgrounds can easily view geologic features on a global-to-local scale, giving access to educational background on individual geologic features or events such as volcanoes and earthquakes. The Smithsonian Institution's Global Volcanism Program (GVP) volcano data became available as a Google Earth layer on 11 June 2006. Locations for about 1550 volcanoes with known or possible Holocene activity are shown as red triangles with associated volcano names that appear when zooming in to a regional-scale view. Clicking on a triangle opens an informational balloon that displays a photo, geographic data, and a brief paragraph summarizing the volcano's geologic history. The balloon contains links to a larger version of the photo with credits and a caption and to more detailed information on the volcano, including eruption chronologies, from the GVP website. Links to USGS and international volcano observatories or other websites focusing on regional volcanoes are also provided, giving the user ready access to a broad spectrum of volcano data. Updates to the GVP volcano layer will be provided to Google Earth. A downloadable file with the volcanoes organized regionally is also available directly from the GVP website (www.volcano.si.edu) and provides the most current volcano data set. Limitations of the implied accuracy of spacially plotted data at high zoom levels are also apparent using platforms such as Google Earth. Real and apparent mismatches between plotted locations and the summits of some volcanoes seen in Google Earth satellite imagery occur for reasons including data precision (deg/min vs. deg/min/sec) and the GVP convention of plotting the center-point of large volcanic fields, which often do not correspond to specific volcanic vents. A more fundamental problem originates from the fact that regional topographic mapping does not utilize a standardized global datum, so that locations from topographic maps often diverge from those of the World Geodetic System datum used in geo-registered satellite imagery. These limitations notwithstanding, virtual globe platforms such as Google Earth provide an easily accessible pathway to volcano data for a broad spectrum of users ranging from the home/classroom to Earth scientists.

  1. Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Lick Observatory, located on Mount Hamilton 30 km east of San Jose, California, at an elevation of 1280 m, serves astronomers from throughout the University of California system. It is administered by University of California Observatories/Lick Observatory, which has its headquarters on the Santa Cruz campus. This multi-campus research unit also serves as the University of California liaison with...

  2. Lowell Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Lowell Observatory, founded in 1894 by Percival Lowell, is one of the largest independent, privately managed observatories in the world. Endowed by its founder, Lowell Observatory continues today as a private research institution dedicated to the study of astronomy. The large redshifts of galaxies were discovered by Lowell astronomer Vesto M Slipher. In 1930, Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto ...

  3. Lowell Observatory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Murdin

    2000-01-01

    Lowell Observatory, founded in 1894 by Percival Lowell, is one of the largest independent, privately managed observatories in the world. Endowed by its founder, Lowell Observatory continues today as a private research institution dedicated to the study of astronomy. The large redshifts of galaxies were discovered by Lowell astronomer Vesto M Slipher. In 1930, Clyde Tombaugh discovered Pluto ...

  4. A compilation of sulfur dioxide and carbon dioxide emission-rate data from Cook Inlet volcanoes (Redoubt, Spurr, Iliamna, and Augustine), Alaska during the period from 1990 to 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doukas, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Airborne sulfur dioxide (SO2) gas sampling of the Cook Inlet volcanoes (Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) began in 1986 when several measurements were carried out at Augustine volcano during the eruption of 1986 (Rose and others, 1988). More systematic monitoring for SO2 began in March 1990 and for carbon dioxide (CO2) began in June, 1990 at Redoubt Volcano (Brantley, 1990 and Casadevall and others, 1994) and continues to the present. This report contains all of the available daily SO2 and CO2 emission rates determined by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) from March 1990 through July 1994. Intermittent measurements (four to six month intervals) at Augustine and Iliamna began in 1990 and continues to the present. Intermittent measurements began at Mt. Spurr volcano in 1991, and were continued at more regular intervals from June, 1992 through the 1992 eruption at the Crater Peak vent to the present.

  5. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  6. Perspective View of Umnak Island, Aleutian Islands, Alaska (#2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image is a perspective view of Umnak Island, one of Alaska's Aleutian Islands. The active Okmok volcano appears in the center of the island.

    The image was created by draping a Landsat 7 Thematic Mapper image over a digital elevation mosaic derived from Airsar data.

    This work was conducted as part of a NASA-funded Alaska Digital Elevation Model Project at the Alaska Synthetic Aperture Radar Facility (ASF) at the University of Alaska Geophysical Institute in Fairbanks, Alaska.

    Airsar collected the Alaska data as part of its PacRim 2000 Mission, which took the instrument to French Polynesia, American and Western Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Australia, New Guinea, Indonesia, Malaysia, Cambodia, Philippines, Taiwan, South Korea, Japan, Northern Marianas, Guam, Palau, Hawaii and Alaska. Airsar, part of NASA's Airborne Science Program, is managed for NASA's Earth Science Enterprise by JPL. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

  7. High-Resolution Satellite and Airborne Thermal Infrared Imaging of the 2006 Eruption of Augustine Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wessels, Rick L.; Coombs, Michelle L.; Schneider, David J.; Dehn, Jonathan; Ramsey, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal infrared (TIR) images provided a timely pre- and syn-eruption record of summit changes, lava flow emplacement, and pyroclastic-flow-deposit distribution during the Alaska Volcano Observatory's (AVO) response to the 2006 eruption of Augustine Volcano. A series of images from both handheld and helicopter mounted forward looking infrared radiometers (FLIR) captured detailed views during a series of 13 overflights from December 2005 through August 2006. In conjunction with these images, data from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) provided frequent multispectral synoptic views of the eruption's emissions and deposits. The ASTER Urgent Request Protocol system also facilitated more frequent scheduling and faster data availability during the eruption. Airborne and satellite imaging provided 20 different days of TIR coverage over the 5-month eruptive period, with 4 of those days covered by both FLIR and ASTER. The high-resolution TIR images documented gradual pre-eruption heating of the summit, emplacement of pyroclastic-flow deposits, rapid temperature increase as the lava dome and flows formed, and slow cooling of the volcanic deposits that followed. The high-resolution data uniquely documented segmentation of the lava flows into hot areas of increased flow deformation and cooler, more stable crust on the active flows. In contrast, the satellite TIR data provided synoptic views of the areal distribution of volcanic products at Augustine including the extent and composition of the plumes.

  8. Earthquake waveform similarity and evolution at Augustine Volcano from 1993 to 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeShon, Heather R.; Thurber, Clifford H.; Power, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal changes in waveform characteristics and earthquake locations associated with the 2006 Augustine eruption and preeruptive seismicity provide constraints on eruptive processes within the edifice. Volcano-tectonic earthquakes occur within the upper 1 to 2 km at Augustine between and during eruptive cycles, and we use the Alaska Volcano Observatory hypocenter and waveform catalog from 1993 to 2006 to constrain changes in event similarity and location over time. Waveform crosscorrelation with bispectrum verification improves the pick accuracy of the catalog data to yield better locations and allows for identification of families of similar earthquakes. Event waveform similarity is low at Augustine, with ~60 to 70 percent of events failing to form event families of more than 10 events. The remaining earthquakes form event families over multiple time scales. Events prior to the 2006 eruption exhibit a high degree of similarity over multiple years. Earthquakes recorded during the precursory and explosive phases of the 2006 eruption form swarms of similar earthquakes over periods of days or hours. Seismicity rate and event similarity decrease rapidly during the explosive and effusive eruption phases. The largest recorded swarms accompany reports of increased steaming and explosive eruptions at the summit. Relative relocation of some event families indicates upward migration of activity over time, consistent with magma transport by way of an ascending dike. Multiple regions of the edifice generate seismicity simultaneously, however, suggesting the edifice contains a network of fractures and/or dikes.

  9. Santorini Volcano

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Druitt, T.H.; Edwards, L.; Mellors, R.M.; Pyle, D.M.; Sparks, R.S.J.; Lanphere, M.; Davies, M.; Barreirio, B.

    1999-01-01

    Santorini is one of the most spectacular caldera volcanoes in the world. It has been the focus of significant scientific and scholastic interest because of the great Bronze Age explosive eruption that buried the Minoan town of Akrotiri. Santorini is still active. It has been dormant since 1950, but there have been several substantial historic eruptions. Because of this potential risk to life, both for the indigenous population and for the large number of tourists who visit it, Santorini has been designated one of five European Laboratory Volcanoes by the European Commission. Santorini has long fascinated geologists, with some important early work on volcanoes being conducted there. Since 1980, research groups at Cambridge University, and later at the University of Bristol and Blaise Pascal University in Clermont-Ferrand, have collected a large amount of data on the stratigraphy, geochemistry, geochronology and petrology of the volcanics. The volcanic field has been remapped at a scale of 1:10 000. A remarkable picture of cyclic volcanic activity and magmatic evolution has emerged from this work. Much of this work has remained unpublished until now. This Memoir synthesizes for the first time all the data from the Cambridge/Bristol/Clermont groups, and integrates published data from other research groups. It provides the latest interpretation of the tectonic and magmatic evolution of Santorini. It is accompanied by the new 1:10 000 full-colour geological map of the island.

  10. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Ash Plume Particle Properties     ... satellite flew over Iceland's erupting Eyjafjallajökull volcano on April 19, 2010, its Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) ...

  11. Monitoring Volcanoes using Seismic Noise Correlations* Florent Brenguier (1), Daniel Clarke (2), Yosuke Aoki (3) , Nikolai M. Shapiro (2) , Michel

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monitoring Volcanoes using Seismic Noise Correlations* Florent Brenguier (1), Daniel Clarke (2 Fournaise Volcano Observatory, Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris. 2 Institut de Physique du Globe de In this paper, we summarize some recent results of measurements of temporal changes of active volcanoes using

  12. Establishment, test and evaluation of a prototype volcano surveillance system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, P. L.; Eaton, J. P.; Endo, E.; Harlow, D.; Marquez, D.; Allen, R.

    1973-01-01

    A volcano-surveillance system utilizing 23 multilevel earthquake counters and 6 biaxial borehole tiltmeters is being installed and tested on 15 volcanoes in 4 States and 4 foreign countries. The purpose of this system is to give early warning when apparently dormant volcanoes are becoming active. The data are relayed through the ERTS-Data Collection System to Menlo Park for analysis. Installation was completed in 1972 on the volcanoes St. Augustine and Iliamna in Alaska, Kilauea in Hawaii, Baker, Rainier and St. Helens in Washington, Lassen in California, and at a site near Reykjavik, Iceland. Installation continues and should be completed in April 1973 on the volcanoes Santiaguito, Fuego, Agua and Pacaya in Guatemala, Izalco in El Salvador and San Cristobal, Telica and Cerro Negro in Nicaragua.

  13. WOVOdat Progress 2012: Installable DB template for Volcano Monitoring Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratdomopurbo, A.; Widiwijayanti, C.; Win, N.-T.-Z.; Chen, L.-D.; Newhall, C.

    2012-04-01

    WOVOdat is the World Organization of Volcano Observatories' (WOVO) Database of Volcanic Unrest. Volcanoes are frequently restless but only a fraction of unrest leads to eruptions. We aim to compile and make the data of historical volcanic unrest available as a reference tool during volcanic crises, for observatory or other user to compare or look for systematic in many unrest episodes, and also provide educational tools for teachers and students on understanding volcanic processes. Furthermore, we promote the use of relational databases for countries that are still planning to develop their own monitoring database. We are now in the process of populating WOVOdat in collaboration with volcano observatories worldwide. Proprietary data remains at the observatories where the data originally from. Therefore, users who wish to use the data for publication or to obtain detail information about the data should directly contact the observatories. To encourage the use of relational database system in volcano observatories with no monitoring database, WOVOdat project is preparing an installable standalone package. This package is freely downloadable through our website (www.wovodat.org), ready to install and serve as database system in the local domain to host various types of volcano monitoring data. The WOVOdat project is now hosted at Earth Observatory of Singapore (Nanyang Technological University). In the current stage of data population, our website supports interaction between WOVOdat developers, observatories, and other partners in building the database, e.g. accessing schematic design, information and documentation, and also data submission. As anticipation of various data formats coming from different observatories, we provide an interactive tools for user to convert their data into standard WOVOdat format file before then able to upload and store in the database system. We are also developing various visualization tools that will be integrated in the system to ease user on querying and viewing the data. As soon as the database is sufficiently populated, data and tools will made accessible to public users.

  14. Armagh Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website presents the news, events, and research of one of the UK and Ireland's leading astronomical research institutes, Armagh Observatory. Users can learn about the Observatory's many research projects in topics including stellar astrophysics, solar physics, and climate and meteorology. The site presents the long history of the observatory and its instruments. Educators can discover the outreach programs available at the Armagh Planetarium. Novices can find information on the objects they observe in the night sky. The site offers abstracts and full papers of many of the Observatory's publications from 1995 to the present.

  15. Punctuated Evolution of Volcanology: An Observatory Perspective

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. C. Burton; J. C. Eichelberger

    2010-01-01

    Volcanology from the perspective of crisis prediction and response-the primary function of volcano observatories-is influenced both by steady technological advances and singular events that lead to rapid changes in methodology and procedure. The former can be extrapolated somewhat, while the latter are surprises or shocks. Predictable advances include the conversion from analog to digital systems and the exponential growth of

  16. Iridium emissions from Hawaiian volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, D. L.; Zoller, W. H.; Miller, T. M.

    1988-01-01

    Particle and gas samples were collected at Mauna Loa volcano during and after its eruption in March and April, 1984 and at Kilauea volcano in 1983, 1984, and 1985 during various phases of its ongoing activity. In the last two Kilauea sampling missions, samples were collected during eruptive activity. The samples were collected using a filterpack system consisting of a Teflon particle filter followed by a series of 4 base-treated Whatman filters. The samples were analyzed by INAA for over 40 elements. As previously reported in the literature, Ir was first detected on particle filters at the Mauna Loa Observatory and later from non-erupting high temperature vents at Kilauea. Since that time Ir was found in samples collected at Kilauea and Mauna Loa during fountaining activity as well as after eruptive activity. Enrichment factors for Ir in the volcanic fumes range from 10,000 to 100,000 relative to BHVO. Charcoal impregnated filters following a particle filter were collected to see if a significant amount of the Ir was in the gas phase during sample collection. Iridium was found on charcoal filters collected close to the vent, no Ir was found on the charcoal filters. This indicates that all of the Ir is in particulate form very soon after its release. Ratios of Ir to F and Cl were calculated for the samples from Mauna Loa and Kilauea collected during fountaining activity. The implications for the KT Ir anomaly are still unclear though as Ir was not found at volcanoes other than those at Hawaii. Further investigations are needed at other volcanoes to ascertain if basaltic volcanoes other than hot spots have Ir enrichments in their fumes.

  17. Nyiragonga Volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image of the Nyiragonga volcano eruption in the Congo was acquired on January 28, 2002 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters about 50 to 300 feet ), ASTER will image Earth for the next 6 years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    Image: A river of molten rock poured from the Nyiragongo volcano in the Congo on January 18, 2002, a day after it erupted, killing dozens, swallowing buildings and forcing hundreds of thousands to flee the town of Goma. The flow continued into Lake Kivu. The lave flows are depicted in red on the image indicating they are still hot. Two of them flowed south form the volcano's summit and went through the town of Goma. Another flow can be seen at the top of the image, flowing towards the northwest. One of Africa's most notable volcanoes, Nyiragongo contained an active lava lake in its deep summit crater that drained catastrophically through its outer flanks in 1977. Extremely fluid, fast-moving lava flows draining from the summit lava lake in 1977 killed 50 to 100 people, and several villages were destroyed. The image covers an area of 21 x 24 km and combines a thermal band in red, and two infrared bands in green and blue.

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of International Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Moshe Pniel of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The primary goal of the ASTER mission is to obtain high-resolution image data in 14 channels over the entire land surface, as well as black and white stereo images. With revisit time of between 4 and 16 days, ASTER will provide the capability for repeat coverage of changing areas on Earth's surface.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

  18. Astronomical observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponomarev, D. N.

    1983-01-01

    The layout and equipment of astronomical observatories, the oldest scientific institutions of human society are discussed. The example of leading observatories of the USSR allows the reader to familiarize himself with both their modern counterparts, as well as the goals and problems on which astronomers are presently working.

  19. Earth Layers and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    brookeshallow

    2011-04-13

    Why do we have volcanoes? Use the information on the websites to answer the questions on the worksheet. Worksheet First, review the layers of the earth. Labeling the layers game Next, go through the maze and read the information given. Magic School Bus volcano game Now, study the different shapes of volcanoes. Click enter, then volcano types in the menu. Read about the 3 types of volcanoes. Discovery Kids Games Finally, watch ...

  20. Intense Rainfall During Hurricane Mitch Triggers Deadly Landslide and Lahar at Casita Volcano, Nicaragua, on October 30, 1998

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    K. Scott

    This web site illustrates and describes damage from a tragic lahar triggered by rainfall on Casita Volcano, an inactive cone of San Cristobal Volcano, northwestern Nicaragua. When the side of Casita Volcano collapsed on October 30, 1998, more than 2,000 people were killed within minutes as a large lahar swept over the towns of El Porvenir and Rolando Rodriguez. Links are also available to a photoglossary of volcanoes, a site on volcano observatories, a site describing current United States volcanic activity, and sites explaining volcano hazards, including gas, lahars, landslides and tephra.

  1. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, Jim; Poland, Mike

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Kilauea volcano (Figure 1)—one of the most active volcanoes on Earth—has provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  2. One hundred years of volcano monitoring in Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kauahikaua, J.; Poland, M.

    2012-01-01

    In 2012 the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), the oldest of five volcano observatories in the United States, is commemorating the 100th anniversary of its founding. HVO's location, on the rim of Klauea volcano (Figure 1)one of the most active volcanoes on Earthhas provided an unprecedented opportunity over the past century to study processes associated with active volcanism and develop methods for hazards assessment and mitigation. The scientifically and societally important results that have come from 100 years of HVO's existence are the realization of one man's vision of the best way to protect humanity from natural disasters. That vision was a response to an unusually destructive decade that began the twentieth century, a decade that saw almost 200,000 people killed by the effects of earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

  3. Santorini Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heiken, Grant

    What is it about Santorini (Thera) that attracts volcanologists? This small archipelago in the Aegean has captivated volcanic pilgrims since Fouque published his geologic study of the volcanic field in 1879 [Fouqué, 1879].It must be the combination of its spectacular setting, rising out of the blue waters of the Aegean, the remarkable exposures that lay open its violent past for everyone to see, or possibly the slower pace of life and remarkable Greek hospitality Perhaps it is the Lower Bronze Age town of Akrotiri, destroyed yet preserved by a large explosive eruption 3600 years ago. There are thousands of volcanoes yet to be studied on our planet, but for 140 years, groups of volcanologists have regularly visited this flooded caldera complex to add yet another bit of information to the foundation laid by Fouqué.

  4. Systematic Search for Background Seismicity Rate Changes and Correlations at Alaskan Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kore, K. R.; McNutt, S. R.; Christensen, D. H.

    2004-12-01

    Recent studies have noted a correlation between large earthquakes and localized seismicity rate changes, particularly those associated with volcanic systems. In this study, we analyzed the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) seismicity catalog from late 1989 through mid-2004 for patterns of background seismicity rate changes at the individual monitored volcanoes throughout the Aleutian Arc. We expand the recent studies to include seismic swarms and background seismicity rate changes as well as volcanic eruptions and regional earthquakes. We assume that seismicity rate changes reflect a change in stress on either a local scale, or perhaps over a regional scale when correlated over several volcanoes. The primary analysis was to identify seismicity rate changes at the individual volcanoes. Once all of the rate changes were identified using a z-test, they were examined to determine whether they were man-made or natural. The man-made rate changes were excluded from further study. Of the 27 volcanic regions monitored by AVO, 10 had background seismicity rate changes. Each of these regions had a different characteristic seismicity rate, which can change as often as three times per year or as seldom as once every ten years. Of particular interest are time periods when several volcanic regions have simultaneous rate changes or other significant activity including eruptions, swarms, rate changes at neighboring volcanoes, and large regional earthquakes from the Aleutian subduction zone. For example, in 1996, seven different volcanic regions experienced significant activities: seismic swarms at Akutan (March), Iliamna (August), Strandline Lake (September), and in the Katmai region (October), a deformation episode began at Mt. Peulik (October), an eruption at Pavlof (September), and a background seismicity rate change at Spurr (October). In 1998, Strandline Lake and Spurr experienced a seismicity rate change in early April, and Redoubt had a rate change in early May. The latter rate changes are coincident with the onset of a slow deformation event in the subduction zone of the Cook Inlet region, as determined by GPS data. Other coincident events were noted in the studied regions, but these are still under study.

  5. Living on Active Volcanoes - The Island of Hawaii

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Christina Heliker

    This United States Geological Survey (USGS) on-line publication highlights the volcanic hazards facing the people living on the Island of Hawaii. These hazards include lava flows, explosive eruptions, volcanic smog, earthquakes and tsunamis. This report discusses these hazards, the volcanoes of Mauna Loa and Kilauea, and the work of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory to monitor and issue warnings to the people affected by these hazards.

  6. ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program

    E-print Network

    ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

  7. Types of Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This volcano resource introduces the six-type classification system and points out weaknesses of the classic three-type system. The six types of volcanoes are shield volcanoes, strato volcanoes, rhyolite caldera complexes, monogenetic fields, flood basalts, and mid-ocean ridges. For each type of volcano there is a description of both structure and dynamics along with examples of each. You can account for more than ninty percent of all volcanoes with these six types. Additionally, any system will be more useful if you use modifiers from the other potential classification schemes with the morphological types.

  8. Vatican Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The Vatican Observatory is one of the oldest astronomical institutes in the world. It began with the reformation of the calendar in 1582. At the Roman College, Father Angelo Secchi first classified stars according to their spectra. With these rich traditions Leo XIII, in 1891, formally founded the Vatican Observatory on a hillside behind the dome of St Peter's Basilica. In 1935 Pius XI provided a...

  9. Taosi Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaochun

    Taosi observatory is the remains of a structure discovered at the later Neolithic Taosi site located in Xiangfen County, Shanxi Province, in north-central China. The structure is a walled enclosure on a raised platform. Only rammed-earth foundations of the structure remained. Archaeoastronomical studies suggest that this structure functioned as an astronomical observatory. Historical circumstantial evidence suggests that it was probably related to the legendary kingdom of Yao from the twenty-first century BC.

  10. Neutrino Observatories

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This online article, from Cosmic Horizons: Astronomy at the Cutting Edge, takes an in-depth look at the new generation of astronomy equipment. It provides an overview of the discovery of neutrinos, subatomic particles, and their role in the developing field of physics, studies that showed that nuclear reactions, including those that power the stars, produce an enormous number of neutrinos, the creation of neutrino observatories deep underground and the stunning and unexpected advances these observatories have already made.

  11. Klauea--an Explosive Volcano in Hawai`i U.S. Department of the Interior

    E-print Network

    Torgersen, Christian

    K Kïlauea--an Explosive Volcano in Hawai`i U.S. Department of the Interior U.S. Geological Survey USGS Fact Sheet 2011­3064 July 2011 Kïlauea Volcano, on the Island of Hawai`i, is best known for its.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) 1.8 km (1.1 mile) away, opened in the floor

  12. Volcano hazards program in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, R.I.; Bailey, R.A.

    1985-01-01

    Volcano monitoring and volcanic-hazards studies have received greatly increased attention in the United States in the past few years. Before 1980, the Volcanic Hazards Program was primarily focused on the active volcanoes of Kilauea and Mauna Loa, Hawaii, which have been monitored continuously since 1912 by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory. After the reawakening and catastrophic eruption of Mount St. Helens in 1980, the program was substantially expanded as the government and general public became aware of the potential for eruptions and associated hazards within the conterminous United States. Integrated components of the expanded program include: volcanic-hazards assessment; volcano monitoring; fundamental research; and, in concert with federal, state, and local authorities, emergency-response planning. In 1980 the David A. Johnston Cascades Volcano Observatory was established in Vancouver, Washington, to systematically monitor the continuing activity of Mount St. Helens, and to acquire baseline data for monitoring the other, presently quiescent, but potentially dangerous Cascade volcanoes in the Pacific Northwest. Since June 1980, all of the eruptions of Mount St. Helens have been predicted successfully on the basis of seismic and geodetic monitoring. The largest volcanic eruptions, but the least probable statistically, that pose a threat to western conterminous United States are those from the large Pleistocene-Holocene volcanic systems, such as Long Valley caldera (California) and Yellowstone caldera (Wyoming), which are underlain by large magma chambers still potentially capable of producing catastrophic caldera-forming eruptions. In order to become better prepared for possible future hazards associated with such historically unpecedented events, detailed studies of these, and similar, large volcanic systems should be intensified to gain better insight into caldera-forming processes and to recognize, if possible, the precursors of caldera-forming eruptions. ?? 1985.

  13. Prototype PBO Instrumentation of CALIPSO Project Captures World-Record Lava Dome Collapse on Montserrat Volcano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Glen S. Mattioli; Simon R. Young; Barry Voight; R. Steven J. Sparks; Eylon Shalev; Sacks Selwyn; Peter Malin; Alan Linde; William Johnston; Dannie Hadayat; Derek Elsworth; Peter Dunkley; Richard Herd; Jurgen Neuberg; Gillian Norton; Christina Widiwijayanti

    2004-01-01

    This article is an update on the status of an innovative new project designed to enhance generally our understanding of andesitic volcano eruption dynamics and, specifically, the monitoring and scientific infrastructure at the active Soufriàre Hills Volcano (SHV), Montserrat. The project has been designated as the Caribbean Andesite Lava Island Precision Seismo-geodetic Observatory, known as CALIPSO. Its purpose is to

  14. Ol Doinyo Lengai Volcano

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    Scientists from the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program team and the Geological Survey of Tanzania take a sample of the most recent ashfall from Ol Doinyo Lengai as the volcano looms in the background....

  15. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Ash from Eyjafjallajökull Volcano, Iceland Stretches over the North Atlantic   ... that occurred in late March 2010, the Eyjafjallajökull Volcano in Iceland began erupting again on April 14, 2010. The resulting ash ...

  16. Iceland: Grímsvötn Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Grímsvötn Volcano Injects Ash into the Stratosphere     ... p.m. local time (1730 UTC) on Saturday, May 21, 2011. The volcano, located approximately 140 miles (220 kilometers) east of the capital ...

  17. Volcanoes: Annenberg Media Project

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Volcanoes is an exhibit from the Annenberg Media Project that provides a wealth of information about volcanoes and includes sections such as Melting Rocks, the Dynamic Earth, and Forecasting. Interactive exercises enable the user to learn how rock turns into magma, how to locate volcanoes, and how to decide if building a project near a volcano is safe. Quicktime videos are used for each of the six categories to illustrate the points outlined in the text.

  18. The Volcano Adventure Guide

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rosaly Lopes

    2005-01-01

    This guide contains vital information for anyone wishing to visit, explore, and photograph active volcanoes safely and enjoyably. Following an introduction that discusses eruption styles of different types of volcanoes and how to prepare for an exploratory trip that avoids volcanic dangers, the book presents guidelines to visiting 42 different volcanoes around the world. It is filled with practical information

  19. How Volcanoes Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Victor Camp

    2001-10-01

    This educational resource describes the science behind volcanoes and volcanic processes. Topics include volcanic environments, volcano landforms, eruption dynamics, eruption products, eruption types, historical eruptions, and planetary volcanism. There are two animations, over 250 images, eight interactive tests, and a volcano crossword puzzle.

  20. Where are the Volcanoes?

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Jessica Fries-Gaither

    This formative assessment item discusses common misconceptions about volcano location around the world. Resources include background and content information as well as alignment to the National Science Education Standards. The probe could easily be modified to be used with a study of earthquakes instead of volcanoes. Teachers can access other resources including facts about volcanoes and lesson ideas.

  1. A Scientific Excursion: Volcanoes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olds, Henry, Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Reviews an educationally valuable and reasonably well-designed simulation of volcanic activity in an imaginary land. VOLCANOES creates an excellent context for learning information about volcanoes and for developing skills and practicing methods needed to study behavior of volcanoes. (Author/JN)

  2. Aerosol Lesson: Volcano Types

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This activity has students research a list of volcanoes and then write detailed information they researched under a column that identifies that type of volcano - Cinder Cone, Composite, or Shield. Included are a worksheet and a collection of links to referential websites about specific volcanoes.

  3. Focus: alien volcanos

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Carroll; Rosaly Lopes

    2007-01-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  4. Focus: alien volcanos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, Michael; Lopes, Rosaly

    2007-03-01

    Part 1: Volcanoes on Earth - blowing their top; Part 2: Volcanoes of the inner Solar System - dead or alive: the Moon, Mercury, Mars, Venus; Part 3: Volcanoes of the outer Solar System - fire and ice: Io, Europa, Ganymede and Miranda, Titan, Triton, Enceladus.

  5. Rainwater Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Rainwater Observatory, located in French Camp, Mississippi, features astronomy workshops for educators and educational programs for the public. It also hosts an informal astronomical association and an annual amateur astronomers' conference. The educator workshops focus on activities to teach astronomy using robotic telescopes available through the Las Cumbres Global Telescope Network (including the Sangre Telescope at Rainwater Observatory), and on learning hands-on activities that can be used in the classroom to teach concepts of astronomy. The Observatory's web site includes an ask-an-astronomer feature, a virtual tour, information on the Sangre Astronomical Research Telescope (their newest research telescope), and an e-newsletter with information about upcoming programs and events and current headlines in space science.

  6. Streamlining volcano-related, web-based data display and design with a new U.S. Geological Survey Volcano Science Center website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, W. K.; Randall, M. J.; Cervelli, P. F.

    2011-12-01

    The goal of the newly designed U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Volcano Science Center website is to provide a reliable, easy to understand, and accessible format to display volcano monitoring data and scientific information on US volcanoes and their hazards. There are greater than 150 active or potentially active volcanoes in the United States, and the Volcano Science Center aims to advance the scientific understanding of volcanic processes at these volcanoes and to lessen the harmful impacts of potential volcanic activity. To fulfill a Congressional mandate, the USGS Volcano Hazards Program must communicate scientific findings to authorities and the public in a timely and understandable form. The easiest and most efficient way to deliver this information is via the Internet. We implemented a new database model to organize website content, ensuring consistency, accuracy, and timeliness of information display. Real-time monitoring data is available for over 50 volcanoes in the United States, and web-site visitors are able to interact with a dynamic, map-based display system to access and analyze these data, which are managed by scientists from the five USGS volcano observatories. Helicorders, recent hypocenters, webcams, tilt measurements, deformation, gas emissions, and changes in hydrology can be viewed for any of the real-time instruments. The newly designed Volcano Science Center web presence streamlines the display of research findings, hazard assessments, and real-time monitoring data for the U.S. volcanoes.

  7. The seismicity of Marapi volcano, West Sumatra.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Auria, L.

    2009-04-01

    Marapi is one of the active volcanoes in West Sumatra. It is a stratovolcano with an edifice that is elongated in the ENE-WSW direction. Its elevation is about 2,900 m a.s.l. The summit area is characterized by a caldera that contains some active craters aligned along the ENE-WSW direction. The Marapi volcano is an attractive region for tourists and hosts many small communities its surrounding areas. The recent history of Mt. Marapi is characterized by explosive activity at the summit craters. No lava flows have passed the rim of the summit caldera in recent times. The last eruption occurred on August 5, 2004, and consisted of moderate explosive activity from the central crater. In 1975 an eruption with magmatic and phreatic explosive phases and mudflows and lahars occurred that caused fatalities in the surrounding areas. Since 1980 other eruptions have occurred at Marapi volcano. Even if the explosive intensities of those eruptions have been small to moderate, in some cases, there were fatalities. A cooperation project started between Italy and Indonesia (COVIN) for the monitoring of volcanoes in West Sumatra. In the context of this project a monitoring centre has been set up at the Bukittinggi Observatory and a seismological monitoring system for Marapi volcano has been realized. This system is based on a broadband seismic network including 4 three-component stations. The data acquired by the broadband network of Marapi volcano are continuous recordings of the seismic signals starting from 19/10/2006. Volcano-Tectonic and Long Period events of Marapi volcano together with regional and teleseismic earthquakes are recorded. Several events of high magnitude located at short distances from the network were also recorded such as on March 6, 2007, when two events of Magnitudes Mw 6.4 and 6.3 were recorded with the epicentres near the Marapi volcano. During the following days, there was a sequence of hundreds of aftershocks. The preliminary analysis of the seismicity of the Marapi Volcano indicates that the broadband network installed under the joint Italy-Indonesia project provides great help for its study and for the monitoring of this active volcanic and seismogenic area.

  8. Frequency based satellite monitoring of small scale explosive activity at remote North Pacific volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worden, Anna; Dehn, Jonathan; Webley, Peter

    2014-10-01

    Monitoring of volcanoes in the North Pacific can be an expensive and sometimes dangerous task, specifically for those located in Alaska (USA) and Kamchatka (Russia). An active frequency detection method previously used at Stromboli, Italy, uses the thermal- and mid-infrared wavelength bands from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite data to detect anomalies at a volcano. This method focuses on small scale explosive activity, often referred to as Strombolian activity which can produce small spatter fields near a volcano's active vent. In the North Pacific, there are a number of volcanoes which exhibit small scale explosive activity and three are the focus of this study: Chuginadak (Mt. Cleveland) and Shishaldin in Alaska, and Karymsky Volcano in Kamchatka. Satellite images from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used to monitor the frequency of thermal features as well as the occurrence of ash plumes at each volcano. This data was then used to produce a time series spanning 2005-2010 for all three volcanoes. During this time period, each volcano underwent a series of eruptive cycles including background levels of activity, heightened frequency of small explosions (identified as precursory activity), and heightened activity typified by ash plume-producing eruptions. Each location has a unique precursory signal, both in timing and magnitude. The use of a previously developed method on a new sample set of volcanoes has proved the validity of this method as a monitoring tool for volcanoes with small scale explosive activity. This method should be applied to a larger set of volcanoes to continue the development and database production for its use as a volcano monitoring tool.

  9. ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER Winter 2007 of the first general study on offender recidivism in Alaska (page 5). · A look at incarceration rates in the U.S. as a whole and in Alaska, with a comparison of U.S. rates with rates of other nations (page 7). Total justice

  10. UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER, statewide African-Americans and Alaska Natives could expect to spend 7 days longer in predisposition might have explained some of the disparate outcomes. Preclearance under the Voting Rights Act Alaska

  11. ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE A PUBLICATION OF THE JUSTICE CENTER André B Justice Center examination ofAlaska State Trooper case files has revealed that the crime of stalking not charged often enough in Alaska. A charge of stalking can be applied in a wide range of situations, and its

  12. Volcano seismology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chouet, B.

    2003-01-01

    A fundamental goal of volcano seismology is to understand active magmatic systems, to characterize the configuration of such systems, and to determine the extent and evolution of source regions of magmatic energy. Such understanding is critical to our assessment of eruptive behavior and its hazardous impacts. With the emergence of portable broadband seismic instrumentation, availability of digital networks with wide dynamic range, and development of new powerful analysis techniques, rapid progress is being made toward a synthesis of high-quality seismic data to develop a coherent model of eruption mechanics. Examples of recent advances are: (1) high-resolution tomography to image subsurface volcanic structures at scales of a few hundred meters; (2) use of small-aperture seismic antennas to map the spatio-temporal properties of long-period (LP) seismicity; (3) moment tensor inversions of very-long-period (VLP) data to derive the source geometry and mass-transport budget of magmatic fluids; (4) spectral analyses of LP events to determine the acoustic properties of magmatic and associated hydrothermal fluids; and (5) experimental modeling of the source dynamics of volcanic tremor. These promising advances provide new insights into the mechanical properties of volcanic fluids and subvolcanic mass-transport dynamics. As new seismic methods refine our understanding of seismic sources, and geochemical methods better constrain mass balance and magma behavior, we face new challenges in elucidating the physico-chemical processes that cause volcanic unrest and its seismic and gas-discharge manifestations. Much work remains to be done toward a synthesis of seismological, geochemical, and petrological observations into an integrated model of volcanic behavior. Future important goals must include: (1) interpreting the key types of magma movement, degassing and boiling events that produce characteristic seismic phenomena; (2) characterizing multiphase fluids in subvolcanic regimes and determining their physical and chemical properties; and (3) quantitatively understanding multiphase fluid flow behavior under dynamic volcanic conditions. To realize these goals, not only must we learn how to translate seismic observations into quantitative information about fluid dynamics, but we also must determine the underlying physics that governs vesiculation, fragmentation, and the collapse of bubble-rich suspensions to form separate melt and vapor. Refined understanding of such processes-essential for quantitative short-term eruption forecasts-will require multidisciplinary research involving detailed field measurements, laboratory experiments, and numerical modeling.

  13. NeMO: New Millennium Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    NOAA's New Millennium Observatory (NeMO) "studies the dynamic interactions between submarine volcanic activity and seafloor hotsprings at an observatory, Axial seamount." The website presents a host of information on the participants, tools, and cruise plans for past, present, and scheduled expeditions. Researchers can learn about the Remote Access Sampler (RAS) and a Bottom Access Pressure Recorder (BPR) which transmits the latest data from the seafloor to the website. Through NeMO explorer, users can explore the seafloor with panorama, fly-throughs, and video clips. The education section offers stimulating curriculum materials where students can learn about mid-ocean ridges, hydrothermal vents, axial volcanoes, and much more.

  14. Dunsink Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Designed by Henry Ussher, the first astronomy professor of Trinity College Dublin, Dunsink Observatory (1783) incorporated modern designs such as ventilation in the observation room and a free-standing telescope support column. Among the past directors were the mathematician W R Hamilton (1827-65) and stellar dynamicist H C Plummer (1912-21). The main remaining instrument is a Grubb 12 ft (3.66 m...

  15. Observatory Collaboration

    E-print Network

    Waltham, Chris

    USA 1 J.M. Anaya, T.J. Bowles, S.J. Brice, Ernst­Ingo Esch, M.M. Fowler, Azriel Goldschmidt, 5 A. HimeThe Sudbury Neutrino Observatory The SNO Collaboration J. Boger, R.L. Hahn, J.K. Rowley Chemistry Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario K1S 5B6 CANADA 2 I. Blevis, F. Dalnoki­Veress, A. DeKok, J. Farine, 3

  16. Investigating Geothermal Activity, Volcanic Systems, and Deep Tectonic Tremor on Akutan Island, Alaska, with Array Seismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haney, M. M.; Prejean, S. G.; Ghosh, A.; Power, J. A.; Thurber, C. H.

    2012-12-01

    In addition to hosting one of the most active volcanoes in the Aleutian Arc, Akutan Island, Alaska, is the site of a significant geothermal resource within Hot Springs Bay Valley (HSBV). We deployed 15 broadband (30 s to 50 Hz) seismometers in and around HSBV during July 2012 as part of an effort to establish a baseline for background seismic activity in HSBV prior to geothermal production on the island. The stations recorded data on-site and were retrieved in early September 2012. Additional targets for the array include the tracking of deep tectonic tremor known to occur within the Aleutian subduction zone and the characterization of volcano-tectonic (VT) and deep long period (DLP) earthquakes from Akutan Volcano. Because 13 of the stations in the array sit within an area roughly 1.5 km by 1.5 km, we plan to apply methods based on stacking and beamforming to analyze the waveforms of extended signals lacking clear phase arrivals (e.g., tremor). The average spacing of the seismometers, roughly 350 m, provides sensitivity to frequencies between 2-8 Hz. The stacking process also increases the signal-to-noise ratio of small amplitude signals propagating across the array (e.g., naturally occurring geothermal seismicity). As of August 2012, several episodes of tectonic tremor have been detected in the vicinity of Akutan Island during the array deployment based on recordings from nearby permanent stations operated by the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). This is the first small-aperture array deployed in the Aleutian Islands and the results should serve as a guide for future array deployments along the Aleutian Arc as part of the upcoming EarthScope and GeoPRISMS push into Alaska. We demonstrate the power of array methods based on stacking at Akutan Volcano using a sequence of DLP earthquakes from June 11, 2012 that were recorded on the permanent AVO stations. We locate and characterize the lowest frequency portion of the signals at 0.5 Hz. At these low frequencies, the traditional "sparse" local network at Akutan effectively becomes a small-aperture array relative to the wavelength. We exploit the coherency among the stations and locate the DLPs by using a novel stacking method. The crux of the method involves scanning over all possible source locations and relative polarity combinations between the local stations to find the one that maximizes the stacked power at a well-defined region in the subsurface. As a result, the method is applicable even in the presence of mixed polarities. We discover that two of the stations at Akutan have DLP waveforms with opposite polarities compared to the other stations. Accounting for this polarity variation gives a DLP source location at 10 km depth, to the west-southwest of the Akutan summit caldera. These results give clear evidence for non-isotropic radiation patterns associated with DLPs and show the promise of array methods based on waveform stacking for providing future insights into the origin of volcanic as well as geothermal and tectonic seismicity.

  17. Global Volcano Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparks, R. S. J.; Loughlin, S. C.; Cottrell, E.; Valentine, G.; Newhall, C.; Jolly, G.; Papale, P.; Takarada, S.; Crosweller, S.; Nayembil, M.; Arora, B.; Lowndes, J.; Connor, C.; Eichelberger, J.; Nadim, F.; Smolka, A.; Michel, G.; Muir-Wood, R.; Horwell, C.

    2012-04-01

    Over 600 million people live close enough to active volcanoes to be affected when they erupt. Volcanic eruptions cause loss of life, significant economic losses and severe disruption to people's lives, as highlighted by the recent eruption of Mount Merapi in Indonesia. The eruption of Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland in 2010 illustrated the potential of even small eruptions to have major impact on the modern world through disruption of complex critical infrastructure and business. The effects in the developing world on economic growth and development can be severe. There is evidence that large eruptions can cause a change in the earth's climate for several years afterwards. Aside from meteor impact and possibly an extreme solar event, very large magnitude explosive volcanic eruptions may be the only natural hazard that could cause a global catastrophe. GVM is a growing international collaboration that aims to create a sustainable, accessible information platform on volcanic hazard and risk. We are designing and developing an integrated database system of volcanic hazards, vulnerability and exposure with internationally agreed metadata standards. GVM will establish methodologies for analysis of the data (eg vulnerability indices) to inform risk assessment, develop complementary hazards models and create relevant hazards and risk assessment tools. GVM will develop the capability to anticipate future volcanism and its consequences. NERC is funding the start-up of this initiative for three years from November 2011. GVM builds directly on the VOGRIPA project started as part of the GRIP (Global Risk Identification Programme) in 2004 under the auspices of the World Bank and UN. Major international initiatives and partners such as the Smithsonian Institution - Global Volcanism Program, State University of New York at Buffalo - VHub, Earth Observatory of Singapore - WOVOdat and many others underpin GVM.

  18. Lowell Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Home of the Clark Telescope, the Lowell Observatory's mission is to pursue the study of astronomy, especially the study of our solar system and its evolution, to conduct pure research in astronomical phenomena, and to maintain quality public education and outreach programs to bring the results of astronomical research to the general public. The Steele Visitor Center, the staging area for all daytime tours and evening programs, also houses the interactive exhibit hall, the Giclas Lecture Hall, and more. Known for its solar system research, Lowell astronomers are conducting investigations of near-Earth asteroids, planetary satellites and ring systems, Centaurs, Kuiper Belt objects, and comets. A decades long study of the photometric stability of the Sun also continues. The Discovery Channel Telescope is Lowell Observatory’s newest project to design and construct a powerful, 4.2-meter telescope. Currently under development, the Discovery Channel Telescope will significantly advance Lowell’s scientific research capabilities while providing opportunities for real-time global broadcasting and educational programming about astronomy and science.

  19. Volcanoes: On-Line Edition

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the on-line version of a general interest publication prepared by the United States Geological Survey (USGS). It provides a general introduction to volcanoes and volcanology. Topics include types of volcanoes; types of eruptions; submarine volcanoes; and features associated with volcanic terrains (geysers, hot springs, etc.). There is also discussion of volcanoes and their association to plate tectonics, extraterrestrial volcanoes, monitoring and research efforts, and the impacts of volcanoes on human populations. A text-only version is also available.

  20. Iceland's Grímsvötn volcano erupts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-05-01

    About 13 months after Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano began erupting on 14 April 2010, which led to extensive air traffic closures over Europe, Grímsvötn volcano in southeastern took its turn. Iceland's most active volcano, which last erupted in 2004 and lies largely beneath the Vatnajökull ice cap, began its eruption activity on 21 May, with the ash plume initially reaching about 20 kilometers in altitude, according to the Icelandic Meteorological Office. Volcanic ash from Grímsvötn has cancelled hundreds of airplane flights and prompted U.S. president Barack Obama to cut short his visit to Ireland. As Eos went to press, activity at the volcano was beginning to subside.

  1. Interdisciplinary studies of eruption at Chaitén volcano, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, John S.; Major, Jon J.; Pierson, Thomas C.; Holitt, Richard P.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Eichelberger, John C.; Luis, Lara; Moreno, Hugo; Muñoz, Jorge; Castro, Jonathan M.; Iroumé, Andrés; Andreoli, Andrea; Jones, Julia; Swanson, Fred; Crisafulli, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    High-silica rhyolite magma fuels Earth's largest and most explosive eruptions. Recurrence intervals for such highly explosive eruptions are in the 100- to 100,000-year time range, and there have been few direct observations of such eruptions and their immediate impacts. Consequently, there was keen interest within the volcanology community when the first large eruption of high-silica rhyolite since that of Alaska's Novarupta volcano in 1912 began on 1 May 2008 at Chaitén volcano, southern Chile, a 3-kilometer-diameter caldera volcano with a prehistoric record of rhyolite eruptions [Naranjo and Stern, 2004semi; Servicio Nacional de Geología y Minería (SERNAGEOMIN), 2008semi; Carn et al., 2009; Castro and Dingwell, 2009; Lara, 2009; Muñoz et al., 2009]. Vigorous explosions occurred through 8 May 2008, after which explosive activity waned and a new lava dome was extruded.

  2. Geologic map of the Gulkana B-1 quadrangle, south-central Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Richter, D.H.; Ratte, J.C.; Schmoll, H.R.; Leeman, W.P.; Smith, J.G.; Yehle, L.A.

    1989-01-01

    The quadrangle includes the Capital Mountain Volcano and the northern part of Mount Sanford Volcano in the Wrangell Mountains of south-central Alaska. The Capital Mountain volcano is a relatively small, andesitic shield volcano of Pleistocene age, which contains a 4-km-diameter summit caldera and a spectacular post-caldera radial dike swam. Lava flows from the younger Pleistocene Mount Sanford Volcano overlap the south side of the Capital Mountain Volcano. Copper-stained fractures in basaltic andesite related to a dike-filled rift of the North Sanford eruptive center are the only sign of mineralization in the quadrangle. Rock glaciers, deposits of Holocene and Pleistocene valley glaciers and Pleistocene Copper River basin glaciers mantle much of the volcanic bedrock below elevations of 5,500 ft.

  3. Volcano Resources for Educators

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site provides an up-to-date list of textual and video educational materials pertaining to volcanoes. The online pamphlets and books, hardcopy books, rental films and videos cover all levels of interest regarding volcanoes. The site furnishes the information or links to information needed to obtain these materials.

  4. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... height map   Ash from Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull volcano, viewed here in imagery from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer ... natural-color, nadir (vertical) view of the scene, with the volcano itself located outside the upper left corner of the image. The ash ...

  5. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... to capture a series of images of the Eyjafjallajökull volcano and its erupting ash plume. Figure 1 is a view from MISR's nadir ... The companion image, Figure 2, is a stereo anaglyph (see  Volcano Plume Heights Anaglyph ) generated from the nadir and 46-degree ...

  6. Chaiten Volcano Still Active

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This Boston Globe news article shows 12 stunning pictures of the Chaiten Volcano erupting in Chile, its first activity in over 9,000 years. The most recent eruptive phase of the volcano began on May 2, 2008, and is ongoing. The site also has a blog of open, public commentary.

  7. Volcanoes, Third Edition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christopher J. Nye

    1998-01-01

    It takes confidence to title a smallish book merely ``Volcanoes'' because of the impliction that the myriad facets of volcanism---chemistry, physics, geology, meteorology, hazard mitigation, and more---have been identified and addressed to some nontrivial level of detail. Robert and Barbara Decker have visited these different facets seamlessly in Volcanoes, Third Edition. The seamlessness comes from a broad overarching, interdisciplinary, professional

  8. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    article title:  Eyjafjallajökull Volcano Plume Heights     View ... volcano produced its second major ash plume of 2010 beginning on May 7. Unlike the response to the earlier eruption, which began on April 14, 2010, the reaction to the new plume was better informed. Aircraft were diverted ...

  9. Volcano's Deadly Warning

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site highlights the Nova television program Volcano's Deadly Warning broadcast in November of 2002. In addition to a description of the program, which included information on the eruptions of Galeras and Nevado del Ruiz in Columbia and Popocatepetl in Mexico, the site has four other sections. There is an interactive slide show that includes information about ash, lava flow, lava domes, lava, vents, tephra, calderas, lahars, fissures, dikes, and magmas; a section where one can discover the hidden signatures that volcanologists seek in the noise emanating from a restless volcano; a section where Bernard Chouet of the United States Geological Surveys Volcano Hazard Team describes the mysterious seismic signal he discovered that hints when a volcano might blow; and an interview with Dan Miller of the Volcano Disaster Assistance Program discussing their work with other countries, including the success at Mt. Pinatubo in the Philippines in 1991.

  10. The Evolution of Large Shield Volcanoes on Venus Robert R. Herrick

    E-print Network

    Herrick, Robert R.

    1 The Evolution of Large Shield Volcanoes on Venus Robert R. Herrick Lunar and Planetary Institute Author: Robert R. Herrick Geophysical Institute University of Alaska Fairbanks 903 Koyukuk Dr. Fairbanks by retrograde subduction and or delamination [Janes et al., 1992; Sandwell and Schubert, 1992; Koch and Manga

  11. Studies of Strong Langmuir Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Sheerin; M. E. Bacon; J. M. Gerres; B. J. Watkins; W. A. Bristow; S. I. Oyama; C. J. Heinselman

    2008-01-01

    High power HF transmitters have induced a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from a series of such experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) in comprehensive studies of strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied are:

  12. The volcanoes of Auckland city

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. J. Searle

    1962-01-01

    This article considers that portion of the Auckland volcanic field included in the isthmus west of Tamaki Inlet. The volcanoes (late Pleistocene-Recent) are described in four groups: the dominantly tuff-producing volcanoes of the c.entral city area; the mainly effusive volcanoes of Wraitemata lava field; the volcanoes of Manukau lava field and the associated Epsom tuff deposit: and the volcanoes of

  13. Northern Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Seasonal ice in the Beaufort Sea off Alaska's North Slope has begun its spring retreat. This true color MODIS image from March 18, 2002, shows the pack ice in the Chuckchi Sea (left) and Beaufort Sea (top) backing away from its winter position snug up against Alaska's coasts, beginning its retreat into the Arctic Ocean. While not as pronounced in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas as other part of the Arctic, scientists studying Arctic sea ice over the course of the century have documented dramatic changes in the extent of Arctic sea ice. It retreats farther in the summer and does not advance as far in the winter than it did a half-century ago. Both global warming and natural variation in regional weather systems have been proposed as causes. Along the coastal plain of the North Slope, gray-brown tracks (see high-resolution image) hint at melting rivers. South of the North Slope, the rugged mountains of the Brooks Range make a coast-to-coast arc across the state. Coming in at the lower right of the image, the Yukon River traces a frozen white path westward across half the image before veering south and out of view. Credit: Jacques Descloitres, MODIS Land Rapid Response Team, NASA/GSFC

  14. University of Alaska Graduate Survey

    E-print Network

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    University of Alaska Graduate Survey 2012 Prepared for: University of Alaska March 2013 #12;University of Alaska Graduate Survey 2012 Prepared for: University of Alaska Prepared by: Juneau · Anchorage ............................................................................................................................... 60 Survey Instrument

  15. Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Page 1 Alaska Justice Forum ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM Winter 2000 UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Vol. 16, No. 4 A Publication of the Justice Center Alaska Justice Statistical Analysis Unit Please see Alaska Natives, page 4 HIGHLIGHTS INSIDE THIS ISSUE · An examination of victimization of Alaska Natives

  16. Haystack Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Radio astronomy programs comprise three very-long-baseline interferometer projects, ten spectral line investigations, one continuum mapping in the 0.8 cm region, and one monitoring of variable sources. A low-noise mixer was used in mapping observations of 3C273 at 31 GHz and in detecting of a new methyl alcohol line at 36,169 MHz in Sgr B2. The new Mark 2 VLBI recording terminal was used in galactic H2O source observations using Haystack and the Crimean Observatory, USSR. One feature in W29 appears to have a diameter of 0.3 millisec of arc and a brightness temperature of 1.4 x 10 to the 15th power K. Geodetic baseline measurements via VLBI between Green Bank and Haystack are mutually consistent within a few meters. Radar investigations of Mercury, Venus, Mars, and the Moon have continued. The favorable opposition of Mars and improvements in the radar permit measurements on a number of topographic features with unprecedented accuracy, including scarps and crater walls. The floor of Mare Serenitatis slopes upward towards the northeast and is also the location of a strong gravitational anomaly.

  17. Volcano-Ice Interactions During Recent Eruptions of Aleutian Arc Volcanoes and Implications for Melt Water Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waythomas, C. F.

    2013-12-01

    Recent eruptions in Alaska (Redoubt 2009; Pavlof 2007, 2013; Veniaminof 2013) all involved ice eruptive-product interactions that led to variable amounts of melt water generation. Production of melt water during explosive eruptions is the primary mechanism for lahar generation, which is a significant and sometimes-deadly hazard at snow and ice clad volcanoes. During the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano, pyroclastic flows produced by explosive destruction of lava domes swept across and eroded glacier ice and generated large quantities of melt water that formed correspondingly large lahars (107-109 m3) in the Drift River valley north of the volcano. Three of the twenty lahars generated during the eruption were large enough to threaten an oil storage facility 40 km from the volcano. During eruptions of Pavlof Volcano in 2007 and 2013 spatter-fed lava flows and minor pyroclastic flows descended over snow and ice on the upper flanks of the volcano and produced some melt water that generated lahars in the associated drainages. These lahars were smaller than those associated with the 2009 eruption of Redoubt Volcano because the melt water generation mechanism was different. At Veniaminof Volcano, a low-level eruption beginning in June 2013 produced small lava flows that flowed passively over glacier ice and produced only limited amounts of melt water. Although melt pits surrounding the lava flows eventually developed, the rate of melt water production was gradual and no significant outflows of water occurred. These eruptions and comparison with past events highlight the various mechanisms for melt water production during eruptive activity at snow and ice clad Alaskan volcanoes. Dynamic emplacement of eruptive products over glacier ice that involves significant erosion of ice and snow leads to production of large volumes of melt water. Less dynamic, but still energetic interactions such as those that have occurred at Pavlof Volcano, produce smaller amounts of melt and correspondingly smaller volume lahars whose distribution is controlled in part by changes in the location of the summit vent. Effusive, subaerial eruptions at Veniaminof Volcano result in the smallest amount of meltwater production, mainly because the lava-ice interaction is not very dynamic and only a small proportion of the heat flux goes to melt ice.

  18. Anatomy of a Volcano

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2005-12-17

    In this interactive activity from NOVA Online, explore the main features of the Nyiragongo volcano, located in the Democratic Republic of Congo, and learn what risks it poses to the 500,000 people who live in its shadow.

  19. Volcano Watch Satellite Images

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center displays these satellite images of the world's ten most active volcanoes. Users can view images of the Colima Volcano in Central Mexico or Mount Etna in Sicily, Italy. The latest images are updated every half-hour. Also, a Java animation feature splices together the last four images to show a simulation over a two-hour period.

  20. Global synthesis of volcano deformation: Results of the Volcano Deformation Task Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. E.; Jay, J.; Biggs, J.; Ebmeier, S. K.; Delgado, F.

    2013-12-01

    Ground deformation in volcanic regions is being observed more frequently -- the number of known deforming volcanoes has increased from 44 in 1997 to more than 210 in 2013 thanks in large part thanks to the availability of satellite InSAR observations. With the launch of new SAR satellites in the coming years devoted to global deformation monitoring, the number of well-studied episodes of volcano deformation will continue to increase. But evaluating the significance of the observed deformation is not always straightforward -- how often do deformation episodes lead to eruption? Are there certain characteristics of the deformation or the volcano that make the linkage between deformation and eruption more robust -- for example the duration or magnitude of the ground deformation and/or the composition and tectonic setting of the volcano? To answer these questions, a global database of volcano deformation events is needed. Recognizing the need for global information on volcano deformation and the opportunity to address it with InSAR and other techniques, we formed the Volcano Deformation Database Task force as part of Global Volcano Model. The three objectives of our organization are: 1) to compile deformation observations of all volcanoes globally into appropriate formats for WOVOdat and the Global Volcanism Program of the Smithsonian Institution. 2) document any relation between deformation events and eruptions for the Global assessment of volcanic hazard and risk report for 2015 (GAR15) for the UN. 3) to better link InSAR and other remote sensing observations to volcano observatories. We present the first results from our global study of the relation between deformation and eruptions, including case studies of particular eruptions. We compile a systematically-observed catalog of >500 volcanoes with observation windows up to 20 years. Of 90 volcanoes showing deformation, 40 erupted. The positive predictive value (PPV = 0.44) linking deformation and eruption on this timescale indicates ';strong' evidential worth. The negative predictive value (NPV = 0.94) linking non-deformation with non-eruption, is even stronger. But, linking individual deformation events to eruptions is unreliable with existing InSAR data that are rarely available in the critical days to weeks before the eruption of a volcano that has been dormant for decades to millenia. For example, while ground deformation was observed before the 2011 eruptions of Cordon Caulle and Cerro Hudson (both in Chile), the observations were too infrequent to see any change in the pattern or rate of deformation before the eruptions. Before 2011, Cordon Caulle and Cerro Hudson both erupted in the 20th century, but the 2008 eruption of Chaiten (also in Chile) was preceded by centuries of dormancy and still had no measured precursory deformation up to two weeks before eruption. New InSAR missions with more frequent observations along with ground observations from tiltmeters and GPS are essential to constrain whether there is a reliable deformation signal before eruption.

  1. Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This ASTER image of Teshekpuk Lake on Alaska's North Slope, within the National Petroleum Reserve, was acquired on August 15, 2000. It covers an area of 58.7 x 89.9 km, and is centered near 70.4 degrees north latitude, 153 degrees west longitude.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission Directorate.

    Size: 58.7 by 89.9 kilometers (36.4 by 55.7 miles) Location: 70.4 degrees North latitude, 153 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER Bands 3, 2, and 1 Original Data Resolution: ASTER 30 meters (98.4 feet) Dates Acquired: August 15, 2000

  2. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use of the ASTER Urgent Request Protocol (URP) for natural disaster monitoring and scientific analysis, has expanded the project to other volcanoes around the world and is in progress through 2011. The focus on ASTER data is due to the suitability of the sensor for natural disaster monitoring and the availability of data. The instrument has several unique facets that make it especially attractive for volcanic observations (Ramsey and Dehn, 2004). Specifically, ASTER routinely collects data at night, it has the ability to generate digital elevation models using stereo imaging, it can collect data in various gain states to minimize data saturation, it has a cross-track pointing capability for faster targeting, and it collects data up to ±85° latitude for better global coverage. As with any optical imaging-based remote sensing, the viewing conditions can negatively impact the data quality. This impact varies across the optical and thermal infrared wavelengths as well as being a function of the specific atmospheric window within a given wavelength region. Water vapor and cloud formation can obscure surface data in the visible and near infrared (VNIR)/shortwave infrared (SWIR) region due mainly to non-selective scattering of the incident photons. In the longer wavelengths of the thermal infrared (TIR), scattering is less of an issue, but heavy cloud cover can still obscure the ground due to atmospheric absorption. Thin clouds can be optically-transparent in the VNIR and TIR regions, but can cause errors in the extracted surface reflectance or derived surface temperatures. In regions prone to heavy cloud cover, optical remote sensing can be improved through increased temporal resolution. As more images are acquired in a given time period the chances of a clear image improve dramatically. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) routine monitoring, which commonly collects 4-6 images per day of any north Pacific volcano, takes advantage of this fact. The rapid response program described in this chapter also improves the temporal resolution of the AS

  3. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE RESOLVES VOLCANOES ON IO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This picture is a composite of a black and white near infrared image of Jupiter and its satellite Io and a color image of Io at shorter wavelengths taken at almost the same time on March 5, 1994. These are the first images of a giant planet or its satellites taken by NASA's Hubble Space Telescope (HST) since the repair mission in December 1993. Io is too small for ground-based telescopes to see the surface details. The moon's angular diameter of one arc second is at the resolution limit of ground based telescopes. Many of these markings correspond to volcanoes that were first revealed in 1979 during the Voyager spacecraft flyby of Jupiter. Several of the volcanoes periodically are active because Io is heated by tides raised by Jupiter's powerful gravity. The volcano Pele appears as a dark spot surrounded by an irregular orange oval in the lower part of the image. The orange material has been ejected from the volcano and spread over a huge area. Though the volcano was first discovered by Voyager, the distinctive orange color of the volcanic deposits is a new discovery in these HST images. (Voyager missed it because its cameras were not sensitive to the near-infrared wavelengths where the color is apparent). The sulfur and sulfur dioxide that probably dominate Io's surface composition cannot produce this orange color, so the Pele volcano must be generating material with a more unusual composition, possibly rich in sodium. The Jupiter image, taken in near-infrared light, was obtained with HST's Wide Field and Planetary Camera in wide field mode. High altitude ammonia crystal clouds are bright in this image because they reflect infrared light before it is absorbed by methane in Jupiter's atmosphere. The most prominent feature is the Great Red Spot, which is conspicuous because of its high clouds. A cap of high-altitude haze appears at Jupiter's south pole. The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science. Credit: John Spencer, Lowell Observatory; NASA

  4. Malaspina Glacier, Alaska

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This image from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument on NASA's Terra satellite covers an area of 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) over the southwest part of the Malaspina Glacier and Icy Bay in Alaska. The composite of infrared and visible bands results in the snow and ice appearing light blue, dense vegetation is yellow-orange and green, and less vegetated, gravelly areas are in orange. According to Dr. Dennis Trabant (U.S. Geological Survey, Fairbanks, Alaska), the Malaspina Glacier is thinning. Its terminal moraine protects it from contact with the open ocean; without the moraine, or if sea level rises sufficiently to reconnect the glacier with the ocean, the glacier would start calving and retreat significantly. ASTER data are being used to help monitor the size and movement of some 15,000 tidal and piedmont glaciers in Alaska. Evidence derived from ASTER and many other satellite and ground-based measurements suggests that only a few dozen Alaskan glaciers are advancing. The overwhelming majority of them are retreating.

    This ASTER image was acquired on June 8, 2001. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER will image Earth for the next six years to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18,1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., is the U.S. science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. ASTER is the only high-resolution imaging sensor on Terra. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, along-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    Size: 55 by 40 kilometers (34 by 25 miles) Location: 60.0 degrees North latitude, 140.7 degrees West longitude Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 2, 3 and 4 Original Data Resolution: 15 meters (49 feet) Date Acquired: June 8, 2001

  5. Volcanoes: Coming Up from Under.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Science and Children, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Provides specific information about the eruption of Mt. St. Helens in March 1980. Also discusses how volcanoes are formed and how they are monitored. Words associated with volcanoes are listed and defined. (CS)

  6. Alaska's Economy: What's Ahead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Review of Social and Economic Conditions, 1987

    1987-01-01

    This review describes Alaska's economic boom of the early 1980s, the current recession, and economic projections for the 1990s. Alaska's economy is largely influenced by oil prices, since petroleum revenues make up 80% of the state government's unrestricted general fund revenues. Expansive state spending was responsible for most of Alaska's…

  7. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  8. Alaska Native Hispanic or

    E-print Network

    Kunkle, Tom

    fCOLLEGEo CHARLESTON American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native Hawaiian or Other Enrolled American Indian or Alaska Native Asian Black or African American Hispanic or Latino Native

  9. Alaska Women: A Databook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Karen; Baker, Barbara

    This data book uses survey and census information to record social and economic changes of the past three decades and their effects upon the role of Alaska women in society. Results show Alaska women comprise 47% of the state population, an increase of 9% since 1950. Marriage continues as the predominant living arrangement for Alaska women,…

  10. Michigan Technological University Volcanoes Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This site offers links to current volcanic activity reports, volcanic hazards mitigation, information on Central American volcanoes, remote sensing of volcanoes, volcanologic research in online journals, and more. There are also links to a site with information on becoming a volcanologist, and a comics page of volcano humor.

  11. THE GEOLOGIC RISK IN THE LAKE KIVU BASIN AREA PRODUCTED BY EARTHQUAKES. Case of the February 3th 2008 earthquake. By: L.M.Bagalwa(1), F.Lukaya(1), M.Burume(2), J.Moeyerson(3) (1): Goma Volcano Observatory, D.R.Congo (2): Naturals Sciences Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagalwa Rukeza, Montfort

    2010-05-01

    The eastern Democratic Republic of Congo is prone to earthquakes of magnitude greater than or equal to 4 on the Richter scale. The western edge of Lake Kivu, the most populated part of the region is no exception to the solicitation of these earthquakes. Since 1997, the western basin of Lake Kivu is experiencing intense seismicity, several earthquakes of great intensity, magnitude greater than or equal to 4 develop major destructive phenomena. These include the 1997 earthquake (M = 4.7) 2000 (M = 4.6 and 5.4), 2002 (M = 4.9, 5.2, 6.1 and 24 October 2002 M = 6.2) of February 3rd 2008 (M = 6). Earthquakes of Kalehe on October 24th 2002 and Birava, February 3rd 2008 have resulted deformations of soil, human and material damage. This latest natural disaster ever known in the south-western basin of Lake Kivu has attracted our scientific curiosity we go there to inquire into its causes and consequences in this region. The basin of Lake Kivu is affected by transform faults emerging (MUKONKI & CHOROWICZ, 1980, quoted by K.S.KAVOTHA & ali, 1990) that delimit the Rift were intersecting at the level of Lake Kivu. We Consider the seismicity, volcanism and uplift of the basin of Lake Kivu as a sign of fracturing under way to delimit a plate tectonics formed (Wong and Von Herzen, 1974, quoted by KSKAVOTHA et al, 1990). The physiography of Lake Kivu is dominated by the fault which borders the western shore and one which intersects the island of Idjwi. The telemetry data of Goma Volcano Observatory added to those of the seismographic station of Lwiro have always revealed a pattern of epicenters clearer in Lake Kivu. In correlation with the faults of the region, earthquakes affect mainly the western edge of Lake Kivu and the island of Idjwi with increasing density from north to south (K.S.KAVOTHA et al, 1990). The great earthquake of Lake Kivu basin on February 03rd 2008, of magnitude 6 on the Richter scale occurred at 07 hours 34 minutes 12 seconds GMT, about 20 km north of Bukavu, 80km south-west of Goma, between 02,314S and 028,896E, at a depth of 10km epicentral surface. Three major aftershocks followed to this great earthquake and were recorded at the seismographic station of Lwiro and the Goma Volcano Observatory: 1. The first after shock at 10 hours 56minutes 10seconds AM GMT, of magnitude 5.0, located at 20km depth and oriented on the north-east of Bukavu and 80km depth on the west of Butare in Rwanda between 02.456 S and 029.039 E. 2. The second after shock at 11 hours 07 minutes AM GMT, of magnitude 4.7, located at 25km depth on the north-east of Bukavu and 75 km depth on the south-west of Goma, between 02.307S and 028.997E. 3. The third after shock at 11hours 37minutes 49secondes AM GMT, of magnitude 4.5, located at 40km depth on the west of Butare in Rwanda and 55km depth on the east of Bukavu between 02.525S and 029.363E (Lukaya N'yombo Fr,11 February 2008). Other after shocks not indicated in this text was shacked the western of Lake Kivu basin. This great earthquake and its first two aftershocks were located in the south western of Lake Kivu basin, in Ishungu and Birava region in territory of Kabare. The damage is observed on a radius of approximately 20 km. This earthquake has reactivated the faults along the western shore of the Lake Kivu, but also those of the Fomulac-Kakondo-Ishungu-Birava axis. Those in Bukavu town, the South and North direction have not escaped at this reactivation. The movement of these faults has caused deformations in the surface soil and buildings erected on these flaws have suffered cracks and destruction. We will present damages of this natural risk in our poster presentation.

  12. A seafloor experiment to monitor vertical deformation at the Lucky Strike volcano, Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Valérie Ballu; Jérome Ammann; Olivier Pot; Olivier de Viron; Glenn S. Sasagawa; Gilles Reverdin; Marie-Noelle Bouin; Mathilde Cannat; Christine Deplus; Sébastien Deroussi; Marcia Maia; Michel Diament

    2009-01-01

    Decades of cruise-based exploration have provided excellent snapshots of the structure of mid-ocean ridges and have revealed\\u000a that accretion is a mixture of steady-state and quantum events. Observatory-type studies are now needed to quantify the temporal\\u000a evolution of these systems. A multi-disciplinary seafloor observatory site is currently being set up at the Lucky Strike volcano,\\u000a in the axial valley of

  13. Earthquakes and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2001-01-01

    This activity has students compare maps of plate tectonics with population density maps and to analyze what these maps imply about the relationship between population and seismic hazards. Students will read about and discuss the theory of plate tectonics, map the regions of the United States that are most susceptible to earthquakes and those that have volcanoes, and list the states that lie on plate boundaries. In addition, they will look at a population density map to determine if people avoid living in areas at high risk for earthquakes and volcanoes. Students will also research specific volcanoes or earthquake zones and write pretend letters to residents of these areas describing the risks. This site also contains suggestions for assessment and ideas for extending the lesson.

  14. UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE

    E-print Network

    Duddleston, Khrys

    UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE #12;UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA ANCHORAGE Dear Student, Congratulations on taking the first step toward becoming a college student. At the University of Alaska Anchorage, you Director of Admissions University of Alaska Anchorage Welcome to the UNIVERSITY OF ALASKA Anchorage! #12

  15. Volcano: Tectonic Environments

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Victor Camp

    This site describes where volcanoes are found in terms of plate tectonics and explains why they occur at those locations. S map shows that volcanoes are located mainly at plate boundaries. Then there are explanations for plate motion, mantle convection, and magma generation. The three types of plate boundaries are listed as divergent, convergent, and transform. There is also information about the relationship between types of boundaries and types of volcanism and the fact that intraplate volcanism describes volcanic eruptions within tectonic plates. The site features a diagram that depicts each type, with a link for more information about the Earth's internal heat energy and interior structure.

  16. The Worlds Deadliest Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    At this interactive site the student attempts to rate the eruption of a volcano according to the Volcanic Explosive Index (VEI). After seeing the step by step eruption of an actual volcano, the student is introduced to VEI scale, which includes a description of the eruption, volume of ejected material, plume height, eruption type, duration, total known eruptions with that VEI, and an example. Each factor is linked to a section where it is explained in detail. After evaluating all of the factors and rating them, the student selects a VEI number and clicks for feedback. The correct answer is given with an explanation.

  17. Astronomical Observatories in Kazakhstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironov, A. V.; Tereshchenko, V. M.

    1998-03-01

    A short description of three astronomical observatories of Kazakhstan situated in the northern Tien-Shan mountains is given, including instrumentation, scientific research directions and climate conditions. The observatories may be considered as convenient sites for WET observations.

  18. Denali Geographic 2012 : A University led scientific field experience for High School students at the Alaska Summer Research Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shipman, J. S.; Webley, P. W.; Burke, S.; Chebul, E.; Dempsey, A.; Hastings, H.; Terry, R.; Drake, J.

    2012-12-01

    The Alaska Summer Research Academy (ASRA) annually provides the opportunity for ~150 exceptional high school students to engage in scientific exploration at the university level. In July 2012, University of Alaska Fairbanks instructors led a two-week long ASRA module, called 'Denali Geographic', where eight student participants from across the USA and Canada learned how to observe changes in the natural world and design their own experiments for a field expedition to Denali National Park and Preserve, with assistance from the National Park Service. Each student designed an experiment/observational project prior to the expedition to investigate changes across the expanse of the park. Projects included wildlife documentation; scat and track observations; soil ph and moisture with elevation and vegetation changes; wildflowers species distribution; waterborne insect populations; atmospheric pressure and temperature variations; construction of sustainable buildings to minimize human impact on the park; and park geology comparisons between outcrop and distal stream deposits. The students learned how to design experiments, purchase supplies needed to conduct the work, and select good locations in which to sample in the park. Students used equipment such as GPS to mark field locations; a range finder to determine distance from wildlife; a hygrometer for temperature and pressure; nets and sorting equipments to analyze insects; and the preparation of Plaster of Paris for creating casts of animal tracks. All observations were documented in their field notebooks and blog entries made to share their experiences. Day excursions as part of the module included Poker Flats Research Range, where students learned about the use of unmanned aerial vehicles in scientific exploration; Alaska Volcano Observatory, where students learned about volcanic hazards in Alaska and the North Pacific; Chena Hot Springs and the Ice Museum, where students learned about thermal imaging using a Forward Looking Infrared Radiometer; and Pioneer Park to learn how to pan for gold. After the completion of the expedition, students had to then synthesize each of their research projects and create a collaborative presentation of their findings. On the final day of the camp, students delivered a presentation to 150 of their peers and instructors in the other ASRA modules. Presented here are details of the field camp and experiences gained by the students. The camp and two-week long module showed students how to pursue their own curiosities about the natural world. By encouraging students to take an idea and develop it into a research topic, we engaged them in the scientific method and illustrated possibilities for future avenues of academic study.

  19. Brooks Astronomical Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Brooks Astronomical Observatory, located at Central Michigan University, was built for research and public use. The website presents the history of the Observatory and its technological capabilities. Users can find a long list of scientific publications based on research performed at the observatory. The numerous astronomical topics researched include asteroids, stellar clusters, occultations, and light pollution. Individuals can view fantastic images of comets, planets, and other space phenomena collected at the Observatory.

  20. The Outlier State: Alaska’s FY 2012 Budget

    E-print Network

    McBeath, Jerry; Corbin, Tanya Buhler

    2012-01-01

    Although prices for Alaska North Slope (ANS) crude stayed inexplore for oil on the Alaska North Slope. It promised a “Alaska has a clearly identified 35 billion cubic meters of natural gas on the North Slope,

  1. Nyamuragira Volcano Erupts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Nyamuragira volcano erupted on July 26, 2002, spewing lava high into the air along with a large plume of steam, ash, and sulfur dioxide. The 3,053-meter (10,013-foot) volcano is located in eastern Congo, very near that country's border with Rwanda. Nyamuragira is the smaller, more violent sibling of Nyiragongo volcano, which devastated the town of Goma with its massive eruption in January 2002. Nyamuragira is situated just 40 km (24 miles) northeast of Goma. This pair of images was acquired by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA's Terra satellite, on July 26. The image on the left shows the scene in true color. The small purple box in the upper righthand corner marks the location of Nyamuragira's hot summit. The false-color image on the right shows the plume from the volcano streaming southwestward. This image was made using MODIS' channels sensitive at wavelengths from 8.5 to 11 microns. Red pixels indicate high concentrations of sulphur dioxide. Image courtesy Liam Gumley, Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison

  2. Iceland: Eyjafjallajökull Volcano

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-17

    ... of the plume features between camera views. A quantitative computer analysis is necessary to separate out wind and height (see  Volcano ... NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Terra spacecraft is managed ...

  3. The Super Volcano Game

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    British Broadcasting Corporation

    How would you handle a volcano diasater? In this game, you've just been appointed chief of the Emergency Management Agency for Bluebear County. Everyone is counting on you to handle the eruption of Mount Spur. Download this game to find out. Before you play, make sure Flash is installed on your computer.

  4. Geology of Kilauea volcano

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, R.B. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Federal Center); Trusdell, F.A. (Geological Survey, Hawaii National Park, HI (United States). Hawaiian Volcano Observatory)

    1993-08-01

    This paper summarizes studies of the structure, stratigraphy, petrology, drill holes, eruption frequency, and volcanic and seismic hazards of Kilauea volcano. All the volcano is discussed, but the focus is on its lower east rift zone (LERZ) because active exploration for geothermal energy is concentrated in that area. Kilauea probably has several separate hydrothermal-convection systems that develop in response to the dynamic behavior of the volcano and the influx of abundant meteoric water. Important features of some of these hydrothermal-convection systems are known through studies of surface geology and drill holes. Observations of eruptions during the past two centuries, detailed geologic mapping, radiocarbon dating, and paleomagnetic secular-variation studies indicate that Kilauea has erupted frequently from its summit and two radial rift zones during Quaternary time. Petrologic studies have established that Kilauea erupts only tholeiitic basalt. Extensive ash deposits at Kilauea's summit and on its LERZ record locally violent, but temporary, disruptions of local hydrothermal-convection systems during the interaction of water or steam with magma. Recent drill holes on the LERZ provide data on the temperatures of the hydrothermal-convection systems, intensity of dike intrusion, porosity and permeability, and an increasing amount of hydrothermal alteration with depth. The prehistoric and historic record of volcanic and seismic activity indicates that magma will continue to be supplied to deep and shallow reservoirs beneath Kilauea's summit and rift zones and that the volcano will be affected by eruptions and earthquakes for many thousands of years. 71 refs., 2 figs.

  5. The Three Little Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    In this worksheet students identify and label the characteristic features of shield, cinder cone and composite volcanoes. The resource is part of the teacher's guide accompanying the video, NASA Why Files: The Case of the Mysterious Red Light. Lesson objectives supported by the video, additional resources, teaching tips and an answer sheet are included in the teacher's guide.

  6. What Are Volcano Hazards?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... of Mount St. Helens, Washington, fell over an area of 22,000 square miles in the Western United States. Heavy ash fall can collapse buildings, and even minor ash fall can damage crops, electronics, and machinery. Volcanic Gases Volcanoes emit gases during eruptions. Even when a ...

  7. FIRE_CI1_SRB_ALASKA

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-05-06

    FIRE_CI1_SRB_ALASKA Project Title:  FIRE I CIRRUS Discipline:  ... Guide Documents:  SRB Data Set Guide - Alaska, Canada, So Pole, Switz Readme Files:  Readme SRB Alaska Header SRB Alaska Table of Contents SRB Alaska ...

  8. On Relations between Current Global Volcano Databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newhall, C. G.; Siebert, L.; Sparks, S.

    2009-12-01

    The Smithsonian’s Volcano Reference File (VRF), the database that underlies Volcanoes of the World and This Dynamic Planet, is the premier source for the “what, when, where, and how big?” of Holocene and historical eruptions. VOGRIPA (Volcanic Global Risk Identification and Analysis) will catalogue details of large eruptions, including specific phenomena and their impacts. CCDB (Collapse Caldera Database) also considers large eruptions with an emphasis on the resulting calderas. WOVOdat is bringing monitoring data from the world’s observatories into a centralized database in common formats, so that they can be searched and compared during volcanic crises and for research on preeruption processes. Oceanographic and space institutions worldwide have growing archives of volcano imagery and derivative products. Petrologic databases such as PETRODB and GEOROC offer compositions of many erupted and non-erupted magmas. Each of these informs and complements the others. Examples of interrelations include: ? Information in the VRF about individual volcanoes is the starting point and major source of background “volcano” data in WOVOdat, VOGRIPA, and petrologic databases. ? Images and digital topography from remote sensing archives offer high-resolution, consistent geospatial "base maps" for all of the other databases. ? VRF data about eruptions shows whether unrest of WOVOdat culminated in an eruption and, if yes, its type and magnitude. ? Data from WOVOdat fills in the “blanks” between eruptions in the VRF. ? VOGRIPA adds more detail to the VRF’s descriptions of eruptions, including quantification of runout distances, expanded estimated column heights and eruption impact data, and other parameters not included in the Smithsonian VRF. ? Petrologic databases can add detail to existing petrologic data of the VRF, WOVOdat, and VOGRIPA, e.g, detail needed to estimate viscosity of melt and its influence on magma and eruption dynamics ? Hazard information in the VRF and VOGRIPA, based on geologic records and written history, is updated by WOVOdat and current monitoring. ? For event trees that estimate probabilities of both eruptions and their effects, WOVOdat, VRF, and VOGRIPA will all be co-contributors. Collectively, these databases will enable new studies of relations between tectonics, magma generation and transport, degassing, eruptions, and eruption aftermaths, and better probabilistic eruption forecasts and dynamic hazard and risk assessments; fragility curves; and cost-benefit analysis of mitigation decisions.

  9. The Alaska Climate Research Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The University of Fairbanks's Alaska Climate Research Center offers a host of materials about its climate research and about Alaska's climate in general. The website supplies abstracts of the Center's research projects such as _The Urban Heat Island Effect at Fairbanks, Alaska_ and _Radiation Climatology of Alaska_. Researchers can find data and statistics on Alaska's temperature, humidity, precipitation, cloudiness, pressure, and wind. The website provides Climographs for various areas throughout the state. Students can discover how latitude, continentiality, and elevation affect Alaska's climate.

  10. Holocene Tephrochronology from Lake Sediments, Redoubt Volcano, Alaska

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. J. Schiff; D. S. Kaufman; K. L. Wallace

    2006-01-01

    Lake sediments in volcanically active areas provide a geological archive of tephra-fall events because sedimentation often occurs continuously and organic material for 14C dating is commonly available; lake sediments, therefore, contain valuable information about tephra fall and associated hazards. Recovering tephra-fall records from lakes requires careful site selection, core recovery, and tephra age assignments. A 5.6-m-long lake sediment core from

  11. Third International Volcanological Field School in Kamchatka and Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, D.; Eichelberger, J.; Gordeev, E.; Malcolm, J.; Shipman, J.; Izbekov, P.

    2005-12-01

    The Kamchatka State University, Institute of Volcanology and Seismology FEB RAS (Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, Russia) and University of Alaska Fairbanks have developed an international field school focused on explosive volcanism of the North Pacific. The concept of the field school envisages joint field studies by young Russian scientists and their peers from the United States and Japan. Beyond providing first-hand experience with some of Earth's most remarkable volcanic features, the intent is to foster greater interest in language study, cultures, and ultimately in international research collaborations. The students receive both theoretical and practical knowledge of active volcanic systems, as well experience in working productively in a harsh environment. Each year, the class is offered in both Alaska and Kamchatka. The Alaska session is held in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes, Katmai National Park, product of the greatest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. A highlight in 2005 was the discovery of a new 70-m crater atop Trident Volcano. Also this year, we added the Great Tolbachik Eruption of 1975-76 to the itinerary of the Kamchatka school. Day trips were conducted to summit craters of New Tolbachik volcanoes and Plosky Tolbachik, Tolbachik lava flows; fumarole fields of Mutnovsky volcano, and a geothermal area and 60 MWe power plant. Students who attended both the Alaska and Kamchatka sessions could ponder the implications of great lateral separation of active vents - 10 km at Katmai and 30 km at Tolbachik - with multiple magmas and non-eruptive caldera collapse at the associated stratocones. During the evenings and on days of bad weather, the school faculty conducted lectures on various topics of volcanology in either Russian or English, with translation. The field school is a strong stimulus for growth of young volcanologists and cooperation among Russia, USA and Japan, leading naturally to longer student exchange visits and to joint research projects.

  12. Eruptions of Hawaiian Volcanoes - Past, Present, and Future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tilling, Robert I.; Heliker, Christina; Swanson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    Viewing an erupting volcano is a memorable experience, one that has inspired fear, superstition, worship, curiosity, and fascination since before the dawn of civilization. In modern times, volcanic phenomena have attracted intense scientific interest, because they provide the key to understanding processes that have created and shaped more than 80 percent of the Earth's surface. The active Hawaiian volcanoes have received special attention worldwide because of their frequent spectacular eruptions, which often can be viewed and studied with relative ease and safety. In January 1987, the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), located on the rim of Kilauea Volcano, celebrated its 75th Anniversary. In honor of HVO's Diamond Jubilee, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) published Professional Paper 1350 (see list of Selected Readings, page 57), a comprehensive summary of the many studies on Hawaiian volcanism by USGS and other scientists through the mid-1980s. Drawing from the wealth of data contained in that volume, the USGS also published in 1987 the original edition of this general-interest booklet, focusing on selected aspects of the eruptive history, style, and products of two of Hawai'i's active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa. This revised edition of the booklet-spurred by the approaching Centennial of HVO in January 2012-summarizes new information gained since the January 1983 onset of Kilauea's Pu'u 'O'o-Kupaianaha eruption, which has continued essentially nonstop through 2010 and shows no signs of letup. It also includes description of Kilauea's summit activity within Halema'uma'u Crater, which began in mid-March 2008 and continues as of this writing (late 2010). This general-interest booklet is a companion to the one on Mount St. Helens Volcano first published in 1984 and revised in 1990 (see Selected Readings). Together, these publications illustrate the contrast between the two main types of volcanoes: shield volcanoes, such as those in Hawai'i, which generally are nonexplosive; and composite volcanoes, such as Mount St. Helens in the Cascade Range, which are renowned for their explosive eruptions.

  13. Tectonic Plates, Earthquakes, and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    According to theory of plate tectonics, Earth is an active planet -- its surface is composed of many individual plates that move and interact, constantly changing and reshaping Earth's outer layer. Volcanoes and earthquakes both result from the movement of tectonic plates. This interactive feature shows the relationship between earthquakes and volcanoes and the boundaries of tectonic plates. By clicking on a map, viewers can superimpose the locations of plate boundaries, volcanoes and earthquakes.

  14. An Assessment of Volcanic Threat and Monitoring Capabilities in the United States: Framework for a National Volcano Early Warning System

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    "A National Volcano Early Warning System-NVEWS-is being formulated by the Consortium of U.S. Volcano Observatories (CUSVO) to establish a proactive, fully integrated, national-scale monitoring effort that ensures the most threatening volcanoes in the United States are properly monitored in advance of the onset of unrest and at levels commensurate with the threats posed." At this website, users can download the USGS's 62 page report detailing the current monitoring system and the proposed changes to the level of monitoring at each volcano. Visitors can discover why monitoring is needed through the descriptions of the damage volcanoes have caused in the United States since 1980 and their future threats.

  15. Earthquakes and Volcanoes

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Medina, Philip

    This unit provides an introduction for younger students on earthquakes, volcanoes, and how they are related. Topics include evidence of continental drift, types of plate boundaries, types of seismic waves, and how to calculate the distance to the epicenter of an earthquake. There is also information on how earthquake magnitude and intensity are measured, and how seismic waves can reveal the Earth's internal structure. A vocabulary list and downloadable, printable student worksheets are provided.

  16. Gelatin Volcanoes: Student Page

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This is the Student Page of an activity that teaches students how and why magma moves inside volcanoes by injecting colored water into a clear gelatin cast. The Student Page contains the activity preparation instructions and materials list, key words, and a photograph of the experimental setup. There is also an extension activity question that has students predict what will happen when the experiment is run using an elongated model. This activity is part of Exploring Planets in the Classroom's Volcanology section.

  17. Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A distance of about 80 kilometers (50 miles) separates Shiveluch and Klyuchevskaya Volcanoes on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula. Despite this distance, however, the two acted in unison on April 26, 2007, when the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite caught them both erupting simultaneously. ASTER 'sees' a slightly different portion of the light spectrum than human eyes. Besides a portion of visible light, ASTER detects thermal energy, meaning it can detect volcanic activity invisible to human eyes. Inset in each image above is a thermal infrared picture of the volcano's summit. In these insets, dark red shows where temperatures are coolest, and yellowish-white shows where temperatures are hottest, heated by molten lava. Both insets show activity at the crater. In the case of Klyuchevskaya, some activity at the crater is also visible in the larger image. In the larger images, the landscapes around the volcanoes appear in varying shades of blue-gray. Dark areas on the snow surface are likely stains left over from previous eruptions of volcanic ash. Overhead, clouds dot the sky, casting their shadows on the snow, especially southeast of Shiveluch and northeast of Klyuchevskaya. To the northwest of Klyuchevskaya is a large bank of clouds, appearing as a brighter white than the snow surface. Shiveluch (sometimes spelled Sheveluch) and Klyuchevskaya (sometimes spelled Klyuchevskoy or Kliuchevskoi) are both stratovolcanoes composed of alternating layers of hardened lava, solidified ash, and rocks from earlier eruptions. Both volcanoes rank among Kamchatka's most active. Because Kamchatka is part of the Pacific 'Ring of Fire,' the peninsula experiences regular seismic activity as the Pacific Plate slides below other tectonic plates in the Earth's crust. Large-scale plate tectonic activity causing simultaneous volcanic eruptions in Kamchatka is not uncommon.

  18. Volcanoes and Climate Change

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Major volcanic eruptions alter the Earth's radiative balance, as volcanic ash and gas clouds absorb terrestrial radiation and scatter a significant amount of the incoming solar radiation, an effect known as "radiative forcing" that can last from two to three years following a volcanic eruption. This results in reduced temperatures in the troposphere, and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns. This site uses text, photographs, and links to related sites to describe volcano-induced climate change.

  19. 4D volcano gravimetry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Battaglia, Maurizio; Gottsmann, J.; Carbone, D.; Fernandez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Time-dependent gravimetric measurements can detect subsurface processes long before magma flow leads to earthquakes or other eruption precursors. The ability of gravity measurements to detect subsurface mass flow is greatly enhanced if gravity measurements are analyzed and modeled with ground-deformation data. Obtaining the maximum information from microgravity studies requires careful evaluation of the layout of network benchmarks, the gravity environmental signal, and the coupling between gravity changes and crustal deformation. When changes in the system under study are fast (hours to weeks), as in hydrothermal systems and restless volcanoes, continuous gravity observations at selected sites can help to capture many details of the dynamics of the intrusive sources. Despite the instrumental effects, mainly caused by atmospheric temperature, results from monitoring at Mt. Etna volcano show that continuous measurements are a powerful tool for monitoring and studying volcanoes.Several analytical and numerical mathematical models can beused to fit gravity and deformation data. Analytical models offer a closed-form description of the volcanic source. In principle, this allows one to readily infer the relative importance of the source parameters. In active volcanic sites such as Long Valley caldera (California, U.S.A.) and Campi Flegrei (Italy), careful use of analytical models and high-quality data sets has produced good results. However, the simplifications that make analytical models tractable might result in misleading volcanological inter-pretations, particularly when the real crust surrounding the source is far from the homogeneous/ isotropic assumption. Using numerical models allows consideration of more realistic descriptions of the sources and of the crust where they are located (e.g., vertical and lateral mechanical discontinuities, complex source geometries, and topography). Applications at Teide volcano (Tenerife) and Campi Flegrei demonstrate the importance of this more realistic description in gravity calculations. ?? 2008 Society of Exploration Geophysicists. All rights reserved.

  20. Volcanoes generate devastating waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lockridge, P. (National Geophysical Data Center, Boulder, CO (USA))

    1988-01-01

    Although volcanic eruptions can cause many frightening phenomena, it is often the power of the sea that causes many volcano-related deaths. This destruction comes from tsunamis (huge volcano-generated waves). Roughly one-fourth of the deaths occurring during volcanic eruptions have been the result of tsunamis. Moreover, a tsunami can transmit the volcano's energy to areas well outside the reach of the eruption itself. Some historic records are reviewed. Refined historical data are increasingly useful in predicting future events. The U.S. National Geophysical Data Center/World Data Center A for Solid Earth Geophysics has developed data bases to further tsunami research. These sets of data include marigrams (tide gage records), a wave-damage slide set, digital source data, descriptive material, and a tsunami wall map. A digital file contains information on methods of tsunami generation, location, and magnitude of generating earthquakes, tsunami size, event validity, and references. The data can be used to describe areas mot likely to generate tsunamis and the locations along shores that experience amplified effects from tsunamis.

  1. Pairing the Volcano

    E-print Network

    Ionica, Sorina

    2011-01-01

    Isogeny volcanoes are graphs whose vertices are elliptic curves and whose edges are $\\ell$-isogenies. Algorithms allowing to travel on these graphs were developed by Kohel in his thesis (1996) and later on, by Fouquet and Morain (2001). However, up to now, no method was known, to predict, before taking a step on the volcano, the direction of this step. Hence, in Kohel's and Fouquet-Morain algorithms, many steps are taken before choosing the right direction. In particular, ascending or horizontal isogenies are usually found using a trial-and-error approach. In this paper, we propose an alternative method that efficiently finds all points $P$ of order $\\ell$ such that the subgroup generated by $P$ is the kernel of an horizontal or an ascending isogeny. In many cases, our method is faster than previous methods. This is an extended version of a paper published in the proceedings of ANTS 2010. In addition, we treat the case of 2-isogeny volcanoes and we derive from the group structure of the curve and the pairing ...

  2. Volcanoes and climate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.

    1982-01-01

    The evidence that volcanic eruptions affect climate is reviewed. Single explosive volcanic eruptions cool the surface by about 0.3 C and warm the stratosphere by several degrees. Although these changes are of small magnitude, there have been several years in which these hemispheric average temperature changes were accompanied by severely abnormal weather. An example is 1816, the "year without summer" which followed the 1815 eruption of Tambora. In addition to statistical correlations between volcanoes and climate, a good theoretical understanding exists. The magnitude of the climatic changes anticipated following volcanic explosions agrees well with the observations. Volcanoes affect climate because volcanic particles in the atmosphere upset the balance between solar energy absorbed by the Earth and infrared energy emitted by the Earth. These interactions can be observed. The most important ejecta from volcanoes is not volcanic ash but sulfur dioxide which converts into sulfuric acid droplets in the stratosphere. For an eruption with its explosive magnitude, Mount St. Helens injected surprisingly little sulfur into the stratosphere. The amount of sulfuric acid formed is much smaller than that observed following significant eruptions and is too small to create major climatic shifts. However, the Mount St. Helens eruption has provided an opportunity to measure many properties of volcanic debris not previously measured and has therefore been of significant value in improving our knowledge of the relations between volcanic activity and climate.

  3. GlobVolcano pre-operational services for global monitoring active volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tampellini, Lucia; Ratti, Raffaella; Borgström, Sven; Seifert, Frank Martin; Peltier, Aline; Kaminski, Edouard; Bianchi, Marco; Branson, Wendy; Ferrucci, Fabrizio; Hirn, Barbara; van der Voet, Paul; van Geffen, J.

    2010-05-01

    The GlobVolcano project (2007-2010) is part of the Data User Element programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The project aims at demonstrating Earth Observation (EO) based integrated services to support the Volcano Observatories and other mandate users (e.g. Civil Protection) in their monitoring activities. The information services are assessed in close cooperation with the user organizations for different types of volcano, from various geographical areas in various climatic zones. In a first phase, a complete information system has been designed, implemented and validated, involving a limited number of test areas and respective user organizations. In the currently on-going second phase, GlobVolcano is delivering pre-operational services over 15 volcanic sites located in three continents and as many user organizations are involved and cooperating with the project team. The set of GlobVolcano offered EO based information products is composed as follows: Deformation Mapping DInSAR (Differential Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry) has been used to study a wide range of surface displacements related to different phenomena (e.g. seismic faults, volcanoes, landslides) at a spatial resolution of less than 100 m and cm-level precision. Permanent Scatterers SAR Interferometry method (PSInSARTM) has been introduced by Politecnico of Milano as an advanced InSAR technique capable of measuring millimetre scale displacements of individual radar targets on the ground by using multi-temporal data-sets, estimating and removing the atmospheric components. Other techniques (e.g. CTM) have followed similar strategies and have shown promising results in different scenarios. Different processing approaches have been adopted, according to data availability, characteristic of the area and dynamic characteristics of the volcano. Conventional DInSAR: Colima (Mexico), Nyiragongo (Congo), Pico (Azores), Areanal (Costa Rica) PSInSARTM: Piton de la Fournaise (La Reunion Island), Stromboli and Volcano (Italy), Hilo (Hawai), Mt. St. Helens (United States), CTM (Coherent Target Monitoring): Cumbre Vieja (La Palma) To generate products either Envisat ASAR, Radarsat 1or ALOS PALSAR data have been used. Surface Thermal Anomalies Volcanic hot-spots detection, radiant flux and effusion rate (where applicable) calculation of high temperature surface thermal anomalies such as active lava flow, strombolian activity, lava dome, pyroclastic flow and lava lake can be performed through MODIS (Terra / Aqua) MIR and TIR channels, or ASTER (Terra), HRVIR/HRGT (SPOT4/5) and Landsat family SWIR channels analysis. ASTER and Landsat TIR channels allow relative radiant flux calculation of low temperature anomalies such as lava and pyroclastic flow cooling, crater lake and low temperature fumarolic fields. MODIS, ASTER and SPOT data are processed to detect and measure the following volcanic surface phenomena: Effusive activity Piton de la Fournaise (Reunion Island); Mt Etna (Italy). Lava dome growths, collapses and related pyroclastic flows Soufrière Hills (Montserrat); Arenal - (Costa Rica). Permanent crater lake and ephemeral lava lake Karthala (Comores Islands). Strombolian activity Stromboli (Italy). Low temperature fumarolic fields Nisyros (Greece), Vulcano (Italy), Mauna Loa (Hawaii). Volcanic Emission The Volcanic Emission Service is provided to the users by a link to GSE-PROMOTE - Support to Aviation Control Service (SACS). The aim of the service is to deliver in near-real-time data derived from satellite measurements regarding SO2 emissions (SO2 vertical column density - Dobson Unit [DU]) possibly related to volcanic eruptions and to track the ash injected into the atmosphere during a volcanic eruption. SO2 measurements are derived from different satellite instruments, such as SCIAMACHY, OMI and GOME-2. The tracking of volcanic ash is accomplished by using SEVIRI-MSG data and, in particular, the following channels VIS 0.6 and IR 3.9, and along with IR8.7, IR 10.8 and IR 12.0. The GlobVolcano information system and its current experimentation represent a

  4. Spatial Databases for CalVO Volcanoes: Current Status and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsey, D. W.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) California Volcano Observatory (CalVO) aims to advance scientific understanding of volcanic processes and to lessen harmful impacts of volcanic activity in California and Nevada. Within CalVO's area of responsibility, ten volcanoes or volcanic centers have been identified by a national volcanic threat assessment in support of developing the U.S. National Volcano Early Warning System (NVEWS) as posing moderate, high, or very high threats to surrounding communities based on their recent eruptive histories and their proximity to vulnerable people, property, and infrastructure. To better understand the extent of potential hazards at these and other volcanoes and volcanic centers, the USGS Volcano Science Center (VSC) is continually compiling spatial databases of volcano information, including: geologic mapping, hazards assessment maps, locations of geochemical and geochronological samples, and the distribution of volcanic vents. This digital mapping effort has been ongoing for over 15 years and early databases are being converted to match recent datasets compiled with new data models designed for use in: 1) generating hazard zones, 2) evaluating risk to population and infrastructure, 3) numerical hazard modeling, and 4) display and query on the CalVO as well as other VSC and USGS websites. In these capacities, spatial databases of CalVO volcanoes and their derivative map products provide an integrated and readily accessible framework of VSC hazards science to colleagues, emergency managers, and the general public.

  5. Pyroclastic flow hazard assessment at Soufriere Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    2012-04-01

    For 16 years the ongoing eruption at Soufriere Hills Volcano has produced periods of lava dome growth leading to the formation of pyroclastic flows. These flows have destroyed much of the island's infrastructure and led to evacuation of the formerly occupied parts of the volcano. Management of the risks lies with the Montserrat Volcano Observatory (MVO) at an operational level with oversight and periodic input from a Scientific Advisory Committee (SAC). The northwestern margin of the volcano is still inhabited and has required careful assessment of the pyroclastic flow hazard. The main components of the problem are: What dome mass is available to reach the inhabited area? What are the likely boundaries of the resultant pyroclastic flows? How frequent are hazardous flows likely to be in future? I describe how the SAC/MVO has carried out this assessment process since 2007 using a variety of flow simulation codes, coupled with knowledge elicitation. The way in which the results of this assessment have been communicated via maps, statistical measures and public outreach has proven to be a vital but difficult task.

  6. McDonald Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    McDonald Observatory, located in West Texas near Fort Davis, is the astronomical observatory of the University of Texas at Austin. Discoveries at McDonald Observatory include water vapor on Mars, the abundance of rare-earth chemical elements in stars, the discovery of planets circling around nearby stars and the use of the measurements of rapid oscillations in the brightness of white dwarf stars ...

  7. Earth Observatory Glossary

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Earth Observatory Glossary defines words from space science, ecology and Earth science. It is part of the NASA Earth Observatory site, which provides new satellite imagery and scientific information about Earth with a focus on climate and environmental change. The new glossary mode allows users to browse the Earth Observatory site with special terms highlighted that, when selected, will take you to the appropriate entry in the glossary.

  8. Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska

    E-print Network

    Raina, Ramesh

    · · · · · · #12;V1 Mendenhall Glacier Juneau, Alaska 404 Alaskan Frontiers & Glaciers V1 PRSRTSTD U blend of nature and modern culture. Marvel at the spectacular Hubbard Glacier, the longest tidewater glacier in Alaska and visit Icy Strait Point, a seaport nestled in the lush, seemingly endless northern

  9. Alaska geothermal bibliography

    SciTech Connect

    Liss, S.A.; Motyka, R.J.; Nye, C.J. (comps.)

    1987-05-01

    The Alaska geothermal bibliography lists all publications, through 1986, that discuss any facet of geothermal energy in Alaska. In addition, selected publications about geology, geophysics, hydrology, volcanology, etc., which discuss areas where geothermal resources are located are included, though the geothermal resource itself may not be mentioned. The bibliography contains 748 entries.

  10. ALASKA CRUISE SHIP INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    During the course of the annual vacation season, luxury cruise ships carrying up to 3000 passengers visit the coastal cities and small towns of Alaska. Alaska is the first state to impose regulations requiring such vessels to submit to inspection and monitoring of gray water and...

  11. Educational Telecommunications for Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska State Dept. of Education, Juneau. Office of Planning and Research.

    This telecommunications program planned and initiated by the Alaska Department of Education is designed to (1) provide basic communication capability to the state's 52 school district headquarters, (2) examine and report the results of making research and instructional information collections which exist outside Alaska available to educational…

  12. Renewable Energy in Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-03-01

    This report examines the opportunities, challenges, and costs associated with renewable energy implementation in Alaska and provides strategies that position Alaska's accumulating knowledge in renewable energy development for export to the rapidly growing energy/electric markets of the developing world.

  13. The Alaska Quaternary Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This website illustrates the Alaska Quaternary Center's (at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks) commitment "to the promotion of interdisciplinary research and the enhancement of interdisciplinary instruction in Quaternary sciences." Users can view images of the field work and learn how to obtain quaternary data from the AQC Quaternary Research Geodatabase.

  14. Predictability of volcano eruption: Lessons from a basaltic effusive volcano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-Robert Grasso; Ilya Zaliapin

    2004-01-01

    Volcano eruption forecast remains a challenging and controversial problem despite the fact that data from volcano monitoring significantly increased in quantity and quality during the last decades. This study uses pattern recognition techniques to quantify the predictability of the 15 Piton de la Fournaise (PdlF) eruptions in the 1988–2001 period using increase of the daily seismicity rate as a precursor.

  15. Wildlife Biologist Delta Junction, Alaska

    E-print Network

    Wildlife Biologist Delta Junction, Alaska POSITION A Wildlife Biologist (Research Associate II). This position is located at Donnelly Training Area, Delta Junction, Alaska. ORGANIZATION CEMML is a research south of Delta Junction in Alaska and is located approximately 100 miles southeast of Fairbanks, Alaska

  16. Alaska SeaLife Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Located in Seward, Alaska, the Alaska SeaLife Center is a non-profit marine science facility dedicated to understanding and maintaining the integrity of the marine ecosystem of Alaska through research, rehabilitation and public education. The Center's research and rehabilitation facilities and naturalistic exhibits immerse visitors in the dynamic marine ecosystems of Alaska. Includes links to additional resources for students and teachers.

  17. Alaska Airlines Operating costs and

    E-print Network

    SYS-461 Alaska Airlines Operating costs and Productivity Daric Megersa #12;Airline Business Model-largest U.S. carrier · Founded: 1932, in Anchorage, Alaska · Hubs: Seattle (main hub); Anchorage, Alaska expense, interest capitalized and some other costs · The trend shows that Alaska airlines has shown

  18. Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaskan Volcanoes: January 1 through December 31, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dixon, James P.; Stihler, Scott D.; Power, John A.; Searcy, Cheryl

    2008-01-01

    Between January 1 and December 31, 2006, AVO located 8,666 earthquakes of which 7,783 occurred on or near the 33 volcanoes monitored within Alaska. Monitoring highlights in 2006 include: an eruption of Augustine Volcano, a volcanic-tectonic earthquake swarm at Mount Martin, elevated seismicity and volcanic unrest at Fourpeaked Mountain, and elevated seismicity and low-level tremor at Mount Veniaminof and Korovin Volcano. A new seismic subnetwork was installed on Fourpeaked Mountain. This catalog includes: (1) descriptions and locations of seismic instrumentation deployed in the field during 2006, (2) a description of earthquake detection, recording, analysis, and data archival systems, (3) a description of seismic velocity models used for earthquake locations, (4) a summary of earthquakes located in 2006, and (5) an accompanying UNIX tar-file with a summary of earthquake origin times, hypocenters, magnitudes, phase arrival times, location quality statistics, daily station usage statistics, and all files used to determine the earthquake locations in 2006.

  19. 78 FR 75321 - Migratory Bird Subsistence Harvest in Alaska; Harvest Regulations for Migratory Birds in Alaska...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ...Service, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, and Alaska Native representatives. The...Service, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, and Alaska Native representatives...enacted the Alaska Department of Fish and Game's request to expand the Fairbanks...

  20. Volcano Hazards Assessment for Medicine Lake Volcano, Northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Donnelly-Nolan, Julie M.; Nathenson, Manuel; Champion, Duane E.; Ramsey, David W.; Lowenstern, Jacob B.; Ewert, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Medicine Lake volcano (MLV) is a very large shield-shaped volcano located in northern California where it forms part of the southern Cascade Range of volcanoes. It has erupted hundreds of times during its half-million-year history, including nine times during the past 5,200 years, most recently 950 years ago. This record represents one of the highest eruptive frequencies among Cascade volcanoes and includes a wide variety of different types of lava flows and at least two explosive eruptions that produced widespread fallout. Compared to those of a typical Cascade stratovolcano, eruptive vents at MLV are widely distributed, extending 55 km north-south and 40 km east-west. The total area covered by MLV lavas is >2,000 km2, about 10 times the area of Mount St. Helens, Washington. Judging from its long eruptive history and its frequent eruptions in recent geologic time, MLV will erupt again. Although the probability of an eruption is very small in the next year (one chance in 3,600), the consequences of some types of possible eruptions could be severe. Furthermore, the documented episodic behavior of the volcano indicates that once it becomes active, the volcano could continue to erupt for decades, or even erupt intermittently for centuries, and very likely from multiple vents scattered across the edifice. Owing to its frequent eruptions, explosive nature, and proximity to regional infrastructure, MLV has been designated a 'high threat volcano' by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Volcano Early Warning System assessment. Volcanic eruptions are typically preceded by seismic activity, but with only two seismometers located high on the volcano and no other USGS monitoring equipment in place, MLV is at present among the most poorly monitored Cascade volcanoes.

  1. A reconnaissance of the major Holocene tephra deposits in the upper Cook Inlet region, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Riehle, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The upper Cook Inlet region of southcentral Alaska would be significantly impacted by a major tephrafall, owing to a widespread population and heavily travelled transportation corridors. To evaluate the likelihood of such an occurrence, the tephra deposits of the region have been inventoried. Approximately 90 deposits of Holocene age are sufficiently thick to have been preserved for sampling; the frequency of such major tephrafalls ranges from 1 every 200 years near sources on the west side of upper Cook Inlet, to 1 every 1000 years on the more populated east side. The volcanoes located on the west side of upper Cook Inlet are, from north to south, Hayes, Spurr, Redoubt, and Iliamna. Hayes volcano produced the most extensive set of 6 to perhaps 8 tephra layers in the region about 3650 yr B.P. and produced one other, less extensive tephra layer during Holocene time. Spurr and Redoubt volcanoes have produced, respectively, approximately 35 and 30 Holocene layers which were dispersed eastward toward population centers. No Holocene tephra layers of Iliamna have been recognized with certainty; consequently, several tephra layers which originated to the south of the region must have a source at Augustine Volcano, or some more distant volcano. Tephra layers of Hayes volcano are calc-alkaline dacites. Most of the Spurr deposits are tholeiitic, basaltic andesites whereas those of Redoubt Volcano are calc-alkaline andesites and dacites. ?? 1985.

  2. Remote sensing of Italian volcanos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bianchi, R.; Casacchia, R.; Coradini, A.; Duncan, A. M.; Guest, J. E.; Kahle, A.; Lanciano, P.; Pieri, D. C.; Poscolieri, M.

    1990-01-01

    The results of a July 1986 remote sensing campaign of Italian volcanoes are reviewed. The equipment and techniques used to acquire the data are described and the results obtained for Campi Flegrei and Mount Etna are reviewed and evaluated for their usefulness for the study of active and recently active volcanoes.

  3. Anatomy of a basaltic volcano

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert I. Tilling; John J. Dvorak

    1993-01-01

    Kilauea volcano, in Hawaii, may be the best understood basaltic volcano in the world. Magma rises from a depth of 80 km or more and resides temporarily in near-surface reservoirs: eruption begins when the crust above one of these reservoirs splits open in response to a pressure increase. Repeated rift-zone eruptions compress Kilauea's flanks; after decades of accumulation, the stress

  4. Deformation of Alaskan Volcanoes, Measured by Satellite Radar Inferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freymueller, Jeff; Dean, Ken; Wyss, Max

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to determine the suitability of measuring active deformation of volcanoes in Alaska using Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (INSAR) techniques. Work sponsored by this grant supported one graduate student (for almost 2 years) and one postdoc (for several months), and has resulted in two published peer-reviewed papers and a front-page article in EOS. An additional paper is in review and a fourth is in preparation. An additional paper in preparation was based in part on research supported by this grant and in part by a successor grant from NASA's Solid Earth Natural Hazards program. Over the course of this research, we documented measurable uplift of Trident volcano in the Katmai group, conducted a systematic study of the change in phase coherence over time on volcanic surfaces, and measured and modeled the spectacular 1.5 m deflation of Okmok caldera associated with its 1997 eruption. We also generated initial interferograms spanning the 1996 seismic swarm of Akutan volcano; however, during the period covered by this project we were not able to remove topography. That has been done under the subsequent funding and a paper is now in preparation. This report summarizes work done under two separate contracts because both were based on the same proposal to NASA's ADRO (Application Development and Research Opportunity) program. The first year was funded out of a grant from NASA Headquarters and the second and third years out of a grant through Goddard. The work, however, was a continuous three year effort.

  5. The Norwegian Naval Observatories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pettersen, Bjørn Ragnvald

    2007-07-01

    Archival material has revealed milestones and new details in the history of the Norwegian Naval Observatories. We have identified several of the instrument types used at different epochs. Observational results have been extracted from handwritten sources and an extensive literature search. These allow determination of an approximate location of the first naval observatory building (1842) at Fredriksvern. No physical remains exist today. A second observatory was established in 1854 at the new main naval base at Horten. Its location is evident on military maps and photographs. We describe its development until the Naval Observatory buildings, including archives and instruments, were completely demolished during an allied air bomb raid on 23 February 1945. The first director, C.T.H. Geelmuyden, maintained scientific standards at the the Observatory between 1842 and 1870, and collaborated with university astronomers to investigate, develop, and employ time-transfer by telegraphy. Their purpose was accurate longitude determination between observatories in Norway and abroad. The Naval Observatory issued telegraphic time signals twice weekly to a national network of sites, and as such served as the first national time-service in Norway. Later the Naval Observatory focused on the particular needs of the Navy and developed into an internal navigational service.

  6. Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolentsev, Sergey; Rahimov, Ismail

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes information about the Svetloe Radio Astronomical Observatory activities in 2012. Last year, a number of changes took place in the observatory to improve some technical characteristics and to upgrade some units to their required status. The report provides an overview of current geodetic VLBI activities and gives an outlook for the future.

  7. NASA's Great Observatories Kit

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Using this kit, students may construct paper models of the Hubble Space Telescope, the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Parts sheets for printing, instructions, and a list of other required materials are included. Links to other related sites are also provided.

  8. INTERMAGNET and magnetic observatories

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Chulliat, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic observatory is a specially designed ground-based facility that supports time-series measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field. Observatory data record a superposition of time-dependent signals related to a fantastic diversity of physical processes in the Earth’s core, mantle, lithosphere, ocean, ionosphere, magnetosphere, and, even, the Sun and solar wind.

  9. Italian Volcano Supersites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puglisi, G.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the geohazards that may have a substantial economic and social impact, even at worldwide scale. Large populated regions are prone to volcanic hazards worldwide. Even local phenomena may affect largely populated areas and in some cases even megacities, producing severe economic losses. On a regional or global perspective, large volcanic eruptions may affect the climate for years with potentially huge economic impacts, but even relatively small eruptions may inject large amounts of volcanic ash in the atmosphere and severely affect air traffic over entire continents. One of main challenges of the volcanological community is to continuously monitor and understand the internal processes leading to an eruption, in order to give substantial contributions to the risk reduction. Italian active volcanoes constitute natural laboratories and ideal sites where to apply the cutting-edge volcano observation systems, implement new monitoring systems and to test and improve the most advanced models and methods for investigate the volcanic processes. That's because of the long tradition of volcanological studies resulting into long-term data sets, both in-situ and from satellite systems, among the most complete and accurate worldwide, and the large spectrum of the threatening volcanic phenomena producing high local/regional/continental risks. This contribution aims at presenting the compound monitoring systems operating on the Italian active volcanoes, the main improvements achieved during the recent studies direct toward volcanic hazard forecast and risk reductions and the guidelines for a wide coordinated project aimed at applying the ideas of the GEO Supersites Initiative at Mt. Etna and Campi Flegrei / Vesuvius areas.

  10. The implementation of a volcano seismic monitoring network in Sete Cidades Volcano, São Miguel, Açores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenstein, N.; Montalvo, A.; Barata, U.; Ortiz, R.

    2003-04-01

    Sete Cidades is one of the three active central volcanoes of S. Miguel Island, in the Azores archipelago. With a 5 kilometres wide caldera, it has the highest eruptive record in the last 5000 years with 17 intracaldera explosive events (Queiroz, 1997). Only submarine volcanic eruptions occurred in Sete Cidades volcano-tectonic system since the settlement of the island, in the 15th century. Small seismic swarms, some of which were interpreted as being related with magmatic and/or deep hydrothermal origin, characterize the most recent seismo-volcanic activity of Sete Cidades volcano. To complement the regional seismic network, operating since the early 80's, a new local seismic network was designed and installed at Sete Cidades Volcano. It includes 5 digital stations being one 5-seconds three-component station located inside the caldera and four 10-seconds one-component stations placed on the caldera rim. The solution found for the digital telemetry is based on UHF 19,2 Kbps radio modems linking four of the seismic stations to a central point, where the fifth station is installed. At this site, signals are synchronised with a GPS receiver, stored in a PC and re-transmitted to the Azores University Volcanological Observatory by an 115,2 Kbps Spread Spectrum 2.4 Ghz Radio Modem Network. Seismic signal tests carried out in all the area showed that cultural and sea noise, as well as some scattering effects due to the geological nature of the terrain (composed by thick pumice and ash deposits) and the topographic effects are factors that can not be avoidable and will be present in future records. This low cost network with locally developed and assembled components, based on short-period sensors without signal filtering in the field and digital telemetry, will improve the detection and location of low magnitude events in the Sete Cidades volcano area. Future developments of this program will include the installation of a seismic array inside the caldera to identify and characterize LP events and volcanic tremor signals.

  11. Three-dimensional seismic velocity structure and earthquake relocations at Katmai, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Rachel; Thurber, Clifford; Prejean, Stephanie G.; Bennington, Ninfa

    2014-01-01

    We invert arrival time data from local earthquakes occurring between September 2004 and May 2009 to determine the three-dimensional (3D) upper crustal seismic structure in the Katmai volcanic region. Waveforms for the study come from the Alaska Volcano Observatory's permanent network of 20 seismic stations in the area (predominantly single-component, short period instruments) plus a densely spaced temporary array of 11 broadband, 3-component stations. The absolute and relative arrival times are used in a double-difference seismic tomography inversion to solve for 3D P- and S-wave velocity models for an area encompassing the main volcanic centers. The relocated hypocenters provide insight into the geometry of seismogenic structures in the area, revealing clustering of events into four distinct zones associated with Martin, Mageik, Trident-Novarupta, and Mount Katmai. The seismic activity extends from about sea level to 2 km depth (all depths referenced to mean sea level) beneath Martin, is concentrated near 2 km depth beneath Mageik, and lies mainly between 2 and 4 km depth below Katmai and Trident-Novarupta. Many new features are apparent within these earthquake clusters. In particular, linear features are visible within all clusters, some associated with swarm activity, including an observation of earthquake migration near Trident in 2008. The final velocity model reveals a possible zone of magma storage beneath Mageik, but there is no clear evidence for magma beneath the Katmai-Novarupta area where the 1912 eruptive activity occurred, suggesting that the storage zone for that eruption may have largely been evacuated, or remnant magma has solidified.

  12. Volcano Homework Assignment

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Steven Jaume

    In this and similar assignments students have to download quantitative natural hazard data from the Internet, load it into a spreadsheet, rank order the data, calculate recurrence times and plot the result on a log-log graph. They then interpret this graph in terms of the recurrence time of hazard events of different sizes. In many cases this includes comparing results from two different features (volcanoes, faults, rivers, etc.) Uses online and/or real-time data Addresses student fear of quantitative aspect and/or inadequate quantitative skills Uses geophysics to solve problems in other fields Addresses student misconceptions

  13. How Volcanoes Work

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Camp, Vic.

    2000-01-01

    How Volcanoes Work was constructed and is maintained by Dr. Vic Camp from San Diego State University's Department of Geological Sciences. The site takes a comprehensive look into every aspect of volcanic formations and eruptions, including historical eruptions (Mt. St. Helens) and volcanism on other planets. Well written and designed, this site offers excellent illustrations, photographs, and several multimedia files such as a cross-sectional view of an eruption taking place. Anyone from geology students to lifelong learners will find this site interesting and informative.

  14. Continuous monitoring of Hawaiian volcanoes using thermal cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Antolik, L.; Lee, R.; Kamibayashi, K.

    2012-12-01

    Thermal cameras are becoming more common at volcanoes around the world, and have become a powerful tool for observing volcanic activity. Fixed, continuously recording thermal cameras have been installed by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory in the last two years at four locations on Kilauea Volcano to better monitor its two ongoing eruptions. The summit eruption, which began in March 2008, hosts an active lava lake deep within a fume-filled vent crater. A thermal camera perched on the rim of Halema`uma`u Crater, acquiring an image every five seconds, has now captured about two years of sustained lava lake activity, including frequent lava level fluctuations, small explosions , and several draining events. This thermal camera has been able to "see" through the thick fume in the crater, providing truly 24/7 monitoring that would not be possible with normal webcams. The east rift zone eruption, which began in 1983, has chiefly consisted of effusion through lava tubes onto the surface, but over the past two years has been interrupted by an intrusion, lava fountaining, crater collapse, and perched lava lake growth and draining. The three thermal cameras on the east rift zone, all on Pu`u `O`o cone and acquiring an image every several minutes, have captured many of these changes and are providing an improved means for alerting observatory staff of new activity. Plans are underway to install a thermal camera at the summit of Mauna Loa to monitor and alert to any future changes there. Thermal cameras are more difficult to install, and image acquisition and processing are more complicated than with visual webcams. Our system is based in part on the successful thermal camera installations by Italian volcanologists on Stromboli and Vulcano. Equipment includes custom enclosures with IR transmissive windows, power, and telemetry. Data acquisition is based on ActiveX controls, and data management is done using automated Matlab scripts. Higher-level data processing, also done with Matlab, includes automated measurements of lava lake level and surface crust velocity, tracking temperatures and hot areas in real-time, and alerts which notify users of notable temperature increases via text messaging. Lastly, real-time image and processed data display, which is vital for effective use of the images at the observatory, is done through a custom Web-based environment . Near real-time webcam images are displayed for the public at hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams. Thermal cameras are costly, but have proven to be an extremely effective monitoring and research tool at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory.

  15. Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Bjorn Scheuermann

    E-print Network

    Mannheim, Universität

    Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades Bj¨orn Scheuermann Vortrag im Rahmen des Seminars Datenbanken, WS 03/04 Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.1/23 #12;Zielsetzung Entwicklung von ¨angig von konkretem Datenmodell Anfrageoptimierung in Volcano und Cascades ­ p.2/23 #12;Volcano

  16. Studies of HF-induced Strong Langmuir Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Sheerin; J. M. Gerres; M. R. Keith; N. Adham; A. Wittbrodt; B. J. Watkins; W. A. Bristow; P. A. Bernhardt; C. A. Selcher

    2009-01-01

    High power HF transmitters may induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from our recent experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied are: SLT spectra

  17. Studies of HF-induced Strong Plasma Turbulence at the HAARP Ionospheric Observatory

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. P. Sheerin; N. Adham; R. G. E. Roe; M. R. Keith; B. J. Watkins; W. A. Bristow; P. A. Bernhardt; C. A. Selcher

    2010-01-01

    High power HF transmitters may induce a number of plasma instabilities in the interaction region of overdense ionospheric plasma. We report results from our recent experiments using over one gigawatt of HF power (ERP) to generate and study strong Langmuir turbulence (SLT) and particle acceleration at the HAARP Observatory, Gakona, Alaska. Among the effects observed and studied in UHF radar

  18. Volcanoes, Plates, and Chains

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    In this lesson students will discover how seamounts in the Axial-Cobb-Eikelberg-Patton chain were formed. They will learn about the processes that form seamounts, describe the movement of tectonic plates in the Gulf of Alaska region and explain the types of volcanic activity that might be associated with these movements, and describe how a combination of hotspot activity and tectonic plate movement could produce the arrangement of seamounts observed in this chain. This hands-on activity uses online data resources and includes: focus questions, learning objectives, teaching time, audio/visual materials needed, background information, learning procedures, evaluations, extensions, as well as resources and student handouts.

  19. Volcanic tsunamis and prehistoric cultural transitions in Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Begét, James; Gardner, Cynthia; Davis, Kathleen

    2008-10-01

    The 1883 eruption of Augustine Volcano produced a tsunami when a debris avalanche traveled into the waters of Cook Inlet. Older debris avalanches and coeval paleotsunami deposits from sites around Cook Inlet record several older volcanic tsunamis. A debris avalanche into the sea on the west side of Augustine Island ca. 450 years ago produced a wave that affected areas 17 m above high tide on Augustine Island. A large volcanic tsunami was generated by a debris avalanche on the east side of Augustine Island ca. 1600 yr BP, and affected areas more than 7 m above high tide at distances of 80 km from the volcano on the Kenai Peninsula. A tsunami deposit dated to ca. 3600 yr BP is tentatively correlated with a southward directed collapse of the summit of Redoubt Volcano, although little is known about the magnitude of the tsunami. The 1600 yr BP tsunami from Augustine Volcano occurred about the same time as the collapse of the well-developed Kachemak culture in the southern Cook Inlet area, suggesting a link between volcanic tsunamis and prehistoric cultural changes in this region of Alaska.

  20. Using Bayesian Belief Networks To Assess Volcano State from Multiple Monitoring Timeseries And Other Evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odbert, Henry; Aspinall, Willy

    2013-04-01

    When volcanoes exhibit unrest or become eruptively active, science-based decision support invariably is sought by civil authorities. Evidence available to scientists about a volcano's internal state is usually indirect, secondary or very nebulous.Advancement of volcano monitoring technology in recent decades has increased the variety and resolution of multi-parameter timeseries data recorded at volcanoes. Monitoring timeseries may be interpreted in real time by observatory staff and are often later subjected to further analytic scrutiny by the research community at large. With increasing variety and resolution of data, interpreting these multiple strands of parallel, partial evidence has become increasingly complex. In practice, interpretation of many timeseries involves familiarity with the idiosyncracies of the volcano, the monitoring techniques, the configuration of the recording instrumentation, observations from other datasets, and so on. Assimilation of this knowledge is necessary in order to select and apply the appropriate statistical techniques required to extract the required information. Bayesian Belief Networks (BBNs) use probability theory to treat and evaluate uncertainties in a rational and auditable scientific manner, but only to the extent warranted by the strength of the available evidence. The concept is a suitable framework for marshalling multiple observations, model results and interpretations - and associated uncertainties - in a methodical manner. The formulation is usually implemented in graphical form and could be developed as a tool for near real-time, ongoing use in a volcano observatory, for example. We explore the application of BBNs in analysing volcanic timeseries, the certainty with which inferences may be drawn, and how they can be updated dynamically. Such approaches provide a route to developing analytical interface(s) between volcano monitoring analyses and probabilistic hazard analysis. We discuss the use of BBNs in hazard analysis as a tractable and traceable tool for the rational assimilation of complex, multi-parameter data sets in the context of volcanic crisis decision support.

  1. ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    in criminal justice processing of cases of intimate partner violence against women (page 2). · A summary of two sets of recommendations to reduce violence against women in Alaska (page 5). · A look at the relationship between animal abuse and domestic violence (page 6). · A comparison between leading causes

  2. ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Justice Minority youths in Anchorage are re- ferred to the Alaska Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ) for delinquent behavior at rates much higher than white youths, according to a study undertaken by the Justice that looked at referrals on a statewide basis in the 1990s. The 2002 Juvenile Justice and Delin- quency

  3. UNIVERSITY of ALASKA ANCHORAGE ALASKA JUSTICE FORUM

    E-print Network

    Pantaleone, Jim

    Vol. 27, No. 1 Please see Sex offenders, page 7 Sex Offenders in the Alaska Juvenile Justice System and were released during the period July 1, 2004 ­ June 20, 2007. All of the 29 juvenile sex offenders the statewide juvenile offender management information system (JOMIS). For each youth, we examined their delin

  4. Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 1111

    E-print Network

    Rose, William I.

    Volcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, GuatemalaVolcano Hazards at Fuego and Acatenango, Guatemala 11111 Open-File Report 01­431Open-File Report 01

  5. W. M. Keck Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The W. M. Keck Observatory, located on the summit of Mauna Kea on the island of Hawaii, takes advantage of its high altitude and stable atmospheric conditions to engage in advanced research into the deepest regions of the universe. The observatory's website includes information on its two ten-meter telescopes, their revolutionary segmented mirrors, and some of the research programs currently under way. There is also information on the observatory's research communities and their allocations of observing time; how to apply for time, and information for scheduled observing teams. The site's news and outreach page features archived press releases and links to the observatory's newsletter and "Cosmic Matters" magazine. The educational page includes podcasts of the observatory's astronomers discussing recent discoveries, information on field trips and class visits, and information on the family ASTRO program. Photos of the instruments, the observatory site, and a selection of remote images captured by the telescopes are collected in an image gallery, and there is also a bibliography of articles referencing data collected at the observatory.

  6. The Virtual Observatory: I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanisch, R. J.

    2014-11-01

    The concept of the Virtual Observatory arose more-or-less simultaneously in the United States and Europe circa 2000. Ten pages of Astronomy and Astrophysics in the New Millennium: Panel Reports (National Academy Press, Washington, 2001), that is, the detailed recommendations of the Panel on Theory, Computation, and Data Exploration of the 2000 Decadal Survey in Astronomy, are dedicated to describing the motivation for, scientific value of, and major components required in implementing the National Virtual Observatory. European initiatives included the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory at the European Southern Observatory, the AstroGrid project in the United Kingdom, and the Euro-VO (sponsored by the European Union). Organizational/conceptual meetings were held in the US at the California Institute of Technology (Virtual Observatories of the Future, June 13-16, 2000) and at ESO Headquarters in Garching, Germany (Mining the Sky, July 31-August 4, 2000; Toward an International Virtual Observatory, June 10-14, 2002). The nascent US, UK, and European VO projects formed the International Virtual Observatory Alliance (IVOA) at the June 2002 meeting in Garching, with yours truly as the first chair. The IVOA has grown to a membership of twenty-one national projects and programs on six continents, and has developed a broad suite of data access protocols and standards that have been widely implemented. Astronomers can now discover, access, and compare data from hundreds of telescopes and facilities, hosted at hundreds of organizations worldwide, stored in thousands of databases, all with a single query.

  7. Internet-accessible, near-real-time volcano monitoring data for geoscience education: the Volcanoes Exploration Project---Pu`u `O`o

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. P. Poland; R. Teasdale; K. Kraft

    2010-01-01

    Internet-accessible real- and near-real-time Earth science datasets are an important resource for geoscience education, but relatively few comprehensive datasets are available, and background information to aid interpretation is often lacking. In response to this need, the U.S. Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory, in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the University of Hawai`i, Manoa, established the

  8. Mount Rainier active cascade volcano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Mount Rainier is one of about two dozen active or recently active volcanoes in the Cascade Range, an arc of volcanoes in the northwestern United States and Canada. The volcano is located about 35 kilometers southeast of the Seattle-Tacoma metropolitan area, which has a population of more than 2.5 million. This metropolitan area is the high technology industrial center of the Pacific Northwest and one of the commercial aircraft manufacturing centers of the United States. The rivers draining the volcano empty into Puget Sound, which has two major shipping ports, and into the Columbia River, a major shipping lane and home to approximately a million people in southwestern Washington and northwestern Oregon. Mount Rainier is an active volcano. It last erupted approximately 150 years ago, and numerous large floods and debris flows have been generated on its slopes during this century. More than 100,000 people live on the extensive mudflow deposits that have filled the rivers and valleys draining the volcano during the past 10,000 years. A major volcanic eruption or debris flow could kill thousands of residents and cripple the economy of the Pacific Northwest. Despite the potential for such danger, Mount Rainier has received little study. Most of the geologic work on Mount Rainier was done more than two decades ago. Fundamental topics such as the development, history, and stability of the volcano are poorly understood.

  9. Eruptive viscosity and volcano morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posin, Seth B.; Greeley, Ronald

    1988-01-01

    Terrestrial central volcanoes formed predominantly from lava flows were classified as shields, stratovolcanoes, and domes. Shield volcanoes tend to be large in areal extent, have convex slopes, and are characterized by their resemblance to inverted hellenic war shields. Stratovolcanoes have concave slopes, whereas domes are smaller and have gentle convex slopes near the vent that increase near the perimeter. In addition to these differences in morphology, several other variations were observed. The most important is composition: shield volcanoes tend to be basaltic, stratovolcanoes tend to be andesitic, and domes tend to be dacitic. However, important exceptions include Fuji, Pico, Mayon, Izalco, and Fuego which have stratovolcano morphologies but are composed of basaltic lavas. Similarly, Ribkwo is a Kenyan shield volcano composed of trachyte and Suswa and Kilombe are shields composed of phonolite. These exceptions indicate that eruptive conditions, rather than composition, may be the primary factors that determine volcano morphology. The objective of this study is to determine the relationships, if any, between eruptive conditions (viscosity, erupted volume, and effusion rate) and effusive volcano morphology. Moreover, it is the goal of this study to incorporate these relationships into a model to predict the eruptive conditions of extraterrestrial (Martian) volcanoes based on their morphology.

  10. Volcano spacing and plate rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Brink, U. (Stanford Univ., California (USA))

    1991-04-01

    In-plane stresses, which accompany the flexural deformation of the lithosphere under the load adjacent volcanoes, may govern the spacing of volcanoes in hotspot provinces. Specifically, compressive stresses in the vicinity of a volcano prevent new upwelling in this area, forcing a new volcano to develop at a minimum distance that is equal to the distance in which the radial stresses change from compressional to tensile (the inflection point). If a volcano is modeled as a point load on a thin elastic plate, then the distance to the inflection point is proportional to the thickness of the plate to the power of 3/4. Compilation of volcano spacing in seven volcanic groups in East Africa and seven volcanic groups of oceanic hotspots shows significant correlation with the elastic thickness of the plate and matches the calculated distance to the inflection point. In contrast, volcano spacing in island arcs and over subduction zones is fairly uniform and is much larger than predicted by the distance to the inflection point, reflecting differences in the geometry of the source and the upwelling areas.

  11. Creating Griffith Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cook, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Griffith Observatory has been the iconic symbol of the sky for southern California since it began its public mission on May 15, 1935. While the Observatory is widely known as being the gift of Col. Griffith J. Griffith (1850-1919), the story of how Griffith’s gift became reality involves many of the people better known for other contributions that made Los Angeles area an important center of astrophysics in the 20th century. Griffith began drawing up his plans for an observatory and science museum for the people of Los Angeles after looking at Saturn through the newly completed 60-inch reflector on Mt. Wilson. He realized the social impact that viewing the heavens could have if made freely available, and discussing the idea of a public observatory with Mt. Wilson Observatory’s founder, George Ellery Hale, and Director, Walter Adams. This resulted, in 1916, in a will specifying many of the features of Griffith Observatory, and establishing a committee managed trust fund to build it. Astronomy popularizer Mars Baumgardt convinced the committee at the Zeiss Planetarium projector would be appropriate for Griffith’s project after the planetarium was introduced in Germany in 1923. In 1930, the trust committee judged funds to be sufficient to start work on creating Griffith Observatory, and letters from the Committee requesting help in realizing the project were sent to Hale, Adams, Robert Millikan, and other area experts then engaged in creating the 200-inch telescope eventually destined for Palomar Mountain. A Scientific Advisory Committee, headed by Millikan, recommended that Caltech Physicist Edward Kurth be put in charge of building and exhibit design. Kurth, in turn, sought help from artist Russell Porter. The architecture firm of John C. Austin and Fredrick Ashley was selected to design the project, and they adopted the designs of Porter and Kurth. Philip Fox of the Adler Planetarium was enlisted to manage the completion of the Observatory and become its temporary Director.

  12. North Pole Environmental Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The North Pole Environmental Observatory (NPEO) is a collection of the University of Washington's year-round un-manned scientific platforms in the Central Basin of the Arctic Ocean. Researchers will find images, data, and other information about the three types of measurement systems: Drifting Buoys, Oceanographic Mooring, and Aerial Surveys of Hydrographic Casts. Viewers can find links to the weather and other atmospheric conditions at the observatory. The site also provides links to news coverage pertaining to NPEO. Students can study the circulation patterns of the Freshwater Switchyard of the Arctic Ocean. Everyone can learn about the international research team's yearly expeditions to the observatory.

  13. Dartmouth Flood Observatory

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Dartmouth Flood Observatory produced this website as "a research tool for detection, mapping, measurement, and analysis of extreme flood events world-wide using satellite remote sensing." Users can learn about the Observatory's use of microwave and optical satellite imaging to determine flooding and extreme low flow conditions for various places throughout the world. Students and researchers can discover how the observatory monitors wetland hydrology for various places. Researchers can find archives of large flooding events from 1985 to the present. The web site features a variety of maps and satellite images of floods. This site is also reviewed in the May 28, 2004 _NSDL Physical Sciences Report_.

  14. 1964 Alaska Earthquake

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2008-11-04

    This video adapted from the Valdez Museum & Historical Archive, explores what happened during the Great Alaska Earthquake of 1964 through original footage, first-person accounts, and animations illustrating plate tectonics.

  15. Hawkweed Control in Alaska

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several hawkweed species from Europe have escaped ornamental planting and have colonized roadsides and grasslands in south central and southeast Alaska. These plants form near monotypic stands, reducing plant diversity and decreasing pasture productivity. A replicated greenhouse study was conducted ...

  16. Alaska: A frontier divided

    SciTech Connect

    O'Dell, R. (Conservation Foundation Latter, Washington, DC (USA))

    1986-09-01

    The superlatives surrounding Alaska are legion. Within the borders of the 49th US state are some of the world's greatest concentrations of waterfowl, bald eagles, fur seals, walrus, sea lions, otters, and the famous Kodiak brown bear. Alaska features the highest peak of North America, the 20,320-foot Mount McKinley, and the longest archipelago of small islands, the Aleutians. The state holds the greatest percentage of protected wilderness per capita in the world. The expanse of some Alaskan glaciers dwarfs entire countries. Like the periodic advance and retreat of its glaciers, Alaska appears with some regularity on the national US agenda. It last achieved prominence when President Jimmy Carter signed the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act in 1980. Since then the conflict between environmental protection and economic development has been played out throughout the state, and Congress is expected to turn to Alaskan issues again in its next sessions.

  17. NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region

    E-print Network

    NOAA Fisheries Alaska Region Glenn Merrill Assistant Regional Administrator for Sustainable Fisheries Rachel Baker CSP, Allocation Forrest Bowers Fishery Management Specialist Gretchen Harrington Fishery Biologist Gwen Herrewig Fishery Management Specialist Peggy Murphy Natural Resource Management

  18. Alaska's Digital Archive

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Many states have begun elaborate and well-funded digital archive projects in order to increase the accessibility of compelling historical materials from their area, and Alaska's very worthwhile effort is the latest to reach us here at the Scout Report. The project is being directed through the leadership of the Rasmuson Library at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Consortium Library at the University of Alaska Anchorage, and the Alaska State Library in Juneau. Currently there are close to 3,000 objects for consideration within their archive, all of which may be browsed by thumbnail image, bibliographic record, or title. Some of the documents include photographs of the "Aleutian Five" musical band which performed during World War II and "Happy Jack", the noted ivory carver. The archive can also be searched using an advanced search engine, and visitors may also create a selection of their favorite documents as well.

  19. Alaska Earthquake Information Center

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Housed at the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, the Alaska Earthquake Information Center reports and provides information on seismic activity in Alaska. While its southern Pacific coast colleague, California, gets a lot more attention when it comes to earthquakes, Alaska experienced a magnitude 6.7 earthquake already this summer and was rocked by a 7.9 in 2002. The site offers links to general information about the center, general earthquake information, research activities at the center, education and outreach materials (including information on seismology education projects), and much more. The site is well populated with materials and should provide a great resources for those interested in North American seismic events.

  20. EarthScope's Transportable Array in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, R. W.; Woodward, R.; Hafner, K.

    2013-12-01

    Since 2003, EarthScope has been installing a network of seismometers, known as the Transportable Array-across the continental United States and southern Canada. The station deployments will be completed in the Conterminous US in the fall of 2013. Beginning in October, 2013, and continuing for 5 years, EarthScope's Transportable Array plans to create a grid of seismic sensors in approximately 300 locations In Alaska and Western Canada. The proposed station grid is 85 km, and target locations will supplement or enhance existing seismic stations operating in Alaska. When possible, they will also be co-located with existing GPS stations constructed by the Plate Boundary Observatory. We review the siting plans for stations, the progress towards reconnaissance and permitting, and detail the engineering concept of the stations. In order to be able to determine the required site conditions and descriptions of installation methods to the permitting agencies, the National Science Foundation (NSF) has been supporting exploratory work on seismic station design, sensor emplacement and communication concepts appropriate for the challenging high-latitude environment that is proposed for deployment. IRIS has installed several experimental stations to evaluate different sensor emplacement schemes both in Alaska and the lower-48 U.S. The goal of these tests is to maintain or enhance a station's noise performance while minimizing its footprint and the equipment, materials, and overall expense required for its construction. Motivating this approach are recent developments in posthole broadband seismometer design and the unique conditions for operating in Alaska, where most areas are only accessible by small plane or helicopter, and permafrost underlies much of the region. IRIS has experimented with different portable drills and drilling techniques to create shallow holes (1-5M) in permafrost and rock outcrops. Seasonal changes can affect the performance of seismometers in different ways depending on the emplacement technique. Results of these tests are described in a companion presentation.