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Sample records for albanian maternity hospital

  1. Reported maternal styles and substance use: a cross-sectional study among educated Albanian young adults.

    PubMed

    Kalyva, Efrosini; Melonashi, Erika

    2014-05-01

    The study explored a predictive model of substance use including perceived maternal parenting style, age and gender. Participants were 347 Albanian young adults (144 males and 203 females) aged 18 to 28 years. They completed the Parental Authority Questionnaire and the Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Involvement Scale. Gender, perceived authoritative maternal style, and age predicted a proportion of substance use involvement. Gender and perceived authoritative maternal style also predicted the proportion of young people at risk for substance use or abuse. Implications of the findings and limitations of the study are discussed. PMID:24245766

  2. An exceptional Albanian family with seven children presenting with dysmorphic features and mental retardation: maternal phenylketonuria

    PubMed Central

    Knerr, Ina; Zschocke, Johannes; Schellmoser, Stefan; Topf, Hans G; Weigel, Corina; Dötsch, Jörg; Rascher, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    Background Phenylketonuria is an inborn error of amino acid metabolism which can cause severe damage to the patient or, in the case of maternal phenylketonuria, to the foetus. The maternal phenylketonuria syndrome is caused by high blood phenylalanine concentrations during pregnancy and presents with serious foetal anomalies, especially congenital heart disease, microcephaly and mental retardation. Case presentation We report on an affected Albanian woman and her seven children. The mother is affected by phenylketonuria and is a compound heterozygote for two pathogenetic mutations, L48S and P281L. The diagnosis was only made in the context of her children, all of whom have at least one severe organic malformation. The first child, 17 years old, has a double-chambered right ventricle, vertebral malformations and epilepsy. She is also mentally retarded, microcephalic, exhibits facial dysmorphies and small stature. The second child, a girl 15 years of age, has severe mental retardation with microcephaly, small stature and various dysmorphic features. The next sibling, a boy, died of tetralogy of Fallot at the age of three months. He also had multiple vertebral and rib malformations. The subsequent girl, now eleven years old, has mental retardation, microcephaly and epilepsy along with facial dysmorphy, partial deafness and short stature. The eight-year-old child is slightly mentally retarded and microcephalic. A five-year-old boy was a premature, dystrophic baby and exhibits mental retardation, dysmorphic facial features, brachydactyly and clinodactyly of the fifth finger on both hands. Following a miscarriage, our index case, the youngest child at two years of age, is microcephalic and mentally retarded and shows minor facial anomalies. All children exhibit features of phenylalanine embryopathy caused by maternal phenylketonuria because the mother had not been diagnosed earlier and, therefore, never received any diet. Conclusion This is the largest family suffering

  3. Application of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) in Albanian hospitals: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Gabrani, Adriatik; Hoxha, Adrian; Simaku, Artan; Gabrani, Jonila (Cyco)

    2015-01-01

    Objective To establish the reliability and validity of the translated version of the Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) by evaluating its psychometric properties and to determine possible differences among nurses and physicians regarding safety attitudes. Design A cross-sectional study utilising the Albanian version of the SAQ and a demographic questionnaire. Setting Four regional hospitals in Albania. Participants 341 healthcare providers, including 132 nurses and 209 doctors. Main outcome measure(s) The translation, construct validity and internal validity of the SAQ. The SAQ includes six scales and 30 items. Results A total of 341 valid questionnaires were returned, for a response rate of 70%. The confirmatory factor analysis and its goodness-of-fit indices (standardised root mean square residual 0.075, root mean square error of approximation 0.044 and comparative fit index 0.97) showed good model fit. The Cronbach's α values for each of the scales of the SAQ ranged from 0.64 to 0.82. The percentage of hospital healthcare workers who had a positive attitude was 60.3% for the teamwork climate, 57.2% for the safety climate, 58.4% for job satisfaction, 37.4% for stress recognition, 59.3% for the perception of management and 49.5% for working conditions. Intercorrelations showed that the subscales had moderate-to-high correlations with one another. Nurses were more hesitant to admit and report errors; only 55% of physicians and 44% of nurses endorsed this statement (χ2=4.9, p=0.02). Moreover, nurses received lower scores on team work compared with doctors (N 45.7 vs D 52.3, p=0.01). Doctors denied the effects of stress and fatigue on their performance (N 46.7 vs D 39.5, p<0.01), neglecting the workload. Conclusions The SAQ is a useful tool for evaluating safety attitudes in Albanian hospitals. In light of the health workforce's poor recognition of stress, establishing patient safety programmes should be a priority among policymakers in Albania. PMID:25877270

  4. Albanians accuse Serbs of waging demographic war, flock to secret birth clinics.

    PubMed

    1992-06-21

    Even giving birth has become a political issue in the tense Yugoslav province of Kosovo. Although ethnic Albanians in the province outnumber Serbs by nearly 10-to-1, they live 2nd-class lives. One ethnic Albanian midwife who lives near the capital of Pristina says that 1500 babies have been born in her spare room during the past 20 months to women who preferred to take risks rather than go to Serb-run clinics. Women who come to the midwife--she did not want her name used or even the name of her town mentioned--give birth on a narrow cot covered with 2 soiled plastic sheets. They clench their teeth to stifle the pain--the midwife saves her meager supply of anesthetic for severe cases only. Next to the cot is a small cradle, but otherwise there is no sign that the room with its sofas and cabinets is a maternity clinic. Albanians have a birth rate of 34/1000 residents--Europe's highest. In Kosovo, about 200,000 Serbs are outnumbered by 1.8 million albanians, in the land Serbia cherishes as the cradle of it civilization. The Serbs say they are being swamped by Albanians, and in the past 10 years, waves of Serbs have left Kosovo, Yugoslavia's poorest province. At least 2000 have left in the past 12 months. But ethnic Albanians say it is the Serbs who practice demographic warfare. After a period of unrest in mid-1990. Serbian forces clamped down on an Albanian independence drive. Albanian doctors and nurses were fired. The gynecological clinic in Pristina lost some top specialists. "They did it to change the demographic map of Kosovo--to discourage Albanian births," said Dr. Flora Doko, president of the health committee of the Democratic League--the main Albanian opposition party, which has formed a government-in-exile and seeks independence for the province. Unconfirmed reports of Albanian babies being positioned in hospitals further inflamed the atmosphere in the suspicious society. There is no law discriminating against Albanians in medical care, but they claim

  5. Albanian: Basic Course. Development of Albanian Economy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This volume is intended as a supplement to "Albanian: Basic Course." The development of the Albanian economy and its status at the time the document was published are discussed in terms of industry, agriculture, and foreign trade. (JB)

  6. Albanian. Verbs: Reference Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This supplementary volume to "Albanian: Basic Course" is divided into two sections. The first is a summary of Albanian verb forms (tense and mood) and their use. The second section consists of a set of paradigms for the conjugation of regular and irregular Albanian verbs. (JB)

  7. Influence of the support offered to breastfeeding by maternity hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Passanha, Adriana; Benício, Maria Helena D’Aquino; Venâncio, Sônia Isoyama; dos Reis, Márcia Cristina Guerreiro

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate whether the support offered by maternity hospitals is associated with higher prevalences of exclusive and predominant breastfeeding. METHODS This is a cross-sectional study including a representative sample of 916 infants less than six months who were born in maternity hospitals, in Ribeirao Preto, Sao Paulo, Southeastern Brazil, 2011. The maternity hospitals were evaluated in relation to their fulfillment of the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Data were collected regarding breastfeeding patterns, the birth hospital and other characteristics. The individualized effect of the study factor on exclusive and predominant breastfeeding was analyzed using Poisson multiple regression with robust variance. RESULTS Predominant breastfeeding tended to be more prevalent when the number of fulfilled steps was higher (p of linear trend = 0.057). The step related to not offering artificial teats or pacifiers to breastfed infants and that related to encouraging the establishment of breastfeeding support groups were associated, respectively, to a higher prevalence of exclusive (PR = 1.26; 95%CI 1.04;1.54) and predominant breastfeeding (PR = 1.55; 95%CI 1.01;2.39), after an adjustment was performed for confounding variables. CONCLUSIONS We observed a positive association between support offered by maternity hospitals and prevalences of exclusive and predominant breastfeeding. These results can be useful to other locations with similar characteristics (cities with hospitals that fulfill the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding) to provide incentive to breastfeeding, by means of promoting, protecting and supporting breastfeeding in maternity hospitals. PMID:26759966

  8. Informal patient payments in maternity hospitals in Kiev, Ukraine.

    PubMed

    Stepurko, Tetiana; Pavlova, Milena; Levenets, Olena; Gryga, Irena; Groot, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Maternity care in Ukraine is a government priority. However, it has not undergone substantial changes since the collapse of the Soviet Union. Similar to the entire health care sector in Ukraine, maternity care suffers from inefficient funding, which results in low quality and poor access to services. The objective of this paper is to explore the practice of informal payments for maternity care in Ukraine, specifically in cases of childbirth in Kiev maternity hospitals. The paper provides an ethnographic study on the consumers' and providers' experiences with informal payments. The results suggest that informal payments for childbirth are an established practice in Kiev maternity hospitals. The bargaining process between the pregnant woman (incl. her partner) and the obstetrician is an important part of the predelivery arrangement, including the informal payment. To deal with informal payments in Kiev maternity hospitals, there is a need for the following: (i) regulation of the "quasi-official" patient payments at the health care facility level; and (ii) improvement of professional ethics through staff training. These strategies should be coupled with improved governance of the health care sector in general, and maternity care in particular in order to attain international quality standards and adequate access to facilities. PMID:23239082

  9. Reading Difficulties in Albanian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avdyli, Rrezarta; Cuetos, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Albanian is an Indo-European language with a shallow orthography, in which there is an absolute correspondence between graphemes and phonemes. We aimed to know reading strategies used by Albanian disabled children during word and pseudoword reading. A pool of 114 Kosovar reading disabled children matched with 150 normal readers aged 6 to 11 years…

  10. Erratum: maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    2015-01-01

    This erratum corrects article: "Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report." The Pan African Medical Journal. 2015;21:16. doi:10.11604/pamj.2015.21.16.3912[This corrects the article on p. 16 in vol. 21, PMID: 26401210.]. PMID:26816561

  11. Maternal mortality in a district hospital in West Bengal.

    PubMed

    Gun, K M

    1970-06-01

    To ascertain the causes of high maternal mortality in West Bengal, the author examined maternal mortality between 1964-68. It was intended that measures to improve the situation in rural areas could be suggested. Women in labor often arrive at the hospital very late and few antenatal care facilities are available in rural areas. High risk cases often are delivered at home, a situation which often results in fetal complications. Maternal deaths have declined, but not dramatically. Of the 24,265 deliveries at the Burdwan district hospital, there were 333 maternal deaths for an incidence of 13.7/1000, along with another 42 cases where death was due to pregnancy-associated causes. In contrast, the maternal mortality rate in a district hospital in Calcutta was 4/1000 in 1968. Eclampsia accounted for 42.34% (141) of maternal deaths making it the major cause of death. In Calcutta this cause of death is receding gradually but in the districts it still accounts for a heavy loss of life (an incidence of 1 in 38). Adequate antenatal care would reduce this high mortality. 2 factors which have contributed to the high mortality are the hours lost in transporting a patient from a rural area and inadequate hospital staff. Postpartum hemorrhage and/or retained placenta was responsible for 39 deaths and none of the cases admitted from outside had received antenatal care. A shortage of blood was also a contributory factor. Severe anemia was responsible for 34 deaths and abortions resulted in another 29 deaths (16 because of severe sepsis; 13 due to hemorrhage or shock). An emergency service would help reduce the number of deaths but at present such a service does not even exist in the urban areas. Ruptured uterus resulted in 29 deaths and obstructed labor in 27 deaths. Placenta previa brought about 14 deaths and the remaining 20 deaths were due to such causes as accidental hemorrhage (10), hydatidiform mole (4), puerperal sepsis (3), ectopic pregnancy (2), and uterine inversion (1

  12. Maternal satisfaction with organized perinatal care in Serbian public hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Understanding the experiences and expectations of women across the continuum of antenatal, perinatal, and postnatal care is important to assess the quality of maternal care and to determine problematic areas which could be improved. The objective of this study was to identify the factors associated with maternal satisfaction with hospital-based perinatal care in Serbia. Methods Our survey was conducted from January 2009 to January 2010 using a 28-item, self-administered questionnaire. The sample consisted of 50% of women who expected childbirths during the study period from all 76 public institutions with obstetric departments in Serbia. The following three composite outcome variables were constructed: satisfaction with technical and professional aspects of care; communication and interpersonal aspects of care; and environmental factors. Results We analyzed 34,431 completed questionnaires (84.2% of the study sample). The highest and lowest average satisfaction scores (4.43 and 3.25, respectively) referred to the overall participation of midwives during delivery and the quality of food served in the hospital, respectively. Younger mothers and multiparas were less concerned with the environmental conditions (OR = 0.55, p = 0.006; OR = 1.82, p = 0.004). Final model indicated that mothers informed of patients’ rights, pregnancy and delivery through the Maternal Counseling Service were more likely to be satisfied with all three outcome variables. The highest value of the Pearson’s coefficient of correlation was between the overall satisfaction score and satisfaction with communication and interpersonal aspects of care. Conclusions Our study illuminated the importance of interpersonal aspects of care and education for maternal satisfaction. Improvement of the environmental conditions in hospitals, the WHO program, Baby-friendly Hospital, and above all providing all pregnant women with antenatal education, are recommendations which would

  13. Information for managers in hospitals: representing maternity unit statistics graphically.

    PubMed Central

    Szczepura, A; Mugford, M; Stilwell, J A

    1987-01-01

    Staff who organise and run maternity units contribute many statistics to their health authority but do not find it easy to obtain information about their unit from these statistics. Data that are collected routinely, however, can be used to provide each unit with a graphical profile of its activity and resources. The method described here was derived from the personality profiles used by psychologists and allows staff in one unit to assess the outcome, activity, and use of resources in their unit in relation to similar units, to explain some of the differences when these occur, or to highlight potential problems. Examples are taken from a study of maternity units in the West Midlands. It is concluded that the technique can indicate potential problems and usefully be adopted by those who monitor maternity care in districts or hospitals. PMID:3105784

  14. Albanian: Basic Radio Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume has been designed as a supplement to a course in Albanian developed by the Defense Language Institute. The emphasis in this text is placed on radio communications instruction. The volume is divided into five exercises, each of which contains a vocabulary, dictation, and an air-to-ground communications procedure conducted in Albanian…

  15. Albanian Geography and History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This volume supplements lessons 1-120 in the "Albanian Basic Course" developed by the Defense Language Institute. New words and idioms are introduced, and historical, political, cultural, and geographic information about Albania focuses on contemporary life. It is suggested that the work in this text be initiated during the final phase of the…

  16. Reading difficulties in Albanian.

    PubMed

    Avdyli, Rrezarta; Cuetos, Fernando

    2012-10-01

    Albanian is an Indo-European language with a shallow orthography, in which there is an absolute correspondence between graphemes and phonemes. We aimed to know reading strategies used by Albanian disabled children during word and pseudoword reading. A pool of 114 Kosovar reading disabled children matched with 150 normal readers aged 6 to 11 years old were tested. They had to read 120 stimuli varied in lexicality, frequency, and length. The results in terms of reading accuracy as well as in reading times show that both groups were affected by lexicality and length effects. In both groups, length and lexicality effects were significantly modulated by school year being greater in early grades and later diminish in length and just the opposite in lexicality. However, the reading difficulties group was less accurate and slower than the control group across all school grades. Analyses of the error patterns showed that phonological errors, when the letter replacement leading to new nonwords, are the most common error type in both groups, although as grade rises, visual errors and lexicalizations increased more in the control group than the reading difficulties group. These findings suggest that Albanian normal children use both routes (lexical and sublexical) from the beginning of reading despite of the complete regularity of Albanian, while children with reading difficulties start using sublexical reading and the lexical reading takes more time to acquire, but finally both routes are functional. PMID:22739980

  17. Readings in Albanian. Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Leonard; And Others

    This text is designed to enable a student who knows English to gain reading proficiency in Albanian. Part One, which is presented here, includes the first 30 of the 100 units in the complete course. The units include texts from various periods of Albanian writing and include a variety of contents and styles: folklore, biography, news articles,…

  18. Neonatal respiratory distress in Omdurman Maternity Hospital, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Hamed, Selma MA; Nasr, Abdelhaleem

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal respiratory distress (NRD) is a common neonatal problem, which is responsible for high morbidity and mortality. There are few published studies in developing countries addressing neonatal respiratory distress. There is no previously published study in Sudan on this problem. The objective of the study is to determine the frequency, different causes, immediate outcome. It was a prospective, descriptive, cross sectional hospital-based study which was carried out in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of Omdurman Maternity Hospital, between February-March 2013. The study enrolled all Sudanese newborns from 0-28 days including normal, low and high birth weight of different gestational ages admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit and diagnosed as neonatal respiratory distress. The frequency of NRD was calculated, the causes and immediate outcome were determined. Results showed that the frequency rate of NRD was (4.83%) among the total number of hospital (2071) live births during the period of the study. The commonest causes were transient tachypnoea of the newborn (TTN) in 28% of cases, sepsis in 24% of cases and hyaline membrane disease (HMD) in 15% of cases. The outcome of NRD was: cure in 56% of cases, death in 36% of cases, and patients discharged with complications in 8% of cases. In conclusion, the study confirmed the importance of NRD with a frequency rate of 4.83%, morbidity of 8% and mortality of 36% of cases. The causes and immediate outcome were determined and discussed. Some recommendations were suggested in order to reduce its frequency, morbidity and mortality. PMID:27493392

  19. Quality of Care: A Review of Maternal Deaths in a Regional Hospital in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Adusi-Poku, Yaw; Antwil, Edward; Osei-Kwakye, Kingsley; Tetteh, Chris; Detoh, Eric Kwame; Antwi, Phyllis

    2015-09-01

    The government of Ghana and key stakeholders have put into place several interventions aimed at reducing maternal deaths. At the institutional level, the conduct of maternal deaths audit has been instituted. This also contributes to reducing maternal deaths as shortcomings that may have contributed to such deaths could be identified to inform best practice and forestall such occurrences in the future. The objective of this study was to review the quality of maternal care in a regional hospital. A review of maternal deaths using Quality of Care Evaluation Form adapted from the Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital (KATH) Maternal Death Audit Evaluation Committee was used. About fifty-five percent, 18 (55%) of cases were deemed to have received adequate documentation, senior clinicians were involved in 26(85%) of cases. Poor documentation, non-involvement of senior clinicians in the management of cases, laboratory related issues particularly in relation to blood and blood products as well as promptness of care and adequacy of intensive care facilities and specialists in the hospital were contributory factors to maternal deaths . These are common themes contributing to maternal deaths in developing countries which need to be urgently tackled. Maternal death review with emphasis on quality of care, coupled with facility gap assessment, is a useful tool to address the adequacy of emergency obstetric care services to prevent further maternal deaths. PMID:26897915

  20. Albanian: A Survey of Albanian Language and Literature. Area Background Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This survey of Albanian language and literature is a synopsis of linguistic studies and literary achievements in Albania. The first chapter discusses the origin of the Albanian language. The next chapters deal with the Greek, Latin, Slavic, and Turkish influences on the Albanian language. The influence of Albanian on other Balkan languages and the…

  1. Maternal mortality in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region.

    PubMed

    Ray, A

    1992-05-01

    This study was conducted in a subdivisional hospital of eastern Himalayan region among 5,273 pregnant women over a period of 8 years. There were 29 deaths, the maternal mortality rate was 55 per 10,000. Septic abortion was encountered in 4 among them. Direct obstetric cause was responsible in 72.41% of cases and indirect cause in 27.59% cases. Sepsis, both puerperal and postabortal resulted in 24.14% followed by postpartum haemorrhage in 20.69%. Two of these cases were associated with inversion of the uterus. Preeclampsia caused 10.34% and eclampsia 6.9% of the deaths. Among the indirect causes severe anaemia and pulmonary tuberculosis accounted for 10.34% and 6.9% respectively. Infective hepatitis was the cause in 6.9% cases. Only 17% of the cases were booked and the rest were unbooked. Majority of the cases (62.07%) belonged to the age group of 20-30 years. Primigravida constituted 41.38% of the cases. PMID:1517613

  2. Trends in Maternal Mortality Ratio in a Tertiary Referral Hospital and the Effects of Various Maternity Schemes on It

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Harpreet; Kaur, Sharanjit; Singh, Sukhwinderjit

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the trend in maternal mortality ratio in a tertiary care centre and the effect of various maternity schemes on it. Materials and methods: Retrospective analysis of all maternal deaths occurring in the Guru Gobind Singh Medical College & Hospital, Faridkot, Punjab, India was done from Jan 2010 to Dec 2012. Every maternal death was scrutinized from various aspects like direct cause of death, age, locality, antenatal care and gestational age. Results: The total number of deliveries has risen from 957 in 2010 to 1063 in 2012 at the same time the maternal mortality ratio has increased from 835.94 in 2010 to 2054.55 per one live birth in 2012. Haemorrhage (24.12%) and sepsis (18.9%) were the most common causes of death followed closely by pregnancy induced hypertension including eclampsia (15.5%). Anemia (12.06%) contributed to the most common indirect cause of death. Conclusion: Implementation of the various maternity schemes has had no significant impact on the profile of dying mothers. There is a need to stress the importance of good antenatal care in reducing Maternal Mortality Ratio. PMID:26175763

  3. Maternal mortality in Cameroon: a university teaching hospital report.

    PubMed

    Tebeu, Pierre-Marie; Pierre-Marie, Tebeu; Halle-Ekane, Gregory; Gregory, Halle-Ekane; Da Itambi, Maxwell; Maxwell, Da Itambi; Enow Mbu, Robinson; Robinson, Enow Mbu; Mawamba, Yvette; Yvette, Mawamba; Fomulu, Joseph Nelson; Nelson, Fomulu Joseph

    2015-01-01

    More than 550,000 women die yearly from pregnancy-related causes. Fifty percent (50%) of the world estimate of maternal deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa alone. There is insufficient information on the risk factors of maternal mortality in Cameroon. This study aimed at establishing causes and risk factors of maternal mortality. This was a case-control study from 1st January, 2006 to 31st December, 2010 after National Ethical Committee Approval. Cases were maternal deaths; controls were women who delivered normally. Maternal deaths were obtained from the delivery room registers and in-patient registers. Controls for each case were two normal deliveries following identified maternal deaths on the same day. Variables considered were socio-demographic and reproductive health characteristics. Epi Info 3.5.1 was used for analysis. The mean MMR was 287.5/100,000 live births. Causes of deaths were: postpartum hemorrhage (229.2%), unsafe abortion (25%), ectopic pregnancy (12.5%), hypertension in pregnancy (8.3%), malaria (8.3%), anemia (8.3%), heart disease (4.2%), and pneumonia (4.2%), and placenta praevia (4.2%). Ages ranged from 18 to 41 years, with a mean of 27.7 ± 5.14 years. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal death (OR=78.33; CI: (8.66- 1802.51)). The mean MMR from 2006 to 2010 was 287.5/100,000 live births. Most of the causes of maternal deaths were preventable. Lack of antenatal care was a risk factor for maternal mortality. Key words: Maternal mortality, causes, risk factors, Cameroon. PMID:26401210

  4. Maternal mortality in a teaching hospital in southern India. A 13-year study.

    PubMed

    Rao, K B

    1975-10-01

    During the 13 years 1960-1972, in a teaching hospital that serves a predominantly rural and semiurban population in southern India, there were 74,384 deliveries and 1245 maternal deaths, a maternal mortality rate of 16.7 per 1000 births. Direct obstetric factors caused 854 (65.5%) of these deaths. The leading indirect or associated causes of maternal deaths were anemia, cerebrovascular accidents, and infectious hepatitis. During the past 13 years, monthly maternal mortality meetings have helped to reduce the incidence of avoidable factors in maternal deaths among patients from the city but not among those brought from the surrounding countryside. The important causes of maternal deaths in this developing country, and their prevention, are individually discussed. PMID:1080844

  5. Evaluation of maternal and neonatal hospital care: quality index of completeness

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Ana Lúcia Andrade; Mendes, Antonio da Cruz Gouveia; Miranda, Gabriella Morais Duarte; de Sá, Domicio Aurélio; de Souza, Wayner Vieira; Lyra, Tereza Maciel

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Develop an index to evaluate the maternal and neonatal hospital care of the Brazilian Unified Health System. METHODS This descriptive cross-sectional study of national scope was based on the structure-process-outcome framework proposed by Donabedian and on comprehensive health care. Data from the Hospital Information System and the National Registry of Health Establishments were used. The maternal and neonatal network of Brazilian Unified Health System consisted of 3,400 hospitals that performed at least 12 deliveries in 2009 or whose number of deliveries represented 10.0% or more of the total admissions in 2009. Relevance and reliability were defined as criteria for the selection of variables. Simple and composite indicators and the index of completeness were constructed and evaluated, and the distribution of maternal and neonatal hospital care was assessed in different regions of the country. RESULTS A total of 40 variables were selected, from which 27 single indicators, five composite indicators, and the index of completeness of care were built. Composite indicators were constructed by grouping simple indicators and included the following variables: hospital size, level of complexity, delivery care practice, recommended hospital practice, and epidemiological practice. The index of completeness of care grouped the five variables and classified them in ascending order, thereby yielding five levels of completeness of maternal and neonatal hospital care: very low, low, intermediate, high, and very high. The hospital network was predominantly of small size and low complexity, with inadequate child delivery care and poor development of recommended and epidemiological practices. The index showed that more than 80.0% hospitals had a low index of completeness of care and that most qualified heath care services were concentrated in the more developed regions of the country. CONCLUSIONS The index of completeness proved to be of great value for monitoring the

  6. Are urban safety-net hospitals losing low-risk Medicaid maternity patients?

    PubMed Central

    Gaskin, D J; Hadley, J; Freeman, V G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine data on Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity cases to address four questions: (1) Did safety-net hospitals' share of Medicaid patients decline while their shares of self-pay/charity-care patients increased from 1991 to 1994? (2) Did Medicaid patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals decline during 1991-94? (3) Did self-pay/charity patients' propensity to use safety-net hospitals increase during 1991-94? (4) Did the change in Medicaid patients' use of safety-net hospitals differ for low- and high-risk patients? STUDY DESIGN: We use hospital discharge data to estimate logistic regression models of hospital choice for low-risk and high-risk Medicaid and self-pay/charity maternity patients for 25 metropolitan statistical areas (MSAs) in five states for the years 1991 and 1994. We define low-risk patients as discharges without comorbidities and high-risk patients as discharges with comorbidities that may substantially increase hospital costs, length of stay, or morbidity. The five states are California, Florida, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York. The MSAs in the analysis are those with at least one safety-net hospital and a population of 500,000 or more. This study also uses data from the 1990 Census and AHA Annual Survey of Hospitals. The regression analysis estimates the change between 1991 and 1994 in the relative odds of a Medicaid or self-pay/charity patient using a safety-net hospital. We explore whether this change in the relative odds is related to the risk status of the patient. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The findings suggest that competition for Medicaid patients increased from 1991 to 1994. Over time, safety-net hospitals lost low-risk maternity Medicaid patients while services to high-risk maternity Medicaid patients and self-pay/charity maternity patients remained concentrated in safety-net hospitals. IMPLICATIONS FOR POLICY: Safety-net hospitals use Medicaid patient revenues and public subsidies that are based on Medicaid

  7. Maternal Infection Requiring Hospitalization during Pregnancy and Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atladottir, Hjordis O.; Thorsen, Poul; Ostergaard, Lars; Schendel, Diana E.; Lemcke, Sanne; Abdallah, Morsi; Parner, Erik T.

    2010-01-01

    Exposure to prenatal infection has been suggested to cause deficiencies in fetal neurodevelopment. In this study we included all children born in Denmark from 1980, through 2005. Diagnoses of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and maternal infection were obtained through nationwide registers. Data was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards…

  8. Wide Variation Found In Hospital Facility Costs For Maternity Stays Involving Low-Risk Childbirth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiao; Gariepy, Aileen; Lundsberg, Lisbet S; Sheth, Sangini S; Pettker, Christian M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Illuzzi, Jessica L

    2015-07-01

    Childbirth is the leading cause of hospital admission in the United States, yet there has been little research on variation in hospital costs associated with childbirth. Using data from the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample, we characterized the variation in estimated facility costs of hospitalizations for low-risk childbirth across US hospitals. We found that the average estimated facility cost per maternity stay ranged from $1,189 to $11,986 (median: $4,215), with a 2.2-fold difference between the 10th and 90th percentiles. Estimated facility costs were higher at hospitals with higher rates of cesarean delivery or serious maternal morbidity. Hospitals having government or nonprofit ownership; being a rural hospital; and having relatively low volumes of childbirths, low proportions of childbirths covered by Medicaid, and long stays also had significantly higher costs. The large variation in estimated facility cost for low-risk childbirths among hospitals suggests that hospital practices might be an important contributor to variation in cost and that there may be opportunities for cost reduction. The safe reduction of cesarean deliveries, increasing the coordination of care, and emphasizing value of care through new payment and delivery systems reforms may help reduce hospital costs and cost variation associated with childbirth in the United States. PMID:26153317

  9. Association of Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy with Infant Hospitalization and Mortality Due to Infectious Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Metzger, Michael J.; Halperin, Abigail C.; Manhart, Lisa E.; Hawes, Stephen E.

    2012-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking is associated with infant respiratory infections and with increased risk of low birthweight (LBW) infants and preterm birth. This study assesses the association of maternal smoking during pregnancy with both respiratory and non-respiratory infectious disease (ID) morbidity and mortality in infants. Methods We conducted two retrospective case-control analyses of infants born in Washington State from 1987–2004 using linked birth certificate, death certificate, and hospital discharge records. One assessed morbidity—infants hospitalized due to ID within one year of birth (47,404 cases/48,233 controls). The second assessed mortality—infants who died within one year due to ID (627 cases/2,730 controls). Results Maternal smoking was associated with both hospitalization (Adjusted Odds Ratio (AOR)=1.52; 95%CI: 1.46, 1.58) and mortality (AOR=1.51; 95%CI: 1.17, 1.96) due to any ID. In subgroup analyses, maternal smoking was associated with hospitalization due to a broad range of ID including both respiratory (AOR=1.69; 95%CI: 1.63, 1.76) and non-respiratory ID (AOR=1.27; 95%CI: 1.20, 1.34). Further stratification by birthweight and gestational age did not appreciably change these estimates. In contrast, there was no association of maternal smoking with ID infant mortality when only LBW infants were considered. Conclusions Maternal smoking was associated with a broad range of both respiratory and non-respiratory ID outcomes. Despite attenuation of the mortality association among LBW infants, ID hospitalization was found to be independent of both birthweight and gestational age. These findings suggest that full-term infants of normal weight whose mothers smoked may suffer an increased risk of serious ID morbidity and mortality. PMID:22929173

  10. Major Placenta Previa: Rate, Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes Experience at a Tertiary Maternity Hospital, Sohag, Egypt: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Salah Roshdy; Aitallah, Abdusaeed; Abdelghafar, Hazem M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Major degree placenta is a serious health issue and is associated with high fetal-maternal morbidity and mortality. Literature from developing countries is scant. Aim To determine the prevalence and maternal and neonatal outcomes among women with major placenta previa (PP). Materials and Methods A prospective descriptive study of 52 singleton pregnancies with PP was evaluated in this study. The study was conducted at Sohag University Hospital, Egypt from January through June 2014. Outcome measures, including the prevalence of PP, maternal and neonatal outcomes, and case-fatality rate. Results The total number of deliveries performed during the study period was 3841, of them, 52 cases were placenta previa. Thus, the prevalence of PP was 1.3%. The mean of previous cesarean scars was 2.2±1.4. Of women with PP, 26.4% (n=14) had placenta accreta. In total, 15.1% (n=8) of women underwent an obstetric hysterectomy. From the total no. of babies, 13.2% (n=7) were delivered fresh stillborn babies. Of the surviving babies (n=45), 20% (n=9) required admission to NICU. The frequencies of bowel and bladder injuries were 3.8% (n=2) and 13.2% (n=7) respectively. There was no maternal death in this study. Conclusion The rate of PP is comparable to previous studies, however, the rate of placenta accreta is high. Also, there are high rates of neonatal mortality and intraoperative complications which can be explained by accreta. The study highlights the need to revise maternity and child health services. PMID:26674539

  11. Association between Short Maternal Height and Low Birth Weight: a Hospital-based Study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Anthropometry measurements, such as height and weight, have recently been used to predict poorer birth outcomes. However, the relationship between maternal height and birth outcomes remains unclear. We examined the effect of shorter maternal height on low birth weight (LBW) among 17,150 pairs of Japanese mothers and newborns. Data for this analysis were collected from newborns who were delivered at a large hospital in Japan. Maternal height was the exposure variable, and LBW and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit were the outcome variables. Logistic regression models were used to estimate the associations. The shortest maternal height quartile (131.0–151.9 cm) was related to LBW (OR 1.91 [95% CI 1.64, 2.22]). The groups with the second (152.0–157.9 cm) and the third shortest maternal height quartiles (158.0–160.9 cm) were also related to LBW. A P trend with one quartile change also showed a significant relationship. The relationship between maternal height and NICU admission disappeared when the statistical model was adjusted for LBW. A newborn’s small size was one factor in the relationship between shorter maternal height and NICU admission. In developed countries, shorter mothers provide a useful prenatal target to anticipate and plan for LBW newborns and NICU admission. PMID:26955234

  12. Factors for change in maternal and perinatal audit systems in Dar es Salaam hospitals, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Effective maternal and perinatal audits are associated with improved quality of care and reduction of severe adverse outcome. Although audits at the level of care were formally introduced in Tanzania around 25 years ago, little information is available about their existence, performance, and practical barriers to their implementation. This study assessed the structure, process and impacts of maternal and perinatal death audit systems in clinical practice and presents a detailed account on how they could be improved. Methods A cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in eight major hospitals in Dar es Salaam in January 2009. An in-depth interview guide was used for 29 health managers and members of the audit committees to investigate the existence, structure, process and outcome of such audits in clinical practice. A semi-structured questionnaire was used to interview 30 health care providers in the maternity wards to assess their awareness, attitude and practice towards audit systems. The 2007 institutional pregnancy outcome records were reviewed. Results Overall hospital based maternal mortality ratio was 218/100,000 live births (range: 0 - 385) and perinatal mortality rate was 44/1000 births (range: 17 - 147). Maternal and perinatal audit systems existed only in 4 and 3 hospitals respectively, and key decision makers did not take part in audit committees. Sixty percent of care providers were not aware of even a single action which had ever been implemented in their hospitals because of audit recommendations. There were neither records of the key decision points, action plan, nor regular analysis of the audit reports in any of the facilities where such audit systems existed. Conclusions Maternal and perinatal audit systems in these institutions are poorly established in structure and process; and are less effective to improve the quality of care. Fundamental changes are urgently needed for successful audit systems in these institutions. PMID

  13. Maternal mortality at government maternity hospital. Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh (a review of 431 cases).

    PubMed

    Durgamba, K K; Qureshi, S

    1970-01-01

    This reviews 431 maternal deaths over 3 periods of 3-4 years each from January 1958 to December 1968. Trends in mortality are noted. A steady decline was noted. Associated diseases increased maternal mortality but age and parity had no significant influence. 47% of the deaths were intrapartum, 35% postpartum, and 18% antenatal. Major causes were hemorrhage, preeclampsia, eclampsia, sepsis, and anemia, in that order. Deaths due to infection diminished markedly during the period. 58.2% of the deaths were considered avoidable. Delay by patient or doctor and lack of facilities in rural areas were principle avoidable factors. Extension of obstetrical service to villages, emergency mobile squads, and periodic review of mortality statistics are recommended. PMID:12304876

  14. Observations from a maternal and infant hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan--2003.

    PubMed

    Williams, Jennifer L; McCarthy, Brian

    2005-01-01

    Afghanistan is believed to have one of the highest infant and maternal mortality rates in the world. As a result of decades of war and civil unrest, Afghan women and children suffer from poor access to health services, harsh living conditions, and insufficient food and micronutrient security. To address the disproportionately high infant and maternal mortality rates in Afghanistan, the US Department of Health and Human Services pledged support to establish a maternal health facility and training center. Rabia Balkhi Hospital in Kabul, Afghanistan, was selected because this hospital admits approximately 36,000 patients and delivers more than 14,000 babies annually. This article reports the initial observations at Rabia Balkhi Hospital and describes factors that influenced women's access, the quality of care, and the evaluation health care services. This observational investigation examined areas of obstetric, laboratory and pharmacy, and ancillary services. The investigators concluded that profound changes were needed in the hospital's health care delivery system to make the hospital a safe and effective health care facility for Afghan women and children and an appropriate facility in which to establish an Afghan provider training program for updating obstetric skills and knowledge. PMID:15973254

  15. Albanian Area Studies: Bibliography Arranged by Topics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This bibliography on Albanian area studies is a guide of reference material for the student of Albanian language and culture. The first section on area background includes topics on history, physical and economic geography, natural resources, communication, transportation, demography, public utilities, industry, and agriculture. The next sections…

  16. Standard Albanian. A Reference Grammar for Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newmark, Leonard; And Others

    This book is intended as a reference grammar for English-speaking students of present-day Albanian. The introductory chapter provides information on the country and its people, the Albanian language and dialects, phonology, and morphology. The other chapters contain grammatical explanations in English and examples. (AMH)

  17. [Maternal mortality at the Hospital Center of Libreville (1984-1987)].

    PubMed

    Picaud, A; Nlome-Nze, R A; Faye, A; Ogowet Igumu, N

    1989-01-01

    Maternal mortality at the University Hospital of Libreville was 152.5 for every 100,000 live births. There were 48 maternal deaths out of 31,799 deliveries carried out between 1984 and 1987. The principal causes were: haemorrhage in 45.8%, infections in 20.8%, intercurrent diseases in 20.8%, vasculo-renal syndromes in 10.4% and thromboses in 2%. The main differences between this country and developed countries were the large number of haemorrhages and the rarity of thrombosis. Poor prognostic factors were SS sickle-cell disease in 10.4% of the cases who died and in deaths due to anaemias, of which 25% were due to haemorrhage connected with the afterbirth. Complications occurring in the 1st trimester of pregnancy caused nearly a third of all maternal deaths. Complications of abortion occurred in 16.6% and of extra-uterine pregnancies in 14.6%. If the maternal mortality rate is to be reduced it is important to have a proper blood bank. The risks of caesarean section are ten times greater than of vaginal delivery, although it is a good way out for difficult situations. The indications for the operation have to be carefully considered. Comparing the statistics reported from Cotonou, the University Hospital in Libreville has a lower incidence of maternal mortality but it is too high and requires real progress to be made. PMID:2778279

  18. Maternal Clinical Diagnoses and Hospital Variation in the Risk of Cesarean Delivery: Analyses of a National US Hospital Discharge Database

    PubMed Central

    Kozhimannil, Katy B.; Arcaya, Mariana C.; Subramanian, S. V.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cesarean delivery is the most common inpatient surgery in the United States, where 1.3 million cesarean sections occur annually, and rates vary widely by hospital. Identifying sources of variation in cesarean use is crucial to improving the consistency and quality of obstetric care. We used hospital discharge records to examine the extent to which variability in the likelihood of cesarean section across US hospitals was attributable to individual women's clinical diagnoses. Methods and Findings Using data from the 2009 and 2010 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project—a 20% sample of US hospitals—we analyzed data for 1,475,457 births in 1,373 hospitals. We fitted multilevel logistic regression models (patients nested in hospitals). The outcome was cesarean (versus vaginal) delivery. Covariates included diagnosis of diabetes in pregnancy, hypertension in pregnancy, hemorrhage during pregnancy or placental complications, fetal distress, and fetal disproportion or obstructed labor; maternal age, race/ethnicity, and insurance status; and hospital size and location/teaching status. The cesarean section prevalence was 22.0% (95% confidence interval 22.0% to 22.1%) among women with no prior cesareans. In unadjusted models, the between-hospital variation in the individual risk of primary cesarean section was 0.14 (95% credible interval 0.12 to 0.15). The difference in the probability of having a cesarean delivery between hospitals was 25 percentage points. Hospital variability did not decrease after adjusting for patient diagnoses, socio-demographics, and hospital characteristics (0.16 [95% credible interval 0.14 to 0.18]). A limitation is that these data, while nationally representative, did not contain information on parity or gestational age. Conclusions Variability across hospitals in the individual risk of cesarean section is not decreased by accounting for differences in maternal diagnoses. These findings highlight

  19. Maternal mortality -- aetiological factors: analytic study from a teaching hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Sarin, A R; Singla, P; Kaur, H

    1992-01-01

    A review of maternal deaths at Rajendra Hospital, Punjab, from January 1978 to December 1991 yielded important data for the planning of maternal health services in this area of India, During the 14 year study period, there were 33,160 births and 339 deaths, for a maternal mortality rate of 1002/100,000 live births. Women who had received no prenatal care accounted for 47.4% of deliveries but 92.8% of maternal deaths. In addition, a disproportionate number of deaths involved rural women (74.6%) and poor women (76.4%). 57.8% of maternal deaths involved women 21-30 years of age; 37.1% occurred among primigravidas. Direct obstetrical causes were considered the etiologic factor in 83.1% of these deaths. Primary among these causes were sepsis (37.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (26.2%), hypertensive disorders of pregnancy (21.4%), and obstructed labor (15.3%). 30.6% of deaths occurred during pregnancy, 50.3% during labor, and 19.1% in the postpartum period. Indirect obstetrical causes, notably severe anemia and anesthesia complications, were implicated in 15.3% of the maternal deaths. Critical analysis of the maternal deaths in this series suggested that 89.6% were totally preventable, 9.6% were probably preventable, and only 0.8% were not avoidable. Factors that would reduce the high rate of maternal mortality in this region include more widespread use of prenatal care, training of traditional birth attendants in asepsis, referral of high-risk pregnancies, and improved transportation in rural areas. PMID:12288813

  20. A Retrospective Audit of Clinically Significant Maternal Bacteraemia in a Specialist Maternity Hospital from 2001 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Richard John; Fonseca-Kelly, Zara; Eogan, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    Maternal sepsis is a significant problem in obstetrics, with almost one in four maternal deaths related to severe sepsis. We carried out a retrospective review of clinically significant bacteraemia in obstetric patients attending Rotunda Hospital over 14 years. From 2001 to 2014, there were 252 clinically significant positive blood culture episodes in obstetric patients. There were 112,361 live births >500 g during the study period giving an overall rate of 2.24 clinically significant positive maternal blood culture episodes per 1000 live births >500 g. The median rate over the 14 years was 2.12 episodes per 1000 live births >500 g, with an interquartile range of 1.74–2.43 per 1000 live births >500 g. There was no discernable increasing or decreasing trend over the 14 years. E. coli was the most commonly isolated organism (n = 92/252, 37%), followed by group B Streptococcus (n = 64/252, 25%), Staphylococcus aureus (n = 28/252, 11%), and anaerobes (n = 11/252, 4%). These top four organisms represented three-quarters of all positive blood culture episodes (n = 195/252, 77.3%). Of note, there were only five cases of listeriosis, representing a rate of 4.4 cases per 100,000 live births >500 g. The rate of invasive group A streptococcal infection was also very low at 5.3 cases per 100,000 live births >500 g. PMID:26494975

  1. Dental status of pregnant women attending a Brisbane maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Jago, J D; Chapman, P J; Aitken, J F; McEniery, T M

    1984-12-01

    A sample of 314 consecutive women attending for their first antenatal visit at a public hospital were examined according to the WHO survey procedure. The women's age ranged from 16 to 42 yr with a mean of 23.5 yr. Only 3% were edentulous in both jaws, but 13% had some form of denture. A quarter had pocketing in at least one sextant and only 16% were free of gingivitis. The average number of DMF teeth was 15.8, comprising 2.7 decayed, 4.5 missing and 8.6 filled teeth; 70% had teeth needing restoration and 10% had at least one tooth needing extraction. There were significant relationships between DMF score and age (positive) and between number of teeth needing restoration and age, educational level, and the woman's own perception of her dental health (all inverse). Some form of dental attention was needed by 86% of the women; 12% had conditions needing immediate attention. By comparison with a 1971 study of pregnant women in Brisbane, there has been a marked decline in DMFT score (from 19.1 to 15.8). PMID:6597062

  2. [Hospital readmission after postpartum discharge of term newborns in two maternity wards in Stockholm and Marseille].

    PubMed

    Boubred, F; Herlenius, E; Andres, V; des Robert, C; Marchini, G

    2016-03-01

    The consequences of early postpartum discharge (EPPD, within 2days after birth) on newborn health remain debated. Early discharge has been associated with increased neonatal morbidity. However, neonatal re-hospitalization can be prevented by careful follow-up during the 1st week after birth. We compared the early neonatal hospitalization of term newborns over 2years in two hospitals: Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm (n=7300births), which allowed early discharge from 6h after birth with specific neonatal follow-up, and Marseille University Hospital (AP-HM) (n=4385) where postpartum discharge was more conventional after 72h. During the study period, the EPPD rate was 41% vs. 2% in Stockholm and Marseille, respectively (P<0.001). Hospital readmission was comparable (5.6‰ vs. 7‰, P=0.2). The leading cause associated with hospitalization was icterus in Stockholm (76% vs. 26%, P<0.001) and feeding difficulties in Marseille (17% vs. 48%, P<0.001). In conclusion, close neonatal follow-up during the 1st week of life associated with restricted maternal and neonatal eligibility criteria for EPPD are required to prevent early neonatal re-hospitalization. PMID:26899902

  3. Case Study: Clinical Governance as an Approach to Improve Maternal and Newborn Health in 22 Hospitals in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Amelia, Dwirani; Suhowatsky, Stephanie; Baharuddin, Mohammad; Tholandi, Maya; Hyre, Anne; Sethi, Reena

    2015-01-01

    Clinical governance is a concept used to improve management, accountability and the provision of quality healthcare. An approach to strengthen clinical governance as a means to improve the quality of maternal and newborn care in Indonesia was developed by the Expanding Maternal and Neonatal Survival (EMAS) Program. This case study presents findings and lessons learned from EMAS program experience in 22 hospitals where peer-to-peer mentoring supported staff in strengthening clinical governance from 2012-2015. Efforts resulted in improved hospital preparedness and significantly increased the odds of facility-level coverage for three evidence-based maternal and newborn healthcare interventions. PMID:26860759

  4. Self-efficacy as a mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations in low-income urban families.

    PubMed

    Holland, Margaret L; Yoo, Byung-Kwang; Kitzman, Harriet; Chaudron, Linda; Szilagyi, Peter G; Temkin-Greener, Helena

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the role of maternal self-efficacy as a potential mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations in low-income families. We analyzed data from 432 mother-child pairs who were part of the control-group for the Nurse-Family Partnership trial in Memphis, TN. Low-income urban, mostly minority women were interviewed 12 and 24 months after their first child's birth and their child's medical records were collected from birth to 24 months. We fit linear and ordered logistic regression models to test for mediation. We also tested non-linear relationships between the dependent variable (child hospitalization) and covariates (depressive symptoms and self-efficacy). Elevated depressive symptoms (OR: 1.70; 90% CI: 1.05, 2.74) and lower maternal self-efficacy (OR: 0.674; 90% CI: 0.469, 0.970) were each associated with increased child hospitalizations. When both maternal self-efficacy and depressive symptoms were included in a single model, the depressive symptoms coefficient decreased significantly (OR decreased by 0.13, P = 0.069), supporting the hypothesis that self-efficacy serves as a mediator. A non-linear, inverse-U shaped relationship between maternal self-efficacy and child hospitalizations was supported: lower compared to higher self-efficacy was associated with more child hospitalizations (P = 0.039), but very low self-efficacy was associated with fewer hospitalizations than low self-efficacy (P = 0.028). In this study, maternal self-efficacy appears to be a mediator between maternal depression and child hospitalizations. Further research is needed to determine if interventions specifically targeting self-efficacy in depressed mothers might decrease child hospitalizations. PMID:20706866

  5. Public versus private hospital maternity length of stay: a gamma mixture modelling approach.

    PubMed

    Lee, A H; Xiao, J; Codde, J P; Ng, A S K

    2002-02-01

    Application of a gamma mixture model to obstetrical diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) revealed heterogeneity of maternity length of stay (LOS). The proportion of long-stay subgroups identified, which can account for 30% of admissions, varied between DRGs. The burden of long-stay patients borne was estimated to be much higher in private hospitals than public hospitals for normal delivery, but vice versa for Caesarean section. Such differences highlights the impact of DRG-based casemix funding on inpatient LOS and have significant implications for health insurance companies to integrate casemix funding across the public and private sectors. The analysis also benefits hospital administrators and managers to budget expenditures accordingly. PMID:11854995

  6. Maternal mortality and its relationship to emergency obstetric care (EmOC) in a tertiary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the trends in maternal mortality ratio over 5 years at JIPMER Hospital and to find out the proportion of maternal deaths in relation to emergency admissions. Methods: A retrospective analysis of maternal deaths from 2008 to 2012 with respect to type of admission, referral and ICU care and cause of death according to WHO classification of maternal deaths. Results: Of the 104 maternal deaths 90% were emergency admissions and 59% of them were referrals. Thirty two percent of them died within 24 hours of admission. Forty four percent could be admitted to ICU and few patients could not get ICU bed. The trend in cause of death was increasing proportion of indirect causes from 2008 to 2012. Conclusion: The trend in MMR was increasing proportion of indirect deaths. Ninety percent of maternal deaths were emergency admissions with complications requiring ICU care. Hence comprehensive EmOC facilities should incorporate Obstetric ICU care. PMID:27512460

  7. Poor standards of care in small, private hospitals in Maharashtra, India: implications for public-private partnerships for maternity care.

    PubMed

    Bhate-Deosthali, Padma; Khatri, Ritu; Wagle, Suchitra

    2011-05-01

    The private health sector in India is generally unregulated. Maharashtra is among the few states which require registration of private hospitals. This paper reports on a study of standards of care in small, private hospitals (less than 30 beds) in Maharashtra state, India, with a focus on maternity care, based on interviews with the hospitals' owners or senior staff, and observation. In the absence of reliable information on the number of private hospitals in the state, a physical listing was carried out in 11 districts and an estimate drawn up; 10% of hospitals found in each location were included in the study sample. We found poor standards of care in many cases, and few or no qualified nurses or a duty medical officer in attendance. Of the 261 hospitals visited, 146 provided maternity services yet 137 did not have a qualified midwife, and though most claimed they provided emergency care, including caesarean section, only three had a blood bank and eight had an ambulance. Government plans to promote public-private partnerships with such hospitals, including for maternity services, create concern, given our findings. The need to enforce existing regulations and collect information on health outcomes and quality of care before the state involves these hospitals further in provision of maternity care is called for. PMID:21555084

  8. Major clonal lineages in impetigo Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals.

    PubMed

    Růžičková, Vladislava; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Machová, Ivana; Kostýlková, Karla; Doškař, Jiří

    2012-11-01

    One hundred and twenty-seven exfoliative toxin-producing (ET-positive) strains of Staphylococcus aureus collected in 23 Czech and one Slovak maternity hospitals from 1998 to 2011 were genotypically characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST), pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) profiling, spa gene polymorphism analysis, and ETA-converting prophage carriage, which resulted in the identification of 21 genotypes grouped into 4 clonal complexes (CC). Ninety-one isolates carried the eta gene alone whilst 12 isolates harboured only the etb gene. Two new, to date not defined, spa types (t6644 and t6645) and 2 novel sequence types (ST2194 and ST2195) were identified in the set of strains under study. The predominant CC121 occurred in 13 Czech hospitals. CC15, CC9, and ST88 (CC88) exclusively included eta gene-positive strains while the strains belonging to ST121 harboured the eta and/or etb genes. This study highlights not only significant genomic diversity among impetigo strains and the distribution of major genotypes disseminated in the Czech and Slovak maternity hospitals, but also reveals their impact in epidermolytic infections. PMID:22664376

  9. Is baby-friendly breastfeeding support in maternity hospitals associated with breastfeeding satisfaction among Japanese mothers?

    PubMed

    Hongo, Hiroko; Nanishi, Keiko; Shibanuma, Akira; Jimba, Masamine

    2015-06-01

    While the World Health Organization's Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative has increased breastfeeding duration and exclusivity, a survey found that only 8.5 % of maternity hospitals in 31 developed countries could be designated baby-friendly. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support is sometimes criticized as mother unfriendly. This study examined whether baby-friendly breastfeeding support was associated with breastfeeding satisfaction, duration, and exclusivity among Japanese mothers. In this cross-sectional study, 601 breastfeeding Japanese mothers completed questionnaires at their infants' 4-month health checkups at two wards in Yokohama, Japan; 363 were included in the analysis. Baby-friendly breastfeeding support was measured based on the WHO's "Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding." We measured satisfaction using two subscales of the Japanese version of the Maternal Breastfeeding Evaluation Scale. The association of baby-friendly support with maternal satisfaction was assessed using multiple linear regression, while the prevalence ratios (PRs) for breastfeeding were estimated using Poisson regression. Mothers were stratified by prepartum exclusive breastfeeding intention (yes, n = 256; no, n = 107). Mothers who experienced early skin-to-skin contact with their infants were more likely to report breastfeeding satisfaction than those who did not. Among mothers without exclusive breastfeeding intention, those who were encouraged to feed on demand were more likely to be breastfeeding without formula at 1 month (PR 2.66 [95 % CI 1.32, 5.36]) and to perceive breastfeeding as beneficial for their baby (regression coefficient = 3.14 [95 % CI 0.11, 6.17]) than those who were not so encouraged. Breastfeeding satisfaction was a useful measure of breastfeeding outcome. Early skin-to-skin contact and encouragement to feed on demand in the hospital facilitate breastfeeding satisfaction. PMID:25366103

  10. Slavic-Albanian Language Contact, Convergence, and Coexistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, Matthew Cowan

    2012-01-01

    As historical relationships of Slavs and Albanians in the western Balkans have been subject to a wide range of scholarly interpretations, this dissertation seeks to present the facts of linguistic evidence of Slavic-Albanian contact, and apply them to an informed understanding of Slavs' and Albanians' interactions historically. Although…

  11. Incidence of maternal near miss in hospital childbirth and postpartum: data from the Birth in Brazil study.

    PubMed

    Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Domingues, Rosa Maria Soares Madeira; Schilithz, Arthur Orlando Corrêa; Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Diniz, Carmen Simone Grilo; Brum, Ione Rodrigues; Martins, Alaerte Leandro; Theme Filha, Mariza Miranda; Gama, Silvana Granado Nogueira da; Carmo Leal, Maria do

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluated data on the incidence of maternal near miss identified on World Health Organization (WHO) criteria from the Birth in Brazil survey. The study was conducted between February 2011 and October 2012. The results presented are estimates for the study population (2,337,476 births), based on a sample of 23,894 women interviewed. The results showed an incidence of maternal near miss of 10.21 per 1,000 live births and a near-miss-to-mortality ratio of 30.8 maternal near miss to every maternal death. Maternal near miss was identified most prevalently by clinical criteria, at incidence of 5.2 per 1,000 live births. Maternal near miss was associated with maternal age 35 or more years (RR=1.6; 95%CI: 1.1-2.5), a history of previous cesarean delivery (RR=1.9; 95%CI: 1.1-3.4) and high-risk pregnancy (RR=4.5; 95%CI: 2.8-7.0). incidence of maternal near miss was also higher at hospitals in capital cities (RR=2.2; 95%CI: 1.3-3.8) and those belonging to Brazil's national health service, the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SUS) (RR=3.2; 95%CI: 1.6-6.6). Improved quality of childbirth care services can help reduce maternal mortality in Brazil. PMID:25167176

  12. [Microflora formation in the newborn in maternity hospitals and neonatal abnormality units].

    PubMed

    Shilova, V P; Rozanova, S M; Kyrf, M V; Beĭkin, Ia B; Kuznetsova, L S; Turintseva, E G; Usova, O P; Chernykh, N G; Iagafarova, I S

    2007-10-01

    The basic sources of pyoseptic infection pathogens are infected and colonized neonatal infants in maternity hospitals. Microbiological monitoring revealed the specific features of biocenosis formation in the newborn in the "Mother and Baby" units, resuscitative departments (RD), intensive care units, and neonatal abnormality departments (NAD). Irrespective of the conditions of hospital stay, methicillin-resistant S. epidermis (MRSE) and Enterococcus faecium were prevalent in the neonatal microbial landscape. Colonization with the normal flora in the newborn actively treated with antibiotics is difficult in RD, at the same time there is a significant infection with the mycotic flora. Broad-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Klebsiela pneumonia strains have received wide acceptance in NAD. PMID:18154133

  13. Association between Hospital Birth Volume and Maternal Morbidity among Low-Risk Pregnancies in Rural, Urban, and Teaching Hospitals in the United States.

    PubMed

    Kozhimannil, Katy B; Thao, Viengneesee; Hung, Peiyin; Tilden, Ellen; Caughey, Aaron B; Snowden, Jonathan M

    2016-05-01

    Objectives This study aims to examine the relationship between hospital birth volume and multiple maternal morbidities among low-risk pregnancies in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, and urban teaching hospitals, using a representative sample of U.S. hospitals. Study Design Using the 2011 Nationwide Inpatient Sample from 607 hospitals, we identified 508,146 obstetric deliveries meeting low-risk criteria and compared outcomes across hospital volume categories. Outcomes include postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), chorioamnionitis, endometritis, blood transfusion, severe perineal laceration, and wound infection. Results Hospital birth volume was more consistently related to PPH than to other maternal outcomes. Lowest-volume rural (< 200 births) and non-teaching (< 650 births) hospitals had 80% higher odds (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 1.80; 95% CI = 1.56-2.08) and 39% higher odds (AOR = 1.39; 95% CI = 1.26-1.53) of PPH respectively, than those in corresponding high-volume hospitals. However, in urban teaching hospitals, delivering in a lower-volume hospital was associated with 14% lower odds of PPH (AOR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.80-0.93). Deliveries in rural hospitals had 31% higher odds of PPH than urban teaching hospitals (AOR = 1.31; 95% CI = 1.13-1.53). Conclusions Low birth volume was a risk factor for PPH in both rural and urban non-teaching hospitals, but not in urban teaching hospitals, where higher volume was associated with greater odds of PPH. PMID:26731180

  14. Causes of Trauma in Pregnant Women Referred to Shabih-Khani Maternity Hospital in Kashan

    PubMed Central

    Mesdaghinia, Elaheh; Sooky, Zahra; Mesdaghinia, Azam

    2012-01-01

    Background Trauma occurs in 7% of pregnancies and is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the mother and fetus. Objectives The present study was conducted in Kashan in 2009–2010 to evaluate the causes of trauma in pregnancy. Patients and Methods This descriptive study analyzed data from 32 pregnant women with trauma who were referred to the maternity hospital from 2009 to 2010. Data included age, gestational age, mother’s occupation, cause of trauma, maternal-fetal complications, gravidity, and parity. The diagnosis of maternal and fetal complications was based on clinical examinations by a gynecologist and results of blood tests, urine analysis tests, and sonography. Data were analyzed as frequency distributions. Results the causes of trauma included falling (9 cases (28.1%)), abdominal trauma (8 cases ( 25%)), spousal feud (3 cases (9.4%)), motorcycle accident (2 cases (6.25%)), car accident (2 cases (6.25%)), falling from a motorcycle (2 cases (6.25%)), falling or fainting resulting in head trauma (1 case (3.1%)), pain from crossing over a bump in the car (1 cases (3.1%)), and unspecified causes (4 cases (12.55%)). The causes of traumas occurred between 5 and 40 weeks of gestation. In 17.2% of the cases, trauma occurred prior to 20 weeks of gestation. However, there was no significant relationship between the cause of trauma and maternal age or gestational age. Vaginal bleeding and retroplacental clots were reported in 2 (6.25%) cases and 1 (3.1%) case, respectively. Conclusions Nearly half of the women presenting with trauma had experienced spousal feud or domestic violence; therefore, it is necessary to recognize spousal abuse and provide adequate support to traumatized pregnant women. PMID:24719837

  15. Fetal outcome in emergency versus elective cesarean sections at Souissi Maternity Hospital, Rabat, Morocco

    PubMed Central

    Benzouina, Soukayna; Boubkraoui, Mohamed El-mahdi; Mrabet, Mustapha; Chahid, Naima; Kharbach, Aicha; El-hassani, Amine; Barkat, Amina

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Perinatal mortality rates have come down in cesarean sections, but fetal morbidity is still high in comparison to vaginal delivery and the complications are more commonly seen in emergency than in elective cesarean sections. The objective of the study was to compare the fetal outcome and the indications in elective versus emergency cesarean section performed in a tertiary maternity hospital. Methods This comparative cross-sectional prospective study of all the cases undergoing elective and emergency cesarean section for any indication at Souissi maternity hospital of Rabat, Morocco, was carried from January 1, to February 28, 2014. Data were analyzed with emphasis on fetal outcome and cesarean sections indications. Mothers who had definite antenatal complications that would adversely affect fetal outcome were excluded from the study. Results There was 588 (17.83%) cesarean sections among 3297 births of which emergency cesarean section accounted for 446 (75.85%) and elective cesarean section for 142 cases (24.15%). Of the various factors analyzed in relation to the two types of cesarean sections, statistically significant associations were found between emergency cesarean section and younger mothers (P < 0.001), maternal illiteracy (P = 0.049), primiparity (P = 0.005), insufficient prenatal care (P < 0.001), referral from other institution for pregnancy complications or delivery (P < 0.001), cesarean section performed under general anesthesia (P < 0.001), lower birth weight (P < 0.016), neonatal morbidity and early mortality (P < 0.001), and admission in neonatal intensive care unit (P = 0.024). The commonest indication of emergency cesarean section was fetal distress (30.49%), while the most frequent indication in elective cesarean section was previous cesarean delivery (47.18%). Conclusion The overall fetal complications rate was higher in emergency cesarean section than in elective cesarean section. Early recognition and referral of mothers who are

  16. Establishing a National Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator in England: A Population-Based Study Using Routine Hospital Data

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Manisha; Kurinczuk, Jennnifer J.; Knight, Marian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction As maternal deaths become rarer, monitoring near-miss or severe maternal morbidity becomes important as a tool to measure changes in care quality. Many calls have been made to use routinely available hospital administration data to monitor the quality of maternity care. We investigated 1) the feasibility of developing an English Maternal Morbidity Outcome Indicator (EMMOI) by reproducing an Australian indicator using routinely available hospital data, 2) the impact of modifications to the indicator to address potential data quality issues, 3) the reliability of the indicator. Methods We used data from 6,389,066 women giving birth in England from April 2003 to March 2013 available in the Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) database of the Health and Social care Information centre (HSCIC). A composite indicator, EMMOI, was generated from the diagnoses and procedure codes. Rates of individual morbid events included in the EMMOI were compared with the rates in the UK reported by population-based studies. Results EMMOI included 26 morbid events (17 diagnosis and 9 procedures). Selection of the individual morbid events was guided by the Australian indicator and published literature for conditions associated with maternal morbidity and mortality in the UK, but was mainly driven by the quality of the routine hospital data. Comparing the rates of individual morbid events of the indicator with figures from population-based studies showed that the possibility of false positive and false negative cases cannot be ruled out. Conclusion While routine English hospital data can be used to generate a composite indicator to monitor trends in maternal morbidity during childbirth, the quality and reliability of this monitoring indicator depends on the quality of the hospital data, which is currently inadequate. PMID:27054761

  17. ‘Because of Poverty brought into Hospital: . . .’A Casenote-Based Analysis of the Changing Role of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital, 1850-1912

    PubMed Central

    Nuttall, Alison

    2008-01-01

    Summary Although the shift from a social to a medical function which occurred in nineteenth-century general hospitals has been explored, the occurrence of such a change in maternity hospitals has not been considered. Recent analyses of such institutions have examined particular aspects only, and thus give a somewhat static picture. This paper uses analysis of patient records (themselves an under-exploited resource) to explore the changing function of the Edinburgh Royal Maternity Hospital from a provider of shelter during childbirth to the destitute to a source of skilled medical care. It concludes that, although the Hospital had adopted the outward features of a medical institution by 1890, its casebooks suggest that its purpose only truly changed in the early twentieth century, and thus can perhaps be more appropriately linked with national anxiety regarding the health of babies and their mothers. PMID:18605328

  18. Complications of childbirth and maternal deaths in Kinshasa hospitals: testimonies from women and their families

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Maternal mortality in Kinshasa is high despite near universal availability of antenatal care and hospital delivery. Possible explanations are poor-quality care and by delays in the uptake of care. There is, however, little information on the circumstances surrounding maternal deaths. This study describes and compares the circumstances of survivors and non survivors of severe obstetric complications. Method Semi structured interviews with 208 women who survived their obstetric complication and with the families of 110 women who died were conducted at home by three experienced nurses under the supervision of EK. All the cases were identified from twelve referral hospitals in Kinshasa after admission for a serious acute obstetric complication. Transcriptions of interviews were analysed with N-Vivo 2.0 and some categories were exported to SPSS 14.0 for further quantitative analysis. Results Testimonies showed that despite attendance at antenatal care, some women were not aware of or minimized danger signs and did not seek appropriate care. Cost was a problem; 5 deceased and 4 surviving women tried to avoid an expensive caesarean section by delivering in a health centre, although they knew the risk. The majority of surviving mothers (for whom the length of stay was known) had the caesarean section on the day of admission while only about a third of those who died did so. Ten women died before the required caesarean section or blood transfusion could take place because they did not bring the money in time. Negligence and lack of staff competence contributed to the poor quality of care. Interviews revealed that patients and their families were aware of the problem, but often powerless to do anything about it. Conclusion Our findings suggest that women with serious obstetric complications have a greater chance of survival in Kinshasa if they have cash, go directly to a functioning referral hospital and have some leverage when dealing with health care staff PMID

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS and other important predictors of maternal mortality in Mulago Hospital Complex Kampala Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Women with severe maternal morbidity are at high risk of dying. Quality and prompt management and sometimes luck have been suggested to reduce on the risk of dying. The objective of the study was to identify the direct and indirect causes of severe maternal morbidity, predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to maternal mortality in Mulago hospital, Kampala, Uganda. Methods This was a longitudinal follow up study at the Mulago hospital's Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Participants were 499 with severe maternal morbidity admitted in Mulago hospital between 15th November 2001 and 30th November 2002 were identified, recruited and followed up until discharge or death. Potential prognostic factors were HIV status and CD4 cell counts, socio demographic characteristics, medical and gynaecological history, past and present obstetric history and intra- partum and postnatal care. Results Severe pre eclampsia/eclampsia, obstructed labour and ruptured uterus, severe post partum haemorrhage, severe abruptio and placenta praevia, puerperal sepsis, post abortal sepsis and severe anaemia were the causes for the hospitalization of 499 mothers. The mortality incidence rate was 8% (n = 39), maternal mortality ratio of 7815/100,000 live births and the ratio of severe maternal morbidity to mortality was 12.8:1. The independent predictors of maternal mortality were HIV/AIDS (OR 5.1 95% CI 2-12.8), non attendance of antenatal care (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.3-9.2), non use of oxytocics (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.7-9.7), lack of essential drugs (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.1-11.3) and non availability of blood for transfusion (OR 53.7, 95% CI (15.7-183.9) and delivery of amale baby (OR 4.0, 95% CI 1.6-10.1). Conclusion The predictors of progression from severe maternal morbidity to mortalitywere: residing far from hospital, low socio economic status, non attendance of antenatal care, poor intrapartum care, and HIV/AIDS. There is need to improve on the referral system, economic

  20. Maternal and fetal outcome in pre-eclampsia in a secondary care hospital in South India

    PubMed Central

    Aabidha, Parveen M.; Cherian, Anne G.; Paul, Emmanuel; Helan, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypertensive disorders in pregnancy are one of the common causes for perinatal and maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries. Pre-eclampsia is a condition which typically occurs after 20 weeks of gestation and has high blood pressure as the main contributing factor. The aim was to study the effects of pre-eclampsia on the mother and the fetus in rural South Indian population. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study conducted in a secondary level hospital in rural South India. A total of 1900 antenatal women were screened for pre-eclampsia during the period August 2010 to July 2011 to study the effects on the mother and fetus. Results: Of the 1900 women screened 93 were detected with pre-eclampsia in the study. Among these, 46.23% were primigravida, 30.1% belonged to socio-economic class 4 and 48.8% were among those with BMI 26–30. The incidence of severe pre-eclampsia was higher in the unregistered women. The most common maternal complication was antepartum hemorrhage (13.9%) and the most common neonatal complication was prematurity (23.65%). Conclusions: Treating anemia and improving socioeconomic status will improve maternal and neonatal outcome in pre-eclampsia. Antenatal care and educating women on significance of symptoms will markedly improve perinatal morbidity and mortality. Prematurity, growth restriction and low birth weight are neonatal complications to be anticipated and dealt with when the mother has pre-eclampsia. A good neonatal intensive care unit will help improve neonatal outcomes. PMID:25949977

  1. Assessment of client satisfaction in labor and delivery services at a maternity referral hospital in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Melese, Tadele; Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Bisetegne, Daniel; Habte, Dereje

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients perception about service quality shapes their confidence with regard to use of the available health care facility. This study is aimed to assess the client`s satisfaction in a maternal health care setting. Methods This is an institution based cross sectional descriptive study. A total of 423 postpartum women were interviewed. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20 statistical package. Results The proportion of mothers who are completely satisfied with health care ranges between 2.4 to 21%. Pain control was the poorest source of satisfaction with 82% reporting dissatisfaction. Provider's communication with clients yielded complete satisfaction rates ranging between 0.7 to 26%. Inadequate information about the drug prescribed and explanation of procedures to be done to the client were found to be major causes of dissatisfaction. The complete satisfaction rate with environmental factor of the hospital was between 3.3 to 40.2%. Age of the client, educational status, income of the client and client's address away from Addis Ababa were found to be the predictors of client satisfaction. Provider's attitude and communication, as well as longer duration of stay in the ward were independent predictors of client satisfaction. Conclusion Pain management, client privacy and client provider communication need to be addressed to ensure the satisfaction of maternity clients. The clients need to be involved in the management of their own health problems. PMID:25018826

  2. FURTHER MAPPING OF THE NATALITY CHRONOME IN TODA CITY (JAPAN) MATERNITY HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    YAMANAKA, T.; CORNÉLISSEN, G.; KAZUMA, M.; KAZUMA, N.; MURAKAMI, S.; OTSUKA, K.; SIEGELOVÁ, J.; DUŠEK, J.; SOSÍKOVÁ, M.; HALBERG, F.

    2008-01-01

    In order to investigate any circannual and/or circaseptan variations in birth incidence and birth weight in Toda City (Japan), data on 4,411 consecutive births were obtained from the city’s Maternity Hospital between 1 Jan 1999 and 31 Dec 2001. Data were analysed by cosinor separately for babies with birth weights in given ranges, and separately for boys and girls born at different gestational ages. A circannual rhythm was detected with statistical significance (P=0.047) for birth incidence of all vaginal deliveries, with an acrophase in the fall. A similar result for caesarean sections was of borderline statistical significance. A circaseptan component with a relatively consistent acrophase around midweek was of borderline statistical significance for birth incidence in some of the groups investigated. About-yearly and about-weekly variations were also found to characterize birth weight in some of the groups investigated. PMID:18978949

  3. Becoming Baby-Friendly and Transforming Maternity Care in a Safety-Net Hospital on the Texas-Mexico Border.

    PubMed

    Eganhouse, Deborah J; Gutierrez, Leticia; Cuellar, Lorena; Velasquez, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Nurse leaders used the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's survey on Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care, as well as Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative guidelines, to transform maternity care in a safety-net hospital with more than 3,500 births annually. Implementing evidence-based guidelines to support breastfeeding was essential for a vulnerable population characterized by minimal prenatal care and high rates of diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and poverty. Research showing the importance of breastfeeding in protecting against these factors guided extensive changes in our maternity care model. The nursing and medical teams changed long-held practices that separated women from their newborns and observed substantial improvements in breastfeeding initiation and exclusive breastfeeding rates at discharge. PMID:27520602

  4. ADOPTION OF THE WHO ASSESSMENT TOOL ON THE QUALITY OF HOSPITAL CARE FOR MOTHERS AND NEWBORNS IN ALBANIA

    PubMed Central

    Mersini, Ehadu; Novi, Silvana; Tushe, Eduard; Gjoni, Maksim; Burazeri, Genc

    2012-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the adoption process of the “Quality of hospital care for mothers and newborns babies, assessment tool” (WHO, 2009) was to provide the Albanian health professionals of maternity hospitals with a tool that may help them assess the quality of perinatal care and identify key areas of pregnancy, childbirth and newborn care that need to be improved. Methods: Four maternity hospitals (one university hospital and three regional hospitals) were selected for the assessment using this standard tool covering over 600 items grouped into 13 areas ranging from supportive services to case management. Sources of information consisted of site visits, hospital statistics, medical records, observation of cases and interviews with staff and patients. A score was assigned to each item (range 0-3) and area of care. The assessments were carried out in two rounds: in 2009 and in 2011. These assessments provided semi-quantitative data on the quality of hospital care for mothers and newborns. Results: Data collected on the first round established a baseline assessment, whereas the second round monitored the subsequent changes. The findings of the second round revealed improvements encountered in all maternities, notwithstanding differences in the levels of improvement between maternities, not necessarily linked with extra financial inputs. Conclusions: The Albanian experience indicates a successful process of the adoption of the WHO tool on the quality of hospital care for mothers and newborn babies. The adopted tool can be used country-wide as a component of a quality improvement strategy in perinatal health care in Albania. PMID:23378688

  5. Infant and maternal characteristics in neonatal abstinence syndrome--selected hospitals in Florida, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Lind, Jennifer N; Petersen, Emily E; Lederer, Philip A; Phillips-Bell, Ghasi S; Perrine, Cria G; Li, Ruowei; Hudak, Mark; Correia, Jane A; Creanga, Andreea A; Sappenfield, William M; Curran, John; Blackmore, Carina; Watkins, Sharon M; Anjohrin, Suzanne

    2015-03-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a constellation of physiologic and neurobehavioral signs exhibited by newborns exposed to addictive prescription or illicit drugs taken by a mother during pregnancy. The number of hospital discharges of newborns diagnosed with NAS has increased more than 10-fold (from 0.4 to 4.4 discharges per 1,000 live births) in Florida since 1995, far exceeding the three-fold increase observed nationally. In February 2014, the Florida Department of Health requested the assistance of CDC to 1) assess the accuracy and validity of using Florida's hospital inpatient discharge data, linked to birth and infant death certificates, as a means of NAS surveillance and 2) describe the characteristics of infants with NAS and their mothers. This report focuses only on objective two, describing maternal and infant characteristics in the 242 confirmed NAS cases identified in three Florida hospitals during a 2-year period (2010-2011). Infants with NAS experienced serious medical complications, with 97.1% being admitted to an intensive care unit, and had prolonged hospital stays, with a mean duration of 26.1 days. The findings of this investigation underscore the important public health problem of NAS and add to current knowledge on the characteristics of these mothers and infants. Effective June 2014, NAS is now a mandatory reportable condition in Florida. Interventions are also needed to 1) increase the number and use of community resources available to drug-abusing and drug-dependent women of reproductive age, 2) improve drug addiction counseling and rehabilitation referral and documentation policies, and 3) link women to these resources before or earlier in pregnancy. PMID:25742381

  6. High rates of burnout among maternal health staff at a referral hospital in Malawi: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Burnout among maternal healthcare workers in sub-Saharan Africa may have a negative effect on services provided and efforts to mitigate high maternal mortality rates. In Malawi, research on burnout is limited and no empirical research has been conducted specifically among maternal health staff. Therefore, the aims of the study were to examine the prevalence and degree of burnout reported by healthcare workers who provide antenatal, intrapartum, and postnatal services in a district referral hospital in Malawi; and, to explore factors that may influence the level of burnout healthcare workers experience. Methods In the current cross-sectional study, levels of burnout among staff working in obstetrics and gynaecology at a referral hospital in Malawi were examined, in addition to individual and job characteristics that may be associated with burnout. Results In terms of the three dimensions of burnout, of the 101 participants, nearly three quarters (72%) reported emotional exhaustion, over one third (43%) reported depersonalization while almost three quarters (74%) experienced reduced personal accomplishment. Conclusions Based on these findings, burnout appears to be common among participating maternal health staff and they experienced more burnout than their colleagues working in other medical settings and countries. Further research is needed to identify factors specific to Malawi that contribute to burnout in order to inform the development of prevention and treatment within the maternal health setting. PMID:21605379

  7. Early breast-feeding patterns in a Malaysian maternity hospital, 1980-1983.

    PubMed

    Kader, H A

    1984-12-01

    The promotion of commercial infant formulas in hospitals making such formulas freely available to new mothers has been prohibited by a set of rules 1st enforced in Malaysia in 1981. This report studies the influence this development has had on infant feeding patterns among health mothers over 3 different time periods: the period before this code of ethics was enforced in 1980-1981 (29,401 cases); the period immediately after from June to December of 1982 (7,833 cases); and the last phase from January to April of 1983 (4,380 cases). Over the 3 phases of the study, choice of breastfeeding increased consecutively from 4.1% to 10.5% and finally 31.7%. Formula feeding increased also, from 1.5% to 2.0% and 2.4%. While mixed feeding was the most popular choice, its incidence declined from 94.4% in 1981 to 65.9% in 1983. Differences among ethnic groups were not statistically significant in the early studies, while in 1983 the incidence of breastfeeding among Chinese, Indians and Malays was 33.1%, 32.1% and 31.0%, respectively. For maternal age groups studied, the increase in breastfeeding was greater for the at-risk groups (mothers less than 20 years and over 35 years of age). This same trend was seen among parity groups, with at-risk groups being parity 1 and parity 5. When socioeconomic status was compared, all classes showed an increase in breastfeeding, but the largest increase was among the highest socioeconomic class. Although mixed feeding is still favored, there is a definitive trend toward breastfeeding, perhaps partly helped by the introduction of the code of ethics against free formula distribution in hospitals. PMID:12280340

  8. [Birth weight and factors associated with the prenatal period: a cross-sectional study in a maternity hospital of reference].

    PubMed

    Capelli, Jane de Carlos Santana; Pontes, Juliana Silva; Pereira, Silvia Eliza Almeida; Silva, Alexandra Anastácio Monteiro; do Carmo, Cleber Nascimento; Boccolini, Cristiano Siqueira; de Almeida, Maria Fernanda Larcher

    2014-07-01

    This study examined factors related to birth weight in a maternity hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro. It is a descriptive, sectional study conducted in the Herculano Pinheiro Maternity Hospital (HMHP) in Rio de Janeiro between December 2008 and February 2009, with postpartum mothers between 20 and 34 years of age. The chi-square test, the Student's t test and the logistical regression model were applied. 14.6% of the infants had low birth weight (less than 2500 g). There was a negative correlation between birth weight and smoking habits of the mother. The pre-pregnancy weight, maternal pre-pregnancy body mass index and number of pre-natal visit variables were positively associated with birth weight. Multiple regression analysis indicated maternal age as being a risk factor for low birth weight. The conclusion reached is that the marital status situation, where this was perceived as an important variable, as well as the number of prenatal visits, which in group analysis showed no statistical significance, deserve further investigation together with other studies. PMID:25014286

  9. Assessment of maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight neonates at a tertiary hospital, Nanded, Maharashtra

    PubMed Central

    Domple, Vijay Kishanrao; Doibale, Mohan K.; Nair, Abhilasha; Rajput, Pinkesh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background: To assess the maternal risk factors associated with low birth weight (LBW) neonates at a tertiary hospital, Nanded, Maharashtra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out in a tertiary care hospital in Nanded city of Maharashtra between January 2014 and July 2014 among 160 cases (LBW-birth weight ≤2499 g) and 160 controls (normal birth weight-birth weight >2499. Data collection was done by using predesigned questionnaire and also related health documents were checked and collected the expected information during the interview after obtaining informed consent from mothers. The data were analyzed by Epi Info 7 Version. Results: The present study found the significant association among gestational age, sex of baby, type of delivery, maternal age, religion, education of mother and husband, occupation of mother and husband, type of family, maternal height, weight gain, hemoglobin level, planned/unplanned delivery, bad obstetric history, interval between pregnancies, previous history of LBW, underlying disease, tobacco chewing, timing of first antenatal care (ANC) visit, total number of ANC visit, and iron and folic acid (IFA) tablets consumption with LBW. No significant association was found among maternal age, residence, caste, consanguinity of marriage, socioeconomic status, gravida, birth order, multiple pregnancy, and smoking with LBW in our study. Conclusion: It was concluded that hemoglobin level, weight gain during pregnancy, gestational age, planned/unplanned delivery, bad obstetric history, and IFA tablets consumption during pregnancy were independent risk factors for LBW. PMID:27185977

  10. Factors affecting the outcome of maternity care. II. Neonatal outcomes and resources beyond the hospital of birth.

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, M; Szczepura, A; Lodwick, A; Stilwell, J

    1988-01-01

    Analysis of data about perinatal mortality and indicators of resources at maternity hospitals in the West Midlands region between 1977 and 1983 showed that paediatric staff ratios were inversely related to in-house mortality rates. In this paper, the outcomes for and resources used by transferred babies are added to those of the hospital of birth for three of the study years--1978, 1980, and 1982. Patterns of transfer differ between units and over time in the region, and a regional neonatal intensive care policy was introduced in 1980. Analysis of the new variables showed that in 1978 paediatric staffing was significantly inversely related to neonatal mortality. In later years, neonatal mortality of births at maternity units is explained entirely by the proportion of low or very low weight births. PMID:3221167

  11. Socioeconomic and physical distance to the maternity hospital as predictors for place of delivery: an observation study from Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Wagle, Rajendra Raj; Sabroe, Svend; Nielsen, Birgitte Bruun

    2004-01-01

    Background Although the debate on the safety and women's right of choice to a home delivery vs. hospital delivery continues in the developed countries, an undesirable outcome of home delivery, such as high maternal and perinatal mortality, is documented in developing countries. The objective was to study whether socio-economic factors, distance to maternity hospital, ethnicity, type and size of family, obstetric history and antenatal care received in present pregnancy affected the choice between home and hospital delivery in a developing country. Methods This cross-sectional study was done during June, 2001 to January 2002 in an administratively and geographically well-defined territory with a population of 88,547, stretching from urban to adjacent rural part of Kathmandu and Dhading Districts of Nepal with maximum of 5 hrs of distance from Maternity hospital. There were no intermediate level of private or government hospital or maternity homes in the study area. Interviews were carried out on 308 women who delivered within 45 days of the date of the interview with a pre-tested structured questionnaire. Results A distance of more than one hour to the maternity hospital (OR = 7.9), low amenity score status (OR = 4.4), low education (OR = 2.9), multi-parity (OR = 2.4), and not seeking antenatal care in the present pregnancy (OR = 4.6) were statistically significantly associated with an increased risk of home delivery. Ethnicity, obstetric history, age of mother, ritual observance of menarche, type and size of family and who is head of household were not statistically significantly associated with the place of delivery. Conclusions The socio-economic standing of the household was a stronger predictor of place of delivery compared to ethnicity, the internal family structure such as type and size of family, head of household, or observation of ritual days by the mother of an important event like menarche. The results suggested that mothers, who were in the low

  12. Albanian Language Competencies for Peace Corps Volunteers in Albania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haznedari, Ismail; Repishti, Sami

    This guide is designed for Albanian language training of Peace Corps workers in Albania, is intended to be used in a competency-based language training program, and reflects daily communication needs in that context. It consists of an introductory section on the history, alphabet, and phonology of the Albanian language and a series of 14 topical…

  13. Learning to Read Words in Albanian: A Skill Easily Acquired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoxhallari, Lorenc; van Daal, Victor H. P.; Ellis, Nick C.

    2004-01-01

    Effects of orthographic transparency were examined by comparing children learning to read in Albanian, Welsh, and English. Twenty Year 1 Albanian children were given a reading test consisting of a 100-word stratified sample of decreasing written frequency. They were able to read accurately 80% of the words; reading latency was a direct effect of…

  14. Albanian Basic Course: Workbook for Exercises in Grammar.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Washington, DC.

    This workbook in Albanian grammar requires students to fill in missing words following a particular grammatical pattern, selected from Exercises in Grammar used in the "Albanian Basic Course," prepared by the Defense Language Institute. Drills include: (1) interrogative pronouns, (2) demonstrative adjectives; (3) declension of nouns, possessive…

  15. Factors affecting the outcome of maternity care. 1. Relationship between staffing and perinatal deaths at the hospital of birth.

    PubMed Central

    Stilwell, J; Szczepura, A; Mugford, M

    1988-01-01

    This is the first of two papers describing a retrospective study of maternity hospitals in an English health region using data for the years 1977-83. The research was designed to investigate the relationship between resources (such as staff and equipment) and the outcomes of births at maternity units. Considerable variation in medical and nursing staffing levels in the units in the study was observed. Regression analysis suggests that, after taking account of differences in very low weight births at each unit, the level of paediatric staffing at a maternity unit is a significant factor in explaining differences in "in house" mortality. There was no identifiable relationship between staff categories other than paediatricians and the rate of perinatal death at the hospital of delivery. As selective referral and transfers between hospitals may affect the interpretation of these findings, a second paper follows presenting the results of a further analysis that adjusts both resources and outcomes to take account of neonatal transfers. PMID:3221166

  16. Prenatal lead exposure and relationship with maternal exposure determinants in a public maternity hospital of La Plata, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Martins, Enrique; Varea, Ana; Apezteguía, María; González, Horacio F; Girardelli, Ana; Caro, Laura Sanchez; Lobisuto, Mario; Delgado, Griselda; Disalvo, Liliana

    2014-03-01

    Prenatal lead exposure is a health hazard that may cause cognitive development impairments and other adverse effects in children. We conducted a cross sectional study analyzing cord blood lead levels (CBLL) of newborns and their relationship with maternal determinants of lead exposure. Mothers answered a questionnaire about socio-demographic, lifestyle habits and environmental characteristics. We used Mann-Whitney's test to compare CBLL geometrical means (GM) corresponding to the presence or absence of each lead exposure determinant, and Chi square test to study the relationship between CBLL and maternal lead exposure determinants. A total of 159 newborns participated in the study. CBLL GM was 2.1 μg/dL; and 25% of the participants had a measurable CBLL (LOQ=3.3 μg/dl). Although the participants had several determinants of lead exposure, we only found a significant relationship with inside household determinants, such as presence of lead piping (p=0.026), unplastered walls (p=0.046) and peeling paint (p=0.048). Our results show that CBLL GM was similar to that reported in several studies conducted around the world. However, 25% of the participants might have some degree of risk for lead poisoning. PMID:24361446

  17. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study.

    PubMed

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-08-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  18. An IBCLC in the Maternity Ward of a Mother and Child Hospital: A Pre- and Post-Intervention Study

    PubMed Central

    Chiurco, Antonella; Montico, Marcella; Brovedani, Pierpaolo; Monasta, Lorenzo; Davanzo, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    Published evidence on the impact of the integration of International Board Certified Lactation Consultants (IBCLCs) for breastfeeding promotion is growing, but still relatively limited. Our study aims at evaluating the effects of adding an IBCLC for breastfeeding support in a mother and child hospital environment. We conducted a prospective study in the maternity ward of our maternal and child health Institute, recruiting 402 mothers of healthy term newborns soon after birth. The 18-month intervention of the IBCLC (Phase II) was preceded (Phase I) by data collection on breastfeeding rates and factors related to breastfeeding, both at hospital discharge and two weeks later. Data collection was replicated just before the end of the intervention (Phase III). In Phase III, a significantly higher percentage of mothers: (a) received help to breastfeed, and also received correct information on breastfeeding and community support, (b) started breastfeeding within two hours from delivery, (c) reported a good experience with the hospital staff. Moreover, the frequency of sore and/or cracked nipples was significantly lower in Phase III. However, no difference was found in exclusive breastfeeding rates at hospital discharge or at two weeks after birth. PMID:26308018

  19. Nutritional anemia in pregnancy: a study at the maternity hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Tee E Siong; Kandiah, M; Ali, J; Kandiah, V; Zahari, M R; Kuladevan, R; Hamzah, Z

    1984-06-01

    The study presents recent data on the prevalence and pattern of nutritional anemia in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. A total of 309 pregnant women in their 3rd trimester, of Malay, Chinese and Indian origin from the lower socio-economic strata were randomly selected for the study. Hematological indices (including Hb, PCV, MCHC, and TRBC), serum iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin, serum folate as well as protein and albumin were determined. Based on Hb and PCV values, 30-40% of the women could be considered anemic; approximately 50% of them presented with unsatisfactory serum iron, transferrin saturation and ferritin values; 60.9% had low serum folate levels; and about 30% may be considered to be of poor protein nutriture. Anemia in the study population was seen to be related mostly to iron and to a lesser extent, folate deficiency. Hematological, iron, folate and protein status was observed to be the poorest amongst the Indian women, better in the Malay group and generally the best amongst the Chinese women. Birth records of 169 of these women revealed that all of them had live births. Nearly all the infants were delivered by normal vaginal delivery (NVD). The mean gestational age was 38.6 weeks. One of the infants had a birth weight of 2.0 kg; incidence of low birth weight, 2.5 kg, was 8.3%. Although there was a trend of deteriorating hematological, iron and protein status of women from the 0, 1-3 and 4 parity groups, these differences were not statistically significant. PMID:12267519

  20. Comparison of maternal and fetal outcomes of IVF and spontaneously conceived twin pregnancies: three year experience of a tertiary hospital

    PubMed Central

    Göçmen, Ahmet; Güven, Şirin; Bağci, Simge; Çekmez, Yasemin; Şanlıkan, Fatih

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare maternal and fetal outcomes of spontaneously conceived and in-vitro fertilization (IVF) twin pregnancies that were admitted to our obstetric clinic and delivered between January 1, 2011 to November 1, 2014. Material method: A total of 84 twin pregnancies were enrolled for the study and divided into two groups: group 1 as IVF (n = 19) and group 2 as spontaneously conceived (n = 65) twin pregnancies. Data of neonatal various morbidities needs neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) such as necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), sepsis, retinopathy of prematurity (ROP), and intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and maternal morbidities such as preeclampsia, eclampsia, postpartum bleeding, gestational diabetes mellitus(GDM) were collected by hospital records. Results: There were no statistical difference between two groups regarding hypertension related to pregnancy, intrauterine growth retardation, Apgar scores, NICU needs, birth weight and height (P > 0.05). The rate of premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth were detected higher in IVF group when compared with the other group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Although twin pregnancies, regardless of conception method are high risk pregnancies in terms of obstetric and perinatal outcomes, premature rupture of membranes, maternal age, antenatal anemia and premature birth risks are higher in IVF twin pregnancies. PMID:26131238

  1. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries.To create a major change in Haiti's health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic "community care grids" to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis.We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti's health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  2. Addressing the Child and Maternal Mortality Crisis in Haiti through a Central Referral Hospital Providing Countrywide Care

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lee D; Judd, Thomas M; Bhutta, Zulfiqar A

    2016-01-01

    The neonatal, infant, child, and maternal mortality rates in Haiti are the highest in the Western Hemisphere, with rates similar to those found in Afghanistan and several African countries. We identify several factors that have perpetuated this health care crisis and summarize the literature highlighting the most cost-effective, evidence-based interventions proved to decrease these mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries. To create a major change in Haiti’s health care infrastructure, we are implementing two strategies that are unique for low-income countries: development of a countrywide network of geographic “community care grids” to facilitate implementation of frontline interventions, and the construction of a centrally located referral and teaching hospital to provide specialty care for communities throughout the country. This hospital strategy will leverage the proximity of Haiti to North America by mobilizing large numbers of North American medical volunteers to provide one-on-one mentoring for the Haitian medical staff. The first phase of this strategy will address the child and maternal health crisis. We have begun implementation of these evidence-based strategies that we believe will fast-track improvement in the child and maternal mortality rates throughout the country. We anticipate that, as we partner with private and public groups already working in Haiti, one day Haiti’s health care system will be among the leaders in that region. PMID:26934625

  3. Understanding Afghan healthcare providers: a qualitative study of the culture of care in a Kabul maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, R; van Teijlingen, E; Ryan, K; Holloway, I

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyse the culture of a Kabul maternity hospital to understand the perspectives of healthcare providers on their roles, experiences, values and motivations and the impact of these determinants on the care of perinatal women and their babies. Design Qualitative ethnographic study. Setting A maternity hospital, Afghanistan. Population Doctors, midwives and care assistants. Methods Six weeks of observation followed by 22 semi-structured interviews and four informal group discussions with staff, two focus group discussions with women and 41 background interviews with Afghan and non-Afghan medical and cultural experts. Main outcome measures The culture of care in an Afghan maternity hospital. Results A large workload, high proportion of complicated cases and poor staff organisation affected the quality of care. Cultural values, social and family pressures influenced the motivation and priorities of healthcare providers. Nepotism and cronyism created inequality in clinical training and support and undermined the authority of management to improve standards of care. Staff without powerful connections were vulnerable in a punitive inequitable environment—fearing humiliation, blame and the loss of employment. Conclusions Suboptimal care put the lives of women and babies at risk and was, in part, the result of conflicting priorities. The underlying motivation of staff appeared to be the socio-economic survival of their own families. The hospital culture closely mirrored the culture and core values of Afghan society. In setting priorities for women's health post-2015 Millennium Development Goals, understanding the context-specific pressures on staff is key to more effective programme interventions and sustainability. PMID:25394518

  4. Postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder in a fetal high-risk maternity hospital in the city of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Henriques, Tatiana; Moraes, Claudia Leite de; Reichenheim, Michael E; Azevedo, Gustavo Lobato de; Coutinho, Evandro Silva Freire; Figueira, Ivan Luiz de Vasconcellos

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to estimate the prevalence of postpartum posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in a maternity hospital for fetal high-risk pregnancies and to identify vulnerable subgroups. This was a cross-sectional study at a fetal high-risk maternity hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with a sample of 456 women who had given birth at this hospital. The Trauma History Questionnaire and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist were used to screen for lifetime traumatic events and PTSD symptoms, respectively. Overall prevalence of PTSD was 9.4%. Higher PTSD prevalence was associated with three or more births, a newborn with a 1-minute Apgar score of seven or less, history of mental disorder prior to or during the index pregnancy, postpartum depression, physical or psychological intimate partner violence during the pregnancy, a history of unwanted sexual experience, and lifetime exposure to five or more traumas. Rapid diagnosis and treatment of PTSD are essential to improve the mother's quality of life and the infant's health. PMID:26872229

  5. [The Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System: a performance evaluation for auditing maternal near miss].

    PubMed

    Nakamura-Pereira, Marcos; Mendes-Silva, Wallace; Dias, Marcos Augusto Bastos; Reichenheim, Michael E; Lobato, Gustavo

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate the performance of the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified National Health System (SIH-SUS) in identifying cases of maternal near miss in a hospital in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, in 2008. Cases were identified by reviewing medical records of pregnant and postpartum women admitted to the hospital. The search for potential near miss events in the SIH-SUS database relied on a list of procedures and codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision (ICD-10) that were consistent with this diagnosis. The patient chart review identified 27 cases, while 70 potential occurrences of near miss were detected in the SIH-SUS database. However, only 5 of 70 were "true cases" of near miss according to the chart review, which corresponds to a sensitivity of 18.5% (95%CI: 6.3-38.1), specificity of 94.3% (95%CI: 92.8-95.6), area under the ROC of 0.56 (95%CI: 0.48-0.63), and positive predictive value of 10.1% (IC95%: 4.7-20.3). These findings suggest that SIH-SUS does not appear appropriate for monitoring maternal near miss. PMID:23843001

  6. Medico-social and socio-demographic factors associated with maternal mortality at Kenyatta National Hospital, Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Makokha, A E

    1991-01-01

    To identify the most significant determinants of maternal mortality in Kenya, a prospective study involving 49,335 deliveries occurring at Kenyatta National Hospital from January 1978-87 was conducted. There were 156 maternal deaths in this series, for a maternal mortality rate of 3.2/1000 deliveries. The 5 most frequent causes of death were abortion (24%), hypertensive disease of pregnancy (13%), sepsis (13%), anemia (10%), and cardiac disease (7%). 24% of women who died were age 19 years or under, 27% were 20-24 years, 23% were 25-29 years, and 11% were 30-34 years. The largest percentage (24%) of deaths involved nulliparous women; 16% were to women of parity 5 and above. 28% of the women who died were single, and single women contributed the majority of deaths from abortion. 66% of the women who died had received no prenatal care. The proportion of avoidable deaths was 19% among clinic attenders compared to 29% among non-attenders. Overall, age, parity, and marital status--traditionally regarded as the key factors associated with maternal mortality--vary in their impact, given the cause of death and medical services received. The assumption that high parity is associated with maternal mortality was not confirmed in this study due to the significant number of deaths from abortion that involved single, nulliparous women. In addition, many women who died were in the optimum age group for childbearing, but were more prone to suffer from anemia, hypertension, ectopic pregnancy, and cardiac disease than women over 30 years old. Overall, 126 deaths were considered avoidable. Contributory factors were slowness of surgical management of emergencies, prolonged confinement of women with cardiac disease, and a lack of emergency supplies of blood and drugs for complicated deliveries. PMID:12316813

  7. Conditions triggering local incident reviews in UK hospital maternity units: A national survey

    PubMed Central

    Mohamed-Ahmed, Olaa; McClymont, Charlotte; Knight, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In countries, such as the UK, where maternal deaths are rare, reviews of other severe complications of pregnancy and the puerperium can provide an additional perspective to help learn lessons to improve future care. The objective of this survey was to identify the types of incidents which triggered local reviews in the UK, in order to inform national safety reporting guidance. Design A national descriptive survey. Setting UK. Participants Consultant-led maternity units. Main outcome measure Seventy-one per cent of maternity units provided an incident review trigger list. The conditions included were classified by two assessors. Incidents that were listed by at least 5% of maternity units were reported and compared with incidents recommended for review by the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists (RCOG). Results The conditions covered were highly variable, although those recommended by the RCOG were most highly represented. The most commonly listed conditions that had not been recommended for review by the RCOG included inadequate staffing levels (70%), cardiac arrest (69%) and maternal sepsis (64%). Conclusions Substantial variation exists in the types of incident listed for review by maternity units in the UK. Importantly, some units are not reviewing cases of severe infective complications even though this is a current major concern. Future guidance concerning local serious incident review processes should include how the list of conditions triggering a review should be managed in the light of changing clinical and safety priorities. PMID:25057407

  8. Availability and quality of emergency obstetric care, an alternative strategy to reduce maternal mortality: experience of Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China.

    PubMed

    Bangoura, Ismael Fatou; Hu, Jian; Gong, Xun; Wang, Xuanxuan; Wei, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenbin; Zhang, Xiang; Fang, Pengqian

    2012-04-01

    The burden of maternal mortality (MM) and morbidity is especially high in Asia. However, China has made significant progress in reducing MM over the past two decades, and hence maternal death rate has declined considerably in last decade. To analyze availability and quality of emergency obstetric care (EmOC) received by women at Tongji Hospital, Wuhan, China, this study retrospectively analyzed various pregnancy-related complications at the hospital from 2000 to 2009. Two baseline periods of equal length were used for the comparison of variables. A total of 11 223 obstetric complications leading to MM were identified on a total of 15 730 hospitalizations, either 71.35% of all activities. No maternal death was recorded. Mean age of women was 29.31 years with a wide range of 14-52 years. About 96.26% of women had higher levels of schooling, university degrees and above and received the education of secondary school or college. About 3.74% received primary education at period two (P2) from 2005 to 2009, which was significantly higher than that of period one (P1) from 2000 to 2004 (P<0.05) (OR: 0.586; 95% CI: 0.442 to 0.776). About 65.69% were employed as skilled or professional workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). About 34.31% were unskilled workers at P2, which was significantly higher than that of P1 (P<0.05). Caesarean section was performed for 9,930 women (88.48%) and the percentage of the procedure increased significantly from 19.25% at P1 to 69.23% at P2 (P<0.05). We were led to conclude that, despite the progress, significant gaps in the performance of maternal health services between rural and urban areas remain. However, MM reduction can be achieved in China. Priorities must include, but not limited to the following: secondary healthcare development, health policy and management, strengthening primary healthcare services. PMID:22528213

  9. An audit to review the characteristics and management of placenta praevia at Aberdeen Maternity Hospital, 2009-2011.

    PubMed

    Pande, B; Shetty, A

    2014-07-01

    Placenta praevia (PP) is an important cause of maternal and fetal morbidity. We reviewed the characteristics and management of PP at the Aberdeen Maternity Hospital (AMH) to evaluate performance. In the years 2009-2011, a total of 60 cases with confirmed PP underwent caesarean section (CS) at the AMH. Two-fifths of cases had previous CS and two-thirds were posterior praevias. Four-fifths were major praevias. Diagnosis was mostly by trans-abdominal scanning (TAS). A little less than two-thirds underwent hospital admission (half of them for antepartum haemorrhage). Most received steroid and ferrous sulphate as appropriate. The majority were delivered at greater than 36 weeks' gestation. There was good support in theatre by senior obstetricians and anaesthetists. Cell salvage was used in theatre. Overall, the outcomes were good. Improvements could be made on documentation of counselling preoperatively and practice of trans-vaginal scans (TVS) to confirm low lying placentae even at the 20-week scan for better diagnosis, as per the RCOG guidelines. PMID:24702527

  10. Graves’ Disease in Albanian Children

    PubMed Central

    GJIKOPULLI, A.; TOMORI, SONILA; KOLLÇAKU, L.; HOXHA, P.; GRIMCI, LINDITA; YLLI, ZAMIRA

    2014-01-01

    Background: Graves’ disease (GD) accounts for 10–15% of thyroid disorders in patients less than 18 years of age. It is the most common cause of thyrotoxicosis in children and accounts for at least 95% of cases in children. Pediatric Treatment of Graves’ disease consists of anti-thyroid drugs, radioactive iodide and thyroidectomy but the optimal treatment of GD in children is still controversial. Objective: To review treatment outcome of pediatric Graves’ disease in Albania. Material and Method: Descriptive review of 15 children with Graves’ disease, diagnosed from Jan.2007 to Dec. 2013, at the Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University Hospital Centre “Mother Teresa”, Albania was performed. Results: All patients, mean age 10.56 ± 3.37 years, (range 2.02-16.09 years) were presented with goiter and increased serum FT4, mean 39.80 ± 16.02 ng/mL, (range 21.0-74.70 ng/mL), serum FT3, mean 12.98 ± 3.45 pg/mL, (range 6.90 -17.90 pg/mL) and suppressed TSH levels, mean 0.02 ± 0.01 mUI/L, (range 0.01-0.05 mUI/L). Anti TSH Receptor were positive in 100% of patients mean value 6.51 ± 3.61 UI/mL (range 1.63 – 14.10 UI/mL). Anti-thyroglobulin and Anti-TPO antibodies were positive in 60% and 46.6% respectively. Clinical course of 15 patients after treatment with anti-thyroid drugs mainly MMI for 3.19 ± 1.48 (range 0.60 - 6.20) years is as follows: seven (46.66%) underwent remission, five out of seven (71.41%) who underwent remission, relapsed. Three of them (20%) were treated with I131, and two (13.3%) underwent to total thyroidectomy. Conclusion: MMI was the most common first line therapy in the presented patients with Graves’ disease. Remission rate was 46.66% after an average 1.48 ± 0.71 years (range 0.60 – 2.70 years) of treatment with anti-thyroid drugs. Remission period was 2.70 ± 0.36 years (2.1 – 3.1 years) Relapse occurred in 71.41% of patient. I131 and thyroidectomy were used as second line therapy in the

  11. [Cocooning strategy: Effectiveness of a pertussis vaccination program for parents in the maternity unit of a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Decréquy, A; de Vienne, C; Bellot, A; Guillois, B; Dreyfus, M; Brouard, J

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact on vaccination coverage of a protocol in which promotion and administration of pertussis vaccine in the maternity ward were proposed upon discharge from a French university hospital. Pertussis is a potentially fatal bacterial respiratory infection, especially in young infants. Since 2004 the High Council of Public Health has recommended vaccinating adults who may become parents. This recommendation is not widely applied in France. The study, organized as a professional practice evaluation (EPP) was conducted by a multidisciplinary team at Caen University Hospital. Thirty couples were included for each period. The primary endpoint was the rate of vaccination coverage for both parents at hospital discharge. Before the information campaign (first period, January 2012), immunization coverage of mothers and fathers was 20% and 13%, respectively. No couple had received a prescription for vaccines. During the second period (June 2013), vaccination coverage was 77% at hospital discharge for mothers and 57% for fathers. Parental immunization coverage against pertussis was multiplied by four to five during the study, which is very encouraging, and it is important to continue this campaign at the region and national levels. PMID:27345559

  12. Afraid of Delivering at the Hospital or Afraid of Delivering at Home: A Qualitative Study of Thai Hmong Families' Decision-Making About Maternity Services.

    PubMed

    Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A; Sriphetcharawut, Sarinya; Thawsirichuchai, Rasamee; Yangyuenkun, Wirachon; Kunstadter, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Thailand has high rates of maternity services; both antenatal care (ANC) and hospital delivery are widely used by its citizens. A recent Northern Thailand survey showed that Hmong women used maternity services at lower rates. Our objectives were to identify Hmong families' socio-cultural reasons for using and not using maternity services, and suggest ways to improve Hmong women's use of maternity services. In one Hmong village, we classified all 98 pregnancies in the previous 5 years into four categories: no ANC/home birth, ANC/home, no ANC/hospital, ANC/hospital. We conducted life-history case studies of 4 women from each category plus their 12 husbands, and 17 elders. We used grounded theory to guide qualitative analysis. Families not using maternity services considered pregnancy a normal process that only needed traditional home support. In addition, they disliked institutional processes that interfered with cultural birth practices, distrusted discriminatory personnel, and detested invasive, involuntary hospital procedures. Families using services perceived physical needs or potential delivery risks that could benefit from obstetrical assistance not available at home. While they disliked aspects of hospital births, they tolerated these conditions for access to obstetrical care they might need. Families also considered cost, travel distance, and time as structural issues. The families ultimately balanced their fear of delivering at home with their fear of delivering at the hospital. Providing health education about pregnancy risks, and changing healthcare practices to accommodate Hmong people's desires for culturally-appropriate family-centered care, which are consistent with evidence-based obstetrics, might improve Hmong women's use of maternity services. PMID:26138321

  13. Outcome of very low birthweight neonates in a developing country: experience from a large Malaysian maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Boo, N Y

    1992-02-01

    Between January 1989 to April 1990 (16 months), a prospective observational study was carried out on 329 consecutive very low birthweight (VLBW) less than or equal to 1500 grams) Malaysian neonates born in the Maternity Hospital, Kuala Lumpur before their first discharge from the hospital. The objectives of the study were to determine the common causes of early morbidity and mortality of this group of Malaysian neonates. The study shows that the incidence of Malaysian VLBW neonates was 9.9 per 1000 livebirths (95% confidence intervals 9.0 to 10.8). The mean duration of stay in the hospital was 19.3 days (SD = 21.4). One hundred and ninety-six (59.6 percent) of the VLBW neonates died. They accounted for 60 percent (196/334) of all neonatal deaths in the hospital during the study period. Mortality was significantly higher in neonates of birthweight less than 1000 grams (p less than 0.01) and of gestation of less than 33 weeks (p less than 0.001). The three most common clinical problems were respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) (72.6 percent), septicemia (28.0 percent) and intraventricular haemorrhage (IVH) (21.9 percent). Death occurred in 71.1 percent of the septicemic patients. The most common causative organisms of septicemia were multiresistant klebsiella (52.3 percent) and multiresistant acinetobacter (14.7 percent). RDS (33.2 percent), septicemia (29.6%) and IVH (17.9 percent) were the three most common causes of death. Improvement in the nursing staff situation and basic neonatal care facilities in this hospital and prevention of premature delivery could help to decrease morbidity and mortality in this group of neonates. PMID:1598605

  14. Evaluation of Maternal Complications in Severe Preeclampsia in a University Hospital in Tirana

    PubMed Central

    Ndoni, Eriseida; Hoxhallari, Redi; Bimbashi, Astrit

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Preeclampsia is a hypertensive multisystem disorder of pregnancy that complicates up to 10% of pregnancies worldwide and is one of the leading causes of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality. AIM: To evaluate maternal complications associated with severe preeclampsia. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study conducted in the UHOG “Koço Gliozheni”, in Tirana. Primary outcomes evaluated: maternal death, eclampsia, stroke, HELLP syndrome, and pulmonary edema. Secondary outcomes: renal failure, admission in ICU, caesarean section, placental abruption, and postpartum hemorrhage. Fisher’s exact test and Chi-squared test were used as statistical methods. RESULTS: In women with severe preeclampsia we found higher rates of complications comparing to the group with preeclampsia. Eclampsia (1.5% vs. 7.1%, P < 0.001), HELLP syndrome (2.4% vs. 11.0%; P < 0.001), stroke (0.5% vs 1.9%, P = 0.105) pulmonary edema (0.25% vs. 1.3%, P = 0.0035), renal failure (0.9% vs. 2.6%, P = 0.107), admission in ICU (19.5% vs. 71.4%, P = 0.007), caesarean section rates (55.5% vs. 77%, P = 0.508), placental abruption (4.3% vs. 7.8%, P = 0.103) and severe postpartum hemorrhage (3.2% vs. 3.9%, P = 0.628). CONCLUSION: Severe preeclampsia is associated with high rates of maternal severe morbidity and early diagnosis and timely intervention can prevent life treating complications. PMID:27275340

  15. Serum Retinol Concentrations in Mothers and Newborns at Delivery in a Public Maternity Hospital in Recife, Northeast Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Andreto, Luciana Marques; Vieira, Carmina Silva dos Santos; de Arruda, Ilma Kruze Grande; Diniz, Alcides da Silva

    2014-01-01

    Serum retinol concentrations were compared in a consecutive series of 65 mother-newborn pairs at delivery in a public maternity hospital in Recife, Brazil, from January to August 2008 and examined their association with biological, socioeconomic, environmental and obstetrical characteristics. Serum retinol concentrations of the newborns (umbilical cord) and mothers (brachial venipuncture) were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Prevalence of low (<0.70 µmol/L) and inadequate (<1.05 µmol/L) serum retinol concentrations were observed in 23.1% (95% CI 13.9-35.5) and 23.0% (95% CI 13.5-35.8) among newborns and mothers respectively. The serum retinol distribution was lower in male than female infants (-0.4 µmol/L, p=0.01) and, across both sexes, concentrations in paired newborn and mother were correlated (r=0.27, p=0.04). Further, maternal status explains only 7% of the variance in retinol concentrations in newborn's cord plasma. Among mothers delivering in public facilities in Recife, hypovitaminosis may exist. PMID:24847590

  16. Isonymy and the genetic structure of Albanian populations.

    PubMed

    Mikerezi, Ilia; Pizzetti, Paola; Lucchetti, Enzo; Ekonomi, Milva

    2003-12-01

    It is well known that in systems of surname transmission through the paternal line, surnames simulate neutral gene alleles belonging to the Y chromosome. This property of surnames was used to analyze the genetic structure of Albanian populations. Two large samples of surnames belonging to two different periods of time were analyzed. The analysis of indicators of population structure showed that geographical distance has an important effect on surname distribution. It seems that isolation by distance and genetic drift have been still important factors in the determination of the genetic structure of the Albanian population. PMID:14746137

  17. Abdominal computed tomography during pregnancy for suspected appendicitis: a 5-year experience at a maternity hospital.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Mahesh K; Garrett, Nan M; Carpenter, Wendy S; Shah, Yogesh P; Roberts, Candace

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the role of computed tomography (CT) in a pregnant patient with right lower quadrant pain in whom there was a clinical suspicion of acute appendicitis. During a 5-year period the clinical records of all pregnant women who underwent imaging examination for clinically suspected appendicitis were reviewed. The imaging findings were correlated with patient management and final outcome. Thirty-nine pregnant patients were referred for imaging, of which 35 underwent initial evaluation with sonography, 23 of these women underwent a computed tomographic examination, and an additional 4 patients were directly imaged with CT without earlier sonographic assessment. Surgery confirmed appendicitis in all 5 patients who were operated on on the basis of findings of appendicitis on a CT scan. Two patients underwent surgery based on an alternate diagnosis suggested preoperatively (tubal torsion = 1, ovarian torsion = 1). All patients with negative findings at CT had an uneventful clinical course. In those patients who were evaluated only with ultrasound, a diagnosis of appendicitis was missed in 5 patients. The sensitivity of CT in the diagnosis of appendicitis in our study group was 100%, compared with a sensitivity of 46.1% for ultrasound. CT provides an accurate diagnosis in patients suspected to have acute appendicitis and is of value in avoiding false negative exploratory laparatomy with its consequent risk of maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. Although sonography is the preferred initial imaging modality as its lack of ionizing radiation, CT is more accurate in providing a timely diagnosis and its use is justified to reduce maternal mortality and mortality in patients with appendicitis. PMID:20102691

  18. Maternal and Hospital Factors Associated with First-Time Mothers' Breastfeeding Practice: A Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Tzu-I; Huang, Shu-Her; Lee, Shoou-Yih D

    2015-01-01

    Continuity of breastfeeding is infrequent and indeterminate. Evidence is lacking regarding factors associated with breastfeeding at different postpartum time points. This prospective study investigated the change in, and correlates of, breastfeeding practices after delivery at a hospital and at 1, 3, and 6 months postpartum among first-time mothers. We followed a cohort of 300 primiparous mothers of Taiwan who gave birth at two hospitals during 2010-2011. Logistic and Cox regression analyses were performed to determine factors that were correlated with breastfeeding practices. In the study sample, the rate of exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay was 66%; it declined to 37.5% at 1 month and 30.2% at 3 months postpartum. Only 17.1% of women reported continuing breastfeeding at 6 months. Early initiation of breastfeeding, rooming-in practice, and self-efficacy were significantly related to exclusive breastfeeding during the hospital stay. After discharge, health literacy, knowledge, intention, and self-efficacy were positively and significantly associated with breastfeeding exclusivity. Later initiation (hazard ratio=1.53; 95% confidence interval, 1.05, 1.97), shorter intention (hazard ratio=1.42; 95% confidence interval, 1.13, 1.68), and self-efficacy (hazard ratio=0.98; 95% confidence interval, 0.96, 0.99) were important predictors of breastfeeding cessation within 6 months of delivery. Continuous breastfeeding practice for 6 months is challenging and difficult for new mothers. Results showed that factors related to breastfeeding varied over time after delivery. Interventions seeking to sustain breastfeeding should consider new mothers' needs and barriers at different times. PMID:26110594

  19. Working Conditions, Work Style, and Job Satisfaction among Albanian Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kloep, Marion; Tarifa, Fatos

    1994-01-01

    Describes a study investigating the working conditions of Albanian teachers and their influence on job satisfaction. Indicates that, although the economic and physical conditions were worse than in other countries, levels of job satisfaction and engagement in classroom practices were high. Suggests that work efficiency is predicted by social…

  20. Y-chromosomal STR haplotypes in an Albanian population sample.

    PubMed

    Robino, C; Gino, S; Ricci, U; Grignani, P; Previdere, C; Torre, C

    2002-09-26

    Eight Y-chromosomal short tandem repeats (STRs), DYS19, DYS389-I, DYS389-II, DYS390, DYS391, DYS392, DYS393 and DYS385, were typed in a population sample (n=101) of first-generation Albanian immigrants living in Italy. PMID:12243882

  1. Changing Issues in Vocational Education and Training: An Albanian Example.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Jean; Parkes, David

    1995-01-01

    Issues in European vocational education in the last two decades are examined, including diminishing resources, changing locus of decision making, youth unemployment, and technology-driven change. An international technical assistance project to reform the Albanian vocational education system is then described, and the influence of reforms in five…

  2. Albanian: Basic Differences Between Gege and Toske Dialects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.

    This booklet discusses Albania's two main dialects, Gege and Toske. It contains basic rules and emphasizes the phonological and morphological differences between the two dialects. It is intended to accompany a basic Albanian course for adult students that teaches both the dialects. (NCR)

  3. Family Language Policies among Albanian Immigrants in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatzidaki, Aspassia; Maligkoudi, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on an investigation of family language policies among 37 Albanian immigrant families in Northern Greece within the framework of Spolsky's language policy model. Data collection was based on semi-directed interviews with parents which were analysed using both content and discourse analysis. According to our findings, three…

  4. Racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities: a statewide study of labor and delivery hospitalizations in Wisconsin.

    PubMed

    Cabacungan, Erwin T; Ngui, Emmanuel M; McGinley, Emily L

    2012-10-01

    We examined racial/ethnic disparities in maternal morbidities (MM) and the number of MM during labor and delivery among hospital discharges in Wisconsin. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of hospital discharge data for 206,428 pregnant women aged 13-53 years using 2005-2007 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Dataset (HCUP-SID) for Wisconsin. After adjustments for covariates, MM (preterm labor, antepartum and postpartum hemorrhage, hypertension in pregnancy, gestational diabetes, membrane-related disorders, infections and 3rd and 4th perineal lacerations) were examined using logistic regression models, and number of MM (0, 1, 2, >2 MM) were examined using multivariable ordered logistic regressions with partial proportional odds models. African-Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections (OR = 1.74; 95% CI 1.60-1.89), preterm labor (OR = 1.42; 1.33-1.50), antepartum hemorrhage (OR = 1.63; 1.44-1.83), and hypertension complicating pregnancy (OR = 1.39; 1.31-1.48) compared to Whites. Hispanics, Asian/Pacific Islanders, and Native Americans had significantly higher likelihood of infections, postpartum hemorrhage, and gestational diabetes than Whites. Major perineal lacerations were significantly higher among Asian/Pacific Islanders (OR = 1.53; 1.34-1.75). All minority racial/ethnic groups, except Asians, had significantly higher likelihood of having 0 versus 1, 2 or >2 MM, 0 or 1 versus 2 or >2 MM, and 0, 1 or 2 versus >2 MM than white women. Findings show significant racial/ethnic disparities in MM, and suggest the need for better screening, management, and timely referral of these conditions, particularly among racial/ethnic women. Disparities in MM may be contributing to the high infant mortality and adverse birth outcomes among different racial/ethnic groups in Wisconsin. PMID:22105738

  5. [The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children brought to the Kars Maternal and Children's Hospital with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms].

    PubMed

    Arslan, Mükremin Ozkan; Sari, Bariş; Kulu, Bahar; Mor, Neriman

    2008-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites in 2-6 year-old children who were brought to Kars Maternal and Children's Hospital with complaints of gastrointestinal symptoms during March-June 2007. Fecal samples were taken from children and brought to the parasitology laboratory of the Faculty of Veterinary Medicine to be examined for intestinal parasites. Fecal samples were examined by centrifugal formalin ether, zinc-sulphate floatation, and modified acid fast techniques. Lugol solution was used during microscopic examination and suspected samples were also examined by the Giemsa dye technique. The prevalence of intestinal parasites in children was found to be 36.2% (50/138). Protozoan and helminth parasites were found to be 34.1% (47/138) and 2.9% (4/138) in the fecal samples examined, respectively. Giardia intestinalis (10.9%), Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (10.1%), Entamoeba coli (8%), Blastocystis hominis (6.5%), Endolimax nana (4.3%), Chilomastix mesnili (1.4%), Ascaris lumbricoides (1.4%), Entamoeba hartmanni (0.7%), Cyclospora cayetanensis (0.7%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.7%) and Hymenolepis nana (0.7%) were identified from the feces of children of Kars and vicinity. No Cryptosporidium spp. was detected. PMID:18985583

  6. Recording of Neonatal Seizures in Birth Certificates, Maternal Interviews, and Hospital Discharge Abstracts in a Cerebral Palsy Case-Control Study in Michigan.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Lenski, Madeleine; Copeland, Glenn; Kinsman, Stephen L; Francis, Matthew; Kirby, Russell S; Paneth, Nigel

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the recording of neonatal seizures in birth certificates, hospital discharge abstracts, and maternal interviews in 372 children, 198 of them with cerebral palsy, born in Michigan hospitals from 1993 to 2010. In birth certificates, we examined checkbox items "seizures" or "seizure or serious neurologic dysfunction"; in hospital discharge abstracts ICD-9-CM codes 779.0, 345.X, and 780.3; and in maternal interviews a history of seizures or convulsions on day 1 of life recalled 2-16 years later. In 27 neonates, 38 neonatal seizures were recorded in 1 or more sources, 17 in discharge abstracts, 20 in maternal interviews, but just 1 on a birth certificate. The kappa coefficient (κ) between interviews and discharge abstracts was moderate (κ = 0.55), and substantial (κ = 0.63) if mothers noted use of antiepileptics. Agreement was higher (κ = 0.71 vs κ = 0.29) in term births than in preterm births. Birth certificates significantly underreported neonatal seizures. PMID:26668053

  7. Lichenized and lichenicolous fungi from the Albanian Alps (Kosovo, Montenegro)

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Eva A.; Hafellner, Josef; Stešević, Danijela; Geci, Fehmi; Mayrhofer, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    396 taxa (381 species) of lichenized and 45 species of lichenicolous fungi from the upper montane, subalpine and alpine belts of the Albanian Alps (= Prokletije Mountain Range, Bjeshkët e Nemuna) are presented. 92 lichenized and 26 lichenicolous fungi are new to Montenegro, 165 lichenized and 24 lichenicolous fungi are new to Kosovo, and 25 lichenized fungi (23 species) are new for the Balkan Peninsula. PMID:26869727

  8. A Cross-Cultural Study of Differences in Romantic Attitudes between American and Albanian College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoxha, Eneda; Hatala, Mark N.

    2012-01-01

    Cross-cultural differences in romantic attitudes are often taken for granted and accepted. However, very little research has been conducted to clearly state how much and how different Albanian and American college students are in the way they love. Results indicate that Americans are more romantic than Albanians. In addition, Americans are more…

  9. Ethnolinguistic Vitality, Language Use and Social Integration Amongst Albanian Immigrants in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gogonas, Nikos; Michail, Domna

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on the relationship between Albanian speakers' ethnolinguistic vitality (EV) perceptions and their language maintenance, language use and choice patterns. A subjective EV questionnaire, and a language usage questionnaire capturing domain-specific language use was completed by 200 Albanian immigrants of first and…

  10. Maternal and paternal lineages in Albania and the genetic structure of Indo-European populations.

    PubMed

    Belledi, M; Poloni, E S; Casalotti, R; Conterio, F; Mikerezi, I; Tagliavini, J; Excoffier, L

    2000-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA HV1 sequences and Y chromosome haplotypes (DYS19 STR and YAP) were characterised in an Albanian sample and compared with those of several other Indo-European populations from the European continent. No significant difference was observed between Albanians and most other Europeans, despite the fact that Albanians are clearly different from all other Indo-Europeans linguistically. We observe a general lack of genetic structure among Indo-European populations for both maternal and paternal polymorphisms, as well as low levels of correlation between linguistics and genetics, even though slightly more significant for the Y chromosome than for mtDNA. Altogether, our results show that the linguistic structure of continental Indo-European populations is not reflected in the variability of the mitochondrial and Y chromosome markers. This discrepancy could be due to very recent differentiation of Indo-European populations in Europe and/or substantial amounts of gene flow among these populations. PMID:10909846

  11. Delay in the provision of adequate care to women who died from abortion-related complications in the principal maternity hospital of Gabon.

    PubMed

    Mayi-Tsonga, Sosthene; Oksana, Litochenko; Ndombi, Isabelle; Diallo, Thierno; de Sousa, Maria Helena; Faúndes, Aníbal

    2009-11-01

    Deaths resulting from unsafe induced abortions represent a major component of maternal mortality in countries with restrictive abortion laws. Delays in obtaining care for maternal complications constitute a known determinant of a woman's risk of death. However, data on the role of delays in providing care at health care facilities are sparse. The association between the cause of maternal death (abortion versus post-partum haemorrhage or eclampsia) and the time interval between admission to hospital and the initiation of treatment were evaluated among women who died at the Maternité du Centre Hospitalier de Libreville, Gabon, between 1 January 2005 and 31 December 2007. The women's characteristics and the time between diagnosis of the condition that led to death and the initiation of treatment were compared for each cause of death. After controlling for selected variables, the mean time between admission and treatment was 1.2 hours (95% CI: 0.0-5.6) in the case of women who died from post-partum haemorrhage or eclampsia and 23.7 hours (95% CI: 21.1-26.3) in the case of women who died of abortion-related complications. In conclusion, delay in initiating care was far greater in cases of women with complications of unsafe abortion compared to other pregnancy-related complications. Such delays may constitute an important determinant of the risk of death in women with abortion-related complications. PMID:19962639

  12. Syphilis serology in pregnancy: an eight-year study (2005-2012) in a large teaching maternity hospital in Dublin, Ireland.

    PubMed

    McGettrick, Padraig; Ferguson, Wendy; Jackson, Valerie; Eogan, Maeve; Lawless, Mairead; Ciprike, Vaneta; Varughese, Alan; Coulter-Smith, Sam; Lambert, John S

    2016-03-01

    All cases of positive syphilis serology detected in antenatal and peripartum screening in a large teaching maternity hospital in inner city Dublin, Ireland over an eight-year period (2005-2012 inclusive) were reviewed and included in our study. Demographic, antenatal registration, laboratory (including co-infections), partner serology, treatment and delivery data were recorded in our database. Infant follow-up, treatment and outcome data were also collected. During this period, 194 women had positive syphilis serology, of which 182 completed their pregnancies at the institution. This accounts for 0.28% of the total number of women completing their pregnancies during this time (N = 66038); 79 had no previous diagnosis of infection. There was one case of re-infection during pregnancy. Thirty-two women were co-infected with human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B or hepatitis C. There was one case suggestive of congenital syphilis infection. Our study is a comprehensive analysis of the diagnosis, management and clinical outcomes of women testing positive for syphilis infection in pregnancy. It reveals the relatively high prevalence of syphilis infection in the population utilising the maternity services in north inner-city Dublin. It re-enforces the importance of continued active surveillance to prevent morbidity and mortality associated with maternal syphilis infection. It also highlights the importance of strategies such as re-testing high-risk groups and definitive screening of spouse serology. PMID:25829517

  13. Association between maternal exposure to housing renovation and offspring with congenital heart disease: a multi-hospital case–control study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of the most prevalent birth defects. Housing renovations are a newly recognized source of indoor environmental pollution that is detrimental to health. A growing body of research suggests that maternal occupational exposure to renovation materials may be associated with an increased risk of giving birth to fetuses with CHD. However, the effect of indoor housing renovation exposure on CHD occurrence has not been reported. Methods A multi-hospital case–control study was designed to investigate the association between maternal periconceptional housing renovation exposure and the risk of CHD for offspring. In total, 346 cases and 408 controls were enrolled in this study from four hospitals in China. Exposure information was based on a questionnaire given to women during pregnancy. The association between housing renovation exposure and CHD occurrence was assessed by estimating odds ratios (OR) with logistic regression models adjusted for potential confounders. Results The risk for CHD in offspring was significantly associated with maternal exposure to housing renovations (AOR: 1.89, 95% CI: 1.29-2.77). There were similar risks for cardiac defects with or without extra-cardiac malformation (AOR of 2.65 and 1.76, respectively). Maternal housing renovation exposure may increase the fetus’ risk of suffering from conotruncal defect or anomalous venous return. There were significant risks for cardiac defects if the pregnant woman moved into a new house within one month after decoration at either 3 months before pregnancy (AOR: 2.38, 95% CI: 1.03 to 5.48) or during first trimester (AOR: 4.00, 95% CI: 1.62 to 9.86). Conclusions Maternal exposure to housing renovations may have an increased risk of giving birth to fetuses with some selected types of CHD. This relationship was stronger for women who moved into a newly decorated house. However, considering the limited number of subjects and the problem of multiple exposures

  14. Medical ethnobotany of the Albanian Alps in Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical studies are crucial in South-Eastern Europe for fostering local development and also for investigating the dynamics of Traditional Environmental Knowledge (TEK) related to plants in one of the most crucial European hotspots for biocultural diversity. The current medico-ethnobotanical survey was conducted in rural alpine communities in Kosovo. The aims of the study were twofold: 1) to document the state of TEK of medicinal plants in these communities; 2) to compare these findings with that of similar field studies previously conducted among local populations inhabiting the Montenegrin and Albanian side of the same Alpine range. Methods Field research was conducted in 36 villages on the Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Snowball sampling techniques were used to recruit 91 elderly informants (≥ 50 years-old) for participation in semi-structured interviews and structured surveys regarding the use of the local flora for medicinal and food purposes. Standard ethnobotanical methods were employed and prior informed consent was obtained for all study participants. Results and Conclusion The uses of 98 plants species belonging to 39 families were recorded; the most quoted botanical families were Rosaceae, Asteraceae, and Lamiaceae. Mainly decoctions and infusions were quoted as folk medicinal preparations and the most common uses referred to gastrointestinal and respiratory disorders, as well as illnesses of the uro-genital system. Among the most uncommon medicinal taxa quoted by the informants, Carduus nutans L., Echinops bannaticus Rochel ex Schrad., and Orlaya grandiflora Hoffm. may merit phytochemical and phytopharmacological investigations. Comparison of the data with other ethnobotanical field studies recently conducted on the Albanian and Montenegrin sides of the same Alps has shown a remarkable link between the medical ethnobotany of Montenegrin and Kosovar side of the Albanian Alps. Moreover, folk uses of the most quoted wild medicinal

  15. Spatial Changes and Population Movements on the Albanian Coastline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanjir, U.; Gregorič Bon, N.

    2016-06-01

    The last decade has seen a large increase in construction along the southern Albanian coastline, mainly in the rise of large tourist complexes comprising hotels, apartment houses, touristic villages, and so on. These constructions rarely follow urban planning and not only change its landscape but also often threaten the ecological value of the coastal zone. The uncontrolled and devastating construction along the coast has been accompanied by coastal erosion caused by the sea with the intensity up to 50 cm/year. This paper investigates the environmental change monitoring on the Albanian Riviera by analysing optical remote sensing data (Landsat 5 and 8) in the period between 1984 and 2015. The image analysis results grounded on the change vector analysis indicate coastal morphology changes and land cover changes in the coastal environment, which appear mostly due to erosion in river delta and urban growth. Apart from identifying both phenomena through time, the objective of this study is to show that these landscape changes in fact correlate with the population migration as well as to explain why and the extent to which Albania is one of the most migratory countries in Europe. Based on the multidisciplinary research, which combines anthropological method with spatial analysis, this presentation anticipates future changes in this area. It argues that movements of both people and in landscape formations strongly influence each other, constituting a closely corresponding relationship.

  16. Hormonal risk factors for ovarian cancer in the Albanian case-control study.

    PubMed

    Pajenga, Edlira; Rexha, Tefta; Çeliku, Silva; Bejtja, Gazmend; Pisha, Mimoza

    2013-05-01

    The role of reproductive factors in the aetiology of ovarian cancer had been evaluated in hospital-based case-control study conducted in Albania, providing a total dataset of 283 cases and 1019 controls. Logistic regression models were used to obtain relative risk (OR) estimates. The present results showed that parity had protective effects which increased until the forth birth and the trend in risk was significant (p < 0.01). In each stratum and overall, nulliparous women appeared to be at highly increased risk compared to those who had different number of births (OR=12.5, 95%, CI: 2.4-63.8). Evaluation of early age at menarche and late age at menopause, showed statistically significant increased risk. Furthermore, increased risk was observed between pre-menopausal women and never-married nulliparity women, respectively (OR=1.44 95%, CI: 0.88-2.36; OR=8.98, 95%, CI: 1.44 - 56.14), but ovarian cancer risk was reduced for hysterectomized women. These findings suggest that Albanian women have risk factors similar to women in western countries. PMID:23725504

  17. Hormonal risk factors for ovarian cancer in the Albanian case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Pajenga, Edlira; Rexha, Tefta; Çeliku, Silva; Bejtja, Gazmend; Pisha, Mimoza

    2013-01-01

    The role of reproductive factors in the aetiology of ovarian cancer had been evaluated in hospital-based case-control study conducted in Albania, providing a total dataset of 283 cases and 1019 controls. Logistic regression models were used to obtain relative risk (OR) estimates. The present results showed that parity had protective effects which increased until the forth birth and the trend in risk was significant (p < 0.01). In each stratum and overall, nulliparous women appeared to be at highly increased risk compared to those who had different number of births (OR=12.5, 95%, CI: 2.4-63.8). Evaluation of early age at menarche and late age at menopause, showed statistically significant increased risk. Furthermore, increased risk was observed between pre-menopausal women and never-married nulliparity women, respectively (OR=1.44 95%, CI: 0.88-2.36; OR=8.98, 95%, CI: 1.44 - 56.14), but ovarian cancer risk was reduced for hysterectomized women. These findings suggest that Albanian women have risk factors similar to women in western countries. PMID:23725504

  18. [Social representations by health professionals of sexual violence against women: a study in three municipal public maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Ludmila Fontenele; Gomes, Romeu; Minayo, Maria Cecília de Souza

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze social representations of sexual violence against women, as constructed and reproduced in prenatal care settings in three municipal maternity hospitals in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. This qualitative research explored two themes: ideas about and explanations of sexual violence committed against woman. The forty-five interviews conducted with health professionals were examined using thematic content analysis. The results show that social representations of sexual violence against women were associated with ideas of suffering, behavioral disturbances, and forced sexual intercourse. The explanations offered for why this type of violence occurs included gender relations, urban violence, and ascription of blame to the victim. It can be concluded that hegemonic patterns of asymmetrical relations persist, even in the discourse of maternity health professionals, who are the point of reference for attending to victims of sexual violence. Incorporating the analytical category of gender into healthcare professional training could make prenatal care an important gateway for the recognition and management of sexual violence against women. PMID:16470280

  19. The psychometric and psychosocial dimension of Albanian immigration: data from a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Naimo, M; Massagli, A; Degortes, D; Favaro, A; Campagnola, N; Vidotto, G

    2006-01-01

    The present study is part of a wider ministerial project aimed at analysing--both the healthcare and psychological aspects--the phenomenon of illegal immigration, in particular Albanian immigration in Apulia. The CBA 2.0 Primary Scale was duly translated, in accordance with the guidelines set out in literature, to allow for identification and future use of psychological tools in Albanian and therefore assess the psychological dimension of a sample group of adult Albanians. Moreover, the eventual presence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in subjects who arrived in Italy after a traumatic journey was studied. 82 Albanians were chosen (47 male and 35 female) having lived in Italy for over a year. All subjects were given the Albanian version of CBA 2.0 Primary Scale; subjects who had entered Italy illegally were asked to answer the DSM-IV questionnaire to assess PTSD and MDD and a semi-structured questionnaire made up to evaluate their experiences, before, during and after the trauma of their journey. CBA 2.0 translated into Albanian does not reveal psychological disturbances of clinical significance but did reveal values of hardship significantly lower than the normal Italian standards. Only 3 cases of PTSD and 6 of MDD arose from the questionnaire regarding the assessment of PTSD and MMD. PMID:18924300

  20. Teaching Urban Politics at an Albanian University: How Do You Make an American Sub-Discipline Internationally Relevant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilworth, Richardson

    2008-01-01

    This article compares American and Albanian college students' urban political experiences in order to understand the relevance of American models of urban politics to developing nations. Urban growth in Albania has created needs for teaching students about urban governance. The evidence presented here suggests that Albanians' conceptions of urban…

  1. Maternal mortality in Sirur.

    PubMed

    Shrotri, A; Pratinidhi, A; Shah, U

    1990-01-01

    The research aim was 1) to determine the incidence of maternal mortality in a rural health center area in Sirur, Maharashtra state, India; 2) to determine the relative risk; and 3) to make suggestions about reducing maternal mortality. The data on deliveries was obtained between 1981 and 1984. Medical care at the Rural Training Center was supervised by the Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, the B.J. Medical College in Pune. Deliveries numbered 5994 singleton births over the four years; 5919 births were live births. 15 mothers died: 14 after delivery and 1 predelivery. The maternal mortality rate was 2.5/1000 live births. The maternal causes of death included 9 direct obstetric causes, 3 from postpartum hemorrhage of anemic women, and 3 from puerperal sepsis of anemic women with prolonged labor. 2 deaths were due to eclampsia, and 1 death was unexplained. There were 5 (33.3%) maternal deaths due to indirect causes (3 from hepatitis and 2 from thrombosis). One woman died of undetermined causes. Maternal jaundice during pregnancy was associated with the highest relative risk of maternal death: 106.4. Other relative risk factors were edema, anemia, and prolonged labor. Attributable risk was highest for anemia, followed by jaundice, edema, and maternal age of over 30 years. Maternal mortality at 30 years and older was 3.9/1000 live births. Teenage maternal mortality was 3.3/1000. Maternal mortality among women 20-29 years old was lowest at 2.1/1000. Maternal mortality for women with a parity of 5 or higher was 3.6/1000. Prima gravida women had a maternal mortality rate of 2.9/1000. Parities between 1 and 4 had a maternal mortality rate of 2.3/1000. The lowest maternal mortality was at parity of 3. Only 1 woman who died had received more than 3 prenatal visits. 11 out of 13 women medically examined prenatally were identified with the following risk factors: jaundice, edema, anemia, young or old maternal age, parity, or poor obstetric history. The local

  2. The Permian and Triassic in the Albanian Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaetani, Maurizio; Meço, Selam; Rettori, Roberto; Henderson, Charles M.; Tulone, Accursio

    2015-09-01

    The sedimentary succession of the Permian to Middle Triassic of the Albanian Alps is described, as part of the eastern Adria passive margin towards the Tethys. A carbonate ramp deepening towards NE in present day coordinates developed during the Middle Permian and was affected by block faulting with the deposition of carbonate breccia. The Early Triassic was characterized by intense terrigenous deposition with several cobble conglomerate units up to 80 m-thick, and by oolitic carbonate shoals. The fine clastic deposition ended gradually during the earliest Anisian and a wide calcarenitic ramp occupied the area, with small local carbonate mounds. Basinward, the red nodular limestone of the Han Bulog Formation was interbedded with calcarenitic material exported from the ramp. Drowning to more open conditions occurred towards the end of the Pelsonian. Subsequently, cherty limestone and tuffitic layers spread over the entire area. Towards the end of the Ladinian, with the end of the volcanic activity, red pelagic limestone was deposited locally for a short period. By the latest Ladinian most of the area returned to shallow-water conditions, with a peritidal carbonate platform. In the Theth area, in contrast, a basin with black organic-rich dolostone and limestone developed which seems to be unique in that part of the Adria passive margin. The occurrence of cobble conglomerate units in the Lower Triassic testifies to very active block faulting and high accommodation, not yet described for the area.

  3. Maternal oral health status and preterm low birth weight at Muhimbili National Hospital, Tanzania: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Mumghamba, Elifuraha GS; Manji, Karim P

    2007-01-01

    Background The study examined the relationship between oral health status (periodontal disease and carious pulpal exposure (CPE)) and preterm low-birth-weight (PTLBW) infant deliveries among Tanzanian-African mothers at Muhimbili National Hospital (MNH), Tanzania. Methods A retrospective case-control study was conducted, involving 373 postpartum mothers aged 14–44 years (PTLBW – 150 cases) and at term normal-birth-weight (TNBW) – 223 controls), using structured questionnaire and full-mouth examination for periodontal and dentition status. Results The mean number of sites with gingival bleeding was higher in PTLBW than in TNBW (P = 0.026). No significant differences were observed for sites with plaque, calculus, teeth with decay, missing, filling (DMFT) between PTLBW and TNBW. Controlling for known risk factors in all post-partum (n = 373), and primiparaous (n = 206) mothers, no significant differences were found regarding periodontal disease diagnosis threshold (PDT) (four sites or more that had probing periodontal pocket depth 4+mm and gingival bleeding ≥ 30% sites), and CPE between cases and controls. Significant risk factors for PTLBW among primi- and multiparous mothers together were age ≤ 19 years (adjusted Odds Ratio (aOR) = 2.09, 95% Confidence interval (95% CI): 1.18 – 3.67, P = 0.011), hypertension (aOR = 2.44, (95% CI): 1.20 – 4.93, P = 0.013) and being un-married (aOR = 1.59, (95% CI): 1.00 – 2.53, P = 0.049). For primiparous mothers significant risk factors for PTLBW were age ≤ 19 years (aOR = 2.07, 95% CI: 1.13 – 3.81, P = 0.019), and being un-married (aOR = 2.58, 95% CI: 1.42 – 4.67, P = 0.002). Conclusions These clinical findings show no evidence for periodontal disease or carious pulpal exposure being significant risk factors in PTLBW infant delivery among Tanzanian-Africans mothers at MNH, except for young age, hypertension, and being unmarried. Further research incorporating periodontal pathogens is recommended. PMID:17594498

  4. Albanian Parents and the Greek Educational Context: Who Is Willing to Fight for the Home Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gkaintartzi, Anastasia; Chatzidaki, Aspasia; Tsokalidou, Roula

    2014-01-01

    This article examines views of Albanian immigrant parents regarding home-language maintenance in Greece. It aims to reveal language ideologies in relation to broader ideologies about schooling and education. Following a qualitative interpretative approach, we conducted semi-structured individual and group interviews with 19 parents of bilingual…

  5. The "7 Keys of the Dragon": An E-Learning Gamelike Environment for Albanian and Russian

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Revithiadou, Anthi; Kourtis-Kazoullis, Vasilia; Soukalopoulou, Maria; Konstantoudakis, Konstantinos; Zarras, Christos; Pelesoglou, Nestoras

    2014-01-01

    In this article we report on the development of an interactive open source extensible software, dubbed "The 7 Keys of the Dragon," for the teaching/learning of Albanian and Russian to students (9-12 years old) with the respective languages as their heritage languages. Based on the assumption that games in language learning are associated…

  6. The Relationship between Emotional Competence and Hostile/Prosocial Behavior in Albanian Preschoolers: An Exploratory Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farina, Eleonora; Belacchi, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    We explored the relationship between the ascribed tendency of Albanian preschoolers' to take on prosocial and/or hostile roles and their empathy and emotion comprehension. Participants were 63 preschoolers (3- to 6-years-old) and six teachers. Pupils' empathy and hostile/prosocial roles were assessed via teacher reports and their…

  7. Maternal microchimerism

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Jody; Vives-Pi, Marta; Gillespie, Kathleen M

    2014-01-01

    Increased levels of non-inherited maternal HLA alleles have been detected in the periphery of children with type 1 diabetes and an increased frequency of maternal cells have been identified in type 1 diabetes pancreas. It is now clear that the phenotype of these cells is pancreatic,1 supporting the hypothesis that maternal cells in human pancreas are derived from multipotent maternal progenitors. Here we hypothesize how increased levels of maternal cells could play a role in islet autoimmunity. PMID:25093746

  8. Maternal understanding of infective endocarditis after hospitalization: assessing the knowledge of mothers of children with congenital heart disease and the practical implications.

    PubMed

    Knöchelmann, Anja; Geyer, Siegfried; Grosser, Urte

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to examine the knowledge of mothers of children with congenital heart disease as well as the association of cardiological factors and maternal characteristics with maternal understanding. Mothers of 135 children (≤2 years old) were interviewed to assess maternal knowledge of infective endocarditis (IE) using the Hannover Inventory of Parental Knowledge of Congenital Heart Disease. Two subscales, endocarditis and risk factors, were used. Cardiological data as well as maternal characteristics were collected. Two-thirds of the mothers achieved only low scores, answering 0-20 % of the questions correctly (endocarditis = 64.4 %; risk factors = 71.1 %). Mothers with higher education recalled the correct definition of IE (P = 0.001) and the importance of dental hygiene (P = 0.004) more often. Mothers with only one child were more likely to know the most typical symptom (P = 0.007). The severity of the heart disease and the requirement of endocarditis prophylaxis did not influence maternal understanding. Yet, mothers assessing the heart disease as severe showed better knowledge (typical symptom P = 0.021; importance of dental hygiene P = 0.007). If mothers learned the diagnosis before their child's birth, they remembered relevant information more often. Mothers receiving information by the medical staff and from the Internet showed better knowledge (definition P = 0.014; importance of dental hygiene P = 0.001). Due to low levels of knowledge, more efforts must be put into the education of mothers. Educational programs should take maternal characteristics into account, providing written material and thereby keeping the instruction of lower-educated persons in mind. Furthermore, education should be focused on mothers of children requiring IE prophylaxis. PMID:23982219

  9. [A fetal extraction device used in under-equipped countries: the obstetrical vacuum extractor. Results of 393 vacuum extractions in the Maternity Hospital in Sélestat. (Reflections on the use of this device in African practice)].

    PubMed

    Pambou, O; Wurch, T; Weygandt, J M; Treisser, A

    1991-01-01

    The level of mortality and feto-maternal morbidity in under-equipped countries is frightening. It is important to find answers. Among these: the obstetrical Ventouse is an instrument that can be used for extracting the fetus without too much difficulty. It is relatively easy to learn and to apply as compared with forceps (so long as the mechanism by which it is used is understood). The conditions under which it can be used are well defined at present: term pregnancy, the woman must be in labour, fetal membranes must be ruptured, the cervix must be completely dilated, presentation must be cephalic and the head must be engaged. 393 Ventouse extractions were carried out between 1982 and 1988 at the Maternity Hospital of Selastat and this resulted in delivery of 393 infants in good health. No maternal or fetal mortality occurred in the series. The maternal morbidity was low at 0.76% and the fetal morbidity was only 4.7%. In view of our experience, we believe that the tendency for black women to have android pelves makes it preferable to use the Ventouse as against the forceps because it has several advantages. In view of the literature and of their practice, the authors advise that the obstetric Ventouse should be used in under-equipped countries where conditions of practice are often precarious and the team poorly qualified. This will reduce the mortality and morbidity due to delivery. Pregnant women are insufficiently educated. The quality of health personnel is inadequate. The health services are inadequate for the needs of the population.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2019713

  10. Mission impossible: upholding successfully a charge of infanticide in the Albanian legal practice

    PubMed Central

    Myftari, Kreshnik; Vyshka, Gentian

    2014-01-01

    Infanticide is a horrendous crime universally condemned from all ethical, juridical and moral standpoints. However, legislation on infanticide foresees mitigating circumstances for infanticidal mothers, with sentences by far disproportionate to the severity of the crime. The main justification for this abstaining from severe punishments has been the so-called post puerperal psychosis, whose diagnostic criteria and existence are still very confusing. Psychiatric experts and even jurors show excessive feelings of empathy toward defendant mothers, and fair verdicts under this setting and with this judicial tradition are questionable. Albanian courts have in some cases even denied defendant mothers the unwilling albeit necessary psychiatric treatment, thus exposing them to recidivism and to other social difficulties. Upholding the charge of infanticide in an Albanian court is hereby an impossible enterprise, with high chances for defendants to achieve acquittal on mental insanity grounds. Through describing three cases of infanticide and filicide in recent years of Albanian judicial proceedings, authors raise the concern formulated from other sources regarding the excessive empathy surrounding infanticidal mothers, a deleterious obstacle toward achieving justice. PMID:25512825

  11. A Population-Based Assessment of Human Rights Abuses Committed Against Ethnic Albanian Refugees From Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Iacopino, Vincent; Frank, Martina W.; Bauer, Heidi M.; Keller, Allen S.; Fink, Sheri L.; Ford, Doug; Pallin, Daniel J.; Waldman, Ronald

    2001-01-01

    Objectives. This study assessed patterns of displacement and human rights abuses among Kosovar refugees in Macedonia and Albania. Methods. Between April 19 and May 3, 1999, 1180 ethnic Albanian refugees living in 31 refugee camps and collective centers in Macedonia and Albania were interviewed. Results. The majority (68%) of participants reported that their families were directly expelled from their homes by Serb forces. Overall, 50% of participants saw Serb police or soldiers burning the houses of others, 16% saw Serb police or soldiers burn their own home, and 14% witnessed Serb police or soldiers killing someone. Large percentages of participants saw destroyed mosques, schools, or medical facilities. Thirty-one percent of respondents reported human rights abuses committed against their household members, including beatings, killings, torture, forced separation and disappearances, gunshot wounds, and sexual assault. Conclusions. The present findings confirm that Serb forces engaged in a systematic and brutal campaign to forcibly expel the ethnic Albanian population of Kosovo. In the course of these mass deportations, Serb forces committed widespread abuses of human rights against ethnic Albanians. PMID:11726386

  12. There Is No Elevation of Immunoglobulin E Levels in Albanian Patients with Autoimmune Thyroid Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Gacaferri-Lumezi, Besa; Lokaj-Berisha, Violeta

    2014-01-01

    Background. Studies in several ethnic groups reported high incidence of elevated levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE) in patients with autoimmune thyroid diseases (ATD), especially in patients with Graves' disease. Objective. To study association between serum levels of IgE and thyroid stimulating hormone receptor antibodies (TRAb) in Albanian patients with ATD. Material and Methods. Study was performed in 40 patients with Graves' disease, 15 patients with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and 14 subjects in the control group. The IgE levels were measured by immunoradiometric assay, whereas the TRAb levels were measured by radioreceptor assay. Results. In all groups of subjects the IgE levels were within reference values (<200 kIU/L). Significant difference in mean concentration of IgE was found between two groups of Graves' disease patients, and those with normal and elevated TRAb levels (22.57 versus 45.03, P < 0.05). Positive correlation was found between TRAb and IgE only in Graves' disease patients (r = 0.43, P = 0.006). Conclusion. In Albanian patients with ATD there is no elevation of IgE levels. This could be the result of low prevalence of allergic diseases in Albanian population determined by genetic and environmental factors. PMID:24959371

  13. 'I Used to Fight with Them but Now I Have Stopped!': Conflict and Doctor-Nurse-Anaesthetists' Motivation in Maternal and Neonatal Care Provision in a Specialist Referral Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Aberese-Ako, Matilda; Agyepong, Irene Akua; Gerrits, Trudie; Van Dijk, Han

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives This paper analyses why and how conflicts occur and their influence on doctors and nurse-anaesthetists' motivation in the provision of maternal and neonatal health care in a specialist hospital. Methodology The study used ethnographic methods including participant observation, conversation and in-depth interviews over eleven months in a specialist referral hospital in Ghana. Qualitative analysis software Nvivo 8 was used for coding and analysis of data. Main themes identified in the analysis form the basis for interpreting and reporting study findings. Ethics Statement Ethical clearance was obtained from the Ghana Health Service Ethics Review board (approval number GHS-ERC:06/01/12) and from the University of Wageningen. Written consent was obtained from interview participants, while verbal consent was obtained for conversations. To protect the identity of the hospital and research participants pseudonyms are used in the article and the part of Ghana in which the study was conducted is not mentioned. Results Individual characteristics, interpersonal and organisational factors contributed to conflicts. Unequal power relations and distrust relations among doctors and nurse-anaesthetists affected how they responded to conflicts. Responses to conflicts including forcing, avoiding, accommodating and compromising contributed to persistent conflicts, which frustrated and demotivated doctors and nurse-anaesthetists. Demotivated workers exhibited poor attitudes in collaborating with co-workers in the provision of maternal and neonatal care, which sometimes led to poor health worker response to client care, consequently compromising the hospital's goal of providing quality health care to clients. Conclusion To improve health care delivery in health facilities in Ghana, health managers and supervisors need to identify conflicts as an important phenomenon that should be addressed whenever they occur. Effective mechanisms including training managers

  14. Spatial data integration for analyzing the dynamics of Albanian Adriatic shoreline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arapi, Luan; Nikolli, Pal; Kovaçi, Sander

    2016-04-01

    Shoreline mapping and shoreline change detection are critical subjects for coastal resource management, coastal environmental protection and sustainable coastal development and planning. Coastal changes are attracting more focus since they are important environmental indicators that directly impact coastal economic development and land management. Changes in the shape of shoreline may essentially affect the environment of the coastal zone. These may be caused by natural processes and human activities. The undertaken work focuses on analyzing the Adriatic shoreline dynamics, using spatial temporal data, by taking advantage of Geographic Informatin System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS). Shoreline mapping focuses on some specific issues such as mapping methods used to acquire shoreline data, models and database design used to represent shoreline in the spatial database and shoreline -change analysis methods. The study area extends from the mouth of Buna River in the north to Vlora Bay in the south covering a total length of about 220 km. Detection and future assessment of Albanian Adriatic shoreline spatial position is carried out through integration of multi scale resolution of spatial temporal data and different processing methods. We have combined topographic maps at different scales (1:75 000, 1918; 1:50 000, 1937; 1:25 000, 1960, 1986 and 1:10 000, 1995), digital aerial photographs of 2007 year, satellite images of Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and field observed GIS data. Generation of spatial data is carried out through vectorization process and image processing. Monitoring the dynamics of shoreline position change requires understanding the coastal processes as well as coastal mapping methods. The net rates of variations in the position of the shoreline are calculated according to transects disposed perpendicularly to the baseline and spaced equally along the coast. Analysis of the relative impact of the natural factors and human activities, it is fundamental

  15. Alternative Maternity Services in Washington State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starzyk, Patricia M.

    The nature of maternity services has changed in the past 20 years, with a movement away from traditional (physician delivery in a hospital) towards other alternative services. This study examined alternative maternity services in Washington State, which ranks eighth in the country in the use of such services. Data were collected from birth and…

  16. Maternal mortality in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, S K; Sengupta, B S; Chattopadhyay, C; Zaidi, Z; Showail, H

    1983-09-01

    The maternal mortality in the Maternity and Children Hospital, Riyadh, during the years 1978-1980 was 52 per 100 000 births, when the total births were 55 428. This is higher than the rate reported from the hospitals in developed countries but lower than rates reported by the university hospitals of developing countries such as India, Thailand and Nigeria. Haemorrhage, associated disease, pulmonary embolism and infection, in that order, were the main causes of maternal deaths. The main avoidable factor was failure by the patient to seek the medical care. Much could be done in reducing deaths due to haemorrhage by improving blood transfusion facilities in the peripheral hospitals. Adequate health education, especially of rural women and their midwives, is a crucial factor in improving the maternal death rate for the country as a whole. PMID:6615737

  17. Maternal Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Helen Y.; Englund, Janet A.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization has the potential to protect the pregnant woman, fetus, and infant from vaccine-preventable diseases. Maternal immunoglobulin G is actively transported across the placenta, providing passive immunity to the neonate and infant prior to the infant's ability to respond to vaccines. Currently inactivated influenza, tetanus toxoid, and acellular pertussis vaccines are recommended during pregnancy. Several other vaccines have been studied in pregnancy and found to be safe and immunogenic and to provide antibody to infants. These include pneumococcus, group B Streptococcus, Haemophilus influenzae type b, and meningococcus vaccines. Other vaccines in development for potential maternal immunization include respiratory syncytial virus, herpes simplex virus, and cytomegalovirus vaccines. PMID:24799324

  18. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  19. National and Post-National Discourses and the Construction of Linguistic Identities by Students of Albanian Origin in Greece

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archakis, Argiris

    2016-01-01

    Drawing on Critical Discourse Analysis and, more specifically, on the relationship between the macro-level of dominant discourses and the micro-level of individual positionings, we examine the way linguistic identities are constructed by immigrant students of Albanian origin in Greece. We elaborate on two "competitive" discourses: the…

  20. Results of a pilot antibiotic resistance survey of Albanian poultry farms.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Molla, L; Nugen, S R; Kruse, H

    2016-03-01

    Global dissemination of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in food animals is a major public health concern. Whilst many countries have implemented prudent antibiotic use policies and surveillance systems both in clinical and veterinary settings, there are no such systems in place in Albania and little is known about the levels of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in food animals within the country. A total of 172 poultry samples were taken from six Albanian farms over a 3-month period and were tested for the presence of Enterobacteriaceae. In total, 91 bacterial isolates were obtained and were characterised by species (Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp. or other Enterobacteriaceae) and by susceptibility to 11 antibiotics. Resistance rates of E. coli and Salmonella isolates were, respectively: amoxicillin (86%, 64%); chloramphenicol (77%, 82%); ciprofloxacin (93%, 73%); cefotaxime (14%, 0%); gentamicin (12%, 0%); kanamycin (30%, 18%); nalidixic acid (91%, 73%); streptomycin (70%, 55%); sulphonamides (91%, 73%); tetracycline (95%, 73%); and trimethoprim (79%, 64%). Multidrug resistance to at least four antibiotics was observed in 95% of E. coli isolates and 82% of Salmonella. In conclusion, these data indicate that: (i) Salmonella and E. coli isolates from Albanian poultry farms exhibit high to extremely high levels of antibiotic resistance; (ii) Salmonella and E. coli isolates exhibit resistance to multiple antibiotics; and (iii) multidrug resistance profiles among Enterobacteriaceae are geographically widespread. Implementation of prudent antibiotic use policies in food animals and related surveillance will be necessary to reduce the emergence, spread and establishment of highly resistant strains across poultry farms in Albania. PMID:27436396

  1. Molecular Genetic Characterization of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Syndrome in the Albanian Population.

    PubMed

    Babameto-Laku, A; Mitre, A; Berisha, S; Mokini, V; Roko, D

    2011-06-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is a major public health problem in Albania as it is in many Mediterranean countries. We determined the different β-thal alleles that are present in the Albanian population by using the temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) method because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and simplicity. DNA from blood of 68 patients with β-thal, 26 with sickle cell anemia or sickle cell β-thal, 54 parents of these patients and 14 heterozygotes related to these families. We found the IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 39 (C>T), IVS-I-6 (T>C), IVS-I-1 (G>A) and codon 44 (-C) mutations that accounted for nearly 90% of the β-thal alleles. Their frequencies were similar to those found in other studies in the Albanian population. This method has permitted the detection of heterozygotes for β-thal in this population and offers a prenatal diagnosis with a probability of 90% accuracy. PMID:24052702

  2. Molecular Genetic Characterization of β-Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Syndrome in the Albanian Population

    PubMed Central

    Babameto-Laku, A; Mitre, A; Berisha, S; Mokini, V; Roko, D

    2011-01-01

    β-Thalassemia (β-thal) is a major public health problem in Albania as it is in many Mediterranean countries. We determined the different β-thal alleles that are present in the Albanian population by using the temporal temperature gradient electrophoresis (TTGE) method because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness, sensitivity and simplicity. DNA from blood of 68 patients with β-thal, 26 with sickle cell anemia or sickle cell β-thal, 54 parents of these patients and 14 heterozygotes related to these families. We found the IVS-I-110 (G>A), codon 39 (C>T), IVS-I-6 (T>C), IVS-I-1 (G>A) and codon 44 (–C) mutations that accounted for nearly 90% of the β-thal alleles. Their frequencies were similar to those found in other studies in the Albanian population. This method has permitted the detection of heterozygotes for β-thal in this population and offers a prenatal diagnosis with a probability of 90% accuracy. PMID:24052702

  3. Maternal and perinatal mortality.

    PubMed

    Krishna Menon, M K

    1972-01-01

    A brief analysis of data from the records of the Government Hospital for Women and Children in Madras for a 36-year period (1929-1964) is presented. India with a population of over 550 million has only 1 doctor for each 6000 population. For the 80% of the population which is rural, the doctor ratio is only 88/1 million. There is also a shortage of paramedical personnel. During the earlier years of this study period, abortions, puerperal infections; hemorrhage, and toxemia accounted for nearly 75% of all meternal deaths, while in later years deaths from these causes were 40%. Among associated factors in maternal mortality, anemia was the most frequent, it still accounts for 20% and is a contributory factor in another 20%. The mortality from postpartum hemorrhage was 9.3% but has now decreased to 2.8%. Eclampsia is a preventable disease and a marked reduction in maternal and perinatal mortality from this cause has been achieved. Maternal deaths from puerperal infections have dropped from 25% of all maternal deaths to 7%. Uterine rupture has been reduced from 75% to 9.3% due to modern facilities. Operative deliveries still have an incidence of 2.1% and a mortality rate of 1.4% of all deliveries. These rates would be further reduced by more efficient antenatal and intranatal care. Reported perinatal mortality of infants has been reduced from 182/1000 births to an average of 78/1000 in all areas, but is 60.6/1000 in the city of Madras. Socioeconomic standards play an important role in perinatal mortality, 70% of such deaths occurring in the lowest economic groups. Improvement has been noted in the past 25 years but in rural areas little progress has been made. Prematurity and low birth weights are still larger factors in India than in other countries, with acute infectious diseases, anemia, and general malnutrition among mothers the frequent causes. Problems requiring further efforts to reduce maternal and infant mortality are correct vital statistics, improved

  4. Maternal Depression and Parent Management Training Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, Jack; McQuillin, Samuel; Butler, Ashley M; Axelrad, Marni E

    2016-09-01

    This study examines the impact of maternal depression on reductions in children's behavior problems severity following implementation of the Brief Behavioral Intervention-a brief, manualized parent management training treatment. The parents of 87 children aged 2-6 years of age received parent management training at a metropolitan hospital. Parents of participants completed measures of externalizing behavior and maternal depression. The association between pre-post treatment change in externalizing behavior and maternal depression was examined using an autoregressive cross-lagged model. Results showed that self-reported maternal depressive symptoms at pre-treatment negatively influenced the overall magnitude of reduction of reported externalizing behaviors in children following treatment. Results indicate that aspects of family functioning not specifically targeted by parent management training, such as maternal depression, significantly affect treatment outcomes. Clinicians providing parent management training may benefit from assessing for maternal depression and modifying treatment as indicated. PMID:27448152

  5. Maternal Employment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Sam

    1975-01-01

    The overwhelming evidence from years of research is that maternal employment, by itself, has little influence on the behaviors of children. More relevant issues are: mother's reasons for working, family's acceptance of mother's employment, quality of substitute child care, family's social and emotional health, and economic conditions. (Author/AJ)

  6. Resilience at the border: traditional botanical knowledge among Macedonians and Albanians living in Gollobordo, Eastern Albania

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethnobotany in South-Eastern Europe is gaining the interest of several scholars and stakeholders, since it is increasingly considered a key point for the re-evaluation of local bio-cultural heritage. The region of Gollobordo, located in Eastern Albania and bordering the Republic of Macedonia, is of particular interest for conducting ethnobiological studies, since it remained relatively isolated for the larger part of the 20th Century and is traditionally inhabited by a majority of ethnic Macedonians and a minority of Albanians (nowadays both sharing the Muslim faith). Methods An ethnobotanical survey focused on local food, medicinal, and veterinary plant uses was conducted with 58 participants using open and semi-structured interviews and via participant observation. Results We recorded and identified 115 taxa of vascular plants, which are locally used for food, medicinal, and veterinary purposes (representing 268 total plant reports). The Macedonian Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) was greater than the Albanian TEK, especially in the herbal and ritual domains. This phenomenon may be linked to the long socio-cultural and linguistic isolation of this group during the time when the borders between Albania and the former Yugoslavia were completely closed. Moreover, the unusual current food utilisation of cooked potatoes leaves, still in use nowadays among Macedonians, could represent the side effect of an extreme adaptation that locals underwent over the past century when the introduction of the potato crop made new strategies available for establishing stable settlements around the highest pastures. Additionally, the difference in use of Helichrysum plicatum, which is popular in the local Macedonian folk medicine but absent among Albanians, confirms the particular significance of this taxon as it relates to the yellow colour of its flowers in South Slavic folklore. Conclusion Botanical studies with an ethnographic approach are crucial for

  7. [Psychiatry at the maternal clinic].

    PubMed

    Ammälä, Antti-Jussi

    2015-01-01

    Various mental disorders are encountered at the maternal clinic. Pregnancy predisposes to some mental disorders, most commonly depressive and anxiety disorders. The recognition of substance use disorders during pregnancy is very important, but difficult owing to the associated disgrace. An eating disorder with an onset preceding the pregnancy may cause problems for growth and development of the fetus and should thus be identified early enough. The rare but severe postpartum psychosis may often break out only after discharge from the maternity hospital. Drug therapy during pregnancy requires careful consideration and clear-cut reasoning. PMID:26237899

  8. Transcriptional activity of human endogenous retrovirus in Albanian children with autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Cipriani, Chiara; Matteucci, Claudia; Capodicasa, Natale; Pilika, Anita; Korca, Ina; Sorrentino, Roberta; Argaw-Denboba, Ayele; Bucci, Ilaria; Miele, Martino Tony; Coniglio, Antonella; Alessandrelli, Riccardo; Sinibaldi Vallebona, Paola

    2016-09-01

    Recent studies suggest that autism spectrum disorders (ASD) result from interactions between genetic and environmental factors, whose possible links could be represented by epigenetic mechanisms. Here, we investigated the transcriptional activity of three human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) families, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from Albanian ASD children, by quantitative real-time PCR. We aimed to confirm the different expression profile already found in Italian ASD children, and to highlight any social and family health condition emerging from information gathered through a questionnaire, to be included among environmental risk factors. The presence of increased HERV-H transcriptional activity in all autistic patients could be understood as a constant epigenetic imprinting of the disease, potentially useful for early diagnosis and for the development of effective novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:27602423

  9. Strategies for reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Clark, Steven L

    2012-02-01

    The maternal death rate in the United States has shown no improvement in several decades and may be increasing. On the other hand, hospital systems that have instituted comprehensive programs directed at the prevention of maternal mortality have demonstrated rates that are half of the national average. These programs have emphasized the reduction of variability in the provision of care through the use of standard protocols, reliance on checklists instead of memory for critical processes, and an approach to peer review that emphasizes systems change. In addition, elimination of a small number of repetitive errors in the management of hypertension, postpartum hemorrhage, pulmonary embolism, and cardiac disease will contribute significantly to a reduction in maternal mortality. Attention to these general principles and specific error reduction strategies will be of benefit to every practitioner and more importantly to the patients we serve. PMID:22280865

  10. [Influence of tobacco smoking on newborn's birth weight--analisys of dates concerning births from Maternity Hospital named. Dr S. Mossor's in Opole City].

    PubMed

    Guzikowski, Wojciech; Pirogowicz, Iwona

    2008-01-01

    Despite wide education, tobacco smoking while being pregnant is very important issue in perinatology. It is important problem because of life style of polish society, including pregnant women. Clinical observation of this issue is pointing on risk of occurring pathology in pregnancy, unfavorable consequences for neonate also many distant pathological effects among children. Purpose of this was getting an answer for question: whether in current social and economic situation there is connection between low birth mass and smoking tobacco during pregnancy. Under analysis were found births between 38th and 40th one hundred successive births (according to book of birth-room from 2860 labors in hospital in Opol, 2007) of mothers are smoking up to 10 cigarettes a day (group I), mothers smoking 11-20 cigarettes a day (group II) and mothers that are not smoking. This works affirms that smoking has negative influence on child birth mass. It is also displayed that higher the number of smoked cigarettes the higher percent of newborns with low birth mass and higher number o fetus with intrauterine growth retardation. Among mothers that are smoking the biggest group were young women (mean. 24, years) and multipara female (58%). PMID:19189515

  11. Pregnancy Outcomes of Mothers with Detectable CMV-Specific IgM Antibodies: A Three-Year Review in a Large Irish Tertiary Referral Maternity Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Richard J.; Stapleton, Patrick; Abu, Hala; Healy, Eibhlín; Ferguson, Wendy; De Gascun, Cillian; O'Gorman, Joanne; Eogan, Maeve

    2015-01-01

    A retrospective audit was performed for all obstetric patients who had positive CMV IgM results between January 2012 and December 2014 in the Rotunda Hospital, Ireland. In total, 622 CMV IgM positive tests were performed on samples from 572 patients. Thirty-seven patients had a positive CMV IgM result (5.9%) on the Architect system as part of the initial screening. Three patients were excluded as they were not obstetric patients. Of the 34 pregnant women with CMV IgM positive results on initial screening, 16 (47%) had CMV IgM positivity confirmed on the second platform (VIDAS) and 18 (53%) did not. In the 16 patients with confirmed positive CMV IgM results, four (25%) had acute infection, two (12.5%) had infection of uncertain timing, and ten (62.5%) had infection more than three months prior to sampling as determined by the CMV IgG avidity index. Two of the four neonates of women with low avidity IgG had CMV DNA detected in urine. Both these cases had severe neurological damage and the indication for testing their mothers was because the biparietal diameter (BPD) was less than the 5th centile at the routine 20-week gestation anomaly scan. PMID:26696757

  12. Midwives’ knowledge and attitudes when encountering Gender-Based Violence in their practice at a maternity-hospital in Kingston, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Pitter, Cynthia Pearl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Gender-based violence (GBV) can have devastating consequences for pregnancy because both mother and child are at risk. Midwives are in a strategic position to identify and empower pregnant women experiencing GBV; however, currently midwives in Jamaica are not required to screen for GBV, neither are they prepared to do so. Aim This study forms the baseline of a larger study designed to improve the capacity of midwives to identify and treat pregnant women experiencing GBV in Jamaica. This specific component assessed midwives’ knowledge and attitudes when encountering GBV in their practice in Kingston, Jamaica. Methods A qualitative study design was used. Six practicing midwives were purposely selected to participate in a focus group discussion at the antenatal clinic of a hospital in Kingston, Jamaica. Results All six respondents said it was very important to screen for GBV among pregnant women in their care. The findings from their report revolved around six themes, namely midwives have suboptimal knowledge, are exposed to women experiencing GBV in pregnancy, lack professional preparedness, report gaps in the institutional framework to guide their practice, are concerned for their safety and security, and are willing to intervene. Conclusion This study confirmed that midwives are aware of the problem and are willing to intervene but are faced with lack of formal procedures to detect and treat pregnant women who are experiencing GBV. Findings could be used to inform a protocol which is being developed to guide midwives’ practice. Findings could also be incorporated in the national strategy to eliminate GBV. PMID:26894744

  13. Light on maternal mortality in India.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1990-01-01

    In order to investigate the degree and causes of maternal mortality in Anantapur District, Andhra Pradesh, India, detailed enquiries were made at the grass roots and the records of health facilities were examined. The number of maternal deaths proved to be much higher than would have been revealed by a perusal of official data alone. Many women in a serious condition died on the way to hospital or soon after arrival because the means of transport were too slow or otherwise unsuitable. Maternal mortality rates varied substantially from place to place, reflecting differing levels of economic development and the presence or absence of primary health centres and subcentres. PMID:2271096

  14. Assessment of maternal mortality in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Walraven, G E; Mkanje, R J; van Roosmalen, J; van Dongen, P W; Dolmans, W M

    1994-05-01

    The results from a prospective community survey, a sisterhood method survey, and a hospital survey were compared in order to ascertain a reliable and inexpensive method for estimating direct deaths from obstetric complications of pregnancy. The maternal mortality ratio was used to express risk of dying during pregnancy. The surveys were conducted in Kwimba District in Mwanza region of northwestern Tanzania: in August 1989 to March 1991 in the community study within the primary health care area of Sumve Hospital, which supplied data on maternal mortality between 1986 and 1990. The sisterhood survey was conducted in 2 villages in 1990, of which 1 village was included in the community survey. The village study included 447 women, of whom 421 remained in the survey and delivered 427 infants (415 live born); there was 1 maternal death. The sisterhood method engaged 2865 respondents and the lifetime risk of maternal death was estimated at 297 and the proportional maternal mortality rate was 13.9%. There were 82 maternal deaths and 589 deaths from all causes among sisters aged 15 years and older. 7526 women were included in the hospital survey, of which 7335 births were represented; there were 62 maternal deaths. The maternal mortality risk was 845 among hospital admissions. 69% of all maternal deaths were accounted for by direct causes. Most deaths were attributed to the top 5 worldwide causes: obstructed labor, puerperal sepsis, postpartum hemorrhage, complications of abortion, and preeclampsia. There were few reports of abortions and abortion-related mortality. Relapsing fever or Borrelia infection was an indirect cause of death common to the region and particularly hazardous to pregnant women. Many hospital deaths were emergency admissions. The conclusion was that the sisterhood method provided a better indication of the extent of maternal mortality within the community. Other advantages were the small sample and the speed, quickness, and low cost. Hospital data

  15. Improving maternity care in Ethiopia through facility based review of maternal deaths and near misses.

    PubMed

    Gebrehiwot, Yirgu; Tewolde, Birukkidus T

    2014-10-01

    The present study aimed to initiate facility based review of maternal deaths and near misses as part of the Ethiopian effort to reduce maternal mortality and achieve United Nations Millennium Development Goals 4 and 5. An in-depth review of all maternal deaths and near misses among women who visited 10 hospitals in four regions of Ethiopia was conducted between May 2011 and October 2012 as part of the FIGO LOGIC initiative. During the study period, a total of 2774 cases (206 deaths and 2568 near misses) were reviewed. The ratio of maternal deaths to near misses was 1:12 and the overall maternal death rate was 728 per 100 000 live births. Socioeconomic factors associated with maternal mortality included illiteracy 1672 (60.3%) and lack of employment outside the home 2098 (75.6%). In all, 1946 (70.2%) women arrived at hospital after they had developed serious complications owing to issues such as lack of transportation. Only 1223 (44.1%) women received prenatal follow-up and 157 (76.2%) deaths were attributed to direct obstetric causes. Based on the findings, facilities adopted a number of quality improvement measures such as providing 24-hour services, and making ambulances available. Integrating review of maternal deaths and near misses into regular practice provides accurate information on causes of maternal deaths and near misses and also improves quality of care in facilities. PMID:25261109

  16. Maternal Care and Attachment Security in Ordinary and Emergency Contexts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posada, German; Jacobs, Amanda; Carbonell, Olga A.; Alzate, Gloria; Bustamante, Maria R.; Arenas, Angela

    1999-01-01

    Two studies examined the relationship between maternal sensitivity and infant security of attachment in home and hospital contexts. Results are discussed in terms of links between methodology and effect sizes, the generality of links between maternal care and child security, need for research on caregiving in ordinary and emergency situations, and…

  17. Praying until Death: Apostolicism, Delays and Maternal Mortality in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Munyaradzi Kenneth, Dodzo; Marvellous, Mhloyi; Stanzia, Moyo; Memory, Dodzo-Masawi

    2016-01-01

    Religion affects people's daily lives by solving social problems, although it creates others. Female sexual and reproductive health are among the issues most affected by religion. Apostolic sect members in Zimbabwe have been associated with higher maternal mortality. We explored apostolic beliefs and practices on maternal health using 15 key informant interviews in 5 purposively selected districts of Zimbabwe. Results show that apostolicism promotes high fertility, early marriage, non-use of contraceptives and low or non-use of hospital care. It causes delays in recognizing danger signs, deciding to seek care, reaching and receiving appropriate health care. The existence of a customized spiritual maternal health system demonstrates a huge desire for positive maternal health outcomes among apostolics. We conclude that apostolic beliefs and practices exacerbate delays between onset of maternal complications and receiving help, thus increasing maternal risk. We recommend complementary and adaptive approaches that address the maternal health needs of apostolics in a religiously sensitive manner. PMID:27509018

  18. Praying until Death: Apostolicism, Delays and Maternal Mortality in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Religion affects people’s daily lives by solving social problems, although it creates others. Female sexual and reproductive health are among the issues most affected by religion. Apostolic sect members in Zimbabwe have been associated with higher maternal mortality. We explored apostolic beliefs and practices on maternal health using 15 key informant interviews in 5 purposively selected districts of Zimbabwe. Results show that apostolicism promotes high fertility, early marriage, non-use of contraceptives and low or non-use of hospital care. It causes delays in recognizing danger signs, deciding to seek care, reaching and receiving appropriate health care. The existence of a customized spiritual maternal health system demonstrates a huge desire for positive maternal health outcomes among apostolics. We conclude that apostolic beliefs and practices exacerbate delays between onset of maternal complications and receiving help, thus increasing maternal risk. We recommend complementary and adaptive approaches that address the maternal health needs of apostolics in a religiously sensitive manner. PMID:27509018

  19. Does prenatal care benefit maternal health? A study of post-partum maternal care use.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tsai-Ching; Chen, Bradley; Chan, Yun-Shan; Chen, Chin-Shyan

    2015-10-01

    Most studies on prenatal care focus on its effects on infant health, while studying less about the effects on maternal health. Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance claims data in Taiwan in a recursive bivariate probit model, this study examines the impact of adequate prenatal care on the probability of post-partum maternal hospitalization during the first 6 months after birth. The results show that adequate prenatal care significantly reduces the probability of post-partum maternal hospitalization among women who have had vaginal delivery by 43.8%. This finding suggests that the benefits of prenatal care may have been underestimated among women with vaginal delivery. Timely and adequate prenatal care not only creates a positive impact on infant health, but also yields significant benefits for post-partum maternal health. However, we do not find similar benefits of prenatal care for women undergoing a cesarean section. PMID:26189913

  20. In vitro antioxidant activity of non-cultivated vegetables of ethnic Albanians in southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Pieroni, A; Janiak, V; Dürr, C M; Lüdeke, S; Trachsel, E; Heinrich, M

    2002-08-01

    A total of 27 extracts from non-cultivated and weedy vegetables traditionally consumed by ethnic Albanians (Arbëreshë) in the Vulture area (southern Italy) were tested for their free radical scavenging activity (FRSA) in the DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazil radical) screening assay, for their in vitro non-enzymatic inhibition of bovine brain lipid peroxidation and for their inhibition of xanthine oxidase (XO). In both antioxidant assays strong activity was shown for Leopoldia comosa (bulbs, syn.: Muscari comosum) and Centaurea calcitrapa (young whorls). In the lipid peroxidation assay, extracts from leaves of Origanum heracleoticum, Urtica dioica and Tordylium apulum showed a remarkable inhibitory activity (> 50%), too. In the case of Leopoldia comosa and Origanum heracleoticum this activity was comparable to quercetin (at a concentration of 50 microM) and Rhodiola rosea extract. Extracts from non-cultivated Cichorium intybus, Chondrilla juncea and Stellaria media showed strong in vitro inhibition of xanthine oxidase, with an activity higher than that of a reference extract from Ledum groenlandicum. These findings suggest that weedy vegetables may be useful antioxidants of interest in the prevention of ageing related diseases, CNS disorders and as potential sources of phytomedicines against hyperuricaemia and gout. PMID:12203269

  1. Factors Associated with Physical Activity among Macedonian Adolescents in Albanian Ethnic Community

    PubMed Central

    GONTAREV, Seryozha; KALAC, Ruzdija; AMETI, Vullnet; REDJEPI, Agim

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship of demographic, psychological, social and environmental factors with physical activity and to determine whether indicators of physical activity differ by gender among Macedonian adolescents from Albanian ethnic community from 11 to 14 yr (N = 886). Methods: Research were conducted in 2014 in several primary schools randomly selected from Tetovo and Gostivar region of the R. Macedonia. Students completed a questionnaire which examined their level of participation in physical activity and sedentary behavior along with a number of potential correlates. Hierarchical regression was used to explore the relationship between hypothesised factors and physical activity. Results: The boys unlike the girls showed significantly higher levels of physical activity (P=0.001). Respondents of both genders who perceive greater benefits from the physical activity (P=0.010). They have more confidence in their abilities (P=0.001), enjoy more in the physical activities (P=0.016), perceive greater social support from friends (P=0.008) and parents (P=0.001) and have higher levels of physical activity. Conclusions: The results indicate the importance of developing a national plan and program to promote physical activity in order to help young people to change unhealthy lifestyle habits and increase the physical activity, thus improving their health. PMID:27252917

  2. [Prevention of cot death in maternity hospitals].

    PubMed

    Fleurigeon, Aline; Billard, Estelle; Monfort, Sara; Brochard, Mélissa; Angeli, Francine; Éoche, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Part of the role of the child health nurse is to promote the health of infants and families in a public health community approach. She designs and implements health education actions. Raising parents' awareness of how to position newborns when they sleep and the prevention of cot death is a public health priority. PMID:26146000

  3. Birthing Centers and Hospital Maternity Services

    MedlinePlus

    ... Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which Ones & When? Smart School Lunches Emmy-Nominated Video "Cerebral Palsy: Shannon's ...

  4. Levels and causes of maternal mortality in southern India.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1993-01-01

    Most studies of maternal mortality are hospital based. However, in developing countries, where many such deaths take place in the home, hospital statistics do not reflect the true extent of maternal mortality. Furthermore, the socioeconomic and demographic factors and health behavior affecting maternal mortality are rarely known. A study conducted in 1986 in South India demonstrates a new approach to investigating maternal mortality that combines the collection of information from hospital and health-facility records, field surveys, and case-control studies. The findings from this study indicate that there were 7.98 maternal deaths per 1,000 live births. Approximately one-half of the deaths occurred in the home or on the way to the hospital. Maternal deaths accounted for 36 percent of mortality for women of reproductive age. Analysis reveals that many of these deaths were preventable and that significant differentials existed with regard to demographic, social, and behavioral factors between the cases of maternal deaths and the controls. PMID:8296332

  5. Economics Understanding of Albanian High School Students: Factors Related to Achievement as Measured by Test Scores on the Test of Economic Literacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bushati, Dolore

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the level of economics knowledge, overall and on specific economic concepts after Albanian 11th grade and 12th grade students completed their required economics course and investigated how economics knowledge differed by student and teacher characteristics. There were 1,509 students who participated in this research from 12…

  6. Maternal mortality in southern India.

    PubMed

    Rao, P S; Amalraj, A

    1994-01-01

    In a 4 year prospective community survey of 20,000 women randomly selected in North Arcot District of Tamil Nadu State in South India, the maternal mortality rates per 1,000 liveborn were estimated to be 17.4 and 16.6 for rural and semi-urban areas, respectively. The rates based only on direct causes were 11.9 in rural and 14.4 in semi-urban areas. As expected, these figures are considerably higher than those based on official or hospital statistics. Factors associated with such high mortality and the implications for programme planning and implementation are discussed. PMID:7855917

  7. Self-reported Prevalence and Risk Factors of Non-communicable Diseases in the Albanian Adult Population

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Fatjona; Kraja, Bledar; Mone, Iris; Harizi, Ilda; Babameto, Adriana; Burazeri, Genc

    2016-01-01

    Aim: There is growing evidence that non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major health problem in developing and transitional countries. The prevalence of NCDs and associated factors are under-researched in Albania. We aimed to assess the prevalence and socio-demographic and lifestyle correlates of NCDs in the Albanian adult population. Methods: The study was carried out in the framework of Albania Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS), a national population-based cross-sectional study conducted in 2012 including 12,554 men and women aged ≥35 years. All participants reported on the presence of at least one chronic condition, which in the analysis was dichotomized into “yes” vs. “no”. Information on socio-demographic characteristics (age, gender, education, employment status, residence) and lifestyle factors (smoking and alcohol consumption) was also collected. Logistic regression was used to assess socio-demographic and behavioral correlates of NCDs. Results: Overall, the prevalence of chronic diseases in this population-based sample of Albanian adults was 2864/12554=22.8%. Upon multivariable adjustment for all covariates, positive correlates of chronic conditions were older age (OR=6.0, 95%CI=5.3-6.8), female gender (OR=1.2, 95%CI=1.1-1.4), residence in coastal areas of Albania (OR=2.0, 95%CI=1.7-2.5), unemployment (OR=1.8, 95%CI=1.6-2.0), low education (OR=1.6, OR=1.3-1.9) and current smoking (OR=1.2, 95%CI=1.1-1.5). Conversely, there was an inverse association with poverty (OR=0.8, 95%CI=0.7-1.0). Conclusions: This study provides evidence on self-reported NCDs and its determinants in transitional Albania. These baseline data may be useful for assessment of future NCD trends in Albania and cross-comparisons with the neighboring countries. PMID:27594748

  8. HLA allele and haplotype frequencies in the Albanian population and their relationship with the other European populations.

    PubMed

    Sulcebe, G; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Tiercy, J-M; Shyti, E; Mone, I; Ylli, Z; Kardhashi, V

    2009-12-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are very interesting markers in identifying population relationships. Moreover, their frequency distribution data are important in the implementation of donor-recipient registry programs for transplantation purposes and also in determining the genetic predisposition for many diseases. For these reasons, we studied the HLA class I and II allele and haplotype frequencies in 160 healthy, unrelated Albanian individuals originating from all regions of the country. The HLA genotyping was performed through a 2-digit resolution SSOP method. The data were analysed with Arlequin and Phylip programs. No deviation was found from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. A total of 17 A*, 30 B*, 12 Cw*, 13 DRB1* and 5 DQB1* alleles were identified. The six most frequent HLA-A-B-DRB1 haplotypes were A*02-B*18-DRB1*11 (5.60%), A*02-B*51-DRB1*16 (4.74%), A*01-B*08-DRB1*03 (3.48%), A*24-B*35-DRB1*11 (2.77%), A*02-B*51-DRB1*13 (2.21%), A*24-B*35-DRB1*14 (1.89%). Interestingly, 12 HLA-A-B-Cw-DRB1-DQB1 haplotypes occurred at a frequency >1%. When compared with the other populations, a close relationship was found with North Greek, Bulgarian, Macedonian, Romanian, Turkish, Cretan, Serbian, Croatian and Italian populations. A higher differentiation in allele frequency level was found with Western Europe populations. These data are the first report of HLA allele and haplotype distribution in an Albanian population inside this country. When compared with other populations, their distribution frequencies show close similarities with neighbouring populations of the entire Balkan area. PMID:19703234

  9. [New data on maternal mortality in India].

    PubMed

    Bhatia, J C

    1990-01-01

    A survey was carried out in urban and rural areas of the district of Anantapur, Andhra Pradesh state, India, between July 1, 1984-June 30, 1985 by a team of 6 interviewers and 1 supervisor to identify investigate, and study the causative factors/characteristics of the causes of maternal deaths. They visited each of the 15 hospitals in the district collecting information about maternal deaths that occurred in the reproductive age range of 15-49 years. 22 health centers and 50% of subcenters were also visited, registers were examined, and staff and families were also interviewed. The hospitals and centers served 569,500 people. During the 1st phase in the rural area all main village centers, 181 village subcenters, and 1192 other villages in the district with a total population of 1,090,640 were covered. During the 2nd phase all towns in the urban zones, 10 primary centers, 65 subcenters, and 135 others were visited. The maternal mortality rate was 7.9/1000 live births, well above the national average. 36% of female mortality occurred in women in reproductive age, but fewer than 1/2 of these deaths were registered and only 1/3 figured in center and subcenter records. In rural areas maternal mortality was 8.3/1000, ahead of the urban rate of 5.4/1000. 63% of 284 deaths detailed were related to live births, 14% to stillbirths, 10% to abortions, and 13% to obstructed labor. 19% of total maternal deaths occurred before birth, 12% during labor, and 69% after delivery. Among clinical causes of death sepsis accounted for 36%, hemorrhage for 12%, eclampsia for 9%, retention of placenta for 7%, and infectious hepatitis for 10%. 80% of these deaths could have been avoided by timely antenatal care, treatment of previous complaints, and medical attention and hospitalization at the right time. PMID:12179349

  10. An oceanic core complex (OCC) in the Mirdita ophiolite of the Albanian Dinarides?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.

    2011-12-01

    The basic premise of seafloor spreading is that magmatic activity at mid-ocean ridges is responsible for creation of new crust; however only several years after the formulation of plate tectonic theory we have recognised the importance of tectonic, rather than magmatic, processes in accommodating the divergence of the lithospheric plates in slow-spreading oceans. In these settings, magma supply is spatially and temporally discontinuous and the crust freezes solid between delivery of magma batches from the underlying mantle. Large-scale extensional detachment faults develop during these periods of reduced magma supply, and play a fundamental role in accommodating plate separation. Extensional faulting occurs at the corner between ridge and transform fault and is responsible for the generation of the Oceanic Core Complexes (OCCs). OCCs are the uplifted footwalls of oceanic detachment faults forming dome-shaped massifs consisting of mantle and lower crustal lithologies exposed at the seafloor. Numerical modelling and results from the Integrate Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) has shown that the footwalls beneath oceanic detachment faults rotate during their evolution, proving that they initiate at a steep angle at depth and then "roll-over" to their present day low angle orientations as a result of flexural isostasy during unroofing. Accordingly, information from paleomagnetic analyses provided strong constraints to the detachment kinematics, since a difference of 45-65° in paleomagnetic inclination across the fault has been documented by previous studies, confirming the rolling-hinge model for OCCs formation. Here we present the results of an extensive paleomagnetic study of an OCC preserved in the Mirditata ophiolite of the Albanian Dinarides, first recognized by Trembley et al. (2009). Ophiolites are slices of oceanic lithosphere which have been emplaced onto continental margins during the closure of ocean basins, and provide opportunities for the study of oceanic

  11. [A Maternal Health Care System Based on Mobile Health Care].

    PubMed

    Du, Xin; Zeng, Weijie; Li, Chengwei; Xue, Junwei; Wu, Xiuyong; Liu, Yinjia; Wan, Yuxin; Zhang, Yiru; Ji, Yurong; Wu, Lei; Yang, Yongzhe; Zhang, Yue; Zhu, Bin; Huang, Yueshan; Wu, Kai

    2016-02-01

    Wearable devices are used in the new design of the maternal health care system to detect electrocardiogram and oxygen saturation signal while smart terminals are used to achieve assessments and input maternal clinical information. All the results combined with biochemical analysis from hospital are uploaded to cloud server by mobile Internet. Machine learning algorithms are used for data mining of all information of subjects. This system can achieve the assessment and care of maternal physical health as well as mental health. Moreover, the system can send the results and health guidance to smart terminals. PMID:27382731

  12. Community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) to measure and prevent maternal mortality: a pilot study in rural Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Bayley, Olivia; Chapota, Hilda; Kainja, Esther; Phiri, Tambosi; Gondwe, Chelmsford; King, Carina; Nambiar, Bejoy; Mwansambo, Charles; Kazembe, Peter; Costello, Anthony; Rosato, Mikey

    2015-01-01

    Background In Malawi, maternal mortality remains high. Existing maternal death reviews fail to adequately review most deaths, or capture those that occur outside the health system. We assessed the value of community involvement to improve capture and response to community maternal deaths. Methods We designed and piloted a community-linked maternal death review (CLMDR) process in Mchinji District, Malawi, which partnered community and health facility stakeholders to identify and review maternal deaths and generate actions to prevent future deaths. The CLMDR process involved five stages: community verbal autopsy, community and facility review meetings, a public meeting and bimonthly reviews involving both community and facility representatives. Results The CLMDR process was found to be comparable to a previous research-driven surveillance system at identifying deaths in Mchinji District (population 456 500 in 2008). 52 maternal deaths were identified between July 2011 and June 2012, 27 (52%) of which would not have been identified without community involvement. Based on district estimates of population (500 000) and crude birth rate (35 births per 1000 population), the maternal mortality ratio was around 300 maternal deaths per 100 000 live births. Of the 41 cases that started the CLMDR process, 28 (68%) completed all five stages. We found the CLMDR process to increase the quantity of information available and to involve a wider range of stakeholders in maternal death review (MDR). The process resulted in high rates of completion of community-planned actions (82%), and district hospital (67%) and health centre (65%) actions to prevent maternal deaths. Conclusions CLMDR is an important addition to the established forms of MDR. It shows potential as a maternal death surveillance system, and may be applicable to similar contexts with high maternal mortality. PMID:25897028

  13. Caregivers' role in maternal-fetal conflict.

    PubMed

    Avci, Ercan

    2015-01-01

    The case, which occurred in a public hospital in Turkey in 2005, exhibits a striking dilemma between a mother's and her fetus' interests. For a number of reasons, the mother refused to cooperate with the midwives and obstetrician in the process of giving birth, and wanted to leave the hospital. The care providers evaluated the case as a matter of maternal autonomy and asked the mother to give her consent to be discharged from the hospital, which she did despite the fact that her cervix was fully open. She left the hospital and gave birth shortly thereafter. Subsequently, the baby died two days later. In light of the contemporary ethical principles, the mother's competency could be debatable due to the physical and psychological conditions the mother confronted. Furthermore, protection of the fetus' life should have been taken into account by the caregivers when making a decision concerning discharging of the mother. PMID:25981283

  14. [Assistance to delivery according to hospital classification].

    PubMed

    Lopez-escobar, G; Daza-parada, L; Riano-gamboa, G; Fortney, J

    1979-06-01

    Between March and October 1977 40 urban Colombian hospitals participated in an evaluation of services given to women with high risk pregnancies. The purpose of the study was to find out whether high risk cases go to the more appropriate and better equipped hospitals. A total of 13,450 deliveries were observed at random, i.e. 8.3% of all deliveries in all 40 hospitals during the same time. Social, cultural, and clinical characteristics of mothers and infants were carefully recorded. It was found that Social Security hospitals had the lowest number of high risk patients, a moderate number of surgical interventions, and the lowest maternal and perinatal mortality rate. On the other hand, average size hospitals serviced a larger number of high risk patients, had the highest rate of surgical intervention and of perinatal mortality, and a moderate maternal mortality rate. University hospitals, with the highest concentration of high risk patients and with a moderate incidence of surgical interventions, had a moderate rate of perinatal mortality, and a high rate of maternal mortality. Obviously not all high risk patients were serviced by the best equipped hospitals and by the best prepared personnel, which resulted in a high rate of maternal-infant morbidity and mortality. It would be necessary to reorganize all available services in a more functional way, so that high risk patients can be assisted and treated in the most appropriate environment. PMID:12310258

  15. Exploitation of Albanian wheat cultivars: characterization of the flours and lactic acid bacteria microbiota, and selection of starters for sourdough fermentation.

    PubMed

    Nionelli, Luana; Curri, Nertila; Curiel, José Antonio; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Pontonio, Erica; Cavoski, Ivana; Gobbetti, Marco; Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe

    2014-12-01

    Six Albanian soft and durum wheat cultivars were characterized based on chemical and technological features, showing different attitudes for bread making. Gliadin and glutenin fractions were selectively extracted from flours, and subjected to two-dimensional electrophoresis. Linja 7 and LVS flours showed the best characteristics, and abundance of high molecular weight (HMW)-glutenins. Type I sourdoughs were prepared through back slopping procedure, and the lactic acid bacteria were typed and identified. Lactobacillus plantarum and Leuconostoc mesenteroides were the predominant species. Thirty-eight representative isolates were singly used for sourdough fermentation of soft and durum wheat Albanian flours and their selection was carried out based on growth and acidification, quotient of fermentation, and proteolytic activity. Two different pools of lactic acid bacteria were designed to ferment soft or durum wheat flours. Sourdough fermentation with mixed and selected starters positively affected the quotient of fermentation, concentration of free amino acids, profile of phenolic acids, and antioxidant and phytase activities. This study provided the basis to exploit the potential of wheat Albanian flours based on an integrated approach, which considered the characterization of the flours and the processing conditions. PMID:25084651

  16. Mother-baby friendly hospital.

    PubMed

    Aragon-choudhury, P

    1996-01-01

    In Manila, the Philippines, the Dr. Jose Fabella Memorial Hospital has been a maternity hospital for 75 years. It averages 90 deliveries a day. Its fees are P200-P500 for a normal delivery and P800-P2000 for a cesarean section. Patients pay what they can and pay the balance when they can. The hospital provides a safe motherhood package that encompasses teaching responsible parenthood, prenatal care, labor, delivery, postpartum care, breast feeding, family planning, and child survival. In 1986, the hospital introduced innovative policies and procedures that promote, protect, and support breast feeding. It has a rooming-in policy that has saved the hospital P6.5 million so far. In the prenatal stage, hospital staff inform pregnant women that colostrum protects the newborn against infections, that suckling stimulates milk production, and that there is no basis to the claim of having insufficient breast milk. Sales representatives of milk substitutes are banned from the hospital. Staff confiscate milk bottles or formula. A lactation management team demonstrates breast feeding procedures. Mothers also receive support on the correct way of breast feeding from hospital staff, volunteers from the Catholic Women's League, consumer groups, and women lawyers. The hospital's policy is no breast milk, no discharge. This encourages mothers to motivate each other to express milk immediately after birth. The hospital has received numerous awards for its breast feeding promotion efforts. UNICEF has designated Fabella Hospital as a model of the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative. The hospital serves as the National Lactation Management Education Training Center. People from other developing countries have received training in lactation management here. The First Lady of the Philippines, the First Lady of the US, and the Queen of Spain have all visited the hospital. The hospital has also integrated its existing services into a women's health care center. PMID:12347466

  17. Norovirus - hospital

    MedlinePlus

    Gastroenteritis - norovirus; Colitis - norovirus; Hospital acquired infection - norovirus ... fluids ( dehydration ). Anyone can become infected with norovirus. Hospital patients who are very old, very young, or ...

  18. Maternal and neonatal outcomes of macrosomic pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Weisz, Boaz; Achiron, Reuven; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background To compare maternal and neonatal outcomes of term macrosomic and adequate for gestational age (AGA) pregnancies. Material/Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on all term singleton macrosomic (birth weight ≥4000 g) and AGA (birth weight >10th percentile and <4000 g) pregnancies delivered at our hospital between 2004 and 2008. Data collected included maternal age, gestational age at delivery, mode of delivery, birth weight, fetal gender, maternal and neonatal complications. Comparisons were made between macrosomic and AGA pregnancies and between different severities of macrosomia (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g). Results The study population comprised of 34,685 pregnancies. 2077 neonates had birth weight ≥4000 g. Maternal age and gestational age at delivery were significantly higher for macrosomic neonates. Significantly more macrosomic neonates were born by cesarean section, and were complicated with shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and had longer hospitalization period (both in vaginal and cesarean deliveries). Specifically, the odds ratio (OR) relative to AGA pregnancies for each macrosomic category (4000–4250 g, 4250–4500 g and ≥4500 g) of shoulder dystocia was 2.37, 2.24, 7.61, respectively, and for neonatal hypoglycemia 4.24, 4.41, 4.15, respectively. The risk of post partum hemorrhage was statistically increased when birth weight was >4500 g (OR=5.23) but not for birth weight between 4000–4500 g. No differences were found in the rates of extensive perineal lacerations between AGA and the different macrosomic groups. Conclusions Macrosomia is associated with increased rate of cesarean section, shoulder dystocia, neonatal hypoglycemia, and longer hospitalization, but not associated with excessive perineal tears. Increased risk of PPH was found in the >4500g group. PMID:22936200

  19. Next steps to reduce maternal morbidity and mortality in the USA.

    PubMed

    Kilpatrick, Sarah J

    2015-03-01

    Maternal mortality is rising in the USA. The pregnancy-related maternal mortality ratio increased from 10/100,000 to 17/100,000 live births from the 1990s to 2012. A large proportion of maternal deaths are preventable. This review highlights a national approach to reduce maternal death and morbidity and discusses multiple efforts to reduce maternal morbidity, death and improve obstetric safety. These efforts include communication and collaboration between all stake holders involved in perinatal health, creation of national bundles addressing key maternal care areas such as hemorrhage management, call for all obstetric hospitals to review and analyze all cases of severe maternal morbidity, and access to contraception. Implementation of interventions based on these efforts is a national imperative to improve obstetric safety. PMID:25776293

  20. Combined Effect of Fetal Sex and Advanced Maternal Age on Pregnancy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann-Brenner, Alina; Simchen, Michal J.; Zilberberg, Eran; Kalter, Anat; Dulitzky, Mordechai

    2015-01-01

    Background Fetal sex and maternal age are each known to affect outcomes of pregnancies. The objective of the present study was to investigate the influence of the combination of maternal age and fetal sex on pregnancy outcomes in term and post-term singleton pregnancies. Material/Methods This was a retrospective study on term singleton pregnancies delivered between 2004 and 2008 at the Chaim Sheba Medical Center. Data collected included maternal age, fetal sex, and maternal and neonatal complications. The combined effect of fetal sex and maternal age on complications of pregnancy was assessed by multivariable logistic regression models. Results The study population comprised 37,327 pregnancies. The risk of operative deliveries increased with maternal age ≥40 and in pregnancies with male fetuses. The risk of maternal diabetes and of longer hospitalization increased as maternal age increased, and in women <40 carrying male fetuses. The risk of hypertensive disorders increased in pregnancies with males as maternal age advanced. The risk of shoulder dystocia and neonatal respiratory complications increased in male neonates born to women<40. The risk of neonatal hypoglycemia increased in males for all maternal ages. Conclusions Risk assessment for fetal sex and advanced maternal age were given for different pregnancy complications. Knowledge of fetal sex adds value to the risk assessment of pregnancies as maternal age increases. PMID:25892459

  1. Iraqi Nurses’ Perspectives on Safety Issues in Maternity Services

    PubMed Central

    Jamil Piro, Tiran; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Salsali, Mahvash

    2015-01-01

    Background: Studies introduce maternal and neonatal safety phenomena as important challenges to the public health, particularly in low-income countries. However, few researches are conducted on the identification of safety issues in maternity hospitals in Iraq. It was the first study on nurses’ perspectives on safety issues in Kurdistan, Iraq. Objectives: The current study aimed to describe nurses’ perspectives on what constitutes a safe maternity service in Kurdistan, Iraq. Patients and Methods: A qualitative design, based on a content analysis approach, was used. Ten Kurdish nurses who worked in the delivery room of Kurdistan, Iraq maternity hospital were recruited through purposive sampling. Semi-structured interviews were performed to collect data. All interviews were audiotaped and transcribed verbatim. Sampling continued to the level of data saturation. Data analysis was performed based on the steps suggested by Graneheim and Lundman. Results: Thematic analysis led to the identification of six main categories including stressful job, lack of schedule and job description, providing care with limited resources, professional unaccountability, regional sociopolitical factors, and inadequate training. Conclusions: Iraqi nurses identified factors such as limited health resources, lack of job description, and professional unaccountability as major safety issues in maternity services. These findings alarm the need to ensure the provision of females and neonates with appropriate care. This, however, would require coordination between Iraqi Kurdistan health authorities to provide midwifery care facilities, high-quality and relevant staff training, and an effective healthcare system in the maternity units. PMID:26576445

  2. [Maternal refusal to consent to a cesarean delivery, stillbirth].

    PubMed

    Defline, A; Obadia, M; El Djerbi, A; Plevy, P; Lepercq, J

    2014-01-01

    The doctor-lawyer perspective that we discuss is a maternal refusal to consent to a cesarean delivery for a fetal indication in June 2011. Despite repeated information of the risks during a three-week hospitalization for pre-eclampsia, after being assured of the proper understanding of the seriousness of the situation by the patient and spouse, and after consideration to transfer to another hospital, the reiterated refusal led to a late fetal extraction resulting in term stillbirth. PMID:23972774

  3. Current status of pregnancy-related maternal mortality in Japan: a report from the Maternal Death Exploratory Committee in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Junichi; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Tanaka, Hiroaki; Katsuragi, Shinji; Osato, Kazuhiro; Murakoshi, Takeshi; Nakata, Masahiko; Nakamura, Masamitsu; Yoshimatsu, Jun; Sadahiro, Tomohito; Kanayama, Naohiro; Ishiwata, Isamu; Kinoshita, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Tomoaki

    2016-01-01

    Objective To clarify the problems related to maternal deaths in Japan, including the diseases themselves, causes, treatments and the hospital or regional systems. Design Descriptive study. Setting Maternal death registration system established by the Japan Association of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (JAOG). Participants Women who died during pregnancy or within a year after delivery, from 2010 to 2014, throughout Japan (N=213). Main outcome measures The preventability and problems in each maternal death. Results Maternal deaths were frequently caused by obstetric haemorrhage (23%), brain disease (16%), amniotic fluid embolism (12%), cardiovascular disease (8%) and pulmonary disease (8%). The Committee considered that it was impossible to prevent death in 51% of the cases, whereas they considered prevention in 26%, 15% and 7% of the cases to be slightly, moderately and highly possible, respectively. It was difficult to prevent maternal deaths due to amniotic fluid embolism and brain disease. In contrast, half of the deaths due to obstetric haemorrhage were considered preventable, because the peak duration between the initial symptoms and initial cardiopulmonary arrest was 1–3 h. Conclusions A range of measures, including individual education and the construction of good relationships among regional hospitals, should be established in the near future, to improve primary care for patients with maternal haemorrhage and to save the lives of mothers in Japan. PMID:27000786

  4. Maternity records in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936: a comparison.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, A M; Ayaz, E; Sherlock, L; Shenkin, S D

    2015-03-01

    Historians have long used maternity records to understand the evolution of maternity services. More recently, epidemiologists have become interested in obstetric hospital records as a source of data (e.g. birth weight, social class), to study the influence of early life on future health and disease: life course epidemiology. Edinburgh and Aberdeen are unusual in holding detailed records from several maternity institutions. The records of 1936 are of particular interest because all children born in this year and at school in Scotland at age 11 sat a cognitive ability test, the Scottish Mental Survey 1947. This study aims to describe the maternity services in Edinburgh and Aberdeen in 1936, between the First and Second World Wars. Understanding the richness of data in birth records, the manner in which they were recorded, and the context of the institutions in their community is essential for interpreting life course epidemiology studies. PMID:25874836

  5. Transparency in Maternity Care: Empowering Women to Make Educated Choices

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Elan

    2008-01-01

    The author of this guest editorial calls for a higher level of transparency in maternity care. The public should have access to information about hospital and provider policies and practices so that women and their families can determine where and with whom to birth. Currently, many grassroots-level projects, including The Birth Survey, are addressing this need. PMID:19436532

  6. Salmonella isolation from hospital areas.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R. W.; Price, T. H.; Joynson, D. H.

    1979-01-01

    Evidence of the presence of salmonellas in a paediatric ward, a special care baby unit, a maternity unit and a hospital kitchen was obtained by culture of sewer swabs, faeces and food samples. The survey was designed to cause as little administrative interference as possible. The technical aspects of the survey did not strain laboratory facilities. Minimal secondary spread of salmonella infection was experienced. PMID:390044

  7. Maternal deaths in Tanzania -- a challenge.

    PubMed

    1994-08-01

    A reproductive health approach to health care has many consequences for women in Tanzania. Conditions are currently such that in one hospital in Amana there were 30 to 40 deliveries daily, but only 2 beds. The consequence was patients were treated while lying on the floor. The main city hospital did not have a vacuum aspirator, resuscitation equipment for newborns, or a sterilizer. A Dar es Salaam study shows a hospital maternal mortality rate of 754/100,000 live births, which is much higher than the 200-400/100,000 live births estimated by the WHO. The barriers to women's health are low socioeconomic status, poor nutrition, lack of income, lack of employment opportunities, and limited access to basic sanitation. There is discrimination against women in food, education, and economic independence, and social custom that denies decision making about marriage and reproduction. Access to information is limited to mother and child clinics. Men tend not to be involved in family planning or in treatment for sexually transmitted diseases. Strategies have been narrowly focused on maternal mortality, rather than on reproductive health and the right to live. Pregnancy threatens the right to life. PMID:12222520

  8. Effectiveness and safety of 1 vs 4 h blood pressure profile with clinical and laboratory assessment for the exclusion of gestational hypertension and pre-eclampsia: a retrospective study in a university affiliated maternity hospital

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Elizabeth Anne; Carins, Thomas A; Hannigan, Yolanda; Bardien, Nadia; Shub, Alexis; Walker, Susan P

    2015-01-01

    Objective We asked whether 60 compared with 240 min observation is sufficiently informative and safe for pregnancy day assessment (PDAC) of suspected pre-eclampsia (PE). Design A retrospective study of 209 pregnant women (475 PDAC assessments, 6 months) with routinely collected blood pressure (BP), symptom and laboratory information. We proposed a 60 min screening algorithm comprising: absence of symptoms, normal laboratory parameters and ≤1high-BP reading (systolic blood pressure, SBP 140 mm Hg or higher or diastolic blood pressure, DBP 90 mm Hg or higher). We also evaluated two less inclusive screening algorithms. We determined short-term outcomes (within 4 h): severe hypertension, proteinuric hypertension and pregnancy-induced hypertension, as well as long-term outcome: PE-related diagnoses up to the early puerperium. We assessed performance of alternate screening algorithms performance using 2×2 tables. Results 1 in 3 women met all screen negative criteria at 1 h. Their risk of hypertension requiring treatment in the next 3 h was 1.8% and of failing to diagnose proteinuric hypertensive PE at 4 h was 5.1%. If BP triggers were 5 mm Hg lower, 1 in 6 women would be screen-negative of whom 1.1% subsequently develops treatment-requiring hypertension and 4.5% demonstrate short-term proteinuric hypertension. We present sensitivity, specificity, negative and positive likelihood ratios for alternate screening algorithms. Conclusions We endorse further research into the safest screening test where women are considered for discharge after 60 min. Safety, patient and staff satisfaction should be assessed prospectively. Any screening test should be used in conjunction with good clinical care to minimise maternal and perinatal hazards of PE. PMID:26582404

  9. Maternal and Handicapped Child Characteristics Associated with Maternal Involvement Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huntington, Gail S.

    Eighty-six mother-infant pairs were studied to determine the extent to which maternal and child variables predicted maternal involvement. The infants, ranging in age from 3-36 months, were examined on temperament and developmental status. Maternal characteristics studied were temperament, locus of control, and socioeconomic status. Criterion…

  10. Maternal Separation Anxiety and Child Care: Effects on Maternal Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storm, Heidi A.; Ridley-Johnson, Robyn

    Maternal separation anxiety influences maternal behavior, attitudes about employment, and employment decisions made by mothers. This study examined the relationship between maternal separation anxiety and the number of hours a child was in substitute care. The sample consisted of 44 mothers and their children who ranged in age from 12 to 41 months…

  11. Maternal and neonatal tetanus.

    PubMed

    Thwaites, C Louise; Beeching, Nicholas J; Newton, Charles R

    2015-01-24

    Maternal and neonatal tetanus is still a substantial but preventable cause of mortality in many developing countries. Case fatality from these diseases remains high and treatment is limited by scarcity of resources and effective drug treatments. The Maternal and Neonatal Tetanus Elimination Initiative, launched by WHO and its partners, has made substantial progress in eliminating maternal and neonatal tetanus. Sustained emphasis on improvement of vaccination coverage, birth hygiene, and surveillance, with specific approaches in high-risk areas, has meant that the incidence of the disease continues to fall. Despite this progress, an estimated 58,000 neonates and an unknown number of mothers die every year from tetanus. As of June, 2014, 24 countries are still to eliminate the disease. Maintenance of elimination needs ongoing vaccination programmes and improved public health infrastructure. PMID:25149223

  12. Maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcome in low-resource countries

    PubMed Central

    van Lonkhuijzen, Luc; Stekelenburg, Jelle; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2014-01-01

    Background A maternity waiting home (MWH) is a facility within easy reach of a hospital or health centre which provides emergency obstetric care (EmOC). Women may stay in the MWH at the end of their pregnancy and await labour. Once labour starts, women move to the health facility so that labour and giving birth can be assisted by a skilled birth attendant. The aim of the MWH is to improve accessibility to skilled care and thus reduce morbidity and mortality for mother and neonate should complications arise. Some studies report a favourable effect on the outcomes for women and their newborns. Others show that utilisation is low and barriers exist. However, these data are limited in their reliability. Objectives To assess the effects of a maternity waiting facility on maternal and perinatal health. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group’s Trials Register (27 January 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4 of 4), MEDLINE (1966 to January 2012), EMBASE (1980 to January 2012), CINAHL (1982 to January 2012), African Journals Online (AJOL) (January 2012), POPLINE (January 2012), Dissertation Abstracts (January 2012) and reference lists of retrieved papers. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials including quasi-randomised and cluster-randomised trials that compared perinatal and maternal outcome in women using a MWH and women who did not. Data collection and analysis There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Main results There were no randomised controlled trials or cluster-randomised trials identified from the search. Authors’ conclusions There is insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of maternity waiting facilities for improving maternal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:23076927

  13. Trends in Maternal Morbidity Before and During Pregnancy in California

    PubMed Central

    Fridman, Moshe; Korst, Lisa M.; Chow, Jessica; Lawton, Elizabeth; Mitchell, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We examined trends in maternal comorbidities in California. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of 1 551 017 California births using state-linked vital statistics and hospital discharge cohort data for 1999, 2002, and 2005. We used International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes to identify the following conditions, some of which were preexisting: maternal hypertension, diabetes, asthma, thyroid disorders, obesity, mental health conditions, substance abuse, and tobacco use. We estimated prevalence rates with hierarchical logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic shifts, and also examined racial/ethnic disparities. Results. The prevalence of these comorbidities increased over time for hospital admissions associated with childbirth, suggesting that pregnant women are getting sicker. Racial/ethnic disparities were also significant. In 2005, maternal hypertension affected more than 10% of all births to non-Hispanic Black mothers; maternal diabetes affected nearly 10% of births to Asian/Pacific Islander mothers (10% and 43% increases, respectively, since 1999). Chronic hypertension, diabetes, obesity, mental health conditions, and tobacco use among Native American women showed the largest increases. Conclusions. The prevalence of maternal comorbidities before and during pregnancy has risen substantially in California and demonstrates racial/ethnic disparity independent of demographic shifts. PMID:24354836

  14. The Impact of Cardiac Diseases during Pregnancy on Severe Maternal Morbidity and Mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Campanharo, Felipe F.; Cecatti, Jose G.; Haddad, Samira M.; Parpinelli, Mary A.; Born, Daniel; Costa, Maria L.; Mattar, Rosiane

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate maternal heart disease as a cause or complicating factor for severe morbidity in the setting of the Brazilian Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity. Methods and Findings Secondary data analysis of this multicenter cross-sectional study was implemented in 27 referral obstetric units in Brazil. From July 2009 to June 2010, a prospective surveillance was conducted among all delivery hospitalizations to identify cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM), including Potentially Life-Threatening Conditions (PLTC) and Maternal Near Miss (MNM), using the new criteria established by the WHO. The variables studied included: sociodemographic characteristics, clinical and obstetric history of the women; perinatal outcome and the occurrence of maternal outcomes (PLTC, MNM, MD) between groups of cardiac and non-cardiac patients. Only heart conditions with hemodynamic impact characterizing severity of maternal morbidity were considered. 9555 women were included in the Network with severe pregnancy-related complications: 770 maternal near miss cases and 140 maternal death cases. A total of 293 (3.6%) cases were related to heart disease and the condition was known before pregnancy in 82.6% of cases. Maternal near miss occurred in 15% of cardiac disease patients (most due to clinical-surgical causes, p<0.001) and 7.7% of non-cardiac patients (hemorrhagic and hypertensive causes, p<0.001). Maternal death occurred in 4.8% of cardiac patients and in 1.2% of non-cardiac patients, respectively. Conclusions In this study, heart disease was significantly associated with a higher occurrence of severe maternal outcomes, including maternal death and maternal near miss, among women presenting with any severe maternal morbidity. PMID:26650684

  15. Maternal Sexuality and Breastfeeding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Alison

    2005-01-01

    In this paper I consider the ways in which lactation has been discussed as a form of maternal sexuality, and the implications this carries for our understanding of breastfeeding practices and sexuality. Drawing on knowledge constructed in the western world during the last half of the twentieth century, the paper identifies a shift between the…

  16. Maternal Attitudes. Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harnischfeger, Annegret; Wiley, David E.

    This paper discusses ways in which maternal attitudes may serve as mediating variables linking social class characteristics of the family to the socialization of children. Reference is made to the Family Problem Scale (Ernhart and Loevinger) which provides a psychological characterization of social class levels on five dimensions or subscales:…

  17. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2010-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk…

  18. Rural maternity care: can we learn from Wal-Mart?

    PubMed

    van Teijlingen, E R; Pitchforth, E

    2010-03-01

    In many countries rural maternity care is under threat. Consequently rural pregnant women will have to travel further to attend larger maternity units to receive care and deliver their babies. This trend is not dissimilar from the disappearance of other rural services, such as village shops, banks, post offices and bus services. We use a comparative approach to draw an analogy with large-scale supermarkets, such as the Wal-Mart and Tesco and their effect on the viability of smaller rural shops, depersonalisation of service and the wider community. The closure of a community-maternity unit leads to women attending a different type of hospital with a different approach to maternity care. Thus small community-midwifery units are being replaced, not by a very similar unit that happens to be further away, but by a larger obstetric unit that operates on different models, philosophy and notions of risk. Comparative analysis allows a fresh perspective on the provision of rural maternity services. We argue that previous discussions focusing on medicalisation and change in maternity services can be enhanced by drawing on experience in other sectors and taking a wider societal lens. PMID:20004606

  19. Maternal mortality in Vietnam in 1994-95.

    PubMed

    Hieu, D T; Hanenberg, R; Vach, T H; Vinh, D Q; Sokal, D

    1999-12-01

    This report presents the first population-based estimates of maternal mortality in Vietnam. All the deaths of women aged 15-49 in 1994-95 in three provinces of Vietnam were identified and classified by cause. Maternal mortality was the fifth most frequent cause of death. The maternal mortality ratio was 155 deaths per 100,000 live births. This ratio compares with the World Health Organization's estimates of 430 such deaths globally and 390 for Asia. The maternal mortality ratio in the delta regions of these provinces was half that of the mountainous and semimountainous regions. Because a larger proportion of the Vietnamese population live in delta regions than elsewhere, the maternal mortality ratio for Vietnam as a whole may be lower than that of the three provinces studied. Maternal mortality is low in Vietnam primarily because a relatively high proportion of deliveries take place in clinics and hospitals, where few women die in childbirth. Also, few women die of the consequences of induced abortion in Vietnam because the procedure is legal and easily available. PMID:10674328

  20. Maternal cerebrovascular accidents in pregnancy: incidence and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Jennifer; Murphy, Cliona; Murray, Aoife; O'Laoide, Risteard; McAuliffe, Fionnuala M

    2010-01-01

    Stroke occurring during pregnancy and the postnatal period is a rare but potentially catastrophic event. The aim of this study was to examine the incidence and outcomes of pregnancies complicated by maternal stroke in a single centre. This is a prospective study of over 35,000 consecutive pregnancies over a four-year period at the National Maternity Hospital in Dublin from 2004 to 2008; in addition we also retrospectively examined all cases of maternal mortality at our institution over a 50-year period from 1959 to 2009. We prospectively identified eight cases of strokes complicating pregnancy and the postnatal period giving an overall incidence of 22.34 per 100,000 pregnancies or 24.74 per 100,000 deliveries. There were no stroke-related mortalities during that time. Retrospective analysis of maternal mortality revealed 102 maternal deaths over a 50-year period, 19 (18.6%) of which were due to cerebrovascular accidents. In conclusion, strokes complicating pregnancy and the puerperium remain a rare event and though there appears to be evidence that the incidence is increasing, the associated maternal mortality appears to be falling.

  1. Maternal mortality and morbidity. Women's reproductive health in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Alloo, F

    1994-01-01

    Sexuality is a taboo for women in a patriarchal society. Tanzania has inadequate reproductive health care. Aspects of reproductive health are dealt with in safe motherhood or maternal and child health programs. Tanzania's health policy is based on women as mothers; it does not refer to women's right. For women in Tanzania, reproductive health is the right to live. Thousands of Tanzanian women die every year due to maternal complications. In an effort to contribute to the improvement of the conditions in health institutions and the advancement of women's status in the country, the Tanzania Media Women's Association (TAMWA) and the Medical Women's Association of Tanzania (MEWATA) joined in the organization of a Reproductive Health Meeting in Dar es Salaam. At the conference, major factors causing maternal mortality and morbidity, such as complications of abortion, anaemia in pregnancy, hypertensive disorders in pregnancy and puerperal sepsis, were discussed. A World Health Organization (WHO) report indicated that maternal mortality in Tanzania was 200-400/100,000 live births, while a survey conducted by MEWATA showed that maternal deaths at the Muhimbili Medical Center in the capital were 754/100,000 live births in 1991. Many maternal deaths could be prevented if hospitals were be properly equipped. Tanzanian women's poor health results in large part from their low socioeconomic status, poor nutrition, lack of income and employment. TAMWA chairperson Fatma Alloo and Dr. Kimambo (Ministry of Health) endorsed a national women's health movement to demand a government commitment to a holistic reproductive health policy. PMID:12288398

  2. Maternal expectations: new mothers, nurses, and breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Martucci, Jessica

    2012-01-01

    By the middle of the 20th century, breastfeeding rates had fallen to less than 20% in some areas of the United States. Despite these grim statistics, many mothers continued to seek information, advice, and the experience of breastfeeding their infants. This article explores the role that nurses played in these women's struggles to breastfeed in the years between the end of World War II and the 1970s. The role of the nurse in shaping the meaning and experience of breastfeeding in America has been an important, albeit often overlooked, part of the history of infant feeding. In addition to exploring the ways in which hospital policies and structures shaped nurses' relationships with breastfeeding mothers, this article looks at how different maternal ideologies influenced the nature of these (mostly) same-sex interactions. This article argues that the ideas about, and experiences with, motherhood had important implications for how nurses and mothers approached the practice of breastfeeding in the hospital. PMID:22359999

  3. National survey of hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bruster, S.; Jarman, B.; Bosanquet, N.; Weston, D.; Erens, R.; Delbanco, T. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To survey patients' opinions of their experiences in hospital in order to produce data that can help managers and doctors to identify and solve problems. DESIGN--Random sample of 36 NHS hospitals, stratified by size of hospital (number of beds), area (north, midlands, south east, south west), and type of hospital (teaching or non-teaching, trust or directly managed). From each hospital a random sample of, on average, 143 patients was interviewed at home or the place of discharge two to four weeks after discharge by means of a structured questionnaire about their treatment in hospital. SUBJECTS--5150 randomly chosen NHS patients recently discharged from acute hospitals in England. Subjects had been patients on medical and surgical wards apart from paediatric, maternity, psychiatric, and geriatric wards. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Patients' responses to direct questions about preadmission procedures, admission, communication with staff, physical care, tests and operations, help from staff, pain management, and discharge planning. Patients' responses to general questions about their degree of satisfaction in hospitals. RESULTS--Problems were reported by patients, particularly with regard to communication with staff (56% (2824/5020) had not been given written or printed information); pain management (33% (1042/3162) of those suffering pain were in pain all or most of the time); and discharge planning (70% (3599/5124) had not been told about warning signs and 62% (3177/5119) had not been told when to resume normal activities). Hospitals failed to reach the standards of the Patient's Charter--for example, in explaining the treatment proposed and giving patients the option of not taking part in student training. Answers to questions about patient satisfaction were, however, highly positive but of little use to managers. CONCLUSIONS--This survey has highlighted several problems with treatment in NHS hospitals. Asking patients direct questions about what happened

  4. Maternal mortality in India: current status and strategies for reduction.

    PubMed

    Prakash, A; Swain, S; Seth, A

    1991-12-01

    The causes (medical, reproductive factors, health care delivery system, and socioeconomic factors) of maternal mortality in India and strategies for reducing maternal mortality are presented. Maternal mortality rates (MMR) are very high in Asia and Africa compared with Northern Europe's 4/100,000 live births. An Indian hospital study found the MMR to be 4.21/1000 live births. 50-98% of maternal deaths are caused by direct obstetric causes (hemorrhage, infection, and hypertensive disorders, ruptured uterus, hepatitis, and anemia). 50% of maternal deaths due to sepsis are related to illegal induced abortion. MMR in India has not declined significantly in the past 15 years. Age, primi and grande multiparity, unplanned pregnancy, and related illegal abortion are the reproductive causes. In 1985 WHO reported that 63-80% of maternal deaths due to direct obstetric causes and 88-98% of all maternal deaths could probably have been prevented with proper handling. In India, coordination between levels in the delivery system and fragmentation of care account for the poor quality of maternal health care. Mass illiteracy is another cause. Effective strategies for reducing the MMR are 1) to place a high priority on maternal and child health (MCH) services and integrate vertical programs (e.g., family planning) related to MCH; 2) to give attention to care during labor and delivery, which is the most critical period for complications; 3) to provide community-based delivery huts which can provide a clean and safe delivery place close to home, and maternity waiting rooms in hospitals for high risk mothers; 4) to improve the quality of MCH care at the rural community level (proper history taking, palpation, blood pressure and fetal heart screening, risk factor screening, and referral); 5) to improve quality of care at the primary health care level (emergency care and proper referral); 6) to include in the postpartum program MCH and family planning services; 7) to examine the

  5. [Social inequalities in maternal health].

    PubMed

    Azria, E; Stewart, Z; Gonthier, C; Estellat, C; Deneux-Tharaux, C

    2015-10-01

    Although medical literature on social inequalities in perinatal health is qualitatively heterogeneous, it is quantitatively important and reveals the existence of a social gradient in terms of perinatal risk. However, published data regarding maternal health, if also qualitatively heterogeneous, are relatively less numerous. Nevertheless, it appears that social inequalities also exist concerning severe maternal morbidity as well as maternal mortality. Analyses are still insufficient to understand the mechanisms involved and explain how the various dimensions of the women social condition interact with maternal health indicators. Inadequate prenatal care and suboptimal obstetric care may be intermediary factors, as they are related to both social status and maternal outcomes, in terms of maternal morbidity, its worsening or progression, and maternal mortality. PMID:26433316

  6. Are Free Maternity Services Completely Free of Costs?

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Jeevan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Government of Nepal revised free maternity health services, “Aama Surakshya Karyakram”, beginning at the start of Fiscal Year 2012/13, which specifies the services to be funded, the tariffs for reimbursement, and the system for claiming and reporting on free deliveries each month. This study was designed to investigate the amount of monetary expenditure incurred by families using apparently free maternity services. Methods Between August 2014 and December 2014, a hospital-based cross-sectional study was conducted at Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital. Nepalese women were not involved with family finances and had very little knowledge of income or expenditures. Therefore, face-to-face interviews with 384 postpartum mothers with their husbands or the head of the family household were conducted at the time of discharge by using a pre-tested semi-structural questionnaire. Results The average monthly family income was 19,272.4 NRs (189.01 US$), the median duration of hospital stay was 4 days (range, 2−19 days), and the median patient expenditure was equivalent to 13% of annual family income. The average total visible cost was 3,887.07 NRs (38.1 US$). When the average total hidden cost of 27,288.5 NRs (267.6 US$) was added, then the average total maternity care expenditure was 31,175.6 NRs (305.76 US$), with an average cost per day of 7,167.5 NRs (70.29 US$). The mean patient expenditure on food and drink, clothes, transport, and medicine was equivalent to 53.07%, 9.8%. 7.3%, and 5.6% of the mean total maternity care expenditure, respectively. The earnings lost by respondent women, husbands, and heads of household were 5,963.7 NRs (58.4 US$), 7,429.3 NRs (72.9 US$), and 6,175.9 NRs (60.6 US$), respectively. Conclusion The free maternity service in Nepal has high out-of-pocket expenditures, and did not represent a system completely free of costs. Therefore, arrangements should be made by hospitals free of cost to provide

  7. Family Planning in the Hospital Setting

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Keith P.; Meier, Gitta

    1969-01-01

    Although the availability of oral contraceptives and the development of improved intrauterine contraceptive devices have greatly increased the general utilization of family planning services, there are still great segments of our population which are not yet reached, especially in the economically deprived areas. Since over 98 percent of all obstetrical deliveries now occur in hospitals, it seems logical that it is on hospital maternity services that these deficiencies might often be best overcome. Although this is primarily a medical problem, the use of paramedical personnel can greatly augment the physician's practice in these areas. Family planning services should be an integral part of comprehensive maternity care, not alone in the physician's office but also in the hospital setting. PMID:5784113

  8. Improving adolescent maternal health.

    PubMed

    Baxter, C; Moodley, D

    2015-11-01

    Each year thousands of adolescent girls and young women in South Africa (SA) become pregnant and many die from complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. Although women of all ages are susceptible, girls<15 years of age are five times as likely, and those aged 15-19 years twice as likely, to die from complications related to childbirth than women in their 20s. In SA, non-pregnancy-related infections (e.g. HIV), obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension contributed to almost 70% of avoidable maternal deaths. In addition to the implementation of standardized preventive interventions to reduce obstetric haemorrhage and hypertension, better reproductive health services for adolescents, access to HIV care and treatment for women infected with HIV, and improved access to and uptake of long-acting reversible contraception are important ingredients for reducing maternal mortality among adolescents. PMID:26937508

  9. Maternal obesity and pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Johnson, S R; Kolberg, B H; Varner, M W; Railsback, L D

    1987-05-01

    We examined the risk of maternal obesity in 588 pregnant women weighing at least 113.6 kilograms (250 pounds) during pregnancy. Compared with a control group matched for age and parity, we found a significantly increased risk in the obese patient for gestational diabetes, hypertension, therapeutic induction, prolonged second stage of labor, oxytocin stimulation of labor, shoulder dystocia, infants weighing more than 4,000 grams and delivery after 42 weeks gestation. Certain operative complications were also more common in obese women undergoing cesarean section including estimated blood loss of more than 1,000 milliliters, operating time of more than two hours and wound infection postoperatively. These differences remained significant after controlling for appropriate confounding variables. We conclude that maternal obesity should be considered a high risk factor. PMID:3576419

  10. Maternal Hartnup disorder.

    PubMed

    Mahon, B E; Levy, H L

    1986-07-01

    We describe childbearing in two unrelated women with Hartnup disorder, an inborn error of neutral amino acid transport. Two living, unaffected offspring born after untreated and uneventful pregnancies, one from each woman, have had normal growth and development. The older one had an IQ of 92 at 4 years while the younger one at 4 months had a Development Quotient of 107 on the Mental Scale and 102 on the Motor Scale. A third offspring had a neural tube defect complicated by hydrocephalus and died at 3 months. This mother had a family history of major congenital anomalies. We think that this experience supports the view that Hartnup disorder in the mother, unlike phenylketonuria, does not have an adverse effect on the fetus. The presence of normal ratios of the amino acid concentrations between maternal and umbilical veins in one mother also suggests that placental transport of free amino acids, unlike renal transport, may not be reduced in maternal Hartnup disorder. PMID:3728570

  11. Maternal filicide theoretical framework.

    PubMed

    Mugavin, Marie

    2008-01-01

    The maternal filicide theoretical framework (MFTF) was developed to enrich the understanding of how traumatic experiences during formative years can affect a woman's relationship with her own child. Exposure to a known set of vulnerabilities can foster triggers that predispose a woman to respond impulsively and violently toward her child. Comprehensive assessment of vulnerable families is essential for the prevention of fatal and nonfatal abuse. The MFTF may be applied to both crimes. PMID:18522605

  12. Planning Nurses in Maternity Care: a Stochastic Assignment Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillipson, Frank

    2015-05-01

    With 23 percent of all births taking place at home, The Netherlands have the highest rate of home births in the world. Also if the birth did not take place at home, it is not unusual for the mother and child to be out of hospital in a few hours after the baby was born. The explanation for both is the very well organised maternity care system. However, getting the right maternity care nurse available on time introduces a complex planning issue that can be recognized as a Stochastic Assignment Problem. In this paper an expert rule based approach is combined with scenario analysis to support the planner of the maternity care agency in his work.

  13. To Assess the Effect of Maternal BMI on Obstetrical Outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhanpal, Shuchi; Aggarwal, Asha; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2012-06-01

    AIMS: To assess the effect of maternal BMI on complications in pregnancy, mode of delivery, complications of labour and delivery.METHODS:A crossectional study was carried out in the Obst and Gynae department, Kasturba Hospital, Delhi. The study enrolled 100 pregnant women. They were divided into 2 groups based on their BMI, more than or equal to 30.0 kg/m2 were categorized as obese and less than 30 kg/m2 as non obese respectively. Maternal complications in both types of patients were studied.RESULTS:CONCLUSION: As the obstetrical outcome is significantly altered due to obesity, we can improve maternal outcome by overcoming obesity. As obesity is a modifiable risk factor, preconception counseling creating awareness regarding health risk associated with obesity should be encouraged and obstetrical complications reduced.

  14. Effects of two physical education programmes on health- and skill-related physical fitness of Albanian children.

    PubMed

    Jarani, J; Grøntved, A; Muca, F; Spahi, A; Qefalia, D; Ushtelenca, K; Kasa, A; Caporossi, D; Gallotta, M C

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of two school-based physical education (PE) programmes (exercise-based and games-based) compared with traditional PE, on health- and skill-related physical fitness components in children in Tirana, Albania. Participants were 378 first-grade (6.8 years) and 389 fourth-grade (9.8 years) children attending four randomly selected schools in Tirana. Twenty-four school classes within these schools were randomly selected (stratified by school and school grade) to participate as exercise group (EG), games group (GG) and control group (CG). Both EG and GG intervention programmes were taught by professional PE teachers using station/circuit teaching framework while CG referred to traditional PE school lessons by a general teacher. All programmes ran in parallel and lasted 5 months, having the same frequency (twice weekly) and duration (45 min). Heart rate (HR) monitoring showed that intensity during PE lessons was significantly higher in the intervention groups compared with control (P < 0.001). Both PE exercise- and games programmes significantly improved several health- and skill-related fitness indicators compared with traditional PE lessons (e.g. gross motor skill summary score: 9.4 (95% CI 7.9; 10.9) for exercise vs. control and 6.5 (95% CI 5.1; 8.1) for games vs. control, cardiorespiratory fitness: 2.0 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.5; 2.4) for exercise vs. control and 1.4 ml O2 · min(-1) · kg(-1) (95% CI 1.0; 1.8) for games vs. control). Furthermore, compared to games-based PE, exercise-based PE showed more positive changes in some gross motor coordination skills outcomes, coordination skills outcomes and cardiorespiratory fitness. The results from this study show that exercise- and games-based PE represents a useful strategy for improving health- and skill-related physical fitness in Albanian elementary school children. In addition, the study shows that exercise-based PE was more effective than games-based PE in

  15. Maternal-fetal conflict.

    PubMed

    Fasouliotis, S J; Schenker, J G

    2000-03-01

    Advances in prenatal care have brought about a greater understanding as to the special status of the fetus to the point that it is considered a patient in its own regard. Pregnant women generally follow the medical recommendations of their physicians that are intended for the benefit of their baby. Any situation where maternal well-being or wishes contradict fetal benefit constitutes a maternal-fetal conflict. Such situations include a broad range of possible interventions, non-interventions, and coercive influences. In such cases, the attending physician is expected to attain an attitude that involves either the respect of the woman's autonomy and right to privacy, which precludes any approach other than to accept her decision, or to modify this absolute for the beneficence of the fetus. Current ethical viewpoints range from absolute respect for maternal autonomy with no persuasion allowed, to gentle persuasion and to others which permit intervention and overriding of the woman's autonomy. Court-ordered decisions enforcing the pregnant woman to undergo a procedure in order to improve fetal outcome have been criticized as an invasion of a woman's privacy, limitation of her autonomy, and taking away of her right to informed consent. PMID:10733034

  16. Maternal and fetal outcomes in term premature rupture of membrane

    PubMed Central

    Endale, Tigist; Fentahun, Netsanet; Gemada, Desta; Hussen, Mamusha Aman

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Premature rupture of membrane (PROM) is linked to significant maternal prenatal mortalities and morbidity. In Ethiopia, where maternal mortality is still high, the maternal and fetal outcomes in PROM is very important to decrease maternal and child mortality and for better management and prevention of complications. Thus, this study aimed to detect the maternal and fetal outcomes and associated factors in term PROM at Mizan-Aman General Hospital, south-west Ethiopia. METHODS: A retrospective cross sectional study was conducted using data available at Mizan-Aman General Hospital during a period of 3 years (January 2011 to December 2013). We examined records of 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital; out of these women, 185 were diagnosed with term PROM and all of them were included in the study. The data of these women were collected using a checklist based on registration books. The data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 statistical package. The association between independent and dependent variables was assessed by bivariate and multiple logistic regression analyses. 95%CI and P value less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Of the 4 525 women who gave birth in the hospital, 202 were complicated by term PROM. About 22.2% of the women showed unfavorable maternal outcomes. The most common cause of maternal morbidity and mortality was puerperal sepsis. About 33.5% of neonates experienced unfavorable outcomes. The duration of PROM >12 hours (AOR=5.6, 95%CI 1.3–24.1) latency >24 hours (AOR=2.8, 95%CI 1.7–11.8), residing in rural areas (AOR=4.2, 95%CI 3.96–29.4) and birth weight less than 2 500 g were associated with unfavorable outcomes. CONCLUSION: Women residing in rural areas, long latency, and neonates with birth weight less 2 500 g may have unfavorable outcomes. Therefore, optimum obstetric and medical care is essential for the reduction of the devastating complications related to disorders. PMID:27313811

  17. Placental cadmium as an additional noninvasive bioindicator of active maternal tobacco smoking.

    PubMed

    Piasek, Martina; Jurasović, Jasna; Sekovanić, Ankica; Brajenović, Nataša; Brčić Karačonji, Irena; Mikolić, Anja; Grgec, Antonija Sulimanec; Stasenko, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco smoke (TS) is a mixture of chemicals that is known to exert carcinogenic and endocrine-disrupting effects, as well as adverse effects on various systems. In TS nicotine is the major alkaloid and cadmium (Cd) the most abundant metal ion. The aim of this investigation was to assess exposure to Cd attributed to TS in healthy postpartum subjects (mean age 28 years) after term vaginal delivery in a clinical hospital by determining metal levels in maternal blood, placenta, and cord blood in relation to nicotine in maternal hair (12-cm-long samples). Two study groups were compared based upon self-reporting data: smokers (n = 32; continual cigarette smoking 3 months before and 9 months during pregnancy) and nonsmokers (n = 54; including passive smokers whose parameters did not differ from unexposed nonsmokers). In smokers compared to nonsmokers maternal hair nicotine concentrations increased approximately sevenfold, while Cd levels rose fourfold in maternal blood and up to twofold in placenta. Significant positive correlations were noted between maternal hair nicotine and placental Cd, maternal hair nicotine and maternal blood Cd, and placental Cd and maternal blood Cd. Levels of cord blood Cd were low in both study groups (<0.1 ng/ml). Data indicate that Cd in placenta may serve as a noninvasive bioindicator in addition to commonly used noninvasive hair nicotine in maternal TS assessment, especially in cases where unavailable or inappropriate (short or chemically treated) hair samples occur. PMID:27210017

  18. Meeting the community halfway to reduce maternal deaths? Evidence from a community-based maternal death review in Uttar Pradesh, India

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Sunil Saksena; Maine, Deborah; Sahoo, Pratap Kumar; Manthri, Suneedh; Chauhan, Kavita

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Uttar Pradesh (UP) is the most populous state in India with the second highest reported maternal mortality ratio in the country. In an effort to analyze the reasons for maternal deaths and implement appropriate interventions, the Government of India introduced Maternal Death Review guidelines in 2010. Methods: We assessed causes of and factors leading to maternal deaths in Unnao District, UP, through 2 methods. First, we conducted a facility gap assessment in 15 of the 16 block-level and district health facilities to collect information on the performance of the facilities in terms of treating obstetric complications. Second, teams of trained physicians conducted community-based maternal death reviews (verbal autopsies) in a sample of maternal deaths occurring between June 1, 2009, and May 31, 2010. Results: Of the 248 maternal deaths that would be expected in this district in a year, we identified 153 (62%) through community workers and conducted verbal autopsies with families of 57 of them. Verbal autopsies indicated that 23% and 30% of these maternal deaths occurred at home and on the way to a health facility, respectively. Most of the women who died had been taken to at least 2 health facilities. The facility assessment revealed that only the district hospital met the recommended criteria for either basic or comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care. Conclusions: Life-saving treatment of obstetric complications was not offered at the appropriate level of government facilities in a representative district in UP, and an inadequate referral system provided fatal delays. Expensive transportation costs to get pregnant women to a functioning medical facility also contributed to maternal death. The maternal death review, coupled with the facility gap assessment, is a useful tool to address the adequacy of emergency obstetric and neonatal care services to prevent further maternal deaths. PMID:25276519

  19. The Role of CT Angiography of Coronaries in Early Diagnosis of Coronary Artery Plaques in Albanian People with No History of Cardiovascular Disease in Correlation with Traditional Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Allajbeu, Iris; Hajro, Edjon; Temali, Indrit; Cekrezi, Bledi; Preza, Krenar

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of CT angiography of coronaries (CTAC) in the diagnosis of subclinical atherosclerosis by detection of coronary artery plaques (CAP) in a group of consecutive albanian individuals with no history of coronary artery disease (CAD) or acute coronary syndrome and to investigate the relation between the prevalence of CAP, traditional risk factors and the expected 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular event (CVE) based on our own experience. Method and Technique: This is a prospective study including 456 patients with no history of CAD who underwent CTAC in our hospital from September 2009 to March 2013. Risk estimation of fatal CVE was assessed using Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) and then CT scan was performed with a 64 detector CT, including Ca Score and angiography of coronaries with iv contrast. Results: From 456 patients 61.4% were low risk and 32.9% were at intermediate risk according to SCORE. The prevalence of CAP diagnosed by CTAC was calculated as 55.7 % overall. Though the presence and severity of CAP increased significantly with the increase of SCORE, it was found to be 44.1% in the low risk patients and 80% in the intermediate risk group, with a presence of 17% and 25% of stenotic plaques (>50%) respectively. Significant correlation was found between all traditional risk factors and CAP. Conclusion: Although a direct relation between the prevalence of CAP, risk factors and the related 10-year risk of fatal CVE was found, there was a significant prevalence of CAP in low –intermediate risk group with a considerable presence of stenotic lesions. Also 8.3% of patients with no risk factors and 18% of the patients with Ca score 0 had CAP in CT angiography, one resulting with severe stenosis. Our results suggest once more that CT angiography is a reliable, very accurate noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of early CAD, especially in the low-intermediate risk patients compared to the traditional evaluation schemes

  20. Hospital fundamentals.

    PubMed

    Althausen, Peter L; Hill, Austin D; Mead, Lisa

    2014-07-01

    Under the current system, orthopaedic trauma surgeons must work in some form of hospital setting as our primary service involves treatment of the trauma patient. We must not forget that just as a trauma center cannot exist without our services, we cannot function without their support. As a result, a clear understanding of the balance between physicians and hospitals is paramount. Historical perspective enables physicians and hospital personnel alike to understand the evolution of hospital-physician relationship. This process should be understood upon completion of this chapter. The relationship between physicians and hospitals is becoming increasingly complex and multiple forms of integration exist such as joint ventures, gain sharing, and co-management agreements. For the surgeon to negotiate well, an understanding of hospital governance and the role of the orthopaedic traumatologist is vital to success. An understanding of the value provided by the traumatologist includes all aspects of care including efficiency, availability, cost effectiveness, and research activities. To create effective and sustainable healthcare institutions, physicians and hospitals must be aligned over a sustained period of time. Unfortunately, external forces have eroded the historical basis for the working relationship between physicians and hospitals. Increased competition and reimbursement cuts, coupled with the increasing demands for quality, efficiency, and coordination and the payment changes outlined in healthcare reform, have left many organizations wondering how to best rebuild the relationship. The principal goal for the physician when partnering with a hospital or healthcare entity is to establish a sustainable model of service line management that protects or advances the physician's ability to make impactful improvements in quality of patient care, decreases in healthcare costs, and improvements in process efficiency through evidence-based practices and protocols. PMID

  1. Maternal cardiac metabolism in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Laura X; Arany, Zolt

    2014-03-15

    Pregnancy causes dramatic physiological changes in the expectant mother. The placenta, mostly foetal in origin, invades maternal uterine tissue early in pregnancy and unleashes a barrage of hormones and other factors. This foetal 'invasion' profoundly reprogrammes maternal physiology, affecting nearly every organ, including the heart and its metabolism. We briefly review here maternal systemic metabolic changes during pregnancy and cardiac metabolism in general. We then discuss changes in cardiac haemodynamic during pregnancy and review what is known about maternal cardiac metabolism during pregnancy. Lastly, we discuss cardiac diseases during pregnancy, including peripartum cardiomyopathy, and the potential contribution of aberrant cardiac metabolism to disease aetiology. PMID:24448314

  2. Prenatal Maternal Smoking and Tourette Syndrome: A Nationwide Register Study.

    PubMed

    Leivonen, Susanna; Chudal, Roshan; Joelsson, Petteri; Ekblad, Mikael; Suominen, Auli; Brown, Alan S; Gissler, Mika; Voutilainen, Arja; Sourander, Andre

    2016-02-01

    This is the first nationwide register-based study to examine the relationship between prenatal maternal smoking and Tourette syndrome. A total of 767 children diagnosed with Tourette syndrome were identified from the Finnish Hospital Discharge Register. Each case was matched to four controls. Information on maternal smoking during pregnancy was obtained from the Finnish Medical Birth Register. Conditional logistic regression models were used for statistical analyses. Prenatal maternal smoking was associated with Tourette syndrome when comorbid with ADHD (OR 4.0, 95 % CI 1.2-13.5, p = 0.027 for exposure during first trimester, OR 1.7, 95 % CI, 1.05-2.7, p = 0.031 for exposure for the whole pregnancy). There was no association between maternal smoking during pregnancy and Tourette syndrome without comorbid ADHD (OR 0.5, 95 % CI 0.2-1.3, p = 0.166, OR 0.9, 95 % CI 0.7-1.3, p = 0.567). Further research is needed to elucidate the mechanisms behind the association between prenatal maternal smoking and Tourette syndrome with comorbid ADHD. PMID:25796373

  3. A system for counting fetal and maternal red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Ge, Ji; Gong, Zheng; Chen, Jun; Liu, Jun; Nguyen, John; Yang, Zongyi; Wang, Chen; Sun, Yu

    2014-12-01

    The Kleihauer-Betke (KB) test is the standard method for quantitating fetal-maternal hemorrhage in maternal care. In hospitals, the KB test is performed by a certified technologist to count a minimum of 2000 fetal and maternal red blood cells (RBCs) on a blood smear. Manual counting suffers from inherent inconsistency and unreliability. This paper describes a system for automated counting and distinguishing fetal and maternal RBCs on clinical KB slides. A custom-adapted hardware platform is used for KB slide scanning and image capturing. Spatial-color pixel classification with spectral clustering is proposed to separate overlapping cells. Optimal clustering number and total cell number are obtained through maximizing cluster validity index. To accurately identify fetal RBCs from maternal RBCs, multiple features including cell size, roundness, gradient, and saturation difference between cell and whole slide are used in supervised learning to generate feature vectors, to tackle cell color, shape, and contrast variations across clinical KB slides. The results show that the automated system is capable of completing the counting of over 60,000 cells (versus ∼2000 by technologists) within 5 min (versus ∼15 min by technologists). The throughput is improved by approximately 90 times compared to manual reading by technologists. The counting results are highly accurate and correlate strongly with those from benchmarking flow cytometry measurement. PMID:24879644

  4. Decline in maternal mortality in Matlab, Bangladesh: a cautionary tale.

    PubMed

    Ronsmans, C; Vanneste, A M; Chakraborty, J; van Ginneken, J

    This study examines the impact of the Maternal-Child Health and Family Planning (MCH-FP) program in the Matlab, Bangladesh. Data were obtained from the Matlab surveillance system for treatment and comparison areas. This study reports the trends in maternal mortality since 1976. The MCH-FP area received extensive services in health and family planning since 1977. Services included trained traditional birth attendants and essential obstetric care from government district hospitals and a large number of private clinics. Geographic ease of access to essential obstetric care varied across the study area. Access was most difficult in the northern sector of the MCH-FP area. Contraception was made available through family welfare centers. Tetanus immunization was introduced in 1979. Door-to-door contraceptive services were provided by 80 female community health workers on a twice-monthly basis. In 1987, a community-based maternity care program was added to existing MCH-FP services in the northern treatment area. The demographic surveillance system began collecting data in 1966. During 1976-93 there were 624 maternal deaths among women aged 15-44 years in Matlab (510/100,000 live births). 72.8% of deaths were due to direct obstetric causes: postpartum hemorrhage, induced abortion, eclampsia, dystocia, and postpartum sepsis. Maternal mortality declined in a fluctuating fashion in both treatment and comparison areas. Direct obstetric mortality declined at about 3% per year. After 1987, direct obstetric mortality declined in the north by almost 50%. After the 1990 program expansion in the south, maternal mortality declined, though not significantly, in the south. Maternal mortality declined in the south comparison area during 1987-89 and stabilized. The comparison area of the north showed no decline. PMID:9428252

  5. Maternal and neonatal sepsis caused by Haemophilus influenzae type d.

    PubMed

    Warren, S; Tristram, S; Bradbury, R S

    2010-03-01

    A 29-year-old pregnant woman was admitted to hospital with signs of sepsis and threatened pre-term labour. The premature neonate also showed signs of sepsis. Haemophilus influenzae biotype III was cultured from a midstream urine sample taken from the mother, maternal placental swabs and neonatal blood cultures. The placental and neonatal isolates were both found to be serotype d by PCR, and were indistinguishable by PFGE. PMID:19926730

  6. Hospital Hints

    MedlinePlus

    ... Division of Geriatrics and Clinical Gerontology Division of Neuroscience FAQs Funding Opportunities Intramural Research Program Office of ... have to spend the night in the hospital. Learning more about what to expect and about people ...

  7. [Out-of-hospital births].

    PubMed

    Fernández Domínguez, N; Leal Gómez, E; García Lavandeira, S; Vázquez Rodríguez, M

    2016-01-01

    Childbirth is a physiological process and, as such, there should be limited assistance for the woman to ensure that it follows its natural process, avoiding any possible complication and, if they do appear, attempting to resolve them. Health personnel should try to achieve a balance between safety and the least possible outside assistance. The out-of-hospital delivery is considered an emergency as it happens unexpectedly, that is, without being previously planned. Given that it has to be treated outside the ideal conditions of a maternity ward, it is considered as an emergency. PMID:26006314

  8. Hospital philanthropy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Dean G; Clement, Jan P

    2013-01-01

    It remains an open question whether hospital spending on fundraising efforts to garner philanthropy is a good use of funds. Research and industry reports provide conflicting results. We describe the accounting and data challenges in analysis of hospital philanthropy, which include measurement of donations, measurement of fundraising expenses, and finding the relationships among organizations where these cash flows occur. With these challenges, finding conflicting results is not a surprise. PMID:23614267

  9. Maternal ethanol ingestion: effect on maternal and neonatal glucose balance

    SciTech Connect

    Witek-Janusek, L.

    1986-08-01

    Liver glycogen availability in the newborn is of major importance for the maintenance of postnatal blood glucose levels. This study examined the effect of maternal ethanol ingestion on maternal and neonatal glucose balance in the rate. Female rats were placed on 1) the Lieber-DeCarli liquid ethanol diet, 2) an isocaloric liquid pair-diet, or 3) an ad libitum rat chow diet at 3 wk before mating and throughout gestation. Blood and livers were obtained from dams and rat pups on gestational days 21 and 22. The pups were studied up to 6 h in the fasted state and up to 24 h in the fed state. Maternal ethanol ingestion significantly decreased litter size, birth weight, and growth. A significantly higher mortality during the early postnatal period was seen in the prenatal ethanol exposed pups. Ethanol significantly decreased fed maternal liver glycogen stores but not maternal plasma glucose levels. The newborn rats from ethanol ingesting dams also had significantly decreased liver glycogen stores. Despite mobilizing their available glycogen, these prenatal ethanol exposed pups became hypoglycemic by 6 h postnatal. This was more marked in the fasted pups. Ethanol did not affect maternal nor neonatal plasma insulin levels. Thus maternal ethanol ingestion reduces maternal and neonatal liver glycogen stores and leads to postnatal hypoglycemia in the newborn rat.

  10. Child Health, Maternal Marital and Socioeconomic Factors, and Maternal Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garbarski, Dana; Witt, Whitney P.

    2013-01-01

    Although maternal socioeconomic status and health predict in part children's future health and socioeconomic prospects, it is possible that the intergenerational association flows in the other direction such that child health affects maternal outcomes. Previous research demonstrates that poor child health increases the risk of adverse…

  11. Maternal Depression, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Youth Psychopathology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tompson, Martha C.; Pierre, Claudette B.; Boger, Kathryn Dingman; McKowen, James W.; Chan, Priscilla T.; Freed, Rachel D.

    2010-01-01

    Across development, maternal depression has been found to be a risk factor for youth psychopathology generally and youth depression specifically. Maternal Expressed Emotion (EE) has been examined as a predictor of outcome among youth with depression. The present study explored the associations between youth psychopathology and two…

  12. Assessment of legal adult age of 18 by measurement of open apices of the third molars: Study on the Albanian sample.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, Roberto; Santoro, Valeria; Roca, Roberta; Lozito, Piercarlo; Introna, Francesco; Cingolani, Mariano; Galić, Ivan; Ferrante, Luigi

    2014-12-01

    The third molar tooth is one of the few anatomical structures in development available for estimating the age of individuals in the late adolescence. This study tests the accuracy of Cameriere's cut-off value of the third molar index (I3M) in assessing legal adult age of 18 years in an Albanian sample. For this purpose, a sample of orthopantomograms (OPTs) of 286 living subjects (152 female and 134 male) aged between 15 and 22 years was analyzed. Intra-rater and inter-raters agreement of I3M were 0.998 and 0.998, respectively and Cohen Kappa for intra-rater and inter-rater agreement in decision on adult or minor was 1.0 and 1.0, respectively. Age distribution gradually decreases as I3M increases in both males and females. The mean age of females is higher than that of males when I3M is between 0.04 and 0.08. Sensitivity test for males was 94.1%, with a 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 85.6-98.4%, and specificity was 90.9% (95%CI 81.3-96.6%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 92.5%, with a 95%CI of (86.7%, 96.4%). For females, the sensitivity test was 75.4%, with a 95%CI of (63.1%, 85.2%) and specificity was 96.6%, with a 95%CI of (90.3%, 99.3%). The proportion of correctly classified individuals was 87.5%, with a 95%CI of (81.2%, 92.3%). The results indicate that Cameriere's cut-off value of the third molar index (I3M=0.08) is useful in discriminating between Albanian adults and juveniles, and encourage us to test its suitability for determining the adult age in individuals from other populations. PMID:25459273

  13. One century later: the folk botanical knowledge of the last remaining Albanians of the upper Reka Valley, Mount Korab, Western Macedonia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Ethnobotanical surveys of the Western Balkans are important for the cross-cultural study of local plant knowledge and also for obtaining baseline data, which is crucial for fostering future rural development and eco-tourism initiatives in the region. The current ethnobotanical field study was conducted among the last remaining Albanians inhabiting the upper Reka Valley at the base of Mount Korab in the Mavrovo National Park of the Republic of Macedonia. The aims of the study were threefold: 1) to document local knowledge pertaining to plants; 2) to compare these findings with those of an ethnographic account written one century ago and focused on the same territory; and 3) to compare these findings with those of similar field studies previously conducted in other areas of the Balkans. Methods Field research was conducted with all inhabitants of the last four inhabited villages of the upper Reka Valley (n=17). Semi-structured and open interviews were conducted regarding the perception and use of the local flora and cultivated plants. Results and conclusion The uses of ninety-two plant and fungal taxa were recorded; among the most uncommon uses, the contemporary use of young cooked potato (Solanum tuberosum) leaves and Rumex patientia as a filling for savory pies was documented. Comparison of the data with an ethnographic study conducted one century ago in the same area shows a remarkable resilience of original local plant knowledge, with the only exception of rye, which has today disappeared from the local foodscape. Medicinal plant use reports show important similarities with the ethnobotanical data collected in other Albanian areas, which are largely influenced by South-Slavic cultures. PMID:23578063

  14. Maternal nutrition, health, and survival.

    PubMed

    Christian, Parul

    2002-05-01

    The burden of maternal morbidity and mortality in developing countries is high. Each year, 600,000 women die from pregnancy-related causes and 62 million women suffer from morbidity and complications of pregnancy. The extent to which maternal nutrition can improve maternal health and survival is not well understood. Excluding deaths due to induced abortions, the other four main causes of maternal mortality (preeclampsia, hemorrhage, obstructed labor, and infection) may be amenable to nutrition interventions. The role of calcium in reducing the incidence of preeclampsia and hypertension is promising, but more research in deficient populations is urgently needed. Antenatal iron supplementation, although frequently recommended to prevent anemia during pregnancy, has had little program success. Severe anemia may be an important cause of maternal mortality, but convincing evidence is lacking on the health consequences of mild-to-moderate maternal anemia. Knowledge of the etiology of anemia is important in identifying effective strategies for combating it. Other vitamins such as folate, B12, and vitamin A may enhance the effect of iron supplementation in populations where multiple nutrition deficiencies exist. Maternal night blindness is widespread in South Asian women. In Nepal, this condition is associated with markedly increased risks of vitamin A deficiency, anemia, morbidity, and maternal and infant mortality. These findings need to be replicated elsewhere in South Asia. One study has shown vitamin A and beta carotene supplementation to reduce maternal mortality and morbidity. These findings need testing in different settings with emphasis on investigating the mechanisms of the effect. The area of prepregnancy nutrition and its influence on prolonged and obstructed labor is wide open for investigation. The scope for research in the area of maternal nutrition and health is large and the onus is on nutritionists to bring to the forefront the role of nutrition in

  15. Maternal Gatekeeping: Antecedents and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaunt, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    This study examined maternal gatekeeping, its background and psychological antecedents, and its consequences for paternal and maternal involvement in child care. In sum, 209 couples with 6- to 36-month-old children completed extensive questionnaires. Analyses revealed that various dimensions of gate-keeping were differentially associated with the…

  16. Evolution of maternal effect senescence

    PubMed Central

    Moorad, Jacob A.; Nussey, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton’s evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton’s age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species. PMID:26715745

  17. Evolution of maternal effect senescence.

    PubMed

    Moorad, Jacob A; Nussey, Daniel H

    2016-01-12

    Increased maternal age at reproduction is often associated with decreased offspring performance in numerous species of plants and animals (including humans). Current evolutionary theory considers such maternal effect senescence as part of a unified process of reproductive senescence, which is under identical age-specific selective pressures to fertility. We offer a novel theoretical perspective by combining William Hamilton's evolutionary model for aging with a quantitative genetic model of indirect genetic effects. We demonstrate that fertility and maternal effect senescence are likely to experience different patterns of age-specific selection and thus can evolve to take divergent forms. Applied to neonatal survival, we find that selection for maternal effects is the product of age-specific fertility and Hamilton's age-specific force of selection for fertility. Population genetic models show that senescence for these maternal effects can evolve in the absence of reproductive or actuarial senescence; this implies that maternal effect aging is a fundamentally distinct demographic manifestation of the evolution of aging. However, brief periods of increasingly beneficial maternal effects can evolve when fertility increases with age faster than cumulative survival declines. This is most likely to occur early in life. Our integration of theory provides a general framework with which to model, measure, and compare the evolutionary determinants of the social manifestations of aging. Extension of our maternal effects model to other ecological and social contexts could provide important insights into the drivers of the astonishing diversity of lifespans and aging patterns observed among species. PMID:26715745

  18. Midwifery workforce profile in Limpopo Province referral hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In sub-Saharan Africa including South Africa, maternal mortality rates remain unacceptably high due to a shortage of registered nurses with advanced midwifery diplomas. Objective To determine the profile of registered nurses (RNs) involved in maternity care in public referral hospitals of the Limpopo Province, South Africa. Method A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted in all maternity units of Limpopo's public referral hospitals. The study population comprised of 210 registered nurses, who became the study sample. Data on their educational profile and work experience in midwifery was analysed using STATA version 9.0. Results The mean age of the 210 registered nurses was 44.5 ± 9.1 years (range 21 to 62). The majority (152/210; 70%) were 40 years and older, 56% (117/210) had been working for more than 10 years, and 63/210 (30%) were due to retire within 10 years. Only 22% (46/210) had advanced midwifery diplomas, i.e. after their basic undergraduate training. Only six (2.9%) of the RNs providing maternity care in these referral hospitals were studying for advanced midwifery diplomas at the time of the study. Conclusion This study demonstrated a shortage of registered nurses with advanced midwifery training/diplomas in referral hospitals of the Limpopo Province. This has a potentially negative effect in reducing the high maternal mortality rate in the province. PMID:26245396

  19. Maternal filicide in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Eke, Salih Murat; Basoglu, Saba; Bakar, Bulent; Oral, Gokhan

    2015-01-01

    Filicide occurs in every socioeconomic stratum around the world. This study was conducted to evaluate motives, psychopathological aspects, and socio-demographic factors of 74 filicide cases of women in Turkey. Mean age of mothers, most of whom committed infanticide, was 26 years, and breakdown of criminal offenses are as follows: "to get rid of unwanted babies" (24.3%), "acute psychotic-type filicide" (21.6%), "fatal child abuse and neglect" (17.6%), "to get revenge" (12.2%), "protect the lonely child from the harm and badness after suicide" (10.8%), and "pity" (9.5%) motives. Results showed that maternal filicide cannot be reduced to only mental instability or environmental factors and indicates deficiencies in the capacity of the mothers' role in connecting with their child and with parenting skills. Finally, with regard to defendants' motives, similar factors that contribute to committing maternal filicide should be considered while making an assessment of the data and determining employee risk groups. PMID:25066272

  20. An oceanic core complex (OCC) in the Albanian Dinarides? Preliminary paleomagnetic and structural results from the Mirdita Ophiolite (northern Albania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maffione, M.; Morris, A.; Anderson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Oceanic core complexes (OCCs) are dome-shaped massifs commonly associated with the inside corners of the intersection of transform faults and slow (and ultra-slow) spreading centres. They represent the uplifted footwalls of large-slip oceanic detachment faults (e.g. Cann et al., 1997; Blackman et al., 1998) and are composed of mantle and lower crustal rocks exhumed during fault displacement (Smith et al., 2006, 2008). Recent paleomagnetic studies of core samples from OCCs in the Atlantic Ocean (Morris et al., 2009; MacLeod et al., in prep) have confirmed that footwall sections undergo substantial rotation around (sub-) horizontal axes. These studies, therefore, support “rolling hinge” models for the evolution of OCCs, whereby oceanic detachment faults initiate at a steep angle at depth and then “roll-over” to their present day low angle orientations during unroofing (Buck, 1988; Wernicke & Axen, 1988; Lavier et al., 1999). However, a fully integrated paleomagnetic and structural analysis of this process is hampered by the one-dimensional sampling provided by ocean drilling of OCC footwalls. Therefore, ancient analogues for OCCs in ophiolites are of great interest, as these potentially provide 3-D exposures of these important structures and hence a more complete understanding of footwall strain and kinematics (providing that emplacement-related phases of deformation can be accounted for). Recently, the relationship between outcropping crustal and upper mantle rocks led Tremblay et al. (2009) to propose that an OCC is preserved within the Mirdita ophiolite of the Albanian Dinarides (northern Albania). This is a slice of Jurassic oceanic lithosphere exposed along a N-S corridor which escaped the main late Cenozoic Alpine deformation (Robertson, 2002, 2004; Dilek et al., 2007). Though in the eastern portion of the Mirdita ophiolite a Penrose-type sequence is present, in the western portion mantle rocks are in tectonic contact with upper crustal lithologies

  1. Six years' experience of symphysiotomy in a teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Norman, R J

    1978-12-30

    One hundred and sixty-one symphysiotomies were performed at Harari Maternity Hospital, Rhodesia, over a 6-year period. Indications for the operation are discussed and fetal and maternal results reviewed. Seventy-two patients suffered from postoperative complications but the majority of these were minor and of short duration. Multiparous patients did not have a higher morbidity than did primiparous ones. It is concluded that symphysiotomy has a useful role to play in a teaching hospital, provided it is performed by an experienced surgeon on carefully selected patients. PMID:746479

  2. Fetal growth and birth size is associated with maternal anthropometry and body composition.

    PubMed

    Thame, Minerva; Osmond, Clive; Trotman, Helen

    2015-10-01

    The objective was to investigate the association of maternal weight, height and body composition with fetal growth. We recruited 425 women at the University Hospital of the West Indies, Jamaica, who had singleton pregnancies, were less than 15 weeks gestation and had no systemic illness. Maternal weight, height and skinfold thicknesses were measured at the first antenatal visit and lean mass was calculated. Sonographic measurements of the fetus were made at 15, 25 and 35 weeks gestation. Weight, crown-heel length and head circumference were measured at birth. Analyses were confined to 360 (85%) women; 65 women did not complete the study. Maternal height was positively associated with femoral length at 25 and 35 weeks gestation and with head circumference at 35 weeks (all P < 0.02). Maternal weight was positively associated with abdominal circumference and femoral length at 25 weeks, and with larger head and abdominal circumference and longer femur at 35 weeks (all P < 0.02). Maternal lean mass had similar associations to maternal weight and they were both positively associated with estimated fetal weight (all P < 0.02). All three maternal measurements were positively associated with birthweight, length and head circumference. Maternal size was associated with fetal size as early as 25 weeks gestation, with height strongly associated with femoral length, and with weight and lean mass strongly associated with abdominal circumference. PMID:23241104

  3. [Treating mother and baby in conjoint hospitalization in a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Maizel, S; Fainstein, V; Katzenelson, S K

    1998-09-01

    Since 1990 we have been admitting mothers with postpartum psychiatric morbidity together with their babies to our open psychiatric ward. The aim of conjoint hospitalization is to maintain and develop the bond between mother and baby while treating the mother's psychiatric disorder. The presence of the infant in the hospital allows both a thorough evaluation of the mothers' maternal ability and to use the infant as a facilitator of the mothers' recovery by engaging maternal functions. It prevents the infants from being placed in a foster home for the duration of the mothers' hospitalization. Readily available in Britain and Australia, such conjoint hospitalization is controversial and rarely available elsewhere. In the past 5 years we hospitalized 10 women with 11 babies (1 woman was hospitalized twice, after different births). All women had received psychiatric treatment prior to childbirth, but this was the first psychiatric hospitalization for 2 of them. Diagnoses (DSM-IIIR) were chronic paranoid schizophrenia (4), affective disorder (4), schizo-affective schizophrenia (1) and borderline personality disorder (1). 8 were suffering from active psychotic symptoms on admission. They were treated pharmacologically, received individual and group psychotherapy, and participated in all ward activities. Families were engaged in marital, family and/or individual therapy according to need. All participated in cognitive-behavior treatment tailored to individual need to build and enrich the mother-infant bond. All improved significantly and were able to function independently on discharge, but in 1 case adoption was recommended. PMID:9885632

  4. [Laennec Hospital].

    PubMed

    Dauphin, A; Mazin-Deslandes, C

    2000-01-01

    When the Laennec Hospital of Paris closed, after 366 years of activities for the patients, the articles about the circumstances of the foundation and the main stapes of the institution which became an very famous university hospital it present the available information of the history of the apothecaries, of the "gagnants-maitrise", pharmacists and the pharmacy's interns who succeeded themselves to create and dispense the medicaments necessary to the patients hospitalized or welcomed in ambulatory. It describes the evolution of the places, of the material, of forms, of the organization, of the medicaments and of the missions of what became the Pharmacy department after the recent individualization of the biological analysis in the biochemistry. PMID:11625687

  5. Lessons from history--maternal and infant mortality.

    PubMed

    1989-07-15

    Historical analysis of trends in infant and maternal mortality rates reveal different patterns and factors that influence them. Recent international and urban-rural differences in trends, associations with population density and the influence of parental social class and income has led to questioning the long accepted interpretation of the sharp decline of infant mortality in Britain (at the turn of the century) as due to such measures as pure water supplies, sewage disposal and pasteurization of milk. Several authors now believe that direct control of fertility influenced parity and birth spacing, with all other factors contributing to the decline in infant mortality. While the drop in infant mortality rates can be attributable to social and environmental influence, trends in maternal mortality differ considerably. Even though high maternal mortality has often been associated with areas of poverty, such a link has been indirect; the determining factor is the place of delivery, and the skill and care of the birth attendant. The decline in maternal mortality rates began by the mid-1930's and have been halved every 10 years since. National concerns due to high rates of maternal mortality led to different organizational solutions. The US adopted a specialist obstetrician/hospital-based delivery system; the Netherlands combined midwives with home delivery; New Zealand trained midwives but with delivery in hospitals, and Britain included specialized obstetricians with better training of midwives and general practitioners. All of these variations had no effect on mortality rates. The decline is attributed to the use of sulphonamids followed by penicillin and improvements in medical management. In a recent publication entitled "Working for Patients", mortality rates continue to remain the outcome measures to be used universally while infant mortality rates are considered crude and not amenable to health interventions. PMID:2567902

  6. Facility Death Review of Maternal and Neonatal Deaths in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Animesh; Rahman, Fazlur; Eriksson, Charli; Halim, Abdul; Dalal, Koustuv

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To explore the experiences, acceptance, and effects of conducting facility death review (FDR) of maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths at or below the district level in Bangladesh. Methods This was a qualitative study with healthcare providers involved in FDRs. Two districts were studied: Thakurgaon district (a pilot district) and Jamalpur district (randomly selected from three follow-on study districts). Data were collected between January and November 2011. Data were collected from focus group discussions, in-depth interviews, and document review. Hospital administrators, obstetrics and gynecology consultants, and pediatric consultants and nurses employed in the same departments of the respective facilities participated in the study. Content and thematic analyses were performed. Results FDR for maternal and neonatal deaths and stillbirths can be performed in upazila health complexes at sub-district and district hospital levels. Senior staff nurses took responsibility for notifying each death and conducting death reviews with the support of doctors. Doctors reviewed the FDRs to assign causes of death. Review meetings with doctors, nurses, and health managers at the upazila and district levels supported the preparation of remedial action plans based on FDR findings, and interventions were planned accordingly. There were excellent examples of improved quality of care at facilities as a result of FDR. FDR also identified gaps and challenges to overcome in the near future to improve maternal and newborn health. Discussion FDR of maternal and neonatal deaths is feasible in district and upazila health facilities. FDR not only identifies the medical causes of a maternal or neonatal death but also explores remediable gaps and challenges in the facility. FDR creates an enabled environment in the facility to explore medical causes of deaths, including the gaps and challenges that influence mortality. FDRs mobilize health managers at upazila and district

  7. Neurocysticercosis in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes.

    PubMed

    D'Cruz, Rebecca F; Ng, Sher M; Dassan, Pooja

    2016-07-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection with the larvae of Taenia solium from contaminated pork. It is a leading cause of seizures in the developing world. Symptoms may be secondary to live or degenerating cysts, or previous infection causing calcification or gliosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, radiological confirmation of intracranial lesions and immunological testing. Management involves symptom control with antiepileptics and antiparasitic agents. Few cases have been described of maternal NCC during pregnancy. We describe a 25-year-old female presenting to a London hospital with secondary generalized seizures. MRI of the brain confirmed a calcified lesion in the right parietal lobe, and she gave a corroborative history of NCC during her childhood in India. She was stabilized initially on antiepileptics, but during her pregnancy presented with breakthrough seizures and radiological evidence of NCC reactivation. She was managed symptomatically with antiepileptics and completed the pregnancy to term with no fetal complications. PMID:27471595

  8. Neurocysticercosis in pregnancy: maternal and fetal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    D'Cruz, Rebecca F.; Ng, Sher M.; Dassan, Pooja

    2016-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is a parasitic infection with the larvae of Taenia solium from contaminated pork. It is a leading cause of seizures in the developing world. Symptoms may be secondary to live or degenerating cysts, or previous infection causing calcification or gliosis. Diagnosis is based on clinical presentation, radiological confirmation of intracranial lesions and immunological testing. Management involves symptom control with antiepileptics and antiparasitic agents. Few cases have been described of maternal NCC during pregnancy. We describe a 25-year-old female presenting to a London hospital with secondary generalized seizures. MRI of the brain confirmed a calcified lesion in the right parietal lobe, and she gave a corroborative history of NCC during her childhood in India. She was stabilized initially on antiepileptics, but during her pregnancy presented with breakthrough seizures and radiological evidence of NCC reactivation. She was managed symptomatically with antiepileptics and completed the pregnancy to term with no fetal complications. PMID:27471595

  9. The Impact of Maternal Obesity on Maternal and Fetal Health

    PubMed Central

    Leddy, Meaghan A; Power, Michael L; Schulkin, Jay

    2008-01-01

    The increasing rate of maternal obesity provides a major challenge to obstetric practice. Maternal obesity can result in negative outcomes for both women and fetuses. The maternal risks during pregnancy include gestational diabetes and preeclampsia. The fetus is at risk for stillbirth and congenital anomalies. Obesity in pregnancy can also affect health later in life for both mother and child. For women, these risks include heart disease and hypertension. Children have a risk of future obesity and heart disease. Women and their offspring are at increased risk for diabetes. Obstetrician-gynecologists are well positioned to prevent and treat this epidemic. PMID:19173021

  10. Second trimester abortion as a cause of maternal death: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Avcioglu, Sümeyra Nergiz; Altinkaya, Sündüz Özlem; Küçük, Mert; Zafer, Emre; Sezer, Selda Demircan; Yüksel, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Each year, an estimated 529 000 maternal deaths occur worldwide. In literature, it is known that maternal mortality can occur during pregnancy, peripartum and also in postpartum period. Although very rare, maternal deaths may occur after spontaneous abortion. In present case, 37 year old G5P4 (Caesarean Section) women was admitted to Adnan Menderes University, Obstetrics and Gynecology clinic with diagnosis of missed abortion at 18 weeks’ gestation. She had been hospitalized in the public maternity hospital for five days due to abortus incipience and prolapse of amnion membranes but had no contractions. Fetal heart beats ceased at the second day of hospitalization. Medically induced abortion was recommended but not accepted by the patient. At the fifth day of hospitalization, she was referred to our clinic due to deterioration of general health condition, low blood pressure and tachycardia. In emergency department, it was determined that she was not oriented, had confusion, had blood pressure of 49/25 mmHg and tachycardia. In ultrasonographic examination, 18 week in utero ex fetus was determined and there was free fluid in abdominopelvic cavity. The free fluid was suspected to be amniotic fluid due to rupture of uterus. Laparotomy was performed, no uterine rupture, hematoma or atony was observed. However during laparotomy, a very bad smelling odor, might be due to septicemia, was felt in the operation room. Cardiac arrest occurred during that operation. In autopsy report, it was concluded that maternal death was because of remaining of inutero ex fetus for a long time. In conclusion, although very rare, maternal deaths after spontaneous abortion may occur. Because spontaneous abortion is a common outcome of pregnancy, continued careful, strict monitoring and immediate treatment of especially second trimester spontaneous abortion is recommended to prevent related, disappointing, unexpected maternal deaths. PMID:26958124

  11. Maternal outcomes among pregnant women receiving live attenuated influenza vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Toback, Seth L.; Beigi, Richard; Tennis, Patricia; Sifakis, Frangiscos; Calingaert, Brian; Ambrose, Christopher S.

    2011-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Toback et al. (2012) Maternal outcomes among pregnant women receiving live attenuated influenza accine. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(1), 44–51. Background  Although the live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV) prescribing information contains warnings/precautions against use during pregnancy, administration of LAIV to pregnant women does occur. Data regarding maternal outcomes after LAIV administration during pregnancy are limited. Objectives  Maternal outcomes after LAIV vaccination during pregnancy were examined. Methods  Data from a health insurance claims database that covers approximately 50 million individuals were analyzed for the six influenza seasons from 2003–2004 through 2008–2009. Emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations occurring within 42 days of vaccination were analyzed by primary diagnosis; outcomes were categorized as cardiopulmonary, obstetric, and other. Cohort characteristics were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results  Of 834 999 pregnancies identified, 138 (0·017%) were among women who received LAIV vaccinations. Of the 138 pregnant women, 13% were ≤19 years, 67% were 20–34 years, and 20% were ≥35 years of age. Eight events occurred within 42 days of vaccination: one ED visit for bronchitis, two hospitalizations for hyperemesis gravidarum and premature labor, and five ED visits/hospitalizations for common medical conditions. All outcomes identified after LAIV exposure occurred at rates similar to rates in unvaccinated pregnant women reported in the medical literature. Conclusions  Administration of LAIV to pregnant women is rare; the rate has remained constant since 2004–2005. In this cohort, there was no evidence of significant maternal adverse outcomes after receipt of LAIV. These data may offer some reassurance to providers and pregnant women in the event of inadvertent LAIV administration, but do not support the routine use of LAIV in

  12. Maternal Phenylketonuria (MPKU)

    PubMed Central

    Schoonheyt, W.E.; Hanley, W.B.; Clarke, J.T.R.; Austin, V.; Howe, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    Untreated maternal phenylketonuria (MPKU) is a major cause of microcephaly, congenital heart disease, intrauterine growth retardation and mental retardation in the offspring of mothers who have the disease. There is evidence, however, that dietary restriction of phenylalanine in the mother before conception and throughout the pregnancy will reduce the risk of these congenital anomalies in the fetus. It is important to be alert to this preventable cause of developmental retardation and congenital abnormalities in all pregnancies until the stage is reached where every woman of child-bearing age has been through the neonatal PKU-screening program. Family physicians are advised to consider prenatal or premarital screening for PKU of all female patients of child-bearing age for the next generation. PMID:21267327

  13. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female’s lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female’s lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals. PMID:25500107

  14. Academic Hospitality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, Alison; Barnett, Ronald

    2007-01-01

    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with…

  15. Hospitality Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College of the Canyons, Valencia, CA.

    A project was conducted at College of the Canyons (Valencia, California) to initiate a new 2-year hospitality program with career options in hotel or restaurant management. A mail and telephone survey of area employers in the restaurant and hotel field demonstrated a need for, interest in, and willingness to provide internships for such a program.…

  16. Albanian women in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deda, Antoneta; Alushllari, Mirela; Mico, Silvana

    2015-12-01

    In this report, presented at the 5th IUPAP International Conference on Women in Physics, we describe the status of women physicists in Albania and offer some statistical data illustrating the present situation. Undergraduate physics enrollment by girls is high and stable, more women are receiving financial support for doctoral studies, women are well represented in recent academic promotions, and recently women scientists have been appointed to several leadership positions. However, both women and men are challenged by the overall low levels of funding for research and by issues of availability and affordability of child care.

  17. Albanian Refugee Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blake, Caroline; Ademi, Xhevat

    1998-01-01

    Uses the experience of a project working with unaccompanied refugee minors from Albania to England to describe the circumstances of these immigrants. Experience suggests that those in mainstream schools have the best chance of building a life in England. Support should be provided to ensure education and social services for these students. (SLD)

  18. Oxytocin and Maternal Brain Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sohye; Strathearn, Lane

    2016-09-01

    Although dramatic postnatal changes in maternal behavior have long been noted, we are only now beginning to understand the neurobiological mechanisms that support this transition. The present paper synthesizes growing insights from both animal and human research to provide an overview of the plasticity of the mother's brain, with a particular emphasis on the oxytocin system. We examine plasticity observed within the oxytocin system and discuss how these changes mediate an array of other adaptations observed within the maternal brain. We outline factors that affect the oxytocin-mediated plasticity of the maternal brain and review evidence linking disruptions in oxytocin functions to challenges in maternal adaptation. We conclude by suggesting a strategy for intervention with mothers who may be at risk for maladjustment during this transition to motherhood, while highlighting areas where further research is needed. PMID:27589498

  19. Partnership Transitions and Maternal Parenting

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Audrey N.; Cooper, Carey E.; McLanahan, Sara; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N = 1,975) to examine the association between mothers’ partnership changes and parenting behavior during the first five years of their children’s lives. We compare coresidential with dating transitions, and recent with more distal transitions. We also examine interactions between transitions and race/ethnicity, maternal education and family structure at birth. Findings indicate that both coresidential and dating transitions were associated with higher levels of maternal stress and harsh parenting; recent transitions had stronger associations than distal transitions. Maternal education significantly moderates these associations, with less educated mothers responding more negatively to instability in terms of maternal stress, and more educated mothers responding more negatively in terms of literacy activities. PMID:21423848

  20. Maternal Competence, Expectation, and Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Douglas H.

    1977-01-01

    Presents a study of maternal competence, expectations and involvement in child rearing decisions in relation to paternal personality and marital characteristics. Subjects were 45 thirty-year-old mothers. (BD)

  1. Maternal Care Determinant of Longevity?

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Marco; Renzi, Chiara; Oliveri, Serena; Pravettoni, Gabriella

    2016-04-01

    Maternal care is an essential early environment in mammals that ensures emotional regulation and adaptive fitness of progeny. Longevity and healthy aging are associated with favorable environmental factors including fitting social and behavioral features. In the present review, we discuss the findings that link rearing conditions and early maternal care with life span and aging from an evolutionary, psychological, and molecular perspective. The quality of maternal care may influence internal adaptation through a variety of parallel mechanisms including emotional regulation, stress sensitivity, coping and other behavioral strategies in response to events requiring adaptation. From a biological perspective, it regulates physiological pathways that may persist in adulthood through epigenetic mechanisms, influencing disease susceptibility and, potentially, longevity. Abnormal maternal care induces maladaptation that persists over the life span, may accelerate the onset of aging associated diseases, and shorten life span. This may have important implications in the development of preventive approaches and early interventions. PMID:27548096

  2. Client satisfaction of maternity care in Lorestan province Iran

    PubMed Central

    Changee, Farahnaz; Irajpour, Alireza; Simbar, Masoumeh; Akbari, Soheila

    2015-01-01

    Background: Client satisfaction is an important indicator for assessment of the quality of care provided. Detecting patients dissatisfaction and trying to find the most effective and costly services is the basic way for improvement of service quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the satisfaction level of women in the maternity care centers (hospitals) of Lorestan University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, the satisfaction level of 200 patients who received care during childbirth in province hospitals was assessed using a researcher-made questionnaire. Women in maternity care units completed the questionnaires. Results: The mean maternity care satisfaction score was 66.6 ± 3.5. The lowest satisfaction level was related to getting to know the delivery room (64%) and vaginal examination (66%). The highest satisfaction score was related to confidentiality of the information (86%) and trusting the midwife (84%). Regarding the environmental factors, the lowest satisfaction was related to respecting silence in the pain room (69.5%) and the highest was related to cleanliness and hygiene of the delivery room (84%). Conclusions: Our results suggest the relative satisfaction of women receiving care in the health centers of Lorestan province; but this level of satisfaction does not mean that the delivery of care in this province is perfect. By reviewing the policies and the existing care programs regarding promoting the quality of services, managers can increase clients’ satisfaction. PMID:26120342

  3. Neurotensin inversely modulates maternal aggression.

    PubMed

    Gammie, S C; D'Anna, K L; Gerstein, H; Stevenson, S A

    2009-02-18

    Neurotensin (NT) is a versatile neuropeptide involved in analgesia, hypothermia, and schizophrenia. Although NT is released from and acts upon brain regions involved in social behaviors, it has not been linked to a social behavior. We previously selected mice for high maternal aggression (maternal defense), an important social behavior that protects offspring, and found significantly lower NT expression in the CNS of highly protective females. Our current study directly tested NT's role in maternal defense. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injections of NT significantly impaired defense in terms of time aggressive and number of attacks at all doses tested (0.05, 0.1, 1.0, and 3.0 microg). Other maternal behaviors, including pup retrieval, were unaltered following NT injections (0.05 microg) relative to vehicle, suggesting specificity of NT action on defense. Further, i.c.v. injections of the NT receptor 1 (NT1) antagonist, SR 48692 (30 microg), significantly elevated maternal aggression in terms of time aggressive and attack number. To understand where NT may regulate aggression, we examined Fos following injection of either 0.1 microg NT or vehicle. Thirteen of 26 brain regions examined exhibited significant Fos increases with NT, including regions expressing NT1 and previously implicated in maternal aggression, such as lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, paraventricular nucleus, and central amygdala. Together, our results indicate that NT inversely regulates maternal aggression and provide the first direct evidence that lowering of NT signaling can be a mechanism for maternal aggression. To our knowledge, this is the first study to directly link NT to a social behavior. PMID:19118604

  4. Using survival analysis to determine association between maternal pelvis height and antenatal fetal head descent in Ugandan mothers

    PubMed Central

    Munabi, Ian Guyton; Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Mirembe, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fetal head descent is used to demonstrate the maternal pelvis capacity to accommodate the fetal head. This is especially important in low resource settings that have high rates of childbirth related maternal deaths and morbidity. This study looked at maternal height and an additional measure, maternal pelvis height, from automotive engineering. The objective of the study was to determine the associations between maternal: height and pelvis height with the rate of fetal head descent in expectant Ugandan mothers. Methods This was a cross sectional study on 1265 singleton mothers attending antenatal clinics at five hospitals in various parts of Uganda. In addition to the routine antenatal examination, each mother had their pelvis height recorded following informed consent. Survival analysis was done using STATA 12. Results It was found that 27% of mothers had fetal head descent with an incident rate of 0.028 per week after the 25th week of pregnancy. Significant associations were observed between the rate of fetal head descent with: maternal height (Adj Haz ratio 0.93 P < 0.01) and maternal pelvis height (Adj Haz ratio 1.15 P < 0.01). Conclusion The significant associations observed between maternal: height and pelvis height with rate of fetal head descent, demonstrate a need for further study of maternal pelvis height as an additional decision support tool for screening mothers in low resource settings. PMID:26918071

  5. Maternity Leave in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Joyce Yen; Han, Wen-Jui

    2011-01-01

    Using the first nationally representative birth cohort study in Taiwan, this paper examines the role that maternity leave policy in Taiwan plays in the timing of mothers returning to work after giving birth, as well as the extent to which this timing is linked to the amount of time mothers spend with their children and their use of breast milk versus formula. We found that the time when mothers returned to work coincided with the duration of guaranteed leave. In particular, mothers with a labor pension plan resumed work significantly earlier than mothers with no pension plan, and mothers with no pension plan returned to work significantly later than those with pension plans. The short leave of absence guaranteed under existing policies translated into mothers spending less time with their children and being more likely to exclusively use formula by 6 months after birth. In contrast, mothers who resumed work later than 6 months after birth were more likely to have not worked before birth or to have quit their jobs during pregnancy. Implications and recommendations for parental leave policy in Taiwan are discussed. PMID:21603074

  6. Maternal mortality in Pakistan. A success story of the Faisalabad district.

    PubMed

    Bashir, A

    1991-04-01

    Maternal-child health care interventions in Pakistan's Faisalabad District have produced dramatic reductions in maternal mortality and are potentially replicable in other developing country settings. In the late-1970s, health personnel became concerned with the high rates of maternal mortality, infant mortality, malnutrition, fertility, and illegal abortion in the district. Since 80% of deliveries in Pakistan are carried out by traditional birth attendants (TBAs), the author initiated a program of refresher courses for TBAs in the district. In the 10 years since 1978, 5500 urban and rural TBas have participated in these annual seminars and been provided with information on detection of high-risk pregnancies for referral, sepsis prevention, prenatal care, neonatal resuscitative measures, and family planning. During this same 10-year period, maternal mortality dropped from 10.1 to 1.86/1000, largely as a result of referral of complicated cases to the District Headquarters Hospital. Another innovation was the Faisalabad FLying Squad service, an emergency ambulance equipped with medicines and trained staff that can rapidly transport women who develop complications during delivery to the hospital. In the 1 year since program inception in January 1989, there have been 73 calls for the emergency service. In 1990, designated The Year of the Mother and Child, lectures on family planning, maternal-child health, and the availability of the obstetric Flying Squad were given throughout the district. The main causes of the 48 maternal deaths in the district in 1989 (maternal mortality rate of 0.86/1000) were insistence on home delivery and reluctance to go to the hospital. PMID:12343200

  7. What Is and What Should Be: Maternal Perceptions of Their Roles in the NICU.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruns, Deborah A.; McCollum, Jeanette A.; Cohen-Addad, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    This study examined the development of maternal roles in seven mothers of medically fragile, premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) of an urban, teaching hospital using data sources such as interviews, observations, and document review. Mothers gradually assumed caregiving roles of worrier, novice, learner and expert and…

  8. Associations of Psychosocial Factors with Maternal Confidence among Japanese and Vietnamese Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goto, Aya; Nguyen, Quang Vinh; Nguyen, Thi Tu Van; Pham, Nghiem Minh; Chung, Thi Mong Thuy; Trinh, Huu Phuc; Yabe, Junko; Sasaki, Hitomi; Yasumura, Seiji

    2010-01-01

    We conducted this cross-sectional study among 392 Japanese and 294 Vietnamese mothers who attended routine child health visits in a Japanese city and at a tertiary hospital in Vietnam, in order to investigate the prevalence and associated sociodemographic, parenting, and psychological characteristics of low maternal confidence in child rearing…

  9. Reducing high maternal mortality rates in western China: a novel approach.

    PubMed

    Gyaltsen Gongque Jianzan, Kunchok; Gyal Li Xianjia, Lhusham; Gipson, Jessica D; Kyi Cai Rangji, Tsering; Pebley, Anne R

    2014-11-01

    Among the Millennium Development Goals, maternal mortality reduction has proven especially difficult to achieve. Unlike many countries, China is on track to meeting these goals on a national level, through a programme of institutionalizing deliveries. Nonetheless, in rural, disadvantaged, and ethnically diverse areas of western China, maternal mortality rates remain high. To reduce maternal mortality in western China, we developed and implemented a three-level approach as part of a collaboration between a regional university, a non-profit organization, and local health authorities. Through formative research, we identified seven barriers to hospital delivery in a rural Tibetan county of Qinghai Province: (1) difficulty in travel to hospitals; (2) hospitals lack accommodation for accompanying families; (3) the cost of hospital delivery; (4) language and cultural barriers; (5) little confidence in western medicine; (6) discrepancy in views of childbirth; and (7) few trained community birth attendants. We implemented a three-level intervention: (a) an innovative Tibetan birth centre, (b) a community midwife programme, and (c) peer education of women. The programme appears to be reaching a broad cross-section of rural women. Multilevel, locally-tailored approaches may be essential to reduce maternal mortality in rural areas of western China and other countries with substantial regional, socioeconomic, and ethnic diversity. PMID:25555773

  10. Impact of specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments on pregnant women's choice of maternity institutions.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Yoshimi; Iso, Hiroyasu; Shen, Junyi; Ban, Kanami; Fukui, On; Hashimoto, Hiroyuki; Nakashima, Takako; Morishige, Kenichiro; Saijo, Tatuyoshi

    2013-01-01

    In April 2008, specialization in gynecology and obstetrics departments was introduced in the Sennan area of Osaka prefecture in Japan that aimed at solving the problems of regional provisions of obstetrics services (e.g., shortage of obstetricians, overworking of obstetricians, and provision of specialist maternity services for high-risk pregnancies). Under this specialization, the gynecology and obstetrics departments in two city hospitals were combined and reconstructed into two centers, i.e., the gynecological care center in Kaizuka City Hospital and the prenatal care center in Izumisano City Hospital. This paper investigates to what extent and how this specialization affected pregnant women's choices of the prenatal care center and other maternity institutions. We used birth certificate data of 15,927 newborns from the Sennan area between April 1, 2007 and March 30, 2010, for Before and After Analysis to examine changes in pregnant women's choices of maternity institutions before and after the specialization was instituted. Our results indicated that this specialization scheme was, to some extent, successful on the basis of providing maternity services for high-risk pregnancies at the prenatal care center (i.e., Izumisano City Hospital) and having created a positive effect by pregnant women to other facilities in the nearby area. PMID:24364885

  11. Improved Maternal and Child Health Care Access in a Rural Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carcillo, Joseph A.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an underserved rural community in which health care initiatives increased access to comprehensive care. Over a 3-year period, increased accessibility to maternal and child health care also increased use of preventive services, thus decreasing emergency room visits and hospitalizations as well as low birth weight, risk of congenital…

  12. Tender Beginnings program: an educational continuum for the maternity patient.

    PubMed

    Brown, Susan E H

    2006-01-01

    The Tender Beginnings program demonstrates a comprehensive educational plan for maternity patients that can be extended throughout pregnancy, the birth process, and into the postpartum period. In today's healthcare environment, where the maternity patient continues to experience a shortened stay structure, the hurried learning process that is absorbed over a 48-hour stay is often ineffectual. This program provides a strategy and framework for effective teaching that can be successfully implemented all through the peripartum period. Budgetary constraints have given way to an innovative approach and opportunity for the healthcare specialist to explore an entrepreneurial relationship within the structure of the program. The Tender Beginnings program has proven to be a true integration of community educational outreach, nurse entrepreneurship, hospital-based education, and postpartum/neonatal follow-up. PMID:16915052

  13. The importance of cardiovascular pathology contributing to maternal death: Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths in South Africa, 2011–2013

    PubMed Central

    Soma-Pillay, Priya; Seabe, Joseph; Soma-Pillay, Priya; Seabe, Joseph; Sliwa, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Summary Aims Cardiac disease is emerging as an important contributor to maternal deaths in both lower-to-middle and higher-income countries. There has been a steady increase in the overall institutional maternal mortality rate in South Africa over the last decade. The objectives of this study were to determine the cardiovascular causes and contributing factors of maternal death in South Africa, and identify avoidable factors, and thus improve the quality of care provided. Methods Data collected via the South African National Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths (NCCEMD) for the period 2011–2013 for cardiovascular disease (CVD) reported as the primary pathology was analysed. Only data for maternal deaths within 42 days post-delivery were recorded, as per statutory requirement. One hundred and sixty-nine cases were reported for this period, with 118 complete hospital case files available for assessment and data analysis. Results Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) (34%) and complications of rheumatic heart disease (RHD) (25.3%) were the most important causes of maternal death. Hypertensive disorders of pregnancy, HIV disease infection and anaemia were important contributing factors identified in women who died of peripartum cardiomyopathy. Mitral stenosis was the most important contributor to death in RHD cases. Of children born alive, 71.8% were born preterm and 64.5% had low birth weight. Seventy-eight per cent of patients received antenatal care, however only 33.7% had a specialist as an antenatal care provider. Avoidable factors contributing to death included delay in patients seeking help (41.5%), lack of expertise of medical staff managing the case (29.7%), delay in referral to the appropriate level of care (26.3%), and delay in appropriate action (36.4%). Conclusion The pattern of CVD contributing to maternal death in South Africa was dominated by PPCM and complications of RHD, which could, to a large extent, have been avoided. It is likely that there were

  14. Maternal scaffolding behavior: links with parenting style and maternal education.

    PubMed

    Carr, Amanda; Pike, Alison

    2012-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to specify the relationship between positive and harsh parenting and maternal scaffolding behavior. A 2nd aim was to disentangle the effects of maternal education and parenting quality, and a 3rd aim was to test whether parenting quality mediated the association between maternal education and scaffolding practices. We examined associations between positive and harsh parenting practices and contingent and noncontingent tutoring strategies. Ninety-six mother-child dyads (49 boys, 47 girls) from working- and middle-class English families participated. Mothers reported on parenting quality at Time 1 when children were 5 years old and again approximately 5 years later at Time 2. Mother-child pairs were observed working together on a block design task at Time 2, and interactions were coded for contingent (contingent shifting) and noncontingent (fixed failure feedback) dimensions of maternal scaffolding behavior. Positive and harsh parenting accounted for variance in contingent behavior over and above maternal education, whereas only harsh parenting accounted for unique variance in noncontingent scaffolding practices. Our findings provide new evidence for a more differentiated model of the relation between general parenting quality and specific scaffolding behaviors. PMID:22004338

  15. Planned Out-of-Hospital Birth and Birth Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Snowden, Jonathan M.; Tilden, Ellen L.; Snyder, Janice; Quigley, Brian; Caughey, Aaron B.; Cheng, Yvonne W.

    2016-01-01

    Background The frequency of planned out-of-hospital birth in the United States has increased in recent years. The value of studies assessing the perinatal risks of planned out-of-hospital birth versus hospital birth has been limited by cases in which transfer to a hospital is required and a birth that was initially planned as an out-of-hospital birth is misclassified as a hospital birth. Methods We performed a population-based, retrospective cohort study of all births that occurred in Oregon during 2012 and 2013 using data from newly revised Oregon birth certificates that allowed for the disaggregation of hospital births into the categories of planned in-hospital births and planned out-of-hospital births that took place in the hospital after a woman’s intrapartum transfer to the hospital. We assessed perinatal morbidity and mortality, maternal morbidity, and obstetrical procedures according to the planned birth setting (out of hospital vs. hospital). Results Planned out-of-hospital birth was associated with a higher rate of perinatal death than was planned in-hospital birth (3.9 vs. 1.8 deaths per 1000 deliveries, P = 0.003; odds ratio after adjustment for maternal characteristics and medical conditions, 2.43; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37 to 4.30; adjusted risk difference, 1.52 deaths per 1000 births; 95% CI, 0.51 to 2.54). The odds for neonatal seizure were higher and the odds for admission to a neonatal intensive care unit lower with planned out-of-hospital births than with planned in-hospital birth. Planned out-of-hospital birth was also strongly associated with unassisted vaginal delivery (93.8%, vs. 71.9% with planned in-hospital births; P<0.001) and with decreased odds for obstetrical procedures. Conclusions Perinatal mortality was higher with planned out-of-hospital birth than with planned in-hospital birth, but the absolute risk of death was low in both settings. (Funded by the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human

  16. Maternal nutrition and perinatal survival.

    PubMed

    Rush, D

    2001-09-01

    This review addresses the relationship between maternal nutrition and the survival of the foetus and infant. This survey was undertaken because wide-scale programmes on maternal feeding are in process, based, not on a critical synthesis of currently-available empirical research, but on a series of nested and, at times, weakly supported, assumptions. It is concluded that: (i) maternal weight and weight gain are remarkably resistant to either dietary advice or supplementation; (ii) nutritionally-induced increased birth-weight does not universally increase the chance of survival of the offspring, since pre-pregnancy weight, at least in affluent, industrialized societies-while associated with increased birth-weight-is also associated with higher perinatal mortality; (iii) while dietary supplements during pregnancy do have a modest effect on birth-weight, in contrast to a large effect in famine or near-famine conditions, this is not mediated by maternal energy deposition; and (iv) declining peripheral fat stores in late pregnancy are associated with accelerated foetal growth, and improved nutrition can lead to lower fat stores. Rather, the component of maternal weight gain associated with accelerated foetal growth is water, and, presumably, plasma volume. In the few studies, large and thorough enough to adequately address the issues, maternal feeding--both in famine and non-famine conditions--has led to lower perinatal, primarily foetal, mortality; the mechanisms are not likely to have been due only to the acceleration of foetal growth. It is concluded that there is currently an inadequate base of secure knowledge to foster improvement in the health and nutrition of poor mothers and children. The public and policy-makers alike must be informed that greater knowledge relating maternal nutrition to perinatal outcome is urgently needed to create sound health advice and to mount effective programmes. PMID:11761778

  17. Intimate Partner Violence During Pregnancy: Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered “risky,” including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient–provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  18. Intimate partner violence during pregnancy: maternal and neonatal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Alhusen, Jeanne L; Ray, Ellen; Sharps, Phyllis; Bullock, Linda

    2015-01-01

    The effects of intimate partner violence (IPV) on maternal and neonatal outcomes are multifaceted and largely preventable. During pregnancy, there are many opportunities within the current health care system for screening and early intervention during routine prenatal care or during episodic care in a hospital setting. This article describes the effects of IPV on maternal health (e.g., insufficient or inconsistent prenatal care, poor nutrition, inadequate weight gain, substance use, increased prevalence of depression), as well as adverse neonatal outcomes (e.g., low birth weight [LBW]), preterm birth [PTB], and small for gestational age [SGA]) and maternal and neonatal death. Discussion of the mechanisms of action are explored and include: maternal engagement in health behaviors that are considered "risky," including smoking and alcohol and substance use, and new evidence regarding the alteration of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and resulting changes in hormones that may affect LBW and SGA infants and PTB. Clinical recommendations include a commitment for routine screening of IPV in all pregnant women who present for care using validated screening instruments. In addition, the provision of readily accessible prenatal care and the development of a trusting patient-provider relationship are first steps in addressing the problem of IPV in pregnancy. Early trials of targeted interventions such as a nurse-led home visitation program and the Domestic Violence Enhanced Home Visitation Program show promising results. Brief psychobehavioral interventions are also being explored. The approach of universal screening, patient engagement in prenatal care, and targeted individualized interventions has the ability to reduce the adverse effects of IPV and highlight the importance of this complex social disorder as a top priority in maternal and neonatal health. PMID:25265285

  19. Maternal health phone line: saving women in papua new Guinea.

    PubMed

    Watson, Amanda H A; Sabumei, Gaius; Mola, Glen; Iedema, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the "ICTs for healthcare development" model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The "three stages of delay" typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The "three stages of delay" typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges. PMID:25923199

  20. Maternal Health Phone Line: Saving Women in Papua New Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Amanda H.A.; Sabumei, Gaius; Mola, Glen; Iedema, Rick

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the findings of a research project which has involved the establishment of a maternal health phone line in Milne Bay Province of Papua New Guinea (PNG). Mobile phones and landline phones are key information and communication technologies (ICTs). This research study uses the “ICTs for healthcare development” model to ascertain benefits and barriers to the successful implementation of the Childbirth Emergency Phone. PNG has a very high maternal mortality rate. The “three stages of delay” typology was developed by Thaddeus and Maine to determine factors that might delay provision of appropriate medical treatment and hence increase risk of maternal death. The “three stages of delay” typology has been utilised in various developing countries and also in the present study. Research undertaken has involved semi-structured interviews with health workers, both in rural settings and in the labour ward in Alotau. Additional data has been gathered through focus groups with health workers, analysis of notes made during phone calls, interviews with women and community leaders, observations and field visits. One hundred percent of interviewees (n = 42) said the project helped to solve communication barriers between rural health workers and Alotau Provincial Hospital. Specific examples in which the phone line has helped to create positive health outcomes will be outlined in the paper, drawn from research interviews. The Childbirth Emergency Phone project has shown itself to play a critical role in enabling healthcare workers to address life-threatening childbirth complications. The project shows potential for rollout across PNG; potentially reducing maternal morbidity and maternal mortality rates by overcoming communication challenges. PMID:25923199

  1. Maternal vitamin D status during pregnancy and child outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Gale, Catharine R; Robinson, Sian M; Harvey, Nicholas C; Javaid, M Kassim; Jiang, Benyu; Martyn, Christopher N; Godfrey, Keith M; Cooper, Cyrus

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether exposure to high maternal concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy poses any risk to the child. Design: Prospective study. Setting: Princess Anne Maternity Hospital, Southampton, UK. Subjects: 596 pregnant women were recruited. 466 (78%) children were examined at birth, 440 (74%) at age 9 months and 178 (30%) at age 9 years. Methods: Maternal (OH)-vitamin D concentrations were measured in late pregnancy. Anthropometry of the child was recorded at birth, 9 months and 9 years. At 9 months, atopic eczema was assessed. At 9 years, children had an echocardiogram and a DXA scan, blood pressure, arterial compliance and carotid intima-media thickness were measured and intelligence and psychological function assessed. Results: There were no associations between maternal 25(OH)-vitamin D concentrations and the child's body size or measures of the child's intelligence, psychological health or cardiovascular system. Children whose mothers' concentration of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy was >75 nmol/l had an increased risk of eczema on examination at 9 months (OR 3.26, 95% CI 1.15-9.29, p=0.025) and asthma at age 9 years (OR 5.40, 95% CI, 1.09-26.65, p=0.038) compared to children whose mothers' concentration was <30 nmol/l. Conclusion: Exposure to maternal concentrations of 25(OH)-vitamin D in pregnancy in excess of 75 nmol/l does not appear to influence the child's intelligence, psychological health or cardiovascular system; there could be an increased risk of atopic disorders, but this needs confirmation in other studies. PMID:17311057

  2. Appropriate criteria for identification of near-miss maternal morbidity in tertiary care facilities: A cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Souza, JP; Cecatti, JG; Parpinelli, MA; Serruya, SJ; Amaral, E

    2007-01-01

    Background The study of severe maternal morbidity survivors (near miss) may be an alternative or a complement to the study of maternal death events as a health care indicator. However, there is still controversy regarding the criteria for identification of near-miss maternal morbidity. This study aimed to characterize the near miss maternal morbidity according to different sets of criteria. Methods A descriptive study in a tertiary center including 2,929 women who delivered there between July 2003 and June 2004. Possible cases of near miss were daily screened by checking different sets of criteria proposed elsewhere. The main outcome measures were: rate of near miss and its primary determinant factors, criteria for its identification, total hospital stay, ICU stay, and number and kind of special procedures performed. Results There were two maternal deaths and 124 cases of near miss were identified, with 102 of them admitted to the ICU (80.9%). Among the 126 special procedures performed, the most frequent were central venous access, echocardiography and invasive mechanical ventilation. The mean hospital stay was 10.3 (± 13.24) days. Hospital stay and the number of special procedures performed were significantly higher when the organ dysfunction based criteria were applied. Conclusion The adoption of a two level screening strategy may lead to the development of a consistent severe maternal morbidity surveillance system but further research is needed before worldwide near miss criteria can be assumed. PMID:17848189

  3. Maternal death audit in Rwanda 2009–2013: a nationwide facility-based retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sayinzoga, Felix; Bijlmakers, Leon; van Dillen, Jeroen; Mivumbi, Victor; Ngabo, Fidèle; van der Velden, Koos

    2016-01-01

    Objective Presenting the results of 5 years of implementing health facility-based maternal death audits in Rwanda, showing maternal death classification, identification of substandard (care) factors that have contributed to death, and conclusive recommendations for quality improvements in maternal and obstetric care. Design Nationwide facility-based retrospective cohort study. Settings All cases of maternal death audited by district hospital-based audit teams between January 2009 and December 2013 were reviewed. Maternal deaths that were not subjected to a local audit are not part of the cohort. Population 987 audited cases of maternal death. Main outcome measures Characteristics of deceased women, timing of onset of complications, place of death, parity, gravida, antenatal clinic attendance, reported cause of death, service factors and individual factors identified by committees as having contributed to death, and recommendations made by audit teams. Results 987 cases were audited, representing 93.1% of all maternal deaths reported through the national health management information system over the 5-year period. Almost 3 quarters of the deaths (71.6%) occurred at district hospitals. In 44.9% of these cases, death occurred in the post-partum period. Seventy per cent were due to direct causes, with post-partum haemorrhage as the leading cause (22.7%), followed by obstructed labour (12.3%). Indirect causes accounted for 25.7% of maternal deaths, with malaria as the leading cause (7.5%). Health system failures were identified as the main responsible factor for the majority of cases (61.0%); in 30.3% of the cases, the main factor was patient or community related. Conclusions The facility-based maternal death audit approach has helped hospital teams to identify direct and indirect causes of death, and their contributing factors, and to make recommendations for actions that would reduce the risk of reoccurrence. Rwanda can complement maternal death audits with other

  4. Aetiology of maternal mortality using verbal autopsy at Sokoto, North-Western Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Umar, Sadiq

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Maternal mortality in developing countries is higher than that in developed countries. There are few published articles on the factors associated with maternal deaths in northern Nigeria. Objectives The objective of this study was to identify the medical causes and factors associated with maternal mortality in Sokoto, northern Nigeria. Method A verbal autopsy questionnaire was used to interview close relatives of women within the reproductive age group who had died of pregnancy-related complications in the Sokoto metropolis during the preceding two years. A multistage sampling method using simple random sampling at each step was used to select areas of study within the Sokoto metropolis. Data analysis was carried out using a statistical package for social sciences (SPSS), version 19, and the Spearman correlation was used to test association. Significance level was set at 0.05. Results The major causes of death were haemorrhage (48.3%), eclampsia (19%) and prolonged labour (13.8%). The association between maternal mortality and the absence of antenatal booking was significant (p < 0.001); the association between maternal mortality and the ‘three delays’ was also significant (p = 0.013). The association between maternal mortality and educational status and occupation was, however, not significant (p = 0.687 and p = 0.427 respectively). Conclusion The medical causes of maternal mortality identified in this study were similar to those of the hospital-based studies in the area. In addition, an association between maternal deaths and the ‘three delays’ and the absence of antenatal booking was found. There is a need for public education efforts to address these factors in order to reduce maternal mortality in the study area.

  5. The impact of critical total quality management practices on hospital performance in the ministry of health hospitals in saudi arabia.

    PubMed

    Alaraki, Mohammad Shamsuddin

    2014-01-01

    Total Quality Management (TQM) offers a method for solving quality and patient safety problems and bringing significant improvement to hospital performance. However, only few studies have been conducted in this area in developing countries, particularly in Saudi Arabia. This research is carried out in an attempt to address this gap, exploring the impact of applying TQM practices on hospital performance in the Saudi Ministry of Health hospitals. The study has included 4 hospitals in Tabuk Region, namely, King Khaled Hospital, King Fahad Hospital, Maternity and Children Hospital, and Hagel General Hospital. The data collection was done by the researcher when 400 questionnaires were distributed using a convenient sampling technique to access the required data. The response rate was 67.25% of the total questionnaires distributed. The TQM practices used in the study were as follows: leadership, employee management, information analysis, training, customer focus, continuous improvement, process management, and supplier management. The findings of the research show a significant positive correlation between the 8 practices of TQM and hospital performance with a correlation coefficient r value of 0.9 (P = .0001). The study also reveals that Saudi hospitals are facing difficulties in engaging the clinical staff in their quality initiative. Moreover, our findings show that accredited hospitals have significantly applied TQM practices more than unaccredited hospitals. PMID:24368721

  6. Maternal Child Abuse and its Association with Maternal Anxiety in the Socio-Cultural Context of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Douki, Zahra Esmaeili; Esmaeili, Mohammad Reza; Vaezzadeh, Nazanin; Mohammadpour, Reza Ali; Azimi, Hamideh; Sabbaghi, Robabeh; Esmaeil, Mousa; Shahhosseini, Zohreh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The prevalence of parental violence has been an area of major public concern. There are few available data detailing the ways parents and other caregivers discipline children, particularly in low and middle income countries. This study focuses on the prevalence of different types of maternal child abuse and its association with maternal anxiety in the socio-cultural context of Iran. Methods Participants in this cross-sectional study consisted of 562 mothers with the last child aged from 1 month to 12 years old who attended the Amirkola Children’s Referral Hospital in Mazandaran Province, Iran, seeking healthcare services for their children. Demographic characteristics of the mothers, their children and reactions to conflicts with children were evaluated by a validated version of Conflict Tactics Scale for Parent and Child. Also, the relationship between maternal anxiety and child abuse was assessed using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. The association between variables was examined by Pearson correlation coefficient, independent t-test, one-way ANOVA, and multivariate regression. Results The prevalence of mother-to-child corporal punishment, severe physical abuse and very severe physical abuse were 436 (78%), 260 (46%) and 180 (32%), respectively. Verbal emotional abuse was reported by 506 (90%) participants and nonverbal emotional abuse was reported in 374 (67%) cases. A correlation was observed between child abuse and mothers’ age (p=0.02), as well as with the number of children in the family (p=0.03), and the mothers’ trait anxiety (p<0.001). Conclusion Overall, the assessment of maternal child abuse should be an important focus for evaluation in mothers with anxiety and vice versa, when child abuse is suspected, maternal psychological assessment should be essential. PMID:24223243

  7. Maternal Employment and Adolescent Development

    PubMed Central

    Ruhm, Christopher J.

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates how maternal employment is related to the cognitive development and body weight of 10 and 11 year olds, controlling for a wide variety of child, mother and family characteristics. The results suggest that limited market work benefits youths who are relatively “disadvantaged” and even long hours, which occur infrequently, are unlikely to leave them much worse off. By contrast, maternal labor supply is estimated to have more uniformly harmful consequences for “advantaged” adolescents. The negative cognitive effects for these youths probably partly occur because maternal labor supply reduces the time spent in enriching home environments. Some of the growth in obesity may be related to determinants of excess weight common to the child and mother. PMID:19830269

  8. Improving maternal care reduces mortality.

    PubMed

    1987-01-01

    Reduction of maternal mortality in developing countries by community-based action is complex but possible. Deaths related to pregnancy are primarily due to bleeding, infection, toxemia and illegal abortion. The excess maternal deaths in developing countries are also related to high numbers of high-risk pregnancies, total lack of prenatal and obstetric care in some areas, poor nutrition and overwork. The basic interventions available to communities include prenatal care, improved alarm and transport systems, referral centers and improved community-based care. Prenatal care can include nutritional supplements and exams and referrals by traditional birth attendants, targeting women suffering from toxemia, bleeding and infections. Local ambulances with life-support equipment, and maternity waiting houses are examples of ways of dealing with transport problems. Referral centers should be capable of providing sterile conditions and blood transfusions. Nurses can be trained to do caesarean sections. Birth attendants can use checklists to administer antibiotics and oxytocic drugs, for example. PMID:12281272

  9. Cost estimate of hospital stays for premature newborns in a public tertiary hospital in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Desgualdo, Claudia Maria; Riera, Rachel; Zucchi, Paola

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the direct costs of hospital stays for premature newborns in the Interlagos Hospital and Maternity Center in São Paulo, Brazil and to assess the difference between the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System and the real cost of care for each premature newborn. METHODS: A cost-estimate study in which hospital and professional costs were estimated for premature infants born at 22 to 36 weeks gestation during the calendar year of 2004 and surviving beyond one hour of age. Direct costs included hospital services, professional care, diagnoses and therapy, orthotics, prosthetics, special materials, and blood products. Costs were estimated using tables published by the Unified Health System and the Brasíndice as well as the list of medical procedures provided by the Brazilian Classification of Medical Procedures. RESULTS: The average direct cost of care for initial hospitalization of a premature newborn in 2004 was $2,386 USD. Total hospital expenses and professional services for all premature infants in this hospital were $227,000 and $69,500 USD, respectively. The costs for diagnostic testing and blood products for all premature infants totaled $22,440 and $1,833 USD. The daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing less than 1,000 g was $115 USD, and the daily average cost of a premature newborn weighing more than 2,500 g was $89 USD. Amounts reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System corresponded to only 27.42% of the real cost of care. CONCLUSIONS: The cost of hospital stays for premature newborns was much greater than the amount reimbursed to the hospital by the Unified Health System. The highest costs corresponded to newborns with lower birth weight. Hospital costs progressively and discretely decreased as the newborns' weight increased. PMID:22012050

  10. Relationships between Maternal Adult Attachment Security, Child Perceptions of Maternal Support, and Maternal Perceptions of Child Responses to Sexual Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leifer, Myra; Kilbane, Teresa; Skolnick, Linda I.

    2002-01-01

    Study assessed the relationships between maternal adult attachment style, children's perceptions of maternal support following disclosure of sexual abuse, and maternal perceptions of children's behavioral and emotional responses to sexual abuse. Findings indicate that fostering parent-child attachment is important in order to decrease the risk for…

  11. Maternity telehealth: ringing the changes.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Dorothy; Brown, Sheona

    2013-12-01

    This article describes NHS Scotland's Maternity telehealth options project and the implementation of the recommendations made. This 17-month project resulted in the development of national documentation for recording telehealth calls; the development of a self-directed eLearning tool on maternity telehealth call structure which was made available to all health boards in Scotland; a comprehensive programme of training on telehealth for student midwives; a programme of 'Train-the-trainer' events for qualified midwives to enable the cascade of learning throughout the service. The project also involved collaboration with Health Scotland, signposting for women to contact the appropriate caregiver at the appropriate time. PMID:24386706

  12. Alternative medicine in maternity care.

    PubMed

    Petrie, K A; Peck, M R

    2000-03-01

    Primary care physicians are confronted daily with questions from their patients about alternative medicine. When maternity care patients seek information about such therapies, careful attention must be paid to issues of safety and efficacy for both the mother and her unborn child. This article clarifies the role of alternative medicine in maternity care by looking at the definitions and history of common alternative therapies, documenting the evidence for alternative therapies in prenatal, intrapartum, and postpartum care, and suggesting ways to incorporate alternative medicine into primary care practice. PMID:10739460

  13. Hidden Costs of Hospital Based Delivery from Two Tertiary Hospitals in Western Nepal

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Jeevan; Kaehler, Nils; Marahatta, Sujan Babu; Mishra, Shiva Raj; Subedi, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Hospital based delivery has been an expensive experience for poor households because of hidden costs which are usually unaccounted in hospital costs. The main aim of this study was to estimate the hidden costs of hospital based delivery and determine the factors associated with the hidden costs. Methods A hospital based cross-sectional study was conducted among 384 post-partum mothers with their husbands/house heads during the discharge time in Manipal Teaching Hospital and Western Regional Hospital, Pokhara, Nepal. A face to face interview with each respondent was conducted using a structured questionnaire. Hidden costs were calculated based on the price rate of the market during the time of the study. Results The total hidden costs for normal delivery and C-section delivery were 243.4 USD (US Dollar) and 321.6 USD respectively. Of the total maternity care expenditures; higher mean expenditures were found for food & drinking (53.07%), clothes (9.8%) and transport (7.3%). For postpartum women with their husband or house head, the total mean opportunity cost of “days of work loss” were 84.1 USD and 81.9 USD for normal delivery and C-section respectively. Factors such as literate mother (p = 0.007), employed house head (p = 0.011), monthly family income more than 25,000 NRs (Nepalese Rupees) (p = 0.014), private hospital as a place of delivery (p = 0.0001), C-section as a mode of delivery (p = 0.0001), longer duration (>5days) of stay in hospital (p = 0.0001), longer distance (>15km) from house to hospital (p = 0.0001) and longer travel time (>240 minutes) from house to hospital (p = 0.007) showed a significant association with the higher hidden costs (>25000 NRs). Conclusion Experiences of hidden costs on hospital based delivery and opportunity costs of days of work loss were found high. Several socio-demographic factors, delivery related factors (place and mode of delivery, length of stay, distance from hospital and travel time) were associated

  14. Hospitals for sale.

    PubMed

    Costello, Michael M; West, Daniel J; Ramirez, Bernardo

    2011-01-01

    The pace of hospital merger and acquisition activity reflects the economic theory of supply and demand: Publicly traded hospital companies, private equity funds, and large nonprofit hospital systems are investing capital to purchase and operate freestanding community hospitals at a time when many of those hospitals find themselves short of capital reserves and certain forms of management expertise. But the sale of those community hospitals also raises questions about the impact of absentee ownership on the communities which those hospitals serve. PMID:21864058

  15. Prenatal Maternal Stress Programs Infant Stress Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Elysia Poggi; Glynn, Laura M.; Waffarn, Feizal; Sandman, Curt A.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Prenatal exposure to inappropriate levels of glucocorticoids (GCs) and maternal stress are putative mechanisms for the fetal programming of later health outcomes. The current investigation examined the influence of prenatal maternal cortisol and maternal psychosocial stress on infant physiological and behavioral responses to stress.…

  16. Awareness about a Life-Threatening Condition: Ectopic Pregnancy in a Network for Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Filho, Edilberto Alves Rocha; Santana, Danielly Scaranello; Costa, Maria Laura; Haddad, Samira Maerrawe; Parpinelli, Mary Angela; Sousa, Maria Helena; Camargo, Rodrigo Soares; Pacagnella, Rodolfo Carvalho; Surita, Fernanda Garanhani; Pinto e Silva, Joao Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To assess occurrence of severe maternal complications associated with ectopic pregnancy (EP). Method. A multicenter cross-sectional study was conducted, with prospective surveillance of potentially life-threatening conditions (PLTC), maternal near miss (MNM), and maternal death (MD). EP complications, patient sociodemographic/obstetric characteristics, and conditions of severity management were assessed, estimating prevalence ratios with respective 95% CI. Factors independently associated with greater severity were identified using multiple regression analysis. Results. Of the 9.555 severe maternal morbidity patients, 312 women (3.3%) had complications after EP: 286 (91.7%) PLTC, 25 (8.0%) MNM, and 1 (0.3%) MD. Severe maternal outcome ratio (SMOR) was 0.3/1000 LB among EP cases and 10.8/1000 LB among other causes. Complicated EP patients faced a higher risk of blood transfusion, laparotomy, and lower risk of ICU admission and prolonged hospitalization than women developing complications resulting from other causes. Substandard care was the most common in more severe maternal morbidity and EP cases (22.7% MNM and MD versus 15% PLTC), although not significant. Conclusion. Increased maternal morbidity due to EP raised awareness about the condition and its impact on female reproductive life. No important risk factors for greater severity were identified. Care providers should develop specific guidelines and interventions to prevent severe maternal morbidity. PMID:24772441

  17. First time mothers' anxiety and depressive symptoms across the transition to motherhood: associations with maternal and environmental characteristics.

    PubMed

    Sayil, Melike; Güre, Ayşen; Uçanok, Zehra

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine demographic, environmental, belief, and personality factors related to maternal well-being as a part of a comprehensive project. In this study, maternal well-being was measured as prenatal anxiety and postnatal depression. A total of 200 pregnant women participated in this study. Women were included who were married, pregnant with a first child, working full time before conception and over the age of 20 years. The participants were selected from university hospitals and birth clinics in Ankara, Turkey. Participants were interviewed at 6-8 months of pregnancy and at 6-8 months after the birth. Each interview included structured items to measure relevant variables and lasted approximately 45-60 minutes. Results revealed that in the prenatal period lower maternal income, self-esteem and self-efficacy were significantly associated with prenatal maternal anxiety. In the postnatal period, maternal depressive symptoms were significantly associated with unplanned pregnancy, higher anxiety, perceived lower satisfaction with paternal physical support, and negative maternal attitudes toward employment. Findings indicated that prenatal high anxiety might be an adverse risk factor for postnatal well-being of mothers. In conclusion, both common and culture-specific factors related to prenatal and postnatal maternal well-being might assist with maternity and early care policies in this culture. PMID:17255066

  18. Pattern of Maternal Complications and Low Birth Weight: Associated Risk Factors among Highly Endogamous Women.

    PubMed

    Bener, Abdulbari; Salameh, Khalil M K; Yousafzai, Mohammad T; Saleh, Najah M

    2012-01-01

    Objective. The objective of the study was to examine the pattern of low birth weight LBW, maternal complications, and its related factors among Arab women in Qatar. Design. This is a prospective hospital-based study. Setting. The study was carried out in Women's Hospital, Doha. Subjects and Methods. Pregnant women in their third trimester were identified in the log book of Women's Hospital and recruited into the study during first week of January 2010 to July 2011. Only 1674 (out of 2238) Arab women (74.7%) consented to participate in this study. Data on clinical and biochemistry parameters were retrieved from medical records. Follow-up data on neonatal outcome was obtained from labor room register. Results. The incidence of LBW (<2500 g) was 6.7% among Arab women during 2010 in Qatar. Distribution of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), antepartum hemorrhage (APH), maternal anemia, premature rupture of membrane (PROM), maternal occupation, parity, sheesha smoking, and parental consanguinity were significantly different (P < 0.05) between mothers of LBW and normal birth weight NBW (≥2500 g) babies. Multivariable logistic regression analysis revealed that previous LBW, consanguinity, parity, smoking shesha, GDM, APH, anemia, PROM, maternal occupation, and housing condition were significantly associated with LBW adjusting for gestational age. Conclusion. Maternal complications such as GDM, APH, anemia, PROM, and smoking shesha during pregnancy are significantly increasing the risk of LBW outcome. Screening and prompt treatment for maternal complications and health education for smoking cessation during routine antenatal visits will help in substantial reduction of LBW outcome. PMID:22991672

  19. Association between Maternal Characteristics and Neonatal Birth Weight in a Korean Population Living in the Seoul Metropolitan Area, Korea: A Birth Cohort Study (COCOA)

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Youn Ho; Choi, Suk-Joo; Kim, Kyung Won; Yu, Jinho; Ahn, Kang Mo; Kim, Hyung Young; Seo, Ju-Hee; Kwon, Ji-Won; Kim, Byoung-Ju; Kim, Hyo-Bin; Shim, Jung Yeon; Kim, Woo Kyung; Song, Dae Jin; Lee, So-Yeon; Lee, Soo Young; Jang, Gwang Cheon; Kwon, Ja-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ju; Park, Hee Jin; Lee, Pil Ryang; Won, Hye-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that maternal characteristics may be associated with neonatal outcomes. However, the influence of maternal characteristics on birth weight (BW) has not been adequately determined in Korean populations. We investigated associations between maternal characteristics and BW in a sample of 813 Korean women living in the Seoul metropolitan area, Korea recruited using data from the prospective hospital-based COhort for Childhood Origin of Asthma and allergic diseases (COCOA) between 2007 and 2011. The mean maternal age at delivery was 32.3 ± 3.5 yr and prepregnancy maternal body mass index (BMI) was 20.7 ± 2.5 kg/m2. The mean BW of infant was 3,196 ± 406 g. The overall prevalence of a maternal history of allergic disease was 32.9% and the overall prevalence of allergic symptoms was 65.1%. In multivariate regression models, prepregnancy maternal BMI and gestational age at delivery were positively and a maternal history of allergic disease and nulliparity were negatively associated with BW (all P < 0.05). Presence of allergic symptoms in the mother was not associated with BW. In conclusion, prepregnancy maternal BMI, gestational age at delivery, a maternal history of allergic disease, and nulliparity may be associated with BW, respectively. PMID:23579316

  20. Antecedents of Maternal Separation Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fein, Greta G.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined antecedents of maternal separation anxiety in 83 Italian mothers prior to their infants or toddlers entering group care. Mothers' anxiety did not vary with the child's age. Anxious mothers were younger and less educated, received less support, had temperamentally negative infants, and provided less varied stimulation in the home. (MM)

  1. Plotting Maternity in Three Persons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinser, Amber E.

    2012-01-01

    This performance text examines complexities of personal and maternal identity in family life. Speaking in first, second, and third person voices, the author offers autoethnographic accounts of the tensions between separateness and connectedness, normative and subjective motherhood, and novice and seasoned perspectives. The piece functions as a…

  2. Androgyny and the Maternal Principle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Miriam M.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the movement toward androgyny based upon and fostered by an increasing societal emphasis upon "femininity" in its maternal (as opposed to its heterosexual) aspects. Argues that the masculine paradigm promotes differentiation between the sexes, especially the sex objectification of women. (Author/RK)

  3. The profession of maternity home care assistant and its significance for the Dutch midwifery profession.

    PubMed

    van Teijlingen, E R

    1990-01-01

    Maternity home care assistants in the Netherlands assist the midwife (or GP) during the delivery, help and advise the new mother with the baby during the postnatal period at home. They are trained separately from nurses. Currently, more than three-quarters of mothers use this service. Birth statistics of deliveries attended by maternity home care assistants compare favourably with national statistics. The existence of this profession allows midwives to concentrate on midwifery tasks. It also enables pregnant women to consider giving birth at home or during a short-stay hospital delivery. These options are limited to certain groups in other industrialized countries. PMID:2081656

  4. Guided imagery: an innovative approach to improving maternal sleep quality.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Linda; Jallo, Nancy; Howland, Lois; James, Kathy; Glaser, Dale; Arnell, Kathy

    2013-01-01

    Mothers of preterm infants are at risk for poor sleep quality, which may adversely affect their health, maternal-infant attachment, and infant caretaking activities. This study examined the relationship of an 8-week relaxation guided imagery intervention on sleep quality and the association between sleep quality and maternal distress (perceived stress, depressive symptoms, and state anxiety) in 20 mothers of hospitalized preterm infants. Mothers received a CD (compact disc) with three 20-minutes recordings and were asked to listen to at least 1 recording daily for 8 weeks. This analysis used self-report data gathered at baseline and 8 weeks. Pearson correlations were used to examine the relationships between mean cumulative relaxation guided imagery use and measures of maternal distress and sleep quality scores at 8 weeks. Complete data on 19 mothers were available for analysis. At 8 weeks, higher mean relaxation guided imagery use was inversely correlated with sleep quality scores (r = -0.30); sleep quality scores were positively correlated with stress (r = 0.42), depressive symptoms (r = 0.34), and anxiety (r = 0.39) scores. In mothers of preterm infants, sleep quality was negatively affected by mental distress and may be improved by a guided imagery intervention. PMID:23618936

  5. Effects of prenatal care on maternal postpartum behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Reichman, Nancy E.; Corman, Hope; Schwartz-Soicher, Ofira

    2010-01-01

    Most research on the effectiveness of prenatal care has focused on birth outcomes and has found small or no effects. It is possible, however, that prenatal care is “too little too late” to improve pregnancy outcomes in the aggregate, but that it increases the use of pediatric health care or improves maternal health-related parenting practices and, ultimately, child health. We use data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing birth cohort study that have been augmented with hospital medical record data to estimate effects of prenatal care timing on pediatric health care utilization and health-related parenting behaviors during the first year of the child’s life. We focus on maternal postpartum smoking, preventive health care visits for the child, and breastfeeding. We use a multi-pronged approach to address the potential endogeneity of the timing of prenatal care. We find that first trimester prenatal care appears to decrease maternal postpartum smoking by about 5 percentage points and increase the likelihood of 4 or more well-baby visits by about 1 percentage point, and that it may also have a positive effect on breastfeeding. These findings suggest that there are benefits to standard prenatal care that are generally not considered in evaluations of prenatal care programs and interventions. PMID:20582158

  6. Maternal Obesity and Rectovaginal Group B Streptococcus Colonization at Term

    PubMed Central

    Kleweis, Shelby M.; Cahill, Alison G.; Odibo, Anthony O.; Tuuli, Methodius G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To test the hypothesis that maternal obesity is an independent risk factor for rectovaginal group B streptococcus (GBS) colonization at term. Study Design. Retrospective cohort study of consecutive women with singleton term pregnancies admitted in labor at Barnes-Jewish Hospital (2004–2008). Maternal BMI ≥ 30 Kg/m2 (obese) or <30 Kg/m2 (nonobese) defined the two comparison groups. The outcome of interest was GBS colonization from a positive culture. Baseline characteristics were compared using Student's t-test and Chi-squared or Fisher's exact test. The association between obesity and GBS colonization was assessed using univariable and multivariable analyses. Results. Of the 10,564 women eligible, 7,711 met inclusion criteria. The prevalence of GBS colonization in the entire cohort was relatively high (25.8%). Obese gravidas were significantly more likely to be colonized by GBS when compared with nonobese gravidas (28.4% versus 22.2%, P < 0.001). Obese gravidas were still 35% more likely than nonobese women to test positive for GBS after adjusting for race, parity, smoking, and diabetes (adjusted OR 1.35 [95% CI 1.21–1.50]). Conclusion. Maternal obesity is a significant risk factor for GBS colonization at term. Further research is needed to evaluate the impact of this finding on risk-based management strategies. PMID:26300620

  7. Maternal postpartum complications according to delivery mode in twin pregnancies

    PubMed Central

    Stach, Sonia Leme; Liao, Adolfo Wenjaw; de Lourdes Brizot, Maria; Francisco, Rossana Pulcineli Vieira; Zugaib, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to examine maternal postpartum complications of twin deliveries according to mode of delivery and investigate the associated risk factors. METHODS: This was a retrospective cohort review of twin pregnancies with delivery after 26 weeks at a tertiary teaching hospital (1993-2008). The rates of maternal postpartum complications were compared among vaginal, elective cesarean and emergency cesarean deliveries. Significant predictors of complications were investigated with stepwise regression analysis and relative risks were calculated. RESULTS: A total of 90 complications were observed in 56/817 (6.9%) deliveries: 7/131 (5.3%) vaginal, 10/251 (4.0%) elective cesarean and 39/435 (9.0%) emergency cesarean deliveries. Significant predictors included high-risk pregnancy, gestational age at birth and delivery mode. The occurrence of complications was significantly increased in emergency compared to elective cesarean deliveries (RR = 2.34). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal postpartum complications in twin pregnancies are higher in emergency compared to elective cesarean deliveries and are also related to preexisting complications and earlier gestational age at delivery. PMID:25029574

  8. Maternal age and risk of labor and delivery complications

    PubMed Central

    Cavazos-Rehg, Patricia A.; Krauss, Melissa J.; Spitznagel, Edward L.; Bommarito, Kerry; Madden, Tessa; Olsen, Margaret A.; Subramaniam, Harini; Peipert, Jeffrey F.; Jean Bierut, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Objective We utilized an updated nationally representative database to examine associations between maternal age and prevalence of maternal morbidity during complications of labor and delivery. Study design We used hospital inpatient billing data from the 2009 United States Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS), part of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP). To determine whether the likelihood that maternal morbidity during complications of labor and delivery differed among age groups, separate logistic regression models were run for each complication. Age was the main independent variable of interest. Results In analyses that controlled for demographics and clinical confounders, we found that complications with the highest odds among women, 11–18 years of age, compared to 25–29 year old women, included preterm delivery, chorioamnionitis, endometritis, and mild preeclampsia. Pregnant women who were 15–19 years old had greater odds for severe preeclampsia, eclampsia, postpartum hemorrhage, poor fetal growth, and fetal distress. Pregnant women who were ≥35 years old had greater odds for preterm delivery, hypertension, superimposed preeclampsia, severe preeclampsia, and decreased risk for chorioamnionitis. Older women (≥40 years old) had increased odds for mild preeclampsia, fetal distress, and poor fetal growth. Conclusions Our findings underscore the need for pregnant women to be aware of the risks associated with extremes of age so that they can watch for signs and symptoms of such complications. PMID:25366100

  9. Education for adolescent mothers in a hospital setting.

    PubMed Central

    Badger, E; Burns, D; Rhoads, B

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes an innovative service program designed to help adolescent mothers become more effective parents. Mother-infant pairs are recruited in the postpartum unit of Cincinnati (Ohio) General Hospital, and weekly classes are held in a pediatric clinic waiting room until infants are approximately six months of age. Medical consultation and/or treatment and education for parenthood in the areas of health, nutrition, and infant stimulation are the foci of the program. The interest and participation of the mothers, the opinion of professionals, tests of maternal knowledge, and measurements of maternal-infant interaction attest to the value and success of this program. PMID:1275122

  10. Can hospitals compete on quality? Hospital competition.

    PubMed

    Sadat, Somayeh; Abouee-Mehrizi, Hossein; Carter, Michael W

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we consider two hospitals with different perceived quality of care competing to capture a fraction of the total market demand. Patients select the hospital that provides the highest utility, which is a function of price and the patient's perceived quality of life during their life expectancy. We consider a market with a single class of patients and show that depending on the market demand and perceived quality of care of the hospitals, patients may enjoy a positive utility. Moreover, hospitals share the market demand based on their perceived quality of care and capacity. We also show that in a monopoly market (a market with a single hospital) the optimal demand captured by the hospital is independent of the perceived quality of care. We investigate the effects of different parameters including the market demand, hospitals' capacities, and perceived quality of care on the fraction of the demand that each hospital captures using some numerical examples. PMID:25711185

  11. Maternal control of early embryogenesis in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Kun; Smith, George W.

    2015-01-01

    Oocyte quality is a critical factor limiting the efficiency of assisted reproductive technologies (ART) and pregnancy success in farm animals and humans. ART success is diminished with increased maternal age, suggesting a close link between poor oocyte quality and ovarian-aging. However, the regulation of oocyte quality remains poorly understood. Oocyte quality is functionally linked to ART success because the maternal-to-embryonic transition is dependent on stored maternal factors, which are accumulated in oocytes during oocyte development and growth. The maternal-to-embryonic transition consists of critical developmental processes including maternal RNA depletion and embryonic genome activation. In recent years, key maternal proteins encoded by maternal-effect genes have been determined, primarily using genetically modified mouse models. These proteins are implicated in various aspects of early embryonic development including maternal mRNA degradation, epigenetic reprogramming, signal transduction, protein translation and initiation of embryonic genome activation. Species differences exist in number of cell divisions encompassing the maternal-to-embryonic transition and maternal-effect genes controlling this developmental window. Perturbations of maternal control result in decreased oocyte quality, some of which are associated with ovarian aging. PMID:25695370

  12. Maternal Characteristics Predicting Young Girls’ Disruptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    van der Molen, Elsa; Hipwell, Alison E.; Vermeiren, Robert; Loeber, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Little is known about the relative predictive utility of maternal characteristics and parenting skills on the development of girls’ disruptive behavior. The current study used five waves of parent and child-report data from the ongoing Pittsburgh Girls Study to examine these relationships in a sample of 1,942 girls from age 7 to 12 years. Multivariate Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE) analyses indicated that European American race, mother’s prenatal nicotine use, maternal depression, maternal conduct problems prior to age 15, and low maternal warmth explained unique variance. Maladaptive parenting partly mediated the effects of maternal depression and maternal conduct problems. Both current and early maternal risk factors have an impact on young girls’ disruptive behavior, providing support for the timing and focus of the prevention of girls’ disruptive behavior. PMID:21391016

  13. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... tends to be more serious than other lung infections because: People in the hospital are often very sick and cannot fight off ... prevent pneumonia. Most hospitals have programs to prevent hospital-acquired infections.

  14. Preterm Labor and Maternal Hypoxia in Patients With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Pinell, Phillip; Martens, Mark G.; Faro, Sebastian

    1996-01-01

    Objective: We sought to determine if preterm labor is associated with the degree of maternal hypoxia in pregnant women with community-acquired pneumonia but no other maternal diseases. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of all antepartum patients admitted with a diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia to an inner-city university hospital between 1983 and 1987. Included in this review were only the patients with radiologically confirmed diagnose of pneumonia and documented arterial blood gases on room air at the time of admission, but no other maternal diseases. Results: A total of 22 cases were identified. There was no maternal mortality, but there were 2 patients (9%) who developed respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Bacteremia with Streptococcus pneumoniae was documented in 1 patient (5%). Preterm labor complicated 5 cases (23%) and led to preterm delivery in 3 patients (14%). Terbutaline tocolysis was instituted in 3 patients, but was discontinued in 1 patient who was allowed to deliver because of her worsening condition. Preterm labor was associated with the WBC count on admission, usually > 18,000/mm3, but no statistically significant correlation with the severity of maternal hypoxia was noted. Five patients (23%) were incorrectly diagnosed at the time of admission, 4 with an initial diagnosis of pyelonephritis and 1 with an initial diagnosis of cholecystitis. Conclusions: Community-acquired pneumonia in the antepartum period is responsible for significant maternal and fetal complications even in the absence of other maternal diseases. Preterm labor and delivery remain frequent, and tocolysis should be used cautiously. At the time of admission, the diagnosis may be difficult. The degree of maternal hypoxia on admission does not correlate with the presence of preterm labor. PMID:18476096

  15. Incorporating immunizations into routine obstetric care to facilitate Health Care Practitioners in implementing maternal immunization recommendations

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Heather; Street, Jackie; Marshall, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Immunization against pertussis, influenza, and rubella reduces morbidity and mortality in pregnant women and their offspring. Health care professionals (HCPs) caring for women perinatally are uniquely placed to reduce maternal vaccine preventable diseases (VPDs). Despite guidelines recommending immunization during the perinatal period, maternal vaccine uptake remains low. This qualitative study explored the role of obstetricians, general practitioners, and midwives in maternal vaccine uptake. Semi-structured interviews (n = 15) were conducted with perinatal HCPs at a tertiary maternity hospital in South Australia. HCPs were asked to reflect on their knowledge, beliefs, and practice relating to immunization advice and vaccine provision. Interviews were transcribed and coded using thematic analysis. Data collection and analysis was an iterative process, with collection ceasing with theoretical saturation. Participants unanimously supported maternal vaccination as an effective way of reducing risk of disease in this vulnerable population, however only rubella immunity detection and immunization is embedded in routine care. Among these professionals, delegation of responsibility for maternal immunization was unclear and knowledge about maternal immunization was variable. Influenza and pertussis vaccine prevention measures were not included in standard pregnancy record documentation, information provision to patients was “ad hoc” and vaccinations not offered on-site. The key finding was that the incorporation of maternal vaccinations into standard care through a structured process is an important facilitator for immunization uptake. Incorporating vaccine preventable disease management measures into routine obstetric care including incorporation into the Pregnancy Record would facilitate HCPs in implementing recommendations. Rubella prevention provides a useful “template” for other vaccines. PMID:24509790

  16. The Evolution of Multivariate Maternal Effects

    PubMed Central

    Kuijper, Bram; Johnstone, Rufus A.; Townley, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in predicting the social and ecological contexts that favor the evolution of maternal effects. Most predictions focus, however, on maternal effects that affect only a single character, whereas the evolution of maternal effects is poorly understood in the presence of suites of interacting traits. To overcome this, we simulate the evolution of multivariate maternal effects (captured by the matrix M) in a fluctuating environment. We find that the rate of environmental fluctuations has a substantial effect on the properties of M: in slowly changing environments, offspring are selected to have a multivariate phenotype roughly similar to the maternal phenotype, so that M is characterized by positive dominant eigenvalues; by contrast, rapidly changing environments favor Ms with dominant eigenvalues that are negative, as offspring favor a phenotype which substantially differs from the maternal phenotype. Moreover, when fluctuating selection on one maternal character is temporally delayed relative to selection on other traits, we find a striking pattern of cross-trait maternal effects in which maternal characters influence not only the same character in offspring, but also other offspring characters. Additionally, when selection on one character contains more stochastic noise relative to selection on other traits, large cross-trait maternal effects evolve from those maternal traits that experience the smallest amounts of noise. The presence of these cross-trait maternal effects shows that individual maternal effects cannot be studied in isolation, and that their study in a multivariate context may provide important insights about the nature of past selection. Our results call for more studies that measure multivariate maternal effects in wild populations. PMID:24722346

  17. Current Concepts of Maternal Nutrition

    PubMed Central

    Lowensohn, Richard I.; Stadler, Diane D.; Naze, Christie

    2016-01-01

    Background A nutrient-rich maternal diet before and during pregnancy is associated with improved fetal health, more appropriate birth weight, and increased rates of maternal and infant survival. Physicians need a better understanding of the role of diet in shaping fetal outcomes. Given this background, we reviewed and summarized articles on maternal nutrition found in MEDLINE since 1981, written in English, and limited to human subjects. For the Offspring Maternal diets high in sugar and fat lead to an increased incidence of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease later in life. Folic acid should be supplemented prior to conception and continued through at least the first 28 days of fetal life to prevent neural tube defects, and vitamin C should be given to women who smoke to lower the incidence of asthma and wheezing in the children. Iodine deficiency is increasing, and iodine should be included in prenatal supplements. If the maternal hemoglobin is 7 g/dL or more, there is no evidence that iron supplementation is needed. Fish intake during pregnancy is protective against atopic outcomes, whereas high-meat diets contribute to elevated adult blood pressure and hypersecretion of cortisol. For the Mother Calcium supplementation lowers the risk of preeclampsia and hypertensive disease in pregnancy. Conclusions Given the limits of our current knowledge, a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and selected fish is desirable for the best outcomes. Diets high in sugar and fat lead to higher rates of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease. Folic acid, iodine, and calcium in all pregnant women and vitamin C in smokers are the only supplements so far shown to be of value for routine use. The physician treating a pregnant woman should be ready to advise a healthy diet for the benefit of the fetus. Target Audience Obstetricians and gynecologists, family physicians Learning Objectives After participating in this activity, the

  18. Improving maternal confidence in neonatal care through a checklist intervention

    PubMed Central

    Radenkovic, Dina; Kotecha, Shrinal; Patel, Shreena; Lakhani, Anjali; Reimann-Dubbers, Katharina; Shah, Shreya; Jafree, Daniyal; Mitrasinovic, Stefan; Whitten, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Previous qualitative studies suggest a lack of maternal confidence in care of their newborn child upon discharge into the community. This observation was supported by discussion with healthcare professionals and mothers at University College London Hospital (UCLH), highlighting specific areas of concern, in particular identifying and managing common neonatal presentations. The aim of this study was to design and introduce a checklist, addressing concerns, to increase maternal confidence in care of their newborn child. Based on market research, an 8-question checklist was designed, assessing maternal confidence in: feeding, jaundice, nappy care, rashes and dry skin, umbilical cord care, choking, bowel movements, and vomiting. Mothers were assessed as per the checklist, and received a score representative of their confidence in neonatal care. Mothers were followed up with a telephone call, and were assessed after a 7-day-period. Checklist scores before as compared to after the follow-up period were analysed. This process was repeated for three study cycles, with the placement of information posters on the ward prior to the second study cycle, and the stapling of the checklist to the mother's personal child health record (PCHR) prior to the third study cycle. A total of 99 mothers on the Maternity Care Unit at UCLH were enrolled in the study, and 92 were contactable after a 7-day period. During all study cycles, a significant increase in median checklist score was observed after, as compared to before, the 7-day follow up period (p < 0.001). The median difference in checklist score from baseline was greatest for the third cycle. These results suggest that introduction of a simple checklist can be successfully utilised to improve confidence of mothers in being able to care for their newborn child. Further investigation is indicated, but this intervention has the potential for routine application in postnatal care. PMID:27335642

  19. Trends of US Hospitals Distributing Infant Formula Packs to Breastfeeding Mothers, 2007 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Jennifer M.; Li, Ruowei; Perrine, Cria G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine trends in the prevalence of hospitals and birth centers (hereafter, hospitals) distributing infant formula discharge packs to breastfeeding mothers in the United States from 2007 to 2013. Methods The Maternity Practices in Infant Nutrition and Care (mPINC) survey is administered every 2 years to all hospitals with registered maternity beds in the United States. Either a web- or paper-based questionnaire was distributed and completed by the person(s) most knowledgeable about breastfeeding-related hospital practices. We examined the distribution of infant formula discharge packs to breastfeeding mothers from 2007 to 2013 by state and hospital characteristics. Results The percentage of hospitals distributing infant formula discharge packs to breastfeeding mothers was 72.6% in 2007 and 31.6% in 2013, a decrease of 41 percentage points. In 2007, there was only 1 state (Rhode Island) in which <25% of hospitals distributed infant formula discharge packs to breastfeeding mothers, whereas, in 2013, there were 24 such states and territories. Distribution declined across all hospital characteristics examined, including facility type, teaching vs. non-teaching, and size (annual number of births). Conclusions The distribution of infant formula discharge packs to breastfeeding mothers declined markedly from 2007 to 2013. Discontinuing the practice of distributing infant formula discharge packs is a part of optimal, evidence-based maternity care to support mothers who want to breastfeed. PMID:26009631

  20. Experiential avoidance mediates the link between maternal attachment style and theory of mind.

    PubMed

    Vanwoerden, Salome; Kalpakci, Allison H; Sharp, Carla

    2015-02-01

    Theoretical and empirical models suggest a relation between attachment style and theory of mind (ToM) in childhood and adulthood; however, this link has not been evaluated to the same extent in adolescence. Additionally, these models typically fail to consider mechanisms by which attachment style affects ToM abilities. The present study sought to test a mediational model in which experiential avoidance mediates the relation between maternal attachment style and ToM. A sample of 282 adolescents (Mage=15.42years, SD=1.44, 62.8% female) was recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital. Findings revealed that maternal attachment style in females was related to ToM, through experiential avoidance. Specifically, those with a disorganized maternal attachment were most likely to engage in experiential avoidant cognitive and emotional strategies, which in turn related to lower levels of ToM ability. Implications and areas for future research are discussed. PMID:25492226

  1. Differential effects of cigarette smoking on birth weight by maternal body mass index.

    PubMed

    Heinz-Partington, Sean; Condous, George; Mongelli, Max

    2016-07-01

    Links between low birth weight and tobacco exposure in utero are well established, as are associations between maternal body mass index (BMI) and birth weight. This study further develops those relationships. In particular, this article analyses whether high maternal weight acts to dampen the previously established link between tobacco exposure and low birth weight. A retrospective cohort study was undertaken, reviewing the birth weights of 13,473 live singleton pregnancies born at a Sydney regional hospital between 1998 and 2003. Results demonstrated a statistically significant decline in reduced birth weight as BMI increased. That is, as body weight increases, tobacco use has a smaller effect on reducing birth weight. Inversely, the effect on reducing birth weight for each cigarette smoked by leaner women was greater. In effect, the adverse influence of tobacco use on birth weight appears to be modulated by increasing maternal BMI. PMID:27013353

  2. [Epidemiological features of maternal deaths occurred in Recife, PE, Brazil (2000-2006)].

    PubMed

    Correia, Rafaella Araújo; Araújo, Hallana Cristina; Furtado, Betise Mery Alencar; Bonfim, Cristine

    2011-01-01

    This was a cross-sectional study that aimed to describe the epidemiological characteristics of maternal deaths among women living in Recife, PE, Brazil that occurred between 2000 and 2006. The data source consisted of investigation files on maternal deaths. To analyze the data, the EpiInfo 6.04d software was used. The analysis considered 111 deaths, corresponding to a maternal death ratio of 65.99/100,000 live births. The obstetric data showed that these women had had fewer than six prenatal consultations, between one and four previous pregnancies, cesarean deliveries and hospital admission in a severe condition. Hypertensive disorders were the main cause of death. Most of the deaths were considered avoidable. The results indicate the need to improve the healthcare for pregnant women prenatally, at delivery and during the puerperium. PMID:21468495

  3. [Maternal near misses and health inequalities: an analysis of contextual determinants in the State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Rosendo, Tatyana Maria Silva de Souza; Roncalli, Angelo Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The scope of this study was to identify socioeconomic contextual and health care factors in primary care associated with maternal near misses and their marker conditions. This is an ecological study that used aggregated data of 63 clusters formed by the municipalities of State of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil, using the Skater method of area regionalization, as the unit of analysis. The ratio of maternal near misses and their marker conditions were obtained from the Hospital Information System of the Brazilian Unified Health System. In multiple linear regression analysis, there was a significant association between maternal near misses and variables of poverty and poor primary health care. Hypertensive disorders were also associated with poverty and poor primary care and the occurrence of hemorrhaging was associated with infant mortality. It was observed that the occurrence of maternal near misses is linked to unfavorable socioeconomic conditions and poor quality health care that are a reflection of public policies that accentuate health inequalities. PMID:26816176

  4. Persistence of Hemorrhage and Hypertensive Disorders of Pregnancy (HDP) as the Main Causes of Maternal Mortality: Emergence of Medical Errors in Iranian Healthcare System

    PubMed Central

    FARROKH-ESLAMLOU, Hamidreza; AGHLMAND, Siamak; OSHNOUEI, Sima

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background This study aimed to assess factors affecting substandard care and probable medical errors associated with obstetric hemorrhage and HDP at a Northwestern Iranian health care system. Methods In a community-based descriptive cross-sectional study, data on all maternal deaths occurred at West Azerbaijan Province, Iran during a period of 10 years from March 21, 2002 to March 20, 2011 was analyzed. The principal cause of death, main contributory factors, nature of care, main responsible staff for sub-standard care and medical error were determined. The data on maternal deaths was obtained from the national Maternal Mortality Surveillance System (MMSS) which were covered all maternal deaths. The “Three delays model” was used to recognize contributing factors of maternal deaths due to obstetric hemorrhage and HDP. Results There were 183 maternal deaths, therefore the Mean Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) in the province was 32.8 per 100 000 live births (95% CI, 32.64—32.88). The most common causes of maternal deaths were obstetric hemorrhage in 36.6% of cases and HDP in 25.7%. The factors that most contributed to the deaths were all types of medical errors and substandard care with different proportions in management of obstetric hemorrhage and HDP. Conclusion A substandard care and medical error was the major contributing factor in both obstetric hemorrhage and HDP leading to maternal mortality, therefore, it is necessary to improve the quality of health care at all levels especially hospitals. PMID:26060702

  5. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  6. Measuring Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moscovice, Ira; Wholey, Douglas R.; Klingner, Jill; Knott, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Increased interest in the measurement of hospital quality has been stimulated by accrediting bodies, purchaser coalitions, government agencies, and other entities. This paper examines quality measurement for hospitals in rural settings. We seek to identify rural hospital quality measures that reflect quality in all hospitals and that are sensitive…

  7. Hospital marketing revisited.

    PubMed

    Costello, M M

    1987-05-01

    With more hospitals embracing the marketing function in their organizational management over the past decade, hospital marketing can no longer be considered a fad. However, a review of hospital marketing efforts as reported in the professional literature indicates that hospitals must pay greater attention to the marketing mix elements of service, price and distribution channels as their programs mature. PMID:10283019

  8. Progress on the Maternal Mortality Ratio Reduction in Wuhan, China in 2001–2012

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shaoping; Zhang, Bin; Zhao, Jinzhu; Wang, Jing; Flick, Louise; Qian, Zhengmin; Zhang, Dan; Mei, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Background Most maternal deaths occur in developing countries and most maternal deaths are avoidable. China has made a great effort to reduce MMR by three quarters to meet the fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG5). Methods This retrospective study reviewed and analyzed maternal death data in Wuhan from 2001 to 2012. Joinpoint regression and multivariate Poisson regression was conducted using the log-linear model to measure the association of the number of maternal deaths with time, cause of death, where the death occurred, and cognitive factors including knowledge, attitude, resource, and management stratified. Results The MMR declined from 33.41 per 100,000 live births in 2001 to 10.63 per 100,000 live births in 2012, with a total decline of 68.18% and an average annual decline of 9.89%. From 2001–2012, the four major causes of maternal death were obstetric hemorrhage (35.16%), pregnancy complications (28.57%), amniotic fluid embolism (16.48%) and gestational hypertension (8.79%). Multivariate Poisson regression showed on average the MMR decreased by.17% each year from 2001–2006 and stayed stagnant since 2007–2012. Conclusions With the reduction in MMR in obstetric death (e.g. obstetric hemorrhage), there had been a remarkable reduction in MMR in Wuhan in 2001–2012, which may be due to (1) the improvement in the obstetric quality of perinatal care service on prevention and treatment of obstetric hemorrhage and emergency care skills, and (2) the improvement in the maternal health management and quality of prenatal care. Interventions to further reduce the MMR include several efforts such as the following: (1) designing community-based interventions, (2) providing subsidies to rural women and/hospitals for hospital delivery, (3) screening for pregnancy complications, and (4) establishing an emergency rescue system for critically ill pregnant women. PMID:24586836

  9. Neonatal Outcomes and their Relationship to Maternal Buprenorphine Dose during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Hendrée E.; Dengler, Erin; Garrison, Anna; O'Grady, Kevin E.; Seashore, Carl; Horton, Evette; Andringa, Kim; Jansson, Lauren M.; Thorp, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Buprenorphine pharmacotherapy for opioid-dependent pregnant women is associated with maternal and neonatal outcomes superior to untreated opioid dependence. However, the literature is inconsistent regarding the possible existence of a dose-response relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose and neonatal clinical outcomes. Methods The present secondary analysis study (1) examined the relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) peak score, estimated gestational age at delivery, Apgar scores at 1 and 5 minutes, neonatal head circumference, length, and weight at birth, amount of morphine needed to treat NAS, duration of NAS treatment, and duration of neonatal hospital stay; and (2) compared neonates who required pharmacotherapy for NAS to neonates who did not require such pharmacotherapy on these same outcomes, in 58 opioid-dependent pregnant women receiving buprenorphine as participants in a randomized clinical trial. Results (1) Analyses failed to provide evidence of a relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and any of the 10 outcomes (all p-values>.48); and (2) significant mean differences between the untreated (n=31) and treated (n=27) for NAS groups were found for duration of neonatal hospital stay and NAS peak score (both p-values<.001). Conclusions (1) Findings failed to support the existence of a dose-response relationship between maternal buprenorphine dose at delivery and any of 10 neonatal clinical outcomes, including NAS severity; and (2) that infants treated for NAS had a higher mean NAS peak score and, spent a longer time in the hospital than did the group not treated for NAS is unsurprising. PMID:24290979

  10. [Canton Hospital and public health in Canton].

    PubMed

    Li, Jichou; Guo, Qiang

    2015-07-01

    Canton Hospital was not only the most influential missionary hospital in South China, but also the first one brought the concept and practice of public health to Guangzhou. In the late Qing Dynasty, it conducted free vaccination, plague treatment, health education and so on, demonstrating the importance of public health to the people. In the period of the Republic of China, it extensively cooperated with the government and social organizations in developing school health, maternal and child health, communicable disease control and epidemiological investigations to actively serve the social group. In the 1930s, its public health activities extended towards the rural areas of Guangzhou, and promoted the convergence of rural and urban medical and health services. The three-level medical system that it built provided demonstration model for the establishment of Chinese rural medical system. PMID:26815022

  11. Adoption, ART, and a re-conception of the maternal body: toward embodied maternity.

    PubMed

    Brakman, Sarah-Vaughan; Scholz, Sally J

    2006-01-01

    We criticize a view of maternity that equates the natural with the genetic and biological and show how such a practice overdetermines the maternal body and the maternal experience for women who are mothers through adoption and ART (Assisted Reproductive Technologies). As an alternative, we propose a new framework designed to rethink maternal bodies through the lens of feminist embodiment. Feminist embodied maternity, as we call it, stresses the particularity of experience through subjective embodiment. A feminist embodied maternity emphasizes the physical relations of the subjective lived-body rather than the genetic or biological connections. Instead of universalizing claims about the maternal body, embodied maternity looks to communicable experiences and empathetic understanding. PMID:17111556

  12. The Neuroendocrinology of Primate Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Saltzman, Wendy; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-01-01

    In nonhuman primates and humans, similar to other mammals, hormones are not strictly necessary for the expression of maternal behavior, but nevertheless influence variation in maternal responsiveness and parental behavior both within and between individuals. A growing number of correlational and experimental studies have indicated that high circulating estrogen concentrations during pregnancy increase maternal motivation and responsiveness to infant stimuli, while effects of prepartum or postpartum estrogens and progestogens on maternal behavior are less clear. Prolactin is thought to play a role in promoting paternal and alloparental care in primates, but little is known about the relationship between this hormone and maternal behavior. High circulating cortisol levels appear to enhance arousal and responsiveness to infant stimuli in young, relatively inexperienced female primates, but interfere with the expression of maternal behavior in older and more experienced mothers. Among neuropeptides and neurotransmitters, preliminary evidence indicates that oxytocin and endogenous opioids affect maternal attachment to infants, including maintenance of contact, grooming, and responses to separation. Brain serotonin affects anxiety and impulsivity, which in turn may affect maternal behaviors such as infant retrieval or rejection of infants’ attempts to make contact with the mother. Although our understanding of the neuroendocrine correlates of primate maternal behavior has grown substantially in the last two decades, very little is known about the mechanisms underlying these effects, e.g., the extent to which these mechanisms may involve changes in perception, emotion, or cognition. PMID:20888383

  13. Home birth and hospital birth trends in Bo, Sierra Leone.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Abdirahman, Hafsa A; Ansumana, Rashid; Bockarie, Alfred S; Bangura, Umaru; Jimmy, David Henry; Malanoski, Anthony P; Sundufu, Abu James; Stenger, David A

    2012-06-01

    As of April 2010, all maternity care at government healthcare facilities in Sierra Leone is provided at no cost to patients. In late 2010, we conducted a community health census of 18 sections of the city of Bo (selected via randomized cluster sampling from 68 total sections). Among the 3421 women with a history of pregnancy who participated in the study, older women most often reported having a history of both home and hospital deliveries, while younger women showed a preference for hospital births. The proportion of lastborn children delivered at a healthcare facility increased from 71.8% of offspring 10-14 years old to 81.1% of those one to nine years old and 87.3% of infants born after April 2010. These findings suggest that the new maternal healthcare initiative has accelerated an existing trend toward a preference for healthcare facility births, at least in some urban parts of Sierra Leone. PMID:22375565

  14. Maternal and Adolescent Temperament as Predictors of Maternal Affective Behavior during Mother-Adolescent Interactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davenport, Emily; Yap, Marie B. H.; Simmons, Julian G.; Sheeber, Lisa B.; Allen, Nicholas B.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined maternal and early adolescent temperament dimensions as predictors of maternal emotional behavior during mother-adolescent interactions. The sample comprised 151 early adolescents (aged 11-13) and their mothers (aged 29-57). Adolescent- and mother-reports of adolescent temperament and self-reports of maternal temperament were…

  15. Evidence from Maternity Leave Expansions of the Impact of Maternal Care on Early Child Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Michael; Milligan, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    We study the impact of maternal care on early child development using an expansion in Canadian maternity leave entitlements. Following the leave expansion, mothers who took leave spent 48-58 percent more time not working in their children's first year of life. This extra maternal care primarily crowded out home-based care by unlicensed…

  16. Maternal Moderators of Child Care: The Role of Maternal Separation Anxiety.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBride, Susan L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigated the relationships between maternal separation anxiety, maternal employment, and quality of child care for 49 mothers of 2- to 3-year olds in day care centers. Findings suggest that the mother's concern about separation is an important moderator of the effects of maternal employment and child care on children's development. (BB)

  17. SOCIO-DEMOGRAPHIC AND LIFESTYLE CORRELATES OF SELF-PERCEIVED HEALTH STATUS IN A POPULATION-BASED SAMPLE OF ALBANIAN ADULT MEN AND WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Kraja, Fatjona; Kraja, Bledar; Cakerri, Luljeta; Burazeri, Genc

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Self-perceived health is considered a suitable health indicator, based on a single item asking individuals to rate their health. It has been recommended as a reliable factor to assess the population health. Several socio-demographic and lifestyle determinants of self-perceived health status have been documented in different population. The aim of our study was to assess the socio-demographic and lifestyle correlates of self-perceived health status in a population-based sample of Albanian adult men and women. Methods: Data from 12,554 individuals aged ≥35 years collected by the Albania Living Standard Measurement Survey (LSMS) 2012, which is a national population-based cross-sectional study, were analyzed. The study participants rated their health in five categories: very good, good, average, poor and very poor, which in the analyses were dichotomized into “not poor” and “poor health”. Other variables included demographic characteristics, economic level, employment status, smoking and alcohol intake. Binary logistic regression was used to assess the association of self-perceived health with demographic and lifestyle factors. Results: Upon multivariate adjustment for all covariates in a backward stepwise elimination procedure, strong and significant “predictors” of poor self-perceived health status were older age (OR=3.0, 95%CI=2.4-3.7), unemployment (OR=5.6, 95%CI=4.0-7.8), male gender (OR=1.2, 95%CI=1.0-1.5), low education (OR=2.0, OR=1.3-3.0), current smoking (OR=1.7, 95%CI=1.2-2.4) and alcohol abstinence (OR=1.4, 95%CI=1.1-1.7). Conclusions: Our findings indicate that the low socioeconomic groups in Albania have a significantly lower self-perceived health status. Furthermore, smoking was a significant “determinant” of poor self-perceived health in this study population, which is compatible with previous reports from other countries. PMID:27482156

  18. Meteorological and Hydrogeological Warning Thresholds in the operational bulletins of the Albanian National Centre for Forecast and Monitoring of Natural Risks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marku, M.; Mustaqi, V.; Abazi, E.; Zaimi, K.; Vako, E.; Gjonaj, M.; Hoxhaj, F.; Deda, M.; Fiori, E.; Massabò, M.; Castelli, F.

    2012-04-01

    Most operational meteo-hydrological warning system uses fixed rainfall thresholds on given durations to switch alerting bulletins. This may be a too rough approximation in regions with strong climate gradient like Albanian, especially when this bulletins need to include the evaluation of potential ground effect like floods. In the framework of the International cooperation between the Civil Protection of Italy and Albania, the National Centre for Forecast and Monitoring of Natural Risks has been established at the Institute of Geosciences, Energy, Water and Environment (IGEWE). The Centre is supported by expertise of CIMA Research Foundation - International Centre on Environmental Monitoring. The Centre issues (every morning) on a daily basis a Meteorological Warning Bulletin (the first bulletin was issued quite recently on the 20th of December 2011). It is mostly dedicated to the precipitation forecast, the most important hazard in Albania. It covers 36 hours, starting for the noon of the current day till the end of the next day. It offers a detailed precipitation forecast for each prefecture of Albania (12 in total). The prefectures that have to do with the most problematic river (Drini) are divided in a few warning areas each homogenous with respect to climatologic and hydrologic conditions. The meteo-warning is synthetically evaluated for each prefecture; it contains the assessment of the experts about the severity of the forecasted storm in terms of average precipitations, and maximum and, possible storms (if rainfall intensity exceed 90 mm in 3 hours). Reference meteorological model is COSMO LAMI7 (managed by ARPA Bologna, Italy), its spatial resolution is 7 km and temporal resolution for the outputs is 3 hours. Also ECMWF model is available. After the pure meteorological evaluation, possible adverse ground effects are assessed with a second level of variable rainfall thresholds, whose estimated recurrence interval is compared to soil moisture dependent

  19. Maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin in Delhi population.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Md; Pathak, Rahul; Tripathi, A K; Ahmed, Rafat S; Guleria, Kiran; Banerjee, B D

    2010-12-01

    Aldrin and dieldrin, structurally similar organochlorine pesticides belong to cyclodiene family and were widely used for agriculture and public health program in India. Although the manufacturing, use and import of aldrin and dieldrin have been banned in India since 2003, these pesticides are still persistent in environment and may be associated with adverse neurological and reproductive effects. The aim of this study is to assess the recent exposure level of aldrin and dieldrin and their placental transfer to fetus in normal healthy full-term pregnant women belonging to north Indian population undergoing normal delivery at Obstetrics and Gynecology department of UCMS and GTB hospital, Delhi. Quantitative analysis of aldrin and dieldrin residues in maternal and cord blood samples were carried out by gas chromatography system equipped with electron capture detector. The results of our study clearly revealed that maternal and cord blood levels of aldrin and dieldrin of pregnant women are age and dietary habit dependent. The aldrin level in maternal blood and dieldrin level in cord blood are higher in women in the age group 25-30 years than in women in age group of 19-24 years. Similarly, aldrin level in maternal blood is significantly higher in women with non-vegetarian dietary habit than in women with vegetarian dietary habit. No significant association is found for maternal and cord blood level. The results of the present study clearly demonstrate prenatal uptake of aldrin and dieldrin and provide recent information on the subsequent transplacental transfer. PMID:20195752

  20. Finance and faith at the Catholic Maternity Institute, Santa Fe, New Mexico, 1944-1969.

    PubMed

    Cockerham, Anne Z; Keeling, Arlene W

    2010-01-01

    In 1944, the Medical Mission Sisters opened the Catholic Maternity Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico, primarily to serve patients of Spanish American descent. The Maternity Institute offered nurse-midwifery care and functioned as a school to train nurse-midwifery students. Originally planned as a home birth service, the Catholic Maternity Institute soon evolved into a service in which patients chose whether to deliver in their own homes or in a small freestanding building called La Casita. In fact, despite their idealism about home birth and strong feelings that home birth was best, the sisters experienced significant ambivalence concerning La Casita. Births there met many of the institute's pragmatic needs for a larger number of student experiences, quick and safe transfers to a nearby hospital, and more efficient use of the midwives' time. Importantly, as the sisters realized that many of their patients preferred to deliver at La Casita, they came to see that this option permitted these impoverished patients an opportunity to exercise some choice. However, the choice of many patients to deliver at La Casita--which was significantly more expensive for the Maternity Institute than home birth--eventually led to the demise of the Maternity Institute. PMID:20067097

  1. [Death certificates of women in childbearing age: search for maternal deaths].

    PubMed

    Gil, Mariana Marcos; Gomes-Sponholz, Flavia Azevedo

    2013-01-01

    In Brazil, there is a lack of complete records on death certificates, and its reliability is questioned, especially for causes attributed to pregnancy and childbirth. We investigated, based on death certificates of women in reproductive age, any fields for identifying maternal deaths. Documentary research, conducted in hospital records. We analyzed in death certificates, maternal and no maternal deaths, inconclusive deaths and hidden deaths. To analyze the underlying causes of death we used ICD 10th Revision. Of the 301 death certificates reviewed, 60% had the fields 43/44 completed, and 40% had these fields blank and/or ignored. We found 58.5% of no maternal deaths, 2% of maternal deaths and 39.5% inconclusive. The analysis of inconclusive deaths allowed us to classify 4.3% as hidden deaths. To overcome the incompletitudes of civil registries, it is necessary that all health professionals be committed to the reliability of the information, so the priority target could be reached. PMID:23887780

  2. Challenges of maternal mortality reduction and opportunities under National Rural Health Mission--a critical appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish

    2005-01-01

    Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMR) continues to remain high in our country without showing any declining trend over a period of two decades. The proportions of maternal deaths contributed by direct obstetric causes have also remained more or less the same in rural areas. There is a strong need to improve coverage of antenatal care, promote institutional deliveries and provide emergency obstetric care. Delays occur in seeking care for obstetric complications and levels of 'met obstetric need' continue to be low in many parts of the country. Most of the First Referral Units (FRUs) and CHCs function at sub-optimal level in the country. National Rural Health Mission (NRHM) offers institutional mechanism and strategic options to reduce high MMR. 'Janani Suraksha Yojna', strengthening of CHCs (as per Indian Public Health standards) to offer 24 hours quality services including that of anesthetists and Accredited Social Health Activist (ASHA) are important proposals in this regard. District Health Mission can play an important role in monitoring maternal deaths occurring in hospitals or in community and thus create a social momentum to prevent and reduce maternal deaths. NRHM, however, depends largely on Panchayati Raj Institutions for effective implementation of proposed interventions and utilization of resources. In most parts of our country, State Governments have not empowered PRIs with real devolution of power. Therefore, much needs to be done locally to build the capacity of PRIs and develop state-specific guidelines in operational terms to implement interventions under NRHM for reducing maternal mortality ratio. PMID:16468281

  3. Measuring quality in maternal-newborn care: developing a clinical dashboard.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Ann E; Dunn, Sandra I; Fell, Deshayne B; Harrold, Joann; Walker, Mark C; Kelly, Sherrie; Smith, Graeme N

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy, birth, and the early newborn period are times of high use of health care services. As well as opportunities for providing quality care, there are potential missed opportunities for health promotion, safety issues, and increased costs for the individual and the system when quality is not well defined or measured. There has been a need to identify key performance indicators (KPIs) to measure quality care within the provincial maternal-newborn system. We also wanted to provide automated audit and feedback about these KPIs to support quality improvement initiatives in a large Canadian province with approximately 140 000 births per year. We therefore worked to develop a maternal-newborn dashboard to increase awareness about selected KPIs and to inform and support hospitals and care providers about areas for quality improvement. We mapped maternal-newborn data elements to a quality domain framework, sought feedback via survey for the relevance and feasibility of change, and examined current data and the literature to assist in setting provincial benchmarks. Six clinical performance indicators of maternal-newborn quality care were identified and evidence-informed benchmarks were set. A maternal-newborn dashboard with "drill down" capacity for detailed analysis to enhance audit and feedback is now available for implementation. While audit and feedback does not guarantee individuals or institutions will make practice changes and move towards quality improvement, it is an important first step. Practice change and quality improvement will not occur without an awareness of the issues. PMID:23343794

  4. Infant Arterial Stiffness and Maternal Iron Status in Pregnancy: A UK Birth Cohort (Baby VIP Study)

    PubMed Central

    Alwan, Nisreen A.; Cade, Janet E.; McArdle, Harry J.; Greenwood, Darren C.; Hayes, Helen E.; Ciantar, Etienne; Simpson, Nigel A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Background In animal studies, iron deficiency during pregnancy has been linked to increased offspring cardiovascular risk. No previous population studies have measured arterial stiffness early in life to examine its association with maternal iron status. Objective This study aimed to examine the association between maternal iron status in early pregnancy with infant brachio-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV). Methods The Baby VIP (Baby's Vascular Health and Iron in Pregnancy) study is a UK-based birth cohort which recruited 362 women after delivery from the Leeds Teaching Hospitals postnatal wards. Ferritin and transferrin receptor levels were measured in maternal serum samples previously obtained in the first trimester. Infant brachio-femoral PWV was measured during a home visit at 2–6 weeks. Results Iron depletion (ferritin <15 µg/l) was detected in 79 (23%) women in early pregnancy. Infant PWV (mean = 6.7 m/s, SD = 1.3, n = 284) was neither associated with maternal ferritin (adjusted change per 10 µg/l = 0.02, 95% CI: −0.01, 0.1), nor with iron depletion (adjusted change = −0.2, 95% CI: −0.6, 0.2). No evidence of association was observed between maternal serum transferrin receptor level and its ratio to ferritin with infant PWV. Maternal anaemia (<11 g/dl) at <20 weeks’ gestation was associated with a 1.0-m/s increase in infant PWV (adjusted 95% CI: 0.1, 1.9). Conclusion This is the largest study to date which has assessed peripheral PWV as a measure of arterial stiffness in infants. There was no evidence of an association between markers of maternal iron status early in pregnancy and infant PWV. PMID:25790854

  5. Community-based delivery of maternal care in conflict-affected areas of eastern Burma: perspectives from lay maternal health workers.

    PubMed

    Teela, Katherine C; Mullany, Luke C; Lee, Catherine I; Poh, Eh; Paw, Palae; Masenior, Nicole; Maung, Cynthia; Beyrer, Chris; Lee, Thomas J

    2009-04-01

    In settings where active conflict, resource scarcity, and logistical constraints prevail, provision of maternal health services within health centers and hospitals is unfeasible and alternative community-based strategies are needed. In eastern Burma, such conditions necessitated implementation of the "Mobile Obstetric Maternal Health Worker" (MOM) project, which has employed a community-based approach to increase access to essential maternal health services including emergency obstetric care. Lay Maternal Health Workers (MHWs) are central to the MOM service delivery model and, because they are accessible to both the communities inside Burma and to outside project managers, they serve as key informants for the project. Their insights can facilitate program and policy efforts to overcome critical delays and insufficient management of maternal complications linked to maternal mortality. Focus group discussions (n=9), in-depth interviews (n=18), and detailed case studies (n=14) were collected from MHWs during centralized project management meetings in February and October of 2007. Five case studies are presented to characterize and interpret the realities of reproductive health work in a conflict-affected setting. Findings highlight the process of building supportive networks and staff ownership of the MOM project, accessing and gaining community trust and participation to achieve timely delivery of care, and overcoming challenges to manage and appropriately deliver essential health services. They suggest that some emergency obstetric care services that are conventionally delivered only within healthcare settings might be feasible in community or home-based settings when alternatives are not available. This paper provides an opportunity to hear directly from community-based workers in a conflict setting, perspectives seldom documented in the scientific literature. A rights-based approach to service delivery and its suitability in settings where human rights violations

  6. Maternal characteristics and timing of presentation following pre-labour rupture of membranes

    PubMed Central

    Osaikhuwuomwan, James A.; Osemwenkha, Abieyuwa P.

    2014-01-01

    Background: To examine the influence of maternal characteristics on timing of presentation for intervention following pre-labour rupture of membrane (PROM) at term. Materials and Methods: This was a descriptive study of cases of term PROM with singleton births at the University of Benin Teaching Hospital (UBTH) from October 2011 to December 2012. Interval from onset of PROM to presentation to hospital was used as dependent variable. From the study population, two groups were identified based on time interval (≤24 hours or >24 hours) from PROM to presentation to hospital and their relationship to socio-demographic characteristic examined. Results: Over the study period, records of 110 women met the inclusion criteria and were selected for analysis. Their mean age was 29.26 ± 0.67 years; they were all married with 41.8% being nulliparous women. The mean gestational age at presentation with PROM was 38.5 ± 1.2. Over 50% had tertiary level of education. Overall, 38.2% were in social class 1. With regard to maternal response behaviour to PROM, 65.5% presented to the hospital within 24 hours while 34.5% presented after 24 hours of rupture of membranes. Majority of those that presented within 24 hours of PROM were in (upper) social class 1 and 2 and this differed significantly from those that presented after 24 hours, most of whom were in (lower) social class 3,4 and 5; [56 (77.8%) vs 16 (22.2%) and 14 (36.8%) vs 24 (63.2%)] P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Delay in presentation after PROM, illustrative of maternal under utilisation of BPACR package, is associated with being in a lower social class. Socio-economic and educational empowerment of women is advocated, while prospective research on maternal perception and attitude towards ANC is proposed. PMID:24970972

  7. Patterns of the Demographics, Clinical Characteristics, and Resource Utilization Among Maternal Decedents in Texas, 2001 - 2010: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Oud, Lavi

    2015-01-01

    Background Contemporary reporting of maternal mortality is focused on single, mutually exclusive causes of death among a minority of maternal decedents (pregnancy-related deaths), reflecting initial events leading to death. Although obstetric patients are susceptible to the lethal effects of downstream, more proximate contributors to death and to conditions not caused or precipitated by pregnancy, the burden of both categories and related patients’ attributes is invisible to clinicians and healthcare policy makers with the current reporting system. Thus, the population-level demographics, clinical characteristics, and resource utilization associated with pregnancy-associated deaths in the United States have not been adequately characterized. Methods We used the Texas Inpatient Public Use Data File to perform a population-based cohort study of the patterns of demographics, chronic comorbidity, occurrence of early maternal demise, potential contributors to maternal death, and resource utilization among maternal decedents in the state during 2001 - 2010. Results There were 557 maternal decedents during study period. Chronic comorbidity was reported in 45.2%. Most women (74.1%) were admitted to an ICU. Hemorrhage (27.8%), sepsis (23.5%), and cardiovascular conditions (22.6%) were the most commonly reported potential contributing conditions to maternal death, varying across categories of pregnancy-associated hospitalizations. More than one condition was reported in 39% of decedents. One in three women died during their first day of hospitalization, with no significant change over the past decade. The mean hospital length of stay was 7.9 days and total hospital charges were $250,000 or higher in 65 (11.7%) women. Conclusions The findings of the high burden of chronic illness, patterns of occurrence of a broad array of potential contributing conditions to pregnancy-associated death, and the resource-intensive needs of a large contemporary population-based cohort of

  8. Financial management of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Speranzo, A J

    1984-05-01

    The effect of hospital reimbursement systems on the financial management of hospitals is briefly discussed, and the organization of hospital financial operations is reviewed. The implementation of Medicare prospective pricing will change the way in which hospital finances are managed. Health-care managers will be concerned with the profitability of product lines, or diagnosis-related groups, in future strategic planning efforts. The hospital's finance department consists of several traditional areas that exist in almost all financial organizations. The functions and interactions of these various areas are discussed in light of previous and current hospital reimbursement strategies. Staffing of the finance department and the duties of the hospital's chief financial officer are also described. The prospective pricing system of hospital reimbursement and increasing pressure from the business community to stem the rising costs of health care will produce changes in the medical and financial operations of the hospital industry over the next decade. PMID:6375357

  9. Marathon Maternity Oral History Project

    PubMed Central

    Orkin, Aaron; Newbery, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore how birthing and maternity care are understood and valued in a rural community. Design Oral history research. Setting The rural community of Marathon, Ont, with a population of approximately 3500. Participants A purposive selection of mothers, grandmothers, nurses, physicians, and community leaders in the Marathon medical catchment area. Methods Interviews were conducted with a purposive sample, employing an oral history research methodology. Interviews were conducted non-anonymously in order to preserve the identity and personhood of participants. Interview transcripts were edited into short narratives. Oral histories offer perspectives and information not revealed in other quantitative or qualitative research methodologies. Narratives re-personalize and humanize medical research by offering researchers and practitioners the opportunity to bear witness to the personal stories affected through medical decision making. Main findings Eleven stand-alone narratives, published in this issue of Canadian Family Physician, form the project’s findings. Similar to a literary text or short story, they are intended for personal reflection and interpretation by the reader. Presenting the results of these interviews as narratives requires the reader to participate in the research exercise and take part in listening to these women’s voices. The project’s narratives will be accessible to readers from academic and non-academic backgrounds and will interest readers in medicine and allied health professions, medical humanities, community development, gender studies, social anthropology and history, and literature. Conclusion Sharing personal birthing experiences might inspire others to reevaluate and reconsider birthing practices and services in other communities. Where local maternity services are under threat, Marathon’s stories might contribute to understanding the meaning and challenges of local birthing, and the implications of losing

  10. The establishment and duration of breastfeeding. Part 1: Hospital influences.

    PubMed

    Vogel, A M; Mitchell, E A

    1998-05-01

    Most New Zealand mothers initiate breastfeeding in hospital, but many continue for only a relatively short time. Focus group discussions with mothers and health care workers on their perceptions of important factors influencing the duration of breastfeeding indicated many negative initial hospital experiences. Specific concerns included overworked staff; lack of health care workers' skills, particularly in helping infants to latch on; inconsistent advice; noise and embarrassment in four bedded rooms; and the impact of changes in the provision of maternity services and funding. PMID:9618601

  11. Maternal mortality in Yazd Province, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Karimi-Zarchi, Mojgan; Ghane-Ezabadi, Marzie; Vafaienasab, Mohammadreza; Dehghan, Ali; Ghasemi, Fateme; Zaidabadi, Mahbube; Zanbagh, Leila; Yazdian-Anari, Pouria; Teimoori, Soraya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Five hundred thousand maternal deaths occur each year worldwide, many of which are in developing countries. The maternal mortality rate is a measure that demonstrates the degree of adequacy of prenatal care and of economic and social conditions. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and causes of pregnancy-related mortality rates in Yazd Province. Methods This cross-sectional study examined the maternal deaths related to pregnancy that were recorded in Yazd Province, Iran, from 2002 to 2011. All maternal deaths that occurred during pregnancy, during delivery, and 42 days after birth were analyzed in this study. The data were collected through a questionnaire, and both direct and indirect causes of maternal deaths were determined. Results Forty pregnancy-related deaths occurred in this period, and the maternal mortality rate was 20.8 deaths per 100,000 live births. The mean age of death in the mothers in this study was 29.17. Fifty-five percent of women of the women who died delivered their babies by cesarean section, and only 20% of them delivered their babies vaginally. Bleeding was the most common cause of maternal mortality (30%), and it was associated directly with maternal mortality. Furthermore 20% of the mothers died due to heart disease and cardiac complications, which were associated indirectly with maternal mortality. Conclusion Cesarean section and its complications were the main cause of death in many cases. Thus, providing a strategic plan to reduce the use of this procedure, educate mothers, and ensure adequate access to pre-maternal care and to care during pregnancy are the most important measures that can be taken to decrease the maternal mortality rate. PMID:27054003

  12. A multidisciplinary program of preparation for childbirth and motherhood: maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background To study maternal anxiety and perinatal outcomes in pregnant women submitted to a Multidisciplinary Program for Childbirth and Motherhood Preparation (MPCM). Methods This is a not randomized controlled trial on 67 nulliparous pregnant women divided into two groups according to participation (MPCM Group; n = 38) or not (Control Group; n = 29) in MPCM. The program consisted of 10 meetings (between the 18th and the 38th gestational week) during which educational, physiotherapeutic and interaction activities were developed. Anxiety was quantified at the beginning and at the end of the gestational period by the Trace-State Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Results Initial maternal anxiety was equivalent between the groups. At the end of the gestational period, it was observed that anxiety levels increased in the Control Group and were maintained in the MPCM Group. A higher occurrence of vaginal deliveries (83.8%) and hospital discharge of three-day-older newborns (81.6%) as a result of MPCM was also significant. Levels of state-anxiety at the end of pregnancy showed a negative correlation with vaginal delivery, gestational age, birth weight and Apgar index at the first minute and positive correlation with the hospital period remaining of the newborns. Conclusion In the study conditions, MPCM was associated with lower levels of maternal anxiety, a larger number of vaginal deliveries and shorter hospitalization time of newborns. It was not related to adverse perinatal outcomes. PMID:21034460

  13. Maternal Sepsis and Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Chebbo, Ahmad; Tan, Susanna; Kassis, Christelle; Tamura, Leslie; Carlson, Richard W

    2016-01-01

    The year 2015 marked the 200th anniversary of the birth of Ignaz Semmelweis, the Hungarian physician who identified unhygienic practices of physicians as a major cause of childbed fever or puerperal sepsis. Although such practices have largely disappeared as a factor in the development of chorioamnionitis and postpartum or puerperal endometritis, it is appropriate that this article on sepsis in pregnancy acknowledges his contributions to maternal health. This review describes the incidence and mortality of sepsis in pregnancy, methods to identify and define sepsis in this population, including scoring systems, causes, and sites of infection during pregnancy and parturition and management guidelines. PMID:26600449

  14. Hospital demand for physicians.

    PubMed

    Morrisey, M A; Jensen, G A

    1990-01-01

    This article develops a derived demand for physicians that is general enough to encompass physician control, simple profit maximization and hospital utility maximization models of the hospital. The analysis focuses on three special aspects of physician affiliations: the price of adding a physician to the staff is unobserved; the physician holds appointments at multiple hospitals, and physicians are not homogeneous. Using 1983 American Hospital Association data, a system of specialty-specific demand equations is estimated. The results are consistent with the model and suggest that physicians should be concerned about reduced access to hospitals, particularly as the stock of hospitals declines. PMID:10104050

  15. Hospitable Classrooms: Biblical Hospitality and Inclusive Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David W.

    2011-01-01

    This paper contributes to a Christian hermeneutic of special education by suggesting the biblical concept of hospitality as a necessary characteristic of classroom and school environments in which students with disabilities and other marginalized students can be effectively incorporated into the body of the classroom. Christian hospitality, seen…

  16. Immigrants' experiences of maternity care in Japan.

    PubMed

    Igarashi, Yukari; Horiuchi, Shigeko; Porter, Sarah E

    2013-08-01

    Language and cultural differences can negatively impact immigrant women's birth experience. However, little is known about their experiences in Japan's highly homogenous culture. This cross-sectional study used survey data from a purposive sampling of immigrant women from 16 hospitals in several Japanese prefectures. Meeting the criteria and recruited to this study were 804 participants consisting of 236 immigrant women: Chinese (n = 83), Brazilian (n = 62), Filipino (n = 43), South Korean (n = 29) and from variety of English speaking nations (n = 19) and 568 Japanese women. The questionnaire was prepared in six languages: Japanese (kana syllables), Chinese, English, Korean, Portuguese, and Tagalog (Filipino). Associations among quality of maternity care, Japanese literacy level, loneliness and care satisfaction were explored using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. The valid and reliable instruments used were Quality of Care for Pregnancy, Delivery and Postpartum Questionnaire, Rapid Estimate of Adult Literacy in Medicine Japanese version, the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale-Japanese version and Care satisfaction. Care was evaluated across prenatal, labor and delivery and post-partum periods. Immigrant women scored higher than Japanese women for both positive and negative aspects. When loneliness was strongly felt, care satisfaction was lower. Some competence of Japanese literacy was more likely to obstruct positive communication with healthcare providers, and was associated with loneliness. Immigrant women rated overall care as satisfactory. Japanese literacy decreased communication with healthcare providers, and was associated with loneliness presumably because some literacy unreasonably increased health care providers' expectations of a higher level of communication. PMID:23609237

  17. The application of hospitality elements in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ziqi; Robson, Stephani; Hollis, Brooke

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, many hospital designs have taken inspiration from hotels, spurred by factors such as increased patient and family expectations and regulatory or financial incentives. Increasingly, research evidence suggests the value of enhancing the physical environment to foster healing and drive consumer decisions and perceptions of service quality. Although interest is increasing in the broader applicability of numerous hospitality concepts to the healthcare field, the focus of this article is design innovations, and the services that such innovations support, from the hospitality industry. To identify physical hotel design elements and associated operational features that have been used in the healthcare arena, a series of interviews with hospital and hotel design experts were conducted. Current examples and suggestions for future hospitality elements were also sought from the experts, academic journals, and news articles. Hospitality elements applied in existing hospitals that are addressed in this article include hotel-like rooms and decor; actual hotels incorporated into medical centers; hotel-quality food, room service, and dining facilities for families; welcoming lobbies and common spaces; hospitality-oriented customer service training; enhanced service offerings, including concierges; spas or therapy centers; hotel-style signage and way-finding tools; and entertainment features. Selected elements that have potential for future incorporation include executive lounges and/or communal lobbies with complimentary wireless Internet and refreshments, centralized controls for patients, and flexible furniture. Although the findings from this study underscore the need for more hospitality-like environments in hospitals, the investment decisions made by healthcare executives must be balanced with cost-effectiveness and the assurance that clinical excellence remains the top priority. PMID:23424818

  18. [Institutional iatrogeny and maternal death: Semmelweis and puerperal fever].

    PubMed

    Salaverry García, Oswaldo

    2013-07-01

    Puerperal fever is a disease that becomes epidemic in the eighteenth century as a result of two factors: the urban working masses generated by the industrial revolution and the progressive hegemonization and medicalization of birth care in large public hospitals. Institutionalized maternal death reached figures above 30%, while in the case of birth care provided by midwives, it was than 2%. Semmelweis, an Hungarian physician, sustained that physicians contaminated women in labor due to insufficient hygiene after performing necropsies and established prophylactic measures in the Vienna Hospital that reduced mortality dramatically. However, his ideas were rejected because they affected the institutionalization process of medicine, based on altruism and honor, which would make it impossible to cause harm to patients. He was forced to leave Vienna Hospital and he continued his struggle in Budapest, but the rejection and disagreement of his peers with his doctrine affected his mental health. He died in an asylum, a few years before Pasteur and Koch proved the existence of the bacteria that caused diseases such as puerperal fever. PMID:24100831

  19. A new definition of maternal depletion syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Winkvist, A; Rasmussen, K M; Habicht, J P

    1992-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Although the term "maternal depletion syndrome" has been commonly used to explain poor maternal and infant health, whether such a syndrome actually exists remains unclear. This uncertainty may be due to the lack of a clear definition of the syndrome and the absence of theoretical frameworks that account for the many factors related to reproductive nutrition. METHODS. We propose a new definition of maternal depletion syndrome within a framework that accounts for potential confounding factors. RESULTS. Our conceptual framework distinguishes between childbearing pattern and inadequate diet as causes of poor maternal health; hence, our definition of maternal depletion syndrome has both biological and practical meaning. The new definition is based on overall change in maternal nutritional status over one reproductive cycle in relation to possible depletion and repletion phases and in relation to initial nutritional status. CONCLUSIONS. The empirical application of this approach should permit the testing of the existence of maternal depletion syndrome in the developing world, and the distinction between populations where family planning will alleviate maternal depletion and those in which an improved diet is also necessary. PMID:1566948

  20. NATIONAL MATERNAL AND INFANT HEALTH SURVEY (NMIHS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The National Maternal and Infant Health Survey (NMIHS) provides data on maternal and infant health, including prenatal care, birth weight, fetal loss, and infant mortality. The objective of the NMIHS is to collect data needed by Federal, State, and private researchers to study fa...

  1. Infant and Maternal Sensitivity to Interpersonal Timing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henning, Anne; Striano, Tricia

    2011-01-01

    A perturbation paradigm was employed to assess 3- and 6-month-old infants' and their mothers' sensitivity to a 3-s temporal delay implemented in an ongoing televised interaction. At both ages, the temporal delay affected infant but not maternal behavior and only when implementing the temporal delay in maternal (Experiment 1, N = 64) but not infant…

  2. Infant Communicative Behaviors and Maternal Responsiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiCarlo, Cynthia F.; Onwujuba, Chinwe; Baumgartner, Jennifer I.

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study applies attachment and transactional theories in evaluating the dyadic interactions observed between a mother and her infant. Infant communication and maternal responsivity are highlighted as the medium for positive interaction. Objective: The impact of individualized maternal training on mother infant communicative…

  3. Autism Symptom Topography and Maternal Socioemotional Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ekas, Naomi; Whitman, Thomas L.

    2010-01-01

    Researchers examining the relationship of autism "symptomatology" and maternal stress have defined symptomatology in terms of level of severity, frequency of occurrence, or symptom type. In the present study, the relationship of maternal perceptions of these dimensions, along with a fourth, symptom diversity, and negative and positive indices of…

  4. Maternal Depression and Developmental Disability: Research Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Donald B., Jr.; Golden, Robert N.; Roberts, Jane; Ford, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Maternal depression in families having a child with a disability has been the subject of considerable research over the past 25 years. This review was designed to describe the literature on maternal depression, critique its research methodology, identify consensus findings across studies, and make recommendations for future research. A particular…

  5. Putting the "M" back in the Maternal and Child Health Bureau: reducing maternal mortality and morbidity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Michael C; Highsmith, Keisher; de la Cruz, David; Atrash, Hani K

    2015-07-01

    Maternal mortality and severe morbidity are on the rise in the United States. A significant proportion of these events are preventable. The Maternal Health Initiative (MHI), coordinated by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau at the Health Resources and Services Administration, is intensifying efforts to reduce maternal mortality and severe morbidity in the U.S. Through a public-private partnership, MHI is taking a comprehensive approach to improving maternal health focusing on five priority areas: improving women's health before, during and beyond pregnancy; improving the quality and safety of maternity care; improving systems of maternity care including both clinical and public health systems; improving public awareness and education; and improving surveillance and research. PMID:25626713

  6. Maternal vaccination: moving the science forward

    PubMed Central

    Faucette, Azure N.; Unger, Benjamin L.; Gonik, Bernard; Chen, Kang

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Infections remain one of the leading causes of morbidity in pregnant women and newborns, with vaccine-preventable infections contributing significantly to the burden of disease. In the past decade, maternal vaccination has emerged as a promising public health strategy to prevent and combat maternal, fetal and neonatal infections. Despite a number of universally recommended maternal vaccines, the development and evaluation of safe and effective maternal vaccines and their wide acceptance are hampered by the lack of thorough understanding of the efficacy and safety in the pregnant women and the offspring. METHODS An outline was synthesized based on the current status and major gaps in the knowledge of maternal vaccination. A systematic literature search in PUBMED was undertaken using the key words in each section title of the outline to retrieve articles relevant to pregnancy. Articles cited were selected based on relevance and quality. On the basis of the reviewed information, a perspective on the future directions of maternal vaccination research was formulated. RESULTS Maternal vaccination can generate active immune protection in the mother and elicit systemic immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgG, IgA and IgM responses to confer neonatal protection. The maternal immune system undergoes significant modulation during pregnancy, which influences responsiveness to vaccines. Significant gaps exist in our knowledge of the efficacy and safety of maternal vaccines, and no maternal vaccines against a large number of old and emerging pathogens are available. Public acceptance of maternal vaccination has been low. CONCLUSIONS To tackle the scientific challenges of maternal vaccination and to provide the public with informed vaccination choices, scientists and clinicians in different disciplines must work closely and have a mechanistic understanding of the systemic, reproductive and mammary mucosal immune responses to vaccines. The use of animal models should be

  7. Hospital-acquired pneumonia

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000146.htm Hospital-acquired pneumonia To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hospital-acquired pneumonia is an infection of the lungs ...

  8. Surviving Your Child's Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The parent of a young child who required major open heart surgery shares his suggestions for coping with a young child's hospitalization including parent visitation, relating to the hospital staff, getting answers to questions, and utilizing available services. (DB)

  9. Understanding your hospital bill

    MedlinePlus

    ... getting the help you need, consider hiring a medical-billing advocate. Advocates charge an hourly fee or a ... American Hospital Association. Hospital Billing and Collection ... 15, 2015. Family Doctor.org. Understanding your Medical Bills. ...

  10. Hospitals as health educators

    MedlinePlus

    ... than your local hospital. From health videos to yoga classes, many hospitals offer information families need to ... care and breastfeeding Parenting Baby sign language Baby yoga or massage Babysitting courses for teens Exercise classes ...

  11. Evaluation of reliability and validity of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30, Albanian version) among breast cancer patients from Kosovo

    PubMed Central

    Shuleta-Qehaja, Selvete; Sterjev, Zoran; Shuturkova, Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Patients and methods A sample of breast cancer patients (n=62 women) were interviewed for the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) in Albanian. Reliability of the questionnaire was considered acceptable if Cronbach’s alpha was ≥0.70. Item convergent-discriminant validity was tested through multitrait scaling analysis. Construct validity was tested under the hypotheses that QLQ-C30 interscale correlations would have an acceptable value of ≥0.40 and as well as by known group comparisons assessing differences of patient subgroups with reference to disease stage and education level. Results The mean age of the patients was 50 years (standard deviation: 10.9 years). Cronbach’s alpha ranged from 0.54 for the cognitive functioning scale to 0.96 for the global health quality of life (GH/QoL) scale. In multitrait scaling analysis, the strength of Spearman’s correlations between an item and its own subscale was ≥0.40, with the exception of item 5 (ρ=0.22); results for item discriminant validity were satisfactory, with the exception of item 5, which showed higher correlation with other subscales than with its own physical functioning. The Spearman’s interscale coefficients generally were correlated with each other. Results of known group comparisons did not show significant differences in terms of disease stage. Regarding education level, patients with high school/university education had better functional scales scores only in certain subscales compared to other subgroups; furthermore, patients with secondary school education had better GH/QoL compared to other subgroups of patients. Conclusion The EORTC QLQ-C30 (v3.0) in Albanian was found to be valid and reliable for women with breast cancer and could be considered as a starting point for further evaluation study. PMID:25834410

  12. Evidence from community level inputs to improve quality of care for maternal and newborn health: interventions and findings

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Annually around 40 million mothers give birth at home without any trained health worker. Consequently, most of the maternal and neonatal mortalities occur at the community level due to lack of good quality care during labour and birth. Interventions delivered at the community level have not only been advocated to improve access and coverage of essential interventions but also to reduce the existing disparities and reaching the hard to reach. In this paper, we have reviewed the effectiveness of care delivered through community level inputs for improving maternal and newborn health outcomes. We considered all available systematic reviews published before May 2013 on the pre-defined community level interventions and report findings from 43 systematic reviews. Findings suggest that home visitation significantly improved antenatal care, tetanus immunization coverage, referral and early initiation of breast feeding with reductions in antenatal hospital admission, cesarean-section rates birth, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality and perinatal mortality. Task shifting to midwives and community health workers has shown to significantly improve immunization uptake and breast feeding initiation with reductions in antenatal hospitalization, episiotomy, instrumental delivery and hospital stay. Training of traditional birth attendants as a part of community based intervention package has significant impact on referrals, early breast feeding, maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, and perinatal mortality. Formation of community based support groups decreased maternal morbidity, neonatal mortality, perinatal mortality with improved referrals and early breast feeding rates. At community level, home visitation, community mobilization and training of community health workers and traditional birth attendants have the maximum potential to improve a range of maternal and newborn health outcomes. There is lack of data to establish effectiveness of outreach services, mass media

  13. A Multifaceted Approach to Revitalizing the Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative in Croatia.

    PubMed

    Grgurić, Josip; Zakarija-Grković, Irena; Pavičić Bošnjak, Anita; Stanojević, Milan

    2016-08-01

    The Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative (BFHI) was launched in Croatia in 1993. By 1998, 15 of 34 maternity facilities were designated "Baby-Friendly." Introduction of hospital bags, violating the International Code of the Marketing of Breastmilk Substitutes, led to a standstill in the BFHI. The aim of this article is to describe the successful reintroduction of the BFHI in Croatia between 2007 and 2015. After hospital bags were abolished in 2007, UNICEF Croatia undertook an assessment of BFHI implementation. All maternity facilities were invited by UNICEF and the Ministry of Health to join the renewed BFHI. UNICEF materials were translated and training for trainers, assessors, coordinators, and hospital staff held. By June 2015, 30 of 32 (94%) maternity facilities, providing care to 89% of newborns, were Baby-Friendly. Nine maternity hospitals have been renovated and 2 new hospitals have been built. Exclusive breastfeeding rates have risen 16% at 0 to 2 months (from 51% in 2007 to 67% in 2014) and 14% at 3 to 5 months (from 32% in 2007 to 46% in 2014). Fourteen "Breastfeeding-Friendly" primary care practices have been designated, 166 breastfeeding support groups are in operation, criteria for Mother-Friendly care are being piloted in 2 maternity facilities, and "Ten Steps in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit" are being introduced. The BFHI provides an excellent opportunity for revitalizing breastfeeding protection, promotion, and support in all settings. Recognition and support of the BFHI by the Croatian government was crucial for implementing the BFHI, whereas the marketing practices of the breast milk substitutes industry are an ongoing challenge. PMID:27121238

  14. Maternally administered interventions for preterm infants in the NICU: effects on maternal psychological distress and mother-infant relationship.

    PubMed

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C; Levy, Janet A; O'Shea, T Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard J

    2014-11-01

    Although studies have examined the effects of interventions focused on preterm infants, few studies have examined the effects on maternal distress (anxiety, depressive symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress) or parenting. This study examined the effects of the auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention and kangaroo care (KC) on maternal distress and the mother-infant relationship compared to an attention control group. 240 mothers from four hospitals were randomly assigned to the three groups. Maternal characteristics in the three groups were similar: 64.1% of ATVV mothers, 64.2% of KC mothers, and 76.5% of control mothers were African American; maternal age averaged 26.3 years for ATVV mothers, 28.1 for KC mothers, and 26.6 for control mothers; and years of education averaged 13.6 for ATVV and KC mothers, and 13.1 for control mothers. Mothers only differed on parity: 68.4% of ATVV and 54.7% of KC mothers were first-time mothers as compared to 43.6% of control mothers. Their infants had a similar mean gestational ages (27.0 weeks for ATVV, 27.2 for KC, and 27.4 for control) and mean birthweights (993 g for ATVV, 1022 for KC, and 1023 for control). Mothers completed questionnaires during hospitalization, and at 2, 6 and 12 months corrected age on demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, state anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress, worry about child health, and child vulnerability (only at 12 months). At 2 and 6 months, 45-min videotapes of mother-infant interactions were made, and the HOME Inventory was scored. Behaviors coded from the videotapes and a HOME subscale were combined into five interactive dimensions: maternal positive involvement and developmental stimulation and child social behaviors, developmental maturity, and irritability. Intervention effects were examined using general linear mixed models controlling for parity and recruitment site. The groups did not differ on any maternal distress

  15. Maternally Administered Interventions for Preterm Infants in the NICU: Effects on Maternal Psychological Distress and Mother-Infant Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Holditch-Davis, Diane; White-Traut, Rosemary C.; Levy, Janet A.; O’Shea, T. Michael; Geraldo, Victoria; David, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Although studies have examined the effects of interventions focused on preterm infants, few studies have examined the effects on maternal distress (anxiety, depressive symptoms, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress) or parenting. This study examined the effects of the auditory-tactile-visual-vestibular (ATVV) intervention and kangaroo care (KC) on maternal distress and the mother-infant relationship compared to an attention control group. 240 mothers from four hospitals were randomly assigned to the three groups. Maternal characteristics in the three groups were similar: 64.1% of ATVV mothers, 64.2% of KC mothers, and 76.5% of control mothers were African American; maternal age averaged 26.3 years for ATVV mothers, 28.1 for KC mothers, and 26.6 for control mothers; and years of education averaged 13.6 for ATVV and KC mothers, and 13.1 for control mothers. Mothers only differed on parity: 68.4% of ATVV and 54.7% of KC mothers were first-time mothers as compared to 43.6% of control mothers. Their infants had a similar mean gestational ages (27.0 weeks for ATVV, 27.2 for KC, and 27.4 for control) and mean birthweights (993 grams for ATVV, 1022 for KC, and 1023 for control). Mothers completed questionnaires during hospitalization, and at 2, 6 and 12 months corrected age on demographic characteristics, depressive symptoms, state anxiety, post-traumatic stress symptoms, parenting stress, worry about child health, and child vulnerability (only at 12 months). At 2 and 6 months, 45-minute videotapes of mother-infant interactions were made, and the HOME Inventory was scored. Behaviors coded from the videotapes and a HOME subscale were combined into five interactive dimensions: maternal positive involvement and developmental stimulation and child social behaviors, developmental maturity, and irritability. Intervention effects were examined using general linear mixed models controlling for parity and recruitment site. The groups did not differ on any maternal

  16. Maternal influence on the decision to adopt Norplant.

    PubMed

    Rickert, V I; Hendon, A E; Davis, P; Kozlowski, K J

    1995-05-01

    A prospective study of 121 Norplant acceptors 12-21 years old recruited from a hospital-based adolescent gynecology service in Arkansas confirmed the importance of maternal influence on the acceptance process, even when state law does not mandate parental consent. These adolescents completed a questionnaire indicating the relative roles of various significant others in providing information about Norplant and influencing the decision-making process. The adolescent's mother was cited as the most important decision source by 45 (37%) young women; another 33 (27%) identified a health care provider. Although Arkansas does not require parental notification, 74 (63%) had told their mother of their decision to use Norplant. Maternally influenced adolescents were significantly more likely than those who identified health care professionals, girlfriends, and boyfriends as decisive to have obtained specific information about Norplant from their mother, to be former oral contraceptive users, and to have a consistent sexual partner. Overall, 99 (82%) adolescents reported they intended to use Norplant for at least two years. Although 44 (36%) expressed concerns about Norplant's cost, only two indicated this was a factor in their decision. The findings of this study offer reassurance to health care providers who seek to protect patient confidentiality yet encourage parent-teen communication about reproductive health. PMID:7662684

  17. Perimortem cesarean delivery: its role in maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Katz, Vern L

    2012-02-01

    Since Roman times, physicians have been instructed to perform postmortem cesarean deliveries to aid in funeral rites, baptism, and in the very slim chance that a live fetus might still be within the deceased mother's womb. This procedure was disliked by physicians being called to a dying mother's bedside. As births moved to hospitals, and modern obstetrics evolved, the causes of maternal death changed from sepsis, hemorrhage, and dehydration to a greater incidence of sudden cardiac arrest from medication errors or embolism. Thus, the likelihood of delivering a viable neonate at the time of a mother's death increased. Additionally, as cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) became widespread, physicians realized that during pregnancy, with the term gravid woman lying on her back, chest compressions cannot deliver sufficient cardiac output to accomplish resuscitation. Paradoxically, after a postmortem cesarean delivery is performed, effective CPR was seen to occur. Mothers were revived. Thus, the procedure was renamed the perimortem cesarean. Because brain damage begins at 5 minutes of anoxia, the procedure should be initiated at 4 minutes (the 4-minute rule) to deliver the healthiest fetus. If a mother has a resuscitatable cause of death, then her life may be saved as well by a prompt and timely cesarean delivery during CPR. Sadly, too often, we are paralyzed by the horror of the maternal cardiac arrest, and instinctively, we try CPR for too long before turning to the perimortem delivery. The quick procedure though may actually improve the situation for the mother, and certainly will save the child. PMID:22280869

  18. Rating maternal and neonatal health services in developing countries.

    PubMed Central

    Bulatao, Rodolfo A.; Ross, John A.

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess maternal and neonatal health services in 49 developing countries. METHODS: The services were rated on a scale of 0 to 100 by 10 - 25 experts in each country. The ratings covered emergency and routine services, including family planning, at health centres and district hospitals, access to these services for both rural and urban women, the likelihood that women would receive particular forms of antenatal and delivery care, and supporting elements of programmes such as policy, resources, monitoring, health promotion and training. FINDINGS: The average rating was only 56, but countries varied widely, especially in access to services in rural areas. Comparatively good ratings were reported for immunization services, aspects of antenatal care and counselling on breast feeding. Ratings were particularly weak for emergency obstetric care in rural areas, safe abortion and HIV counselling. CONCLUSION: Maternal health programme effort in developing countries is seriously deficient, particularly in rural areas. Rural women are disadvantaged in many respects, but especially regarding the treatment of emergency obstetric conditions. Both rural and urban women receive inadequate HIV counselling and testing and have quite limited access to safe abortion. Improving services requires moving beyond policy reform to strengthening implementation of services and to better staff training and health promotion. Increased financing is only part of the solution. PMID:12378290

  19. ASSOCIATION BETWEEN MATERNAL BODY MASS INDEX AND WEIGHT GAIN WITH LOW BIRTH WEIGHT IN EASTERN THAILAND.

    PubMed

    Sananpanichkul, Panya; Rujirabanjerd, Sinitdhorn

    2015-11-01

    We conducted a retrospective study to determine the association between maternal body mass index and pregnancy weight gain with low birth weight newborns (LBWN) at Phrapokklao Hospital in eastern Thailand. We evaluated the files of 2,012 women who delivered at the hospital. Data obtained from the charts were parity, maternal age, body mass index (BMI), prepregnancy weight, weight gained during pregnancy, gestational age, hematocrit level, referral status, place of residence, fetal presentation, completion of antenatal care visits and maternal HIV infection. Sixty-five point two percent of subjects were aged 20-34 years old. Fifty-seven percent of subjects had a normal BMI and 13.2% were anemic. Thirty- seven point five percent, 32.9% and 29.6% gained too little, the correct amount and too much weight during pregnancy, respectively. Primiparity, too little weight gain and gestational age less than 37 weeks at delivery were all significantly associated with LBWN. Preterm babies were 25 times more likely to have a low birth weight than term infants (adjusted OR = 24.995; 95% CI: 16.824-37.133, p < 0.001). When maternal weight gain of any BMI group was inadequate, the subject had a 3.4 times greater risk (adjusted OR = 3.357; 95% CI: 22.114-5.332, p < 0.001) of having a LBWN. Primiparous women had a 1.7 times (adjusted OR=1.720; 95% CI: 1.182-2.503, p-0.005) greater risk of having a LBWN. The results from this study may be useful to plan maternal health programs for eastern Thailand. PMID:26867367

  20. Challenges for the adoption of evidence-based maternity care in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Turan, Janet Molzan; Bulut, Ayşen; Nalbant, Hacer; Ortayli, Nuriye; Erbaydar, Tuğrul

    2006-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine is an important tool for improving the quality of maternity care. However, getting providers to change their practices may not be an easy or rapid process, and other factors, in addition to knowledge of the literature, may be important. This study documents the current state of obstetric practices at three maternity hospitals in Istanbul, Turkey, and identifies attitudes, social pressures, and perceptions that, according to the theory of planned behavior, may pose challenges for adoption of evidence-based practices. Data were collected through interviews with administrators, examination of hospital statistics, provider and client interviews, and structured observations of maternity care. Practices that did not follow current guidelines included routine episiotomy, not allowing companionship during labor, use of procedures to speed up labor without indications, routine enema, restriction of mobility, restriction of oral fluids, supine position for delivery, and non-use of active management of the third stage of labor. The findings indicate that providers had negative attitudes about some recommended practices, while they had positive attitudes towards some ineffective and/or harmful practices. We identified social pressure to comply with practices recommended by supervisors and peers, as well as the belief that limited resources affect maternity care providers, opportunities to perform evidence-based procedures. An underlying problem was the failure to involve women in decision-making regarding their own maternity care. In addition to informing providers about the evidence, it seems necessary to develop standard protocols, improve physical conditions, and implement behavior interventions that take into account provider attitudes, social pressures, and beliefs. PMID:16289786

  1. 2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. View northwest of main hospital building complex, hospital building (Building 90), administration and clinical hospital building (Building 88), and hospital building (Building 91) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers Western Branch, 4101 South Fourth Street, Leavenworth, Leavenworth County, KS

  2. Modification of the association between maternal smoke exposure and congenital heart defects by polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase genes.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Ying; Li, Shengli; Mu, Dezhi; Tian, Xiaoxian; Lin, Yuan; Yang, Jiaxiang; Li, Jun; Li, Nana; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Xinlin; Deng, Kui; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) arise through various combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Our study explores how polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes affect the association between cigarette smoke exposure and CHDs. We analysed 299 mothers of children with CHDs and 284 mothers of children without any abnormalities who were recruited from six hospitals. The hair nicotine concentration (HNC) was used to quantify maternal smoke exposure, and the maternal GSTT1, and GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes were sequenced. We found a trend of higher adjusted odds ratios with higher maternal HNC levels, suggesting a dose-response relationship between maternal smoke exposure and CHDs. The lowest HNC range associated with an increased risk of CHDs was 0.213-0.319 ng/mg among the mothers with functional deletions of GSTM1 or GSTT1and 0.319-0.573 ng/mg among the mothers with normal copies of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, the adjusted odds ratio for an HNC of >0.573 ng/mg was 38.53 among the mothers with the GSTP1 AG or GG genotype, which was 7.76 (χ(2) = 6.702, p = 0.010) times greater than the AOR in the mothers with GSTP1 AA genotype. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of maternal GST genes may modify the association of maternal smoke exposure with CHDs. PMID:26456689

  3. Modification of the association between maternal smoke exposure and congenital heart defects by polymorphisms in glutathione S-transferase genes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohong; Liu, Zhen; Deng, Ying; Li, Shengli; Mu, Dezhi; Tian, Xiaoxian; Lin, Yuan; Yang, Jiaxiang; Li, Jun; Li, Nana; Wang, Yanping; Chen, Xinlin; Deng, Kui; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) arise through various combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Our study explores how polymorphisms in the glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes affect the association between cigarette smoke exposure and CHDs. We analysed 299 mothers of children with CHDs and 284 mothers of children without any abnormalities who were recruited from six hospitals. The hair nicotine concentration (HNC) was used to quantify maternal smoke exposure, and the maternal GSTT1, and GSTM1 and GSTP1 genes were sequenced. We found a trend of higher adjusted odds ratios with higher maternal HNC levels, suggesting a dose-response relationship between maternal smoke exposure and CHDs. The lowest HNC range associated with an increased risk of CHDs was 0.213–0.319 ng/mg among the mothers with functional deletions of GSTM1 or GSTT1and 0.319–0.573 ng/mg among the mothers with normal copies of GSTM1 and GSTT1. In addition, the adjusted odds ratio for an HNC of >0.573 ng/mg was 38.53 among the mothers with the GSTP1 AG or GG genotype, which was 7.76 (χ2 = 6.702, p = 0.010) times greater than the AOR in the mothers with GSTP1 AA genotype. Our study suggests that polymorphisms of maternal GST genes may modify the association of maternal smoke exposure with CHDs. PMID:26456689

  4. Association between Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy and Low Birthweight: Effects by Maternal Age

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Wei; Suzuki, Kohta; Tanaka, Taichiro; Kohama, Moriyasu; Yamagata, Zentaro

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal smoking during pregnancy has been consistently related to low birthweight. However, older mothers, who are already at risk of giving birth to low birthweight infants, might be even more susceptible to the effects of maternal smoking. Therefore, this study aimed to examine the modified association between maternal smoking and low birthweight by maternal age. Methods Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of all mothers of children born between 2004 and 2010 in Okinawa, Japan who underwent medical check-ups at age 3 months. Variables assessed were maternal smoking during pregnancy, maternal age, gestational age, parity, birth year, and complications during pregnancy. Stratified analyses were performed using a logistic regression model. Results In total, 92641 participants provided complete information on all variables. Over the 7 years studied, the proportion of mothers smoking during pregnancy decreased from 10.6% to 5.0%, while the prevalence of low birthweight did not change remarkably (around 10%). Maternal smoking was significantly associated with low birthweight in all age groups. The strength of the association increased with maternal age, both in crude and adjusted models. Conclusions Consistent with previous studies conducted in Western countries, this study demonstrates that maternal age has a modifying effect on the association between maternal smoking and birthweight. This finding suggests that specific education and health care programs for older smoking mothers are important to improve their foetal growth. PMID:26795494

  5. Maternal caloric restriction partially rescues the deleterious effects of advanced maternal age on offspring.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Kristin E; Jarvis, George; Bock, Martha; Mark Welch, David B

    2014-08-01

    While many studies have focused on the detrimental effects of advanced maternal age and harmful prenatal environments on progeny, little is known about the role of beneficial non-Mendelian maternal inheritance on aging. Here, we report the effects of maternal age and maternal caloric restriction (CR) on the life span and health span of offspring for a clonal culture of the monogonont rotifer Brachionus manjavacas. Mothers on regimens of chronic CR (CCR) or intermittent fasting (IF) had increased life span compared with mothers fed ad libitum (AL). With increasing maternal age, life span and fecundity of female offspring of AL-fed mothers decreased significantly and life span of male offspring was unchanged, whereas body size of both male and female offspring increased. Maternal CR partially rescued these effects, increasing the mean life span of AL-fed female offspring but not male offspring and increasing the fecundity of AL-fed female offspring compared with offspring of mothers of the same age. Both maternal CR regimens decreased male offspring body size, but only maternal IF decreased body size of female offspring, whereas maternal CCR caused a slight increase. Understanding the genetic and biochemical basis of these different maternal effects on aging may guide effective interventions to improve health span and life span. PMID:24661622

  6. Striving to promote male involvement in maternal health care in rural and urban settings in Malawi - a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding the strategies that health care providers employ in order to invite men to participate in maternal health care is very vital especially in today's dynamic cultural environment. Effective utilization of such strategies is dependent on uncovering the salient issues that facilitate male participation in maternal health care. This paper examines and describes the strategies that were used by different health care facilities to invite husbands to participate in maternal health care in rural and urban settings of southern Malawi. Methods The data was collected through in-depth interviews from sixteen of the twenty health care providers from five different health facilities in rural and urban settings of Malawi. The health facilities comprised two health centres, one district hospital, one mission hospital, one private hospital and one central hospital. A semi-structured interview guide was used to collect data from health care providers with the aim of understanding strategies they used to invite men to participate in maternal health care. Results Four main strategies were used to invite men to participate in maternal health care. The strategies were; health care provider initiative, partner notification, couple initiative and community mobilization. The health care provider initiative and partner notification were at health facility level, while the couple initiative was at family level and community mobilization was at village (community) level. The community mobilization had three sub-themes namely; male peer initiative, use of incentives and community sensitization. The sustainability of each strategy to significantly influence behaviour change for male participation in maternal health care is discussed. Conclusion Strategies to invite men to participate in maternal health care were at health facility, family and community levels. The couple strategy was most appropriate but was mostly used by educated and city residents. The male peer

  7. Development of the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) for migrants to Western societies: an international Delphi consensus process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Through the World Health Assembly Resolution, ‘Health of Migrants’, the international community has identified migrant health as a priority. Recommendations for general hospital care for international migrants in receiving-countries have been put forward by the Migrant Friendly Hospital Initiative; adaptations of these recommendations specific to maternity care have yet to be elucidated and validated. We aimed to develop a questionnaire measuring migrant-friendly maternity care (MFMC) which could be used in a range of maternity care settings and countries. Methods This study was conducted in four stages. First, questions related to migrant friendly maternity care were identified from existing questionnaires including the Migrant Friendliness Quality Questionnaire, developed in Europe to capture recommended general hospital care for migrants, and the Mothers In a New Country (MINC) Questionnaire, developed in Australia and revised for use in Canada to capture the maternity care experiences of migrant women, and combined to create an initial MFMC questionnaire. Second, a Delphi consensus process in three rounds with a panel of 89 experts in perinatal health and migration from 17 countries was undertaken to identify priority themes and questions as well as to clarify wording and format. Third, the draft questionnaire was translated from English to French and Spanish and back-translated and subsequently culturally validated (assessed for cultural appropriateness) by migrant women. Fourth, the questionnaire was piloted with migrant women who had recently given birth in Montreal, Canada. Results A 112-item questionnaire on maternity care from pregnancy, through labour and birth, to postpartum care, and including items on maternal socio-demographic, migration and obstetrical characteristics, and perceptions of care, has been created - the Migrant Friendly Maternity Care Questionnaire (MFMCQ) – in three languages (English, French and Spanish). It is

  8. Maternal Age at Holocaust Exposure and Maternal PTSD Independently Influence Urinary Cortisol Levels in Adult Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Bader, Heather N.; Bierer, Linda M.; Lehrner, Amy; Makotkine, Iouri; Daskalakis, Nikolaos P.; Yehuda, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Background: Parental traumatization has been associated with increased risk for the expression of psychopathology in offspring, and maternal posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) appears to increase the risk for the development of offspring PTSD. In this study, Holocaust-related maternal age of exposure and PTSD were evaluated for their association with offspring ambient cortisol and PTSD-associated symptom expression. Method: Ninety-five Holocaust offspring and Jewish comparison subjects received diagnostic and psychological evaluations, and 24 h urinary cortisol was assayed by RIA. Offspring completed the parental PTSD questionnaire to assess maternal PTSD status. Maternal Holocaust exposure was identified as having occurred in childhood, adolescence, or adulthood and examined in relation to offspring psychobiology. Results: Urinary cortisol levels did not differ for Holocaust offspring and comparison subjects but differed significantly in offspring based on maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD status. Increased maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD were each associated with lower urinary cortisol in offspring, but did not exhibit a significant interaction. In addition, offspring PTSD-associated symptom severity increased with maternal age at exposure and PTSD diagnosis. A regression analysis of correlates of offspring cortisol indicated that both maternal age of exposure and maternal PTSD were significant predictors of lower offspring urinary cortisol, whereas childhood adversity and offspring PTSD symptoms were not. Conclusion: Offspring low cortisol and PTSD-associated symptom expression are related to maternal age of exposure, with the greatest effects associated with increased age at exposure. These effects are relatively independent of the negative consequences of being raised by a trauma survivor. These observations highlight the importance of maternal age of exposure in determining a psychobiology in offspring that is consistent with increased

  9. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Keller-Wood, Maureen; Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V; Dahl, Geoffrey E; Tao, Sha

    2014-08-15

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1)) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  10. The maternal health outcomes of paid maternity leave: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Aitken, Zoe; Garrett, Cameryn C; Hewitt, Belinda; Keogh, Louise; Hocking, Jane S; Kavanagh, Anne M

    2015-04-01

    Paid maternity leave has become a standard benefit in many countries throughout the world. Although maternal health has been central to the rationale for paid maternity leave, no review has specifically examined the effect of paid maternity leave on maternal health. The aim of this paper is to provide a systematic review of studies that examine the association between paid maternity leave and maternal health. We conducted a comprehensive search of electronic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Sociological Abstracts) and Google Scholar. We searched websites of relevant organisations, reference lists of key papers and journals, and citation indices for additional studies including those not in refereed journals. There were no language restrictions. Studies were included if they compared paid maternity leave versus no paid maternity leave, or different lengths of paid leave. Data were extracted and an assessment of bias was performed independently by authors. Seven studies were identified, with participants from Australia, Sweden, Norway, USA, Canada, and Lebanon. All studies used quantitative methodologies, including cohort, cross-sectional, and repeated cross-sectional designs. Outcomes included mental health and wellbeing, general health, physical wellbeing, and intimate partner violence. The four studies that examined leave at an individual level showed evidence of maternal health benefits, whereas the three studies conducting policy-level comparisons reported either no association or evidence of a negative association. The synthesis of the results suggested that paid maternity leave provided maternal health benefits, although this varied depending on the length of leave. This has important implications for public health and social policy. However, all studies were subject to confounding bias and many to reverse causation. Given the small number of studies and the methodological limitations of the evidence, longitudinal studies are

  11. Elevated maternal cortisol leads to relative maternal hyperglycemia and increased stillbirth in ovine pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Xiaodi; Wood, Charles E.; Richards, Elaine; Anthony, Russell V.; Dahl, Geoffrey E.; Tao, Sha

    2014-01-01

    In normal pregnancy, cortisol increases; however, further pathological increases in cortisol are associated with maternal and fetal morbidities. These experiments were designed to test the hypothesis that increased maternal cortisol would increase maternal glucose concentrations, suppress fetal growth, and impair neonatal glucose homeostasis. Ewes were infused with cortisol (1 mg·kg−1·day−1) from day 115 of gestation to term; maternal glucose, insulin, ovine placental lactogen, estrone, progesterone, nonesterified free fatty acids (NEFA), β-hydroxybutyrate (BHB), and electrolytes were measured. Infusion of cortisol increased maternal glucose concentration and slowed the glucose disappearance after injection of glucose; maternal infusion of cortisol also increased the incidence of fetal death at or near parturition. The design of the study was altered to terminate the study prior to delivery, and post hoc analysis of the data was performed to test the hypothesis that maternal metabolic factors predict the fetal outcome. In cortisol-infused ewes that had stillborn lambs, plasma insulin was increased relative to control ewes or cortisol-infused ewes with live lambs. Maternal cortisol infusion did not alter maternal food intake or plasma NEFA, BHB, estrone, progesterone or placental lactogen concentrations, and it did not alter fetal body weight, ponderal index, or fetal organ weights. Our study suggests that the adverse effect of elevated maternal cortisol on pregnancy outcome may be related to the effects of cortisol on maternal glucose homeostasis, and that chronic maternal stress or adrenal hypersecretion of cortisol may create fetal pathophysiology paralleling some aspects of maternal gestational diabetes. PMID:24920731

  12. Maternal anxiety: course and antecedents during the early postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Britton, John R

    2008-01-01

    The early course and antecedents of postpartum anxiety are unknown. This study sought to determine the course and antecedents of maternal anxiety during the first month postpartum and to develop a model to predict 1-month anxiety using information obtainable before perinatal hospital discharge. Two hundred and ninety-six mothers were screened before discharge with the State (SS) and Trait (TS) Scales of the State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI). Demographic characteristics were assessed by questionnaire and medical record review, and psychiatric history, measures of perinatal stress, and resilient factors were determined by focused questions and formal instruments. At 1-month postpartum, the SS was repeated. Scores on the SS were significantly higher at 1 month than immediately postpartum (35.30+/-0.68 versus 33.38+/-0.60, mean+/-standard error, P=.004), but only 58.6% of mothers with high pre-discharge anxiety had high anxiety at 1 month. One-month anxiety correlated with pre-discharge SS and TS scores, a history of psychiatric problems including depressed mood, medical and negative social life events, lack of pregnancy planning and prenatal class attendance, perceived peripartum stress, and duration of postpartum hospital stay. Inverse correlations were observed with education, household income, and resiliency factors. In multivariate modeling, anxiety trait, education, history >or=2 years of depression, and perception of peripartum stress accounted for 50% of the variance in the 1-month SS score. Maternal anxiety increases during the first postpartum month. Women with high trait anxiety, low education, a history of depressed mood, and a perception of high peripartum stress are at risk for experiencing anxiety at this time. PMID:17397041

  13. Maternal and Perinatal Outcome of Life Threatening Obstetrical Complications Requiring Multiple Transfusions

    PubMed Central

    Khatuja, Ritu; Radhakrishnan, Gita; Radhika, AG; Juneja, Atul; Singh, Bharat

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Obstetrical haemorrhage is the direct cause of maternal mortality, which can be prevented by timely recognition followed by quick and adequate treatment. Aim To evaluate maternal and perinatal outcome of life threatening obstetric complications requiring multiple transfusions. Materials and Methods It is an observational study conducted on 112 antenatal and postnatal women admitted in a tertiary level hospital, requiring blood and blood products transfusion of >1.5 liters in 24 hours, over a period of 15 months (Aug 2011 to Oct 2012). The demographic and obstetrical profile, amount transfused, mode of delivery, duration of hospital stay, maternal and neonatal morbidity and mortality was evaluated. Statistical Analysis Statistical analysis of the data was performed using chi-squared test. Results There were 95 women who presented in antepartum period and 17 in the postpartum. Multigravidas comprised of 70 women, 81 had unsupervised pregnancies and 33 women presented in shock. At admission, 76 peripartum women had severe anaemia and 62 had coagulopathy. Obstetrical hysterectomy was done for 33 women and total 17 women expired. Haemorrhage was the most common indication for transfusion. The mean blood transfusion and volume replacement in 24 hours was 4.2 units & 2.25 liters respectively. The mean hospital stay was 10-15 days. Intra-uterine death at the time of admission was present in 40 women and 72 had live births. After birth, 21 babies required neonatal intensive care, of which 6 expired. Conclusion Antenatal care is important to prevent complications though pregnancy is always unpredictable. Patients’ condition at admission is single most important factor often influencing the maternal and perinatal outcome. PMID:26673661

  14. [Maternity after breast cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Boratyn-Nowicka, Agnieszka; Sodowski, Krzysztof; Ulman-Włodarz, Izabela

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a notable increase in the number of breast cancer diagnoses among women who have not fulfilled their maternity plans before the disease. Cytotoxic drugs (chemotherapy), used in the treatment of breast cancer patients, cause varying degrees of damage to the ovaries. The expected favorable effect of gonadoliberin analogues on the preservation of fertility has not been confirmed in clinical trials, and these drugs are currently not recommended for therapy. It is only the development of cryobiology and assisted reproduction techniques that make it possible to preserve the reproductive potential. The safety of the mother and the baby after breast cancer treatment is a separate issue. The available data indicate that both, pregnancy and breast-feeding are safe for the mother and the baby. However, the majority of findings come from retrospective studies covering small sample size and excluding the heterogeneity of both, cancer cells and patient clinical data. PMID:25775879

  15. Maternal and infant sleep postpartum.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Elizabeth

    2013-07-01

    New parents should be aware that infants' sleep is unlike that of adults and that meeting their infant's needs is likely to disrupt their own sleep. They will need to adjust their routine to manage their own sleep needs. Parental sleep patterns in the postpartum period are tied to the infant's development of a circadian sleep-wake rhythm, and the infant's feeds. Close contact with the mother and exposure to light/dark cues appear to assist in the development of the infant's circadian rhythm. The composition of breastmilk varies over the course of 24 hours and some components produced at night are likely to contribute to the infant's day/night entrainment. There is no clear evidence that using artificial feeds improves maternal sleep. Most infants need night feeds but requirements for nighttime feeds vary with the individual. PMID:23957180

  16. Measuring quality of maternity care.

    PubMed

    Collins, Katherine J; Draycott, Timothy

    2015-11-01

    Health-care organisations are required to monitor and measure the quality of their maternity services, but measuring quality is complex, and no universal consensus exists on how best to measure it. Clinical outcomes and process measures that are important to stakeholders should be measured, ideally in standardised sets for benchmarking. Furthermore, a holistic interpretation of quality should also reflect patient experience, ideally integrated with outcome and process measures, into a balanced suite of quality indicators. Dashboards enable reporting of trends in adverse outcomes to stakeholders, staff and patients, and they facilitate targeted quality improvement initiatives. The value of such dashboards is dependent upon high-quality, routinely collected data, subject to robust statistical analysis. Moving forward, we could and should collect a standard, relevant set of quality indicators, from routinely collected data, and present these in a manner that facilitates ongoing quality improvement, both locally and at regional/national levels. PMID:25913563

  17. Metabolic adjustments to moderate maternal nutrient restriction.

    PubMed

    Schlabritz-Loutsevitch, Natalia E; Dudley, Christopher J; Gomez, Jeremiah J; Nevill, C Heath; Smith, Bonnie K; Jenkins, Susan L; McDonald, Thomas J; Bartlett, Thad Q; Nathanielsz, Peter W; Nijland, Mark J

    2007-08-01

    Reduced food availability in pregnancy influences fetal growth, obstetric outcomes and offspring health in both developing and developed countries. The objective of the present study was to determine responses to moderate global maternal nutrient restriction (MNR) during pregnancy in baboons (Papio hamadryas) - an established non-human primate model for pregnancy-related research. Starting at 30 d gestation (dG), twelve pregnant baboons received 70 % of food (MNR group) consumed by twenty ad libitum-fed pregnant controls. Maternal body weight, BMI, food intake and physical activity were measured before pregnancy, at 90 dG and at 165 dG (full-term 180 dG). Fetal and placental weights were recorded at the time of Caesarean section (90 and 165 dG). Activity patterns were also evaluated in fourteen non-pregnant female baboons. Behavioural observations were made in five non-pregnant, six control and four MNR animals. Pregnant baboons decreased overall physical activity and energy-expensive behaviours compared with non-pregnant baboons. In the MNR group, maternal weight, weight gain and maternal physical activity were reduced compared with the control animals. MNR decreased placental weight and volume compared with control, while fetal weight and length were unaffected. We conclude that decreased physical activity and increased usage of maternal available body stores play an important role in the maternal response to pregnancy. Also, adaptations in maternal behaviour and energy utilisation protect fetal growth during moderate MNR. PMID:17391566

  18. Fetal and perinatal consequences of maternal obesity.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Chakrapani; Renfrew, Mary; McGuire, William

    2011-09-01

    In many industrialised countries, one in five women booking for antenatal care is obese. As well as affecting maternal health, maternal obesity may have important adverse consequences for fetal, neonatal and long-term health and well-being. Maternal obesity is associated with a higher risk of stillbirth, elective preterm birth and perinatal mortality. The incidence of severe birth defects, particularly neural tube and structural cardiac defects, appears to be higher in infants of obese mothers. Fetal macrosomia associated with maternal obesity and gestational diabetes predisposes infants to birth injuries, perinatal asphyxia and transitional problems such as neonatal respiratory distress and metabolic instability. Maternal obesity may also result in long-term health problems for offspring secondary to perinatal problems and to intrauterine and postnatal programming effects. Currently, the available interventions to prevent and treat maternal obesity are of limited proven utility and further research is needed to define the effects of maternal weight management interventions on fetal and neonatal outcomes. PMID:20530101

  19. Maternal immunoglobulin E and childhood leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jeffrey S; Buffler, Patricia A; Metayer, Catherine; Chokkalingam, Anand P; Patoka, Joe; Kronish, Daniel; Wiemels, Joseph L

    2009-08-01

    Childhood leukemia, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), has long been hypothesized to be affected by abnormal immune responses to microbial challenges stemming from a lack of immune modulation in early childhood. Studies of allergies suggest that a child's immune development may be modulated by maternal immune status. We conducted a study to explore the relationship between maternal immunoglobulin E (IgE) and childhood leukemia and to investigate whether maternal immune status can influence childhood leukemia risk. Serum total and specific IgE (respiratory and food) were measured in biological mothers of 352 children (193 healthy controls and 159 leukemia cases, including 139 ALL cases) ages <8 years who were enrolled in the Northern California Childhood Leukemia Study. Odds ratios associated with maternal IgE were calculated using unconditional logistic regression adjusted for child's age, sex, race/ethnicity, and annual household income. A positive association between childhood leukemia or ALL and elevated levels of maternal serum total IgE was observed, especially among Hispanics. In addition, a positive association was observed between childhood leukemia or ALL and maternal respiratory or food IgE status. These results suggest that maternal immune function may play a crucial role in the etiology of childhood leukemia, although additional studies need to be conducted to confirm the results of this study and provide a perspective on mechanisms. PMID:19622720

  20. Benefits and work-schedule options in hospital pharmacy practice.

    PubMed

    Gaither, C A; Mason, N A; Diokno, D A; Hoffman, E J

    1994-03-15

    Hospital pharmacy directors were surveyed to determine whether their departments offered specific family-related benefits and work-schedule options and how their attitudes about these options compared with those of female hospital pharmacists. Questionnaires were mailed to 300 randomly selected hospital pharmacy directors to collect the following information: vacancy rates and male:female ratios in hospital pharmacy positions, which of 13 selected benefits and work-schedule options were offered, barriers that prevented the other options from being offered, and attitudes about the listed options. The options included in the survey were selected because they represent ways of balancing home and work (e.g., maternity leave, job sharing, day care). The pharmacy directors' responses were compared with those from a similar survey of female hospital pharmacists. The usable response rate was 50.3%. Position vacancy rates ranged from 5.5% for directors to 35.8% for clinical supervisors. All full-time positions had an even distribution of men and women except for director and assistant or associate director positions. Of 13 options, only maternity leave, part-time schedules, and flexible schedules were offered by more than half of the hospitals. These three were also the only listed options that the respondents considered important in recruiting and retaining pharmacists. Barriers to offering other options included the perception that current benefits and work-schedule options were adequate, lack of staff coverage, lack of funds, and the perception that some positions are not compatible with alternative schedules. Respondents' ratings of the importance of the listed benefits and work-schedule options were significantly lower than ratings given by female hospital pharmacists in a separate survey.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8010317

  1. Effect of Multiple Repeat Cesarean Sections on Maternal Morbidity: Data from Southeast Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Kaplanoglu, Mustafa; Bulbul, Mehmet; Kaplanoglu, Dilek; Bakacak, Suleyman Murat

    2015-01-01

    Background Cesarean section (CS) is one of the most common obstetric procedures worldwide and an increased rate of cesarean section has been observed in recent studies. Maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity associated with cesarean section is an important health problem worldwide. This requires the evaluation of the effect of repeated cesarean delivery on maternal morbidity. Material/Methods A total of 2460 patients who underwent delivery by CS at a center in southeast Turkey between January 2012 and January 2014 (24 months) were included in the study. The patients were divided into 5 groups according to the number of CSs, and the maternal and neonatal outcomes of the groups were retrospectively evaluated. Results A statistically significant difference was found between the groups in terms of maternal age, education level, time of hospitalization, operating time, the presence of dense adhesions, bowel and bladder injury, the presence of placenta previa, hysterectomy, blood transfusion requirements, and need for intensive care (p<0.05). Placenta previa (OR, 11.7; 95% CI, 2.6–53.2) and placenta accreta (OR, 12.2; 95% CI, 3.9–37.8) were found to be important risk factors in terms of the need for hysterectomy. No statistically significant difference was found between the groups for gestational age at birth, birth weight, fifth-minute APGAR score, preoperative and postoperative hemoglobin levels, uterine rupture, wound infection, wound dehiscence, placenta accreta, maternal death, and endometritis (p>0.05). A total of 4 or more CSs was identified as the critical level for most of the major complications. Conclusions An increasing number of CSs is accompanied by serious maternal complications. Four or more CSs are of especially critical importance. Decreasing the number of cesarean sections is required to decrease relevant complications. Vaginal birth after CS is an option that should be recommended to the patient. PMID:25989945

  2. Maternal Infections during Pregnancy and Cerebral Palsy: A Population-based Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jessica E.; Pedersen, Lars Henning; Streja, Elani; Bech, Bodil H.; Yeargin-Allsopp, Marshalyn; Van Naarden Braun, Kim; Schendel, Diana E.; Christensen, Deborah; Uldall, Peter; Olsen, Jørn

    2015-01-01

    Background Cerebral palsy (CP) is a common motor disability in childhood. We examined the association between maternal infections during pregnancy and the risk of congenital CP in the child. Methods Liveborn singletons in Denmark between 1997 and 2003 were identified from the Danish National Birth Registry and followed from 1 year of life until 2008. Redemption of antibiotics from the National Register of Medicinal Product Statistics and maternal infections reported by the National Hospital Register were used as markers of maternal infection during pregnancy. CP diagnoses were obtained from the Danish Cerebral Palsy Registry. Adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were estimated by Cox proportional hazard models. Results Of the 440 564 singletons with follow-up data, 840 were diagnosed with congenital CP. Maternal genito-urinary tract infections (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3.2) were associated with CP in all births, in term births (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.1, 3.2), in children with spastic CP (HR 2.1, 95% CI 1.4, 3.3), and among first-born children (HR 1.9, 95% CI 1.4, 3.3). Overall, we found associations between redeemed nitrofurantoin (HR 1.7, 95% CI 1.1, 2.8) and CP. Among trimester-specific exposures, CP risk was associated with prescriptions redeemed in the first trimester for any antibacterials, beta-lactam antibacterials, and nitrofurantoin, an antibiotic commonly used to treat lower urinary tract infection, and genito-urinary tract infections in the third trimester. Conclusion Genito-urinary tract infections and antibiotic use during pregnancy were associated with increased risks of CP, indicating that some maternal infections or causes of maternal infections present in prenatal life may be part of a causal pathway leading to CP. PMID:24117888

  3. Maternal sounds elicit lower heart rate in preterm newborns in the first month of life

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Katherine; Lahav, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background The preferential response to mother’s voice in the fetus and term newborn is well documented. However, the response of preterm neonates is not well understood and more difficult to interpret due to the intensive clinical care and range of medical complications. Aim This study examined the physiological response to maternal sounds and its sustainability in the first month of life in infants born very pretermaturely. Methods Heart rate changes were monitored in 20 hospitalized preterm infants born between 25 and 32 weeks of gestation during 30-minute exposure vs. non-exposure periods of recorded maternal sounds played inside the Neonatal incubator. A total of 13,680 min of HR data was sampled throughout the first month of life during gavage feeds Heart rate with and without exposure to maternal sounds. Results During exposure periods, infants had significantly lower heart rate compared to matched periods of care Auditory without exposure on the same day (p < .0001). This effect was observed in all infants, across the first month of life, irrespective of day of life, gestational age at birth, birth weight, age at testing, Apgar score, caffeine therapy, and requirement for respiratory support. No adverse effects were observed. Conclusion Preterm newborns responded to maternal sounds with decreased heart rate throughout the first month of life. It is possible that maternal sounds improve autonomic stability and provide a more relaxing environment for this population of newborns. Further studies are needed to determine the therapeutic implications of maternal sound exposure for optimizing care practices and developmental outcomes. PMID:25194837

  4. Maternal characteristics and clinical diagnoses influence obstetrical outcomes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Adisasmita, Asri; Smith, Carl V; El-Mohandes, Ayman A E; Deviany, Poppy Elvira; Ryon, Judith J; Kiely, Michele; Rogers-Bloch, Quail; Gipson, Reginald F

    2015-07-01

    This Indonesian study evaluates associations between near-miss status/death with maternal demographic, health care characteristics, and obstetrical complications, comparing results using retrospective and prospective data. The main outcome measures were obstetric conditions and socio-economic factors to predict near-miss/death. We abstracted all obstetric admissions (1,358 retrospective and 1,240 prospective) from two district hospitals in East Java, Indonesia between 4/1/2009 and 5/15/2010. Prospective data added socio-economic status, access to care and referral patterns. Reduced logistic models were constructed, and multivariate analyses used to assess association of risk variables to outcome. Using multivariate analysis, variables associated with risk of near-miss/death include postpartum hemorrhage (retrospective AOR 5.41, 95 % CI 2.64-11.08; prospective AOR 10.45, 95 % CI 5.59-19.52) and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia (retrospective AOR 1.94, 95 % CI 1.05-3.57; prospective AOR 3.26, 95 % CI 1.79-5.94). Associations with near-miss/death were seen for antepartum hemorrhage in retrospective data (AOR 9.34, 95 % CI 4.34-20.13), and prospectively for poverty (AOR 2.17, 95 % CI 1.33-3.54) and delivering outside the hospital (AOR 2.04, 95 % CI 1.08-3.82). Postpartum hemorrhage and severe preeclampsia/eclampsia are leading causes of near-miss/death in Indonesia. Poverty and delivery outside the hospital are significant risk factors. Prompt recognition of complications, timely referrals, standardized care protocols, prompt hospital triage, and structured provider education may reduce obstetric mortality and morbidity. Retrospective data were reliable, but prospective data provided valuable information about barriers to care and referral patterns. PMID:25656716

  5. Etiology of maternal-student role stress.

    PubMed

    Gigliotti, Eileen

    2004-04-01

    This paper details the refinement and testing of a proposition regarding the age-related effects of psychological involvement in both the maternal role and the student role, and total network support on maternal-student role stress. Results of hierarchical multiple regression analysis showed that the independent variables contribute to an explanation of maternal-student role stress only for women aged 37 years and older. The proposition was further refined. It supports the propositions of both Neuman's systems model and Meleis et al.'s transition framework. Implications for research and practice are discussed. PMID:15090092

  6. Postpartum Maternal Sleep, Maternal Depressive Symptoms and Self-Perceived Mother-Infant Emotional Relationship.

    PubMed

    Tikotzky, Liat

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the links between maternal sleep, maternal depressive symptoms, and mothers' perceptions of their emotional relationship with their infant in a self-recruited sample of mothers. Eighty mothers of infants 3-18 months old completed sleep diaries for 5 consecutive nights, and questionnaires assessing sleep (Insomnia Severity Index [ISI]), depressive symptom severity (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale [EPDS]), and perceived mother-infant relationship (Postpartum Bonding Questionnaire [PBQ] and Maternal Postnatal Attachment Questionnaire [MPAQ]). Significant correlations, controlling for depression severity, were found between more disturbed maternal sleep and more negative maternal perceptions of the mother-infant relationship. Regression analyses revealed that EPDS showed the strongest association with PBQ, whereas ISI demonstrated the strongest association with MPAQ. The present study highlights the importance of deepening and expanding our understanding of the negative implications of maternal sleep problems. PMID:25127316

  7. Maternal and child health in India: a critical review.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N K

    1995-10-01

    The Lady Dufferin Fund, founded in 1885 in India, had by 1940 established 400 hospitals to alleviate diseases and mortality related to childbirth. After independence 2328 community health centers and 21254 primary health centers were created in the country. During 1974-94 more than 131,000 subcenters were set up and about 620,000 auxiliary nurse midwives (ANMs) had been trained. The Ministry of Health introduced four health prevention schemes in 1969: 1) immunization of children against diphtheria, pertussis, and tetanus; 2) immunization of pregnant women against tetanus; 3) prophylaxis of mothers and children against nutritional anemia; and 4) prophylaxis of children against blindness caused by vitamin A deficiency. As a result, infant mortality declined from 146/1000 live births to 74/1000 in 1993; but maternal mortality still stayed around 4-5/1000. In 1993 an estimated 117,356 maternal deaths occurred out of a total of 26,057,000 births, equalling 4.5 deaths per 1000 live births. The main causes of maternal deaths are hemorrhage, anemia, abortion, toxemia, and puerperal sepsis. Only about 411 first referral units in community health centers are functioning properly. Prenatal care of mothers includes the administration of tetanus toxoid and iron-folic acid tablets. However, the prenatal coverage reached only about 50% of mothers; and the coverage was only 21.4% in Bihar, 23.8% in Nagaland, 29.3% in Rajasthan, and 29.6% in Uttar Pradesh. In these areas administrative inefficiency is widespread with nonavailability of essential drugs for malaria, infections, sepsis, dysentery, and colds. During 1992-93 the rate of hospital deliveries ranged from 6.1% in Nagaland to 88.4% in Kerala, with a national average of only 25.6%. 71% of deliveries in rural areas and 30% in urban areas were conducted by untrained assistants. Although there are 450 ANM training schools in the country, the level of training has deteriorated. The major causes of infant deaths are respiratory

  8. Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs

    PubMed Central

    Newcombe, Devi; Hunt, John; Mitchell, Christopher; Moore, Allen J

    2015-01-01

    Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and allocation of amino acids to eggs. We manipulated acquisition by varying maternal diet (milkweed or sunflower) in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. Variation in allocation was detected by examining two source populations with different evolutionary histories and life-history response to sunflower as food. We measured amino acids composition in eggs in this 2 × 2 design and found significant effects of source population and maternal diet on egg and nymph mass and of source population, maternal diet, and their interaction on amino acid composition of eggs. We measured significant linear and quadratic maternal selection on offspring mass associated with variation in amino acid allocation. Visualizing the performance surface along the major axes of nonlinear selection and plotting the mean amino acid profile of eggs from each treatment onto the surface revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface. While maternal selection appears to have influenced how females allocate amino acids, this maternal effect did not evolve equally in the two populations. Furthermore, none of the population means coincided with peak performance. Thus, we found that the composition of free amino acids in eggs was due to variation in both acquisition and allocation, which had significant fitness effects and created selection. However, although there can be an evolutionary response to novel food resources, females may be constrained from reaching phenotypic optima with

  9. Maternal effects and maternal selection arising from variation in allocation of free amino acid to eggs.

    PubMed

    Newcombe, Devi; Hunt, John; Mitchell, Christopher; Moore, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    Maternal provisioning can have profound effects on offspring phenotypes, or maternal effects, especially early in life. One ubiquitous form of provisioning is in the makeup of egg. However, only a few studies examine the role of specific egg constituents in maternal effects, especially as they relate to maternal selection (a standardized selection gradient reflecting the covariance between maternal traits and offspring fitness). Here, we report on the evolutionary consequences of differences in maternal acquisition and allocation of amino acids to eggs. We manipulated acquisition by varying maternal diet (milkweed or sunflower) in the large milkweed bug, Oncopeltus fasciatus. Variation in allocation was detected by examining two source populations with different evolutionary histories and life-history response to sunflower as food. We measured amino acids composition in eggs in this 2 × 2 design and found significant effects of source population and maternal diet on egg and nymph mass and of source population, maternal diet, and their interaction on amino acid composition of eggs. We measured significant linear and quadratic maternal selection on offspring mass associated with variation in amino acid allocation. Visualizing the performance surface along the major axes of nonlinear selection and plotting the mean amino acid profile of eggs from each treatment onto the surface revealed a saddle-shaped fitness surface. While maternal selection appears to have influenced how females allocate amino acids, this maternal effect did not evolve equally in the two populations. Furthermore, none of the population means coincided with peak performance. Thus, we found that the composition of free amino acids in eggs was due to variation in both acquisition and allocation, which had significant fitness effects and created selection. However, although there can be an evolutionary response to novel food resources, females may be constrained from reaching phenotypic optima with

  10. Hospital diversification strategy.

    PubMed

    Eastaugh, Steven R

    2014-01-01

    To determine the impact of health system restructuring on the levels of hospital diversification and operating ratio this article analyzed 94 teaching hospitals and 94 community hospitals during the period 2008-2013. The 47 teaching hospitals are matched with 47 other teaching hospitals experiencing the same financial market position in 2008, but with different levels of preference for risk and diversification in their strategic plan. Covariates in the analysis included levels of hospital competition and the degree of local government planning (for example, highly regulated in New York, in contrast to Texas). Moreover, 47 nonteaching community hospitals are matched with 47 other community hospitals in 2008, having varying manager preferences for service-line diversification and risk. Diversification and operating ratio are modeled in a two-stage least squares (TSLS) framework as jointly dependent. Institutional diversification is found to yield better financial position, and the better operating profits provide the firm the wherewithal to diversify. Some services are in a growth phase, like bariatric weight-loss surgery and sleep disorder clinics. Hospital managers' preferences for risk/return potential were considered. An institution life cycle hypothesis is advanced to explain hospital behavior: boom and bust, diversification, and divestiture, occasionally leading to closure or merger. PMID:25223156

  11. Maternal Mortality at Federal Medical Centre Yola, Adamawa State: A Five-Year Review

    PubMed Central

    Bukar, M; Kunmanda, V; Moruppa, JY; Ehalaiye, B; Takai, UI; Ndonya, DN

    2013-01-01

    Background: The North Eastern region of Nigeria has one of the highest maternal mortality ratios (MMRs) in the world, and most of these deaths are preventable. Culture, religion and customs that prevent access to care contribute immensely to these deaths. Aim: To review and document the MMR. Materials and Methods: This was a retrospective study of all maternal deaths recorded at the Federal Medical Centre Yola (FMCY). The case notes of all cases of maternal deaths from January 2007 to December 2011 were retrieved and relevant data obtained and analyzed. The age, parity, literacy level, booking status, causes of maternal deaths, were analysed. Data were presented in tables and percentages, using SPSS version 16(Chicago, USA 2006). Results: There were 54 maternal deaths among the 8497 deliveries, giving an overall MMR of 636 per 100,000 deliveries. Thirty three folders (33) folders were retrieved and 28 had complete information for analysis. The mean (SD) age and parity were 28.2 (6.2) and 3.4 (2.0), respectively. Most deaths (9/28; 32.1%) were in the age group of 20-24 years. Multiparae (14/28; 50%) constituted the largest parity group. Majority (16/28; 57.1) were non-literates, 16/28 (57.1%) were of Hausa/Fulani extraction and 12/28 (42.9%) were unbooked. The leading causes of maternal mortality were preeclampsia/eclampsia (9/28; 32.1%), obstetric hemorrhage (8/28; 28.6%) and severe anemia (3/28; 10.7%). All those who died of preeclampsia/eclampsia were Hausa/Fulani. Most (14/28; 50%) deaths occurred within 24 h of admission. Majority of the deaths were Muslims (χ2 = 15.108, P = <0.001). Ethnicity had no significant influence on maternal death (χ2 = 15.550, P = 0.21). Conclusion: In conclusion, the MMR in FMCY is higher than the national average. The fact that most deaths occurred within 24 h of admission suggests that many of the patients delayed reaching the referring center for a variety of reasons. Preventive measures should focus on this delay, which is

  12. The effect of maternal obesity on the offspring.

    PubMed

    Williams, Christine B; Mackenzie, Kusaynyonon C; Gahagan, Sheila

    2014-09-01

    Maternal obesity is inextricably linked to adverse health outcomes for the mother and her children. The peripartum period is a critical period of risk. In this chapter, we examine the importance of maternal prepregnancy weight status, gestational weight gain, breastfeeding, and postpartum weight loss in relation to subsequent risk for maternal obesity and obesity in the offspring. Promoting optimal maternal weight during the preconception, pregnancy, and postpartum periods will provide lifelong benefits for maternal health and the health of her progeny. PMID:24936914

  13. Income, location, and the demand for health care from public, nonprofit, and for-profit hospitals.

    PubMed

    Brown, H S

    2001-01-01

    Although, empirically, for-profit hospitals serve few poor and indigent patients, they may be able to shift capital more quickly than hospitals of other ownership types, thereby spatially avoiding poor patients. However, in a market with a relatively high proportion of for-profit hospitals, spatial avoidance of poor patients is not possible because spatial competition will exist in non-poor areas. The study examines hospital choice for maternity care in a market with many for-profits using a gravity model or conditional logit. The analysis shows that poor and Medicaid populations choose for-profit hospitals overall. Income, along with distance, is an important factor in hospital choice. PMID:11434711

  14. A strategy for reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, A. B.; Mathews, A.; Jegasothy, R.; Ali, R.; Kandiah, N.

    1999-01-01

    A confidential system of enquiry into maternal mortality was introduced in Malaysia in 1991. The methods used and the findings obtained up to 1994 are reported below and an outline is given of the resulting recommendations and actions. PMID:10083722

  15. Reproduction at an advanced maternal age and maternal health.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Mark V

    2015-05-01

    Advanced age is a risk factor for female infertility, pregnancy loss, fetal anomalies, stillbirth, and obstetric complications. These concerns are based on centuries-old observations, yet women are delaying childbearing to pursue educational and career goals in greater numbers than ever before. As a result, reproductive medicine specialists are treating more patients with age-related infertility and recurrent pregnancy loss, while obstetricians are faced with managing pregnancies often complicated by both age and comorbidities. The media portrayal of a youthful but older woman, able to schedule her reproductive needs and balance family and job, has fueled the myth that "you can have it all," rarely characterizing the perils inherent to advanced-age reproduction. Reproductive medicine specialists and obstetrician/gynecologists should promote more realistic views of the evidence-based realities of advanced maternal age pregnancy, including its high-risk nature and often compromised outcomes. Doctors should also actively educate both patients and the public that there is a real danger of childlessness if individuals choose to delay reproduction. PMID:25934599

  16. Induction of Labour in Late and Postterm Pregnancies and its Impact on Maternal and Neonatal Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Thangarajah, F.; Scheufen, P.; Kirn, V.; Mallmann, P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to determine the effects of induction of labour in late-term pregnancies on the mode of delivery, maternal and neonatal outcome. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed deliveries between 2000 and 2014 at the University Hospital of Cologne. Women with a pregnancy aged between 41 + 0 to 42 + 6 weeks were included. Those who underwent induction of labour were compared with women who were expectantly managed. Maternal and neonatal outcomes were evaluated. Results: 856 patients were included into the study. The rate of cesarean deliveries was significantly higher for the induction of labour group (33.8 vs. 21.1 %, p < 0.001). Aside from the more frequent occurrence of perineal lacerations (induction of labour group vs. expectantly managed group = 38.1 % compared with 26.4 %, p = 0.002) and all types of lacerations (induction of labour group vs. expectantly managed group = 61.5% vs. 52.2 %, p = 0.021) in women with vaginal delivery, there were no significant differences in maternal outcome. Besides, no differences regarding neonatal outcome were observed. Conclusions: Our study suggests that induction of labour in late and postterm pregnancies is associated with a significantly higher cesarean section rate. Other maternal and fetal parameters were not influenced by induction of labour.

  17. Maternal and Neonatal Outcomes in Korean Women with Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-Sook; Jang, Hye-Jung; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Moon-Young; Ko, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate maternal and neonatal outcomes in Korean women with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Methods We performed a retrospective survey of 163 pregnancies in women with type 1 diabetes (n=13) and type 2 diabetes (n=150) treated from 2003 to 2010 at Cheil General Hospital & Women's Healthcare Center, Korea. We compared maternal characteristics as well as maternal and neonatal outcomes between groups. Results Differences in glycosylated hemoglobin between type 1 and type 2 diabetes were not significant. Birth weight (3,501±689.6 g vs. 3,366±531.4 g) and rate of major congenital malformations (7.7% vs. 5.6%) were not significantly different. However, women with type 1 diabetes had higher rates of preeclampsia (38.5% vs. 8.2%, P=0.006), large for gestational age (LGA; 46.2% vs. 20.4%, P=0.004), macrosomia (38.5% vs. 13.4%, P=0.032), and admission for neonatal care (41.7% vs. 14.8%, P=0.03) than women with type 2 diabetes. Conclusion Maternal and neonatal outcomes for women with type 1 diabetes were poorer than for women with type 2 diabetes, especially preeclampsia, LGA, macrosomia and admission to the neonatal intensive care unit. PMID:26301193

  18. Evaluating regional differences in breast-feeding in French maternity units: a multi-level approach

    PubMed Central

    Bonet, Mercedes; Blondel, Béatrice; Khoshnood, Babak

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To study how individual and regional characteristics might explain regional variations in breastfeeding rates in maternity units and to identify outlier regions with very low or high breastfeeding rates. Design Individual characteristics (mother and infant) were collected during hospital stay. All newborns fed entirely or partly on breast milk were considered breastfed. Regional characteristics were extracted from census data. Statistical analysis included multilevel models and estimation of empirical Bayes residuals to identify outlier regions. Setting all births in all administrative regions in France in 2003. Subjects a national representative sample of 13 186 live births. Results Breastfeeding rates in maternity units varied from 43% to 80% across regions. Differences in the distribution of individual characteristics accounted for 55% of these variations. We identified two groups of regions with the lowest and the highest breastfeeding rates, after adjusting for individual-level characteristics. In addition to maternal occupation and nationality, the social characteristics of regions, particularly the population’s educational level and the percentage of non-French residents, were significantly associated with breastfeeding rates. Conclusions Social characteristics at both the individual and regional levels influence breastfeeding rates in maternity units. Promotion policies should be directed at specific regions, groups within the community, and categories of mothers, to reduce the gaps and increase the overall breastfeeding rate. PMID:20576192

  19. Amniotic Fluid Embolism (AFE) in China: Are maternal mortality and morbidity preventable?

    PubMed

    Mo, Xiuting; Feng, Aihua; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tobe, Ruoyan Gai

    2014-08-01

    A case of hospital-patient conflict has occurred in China that has lifted billows in the public and highlighted the lethality of amniotic fluid embolism (AFE). AFE is a rare but severe obstetric complication with high maternal mortality and morbidity. Globally, the incidence of AFE is estimated to be approximately 2 to 6 per 100,000 deliveries. The maternal mortality rate (MMR) attributable to AFE ranges between 0.5 to 1.7 deaths per 100,000 deliveries in the developed world and 1.9 to 5.9 deaths per 100,000 deliveries in the developing world. In developed countries, AFE often accounts for a leading cause of maternal mortality; whereas the proportion of maternal death caused by AFE tends to be not as dominant compared to common perinatal complications in developing countries. With the mechanism remaining to be elucidated, AFE can neither be predicted nor prevented even in developed countries. Treatment requires a set of highly intensive advanced emergency obstetric care, challenging obstetric care in developing countries. Although this complication is currently far from preventable, China has potential to improve the prognosis of AFE by strengthening the emergency obstetric care system. PMID:25364652

  20. [Costs of maternal-infant care in an institutionalized health care system].

    PubMed

    Villarreal Ríos, E; Salinas Martínez, A M; Guzmán Padilla, J E; Garza Elizondo, M E; Tovar Castillo, N H; García Cornejo, M L

    1998-01-01

    Partial and total maternal and child health care costs were estimated. The study was developed in a Primary Care Health Clinic (PCHC) and a General Hospital (GH) of a social security health care system. Maternal and child health care services, type of activity and frequency utilization during 1995, were defined; cost examination was done separately for the PCHC and the GH. Estimation of fixed cost included departmentalization, determination of inputs, costs, basic services disbursements, and weighing. These data were related to depreciation, labor period and productivity. Estimation of variable costs required the participation of field experts; costs corresponded to those registered in billing records. The fixed cost plus the variable cost determined the unit cost, which multiplied by the of frequency of utilization generated the prenatal care, labor and delivery care, and postnatal care cost. The sum of these three equaled the maternal and child health care cost. The prenatal care cost was $1,205.33, the labor and delivery care cost was $3,313.98, and the postnatal care was $559.91. The total cost of the maternal and child health care corresponded to $5,079.22. Cost information is valuable for the health care personnel for health care planning activities. PMID:9528219

  1. Maternal Ethnic Ancestry and Adverse Perinatal Outcomes in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Cheryl R.; Savitz, David A.; Janevic, Teresa; Ananth, Cande V.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Herring, Amy H.; Engel, Stephanie M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between narrowly defined subsets of maternal ethnicity and birth outcomes. Study Design Analysis of 1995-2003 New York City birth certificates linked to hospital discharge data for 949,210 singleton births to examine the multivariable associations between maternal ethnicity and preterm birth, subsets of spontaneous and medically indicated preterm birth, term small for gestational age (SGA), and term birthweight. Results Compared to non-Hispanic whites, Puerto Ricans had an elevated odds ratio (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.9-2.0) for delivering at 32-36 weeks (adjusted for nativity, maternal age, parity, education, tobacco use, pre-pregnancy weight, birth year). We found an excess of adverse outcomes among most Latino groups. Outcomes also varied within regions, with North African infants nearly 100g (adjusted) heavier than sub-Saharan Africans. Conclusions The considerable heterogeneity in risk of adverse perinatal outcomes is obscured in broad categorizations of maternal race/ethnicity, and may help to formulate etiologic hypotheses. PMID:19729145

  2. The use of digital media by women using the maternity services in a developed country.

    PubMed

    O'Higgins, A; Murphy, O C; Egan, A; Mullaney, L; Sheehan, S; Turner, M J

    2014-01-01

    The provision of high quality healthcare information about pregnancy is important to women and to healthcare professionals and it is 1 driven, in part, by a desire to improve clinical outcomes,. The objective of this study was to examine the use of digital media by women' to access pregnancy information. A questionnaire was distributed to women attending a large maternity hospital. Of the 522 respondents, the mean age was 31.8 years, 45% (235/522) were nulliparous, 62% (324/522) lived in the capital city and 29% (150/522) attended the hospital as private patients. Overall 95% (498/522) used the internet for pregnancy information, 76% (399/522) had a smartphone and 59% (235/399) of smartphone owners had used a pregnancy smartapp. The nature of internet usage for pregnancy information included discussion forums (70%), social networks (67%), video media (48%), e-books (15%), blogs (13%), microblogs (9%) and podcasts (4%). Even women who were socially disadvantaged reported high levels of digital media usage. In contemporary maternity care women use digital media extensively for pregnancy information. All maternity services should have a digital media strategy. PMID:25556255

  3. The Role of Peer Support in the Development of Maternal Identity for "NICU Moms"

    PubMed Central

    Rossman, Beverly; Greene, Michelle M.; Meier, Paula P.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine first-time NICU mothers’ perceptions of the initial effect and stress of their birth experiences and hospitalizations of their infants and what facilitated or hindered the development of their maternal roles within the context of the NICU. Design A qualitative descriptive design. Setting A 57 bed, tertiary NICU in Chicago. Participants Twenty-three mothers of very low birth weight (VLBW) infants hospitalized in the NICU. Methods Participants were a subset of a larger longitudinal mixed-method study of psychological distress in 69 mothers of VLBW infants. Mothers were interviewed using an adaptation of the Clinical Interview for Parents of High-Risk Infants (CLIP) approximately six weeks after the births of their infants. Data were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Results Mothers characterized the infants’ births and hospitalizations as a time of overwhelming change culminating in a new perspective on life. Primary themes were Loss, Stress and Anxiety; Adapting; Resilience; Peer Support; and “I’m a NICU Mom.” Mothers rated peer support as the most facilitative and supportive aspect of developing the maternal role in the NICU. Conclusion Peer support and role modeling by NICU-based breastfeeding peer counselors helped the mothers throughout every stage of their infants’ hospitalizations, from giving them hope, to helping them begin to develop maternal identity, to providing anticipatory guidance about taking their infants home. Talking points are provided for nurses who work in NICUs without dedicated peer support to help mothers establish a healthy mother-infant relationship. PMID:25580732

  4. It takes more than one for parenting: How do maternal temperament and child's conduct problems relate to maternal parenting behavior?

    PubMed Central

    Atzaba-Poria, Naama; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Bell, Martha Ann

    2014-01-01

    The current study examined how individual differences in maternal temperament and child problem behaviors correlate with observed maternal positivity and negativity toward the child. The sample consisted of 153 mothers of 3-to-7 year old children. Mothers reported their own temperament (surgency, orienting sensitivity, effortful control and negative affect) and their children's problem behaviors. Maternal behavior was videotaped in a set of structured interaction tasks with the child during a lab visit. Results indicated that children's problem behaviors were related to less maternal positivity and more negativity. In addition, observed maternal negativity was associated with less maternal effortful control and more negative affect. In contrast, maternal temperament was unrelated to observed maternal positivity toward the child. Furthermore, maternal temperament was related to mothers' positivity and negativity but only for children high in problem behaviors. The findings implicate that child problem behaviors may interact with maternal temperament in explaining variance in caregiving positivity and negativity. PMID:25089066

  5. Estimates of maternal mortality for 1995.

    PubMed Central

    Hill, K.; AbouZhar, C.; Wardlaw, T.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To present estimates of maternal mortality in 188 countries, areas, and territories for 1995 using methodologies that attempt to improve comparability. METHODS: For countries having data directly relevant to the measurement of maternal mortality, a variety of adjustment procedures can be applied depending on the nature of the data used. Estimates for countries lacking relevant data may be made using a statistical model fitted to the information from countries that have data judged to be of good quality. Rather than estimate the Maternal Mortality Ratio (MMRatio) directly, this model estimates the proportion of deaths of women of reproductive age that are due to maternal causes. Estimates of the number of maternal deaths are then obtained by applying this proportion to the best available figure of the total number of deaths among women of reproductive age. FINDINGS: On the basis of this exercise, we have obtained a global estimate of 515,000 maternal deaths in 1995, with a worldwide MMRatio of 397 per 100,000 live births. The differences, by region, were very great, with over half (273,000 maternal deaths) occurring in Africa (MMRatio: > 1000 per 100,000), compared with a total of only 2000 maternal deaths in Europe (MMRatio: 28 per 100,000). Lower and upper uncertainty bounds were also estimated, on the basis of which the global MMRatio was unlikely to be less than 234 or more than 635 per 100,000 live births. These uncertainty bounds and those of national estimates are so wide that comparisons between countries must be made with caution, and no valid conclusions can be drawn about trends over a period of time. CONCLUSION: The MMRatio is thus an imperfect indicator of reproductive health because it is hard to measure precisely. It is preferable to use process indicators for comparing reproductive health between countries or across time periods, and for monitoring and evaluation purposes. PMID:11285661

  6. Anesthetic management of maternal Mirror syndrome.

    PubMed

    Tayler, E; DeSimone, C

    2014-11-01

    Mirror syndrome (Ballantyne syndrome, triple edema, maternal hydrops, pseudotoxemia) is a rarely diagnosed condition associated with pregnancy that can be life-threatening for both the mother and fetus. There is limited literature on its pathogenesis and anesthetic management, making prevention and treatment complex. The duration of pregnancy and severity of maternal or fetal presentation often determines outcome. We describe the anesthetic considerations of a morbidly obese parturient with Mirror syndrome. PMID:25066819

  7. Measuring Hospital Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Ruchlin, Hirsch S.; Leveson, Irving

    1974-01-01

    This study presents a comprehensive method for quantifying hospital output and estimating hospital productivity. A number of less comprehensive productivity measures that can be quantified from data available from regional third-party payers and from the American Hospital Association are also developed and evaluated as proxies for the comprehensive measure, which is based on local area data. Methods are discussed for estimating the necessary variables on a regional or national level. PMID:4461703

  8. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV. PMID:23960115

  9. Noninvasive Prenatal Molecular Karyotyping from Maternal Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Stephanie C. Y.; Jiang, Peiyong; Choy, Kwong W.; Chan, Kwan Chee Allen; Won, Hye-Sung; Leung, Wing C.; Lau, Elizabeth T.; Tang, Mary H. Y.; Leung, Tak Y.; Lo, Yuk Ming Dennis; Chiu, Rossa W. K.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal DNA is present in the plasma of pregnant women. Massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA has been used to detect fetal trisomies 21, 18, 13 and selected sex chromosomal aneuploidies noninvasively. Case reports describing the detection of fetal microdeletions from maternal plasma using massively parallel sequencing have been reported. However, these previous reports were either polymorphism-dependent or used statistical analyses which were confined to one or a small number of selected parts of the genome. In this report, we reported a procedure for performing noninvasive prenatal karyotyping at 3 Mb resolution across the whole genome through the massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA. This method has been used to analyze the plasma obtained from 6 cases. In three cases, fetal microdeletions have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In two cases, fetal microduplications have been detected successfully from maternal plasma. In the remaining case, the plasma DNA sequencing result was consistent with the pregnant mother being a carrier of a microduplication. Simulation analyses were performed for determining the number of plasma DNA molecules that would need to be sequenced and aligned for enhancing the diagnostic resolution of noninvasive prenatal karyotyping to 2 Mb and 1 Mb. In conclusion, noninvasive prenatal molecular karyotyping from maternal plasma by massively parallel sequencing is feasible and would enhance the diagnostic spectrum of noninvasive prenatal testing. PMID:23613765

  10. Emotions, stress, and maternal motivation in primates.

    PubMed

    Maestripieri, Dario

    2011-06-01

    Recent research conducted with nonhuman primates confirms that adaptive emotional processes, such as maternal attraction arousability and maternal anxiety arousability, enhance and sustain female motivation to interact with infants, invest in them, and protect them during the postpartum period. Changes in these emotional processes, and concomitant changes in maternal motivation, facilitate the reduction and eventual termination of maternal investment associated with infant weaning. Although laboratory studies of rodents and socially deprived rhesus monkeys have suggested that nulliparous females are neophobic and find infant stimuli aversive, recent primate research indicates that neophobia or aversion to infant stimuli do not occur in females with normal developmental experience. Furthermore, although some rodent and human studies have shown that lactation is accompanied by physiological hyporesponsiveness to stress, other studies of rodents, nonhuman primates, and humans indicate that mothers are highly vulnerable to stress and that stress-induced dysregulation of emotions can interfere with maternal motivation and parenting behavior. It is possible that some aspects of the emotional and experiential regulation of maternal motivation and parental behavior are different in different mammalian species. However, variation in the environments in which subjects are tested and in their developmental experience may also be responsible for the some discrepancies between the results of different studies. PMID:20872879

  11. Central line infections - hospitals

    MedlinePlus

    ... infection; CVC - infection; Central venous device - infection; Infection control - central line infection; Nosocomial infection - central line infection; Hospital acquired infection - central line infection; Patient safety - central ...

  12. ["I was like a ticking bomb": Experiences of severe maternal morbidity in the Metropolitan Area of Buenos Aires].

    PubMed

    Szulik, Dalia; Szwarc, Lucila

    2015-12-01

    With the objective of recording and analyzing women's experiences with severe maternal morbidity from their perspective, between February and May 2011, 16 semi-structured interviews with women treated in the public hospitals of the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area who suffered from severe maternal morbidity were carried out. In their testimonies, women report a number of delays in care, such as difficulties in identifying the problem on time, obstacles in accessing health centers and important faults in the management of obstetric emergencies. They describe the event as surprising, distressing and painful, a perception reinforced by the violation of their rights and significant communication problems. These findings are meant as a step towards the holistic and comprehensive study of severe maternal morbidity, as well as to confirm the urgent need for further research from a gender and humans rights perspective. PMID:26676597

  13. Maternal health in fifty years of Tanzania independence: Challenges and opportunities of reducing maternal mortality.

    PubMed

    Shija, Angela E; Msovela, Judith; Mboera, Leonard E G

    2011-12-01

    High rate of maternal death is one of the major public health concerns in Tanzania. Most of maternal deaths are caused by factors attributed to pregnancy, childbirth and poor quality of health services. More than 80% of maternal deaths can be prevented if pregnant women access essential maternity care and assured of skilled attendance at childbirth as well as emergency obstetric care. The objective of this review was to analyse maternal mortality situation in Tanzania during the past 50 years and to identify efforts, challenges and opportunities of reducing it. This paper was written through desk review of key policy documents, technical reports, publications and available internet-based literature. From 1961 to 1990 maternal mortality ratio in Tanzania had been on a downward trend from 453 to 200 per 100,000 live births. However, from 1990's there been an increasing trend to 578 per 100,000 live births. Current statistics indicate that maternal mortality ratio has dropped slightly in 2010 to 454 per 100,000 live births. Despite a high coverage (96%) in pregnant women who attend at least one antenatal clinic, only half of the women (51%) have access to skilled delivery. Coverage of emergence obstetric services is 64.5% and utilization of modern family planning method is 27%. Only about 13% of home deliveries access post natal check-up. Despite a number of efforts maternal mortality is still unacceptably high. Some of the efforts done to reduce maternal mortality in Tanzania included the following initiatives: reproductive and child survival; increased skilled delivery; maternal death audit; coordination and integration of different programs including maternal and child health services, family planning, malaria interventions, expanded program on immunization and adolescent health and nutrition programmes. These initiatives are however challenged by inadequate access to maternal health care services. In order to considerably reduce maternal deaths some of recommended

  14. The relationship between maternal serum magnesium level and preterm birth.

    PubMed

    Khani, S; Shokrzadeh, M; Karamoddini, P K; Shahmohammadi, S

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between maternal serum magnesium levels and preterm birth. This Nested case-control study carried out on 20 with preterm birth and 20 women at term birth at Imam Khomeini Hospital in Sari/Iran in 2008. The women with singleton gestation and intact fetal membrane suspected to preterm labor (case group), 10 cc blood samples were drawn into syringes and sent to laboratory of the hospital immediately. Sampling for control group was same as the case group. These samples recognized as control group just as birth occurring after week 37. Finally, serum magnesium level measured. Data analyzed using chi2, t-test and OR (Odd's Ratio). There was a relationship between the number of prenatal visits (p = 0.008) and stressful events associated with preterm birth (p < 0.02). Serum magnesium level was associated with preterm birth OR = 4.75, CI 95% = (0.48-46.91), Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value of serum magnesium for preterm birth was 95, 50, 66.5 and 83.33%, respectively. Although, there was a correlation between serum magnesium levels and preterm birth, due to methodology of the study, a cohort study with the same cut off point and supplementation of magnesium in RTC studies is recommended. PMID:20836289

  15. Cardiac Arrest during Hospitalization for Delivery in the United States, 1998–2011

    PubMed Central

    Mhyre, Jill M.; Tsen, Lawrence C.; Einav, Sharon; Kuklina, Elena V.; Leffert, Lisa R.; Bateman, Brian T.

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this analysis was to evaluate the frequency, distribution of potential etiologies, and survival rates of maternal cardiopulmonary arrest during the hospitalization for delivery in the United States. Methods By using data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample during the years 1998 through 2011, the authors obtained weighted estimates of the number of U.S. hospitalizations for delivery complicated by maternal cardiac arrest. Clinical and demographic risk factors, potential etiologies, and outcomes were identified and compared in women with and without cardiac arrest. The authors tested for temporal trends in the occurrence and survival associated with maternal arrest. Results Cardiac arrest complicated 1 in 12,000 or 8.5 per 100,000 hospitalizations for delivery (99% CI, 7.7 to 9.3 per 100,000). The most common potential etiologies of arrest included hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, and sepsis. Among patients with cardiac arrest, 58.9% of patients (99% CI, 54.8 to 63.0%) survived to hospital discharge. Conclusions Approximately 1 in 12,000 hospitalizations for delivery is complicated by cardiac arrest, most frequently due to hemorrhage, heart failure, amniotic fluid embolism, or sepsis. Survival depends on the underlying etiology of arrest. PMID:24694844

  16. [Maternal imagination and congenital malformations].

    PubMed

    Van Heiningen, Teunis Willem

    2011-01-01

    Since antiquity philosophers and scientists tried to explain the cause of congenital malformations. In early modern medicine maternal imagination was largely accepted as their true cause, This concept was rejected by Blondel, a London physician. Around 1750 Wolff introduced the Hemmungsbildung as the cause of congenital malformations, a concept adopted in 1781 by Blumenbach. Later on Soemmerring (1784), Crichton (1785) and Meckel the younger adopted Blumenbach's concept. In 1824 Suringar further developed it. More and more the excessive development of fetal blood vessels or nerves was rejected as a possible cause, although from time to time these ideas were adopted again. In the early 1800s Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1811) and Vrolik (1817) developed a classification of monstra. These attempts urged Isidore Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (Etienne's son) and Vrolik the younger (Gerard's son) to develop it further. Nevertheless, around 1840 Vrolik had to admit that although we are well acqainted with the various malformations, we are still ignorant of the primary cause of these phenomena. Meanwhile the dispute between the adherents of the theory of preformation and those who had adopted the concept of epigenesis exercised many minds. In the second half of the eighteenth century the latter theory became more and more adopted and this fact cleared the way for the ideas introduced by Wolff and Blumenbach, because it was consistent with the idea of a gradual development of fetal structures. PMID:22073754

  17. Evolutionary genetics of maternal effects

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Jason B.; Wade, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Maternal genetic effects (MGEs), where genes expressed by mothers affect the phenotype of their offspring, are important sources of phenotypic diversity in a myriad of organisms. We use a single‐locus model to examine how MGEs contribute patterns of heritable and nonheritable variation and influence evolutionary dynamics in randomly mating and inbreeding populations. We elucidate the influence of MGEs by examining the offspring genotype‐phenotype relationship, which determines how MGEs affect evolutionary dynamics in response to selection on offspring phenotypes. This approach reveals important results that are not apparent from classic quantitative genetic treatments of MGEs. We show that additive and dominance MGEs make different contributions to evolutionary dynamics and patterns of variation, which are differentially affected by inbreeding. Dominance MGEs make the offspring genotype‐phenotype relationship frequency dependent, resulting in the appearance of negative frequency‐dependent selection, while additive MGEs contribute a component of parent‐of‐origin dependent variation. Inbreeding amplifies the contribution of MGEs to the additive genetic variance and, therefore enhances their evolutionary response. Considering evolutionary dynamics of allele frequency change on an adaptive landscape, we show that this landscape differs from the mean fitness surface, and therefore, under some condition, fitness peaks can exist but not be “available” to the evolving population. PMID:26969266

  18. Evolutionary genetics of maternal effects.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jason B; Wade, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    Maternal genetic effects (MGEs), where genes expressed by mothers affect the phenotype of their offspring, are important sources of phenotypic diversity in a myriad of organisms. We use a single-locus model to examine how MGEs contribute patterns of heritable and nonheritable variation and influence evolutionary dynamics in randomly mating and inbreeding populations. We elucidate the influence of MGEs by examining the offspring genotype-phenotype relationship, which determines how MGEs affect evolutionary dynamics in response to selection on offspring phenotypes. This approach reveals important results that are not apparent from classic quantitative genetic treatments of MGEs. We show that additive and dominance MGEs make different contributions to evolutionary dynamics and patterns of variation, which are differentially affected by inbreeding. Dominance MGEs make the offspring genotype-phenotype relationship frequency dependent, resulting in the appearance of negative frequency-dependent selection, while additive MGEs contribute a component of parent-of-origin dependent variation. Inbreeding amplifies the contribution of MGEs to the additive genetic variance and, therefore enhances their evolutionary response. Considering evolutionary dynamics of allele frequency change on an adaptive landscape, we show that this landscape differs from the mean fitness surface, and therefore, under some condition, fitness peaks can exist but not be "available" to the evolving population. PMID:26969266

  19. Health Extension Workers' and Mothers' Attitudes to Maternal Health Service Utilization and Acceptance in Adwa Woreda, Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Ruth; Tesfay, Fisaha Haile; Godefay, Hagos; Gebrehiwot, Tesfay Gebregzabher

    2016-01-01

    Background The maternal health system in Ethiopia links health posts in rural communities (kebeles) with district (woreda) health centres, and health centres with primary hospitals. At each health post two Health Extension Workers (HEWs) assist women with birth preparedness, complication readiness, and mobilize communities to facilitate timely referral to mid-level service providers. This study explored HEWs’ and mother’s attitudes to maternal health services in Adwa Woreda, Tigray Region. Methods In this qualitative study, we trained 16 HEWs to interview 45 women to gain a better understanding of the social context of maternal health related behaviours. Themes included barriers to health services; women’s social status and mobility; and women’s perceptions of skilled birth attendant’s care. All data were analyzed thematically. Findings There have been substantial efforts to improve maternal health and reduce maternal mortality in Adwa Woreda. Women identified barriers to healthcare including distance and lack of transportation due to geographical factors; the absence of many husbands due to off-woreda farming; traditional factors such as zwar (some pregnant women are afraid of meeting other pregnant women), and discouragement from mothers and mothers-in-law who delivered their children at home. Some women experienced disrespectful care at the hospital. Facilitators to skilled birth attendance included: identification of pregnant women through Women’s Development Groups (WDGs), and referral by ambulance to health facilities either before a woman’s Expected Due Date (EDD) or if labour started at home. Conclusion With the support of WDGs, HEWs have increased the rate of skilled birth attendance by calling ambulances to transfer women to health centres either before their EDD or when labour starts at home. These findings add to the growing body of evidence that health workers at the community level can work with women’s groups to improve maternal

  20. Enhancing Maternal and Perinatal Health in Under-Served Remote Areas in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Tanzanian Model

    PubMed Central

    Nyamtema, Angelo S.; Mwakatundu, Nguke; Dominico, Sunday; Mohamed, Hamed; Pemba, Senga; Rumanyika, Richard; Kairuki, Clementina; Kassiga, Irene; Shayo, Allan; Issa, Omary; Nzabuhakwa, Calist; Lyimo, Chagi; van Roosmalen, Jos

    2016-01-01

    Background In Tanzania, maternal mortality ratio (MMR), unmet need for emergency obstetric care and health inequities across the country are in a critical state, particularly in rural areas. This study was established to determine the feasibility and impact of decentralizing comprehensive emergency obstetric and neonatal care (CEmONC) services in underserved rural areas using associate clinicians. Methods Ten health centres (HCs) were upgraded by constructing and equipping maternity blocks, operating rooms, laboratories, staff houses and installing solar panels, standby generators and water supply systems. Twenty-three assistant medical officers (advanced level associate clinicians), and forty-four nurse-midwives and clinical officers (associate clinicians) were trained in CEmONC and anaesthesia respectively. CEmONC services were launched between 2009 and 2012. Monthly supportive supervision and clinical audits of adverse pregnancy outcomes were introduced in 2011 in these HCs and their respective district hospitals. Findings After launching CEmONC services from 2009 to 2014 institutional deliveries increased in all upgraded rural HCs. Mean numbers of monthly deliveries increased by 151% and obstetric referrals decreased from 9% to 3% (p = 0.03) in HCs. A total of 43,846 deliveries and 2,890 caesarean sections (CS) were performed in these HCs making the mean proportion of all births in EmONC facilities of 128% and mean population-based CS rate of 9%. There were 190 maternal deaths and 1,198 intrapartum and very early neonatal deaths (IVEND) in all health facilities. Generally, health centres had statistically significantly lower maternal mortality ratios and IVEND rates than district hospitals (p < 0.00 and < 0.02 respectively). Of all deaths (maternal and IVEND) 84% to 96% were considered avoidable. Conclusions These findings strongly indicate that remotely located health centres in resource limited settings hold a great potential to increase accessibility to CEm

  1. A survey of airway management during induction of general anaesthesia in obstetrics: are the recommendations in the confidential enquiries into maternal deaths being implemented?

    PubMed

    Cook, T M; McCrirrick, A

    1994-07-01

    Recommendations were made in the last two triennial reports on maternal deaths regarding airway management prior to obstetric general anaesthesia. Forty-four hospitals were surveyed to determine departmental practice. Our survey suggests that obstetric anaesthetic practice varies widely between departments and several of the recommendations in the above reports have yet to be implemented. PMID:15636937

  2. Maternal care in rural China: a case study from Anhui province

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhuochun; Viisainen, Kirsi; Li, Xiaohong; Hemminki, Elina

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies on prenatal care in China have focused on the timing and frequency of prenatal care and relatively little information can be found on how maternal care has been organized and funded or on the actual content of the visits, especially in the less developed rural areas. This study explored maternal care in a rural county from Anhui province in terms of care organization, provision and utilization. Methods A total of 699 mothers of infants under one year of age were interviewed with structured questionnaires; the county health bureau officials and managers of township hospitals (n = 10) and county level hospitals (n = 2) were interviewed; the process of the maternal care services was observed by the researchers. In addition, statistics from the local government were used. Results The county level hospitals were well staffed and equipped and served as a referral centre for women with a high-risk pregnancy. Township hospitals had, on average, 1.7 midwives serving an average population of 15,000 people. Only 10–20% of the current costs in county level hospitals and township hospitals were funded by the local government, and women paid for delivery care. There was no systematic organized prenatal care and referrals were not mandatory. About half of the women had their first prenatal visit before the 13th gestational week, 36% had fewer than 5 prenatal visits, and about 9% had no prenatal visits. A major reason for not having prenatal care visits was that women considered it unnecessary. Most women (87%) gave birth in public health facilities, and the rest in a private clinic or at home. A total of 8% of births were delivered by caesarean section. Very few women had any postnatal visits. About half of the women received the recommended number of prenatal blood pressure and haemoglobin measurements. Conclusion Delivery care was better provided than both prenatal and postnatal care in the study area. Reliance on user fees gave the hospitals an incentive

  3. The effects of maternal employment on the health of school-age children.

    PubMed

    Morrill, Melinda Sandler

    2011-03-01

    The effects of maternal employment on children's health are theoretically ambiguous and challenging to identify. There are trade-offs between income and time, and a mother's decision to work reflects, in part, her children's health and her underlying preferences. I utilize exogenous variation in each child's youngest sibling's eligibility for kindergarten as an instrument. Using the restricted-access National Health Interview Survey (1985-2004), I identify the effects on overnight hospitalizations, asthma episodes, and injuries/poisonings for children ages 7-17. Maternal employment increases the probability of each adverse health event by nearly 200 percent. These effects are robust and do not reflect a non-representative local effect. PMID:21316779

  4. Maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of congenital urinary tract anomalies.

    PubMed Central

    Li, D K; Mueller, B A; Hickok, D E; Daling, J R; Fantel, A G; Checkoway, H; Weiss, N S

    1996-01-01

    To study maternal smoking during pregnancy and the risk of congenital urinary tract anomalies, we interviewed mothers of 118 affected infants born to residents of western Washington State during 1990 and 1991 and mothers of 369 control infants randomly selected from those without birth defects delivered during those years in five hospitals in King County, Washington. Maternal smoking was associated with an increased risk of congenital urinary tract anomalies in offspring (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 2.3; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.2, 4.5). This risk was higher among light smokers (1-1000 cigarettes during the pregnancy) (OR = 3.7; 95% CI = 1.7, 8.6) than among heavy smokers (OR = 1.4; 95% CI = 0.6, 3.3). Our results corroborate previous findings and support the hypothesis of a causal relation. PMID:8633746

  5. Cord blood collection for banking and the risk of maternal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Amat, Lluís; Sabrià, Joan; Martínez, Eva; Rodríguez, Núria L; Querol, Sergio; Lailla, Josep M

    2011-09-01

    We determined the effect of cord blood collection before placental expulsion on postpartum maternal blood loss in a retrospective study between a group of cord blood donors and a group of non-donors. The study was conducted in a university hospital blood bank and obstetric services and included Spanish women entered in a European study project (EUPHRATES) and who had consented to donate cord blood for public banking purposes. We measured blood volume lost during delivery by a bag collection method, as well as the need for transfusion and postpartum anemia symptoms. Deliveries at which cord blood was collected presented a significant increase in blood loss (321 ± 273 vs. 255 ± 237 ml, p=0.02). Instrumental deliveries were associated with higher postpartum blood loss than spontaneous deliveries. Cord blood collection can increase intrapartum blood loss, especially at instrumental deliveries. Additional staff who handle the collection are required to allow the leading clinician to focus on maternal care. PMID:21564030

  6. [Analysis of 39 cases of maternal deaths caused by incorrect use of oxytocin].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Q L; Zhang, X M

    1994-05-01

    Thirty-nine cases of maternal deaths directly caused by incorrect use of oxytocin in Fujian Province from 1986 to 1992 were analysed. The results showed that 90.00% of these deaths occurred in the rural and mountainous areas. The main reason was the ignorance of the birth attendents on the pros and cons of oxytocin administration and therefore the incorrect use. The causes of maternal deaths were ranged in the following order: uterine rupture, soft tissue injury of the birth canal and amniotic fluid embolism. All were emergent deaths with 79.49% dying in intrapartum period or within four hours after delivery and 28.20% at patients' home or on their way to hospital. PMID:7956550

  7. Investigation of maternal environmental exposures in association with self-reported preterm birth

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chirag J; Yang, Ting; Hu, Zhongkai; Wen, Qiaojun; Sung, Joyce; El-Sayed, Yasser Y; Cohen, Harvey; Gould, Jeffrey; Stevenson, David K; Shaw, Gary M; Ling, Xuefeng Bruce; Butte, Atul J

    2015-01-01

    Identification of maternal environmental factors influencing preterm birth risks is important to understand the reasons for the increase in prematurity since 1990. Here, we utilized a health survey, the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) to search for personal environmental factors associated with preterm birth. 201 urine and blood markers of environmental factors, such as allergens, pollutants, and nutrients were assayed in mothers (range of N: 49 to 724) who answered questions about any children born preterm (delivery <37 weeks). We screened each of the 201 factors for association with any child born preterm adjusting by age, race/ethnicity, education, and household income. We attempted to verify the top finding, urinary bisphenol A, in an independent study of pregnant women attending Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. We conclude that the association between maternal urinary levels of bisphenol A and preterm birth should be evaluated in a larger epidemiological investigation. PMID:24373932

  8. Emotion Regulation in Preschoolers: The Roles of Behavioral Inhibition, Maternal Affective Behavior, and Maternal Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Xin; Shaw, Daniel S.; Kovacs, Maria; Lane, Tonya; O'Rourke, Flannery E.; Alarcon, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01

    Background: This study examined preschoolers' emotion regulation (ER) strategies and the association with temperament, maternal interactive style, and maternal history of childhood-onset depression (COD). Methods: Participants were 62 children and their mothers, 37 of whom had mothers with COD. Children's ER was assessed using a disappointment…

  9. Trajectories of Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Sensitivity, and Children's Functioning at School Entry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Susan B.; Matestic, Patricia; von Stauffenberg, Camilla; Mohan, Roli; Kirchner, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development, the authors modeled trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms from infant age 1 month to 7 years. The authors identified 6 trajectories of maternal depressive symptoms: high-chronic, moderate-increasing, high-decreasing,…

  10. MATERNAL SELF-REPORTED DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS AND MATERNAL CORTISOL LEVELS INTERACT TO PREDICT INFANT CORTISOL LEVELS.

    PubMed

    Khoury, Jennifer E; Gonzalez, Andrea; Levitan, Robert; Masellis, Mario; Basile, Vincenzo; Atkinson, Leslie

    2016-01-01

    Three basic findings have emerged from research on maternal depressive symptoms and offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal functioning: (a) Mothers' depressive symptoms are positively associated with their offsprings' cortisol stress response, (b) numerous individual and interpersonal maternal characteristics moderate this association, and (c) maternal and infant cortisol levels are highly correlated. In combination, these findings have suggested that maternal cortisol levels may moderate the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and infant cortisol responsivity; the current study assessed this hypothesis. Participants were 297 mother-infant dyads who were recruited from the community. Maternal depressive symptoms were assessed via self-report. Dyads participated in two differentially stressful infant challenges when infants were 16 and 17 months old. Mother and infant salivary cortisol was collected before and after challenges. Results indicate that maternal cortisol levels moderated associations between maternal depressive symptoms and infant cortisol levels across both challenges. Infants showed higher cortisol levels if their mothers had both higher depressive symptoms and higher cortisol levels, as compared to infants of mothers with higher depressive symptoms and lower cortisol, and to infants of mothers with lower depressive symptoms and either higher or lower cortisol levels. We discuss findings in relation to environmental and biological factors that may contribute to the intergenerational transmission of depressive symptoms. PMID:26939829

  11. Associations between Parents' Marital Functioning, Maternal Parenting Quality, Maternal Emotion and Child Cortisol Levels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendry, Patricia; Adam, Emma K.

    2007-01-01

    Associations between family functioning and children's stress hormone levels are explored, by examining how aspects of the interparental relationship (parents' marital satisfaction and parent conflict styles), the mother-child relationship (maternal involvement and warmth) and maternal emotional functioning (depression, anxiety and self-esteem)…

  12. The Contributions of Maternal Sensitivity and Maternal Depressive Symptoms to Epigenetic Processes and Neuroendocrine Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conradt, Elisabeth; Hawes, Katheleen; Guerin, Dylan; Armstrong, David A.; Marsit, Carmen J.; Tronick, Edward; Lester, Barry M.

    2016-01-01

    This study tested whether maternal responsiveness may buffer the child to the effects of maternal depressive symptoms on DNA methylation of "NR3C1," "11ß-HSD2," and neuroendocrine functioning. DNA was derived from buccal epithelial cells and prestress cortisol was obtained from the saliva of 128 infants. Mothers with depressive…

  13. Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Dysfunctional Cognitions, and Infant Night Waking: The Role of Maternal Nighttime Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teti, Douglas M.; Crosby, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Mechanisms were examined to clarify relations between maternal depressive symptoms, dysfunctional cognitions, and infant night waking among 45 infants (1-24 months) and their mothers. A mother-driven mediational model was tested in which maternal depressive symptoms and dysfunctional cognitions about infant sleep predicted infant night waking via…

  14. The Relations among Maternal Depressive Disorder, Maternal Expressed Emotion, and Toddler Behavior Problems and Attachment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravener, Julie A.; Rogosch, Fred A.; Oshri, Assaf; Narayan, Angela J.; Cicchetti, Dante; Toth, Sheree L.

    2012-01-01

    Direct and indirect relations among maternal depression, maternal Expressed Emotion (EE: Self- and Child-Criticism), child internalizing and externalizing symptoms, and child attachment were examined. Participants were mothers with depression (n = 130) and comparison mothers (n = 68) and their toddlers (M age = 20 mo.; 53% male). Assessments…

  15. Poverty and Maternal Responsiveness: The Role of Maternal Stress and Social Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Gary W.; Boxhill, Louise; Pinkava, Michael

    2008-01-01

    One of the main reasons poverty is bad for children's development is because it reduces maternal responsiveness. This study addresses a heretofore unanswered question: why do low-income children experience diminished maternal responsiveness compared with their more affluent counterparts? In addition, we examine this question among a largely…

  16. Young Adults' Attachment: Does Maternal Employment Make a Difference? Attachments Correlates of Maternal Employment after Infancy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domingo, Meera; Keppley, Sharon; Chambliss, Catherine

    As growing numbers of mothers enter the workforce, understanding the effects of maternal employment on children and adolescents has become increasingly important. The effects of maternal employment after infancy on adult attachment, and how these effects vary as a function of children's personality style are examined in this paper. It was…

  17. Current and Past Maternal Depression, Maternal Interaction Behaviors, and Children's Externalizing and Internalizing Symptoms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Cynthia J. Ewell; Garber, Judy; Durlak, Joseph A.

    2008-01-01

    Relations among past maternal depressive disorder, current depressive symptoms, current maternal interaction behaviors, and children's adjustment were examined in a sample of 204 women and their young adolescent offspring (mean age = 11.86, SD = 0.55). Mothers either had (n = 157) or had not (n = 57) experienced at least one depressive disorder…

  18. Maternal Preconceptions About Parenting Predict Child Temperament, Maternal Sensitivity, and Children's Empathy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiang, Lisa; Moreno, Amanda J.; Robinson, JoAnn L.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the influence of maternal preconceptions on child difficult temperament at 6 months and maternal sensitivity at 12-15 months and whether all 3 variables predicted children's empathy at 21-24 months. Within a low-income, ethnically diverse sample of 175 mother-child dyads, path models were tested with 3 empathy indices…

  19. Exploring the effects of maternal eating patterns on maternal feeding and child eating

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent research has demonstrated the importance of maternal feeding practices and children’s eating behavior in the development of childhood obesity. The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between maternal and child eating patterns, and to examine the degree to which these relationsh...

  20. Maternal Psychopathology and Infant Development at 18 Months: The Impact of Maternal Personality Disorder and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conroy, Susan; Pariante, Carmine M.; Marks, Maureen N.; Davies, Helen A.; Farrelly, Simone; Schacht, Robin; Moran, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Objective: No previous longitudinal study has examined the impact of comorbid maternal personality disorder (PD) and depression on child development. We set out to examine whether maternal PD and depression assessed at 2 months post partum would be independently associated with adverse developmental outcomes at 18 months of age. Method: Women were…

  1. Relations among Intimate Partner Violence, Maternal Depressive Symptoms, and Maternal Parenting Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gustafsson, Hanna C.; Cox, Martha J.

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the relations among intimate partner violence (IPV), maternal depressive symptoms, and maternal harsh intrusive parenting. Using a cross-lagged, autoregressive path model, they sought to clarify the directionality of the relations among these 3 variables over the first 2 years of the child's life. The results indicated that,…

  2. Hospitality Occupations. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Homemaking Education.

    This curriculum guide on the hospitality occupations was developed to help secondary and postsecondary home economics teachers prepare individuals for entry-level jobs in the hospitality industry. The content is in seven sections. The first section presents organizational charts of a medium-size hotel, food and beverage division, housekeeping and…

  3. Library Services in Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Health and Social Security, London (England).

    The memorandum gives guidance to the provision and organization of library services at hospitals both for staff and for patients. It also draws attention to the assistance available from outside sources towards the development and maintenance of these services so hospital authorities may make the most effective use of the available facilities.…

  4. Hospitality, Tourism, and Recreation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Novachek, James

    The Northern Arizona Hospitality Education Program is an exemplary three-year project designed to help students, mainly Indian, obtain job skills and attitudes necessary for successful employment in the hospitality industry. Nine high schools from Apache, Coconino, and Navajo Counties participated in the project. Objectives included providing an…

  5. Handbook on Hospital Television.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prynne, T. A.

    Designed for both hospital personnel interested in television and audiovisual personnel entering the medical field, this handbook is a verbal and pictorial survey of what is being done with TV within the medical profession. After an introduction which answers technical questions about medical TV posed during the American Hospital Association's…

  6. Mental hospitals in India.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, K; Venugopal, D; Alimchandani, A K

    2000-04-01

    This review traces the history of the mental hospital movement, initially on the world stage, and later in India, in relation to advances in psychiatric care. Mental hospitals have played a significant role in the evolution of psychiatry to its present statusThe earliest hospital in India were established during the British colonial rule. They served as a means to isolate mentally ill persons from the societal mainstream and provide treatments that were in vogue at the time. Following India's independence, there has been a trend towards establishing general hospital psychiatry units and deinstitutionalization, while at the same time improving conditions in the existing mental hospitals.Since 1947, a series of workshops of superintendents was conducted to review the prevailing situations in mental hospitals and to propose recommendations to improve the same. Implementation of the Mental Health Act, 1987, and grovernmental focus upon mental hospital reform have paved way for a more specific and futuristic role for mental hospitals in planning psychiatric services for the new millenium, especially for severe mental illnesses. PMID:21407925

  7. [Music in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Bouteloup, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    Occasional events, regular workshops, concerts, shows, artists in residence, cultural outings...Hospital does not necessarily have to be a place of silence and sadness. But this situation has not always been so straightforward as on the face of it, nothing is more incompatible with a hospital environment than music, which, by definition, is festive and noisy. PMID:20684389

  8. Hospitality services generate revenue.

    PubMed

    Bizouati, S

    1993-01-01

    An increasing number of hospitals are undertaking external revenue-generating activities to supplement their shrinking budgets. Written at the request of Leadership, this article outlines an example of a successful catering service -- a money-generating business that more Canadian hospitals could profitably consider. PMID:10127850

  9. Hospitality Services Reference Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This reference book provides information needed by employees in hospitality services occupations. It includes 29 chapters that cover the following topics: the hospitality services industry; professional ethics; organization and management structures; safety practices and emergency procedures; technology; property maintenance and repair; purchasing…

  10. Hospitality Services. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Tech Univ., Lubbock. Home Economics Curriculum Center.

    This guide, which was developed as part of Texas' home economics education program, is intended to assist teachers of a hospitality services course focusing on the food and lodging segments of the hospitality and tourism industry. The first 40% of the approximately 600-page guide consists of strategies for teaching each of 29 essential…

  11. Working together: collaboration between midwives and doctors in public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Reiger, Kerreen M; Lane, Karen L

    2009-05-01

    While collaborative, multidisciplinary teamwork is widely espoused as the goal of contemporary hospitals, it is hard to achieve. In maternity care especially, professional rivalries and deep-seated philosophical differences over childbirth generate significant tensions. This article draws on qualitative research in several Victorian public maternity units to consider the challenges to inter-professional collaboration. It reports what doctors and midwives looked for in colleagues they liked to work with - the attributes of a "good doctor" or a "good midwife". Although their ideals did not entirely match, both groups respected skill and hard work and sought mutual trust, respect and accountability. Yet effective working together is limited both by tensions over role boundaries and power and by incivility that is intensified by increasing workloads and a fragmented labour force. The skills and qualities that form the basis of "professional courtesy" need to be recognised as essential to good collaborative practice. PMID:19563323

  12. A randomized clinical trial of care for women with preterm labour: home management versus hospital management

    PubMed Central

    Goulet, Céline; Gévry, Hélène; Lemay, Michel; Gauthier, Robert J.; Lepage, Linda; Fraser, William; Polomeno, Viola

    2001-01-01

    Background Preterm labour occurs in about 10% of all pregnancies and is the most important cause of premature birth. Women with preterm labour are admitted to hospital to have the contractions stopped. Thereafter, many women remain in hospital until delivery. We conducted a randomized clinical trial to compare hospital care with home care of women who had been admitted to hospital for preterm labour. Methods After they had received treatment for an acute episode of premature labour, women at 2 regional perinatal centres associated with teaching hospitals were randomly assigned to home care or hospital care. Eligible women (n = 250) were aged 18 years or older, lived within 50 km of the hospital, had a gestational age between 20 and 35 weeks, had no prior preterm delivery and were experiencing their first episode of preterm labour and first admission to hospital for preterm labour. Analysis was by intention to treat. Results There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in mean gestational age at delivery (home: 37.52 weeks, hospital: 37.50 weeks) or in mean birth weight (home: 2974 g, hospital: 3020 g). There were no significant differences between the 2 groups with respect to the proportions of babies born before term or the mean duration of neonatal hospital stay, neonatal intensive care unit stay and intermediate care nursery stay. The mean duration of the first stay in hospital for the women in the home group (3.8 days) was significantly shorter than the mean duration for women in the hospital group (6.1 days). In addition, the mean duration of all maternal stays in hospital was significantly shorter for the women in the home group (3.7 days) than in the hospital group (5.0 days). Interpretation Home care management is an efficient and acceptable alternative to hospital care for women experiencing preterm labour. PMID:11314452

  13. Maternal mental health: The missing "m" in the global maternal and child health agenda.

    PubMed

    Atif, Najia; Lovell, Karina; Rahman, Atif

    2015-08-01

    While the physical health of women and children is emphasized, the mental aspects of their health are often ignored by maternal and child health programs, especially in low- and middle-income countries. We review the evidence of the magnitude, impact, and interventions for common maternal mental health problems with a focus on depression, the condition with the greatest public health impact. The mean prevalence of maternal depression ranges between 15.6% in the prenatal and 19.8% in the postnatal period. It is associated with preterm birth, low birth weight, and poor infant growth and cognitive development. There is emerging evidence for the effectiveness of interventions, especially those that can be delivered by non-specialists, including community health workers, in low-income settings. Strategies for integrating maternal mental health in the maternal and child health agenda are suggested. PMID:26164538

  14. Maternal mortality surveillance and maternal death reviews in countries of the Eastern Mediterranean Region.

    PubMed

    Chichakli, L O; Atrash, H K; Musani, A S; Mahaini, R; Arnaoute, S

    2000-07-01

    This paper presents the findings of a 1999 survey of 19 countries of the World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region on maternal mortality surveillance systems and death review activities in the Region. Data were collected by questionnaire completed by ministry of health personnel. The findings show that 13 countries require official reporting of deaths of women of reproductive age. Most of the countries conduct maternal death reviews although only 8 have surveillance systems. Other areas investigated were the sources of information on maternal deaths, types of data collected, how the data are analysed and how such data are used. There is a need to strengthen information systems on maternal mortality in the Region in order to guide decision-makers in the planning and evaluation of maternal health programmes. PMID:11794068

  15. Maternal Insomnia and Children's Family Socialization Environments

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, Alice M.; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Ambler, Antony; Arseneault, Louise; Houts, Renate M.; Caspi, Avshalom

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine concurrent associations between maternal insomnia and different aspects of the family socialization environment. Design: Mothers reported on their symptoms of insomnia in a private standardized interview and interviewers evaluated the family socialization environment using the Coder's Inventory. Setting: Assessments were conducted in participants' homes within the U.K. Patients or Participants: One thousand one hundred sixteen mothers of British children enrolled in the Environmental Risk (E-Risk) study were invited to participate when their children were aged 12 years. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: After controlling for family socioeconomic status (SES), mothers' relationship status, and maternal depression, maternal insomnia was associated with a poorer family socialization environment (β = −0.10, [95% confidence intervals (CI) = −0.16, −0.04], P < 0.001). When family socialization environment subscales were examined, after controlling for family SES, mothers' relationship status, and maternal depression, maternal insomnia was associated with greater chaos (β = 0.09, [95% CI = 0.03, 0.15], P = 0.002), greater child neglect (β = 0.13, [95% CI = 0.07, 0.18], P < 0.001), less happiness (β = −0.13, [95% CI = −0.18, −0.07], P < 0.001), less child stimulation (β = −0.06, [95% CI = −0.11, 0.00], P = 0.043), but not poorer state of the home, such as orderliness (β = −0.04, [95% CI = −0.10, 0.02], P = 0.182). Conclusions: Maternal insomnia is associated with the family socialization environment. This finding emphasizes the need to consider insomnia in the family context. Citation: Gregory AM; Moffitt TE; Ambler A; Arseneault L; Houts RM; Caspi A. Maternal insomnia and children's family socialization environments. SLEEP 2012;35(4):579-582. PMID:22467996

  16. Hospital efficiency and debt.

    PubMed

    Bernet, Patrick Michael; Rosko, Michael D; Valdmanis, Vivian G

    2008-01-01

    U.S. Hospitals rely heavily on debt financing to fund major capital investments. Hospital efficiency is at least partly determined by the amount and quality of plant and equipment it uses. As such, a hospital's access to debt and credit rating may be related to its efficiency. This study explores this relationship using a broad sample of hospitals and associated bond issuance histories. Employing stochastic frontier analysis (SFA), we measure cost inefficiency to gauge the impact of debt issuance and debt rating. We find that hospitals with recent bond issues were less inefficient. Although we do not find a perfectly linear relationship between debt rating and inefficiency, we have evidence that hints at such a relation. Finally, we find an increase in inefficiency in the years following bond issues, consistent with the possibility of a debt death spiral. PMID:21110482

  17. [Hospital medicine in Chile].

    PubMed

    Eymin, Gonzalo; Jaffer, Amir K

    2013-03-01

    After 15 years of development of Hospital Medicine in Chile, there are several benefits of this discipline. Among others, a reduction in the length of hospital stay, readmissions, costs, and improved medical teaching of students, residents and fellows have been observed. However, in South América there are only isolated groups dedicated to Hospital Medicine in Chile, Argentina and Brazil, with a rather slow growth. The unjustified fear of competition from sub specialists, and the fee for service system of payment in our environment may be important factors to understand this phenomenon. The aging of the population makes imperative to improve the safety of our patients and to optimize processes and resources within the hospital, to avoid squandering healthcare resources. The following is a detailed and evidence-based article, on how hospital medicine might benefit both the public and prívate healthcare systems in Chile. PMID:23900327

  18. Maternal vitamin levels in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations other than neural tube defects

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Marie; Mills, James L.; Molloy, Anne M.; Troendle, James F.; Brody, Lawrence C.; Conley, Mary; Mc Donnell, Robert; Scott, John M.; Kirke, Peadar N.

    2012-01-01

    Background Periconceptional use of folic acid prevents most neural tube defects (NTDs). Whether folic acid and/or multivitamins can prevent other congenital anomalies is not clear. This study tested whether maternal blood levels of folate and vitamin B12 in pregnancies affected by congenital malformations excluding NTDs are lower when compared to non-affected pregnancies. Methods We measured pregnancy red cell folate (RCF), vitamin B12, and homocysteine (tHcy) concentrations in blood samples taken at the first antenatal clinic in Dublin maternity hospitals in 1986–1990 when vitamin supplementation was rare. The cases were mothers who delivered a baby with a congenital malformation other than NTD identified by the Dublin EUROCAT Registry; controls were a systematic sample of mothers of offspring without congenital malformations from the same hospitals in the same time period. Results The median maternal levels of RCF and tHcy did not differ significantly between cases and controls for any of the congenital malformation groups examined (RCF: all malformations 275.9 ug/L v controls 271.2; p=0.77; tHcy: all malformations 7.5 umol/L v controls 7.6; p=0.57). In an unadjusted analysis vitamin B12 was significantly higher in case-mothers whose babies had cleft palate only (p=0.006), musculoskeletal malformations (p=0.034) and midline defects (p=0.039) but not after adjustment for multiple testing. Conclusions Our data suggest that low maternal folate and B12 levels or high tHcy levels in early pregnancy are not associated with all congenital malformations excluding NTDs. Fortification with folic acid or B12 may not have a beneficial effect in the prevention of these anomalies. PMID:21591245

  19. Rationale for a long-term evaluation of the consequences of potentially life-threatening maternal conditions and maternal "near-miss" incidents using a multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Pacagnella, Rodolfo C; Cecatti, Jose G; Camargo, Rodrigo P; Silveira, Carla; Zanardi, Dulce T; Souza, Joao P; Parpinelli, Mary A; Haddad, Samira M

    2010-08-01

    Recent advances in health care mean that women survive severe conditions and events related to pregnancy that would previously have resulted in death. Therefore, a greater number of women will experience significant maternal morbidity with significant consequences. Little is known, however, about these long-term consequences. Some investigators have evaluated the repercussions of severe biological or traumatic events, and have reported that survivors are at an increased risk of death in the five years after the event. In addition, they continue to experience both organic and emotional problems such as clinical, cardiac, respiratory, and neurological complications, as well as anxiety and depression, following discharge from hospital. Following a maternal "near-miss" incident, various life domains may be affected (organic, mental, cognitive, and social function), and these must be evaluated in addition to the related economic issues and quality of life. However, because of the diversity of methods and instruments used to evaluate possible repercussions, comparisons between the few studies available on the subject are difficult. An in-depth debate should be initiated to discuss the methodological aspects of such investigation. We propose a conceptual and methodological discussion on the long-term repercussions of severe maternal morbidity based on the evaluation of the following variables: reproductive health, quality of life, posttraumatic stress syndrome, sexual function, postpartum depression, daily functioning, and the physical, neurological, and psychomotor development of the children born after a complicated pregnancy. PMID:21050503

  20. Costs of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section at a tertiary level public hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Public hospitals in developing countries, rather than the preventive and primary healthcare sectors, are the major consumers of healthcare resources. Imbalances in rational, equitable and efficient allocation of scarce resources lie in the scarcity of research & information on economic aspects of health care. The objective of this study was to determine the average cost of a spontaneous vaginal delivery and Caesarean section in a tertiary level government hospital in Islamabad, Pakistan and to estimate the out of pocket expenditures to households using these services. Methods This hospital based cost accounting cross sectional study determines the average cost of vaginal delivery and Caesarean section from two perspectives, the patient's and the hospital. From the patient's perspective direct and indirect expenditures of 133 post-partum mothers (65 delivered by Caesarean section & 68 by spontaneous vaginal delivery) admitted in the maternity general ward were determined. From the hospital perspective the step down methodology was adopted, capital and recurrent costs were determined from inputs and cost centers. Results The average cost for a spontaneous vaginal delivery from the hospital's side was 40 US$ (2688 rupees) and from the patient's perspective was 79 US$ (5278 rupees). The average cost for a Caesarean section from the hospital side was 162 US$ (10868 rupees) and 204 US$ (13678 rupees) from the patient's side. Average monthly household income was 141 ± 87 US$ for spontaneous vaginal delivery and 168 ± 97 US$ for Caesarean section. Three fourth (74%) of households had a monthly income of less than 149 US$ (10000 rupees). Conclusion The apparently "free" maternity care at government hospitals involves substantial hidden and unpredicted costs. The anticipated fear of these unpredicted costs may be major factor for many poor households to seek cheaper alternate maternity healthcare. PMID:20085662

  1. Hospitality as an Environmental Metaphor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwood, Bert

    1991-01-01

    Compares stewardship and hospitality as they relate to the biosphere. Traces the origin of the word "hospitality," discusses cultural traditions of hospitality, and applies the concept of hospitality to the natural world. Considers forms of symbiosis in nature: commensals, mutualism, and parasitism. Hospitality promotes respect, humility, and…

  2. Birth choices in Timor-Leste: a framework for understanding the use of maternal health services in low resource settings.

    PubMed

    Wild, Kayli; Barclay, Lesley; Kelly, Paul; Martins, Nelson

    2010-12-01

    The high rate of maternal mortality in Timor-Leste is a persistent problem which has been exacerbated by the long history of military occupation and ongoing political crises since independence in 1999. It is similar to other developing countries where there have been slow declines in maternal mortality despite 20 years of Safe Motherhood interventions. The national Ministry of Health, United Nations (UN) agencies and non-government organisations (NGOs) have attempted to reduce maternal mortality by enacting policies and interventions to increase the number of births in health centres and hospitals. Despite considerable effort in promoting facility-based delivery, most Timorese women birth at home and the lack of midwives means few women have access to a skilled birth attendant. This paper investigates factors influencing access to and use of maternal health services in rural areas of Timor-Leste. It draws on 21 interviews and 11 group discussions with Timorese women and their families collected over two periods of fieldwork, one month in September 2006 and five months from July to December 2007. Theoretical concepts from anthropology and health social science are used to explore individual, social, political and health system issues which affect the way in which maternal health services are utilised. In drawing together a range of theories this paper aims to extend explanations around access to maternal health services in developing countries. An empirically informed framework is proposed which illustrates the complex factors that influence women's birth choices. This framework can be used by policy-makers, practitioners, donors and researchers to think critically about policy decisions and where investments can have the most impact for improving maternal health in Timor-Leste and elsewhere. PMID:20971540

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis transmission in a newborn nursery and maternity ward--New York City, 2003.

    PubMed

    2005-12-23

    Evaluating young children recently exposed to airborne Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a public health priority. If infected, children aged <2 years are at high risk for severe tuberculosis (TB) disease (e.g., TB meningitis). In December 2003, infectious pulmonary TB disease was diagnosed in a foreign-born nurse working in the newborn nursery and maternity ward of a New York City hospital (hospital A); the nurse had declined treatment for latent TB infection (LTBI) after testing positive 11 years earlier. An investigation including medical evaluation of contacts in the nursery and maternity ward was conducted by the Bureau of TB Control (BTBC) at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, hospital A, and CDC. This report summarizes the results of that investigation, which determined that approximately 1,500 patients had been exposed to the nurse but the majority could not be located for evaluation. Among those who were tested, four infants had positive tuberculin skin test (TST) results, likely attributable to recent transmission of M. tuberculosis. The findings emphasize the difficulty of conducting contact investigations in certain settings and the importance of effective LTBI testing and treatment programs for health-care workers (HCWs) to prevent TB disease and subsequent health-care--associated transmission. PMID:16371943

  4. Maternal Fatty Acids and Their Association with Birth Outcome: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Akshaya; Randhir, Karuna; Mehendale, Savita; Wagh, Girija; Joshi, Sadhana

    2016-01-01

    Maternal nutrition, especially LCPUFA, is an important factor in determining fetal growth and development. Our earlier cross sectional study reports lower docosahexanoic acid (DHA) levels at the time of delivery in mothers delivering low birth weight (LBW) babies. This study was undertaken to examine the role of the maternal omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acid profile across the gestation in fetal growth. This is a hospital based study where women were recruited in early gestation. Maternal blood was collected at 3 time points, i.e., T1 = 16th–20th week, T2 = 26th–30th week and T3 = at delivery. Cord blood was collected at delivery. At delivery, these women were divided into 2 groups: those delivering at term a baby weighing >2.5kg [Normal birth weight (NBW) group] and those delivering at term a baby weighing <2.5kg [LBW group]. The study reports data on 111 women recruited at T1, out of which 60 women delivered an NBW baby at term and 51 women delivered an LBW baby at term. Fatty acids were analysed using gas chromatography. At T1 of gestation, maternal erythrocyte DHA levels were positively (p<0.05) associated with baby weight. Maternal plasma and erythrocyte arachidonic acid and total erythrocyte omega-6 fatty acid levels at T2 were higher (p<0.05 for both) in the LBW group. Total erythrocyte omega-3 fatty acid levels were lower (p<0.05) while total erythrocyte omega-6 fatty acid levels were higher (p<0.05) in the LBW group at delivery. Our data demonstrates the possible role of LCPUFA in the etiology of LBW babies right from early pregnancy. PMID:26815428

  5. Maternal complement C1q and increased odds for psychosis in adult offspring

    PubMed Central

    Severance, Emily G.; Gressitt, Kristin L.; Buka, Stephen L.; Cannon, Tyrone D.; Yolken, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    The presence of maternal antibodies to food and infectious antigens may confer an increased risk of developing schizophrenia and psychosis in adult offspring. Complement factor C1q is an immune molecule with multiple functions including clearance of antigen-antibody complexes from circulation and mediation of synaptic pruning during fetal brain development. To determine if maternal C1q was associated with offspring schizophrenia and psychosis, we evaluated 55 matched case-control maternal serum pairs from the National Collaborative Perinatal Project. Sample pairs were composed of mothers whose offspring developed psychoses as adults and those whose offspring were free from psychiatric disease. Matching criteria for offspring included birth date, delivery hospital, race and gender, with further matching based on mother’s age. IgG markers of C1q, bovine milk casein, egg ovalbumin and wheat gluten were measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. C1q levels were compared to food antigen IgG and to previously generated data for C-reactive protein, adenovirus, herpes simplex viruses, influenza viruses, measles virus and Toxoplasma gondii. C1q was significantly elevated in case mothers with odds ratios of 2.66–6.31 (conditional logistic regressions, p≤0.008–0.05). In case mothers only, C1q was significantly correlated with antibodies to both food and infectious antigens: gluten (R2=0.26, p≤0.004), herpes simplex virus type 2 (R2=0.21, p≤0.02), adenovirus (R2=0.25, p≤0.006). In conclusion, exposure to maternal C1q activity during pregnancy may be a risk factor for the development of schizophrenia and psychosis in offspring. Prenatal measurement of maternal C1q may be an important and convergent screening tool to identify potentially deleterious immune activation from multiple sources. PMID:25195065

  6. Effective strategies for reducing maternal mortality in Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Nosraty, Somaye; Rahimi, Mojtaba; Kohan, Shahnaz; Beigei, Margan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Maternal mortality rate is among the most important health indicators. This indicator is a function of factors that are related to pregnant women; these factors include economic status, social and family life of the pregnant woman, human resources, structure of the hospitals and health centers, and management factors. Strategic planning, with a comprehensive analysis and coverage of all causes of maternal mortality, can be helpful in improving this indicator. Materials and Methods: This research is a descriptive exploratory study. After needs assessment and review of the current situation through eight expert panel meetings and evaluating the organization's internal and external environment, the strengths, weaknesses, threats, and opportunities of maternal mortality reduction were determined. Then, through mutual comparison of strengths/opportunities, strengths/threats, weaknesses/opportunities, and weaknesses/threats, WT, WO, ST, and SO strategies and suggested activities of the researchers for reducing maternal mortality were developed and dedicated to the areas of education, research, treatment, and health, as well as food and drug administration to be implemented. Results: In the expert panel meetings, seven opportunity and strength strategies, eight strength and threat strategies, five weakness and threat strategies, and seven weakness and opportunity strategies were determined and a strategic plan was developed. Conclusions: Dedication of the developed strategies to the areas of education, research, treatment, and health, as well as food and drug administration has coordinated these areas to develop Ministry of Health indicators. In particular, it emphasizes the key role of university management in improving the processes related to maternal health. PMID:27186210

  7. Acculturative stress negatively impacts maternal depressive symptoms in Mexican-American women during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    D’Anna-Hernandez, Kimberly L.; Aleman, Brenda; Flores, Ana-Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Background Mexican-American women exhibit high rates of prenatal maternal depressive symptoms relative to the general population. Though pregnant acculturated Mexican-American women experience cultural stressors such as acculturation, acculturative stress and discrimination that may contribute to elevated depressive symptoms, the contribution of these socio-cultural correlates to depressive symptomology is unknown. Method Ninety-eight pregnant women of Mexican descent were recruited from a community hospital clinic during their first trimester. Women completed surveys about acculturation, acculturative stress, perceived discrimination, general perceived stress, and maternal depressive symptoms as well as the potential protective factor of Mexican cultural values. Results Women who experienced greater acculturative and perceived stress, but not perceived discrimination or acculturation, reported significantly elevated depressive symptoms during pregnancy. Also, women who experienced greater acculturative stress identified with a mixture of Mexican and American cultural values. However, only the Mexican cultural value of respect was protective against maternal depressive symptoms while adhering to the Anglo value of independence and self-reliance was a risk factor. Limitations A limitation in the study is the cross-sectional and descriptive self-report nature of the work, underscoring the need for additional research. Moreover, physiological measures of stress were not analyzed in the current study. Conclusions Results point to acculturative stress, above other cultural stressors, as a potential intervention target in culturally competent obstetric care. These findings have implications for maternal mental health treatment during pregnancy, which likely affects maternal-fetal programming and may favorably affect perinatal outcomes in the vulnerable Mexican-American population. PMID:25699668

  8. Maternal near miss in the intensive care unit: clinical and epidemiological aspects

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Leonam Costa; da Costa, Aurélio Antônio Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    Objective To analyze the epidemiological clinical profile of women with maternal near miss according to the new World Health Organization criteria. Methods A descriptive crosssectional study was conducted, in which the records of patients admitted to the obstetric intensive care unit of a tertiary hospital in Recife (Brazil) over a period of four years were analyzed. Women who presented at least one near miss criterion were included. The variables studied were age, race/color, civil status, education, place of origin, number of pregnancies and prenatal consultations, complications and procedures performed, mode of delivery, gestational age at delivery, and maternal near miss criteria. The descriptive analysis was performed using the program Epi-Info 3.5.1. Results Two hundred fifty-five cases of maternal near miss were identified, with an overall ratio of maternal near miss of 12.8/1,000 live births. Among these cases, 43.2% of the women had incomplete primary education, 44.7% were primiparous, and 20.5% had undergone a previous cesarean section. Regarding specific diagnoses, there was a predominance of hypertensive disorders (62.7%), many of which were complicated by HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets) syndrome (41.2%). The laboratory near miss criteria were the most often observed (59.6%), due mainly to the high frequency of acute thrombocytopenia (32.5%). Conclusions A high frequency of women who had a low level of education and who were primiparous was observed. According to the new criteria proposed by the World Health Organization, hypertensive pregnancy disorders are still the most common among maternal near miss cases. The high frequency of HELLP syndrome was also striking, which contributed to acute thrombocytopenia being the most frequent near miss criterion. PMID:26270856

  9. Maternal stature, fertility and infant mortality.

    PubMed

    Martorell, R; Delgado, H L; Valverde, V; Klein, R E

    1981-09-01

    380 women of parity 1 or more living in coffee plantations of the Pacific lowlands of Guatemala were studied during the 18-month period from October 1977 to March 1979 to investigate the relationship between maternal stature, parity, offspring mortality, and number of surviving children. Average height was 142 cm or 4 feet 8 inches, average age was 28 years, and average parity was 4.4 children per woman: average number of surviving children per woman was 3. Simple correlation analysis shows that although shorter women appeared to have greater parities but fewer surviving children, the relationships were not statistically significant (p.05). However, when age and/or parity were adjusted, the association between maternal stature and number of surviving children became statistically significant (p.05). Children of shorter mothers exhibited high mortality rates which were not affected by adjustments for maternal age and parity (p.001). A possible explanation of the link between maternal stature and offspring survival is that taller women generally have heavier babies. This study suggests that maternal height can be used to identify infants at high mortality risk; this can have potential use in developing nations where many women do not get examined more than once during pregnancy. PMID:7309018

  10. Philanthropy and hospital financing.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D G; Clement, J P; Wheeler, J R

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study explores the relationships among donations to not-for-profit hospitals, the returns provided by these hospitals, and fund-raising efforts. It tests a model of hospital behavior and addresses an earlier debate regarding the supply price of donations. DATA SOURCES. The main data source is the California Office of Statewide Health Planning data tapes of hospital financial disclosure reports for fiscal years 1980/1981 through 1986/1987. Complete data were available for 160 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN. Three structural equations (donations, returns, and fund-raising) are estimated as a system using a fixed-effects, pooled cross-section, time-series least squares regression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. Estimation results reveal the expected positive relation between donations and returns. The reverse relation between returns and donations is insignificant. The estimated effect of fund-raising on donations is insignificantly different from zero, and the effect of donations on fund-raising is negative. Fund-raising and returns are negatively associated with one another. CONCLUSION. The empirical results presented here suggest a positive donations-returns relations and are consistent with a positive supply price for donations. Hospitals appear to view a trade-off between providing returns and soliciting donations, but donors do not respond equally to these two activities. Attempts to increase free cash flow through expansion of community returns or fund-raising activity, at least in the short run, are not likely to be highly successful financing strategies for many hospitals. PMID:8537223

  11. Hospitals' Internal Accountability

    PubMed Central

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K.; Deber, Raisa B.

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  12. Hospitals' internal accountability.

    PubMed

    Kraetschmer, Nancy; Jass, Janak; Woodman, Cheryl; Koo, Irene; Kromm, Seija K; Deber, Raisa B

    2014-09-01

    This study aimed to enhance understanding of the dimensions of accountability captured and not captured in acute care hospitals in Ontario, Canada. Based on an Ontario-wide survey and follow-up interviews with three acute care hospitals in the Greater Toronto Area, we found that the two dominant dimensions of hospital accountability being reported are financial and quality performance. These two dimensions drove both internal and external reporting. Hospitals' internal reports typically included performance measures that were required or mandated in external reports. Although respondents saw reporting as a valuable mechanism for hospitals and the health system to monitor and track progress against desired outcomes, multiple challenges with current reporting requirements were communicated, including the following: 58% of survey respondents indicated that performance-reporting resources were insufficient; manual data capture and performance reporting were prevalent, with the majority of hospitals lacking sophisticated tools or technology to effectively capture, analyze and report performance data; hospitals tended to focus on those processes and outcomes with high measurability; and 53% of respondents indicated that valuable cross-system accountability, performance measures or both were not captured by current reporting requirements. PMID:25305387

  13. Iatrogenic risks and maternal health: Issues and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Khaskheli, Meharun-nissa; Baloch, Shahla; Sheeba, Aneela

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To observe acute maternal morbidity and mortality due to iatrogenic factors and outcomes. Methods: This observational cross sectional study was conducted at intensive care unit of Liaquat University of Medical and Health sciences Jamshoro from 1-January-2011 to 31-December-2012. In this study all the delivered or undelivered women who needed intensive care unit (ICU) admission due to management related life threatening complication referred from periphery or within this hospital were included, while those women who had pregnancy complicated by medical conditions were excluded. These women were registered on the predesigned proforma containing variables like Demographic characteristics, various iatrogenic risk factors, complications and management out comes. The data was collected and analyzed on SPSS version 20. Results: During these study period 51 women needed ICU care for different complications due to adverse effects of medical treatments. Majority of these women were between 20-40 years of age 41(80.39%), multiparous 29(56.86%), unbooked 38(74.50%), referred from periphery 39(76.47%), common iatrogenic factors were misuse of oxytocin 16(31.37%), fluid overload/cardiac failure 8(15.68%), blood reaction 7(13.72%), anesthesia related problems were delayed recovery 3(5.88%), cardiac arrest 2(3.92%), spinal shock 2(3.92%), surgical problems were bladder injury 5(9.8%), post operative internal haemorrhage 3(5.88%), 37(72.54%) women recovered and 14(27.45%) expired. Conclusion: The maternal morbidity and mortality rate with iatrogenic factors was high and majority of these factors were avoidable. PMID:24639842

  14. Perinatal complications associated with maternal asthma during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Stephanie; Said, Joanne

    2012-01-01

    Background Asthma is one of the most common medical illnesses occurring in pregnancy and its incidence amongst the obstetric population is increasing. Previous studies have suggested that asthma is not a benign illness in pregnancy, and can contribute towards increased rates of pregnancy complications. Methods We undertook a retrospective audit of 6458 deliveries during 2008 at The Royal Women's Hospital to determine the perinatal outcomes for women with a self-reported diagnosis of asthma. Results We found that 501 (7.8%) deliveries were to women who identified themselves as asthmatics. Of these, 15.6% reported exacerbations of their asthma symptoms during pregnancy, with the remainder reporting improvement or stabilization. There was an increased rate of preterm birth (12.9%) in the asthmatic population, compared to the non-asthmatic population (OR = 1.48, CI [1.12–1.95], P = 0.005). Asthma remained significantly associated with an increased risk of preterm birth after adjusting for maternal smoking status using logistic regression analysis (Adjusted OR 1.41, CI [1.07–1.86], P = 0.01). Women were also at increased risk of developing pre-eclampsia (OR 1.71, CI [1.09–2.67], P = 0.02) but not fetal growth restriction. Women identifying themselves as asthmatics were also more likely to deliver by caesarean section (OR 1.32, CI [1.09–1.6], P = 0.003). Conclusion These findings suggest that maternal asthma may be associated with an increased risk of preterm birth, pre-eclampsia and caesarean delivery.

  15. Effect of Pilates exercises on postpartum maternal fatigue

    PubMed Central

    Ashrafinia, Farzaneh; Mirmohammadali, Mandana; Rajabi, Hamid; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan; Haghighi, Khosro Sadeghniiat; Amelvalizadeh, Mehrnoosh

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Postpartum fatigue is a pervasive phenomenon and often affects mothers immediately after delivery. The present study aimed to assess the effect Pilates home exercises had on postpartum maternal fatigue. METHODS A total of 80 women participated in our clinical trial study. The women were randomly divided into two groups – the intervention group (n = 40) and the control group (n = 40). In the intervention group, the women performed Pilates exercises five times a week (30 min per session) for eight consecutive weeks. The first session was conducted 72 hours after delivery. The control group did not receive any intervention. Each woman’s level of fatigue was evaluated at hospital discharge (as a baseline), and at four and eight weeks after delivery, using the standard Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory (MFI-20) questionnaire and repeated measures analysis. RESULTS During the eight weeks of follow-up, we found that the intervention group had lower mean MFI-20 scores than the control group with regard to general fatigue (7.80 ± 2.07 vs. 12.72 ± 1.79; p < 0.001), physical fatigue (7.12 ± 1.41 vs. 10.42 ± 2.02; p < 0.001), reduced activity (6.95 ± 1.35 vs. 11.27 ± 1.70; p < 0.001), reduced motivation (6.20 ± 1.01 vs. 9.80 ± 2.04; p < 0.001) and mental fatigue (6.85 ± 1.45 vs. 10.72 ± 1.98; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION The present study’s findings show that physical exercise can significantly reduce postpartum maternal fatigue in all subscales. PMID:25820848

  16. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  17. Identifying 'at risk' women and the impact of maternal obesity on National Health Service maternity services.

    PubMed

    Heslehurst, Nicola

    2011-11-01

    Obesity is a public health concern worldwide, arising from multifaceted and complex causes that relate to individual choice and lifestyle, and the influences of wider society. In addition to a long-standing focus on both childhood and adult obesity, there has been more recent concern relating to maternal obesity. This review explores the published evidence relating to maternal obesity incidence and associated inequalities, the impact of obesity on maternity services, and associated guidelines. Epidemiological data comprising three national maternal obesity datasets within the UK have identified a significant increase in maternal obesity in recent years, and reflect broad socio-demographic inequalities particularly deprivation, ethnicity and unemployment. Obese pregnancies present increased risk of complications that require more resource intensive antenatal and perinatal care, such as caesarean deliveries, gestational diabetes, haemorrhage, infections and congenital anomalies. Healthcare professionals also face difficulties when managing the care of women in pregnancy as obesity is an emotive and stigmatising topic. There is a lack of good-quality evidence for effective interventions to tackle maternal obesity. Recently published national guidelines for the clinical management and weight management of maternal obesity offer advice for professionals, but acknowledge the limitations of the evidence base. The consequence of these difficulties is an absence of support services available for women. Further evaluative research is thus required to assess the effectiveness of interventions with women before, during and after pregnancy. Qualitative work with women will also be needed to help inform the development of more sensitive risk communication and women-centred services. PMID:21854697

  18. Strategies To Boost Maternal Immunization To Achieve Further Gains In Improved Maternal And Newborn Health.

    PubMed

    Steedman, Mark R; Kampmann, Beate; Schillings, Egbert; Al Kuwari, Hanan; Darzi, Ara

    2016-02-01

    Despite the indisputable successes of the United Nations Millennium Development Goals, which include goals on improving maternal health and reducing child mortality, millions of mothers and newborns still die tragically and unnecessarily each year. Many of these deaths result from vaccine-preventable diseases, since obstacles such as cost and accessibility have hampered efforts to deliver efficacious vaccines to those most in need. Additionally, many vaccines given to mothers and children under age five are not suitable for newborns, since their maturing immune systems do not respond optimally during the first few months of life. Maternal immunization-the process by which a pregnant woman's immune system is fortified against a particular disease and the protection is then transferred to her unborn child-has emerged as a strategy to prevent many unnecessary maternal and newborn deaths. We review vaccines that are already used for maternal immunization, analyze vaccines under development that could be used for maternal immunization strategies in the future, and recommend that policy makers use maternal immunization for improved maternal and newborn health. PMID:26858385

  19. Maternal Depressive Symptoms, Maternal Behavior, and Toddler Internalizing Outcomes: A Moderated Mediation Model

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Alexandra C.; Kiel, Elizabeth J.

    2014-01-01

    Maternal depression relates to child internalizing outcomes, but one missing aspect of this association is how variation in depressive symptoms, including mild and moderate symptoms, relates to young children’s outcomes. The current study examined a moderated mediation model to investigate how maternal behaviors may mediate this association in the context of child temperament and gender. Mothers and toddlers completed a free-play/clean-up task in the laboratory. Mothers rated their depressive symptoms and their toddlers’ temperament and internalizing behaviors. Results indicated a significant indirect of maternal warmth on the relation between maternal depressive symptoms and toddler internalizing outcomes for boys with low negative emotionality. Toddler gender and temperament moderated the relation between maternal intrusiveness and toddler internalizing outcomes, but mediation was not supported. Results highlight the important interaction between child and maternal variables in predicting child outcomes, and suggest mechanisms by and conditions under which mild maternal depressive symptomatology can be a risk factor for toddler internalizing outcomes. PMID:24553739

  20. The Moldovan experience of maternal death reviews.

    PubMed

    Hodorogea, S; Friptu, V

    2014-09-01

    A Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths is an anonymous, multidisciplinary and systematic review of all cases of maternal mortality. This paper describes one such process implemented at national level in Moldova. Its aim was to conduct an in-depth review of the underlying causes and circumstances surrounding each mother's death to learn lessons to improve care in future. Its findings showed that deaths were predominantly due to direct obstetric causes, especially haemorrhage and sepsis, and adverse social determinants, particularly poverty and migration also played a decisive role in more than half of the cases. The final report identified potentially remediable actions and the key areas requiring interventions by the health sector, administrators and the community. Its recommendations have enabled the implementation of some solutions to help prevent future maternal deaths, including the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines. PMID:25236639