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Sample records for albumin solutions implications

  1. [Pulsed radiolysis of aqueous solutions of serum albumin containing naphthoquinones].

    PubMed

    Pribush, A G; Savich, A V

    1987-01-01

    As was shown by the pulse radiolysis method the simultaneous presence of naphthoquinone and human serum albumin molecules in an aqueous solution leads to the adsorption of the former on the surface of the latter. It is suggested that in these conditions the protein tertiary structure changes. New conformation reduces the reactivity of albumin toward the hydrated electron. PMID:3628723

  2. The role of albumin receptors in regulation of albumin homeostasis: Implications for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Bern, Malin; Sand, Kine Marita Knudsen; Nilsen, Jeannette; Sandlie, Inger; Andersen, Jan Terje

    2015-08-10

    Albumin is the most abundant protein in blood and acts as a molecular taxi for a plethora of small insoluble substances such as nutrients, hormones, metals and toxins. In addition, it binds a range of medical drugs. It has an unusually long serum half-life of almost 3weeks, and although the structure and function of albumin has been studied for decades, a biological explanation for the long half-life has been lacking. Now, recent research has unravelled that albumin-binding cellular receptors play key roles in the homeostatic regulation of albumin. Here, we review our current understanding of albumin homeostasis with a particular focus on the impact of the cellular receptors, namely the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and the cubilin-megalin complex, and we discuss their importance on uses of albumin in drug delivery. PMID:26055641

  3. Corrosion behavior and surface characterization of titanium in solution containing fluoride and albumin.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Shinji; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2005-03-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate the role of albumin on the corrosion behavior of titanium in a solution containing 2.0 g/l fluoride and either 0.1 or 1.0 g/l albumin. The corrosion behavior and surface characterization of passive films on titanium immersed in such a solution were examined. In addition, the change in pH and the concentration of dissolved titanium in the solution were examined. The results showed that the corrosion of titanium in a solution containing fluoride was distinct, and that adding albumin to the solution containing fluoride suppressed corrosion. Fluorine was detected on the titanium surface immersed in the solution containing fluoride, and dissolution of the titanium was confirmed. The titanium immersed in a solution containing both fluoride and albumin had an albumin film regardless of the albumin concentration. In addition, the amount of dissolved titanium from the titanium immersed in the solution was less than when the solution contained no albumin. It was suggested that the formation of adsorbed albumin films on or in the passive film acted to not only protect the titanium from attack by the fluoride but also suppressed dissolution of the titanium-fluoride compounds. PMID:15353194

  4. The influence of albumin on corrosion resistance of titanium in fluoride solution.

    PubMed

    Ide, Katsuhisa; Hattori, Masayuki; Yoshinari, Masao; Kawada, Eiji; Oda, Yutaka

    2003-09-01

    Proteins can interact with corrosion reactions in several ways. In this study, we investigated the effect of albumin on the corrosion resistance of titanium in the presence of fluoride. The effects of the NaF concentration, albumin concentration, and pH on the corrosion characteristics of commercially pure titanium (CP-Ti) were examined by means of electrochemical techniques. The corrosion resistance of titanium decreased as the NaF concentration increased and as pH decreased. The corrosion resistance of titanium in NaF solutions was improved in the presence of albumin. The natural electrode potential was elevated, and the passive current density was reduced by albumin at a concentration of 0.01%. The polarization resistance rose with increased concentrations of albumin in fluoride solution. These results showed that the albumin in saliva and dental plaque affected the corrosion resistance of CP-Ti in fluoride solution. PMID:14621001

  5. Influence of Millimeter Electromagnetic Waves on Fluorescence of Water-Saline Solutions of Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vardevanyan, P. O.; Antonyan, A. P.; Shahinyan, M. A.; Mikaelyan, M. S.

    2016-07-01

    The effect of electromagnetic waves of the millimeter region on the conformation and fluorescence characteristics of human serum albumin was studied. It is shown that the irradiation of the albumin solution leads to an increase of the fluorescence intensity depending on the duration of irradiation. At an irradiation frequency of 48 GHz the fluorescence intensity of albumin hardly changes at all, while at 41.8 and 51.8 GHz it increases. It is also shown that when the irradiation frequency is 51.8 GHz, the intensity of the albumin solution fluorescence increases with increase of the irradiation time.

  6. Study of influence of millimeter range electromagnetic waves on water-saline solutions of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahinyan, Mariam A.; Antonyan, Ara P.; Mikaelyan, Marieta S.; Vardevanyan, Poghos O.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the effect of electromagnetic waves of millimeter diapason (EMW MM) on both melting parameters of serum albumin from human blood and its solution density has been studied. It was shown that the irradiation of albumin solution results in protein denaturation at higher temperatures than in the case of nonirradiated samples, which indicates the increase of albumin packing degree. It was also shown that the enhancement of albumin solution density takes place which indicates the protein packing degree change as well. The obtained data show that the effect of EMW MM does not depend on frequency of these waves, because alterations are revealed at all studied frequencies — 41.8, 48 and 51.8GHz.

  7. Glass transitions in aqueous solutions of protein (bovine serum albumin).

    PubMed

    Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yamamoto, Wataru; Yokoyama, Ayame; Yoshinari, Takeo; Yagihara, Shin; Kita, Rio; Ngai, K L; Capaccioli, Simone

    2009-10-29

    Measurements by adiabatic calorimetry of heat capacities and enthalpy relaxation rates of a 20% (w/w) aqueous solution of bovine serum albumin (BSA) by Kawai, Suzuki, and Oguni [Biophys. J. 2006, 90, 3732] have found several enthalpy relaxations at long times indicating different processes undergoing glass transitions. In a quenched sample, one enthalpy relaxation at around 110 K and another over a wide temperature range (120-190 K) were observed. In a sample annealed at 200-240 K after quenching, three separated enthalpy relaxations at 110, 135, and above 180 K were observed. Dynamics of processes probed by adiabatic calorimetric data are limited to long times on the order of 10(3) s. A fuller understanding of the processes can be gained by probing the dynamics over a wider time/frequency range. Toward this goal, we performed broadband dielectric measurements of BSA-water mixtures at various BSA concentrations over a wide frequency range of thirteen decades from 2 mHz to 1.8 GHz at temperatures from 80 to 270 K. Three relevant relaxation processes were detected. For relaxation times equal to 100 s, the three processes are centered approximately at 110, 135, and 200 K, in good agreement with those observed by adiabatic calorimetry. We have made the following interpretation of the molecular origins of the three processes. The fastest relaxation process having relaxation time of 100 or 1000 s at ca. 110 K is due to the secondary relaxation of uncrystallized water (UCW) in the hydration shell. The intermediate relaxation process with 100 s relaxation time at ca. 135 K is due to ice. The slowest relaxation process having relaxation time of 100 s at ca. 200 K is interpreted to originate from local chain conformation fluctuations of protein slaved by water. Experimental evidence supporting these interpretations include the change of temperature dependence of the relaxation time of the UCW at approximately T(gBSA) approximately = 200 K, the glass transition temperature of

  8. Serum albumin: touchstone or totem?

    PubMed

    Margarson, M P; Soni, N

    1998-08-01

    A decrease in serum albumin concentrations is an almost inevitable finding in disease states, and is primarily mediated in the acute phase by alterations in vascular permeability and redistribution. This change is not disease specific but marked changes that persist are generally associated with a poorer prognosis. Critical appraisal of long-standing practices and the availability of alternative colloid solutions have led to a reduction in albumin replacement therapy, and a widespread tolerance of lower albumin concentrations in patients. The factors determining serum albumin concentrations, their measurement and the implications of hypoalbuminaemia are reviewed. The clinical value of serum albumin measurement is discussed. PMID:9797524

  9. High-field NMR T 2 relaxation mechanism in D2O solutions of albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, A.; Zengin, B.

    2013-07-01

    400 MHz NMR T 2 in D2O solutions of albumin and pure D2O were measured at different temperatures. A relation, based on the chemical exchange between bound HDO and non-exchangeable protein protons, was derived theoretically for the contributions of bound HDO [ P b(1/ T 2b)]. A second relation was also derived theoretically by considering spin-rotation interactions between bound HDO and surrounding protein protons. The P b(1/ T 2b) values in albumin solutions were then determined by replacing experimental data into the first relation. The values of the 1/ T 2 and P b(1/ T 2b) in albumin solutions increase linearly with temperature( T), whereas the 1/ T 2 in D2O decreases with T. In addition, the spin-rotation correlation times were calculated from the second relation. The dipolar correlation time of albumin was then reproduced from the spin-rotation correlation times for confirmative purposes. In conclusion, the 1/ T 2 in albumin solutions with D2O is caused by spin-rotation interactions.

  10. Interaction of silicon nanoparticles with the molecules of bovine serum albumin in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Anenkova, K A; Sergeeva, I A; Petrova, G P; Fedorova, K V; Osminkina, L A; Timoshenko, Viktor Yu

    2011-05-31

    Using the method of photon-correlation spectroscopy, the coefficient of translational diffusion D{sub t} and the hydrodynamic radius R of the particles in aqueous solutions of the bovine serum albumin, containing silicon nanoparticles, are determined. The character of the dependence of these parameters on the concentration of the protein indicates the absence of interaction between the studied particles in the chosen range of albumin concentrations 0.2 - 1.0 mg mL{sup -1}. (optical technologies in biophysics and medicine)

  11. Laser-induced preparation of volume nanocompositions in aqueous albumin solutions

    SciTech Connect

    Podgaetskii, V M; Simunin, M M; Savranskii, V V; Kononov, M A

    2007-09-30

    Ordered volume nanocompositions are obtained by exposing a colloidal aqueous solution of albumin with carbon nanotubes to cw IR laser radiation. Nanocompositions contain spherical and toroidal globules of size 100-500 nm with electric properties inherent in conglomerates of coiled nanotubes. The hardness of the material obtained depends on the irradiation intensity and time, and its consistence can be varied from pasty to glassy. (letters)

  12. Solution structure of RicC3, a 2S albumin storage protein from Ricinus communis.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Bruix, Marta; Giménez-Gallego, Guillermo; Rico, Manuel; Santoro, Jorge

    2003-12-01

    The three-dimensional structure in aqueous solution of recombinant (15)N labeled RicC3, a 2S albumin protein from the seeds of castor bean (Ricinus communis), has been determined by NMR methods. The computed structures were based on 1564 upper limit distance constraints derived from NOE cross-correlation intensities measured in the 2D-NOESY and 3D-HSQC-NOESY experiments, 70 phi torsion angle constraints obtained from (3)J(HNH)(alpha) couplings measured in the HNHA experiment, and 30 psi torsion angle constraints derived from (3)J(H)(alpha)(Ni+1) couplings measured in the HNHB experiment. The computed structures showed a RMSD radius of 0.64 A for the structural core. The resulting structure consists of five amphipatic helices arranged in a right-handed super helix, a folding motif first observed in nonspecific lipid transfer proteins. Different than the latter, RicC3 does have not an internal cavity, a fact that can be related to the exchange in the pairing of disulfide bridges in the segment.CXC. Previous attempts to determine high resolution structures of a 2S albumin protein by either X-ray crystallography or NMR methods failed because of the heterogeneity of the protein prepared from natural sources. Both 2S albumins and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins belong to the prolamine superfamily, some of whose members are food allergens. The solution structure for recombinant RicC3 determined here is a suitable representative structure for the broad family of seed 2S albumin proteins, which may help to establish meaningful relationships between structure and allergenicity. RicC3 is also the peptidic component of the immunomodulator Inmunoferon, a widely used pharmaceutical product, and its structure is expected to help understand its pharmaceutical activity. PMID:14636051

  13. Luminescent spectral characteristics of eosin in solutions of human serum albumin when denatured by treatment with sodium dodecyl sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Zemlyanskii, A. Yu.; Saletskii, A. M.

    2006-09-01

    From analysis of the fluorescence spectra of eosin molecules in a solution with human serum albumin (HSA), we have obtained information about the dynamics of protein conformational rearrangements during denaturing of the protein when treated with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) for different pH values of the solution. We hypothesize that HSA denaturing in the presence of SDS occurs in two stages: the first stage is loosening of the protein globules, and the second stage is complete unfolding of the protein molecules. We have shown that denaturating of the protein in the presence of SDS passes through both stages for a solution pH below the isoelectric point of the albumin, while the denaturing stops in the first stage for a solution pH above the isoelectric point of the albumin.

  14. Comparison of Albumin, Hydroxyethyl Starch and Ringer Lactate Solution as Priming Fluid for Cardiopulmonary Bypass in Paediatric Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Mrugesh; Solanki, Atul; Pandya, Himani

    2016-01-01

    Introduction In paediatric cardiac surgery, there is still not any information with regard to the best choice of priming fluids for Cardiopulmonary Bypass (CPB). Albumin, Hydroxyethyl Starch (HES) & ringer lactate are equally used, but each has its advantages & disadvantages. Albumin & HES had better fluid balance which affect outcome in paediatric cardiac surgery significantly. Aim To compare priming solution containing albumin, hydroxyethyl starch and ringer lactate during elective open-heart surgery in paediatrics aged up to 3 years. Materials and Methods All patients were managed by standardized institution protocol and were randomly distributed into three groups based on the priming solution which is used in the CPB Circuit and having 35 patients in each group. Group A: Receive albumin 10 ml/kg in priming solution, Group B: Receive Hydroxyethyl starch (HES130/0.4) 6% 20ml/kg in priming solution, Group C: Receive ringer lactate priming solution. Primary outcome variable included perioperative haemoglobin, total protein, colloid osmotic pressure, platelets, fluid balance, urine output, post-operative blood loss, blood products usage, renal & liver function, extubation time, ICU stay & outcome. Results Patients receiving albumin had higher perioperative platelet count, total protein level & colloid osmotic pressure, lesser post-operative blood loss & blood products requirement. Patients receiving HES had lower level of platelets postoperatively than ringer lactate group but not associated with increase blood loss. HES did not affect renal function & haemostasis in this dose. Patients receiving ringer lactate had positive fluid balance intraoperatively. All three groups have similar effect on renal & liver function, urine output, time to extubation, ICU stay & outcome. Conclusion We conclude that albumin is expensive but better prime as maintain haemostasis, colloid oncotic pressure & reduced blood product requirement. HES will not hamper haemostasis & renal

  15. DNP-Enhanced MAS NMR of Bovine Serum Albumin Sediments and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Protein sedimentation sans cryoprotection is a new approach to magic angle spinning (MAS) and dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of proteins. It increases the sensitivity of the experiments by a factor of ∼4.5 in comparison to the conventional DNP sample preparation and circumvents intense background signals from the cryoprotectant. In this paper, we investigate sedimented samples and concentrated frozen solutions of natural abundance bovine serum albumin (BSA) in the absence of a glycerol-based cryoprotectant. We observe DNP signal enhancements of ε ∼ 66 at 140 GHz in a BSA pellet sedimented from an aqueous solution containing the biradical polarizing agent TOTAPOL and compare this with samples prepared using the conventional protocol (i.e., dissolution of BSA in a glycerol/water cryoprotecting mixture). The dependence of DNP parameters on the radical concentration points to the presence of an interaction between TOTAPOL and BSA, so much so that a frozen solution sans cryoprotectant still gives ε ∼ 50. We have studied the interaction of BSA with another biradical, SPIROPOL, that is more rigid than TOTAPOL and has been reported to give higher enhancements. SPIROPOL was also found to interact with BSA, and to give ε ∼ 26 close to its maximum achievable concentration. Under the same conditions, TOTAPOL gives ε ∼ 31, suggesting a lesser affinity of BSA for SPIROPOL with respect to TOTAPOL. Altogether, these results demonstrate that DNP is feasible in self-cryoprotecting samples. PMID:24460530

  16. Study of the interaction of C60 fullerene with human serum albumin in aqueous solution

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Song; Zhao, Xiongce; Mo, Yiming; Cummings, Peter T; Heller, William T

    2013-01-01

    Concern about the toxicity of engineered nanoparticles, such as the prototypical nanomaterial C60 fullerene, continues to grow. While evidence continues to mount that C60 and its derivatives may pose health hazards, the specific molecular interactions of these particles with biological macromolecules require further investigation. To better understand the interaction of C60 with proteins, the protein human serum albumin (HSA) was studied in solution with C60 at C60:HSA molar ratios ranging from 1:2 to 4:1. HSA is the major protein component of blood plasma and plays a role in a variety of functions, such as the maintenance of blood pH and pressure. The C60-HSA interaction was probed by a combination of circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) and atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand C60-driven changes in the structure of HSA in solution. The CD spectroscopy demonstrates that the secondary structure of the protein decreases in -helical content in response to the presence of C60. Similarly, C60 produces subtle changes in the solution conformation of HSA, as evidenced by the SANS data and MD. The data do not indicate that C60 is causing a change in the oligomerization state of the protein. Taken together results demonstrate that C60 interacts with HSA, but it does not strongly perturb the structure of the protein by unfolding it or inducing aggregation, suggesting a mechanism for transporting C60 throughout the body to accumulate in various tissues.

  17. Comparison of low molecular weight hydroxyethyl starch and human albumin as priming solutions in children undergoing cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Miao, Na; Yang, Jing; Du, Zhongtao; Liu, Wei; Ni, Hong; Xing, Jialin; Yang, Xiaofang; Xu, Bo; Hou, Xiaotong

    2014-09-01

    Human albumin is the conventional cardiopulmonary bypass circuit primer. However, it has high manufacturing costs. Crystalloid and colloid solutions have been developed as alternatives, including a new generation of non-ionic hydroxyethyl starch (HES). The efficacy of hydroxyethyl starch with a 130 molecular weight and substitution degree of 0.4 (hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4) was compared with human albumin for use in cardiopulmonary bypass surgery in American Society of Anesthesiologists' grade I-II pediatric congenital heart disease patients. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing perioperative hemodynamic parameters, including plasma colloid osmotic pressure, renal function, blood loss, allogeneic blood volumes and plasma volume substitution. The hydroxyethyl starch group exhibited significantly higher preoperative colloid osmotic pressure (p<0.01) and significantly lower operative renal function and postoperative allogeneic blood volumes than the human albumin group. No significant differences were observed in serum creatinine, glucose, hematocrit or lactic acid levels (p>0.05). Our results indicate that hydroxyethyl starch may be a viable alternative to human albumin in pediatric patients undergoing relatively simple cardiopulmonary bypass surgeries. PMID:24658707

  18. Human albumin solution for patients with cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure: Beyond simple volume expansion.

    PubMed

    Valerio, Christopher; Theocharidou, Eleni; Davenport, Andrew; Agarwal, Banwari

    2016-03-01

    To provide an overview of the properties of human serum albumin (HSA), and to review the evidence for the use of human albumin solution (HAS) in critical illness, sepsis and cirrhosis. A MEDLINE search was performed using the terms "human albumin", "critical illness", "sepsis" and "cirrhosis". The references of retrieved articles were reviewed manually. Studies published between 1980 and 2014 were selected based on quality criteria. Data extraction was performed by all authors. HSA is the main plasma protein contributing greatly to its oncotic pressure. HSA demonstrates important binding properties for endogenous and exogenous toxins, drugs and drug metabolites that account for its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In disease states, hypoalbuminaemia is secondary to decreased HSA production, increased loss or transcapillary leakage into the interstitial space. HSA function can be also altered in disease with reduced albumin binding capacity and increased production of modified isoforms. HAS has been used as volume expander in critical illness, but received criticism due to cost and concerns regarding safety. More recent studies confirmed the safety of HAS, but failed to show any survival benefit compared to the cheaper crystalloid fluids, therefore limiting its use. On the contrary, in cirrhosis there is robust data to support the efficacy of HAS for the prevention of circulatory dysfunction post-large volume paracentesis and in the context of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and for the treatment of hepato-renal syndrome and hypervolaemic hyponatraemia. It is likely that not only the oncotic properties of HAS are beneficial in cirrhosis, but also its functional properties, as HAS replaces the dysfunctional HSA. The role of HAS as the resuscitation fluid of choice in critically ill patients with cirrhosis, beyond the established indications for HAS use, should be addressed in future studies. PMID:26981172

  19. Study of the dielectric function of aqueous solutions of glucose and albumin by THz time-domain spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazarov, M. M.; Cherkasova, O. P.; Shkurinov, A. P.

    2016-06-01

    We report a study of aqueous solutions of glucose and bovine serum albumin using THz time-domain spectroscopy. To describe the permittivity of the solutions of these substances, we use a simplified model being applicable in the frequency range of 0.05 – 2.7 THz. On the assumption that most of the water molecules become bound at high concentrations of glucose and protein in the solution, the changes in water characteristics are investigated. To improve the reliability of the results, the measurements are performed by two independent methods: the method of attenuated total internal reflection and the transmission method. Combination of the results obtained by these two methods allows expanding the spectral range towards lower frequencies.

  20. Solution structure of a methionine-rich 2S albumin from sunflower seeds: relationship to its allergenic and emulsifying properties.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Uceda, David; Shewry, Peter R; Bruix, Marta; Tatham, Arthur S; Santoro, Jorge; Rico, Manuel

    2004-06-01

    The three-dimensional structure in aqueous solution of SFA-8, a 2S albumin 103-residue protein from seeds of sunflower (Helianthus anuus L.), has been determined by NMR methods. An almost complete (1)H resonance assignment was accomplished from analysis of two-dimensional (2D) COSY and 2D TOCSY spectra, and the structure was computed by using restrained molecular dynamics on the basis of 1393 upper limit distance constraints derived from NOE cross-correlation intensities measured in 2D NOESY spectra. In contrast with most other 2S albumins, SFA-8 consists of a single polypeptide chain without any cleavage in the segment of residues 30-46. The computed structures exhibited an rmsd radius of 0.52 A for the backbone structural core (residues 11-30 and 46-101) and 1.01 A for the side chain heavy atoms. The resulting structure consists of five amphipathic helices arranged in a right-handed superhelix, a folding motif first observed in nonspecific lipid transfer (nsLTP) proteins, and common to other 2S albumins. In contrast to nsLTP proteins, neither SFA-8 nor RicC3 (a 2S albumin from castor bean) has an internal cavity that is able to host a lipid molecule, which results from an exchange in the pairing of disulfide bridges in the CXC segment. Both 2S albumins and nonspecific lipid transfer proteins belong to the prolamin superfamily, which includes a number of important food allergens. Differences in the extension and solvent exposition of the so-called "hypervariable loop" (which connects helices III and IV) in SFA-8 and RicC3 may be responsible for the different allergenic properties of the two proteins. SFA-8 has been shown to form highly stable emulsions with oil/water mixtures. We propose that these properties may be determined partly by a hydrophobic patch at the surface of the protein which consists of five methionines that partially hide the Trp76 residue. The flexibility of the loop which contains Trp76 and the hydrophobicity of the whole environment may favor

  1. The combination of mannitol and albumin in the priming solution reduces positive intraoperative fluid balance during cardiopulmonary bypass.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, I R; Curtis, A P

    1995-09-01

    During cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) an adequate reservoir volume is maintained by the addition of crystalloid, colloid or packed cells to the reservoir. This volume contributes to the overall perioperative positive fluid balance. We studied the effect of the preoperative addition of either 75 g albumin, or 50 g mannitol followed by 50 g at commencement of rewarming or both of the above to a bypass circuit prime of lactated Ringer's solution (LR) on intraoperative fluid balance, postoperative indices of oxygenation and time to extubation. The study was a prospective, randomized, single-blinded controlled trial of 103 patients undergoing cardiac surgery requiring CPB. There was a large and highly significant reduction in volume of fluid added to the reservoir during CPB (2137 +/- 1499 ml versus 144 +/- 230 ml), the fluid balance during bypass, including prime volume (3236 +/- 650 ml versus 5876 +/- 1465 ml), and perioperative fluid balance (4470 +/- 936 ml versus 7023 +/- 1760 ml) in the group receiving both mannitol and albumin in the pump prime compared with the group receiving only lactated Ringer's solution. There were no differences between the groups with respect to both measured indices of oxygenation measured on return to ICU (alveolar-arterial oxygen tension difference (DA-aO2) or arterial oxygen tension to inspired oxygen fraction ratio (PaO2/FiO2), or time from ICU admission to extubation. PMID:8601041

  2. Human albumin solution for patients with cirrhosis and acute on chronic liver failure: Beyond simple volume expansion

    PubMed Central

    Valerio, Christopher; Theocharidou, Eleni; Davenport, Andrew; Agarwal, Banwari

    2016-01-01

    To provide an overview of the properties of human serum albumin (HSA), and to review the evidence for the use of human albumin solution (HAS) in critical illness, sepsis and cirrhosis. A MEDLINE search was performed using the terms “human albumin”, “critical illness”, “sepsis” and “cirrhosis”. The references of retrieved articles were reviewed manually. Studies published between 1980 and 2014 were selected based on quality criteria. Data extraction was performed by all authors. HSA is the main plasma protein contributing greatly to its oncotic pressure. HSA demonstrates important binding properties for endogenous and exogenous toxins, drugs and drug metabolites that account for its anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. In disease states, hypoalbuminaemia is secondary to decreased HSA production, increased loss or transcapillary leakage into the interstitial space. HSA function can be also altered in disease with reduced albumin binding capacity and increased production of modified isoforms. HAS has been used as volume expander in critical illness, but received criticism due to cost and concerns regarding safety. More recent studies confirmed the safety of HAS, but failed to show any survival benefit compared to the cheaper crystalloid fluids, therefore limiting its use. On the contrary, in cirrhosis there is robust data to support the efficacy of HAS for the prevention of circulatory dysfunction post-large volume paracentesis and in the context of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis, and for the treatment of hepato-renal syndrome and hypervolaemic hyponatraemia. It is likely that not only the oncotic properties of HAS are beneficial in cirrhosis, but also its functional properties, as HAS replaces the dysfunctional HSA. The role of HAS as the resuscitation fluid of choice in critically ill patients with cirrhosis, beyond the established indications for HAS use, should be addressed in future studies. PMID:26981172

  3. Pre-association of polynuclear platinum anticancer agents on a protein, human serum albumin. Implications for drug design†

    PubMed Central

    Montero, Eva I.; Benedetti, Brad T.; Mangrum, John B.; Oehlsen, Michael J.; Qu, Yun; Farrell, Nicholas P.

    2009-01-01

    The interactions of polynuclear platinum complexes with human serum albumin were studied. The compounds examined were the “non-covalent” analogs of the trinuclear BBR3464 as well as the dinuclear spermidine-bridged compounds differing in only the presence or absence of a central -NH2-+ (BBR3571 and analogs). Thus, closely-related compounds could be compared. Evidence for pre-association, presumably through electrostatic and hydrogen-bonding, was obtained from fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopy and Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (ESI-MS). In the case of those compounds containing Pt-Cl bonds, further reaction took place presumably through displacement by sulfur nucleophiles. The implications for protein pre-association and plasma stability of polynuclear platinum compounds are discussed. PMID:17992278

  4. Conformational changes of bovine plasma albumin prior to the salting-out of protein in concentrated salt solution.

    PubMed

    Sogami, M; Inouye, H; Nagaoka, S; Era, S

    1982-09-01

    By working at very low protein concentration (ca. 0.003%), it is possible to measure tryptophyl fluorescence intensity at 350 nm (F350) of bovine plasma albumin (BPA) as a function of pH under precipitating conditions (acidic concentrated salt solutions). Under such conditions, distinct changes in F350 were seen before the starting of precipitation of BPA and no further changes in F350 over the precipitating pH range. Comparison of pH-profiles monitored by F350 with those by solubility in the presence of various salts at various concentrations indicated that the change of solubility is observed after definite changes in conformation of the protein. PMID:7129758

  5. Sucrose dependence of solute retention on human serum albumin stationary phase: hydrophobic effect and surface tension considerations.

    PubMed

    Peyrin, E; Guillaume, Y C; Morin, N; Guinchard, C

    1998-07-15

    In a chromatographic system using human serum albumin (HSA) as a stationary phase, D,L dansyl amino acids as solutes, and sucrose as a mobile-phase modifier, a study on the surface tension effect of sugar on compound retention was carried out by varying the salting-out agent concentration c and the column temperature T. The thermodynamic parameters for solute transfer from the mobile to the stationary phase were determined from linear van't Hoff plots. An enthalpy-entropy compensation study revealed that the type of interaction between solute and HSA was independent of the molecular structure of the dansyl amino acids and the mobile-phase composition. An analysis of the experimental variations in the retention factor and the enantioselectivity values with c was performed using a theoretical model. It was shown that the decrease in solute retention accompanying the sucrose concentration increase was principally governed by a structural rearrangement of the binding cavity due to the increased surface tension effects. The cavity apolar residues were assumed to fold out of contact with the medium in order to reduce the surface area accessible to sucrose molecules, thus implying a restriction of the curvature radius of the cavity. Such behavior caused a decrease in the hydrophobic interaction for ligand binding on HSA explaining the observed thermodynamic parameter trends over the sucrose concentration range. PMID:9684542

  6. Unraveling the binding mechanism of asiatic acid with human serum albumin and its biological implications.

    PubMed

    Gokara, Mahesh; Malavath, Tirupathi; Kalangi, Suresh Kumar; Reddana, Pallu; Subramanyam, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    Asiatic acid (AsA), a naturally occurring pentacyclictriterpenoid found in Centella asiatica, plays a major role in neuroprotection, anticancer, antioxidant, and hepatoprotective activities. Human serum albumin (HSA), a blood plasma protein, participates in the regulation of plasma osmotic pressure and transports endogenous and exogenous substances. The study undertaken to analyze the drug-binding mechanisms of HSA is crucial in understanding the bioavailability of drugs. In this study, we analyzed the cytotoxic activity of AsA on HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma) cell lines and its binding, conformational, docking, molecular simulation studies with HSA under physiological pH 7.2. These studies revealed a clear decrease in the viability of HepG2 cells upon exposure to AsA in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 of 45 μM. Further studies showed the quenching of intrinsic fluorescence of HSA by AsA with a binding constant of KAsA = 3.86 ± 0.01 × 10(4) M(-1), which corresponds to the free energy of (ΔG) -6.3 kcal M(-1) at 25 °C. Circular dichroism (CD) studies revealed that there is a clear decrease in the α-helical content from 57.50 ± 2.4 to 50% ± 2.3 and an increase in the β-turns from 25 ± 0.65 to 29% ± 0.91 and random coils from 17.5% ± 0.95 to 21% ± 1.2, suggesting partial unfolding of HSA. Autodock studies revealed that the AsA is bound to the subdomain IIA with hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions. From molecular dynamics, simulation data (RMSD, Rg and RMSF) emphasized the local conformational changes and rigidity of the residues of both HSA and HSA-AsA complexes. PMID:23844909

  7. AGE-modified albumin containing infusion solutions boosts septicaemia and inflammation in experimental peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Per M; Lukic, Ivan K; Thorpe, Suzanne R; Hofer, Stefan; Awad, Ezzat M; Andrassy, Martin; Deemer, Elizabeth K; Kasper, Michael; Schleicher, Erwin; Schwaninger, Markus; Weigand, Markus A; Nawroth, Peter P; Bierhaus, Angelika

    2009-09-01

    HSA preparations for i.v. use are administered in critically ill patients. Although increasing intravascular osmotic pressure seems to be a pathophysiologically orientated treatment, clinical trials do not indicate a benefit for mortality in HSA-treated patients. Instead, there is evidence for inflammatory reactions upon infusion of different HSA batches. A neglected issue concerning the safety and quality of these therapeutics is processing-related post-transcriptional protein modifications, such as AGEs. We therefore tested the hypothesis that commercially available infusion solutions contain AGEs and studied whether these protein modifications influence outcome and inflammation in a murine model of sepsis induced by CLP. Screening of different HSA and Ig preparations in this study revealed an up to approximate tenfold difference in the amount of AGE modifications. Application of clinically relevant concentrations of CML-modified HSA in CLP led to increased inflammation and enhanced mortality in wild-type mice but not in mice lacking the RAGE. Lethality was paralleled by increased activation of the proinflammatory transcription factor NF-kappaB, NF-kappaB-dependent gene expression, and infiltration of inflammatory cells in the peritoneal cavity. This study implies that infusion solutions containing a high load of the AGE-modified protein have the potential to activate RAGE/NF-kappaB-mediated inflammatory reactions, causing increased mortality in experimental peritonitis. PMID:19401390

  8. Joint aqueous solutions of dextran and bovine serum albumin: coexistence of three liquid phases.

    PubMed

    Antonov, Yurij; Wolf, Bernhard A

    2014-06-10

    The phase diagram of the system water/dextran (DEX)/BSA was measured as well as modeled. On the experimental side, cloud points were determined and the coexisting phases were analyzed. The theoretical calculations use an approach capable of describing solutions of chain polymers and of globular proteins with the same formalism. The required thermodynamic input comes from experiments concerning the binary subsystems, except for the polymer blend for which one interaction parameter had to be adjusted. Both sources of information yield the same essential features: the existence of a large composition area of immiscibility, starting from the subsystem DEX/BSA and extending well into the region of dilute polymer solutions. This range is subdivided into three sections: one two-phase area at high polymer content, a two-phase area at low polymer content, and a three-phase region located in between. Measured and calculated phase diagrams match qualitatively; the reasons for the quantitative discrepancies are being discussed. PMID:24832129

  9. Preventing Aggregation of Recombinant Interferon beta-1b in Solution by Additives: Approach to an Albumin-Free Formulation

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubi, Najmeh; Fazeli, Mohammad Reza; Dinarvand, Rassoul; Khoshayand, Mohammad Reza; Fazeli, Ahmad; Taghavian, Mohammad; Rastegar, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Aggregation suppressing additives have been used to stabilize proteins during manufacturing and storage. Interferonβ-1b is prone to aggregation because of being non-glycosylated. Aggregation behavior of albumin-free formulations of recombinant IFNβ-1b was explored using additives such as n-dodecyl-β-D-maltoside, Tween 20, arginine, glycine, trehalose and sucrose at different pH. Methods: Fractional factorial design was applied to select major factors affecting aggregation in solutions. Box-Behnken technique was used to optimize the best concentration of additives and protein. Results: Quadratic model was the best fitted model for particle size, OD350 and OD280/OD260. The optimal conditions of 0.2% n-Dodecyl-β-D-maltoside, 70 mM arginine, 189 mM trehalose and protein concentration of 0.50 mg/ml at pH 4 were achieved. A potency value of 91% ± 5% was obtained for the optimized formulation. Conclusion: This study shows that the combination of n-Dodecyl-β-D-maltoside, arginine and trehalose would demonstrate a significant stabilizing and anti-aggregating effect on the liquid formulation of interferonβ-1b. It can not only reduce the manufacturing costs but will also ease patient compliance. PMID:26819922

  10. Activation of mitogenic pathways by albumin in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells: implications for the pathophysiology of proteinuric states.

    PubMed

    Dixon, R; Brunskill, N J

    1999-07-01

    Albumin is filtered into the proximal tubule in large quantities in nephrotic states. It has been proposed that this protein may have a toxic effect on tubular epithelial cells and may be responsible for the initiation of interstitial inflammation and scarring. The mitogenic effect of recombinant human albumin in wild-type opossum kidney cells and in similar cells transfected with a dominant negative p85 subunit (deltap85) of phopshatidylinositide 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase) has been studied. This study demonstrates that recombinant human albumin stimulates proliferation of opossum kidney cells in culture. This effect is mediated via PI 3-kinase, and is inhibited by wortmannin and deltap85 expression. Albumin stimulates PI 3-kinase activity in opossum kidney cells as determined by three different experimental procedures. Recombinant albumin also stimulates pp70(s6) kinase activity in a kinase cascade downstream of PI 3-kinase. Activity of pp70(s6) kinase is essential for albumin-induced proliferation of opossum kidney cells. It is proposed that this mitogenic pathway may have a critical role in proximal tubular homeostasis and pathophysiology of proteinuric states. PMID:10405204

  11. Structure and stability of 2S albumin-type peanut allergens: implications for the severity of peanut allergic reactions

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Katrin; Schweimer, Kristian; Reese, Gerald; Randow, Stefanie; Suhr, Martin; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Vieths, Stefan; Rösch, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to proteolytic enzymes and heat is thought to be a prerequisite property of food allergens. Allergens from peanut (Arachis hypogaea) are the most frequent cause of fatal food allergic reactions. The allergenic 2S albumin Ara h 2 and the homologous minor allergen Ara h 6 were studied at the molecular level with regard to allergenic potency of native and protease-treated allergen. A high-resolution solution structure of the protease-resistant core of Ara h 6 was determined by NMR spectroscopy, and homology modelling was applied to generate an Ara h 2 structure. Ara h 2 appeared to be the more potent allergen, even though the two peanut allergens share substantial cross-reactivity. Both allergens contain cores that are highly resistant to proteolytic digestion and to temperatures of up to 100 °C. Even though IgE antibody-binding capacity was reduced by protease treatment, the mediator release from a functional equivalent of a mast cell or basophil, the humanized RBL (rat basophilic leukaemia) cell, demonstrated that this reduction in IgE antibody-binding capacity does not necessarily translate into reduced allergenic potency. Native Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 have virtually identical allergenic potency as compared with the allergens that were treated with digestive enzymes. The folds of the allergenic cores are virtually identical with each other and with the fold of the corresponding regions in the undigested proteins. The extreme immunological stability of the core structures of Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 provides an explanation for the persistence of the allergenic potency even after food processing. PMID:16372900

  12. Microglial AGE-albumin is critical for neuronal death in Parkinson’s disease: a possible implication for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Bayarsaikhan, Enkhjargal; Bayarsaikhan, Delger; Lee, Jaesuk; Son, Myeongjoo; Oh, Seyeon; Moon, Jeongsik; Park, Hye-Jeong; Roshini, Arivazhagan; Kim, Seung U; Song, Byoung-Joon; Jo, Seung-Mook; Byun, Kyunghee; Lee, Bonghee

    2015-01-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson’s disease (PD), by inducing protein aggregation and cross-link, formation of Lewy body, and neuronal death. In this study, we observed that AGE-albumin, the most abundant AGE product in the human PD brain, is synthesized in activated microglial cells and accumulates in the extracellular space. AGE-albumin synthesis in human-activated microglial cells is distinctly inhibited by ascorbic acid and cytochalasin treatment. Accumulated AGE-albumin upregulates the receptor to AGE, leading to apoptosis of human primary dopamine (DA) neurons. In animal experiments, we observed reduced DA neuronal cell death by treatment with soluble receptor to AGE. Our study provides evidence that activated microglial cells are one of the main contributors in AGE-albumin accumulation, deleterious to DA neurons in human and animal PD brains. Finally, activated microglial AGE-albumin could be used as a diagnostic and therapeutic biomarker with high sensitivity for neurodegenerative disorders, including PD. PMID:27601894

  13. Albumin Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... to a variety of conditions in addition to malnutrition , a decrease in albumin needs to be evaluated ... can also be seen in inflammation , shock, and malnutrition . They may be seen with conditions in which ...

  14. Holograms of fluorescent albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordóñez-Padilla, M. J.; Olivares-Pérez, A.; Berriel-Valdos, L. R.; Mejias-Brizuela, N. Y.; Fuentes-Tapia, I.

    2011-09-01

    We report the characterization and analysis of photochromic films gallus gallus albumin as a matrix modified for holographic recording. Photo-oxidation of homogeneous mixtures prepared with albumin-propylene glycol, to combine chemically with aqueous solution of ammonium dichromate at certain concentrations. We analyzed the diffraction gratings, through the diffraction efficiency of the proposed material. Also, eosin was used as a fluorescent agent, so it is found that produces an inhibitory effect, thus decreasing the diffraction efficiency of the matrices prepared in near-identical circumstances. The work was to achieve stability of albumin films, were prepared with propylene glycol. Finally, experimental studies were performed with films when subjected to aqueous solution of eosin (fluorescent agent) to verify the ability to increase or decrease in diffraction efficiency.

  15. Nanotechnology in oncology: Characterization and in vitro release kinetics of cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticles: Implications in anticancer drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Das, Saikat; Jagan, Lavanya; Isiah, Rajesh; Rajesh, B.; Backianathan, Selvamani; Subhashini, J.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Nanotechnology is an empowering technology that holds promise in cancer therapeutics by increasing the ratio of tumor control probability to normal tissue complication probability. It can increase the bioavailability of the drug at the target site, reduce the frequency of administration and reach otherwise lesser-accessible sites. The present study shows the feasibility of the cisplatin-loaded albumin nanoparticle as a sustained delivery system. Aims: Cisplatin is one of the most widely used chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of malignant disorders. Conventional cisplatin formulation given as intravenous infusion has low bioavailability to the target organ in addition to significant side-effects, like ototoxicity and nephrotoxicity. The aim of this study was to develop a protein-based nanoparticulate system for sustained release of cisplatin. Materials and Methods: Nanoparticles were prepared by the coacervaton method of microcapsulation and chemical cross-linking with glutaraldehyde. Particle size was characterized by dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy. Results and Conclusions: Using the coacervation method, nanoparticles of less than 70 nm diameter were produced. Drug encapsulation measured by ultraviolet spectroscopy varied from 30% to 80% for different ratios of cisplatin and protein. In vitro release kinetics shows that the nanoparticle-based formulation has biphasic release kinetics and is capable of sustained release compared with the free drug (80% release in 45 h). The study proves the feasibility of the albumin-based cisplatin nanoparticle formulation as a sustained release vehicle of cisplatin. PMID:21844995

  16. Interactions of a very long chain fatty acid with model membranes and serum albumin. Implications for the pathogenesis of adrenoleukodystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, J K; Moser, H; Kishimoto, Y; Hamilton, J A

    1995-01-01

    Adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is an inherited disorder of fatty acid metabolism marked by accumulation of very long chain saturated fatty acids (VLCFA), especially the 26-carbon acid, hexacosanoic acid (HA), in membranes and tissues. We have studied interactions of 13C-enriched HA with model membranes (phospholipid bilayer vesicles) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) by 13C NMR spectroscopy to compare properties of HA with those of typical dietary fatty acids. In phospholipid bilayers the carboxyl group of HA is localized in the aqueous interface, with an apparent pKa (7.4) similar to other fatty acids; the acyl chain must then penetrate very deeply into the membrane. Desorption of HA from vesicles (t1+2 = 3 h) is orders of magnitude slower than shorter chain fatty acids. In mixtures of vesicles and BSA, HA partitions much more favorably to phospholipid bilayers than typical fatty acids. BSA binds a maximum of only 1 mole of HA at one binding site. Calorimetric experiments show strong perturbations of acyl chains of phospholipids by HA. We predict that disruptive effects of VLCFA on cell membrane structure and function may explain the neurological manifestations of ALD patients. These effects will be further amplified by slow desorption of VLCFA from membranes and by the ineffective binding to serum albumin. PMID:7657817

  17. Theoretical and experimental studies on freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit as methods to measure osmotic pressure of aqueous polyethylene glycol and bovine serum albumin solutions.

    PubMed

    Kiyosawa, Keitaro

    2003-05-01

    For survival in adverse environments where there is drought, high salt concentration or low temperature, some plants seem to be able to synthesize biochemical compounds, including proteins, in response to changes in water activity or osmotic pressure. Measurement of the water activity or osmotic pressure of simple aqueous solutions has been based on freezing point depression or vapor pressure deficit. Measurement of the osmotic pressure of plants under water stress has been mainly based on vapor pressure deficit. However, differences have been noted for osmotic pressure values of aqueous polyethylene glycol (PEG) solutions measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit. For this paper, the physicochemical basis of freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit were first examined theoretically and then, the osmotic pressure of aqueous ethylene glycol and of PEG solutions were measured by both freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit in comparison with other aqueous solutions such as NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, raffinose, and bovine serum albumin (BSA) solutions. The results showed that: (1) freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit share theoretically the same physicochemical basis; (2) theoretically, they are proportional to the molal concentration of the aqueous solutions to be measured; (3) in practice, the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous NaCl, KCl, CaCl(2), glucose, sucrose, and raffinose solutions increase in proportion to their molal concentrations and there is little inconsistency between those measured by freezing point depression and vapor pressure deficit; (4) the osmotic pressure levels of aqueous ethylene glycol and PEG solutions measured by freezing point depression differed from the values measured by vapor pressure deficit; (5) the osmotic pressure of aqueous BSA solution measured by freezing point depression differed slightly from that measured by vapor pressure deficit. PMID:12834836

  18. Effect of Solution Conditions on the Nanoscale Intermolecular Interactions Between Human Serum Albumin and Low Grafting Density Surfaces of Poly(ethylene oxide)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rixman, Monica; Macias, Celia; Dean, Delphine; Ortiz, Christine

    2003-03-01

    The first step in the biological rejection response to an implanted blood-contacting biomaterial is the non-covalent adsorption of proteins onto the surface, which triggers a cascade reaction ultimately resulting in thrombus formation. Using the technique of high resolution force spectroscopy, we have quantified the nonspecific intermolecular forces between fatty acid-complexed human serum albumin (HSA) covalently attached to a cantilever probe tip and individual end-grafted poly(ethylene oxide) mushrooms. In order to help elucidate the molecular origins of the constituent forces (e.g. steric, electrostatic, van der Waals), experiments were performed varying both the solution environmental conditions (e.g. ionic strength, removal of the bound fatty acids, and the addition of the antihydrophobic agent isopropanol), and the probe deflection rate.

  19. Concurrent zero-dimensional and one-dimensional biomineralization of gold from a solution of Au3+ and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartings, Matthew R.; Benjamin, Noah; Briere, Floriene; Briscione, Maria; Choudary, Omar; Fisher, Tamra L.; Flynn, Laura; Ghias, Elizabeth; Harper, Michaela; Khamis, Nader; Koenigsknecht, Catherine; Lazor, Klare; Moss, Steven; Robbins, Elaine; Schultz, Susan; Yaman, Samiye; Haverhals, Luke M.; Trulove, Paul C.; De Long, Hugh C.; Miller, Abigail E.; Fox, Douglas M.

    2013-12-01

    A technique was developed for preparing a novel material that consists of gold nanoparticles trapped within a fiber of unfolded proteins. These fibers are made in an aqueous solution that contains HAuCl4 and the protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). By changing the ratio of gold to BSA in solution, two different types of outcomes are observed. At lower gold to BSA ratios (30-120), a purple solution results after heating the mixture at 80 °C for 4 h. At higher gold to BSA ratios (130-170), a clear solution containing purple fibers results after heating the mixture at 80 °C for 4 h. UV-Vis spectroscopy and light scattering techniques show growth in nanocolloid size as gold to BSA ratio rises above 100. Data indicate that, for the higher gold to BSA ratios, the gold is sequestered within the solid material. The material mass, visible by eye, appears to be an aggregation of smaller individual fibers. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy indicate that these fibers are primarily one-dimensional aggregates, which can display some branching, and can be as narrow as 400 nm in size. The likely mechanism for the synthesis of the novel material is discussed.

  20. CHARACTERIZATION OF INTERACTION KINETICS BETWEEN CHIRAL SOLUTES AND HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN BY USING HIGH-PERFORMANCE AFFINITY CHROMATOGRAPHY AND PEAK PROFILING

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Zenghan; Hage, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Peak profiling and high-performance columns containing immobilized human serum albumin (HSA) were used to study the interaction kinetics of chiral solutes with this protein. This approach was tested using the phenytoin metabolites 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (m-HPPH) and 5-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-phenylhydantoin (p-HPPH) as model analytes. HSA columns provided some resolution of the enantiomers for each phenytoin metabolite, which made it possible to simultaneously conduct kinetic studies on each chiral form. The dissociation rate constants for these interactions were determined by using both the single flow rate and multiple flow rate peak profiling methods. Corrections for non-specific interactions with the support were also considered. The final estimates obtained at pH 7.4 and 37°C for the dissociation rate constants of these interactions were 8.2–9.6 s−1 for the two enantiomers of m-HPPH and 3.2–4.1 s−1 for the enantiomers of p-HPPH. These rate constants agreed with previous values that have been reported for other drugs and solutes that have similar affinities and binding regions on HSA. The approach used in this report was not limited to phenytoin metabolites or HSA but could be applied to a variety of other chiral solutes and proteins. This method could also be adopted for use in the rapid screening of drug-protein interactions. PMID:21872871

  1. Light Scattering Analysis of Mono- and Multi-PEGylated Bovine Serum Albumin in Solution: Role of Composition on Structure and Interactions.

    PubMed

    Ferebee, Rachel; Hakem, Ilhem F; Koch, Amelie; Chen, Maggie; Wu, Yi; Loh, Derek; Wilson, David C; Poole, Jennifer L; Walker, Jeremy P; Fytas, George; Bockstaller, Michael R

    2016-05-26

    The effect of polymer conjugation on the interactions between proteins in solution is evaluated by systematic analysis of the second virial coefficient (A2) for the particular example of single- and double-PEGylated bovine serum albumin (PEG-BSA) in dilute PBS solution. The effect of PEGylation on A2 is found to sensitively depend on both the composition and the distribution of PEG segments within the conjugate. Most importantly, at a given PEG volume fraction, A2 significantly increases with the degree of polymerization of tethered chains. Hence, a lesser number of long chains is more effective in solubilizing BSA than a correspondingly larger number of short chains. Analysis of the hydrodynamic radii of protein-PEG conjugates suggests that the increased solubility is concurrent with a structural transition in the case of high molecular PEG grafts that results in compact core-shell-type structures. The results reveal a link between the composition, structure, and solubility of polymer conjugates that might benefit the understanding of their biochemical characteristics and their design for functional material applications. PMID:27149093

  2. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  3. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  4. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  5. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  6. 21 CFR 640.80 - Albumin (Human).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... a sterile solution of the albumin derived from human plasma. (b) Source material. The source material of Albumin (Human) shall be plasma recovered from Whole Blood prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.1 through 640.5, or Source Plasma prepared as prescribed in §§ 640.60 through 640.76. (c) Additives...

  7. Albumin inhibits platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced responses in platelets and macrophages: implications for the biologically active form of PAF.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, G.; Stewart, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) binds with high affinity to albumin leading Clay et al. (1990) to suggest that the active form of PAF is the albumin-PAF complex. 2. In the present study the proposal that albumin-bound, rather than monomeric PAF, is the active form of PAF at PAF receptors was critically evaluated by examining the effect of albumin on the potency of PAF in isolated platelets and macrophages. 3. Bovine serum albumin inhibited concentration-dependently PAF-induced responses in platelets and macrophages. The most probable explanation of this finding is that BSA reduced the concentration of free PAF. 4. Thus, we conclude that free PAF, rather than the albumin-PAF complex is the active form. Consequently, local concentrations of albumin will influence profoundly the potency of endogenously released PAF. Moreover, estimates of the affinity of PAF for PAF receptors made in buffers containing BSA, underestimate the true affinity of PAF for its receptors by approximately 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:1330167

  8. Albumin and multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    LeVine, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Leakage of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a common pathological feature in multiple sclerosis (MS). Following a breach of the BBB, albumin, the most abundant protein in plasma, gains access to CNS tissue where it is exposed to an inflammatory milieu and tissue damage, e.g., demyelination. Once in the CNS, albumin can participate in protective mechanisms. For example, due to its high concentration and molecular properties, albumin becomes a target for oxidation and nitration reactions. Furthermore, albumin binds metals and heme thereby limiting their ability to produce reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species. Albumin also has the potential to worsen disease. Similar to pathogenic processes that occur during epilepsy, extravasated albumin could induce the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and affect the ability of astrocytes to maintain potassium homeostasis thereby possibly making neurons more vulnerable to glutamate exicitotoxicity, which is thought to be a pathogenic mechanism in MS. The albumin quotient, albumin in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/albumin in serum, is used as a measure of blood-CSF barrier dysfunction in MS, but it may be inaccurate since albumin levels in the CSF can be influenced by multiple factors including: 1) albumin becomes proteolytically cleaved during disease, 2) extravasated albumin is taken up by macrophages, microglia, and astrocytes, and 3) the location of BBB damage affects the entry of extravasated albumin into ventricular CSF. A discussion of the roles that albumin performs during MS is put forth. PMID:27067000

  9. Recombinant albumin monolayers on latex particles.

    PubMed

    Sofińska, Kamila; Adamczyk, Zbigniew; Kujda, Marta; Nattich-Rak, Małgorzata

    2014-01-14

    The adsorption of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) on negatively charged polystyrene latex micro-particles was studied at pH 3.5 and the NaCl concentration range of 10(-3) to 0.15 M. The electrophoretic mobility of latex monotonically increased with the albumin concentration in the suspension. The coverage of adsorbed albumin was quantitatively determined using the depletion method, where the residual protein concentration was determined by electrokinetic measurements and AFM imaging. It was shown that albumin adsorption was irreversible. Its maximum coverage on latex varied between 0.7 mg m(-2) for 10(-3) M NaCl to 1.3 mg m(-2) for 0.15 M NaCl. The latter value matches the maximum coverage previously determined for human serum albumin on mica using the streaming potential method. The increase in the maximum coverage was interpreted in terms of reduced electrostatic repulsion among adsorbed molecules. These facts confirm that albumin adsorption at pH 3.5 is governed by electrostatic interactions and proceeds analogously to colloid particle deposition. The stability of albumin monolayers was measured in additional experiments where changes in the latex electrophoretic mobility and the concentration of free albumin in solutions were monitored over prolonged time periods. Based on these experimental data, a robust procedure of preparing albumin monolayers on latex particles of well-controlled coverage and molecule distribution was proposed. PMID:24354916

  10. Human podocytes perform polarized, caveolae-dependent albumin endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Okamura, Kayo; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Doctor, R. Brian

    2014-01-01

    The renal glomerulus forms a selective filtration barrier that allows the passage of water, ions, and small solutes into the urinary space while restricting the passage of cells and macromolecules. The three layers of the glomerular filtration barrier include the vascular endothelium, glomerular basement membrane (GBM), and podocyte epithelium. Podocytes are capable of internalizing albumin and are hypothesized to clear proteins that traverse the GBM. The present study followed the fate of FITC-labeled albumin to establish the mechanisms of albumin endocytosis and processing by podocytes. Confocal imaging and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of immortalized human podocytes showed FITC-albumin endocytosis occurred preferentially across the basal membrane. Inhibition of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and caveolae-mediated endocytosis demonstrated that the majority of FITC-albumin entered podocytes through caveolae. Once internalized, FITC-albumin colocalized with EEA1 and LAMP1, endocytic markers, and with the neonatal Fc receptor, a marker for transcytosis. After preloading podocytes with FITC-albumin, the majority of loaded FITC-albumin was lost over the subsequent 60 min of incubation. A portion of the loss of albumin occurred via lysosomal degradation as pretreatment with leupeptin, a lysosomal protease inhibitor, partially inhibited the loss of FITC-albumin. Consistent with transcytosis of albumin, preloaded podocytes also progressively released FITC-albumin into the extracellular media. These studies confirm the ability of podocytes to endocytose albumin and provide mechanistic insight into cellular mechanisms and fates of albumin handling in podocytes. PMID:24573386

  11. Comparative solution equilibrium studies on pentamethylcyclopentadienyl rhodium complexes of 2,2'-bipyridine and ethylenediamine and their interaction with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Enyedy, Éva A; Mészáros, János P; Dömötör, Orsolya; Hackl, Carmen M; Roller, Alexander; Keppler, Bernhard K; Kandioller, Wolfgang

    2015-11-01

    Complex formation equilibrium processes of the (N,N) donor containing 2,2'-bipyridine (bpy) and ethylenediamine (en) with (η(5)-pentamethylcyclopentadienyl)rhodium(III) were investigated in aqueous solution via pH-potentiometry, (1)H NMR spectroscopy, and UV-vis spectrophotometry in the absence and presence of chloride ions. The structure of [RhCp*(en)Cl]ClO4 (Cp*, pentamethylcyclopentadienyl) was also studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. pKa values of 8.56 and 9.58 were determined for [RhCp*(bpy)(H2O)](2+) and [RhCp*(en)(H2O)](2+), respectively resulting in the formation of negligible amount of mixed hydroxido complexes at pH 7.4. Stability and the H2O/Cl(-) co-ligand exchange constants of bpy and en complexes considerably exceed those of the bidentate O-donor deferiprone. The strong affinity of the bpy and en complexes to chloride ions most probably contributes to their low antiproliferative effect. Interactions between human serum albumin (HSA) and [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), its complexes formed with deferiprone, bpy and en were also monitored by (1)H NMR spectroscopy, ultrafiltration/UV-vis and spectrofluorometry. Numerous binding sites (≥ 8) are available for [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+); and the interaction takes place most probably via covalent bonds through the imidazole nitrogen of His. According to the various fluorescence studies [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+) binds on sites I and II, and coordination of surface side chain donor atoms of the protein is also feasible. The binding of the bpy and en complex is weaker and slower compared to that of [RhCp*(H2O)3](2+), and formation of ternary HSA-RhCp*-ligand adducts was proved. In the case of the deferiprone complex, the RhCp* fragment is cleaved off when HSA is loaded with low equivalents of the compound. PMID:26364131

  12. Protein Crystal Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    As the most abundant protein in the circulatory system albumin contributes 80% to colloid osmotic blood pressure. Albumin is also chiefly responsible for the maintenance of blood pH. It is located in every tissue and bodily secretion, with extracellular protein comprising 60% of total albumin. Perhaps the most outstanding property of albumin is its ability to bind reversibly to an incredible variety of ligands. It is widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry that the overall distribution, metabolism, and efficiency of many drugs are rendered ineffective because of their unusually high affinity for this abundant protein. An understanding of the chemistry of the various classes of pharmaceutical interactions with albumin can suggest new approaches to drug therapy and design. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter/New Century Pharmaceuticals

  13. Experimental investigation of the serum albumin fascia microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shcherbak, Yu. P.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2012-09-01

    The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of biological liquids are reported. Structural effects observed in fascias are considered with account of the molecular features of albumin and the concept of supramolecular organization of polymers. It is revealed that the morphology of human serum albumin fascias depends on the concentration and quality of the solvent. It is shown that the water-salt fascias of albumin are more structured than water solutions with the same concentration.

  14. Structure of Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Ho, Joseph X.

    1994-01-01

    Because of its availability, low cost, stability, and unusual ligand-binding properties, serum albumin has been one of the mst extensively studied and applied proteins in biochemistry. However, as a protein, albumin is far from typical, and the widespread interest in and application of albumin have not been balanced by an understanding of its molecular structure. Indeed, for more than 30 years structural information was surmised based solely on techniques such as hydrodynamics, low-angle X-ray scattering, and predictive methods.

  15. Physical chemistry of supersaturated solutions and implications for oral absorption.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Lynne S; Zhang, Geoff G Z

    2016-06-01

    Amorphous solid dispersion (ASD) formulations are widely used for delivery of poorly soluble drugs for dissolution enhancement and bioavailability improvement. When administered, ASDs often exhibit fast dissolution to yield supersaturated solutions. The physical chemistry of these supersaturated solutions is not well understood. This review will discuss the concepts of solubility, supersaturation, and the connection to membrane transport rate. Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS), which occurs when the amorphous solubility is exceeded, leading to solutions with interesting properties is extensively discussed as a phenomenon that is relevant to all enabling formulations. The multiple physical processes occurring during dissolution of the ASD and during oral absorption are analyzed. The beneficial reservoir effect of a system that has undergone LLPS is demonstrated, both experimentally and conceptually. It is believed that formulations that rapidly supersaturate and subsequently undergo LLPS, with maintenance of the supersaturation at this maximum value throughout the absorption process, i.e. those that exhibit "spring and plateau" behavior, will give superior performance in terms of absorption. PMID:27013254

  16. Smartphone based point-of-care detector of urine albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cmiel, Vratislav; Svoboda, Ondrej; Koscova, Pavlina; Provaznik, Ivo

    2016-03-01

    Albumin plays an important role in human body. Its changed level in urine may indicate serious kidney disorders. We present a new point-of-care solution for sensitive detection of urine albumin - the miniature optical adapter for iPhone with in-built optical filters and a sample slot. The adapter exploits smart-phone flash to generate excitation light and camera to measure the level of emitted light. Albumin Blue 580 is used as albumin reagent. The proposed light-weight adapter can be produced at low cost using a 3D printer. Thus, the miniaturized detector is easy to use out of lab.

  17. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins.

    PubMed

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride-HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 10⁴ M(-1), at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure. PMID:26742031

  18. Binding of Sulpiride to Seric Albumins

    PubMed Central

    da Silva Fragoso, Viviane Muniz; de Morais Coura, Carla Patrícia; Hoppe, Luanda Yanaan; Soares, Marília Amável Gomes; Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Celia Martins

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study the interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) through the fluorescence quenching technique. As sulpiride molecules emit fluorescence, we have developed a simple mathematical model to discriminate the quencher fluorescence from the albumin fluorescence in the solution where they interact. Sulpiride is an antipsychotic used in the treatment of several psychiatric disorders. We selectively excited the fluorescence of tryptophan residues with 290 nm wavelength and observed the quenching by titrating HSA and BSA solutions with sulpiride. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Results showed that sulpiride form complexes with both albumins. Estimated association constants for the interaction sulpiride–HSA were 2.20 (±0.08) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C, and 5.46 (±0.20) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. Those for the interaction sulpiride-BSA are 0.44 (±0.01) × 104 M−1, at 37 °C and 2.17 (±0.04) × 104 M−1, at 25 °C. The quenching intensity of BSA, which contains two tryptophan residues in the peptide chain, was found to be higher than that of HSA, what suggests that the primary binding site for sulpiride in albumin should be located next to the sub domain IB of the protein structure. PMID:26742031

  19. Cancer stem cells and immunoresistance: clinical implications and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cells can be contained, but not eliminated, by traditional cancer therapies. A cell minor subpopulation is able to evade attack from therapies and may have cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics, including self-renewal, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation (tumor initiating cells, or TICs). Thus, CSCs/TICs, aided by the microenvironment, produce more differentiated, metastatic cancer cells which the immune system detects and interacts with. There are three phases to this process: elimination, equilibrium and escape. In the elimination phase the immune system recognizes and destroys most of the tumor cells. Then the latency phase begins, consisting of equilibrium between immunological elimination and tumor cell growth. Finally, a minor attack-resistant subpopulation escapes and forms a clinically detectable tumor mass. Herein we review current knowledge of immunological characterization of CSCs/TICs. Due to the correlation between CTCs/TICs and drug resistance and metastasis, we also comment on the crucial role of key molecules involved in controlling CSCs/TICs properties; such molecules are essential to detect and destroy CSCs/TICs. Monoclonal antibodies, antibody constructs and vaccines have been designed to act against CSCs/TICs, with demonstrated efficacy in human cancer xenografts and some antitumor activity in human clinical studies. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs/TICs warrant further investigation. Better understanding of the interaction between CSCs and tumor immunology may help to identify strategies to eradicate the minor subpopulation that escapes conventional therapy attack, thus providing a solution to the problem of drug resistance and metastasis. PMID:26798578

  20. Cancer stem cells and immunoresistance: clinical implications and solutions.

    PubMed

    Codony-Servat, Jordi; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-12-01

    Tumor cells can be contained, but not eliminated, by traditional cancer therapies. A cell minor subpopulation is able to evade attack from therapies and may have cancer stem cell (CSC) characteristics, including self-renewal, multiple differentiation and tumor initiation (tumor initiating cells, or TICs). Thus, CSCs/TICs, aided by the microenvironment, produce more differentiated, metastatic cancer cells which the immune system detects and interacts with. There are three phases to this process: elimination, equilibrium and escape. In the elimination phase the immune system recognizes and destroys most of the tumor cells. Then the latency phase begins, consisting of equilibrium between immunological elimination and tumor cell growth. Finally, a minor attack-resistant subpopulation escapes and forms a clinically detectable tumor mass. Herein we review current knowledge of immunological characterization of CSCs/TICs. Due to the correlation between CTCs/TICs and drug resistance and metastasis, we also comment on the crucial role of key molecules involved in controlling CSCs/TICs properties; such molecules are essential to detect and destroy CSCs/TICs. Monoclonal antibodies, antibody constructs and vaccines have been designed to act against CSCs/TICs, with demonstrated efficacy in human cancer xenografts and some antitumor activity in human clinical studies. Therefore, therapeutic strategies that selectively target CSCs/TICs warrant further investigation. Better understanding of the interaction between CSCs and tumor immunology may help to identify strategies to eradicate the minor subpopulation that escapes conventional therapy attack, thus providing a solution to the problem of drug resistance and metastasis. PMID:26798578

  1. Glycated serum albumin stimulates expression of endothelial cell specific molecule-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells: Implication in diabetes mediated endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Nirala, Bikesh K; Perumal, Vivekanandan; Gohil, Nivedita K

    2015-07-01

    Pro-inflammatory conditions induced by products of protein glycation in diabetes substantially enhance the risk of endothelial dysfunction and related vascular complications. Endothelial cell specific molecule-1 (ESM-1) or endocan has been demonstrated as a potential biomarker in cancer and sepsis. Its role in diabetes-induced pathologies remains unknown. The expression of ESM-1 gene is under cytokine regulation, indicating its role in endothelium-dependent pathological disorders. In this study, we investigated the effect of advanced glycated human serum albumin (AGE-HSA) on the production of ESM-1. We show that AGE-HSA exerts a modulating role on the expression of ESM-1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. It up-regulates expression of ESM-1 protein in a dose-dependent manner which correlates with its messenger RNA (mRNA) transcription. RAGE and galectin-3, both AGE receptors, show antagonistic action on its expression. While gene silencing of RAGE has down-regulatory effect, that of galectin-3 has up-regulatory effect on AGE-induced expression of ESM-1. Inhibition of MAPKKK and JNK pathways did not alter the expression. In contrast, phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) inhibition significantly up-regulated ESM-1 expression. In conclusion, these results suggest that AGE-induced activation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells promotes formation of endocan which is an endothelial dysfunction marker and may be related to vascular disease in diabetes. PMID:25963575

  2. Effect of linoleic acid albumin in a dilution solution and long-term equilibration for freezing of bovine spermatozoa with poor freezability.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, T; Itoh, R; Nishinomiya, H; Katoh, M; Manabe, N

    2012-02-01

    Despite normal eucrasia, mating desire and semen quality, sire bulls sometimes have spermatozoa with poor freezing tolerance. This study assessed effects of the addition of linoleic acid albumin (LAA) and long-term (LT) equilibrium to frozen semen on their sperm freezing tolerance. Immediately after collection using an artificial vagina and a breeding mount, semen was diluted with yolk citrate buffer; then, it was cooled slowly to 4°C during more than 5 h. Equilibrium treatment at 4°C was applied using the same extender supplemented with glycerol. Semen of bull A, with low sperm freezing tolerance, was treated with 1 mg/ml of LAA added to the first extender. The equilibrium treatment at 4°C was prolonged to 30 h. Significantly higher motility rates were obtained for the LT + LAA-treated sperm before and after freezing-thawing. However, for semen of bulls B and C with normal sperm freezing tolerance, the LT + LAA treatment barely exhibited a small effect on the motility rate. Almost no difference was found among bulls A, B and C in the motility rates of LT + LAA-treated sperm after freezing-thawing. No difference of fertility was apparent on LT + LAA-treated frozen sperm in comparison with normal sperm in embryonic collection and in vitro fertilization. It was not an aberration of fertility in vivo or in vitro. In addition, the conception rate of artificial insemination did not have a difference, and a normal calf was obtained. Results show that addition of LAA to an extender for frozen bovine spermatozoa and 30 h of low-temperature equilibrium might improve the motility of freezing-thawing spermatozoa with poor freezability. Sperm exhibited normal fertilization capability and ontogenic capability. PMID:21635578

  3. Facile cell patterning on an albumin-coated surface.

    PubMed

    Yamazoe, Hironori; Uemura, Toshimasa; Tanabe, Toshizumi

    2008-08-19

    Fabrication of micropatterned surfaces to organize and control cell adhesion and proliferation is an indispensable technique for cell-based technologies. Although several successful strategies for creating cellular micropatterns on substrates have been demonstrated, a complex multistep process and requirements for special and expensive equipment or materials limit their prevalence as a general experimental tool. To circumvent these problems, we describe here a novel facile fabrication method for a micropatterned surface for cell patterning by utilizing the UV-induced conversion of the cell adhesive property of albumin, which is the most abundant protein in blood plasma. An albumin-coated surface was prepared by cross-linking albumin with ethylene glycol diglycidyl ether and subsequent casting of the cross-linked albumin solution on the cell culture dish. While cells did not attach to the albumin surface prepared in this way, UV exposure renders the surface cell-adhesive. Thus, surface micropatterning was achieved simply by exposing the albumin-coated surface to UV light through a mask with the desired pattern. Mouse fibroblast L929 cells were inoculated on the patterned albumin substrates, and cells attached and spread in a highly selective manner according to the UV-irradiated pattern. Although detailed investigation of the molecular-level mechanism concerning the change in cell adhesiveness of the albumin-coated surface is required, the present results would give a novel facile method for the fabrication of cell micropatterned surfaces. PMID:18627191

  4. Solvation Phenomena in Dilute Solutions: Formal, Experimental Evidence, and Modeling Implications

    SciTech Connect

    Chialvo, Ariel A

    2013-01-01

    We review the fundamentals underlying a general molecular-based formalism for the microscopic interpretation of the solvation phenomena involving sparingly soluble solutes in compressible media, an approach that hinges around the unambiguous splitting of the species correlation function integrals into short-(finite) and long-ranged (diverging) contributions at infinite dilution, where this condition is taken as the reference system for the derivation of composition expansions. Then, we invoke the formalism (a) to illustrate the well-behaved nature of the solvation contributions to the mechanical partial molecular properties of solutes at infinite dilution, (b) to guide the development of, and provide molecular-based support to, the macroscopic modeling of high-temperature dilute aqueous-electrolyte solutions, (c) to study solvation effects on the kinetic rate constants of reactions in near-critical solvents in an attempt to understand from a microscopic perspective the macroscopic evidence regarding the thermodynamic pressure effects, and (d) to interpret the microscopic mechanism behind synergistic solvation effects involving either co-solutes or co-solvents, and provide a molecular argument on the unsuitability of the van der Waals one-fluid (vdW-1f) mixing rules for the 2 description of weakly attractive solutes in compressible solvents. Finally, we develop thermodynamically consistent perturbation expansions, around the infinite dilution reference, for the species residual properties in binary and ternary mixtures, and discuss the theoretical and modeling implications behind ad hoc first-order truncated expansions.

  5. Aggrecan, an Unusual Polyelectrolyte: Review of Solution Behavior and Physiological Implications

    PubMed Central

    Chandran, Preethi L.; Horkay, Ferenc

    2011-01-01

    Aggrecan is a high molecular weight, bottlebrush-shaped, negative-charged biopolymer that forms supermolecular complexes with hyaluronic acid. In the extracellular matrix of cartilage, aggrecan-hyaluronic acid complexes are interspersed in the collagen matrix and provide the osmotic properties required to resist deswelling under compressive load. In this review we compile aggrecan solution behavior from different experimental techniques, and discuss them in the context of concentration regimes that were identified in osmotic pressure experiments. At low concentration, aggrecan exhibits microgel-like behavior. With increasing concentration, the bottlebrushes self assemble into large complexes. In the physiological concentration range (2 < caggrecan < 8 % w/w), the physical properties of the solution are dominated by repulsive electrostatic interactions between aggrecan complexes. We discuss the consequences of the bottlebrush architecture on the polyelectrolyte characteristics of the aggrecan molecule, and its implications for cartilage properties and function. PMID:21884828

  6. Glycated serum albumin: a potential disease marker and an intermediate index of diabetes control.

    PubMed

    Raghav, Alok; Ahmad, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    Glycation is a non-enzymatic spontaneous process in proteins which has remarkable impact on its physical and functional aspect. This alteration with addition of carbohydrate residue to human serum albumin leads to several pathological events such as diabetic nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy and cardiovascular complications. Human serum albumin is the major protein and is most susceptible to non-enzymatic glycation. Structural and biological properties of functional albumin alter due to the addition of reducing carbohydrate to free amino terminal residues vivo. These irreversible changes in functional albumin are stable which makes this modified albumin as new gold standard future diagnostic marker in diabetes associated complications. Glycated albumin can be used to determine the glycemic control due to short half life than erythrocytes which makes it an alternate reliable disease marker in diabetes. In this review, Human serum albumin glycation has been overviewed, stating concept of glycation and sites that are prone to this modifications. Impact of non-enzymatic addition of carbohydrate to albumin's structural and biological properties has also been elaborated. Accurate measurements of glycated albumin with implications of new highly sensitive techniques have also been described briefly. Interestingly human serum albumin imposed glycation can serve as future tool not for diagnosing diabetes but also its potential in assessment of diabetes associated complications. PMID:25311816

  7. The dynamic implication of focal mechanism solutions of Wenchuan earthquake sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Cui, X.; Chen, L.

    2010-12-01

    At 14:28 CST on May 12, 2008, the disastrous MS8.0 Wenchuan earthquake took place in Sichuan province of China, followed by tens of thousands of aftershocks. It occurred on the Longmenshan fault zone which is a high-angle inland over-thrust fault. What is the corresponding tectonic implication behind the focal mechanism is an important issue to realize the dynamic mechanism of Wenchuan earthquake sequence. In order to reveal it, our research as following is carried out. 1) We extensively collected digital waveform records, seriously and strictly read out P wave first motion, used more accurate locating results, employed the improved grid point test method, computed the focal mechanism solutions of Wenchuan earthquake sequence, and gave out 125 reliable focal mechanism solutions (M≥4.0,including a M3.9 earthquake result). The result shows that most of the earthquakes are thrust or strike-slip. The focal mechanism solutions have characteristic of subsection distribution. The P axis mainly distribute in direction of E-W within a certain range. 2) According to the main faults information and fine medium parameters, using ANSYS software, we established a three-dimensional elastic finite element model of the Longmenshan fault zone and its surrounding areas. According to Global Position System observations, considering three representative patterns of tectonic deformation velocity varying with depth, we loaded three different boundary conditions and got each numerical simulation result of the tectonic stress field in this region. The simulation results of the three patterns consistently show that the orientation of the principal compressive stress is almost E-W in Longmenshan fault zone and its surrounding area. And from north to south, there is a clockwise rotation within a narrow range. The result is consistent with the previous research in these areas. 3) Based on the numerical simulation results of tectonic stress field of three structural deformation patterns

  8. Cellular Specificity of the Blood–CSF Barrier for Albumin Transfer across the Choroid Plexus Epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Liddelow, Shane A.; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M.; Møllgård, Kjeld; Whish, Sophie C.; Noor, Natassya M.; Wheaton, Benjamin J.; Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Traweger, Andreas; Bauer, Hannelore; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Saunders, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood–CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood–CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of

  9. Cellular specificity of the blood-CSF barrier for albumin transfer across the choroid plexus epithelium.

    PubMed

    Liddelow, Shane A; Dzięgielewska, Katarzyna M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Whish, Sophie C; Noor, Natassya M; Wheaton, Benjamin J; Gehwolf, Renate; Wagner, Andrea; Traweger, Andreas; Bauer, Hannelore; Bauer, Hans-Christian; Saunders, Norman R

    2014-01-01

    To maintain the precise internal milieu of the mammalian central nervous system, well-controlled transfer of molecules from periphery into brain is required. Recently the soluble and cell-surface albumin-binding glycoprotein SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine) has been implicated in albumin transport into developing brain, however the exact mechanism remains unknown. We postulate that SPARC is a docking site for albumin, mediating its uptake and transfer by choroid plexus epithelial cells from blood into cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). We used in vivo physiological measurements of transfer of endogenous (mouse) and exogenous (human) albumins, in situ Proximity Ligation Assay (in situ PLA), and qRT-PCR experiments to examine the cellular mechanism mediating protein transfer across the blood-CSF interface. We report that at all developmental stages mouse albumin and SPARC gave positive signals with in situ PLAs in plasma, CSF and within individual plexus cells suggesting a possible molecular interaction. In contrast, in situ PLA experiments in brain sections from mice injected with human albumin showed positive signals for human albumin in the vascular compartment that were only rarely identifiable within choroid plexus cells and only at older ages. Concentrations of both endogenous mouse albumin and exogenous (intraperitoneally injected) human albumin were estimated in plasma and CSF and expressed as CSF/plasma concentration ratios. Human albumin was not transferred through the mouse blood-CSF barrier to the same extent as endogenous mouse albumin, confirming results from in situ PLA. During postnatal development Sparc gene expression was higher in early postnatal ages than in the adult and changed in response to altered levels of albumin in blood plasma in a differential and developmentally regulated manner. Here we propose a possible cellular route and mechanism by which albumin is transferred from blood into CSF across a sub-population of specialised

  10. Seeded growth of hydroxyapatite in the presence of dissolved albumin.

    PubMed

    Gilman, H; Hukins, D W

    1994-07-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystals were grown from a supersaturated solution by the addition of a suspension of seed crystals at a controlled pH value of 7.4 and a temperature of 37 degrees C. The degree of supersaturation was comparable to that in biological fluids and was such that all HAP precipitated would be expected to deposit on the seeds. Albumin was added to some of the solutions to give a concentration in the range 75-250 micrograms cm-3. Samples of solution were removed at known times after the addition of seed crystals and their calcium ion concentrations were determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The decrease in the dissolved calcium concentration was taken to be a measure of crystal growth. In the absence of seeds, no decrease in calcium concentration occurred. The initial rate of HAP growth decreased linearly with albumin concentration, i.e., albumin was found to inhibit crystal growth. Inhibition kinetics were consistent with a Langmuir model in which a single albumin molecule was capable of binding to more than one growth site on the crystal surface. Comparison with published results indicated that albumin was a less potent inhibitor of HAP growth than phosphoproteins but was a more potent inhibitor than magnesium or citrate ions. PMID:8046435

  11. Albumin impregnated vascular grafts: albumin resorption and tissue reactions.

    PubMed

    Cziperle, D J; Joyce, K A; Tattersall, C W; Henderson, S C; Cabusao, E B; Garfield, J D; Kim, D U; Duhamel, R C; Greisler, H P

    1992-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the kinetics of albumin resorption from and the healing of two types of albumin impregnated Vasculour II (Bard Cardiovascular) Dacron grafts (ACG-A and ACG-B) using whole blood preclotted Vasculour II Dacron grafts (without albumin) as controls (PCC). Prostheses measuring 4 mm ID x 50 mm length were implanted in the aortoiliac position in 24 dogs (ACG-A n = 12, ACG-B n = 24, PCC n = 12) and explanted after 1, 2 4, and 6 months. Platelet count, platelet aggregometry to 10(-5) M ADP, prothrombin time (PT), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) were determined preoperatively and at explantation. Sections of the explanted grafts were assayed for human albumin by immunohistochemical techniques utilizing a rabbit polyclonal mono-specific antibody for human albumin followed by the addition of a biotinylated goat anti-rabbit IgG. Immunoperoxidase staining was then performed using Avidin D horse-radish peroxidase. Histology of the grafts (light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy) as well as percent thrombus free surface area (TFSA) by computerized planimetry were also determined. Seven of 48 grafts were occluded (85.4% patency) with no difference among the three groups. Platelet aggregometry was not predictive of graft patency. No change in PT or PTT occurred nor was there any difference among the three groups. Retained albumin was detected in every one-month explant but not beyond that time, with the sensitivity for detecting human albumin in this assay being 20 mg albumin per gram of Dacron. All ACG explants at one month revealed inner capsular fibrin coagula not present in PCC specimens.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1388174

  12. Albumin administration in the acutely ill: what is new and where next?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Albumin solutions have been used worldwide for the treatment of critically ill patients since they became commercially available in the 1940s. However, their use has become the subject of criticism and debate in more recent years. Importantly, all fluid solutions have potential benefits and drawbacks. Large multicenter randomized studies have provided valuable data regarding the safety of albumin solutions, and have begun to clarify which groups of patients are most likely to benefit from their use. However, many questions remain related to where exactly albumin fits within our fluid choices. Here, we briefly summarize some of the physiology and history of albumin use in intensive care before offering some evidence-based guidance for albumin use in critically ill patients. PMID:25042164

  13. The transport of albumin across the ferret in vitro whole trachea.

    PubMed Central

    Webber, S E; Widdicombe, J G

    1989-01-01

    1. The whole trachea of the ferret has been isolated in vitro in an organ bath and used to study the transport of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and two dextrans (70,000 and 9000 Da) from external buffer solution to air-filled lumen, assessed by fluorescent-labelled tracers. 2. In control conditions, when mucus secretion was not stimulated by drugs, the concentration of albumin in the lumen was over half that in the buffer, and about six times greater than those of the two dextrans. 3. Methacholine and phenylephrine caused large increases in mucus secretion and albumin output and decreases in albumin concentration. The responses were proportional to drug concentration. We concluded that albumin output is increased but diluted with submucosal gland secretion. 4. Salbutamol caused a small increase in mucus secretion and large increases in output and concentration of albumin. The concentration of albumin became greater than that in the external buffer medium. The responses were proportional to concentration of salbutamol. 5. Histamine increased mucus secretion and albumin output and concentration. 6. None of the four drugs increased the output of dextran-70,000. Methacholine and phenylephrine increased the output of dextran-9000, but to a far less extent than for albumin. 7. Cooling the trachea and buffer to 4 degrees C almost abolished the stimulation of mucus and albumin outputs due to methacholine. 8. Increasing the concentration of albumin external to the trachea did not proportionally increase albumin secretion, the logarithmic relationship suggesting saturation of an active transport system. 9. We conclude that albumin is secreted by active transport into the tracheal lumen, and that the rate of transport can be augmented by salbutamol to build up a higher concentration in the lumen than in the external buffer. Images Fig. 7 PMID:2476558

  14. A new theory of bubble stability: Implications for nanobubbles at surfaces and in bulk solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    Nanobubbles on hydrophobic surfaces can be imaged using Atomic Force Microscopy and are implicated in the very long-range attraction measured between hydrophobic surfaces. However, the widely accepted theory of bubble dissolution predicts that small bubbles under the influence of Laplace pressure should rapidly dissolve resulting in bubble lifetimes of less than a second. Such short lifetimes should preclude nanobubbles from having an effect on surface force measurements or being observed by AFM, yet nanobubbles are readily observed by AFM and widely implicated in force measurements between hydrophobic surfaces. This has led to a number of attempts at describing their unexpected stability, though no explanation is currently widely accepted. Additionally, nanobubbles have contact angles substantially greater (measured through the more dense liquid phase) than the equivalent macroscopic contact angle. It is clear that nanobubbles at surfaces pose a number of problems that are yet to be resolved. Additionally, recent reports of long-lived nanobubbles in bulk solution add to the mystery. Here we present a new theory describing the stability of nanobubbles. We calculate their lifetimes as a function of gas supersaturation and explain the long lifetimes observed. The same theory predicts that bulk nanobubbles should be stable under certain circumstances. Further, in an extension of this work we explain the difference in contact angle between the nanoscopic and macroscopic measurements and describe in detail the process by which nanobubbles are formed during solvent exchange. Experimental evidence is presented supporting this new approach and showing that this theoretical framework has parallels in other nucleated systems. This work was supported by an ARC Future Fellowship.

  15. Formation of bovine serum albumin associates with zinc tetra(4,4'-carboxy)phenylamino- and tetra-(4,4'-carboxy)phenoxy phthalocyanines in aqueous-organic solutions at 298 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedeva, N. Sh.; Popova, T. E.; Mal'kova, E. A.; Gubarev, Yu. A.

    2013-12-01

    The states of water-soluble complexes of zinc phthalocyanine containing -O-C6H4-COONa and -NH-C6H4-COONa substituents in aqueous and organic media are studied. The type of dimerization is determined for each phthalocyanine. Phthalocyanine interaction with bovine serum albumin is studied with respect to the association equilibria. It is shown that phthalocyanines are localized in protein subdomains IB and IIA, and the interaction between protein and phthalocyanines is of a multicenter character.

  16. Near Earth Objects and Cascading Effects from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Eric

    2016-04-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. Further, NEO impacts are typically considered as discrete events, not as initial events in a dynamic cascading system. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks and multi-hazard impacts associated with these hazards. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH9.12 panel.

  17. Characterization of NEOs from the Policy Perspective: Implications from Problem and Solution Definitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, E.

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of near-Earth-objects (NEOs) in regard to physical attributes and potential risk and impact factors presents a complex and complicates scientific and engineering challenge. The societal and policy risks and impacts are no less complex, yet are rarely considered in the same context as material properties or related factors. The objective of this contribution is to position the characterization of NEOs within the public policy process domain as a means to reflect on the science-policy nexus in regard to risks associated with NEOs. This will be accomplished through, first, a brief overview of the science-policy nexus, followed by a discussion of several policy process frameworks, such as agenda setting and the multiple streams model, focusing events, and punctuated equilibrium, and their application and appropriateness to the problem of NEOs. How, too, for example, does NEO hazard and risk compare with other low probability, high risk, hazards in regard to public policy? Finally, we will reflect on the implications of alternative NEO "solutions" and the characterization of the NEO "problem," and the political and public acceptance of policy alternatives as a way to link NEO science and policy in the context of the overall NH004 panel.

  18. Industrial stabilizers caprylate and N-acetyltryptophanate reduce the efficacy of albumin in liver patients.

    PubMed

    Stange, Jan; Stiffel, Melanie; Goetze, Anne; Strube, Sabrina; Gruenert, Juliane; Klammt, Sebastian; Mitzner, Steffen; Koball, Sebastian; Liebe, Stefan; Reisinger, Emil

    2011-06-01

    Liver failure is associated with an accumulation of toxic molecules that exert an affinity to albumin. Some of them have vasoactive activity. So far, albumin has been used as a plasma expander to improve the available circulating blood volume. However, recent studies have suggested that albumin is more effective than starch for this indication. It has not been reported yet whether the industrial stabilizers octanoate and N-acetyltryptophanate, added to albumin, occupy binding sites for vasoactive substances. The aim of this study was to determine whether the presence of the industrial stabilizers octanoate and caprylate has an impact on the effect of the albumin-binding function or circulating blood volume in patients with cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and an indication for albumin. In 25 patients who received albumin via an inline infusion filter that depleted stabilizers, there was an improvement of albumin binding, and there was less deterioration of circulating blood volume and renal function in comparison with a control group. Further studies are needed to confirm the results and identify the potential socioeconomic side effects of industrial stabilizers in commercial albumin solutions. PMID:21618691

  19. Amadori albumin in diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Neelofar, Km; Ahmad, Jamal

    2015-01-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation of macromolecules in diabetes mellitus (DM) is accelerated due to persistent hyperglycemia. Reducing sugar such as glucose reacts non enzymatically with free €-amino groups of proteins through series of reactions forming Schiff bases. These bases are converted into Amadori product and further into AGEs. Non enzymatic glycation has the potential to alter the biological, structural and functional properties of macromolecules both in vitro and in vivo. Studies have suggested that amadori as well as AGEs are involved in the micro-macro vascular complications in DM, but most studies have focused on the role of AGEs in vascular complications of diabetes. Recently putative AGE-induced patho-physiology has shifted attention from the possible role of amadori-modified proteins, the predominant form of the glycated proteins in the development of the diabetic complications. Human serum albumin (HSA), the most abundant protein in circulation contains 59 lysine and 23 arginine residues that could, in theory be involved in glycation. Albumin has dual nature, first as a marker of intermediate glycation and second as a causative agent of the damage of tissues. Among the blood proteins, hemoglobin and albumin are the most common proteins that are glycated. HSA with a shorter half life than RBC, appears to be an alternative marker of glycemic control as it can indicate blood glucose status over a short period (2-3 weeks) and being unaffected by RBCs life span and variant haemoglobin, anemia etc which however, affect HbA1c. On the other hand, Amadori albumin may accumulate in the body tissues of the diabetic patients and participate in secondary complications. Amadori-albumin has potential role in diabetic glomerulosclerosis due to long term hyperglycaemia and plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic nephropathy. This review is an approach to compile both the nature of glycated albumin as a damaging agent of tissues and as an intermediate

  20. PRODUCTION OF UNIFORMLY SIZED SERUM ALBUMIN AND DEXTROSE MICROBUBBLES

    PubMed Central

    Borrelli, Michael J.; O’Brien, William D.; Bernock, Laura J.; Williams, Heather R.; Hamilton, Eric; Wu, Jonah; Oelze, Michael L.; Culp, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Uniformly-sized preparations with average microbubble (MB) diameters from 1 µm to 7 µm were produced reliably by sonicating decafluorobutane-saturated solutions of serum albumin and dextrose. Detailed protocols for producing and size-separating the MBs are presented, along with the effects that changing each production parameter (serum albumin concentration, sonication power, sonication time, etc.) had on MB size distribution and acoustic stability. These protocols can be used to produce MBs for experimental applications or serve as templates for developing new protocols that yield MBs with physical and acoustic properties better suited to specific applications. Size stability and ultrasonic performance quality control tests were developed to assure that successive MB preparations perform identically and to distinguish the physical and acoustic properties of identically sized MBs produced with different serum albumin-dextrose formulations and sonication parameters. MBs can be stored at 5°C for protracted periods (2 weeks to one year depending on formulation). PMID:21689961

  1. Biocompatibility of electrospun human albumin: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Noszczyk, B H; Kowalczyk, T; Łyżniak, M; Zembrzycki, K; Mikułowski, G; Wysocki, J; Kawiak, J; Pojda, Z

    2015-01-01

    Albumin is rarely used for electrospinning because it does not form fibres in its native globular form. This paper presents a novel method for electrospinning human albumin from a solution containing pharmaceutical grade protein and 25% polyethylene oxide (PEO) used as the fibre-forming agent. After spontaneous cross-linking at body temperature, with no further chemicals added, the fibres become insoluble and the excess PEO can be washed out. Albumin deposited along the fibres retains its native characteristics, such as its non-adhesiveness to cells and its susceptibility for degradation by macrophages. To demonstrate this we evaluated the mechanical properties, biocompatibility and biodegradability of this novel product. After subcutaneous implantation in mice, albumin mats were completely resorbable within six days and elicited only a limited local inflammatory response. In vitro, the mats suppressed cell attachment and migration. As this product is inexpensive, produced from human pharmaceutical grade albumin without chemical modifications, retains its native protein properties and fulfils the specific requirements for anti-adhesive dressings, its clinical use can be expedited. We believe that it could specifically be used when treating paediatric patients with epidermolysis bullosa, in whom non-healing wounds occur after minor hand injuries which lead to rapid adhesions and devastating contractures. PMID:25727172

  2. Heat denatured/aggregated albumin-based biomaterial: effects of preparation parameters on biodegradability and mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Rohanizadeh, Ramin; Kokabi, Nima

    2009-12-01

    Albumin-based biomaterials prepared using heat-aggregation or cross-linking agents have been used in various biomedical applications such as solder materials for laser-assisted tissue welding, anti-bacterial coatings and drug carriers. In this study, solid albumin-based materials were prepared via heat aggregation of albumin solution. The study aimed to determine the influences of the preparation parameters such as albumin concentration in solution, solution pH and temperature, on the mechanical properties as well as the biodegradation rate of heat-aggregated albumin-based materials. The results demonstrated that the materials prepared from the albumin solution with the pH of 8.5 had the highest mechanical strength. Augmenting the albumin concentration in solution led to an increase in mechanical strength, and the materials prepared from the solution with isoelectric albumin pH (pH 4.8) possessed the lowest biodegradation rate and those prepared at pH 12 showed the highest biodegradation rate. PMID:19847625

  3. Comparative efficiency of final endodontic cleansing procedures in removing a radioactive albumin from root canal systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cecic, P.A.; Peters, D.D.; Grower, M.F.

    1984-09-01

    Fifty-six teeth were initially instrumented, with the use of seven irrigants or irrigant combinations, and filled with radioactive albumin. The study then showed the relative ability of three final endodontic procedures (copious reirrigation with saline solution, drying with paper points, and reassuring patency of the canal with the final instrument) to remove the albumin. Even after copious irrigation, each additional procedure removed statistically significant amounts of albumin. Alternating an organic solvent and an inorganic solvent did appear to leave the canal system in the optimal condition for final cleansing procedures. The study then correlated the relative efficiency of irrigation alone versus instrumentation plus irrigation in removing the remaining albumin from the canal systems. Reinstrumentation plus copious irrigation removed significantly more albumin than copious irrigation alone.

  4. Albumin-deficient mouse models for studying metabolism of human albumin and pharmacokinetics of albumin-based drugs

    PubMed Central

    Roopenian, Derry C; Low, Benjamin E; Christianson, Gregory J; Proetzel, Gabriele; Sproule, Thomas J; Wiles, Michael V

    2015-01-01

    Serum albumin is the major determinant of blood colloidal osmotic pressure acting as a depot and distributor of compounds including drugs. In humans, serum albumin exhibits an unusually long half-life mainly due to protection from catabolism by neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn)-mediated recycling. These properties make albumin an attractive courier of therapeutically-active compounds. However, pharmaceutical research and development of albumin-based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of appropriate preclinical animal models. To overcome this, we developed and describe the first mouse with a genetic deficiency in albumin and its incorporation into an existing humanized FcRn mouse model, B6.Cg-Fcgrttm1Dcr Tg(FCGRT)32Dcr/DcrJ (Tg32). Albumin-deficient strains (Alb-/-) were created by TALEN-mediated disruption of the albumin (Alb) gene directly in fertilized oocytes derived from Tg32 mice and its non-transgenic background control, C57BL/6J (B6). The resulting Alb-/- strains are analbuminemic but healthy. Intravenous administration of human albumin to Tg32-Alb-/- mFcRn-/- hFcRnTg/Tg) mice results in a remarkably extended human albumin serum half-life of ∼24 days, comparable to that found in humans, and in contrast to half-lives of 2.6–5.8 d observed in B6, B6-Alb-/- and Tg32 strains. This striking increase can be explained by the absence of competing endogenous mouse albumin and the presence of an active human FcRn. These novel albumin-deficient models provide unique tools for investigating the biology and pathobiology of serum albumin and are a more appropriate rodent surrogates for evaluating human serum albumin pharmacokinetics and albumin-based compounds. PMID:25654695

  5. Podocytes degrade endocytosed albumin primarily in lysosomes.

    PubMed

    Carson, John M; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  6. Podocytes Degrade Endocytosed Albumin Primarily in Lysosomes

    PubMed Central

    Carson, John M.; Okamura, Kayo; Wakashin, Hidefumi; McFann, Kim; Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Blaine, Judith

    2014-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong, independent predictor of chronic kidney disease progression. We hypothesize that podocyte processing of albumin via the lysosome may be an important determinant of podocyte injury and loss. A human urine derived podocyte-like epithelial cell (HUPEC) line was used for in vitro experiments. Albumin uptake was quantified by Western blot after loading HUPECs with fluorescein-labeled (FITC) albumin. Co-localization of albumin with lysosomes was determined by confocal microscopy. Albumin degradation was measured by quantifying FITC-albumin abundance in HUPEC lysates by Western blot. Degradation experiments were repeated using HUPECs treated with chloroquine, a lysosome inhibitor, or MG-132, a proteasome inhibitor. Lysosome activity was measured by fluorescence recovery after photo bleaching (FRAP). Cytokine production was measured by ELISA. Cell death was determined by trypan blue staining. In vivo, staining with lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) was performed on tissue from a Denys-Drash trangenic mouse model of nephrotic syndrome. HUPECs endocytosed albumin, which co-localized with lysosomes. Choloroquine, but not MG-132, inhibited albumin degradation, indicating that degradation occurs in lysosomes. Cathepsin B activity, measured by FRAP, significantly decreased in HUPECs exposed to albumin (12.5% of activity in controls) and chloroquine (12.8%), and declined further with exposure to albumin plus chloroquine (8.2%, p<0.05). Cytokine production and cell death were significantly increased in HUPECs exposed to albumin and chloroquine alone, and these effects were potentiated by exposure to albumin plus chloroquine. Compared to wild-type mice, glomerular staining of LAMP-1 was significantly increased in Denys-Drash mice and appeared to be most prominent in podocytes. These data suggest lysosomes are involved in the processing of endocytosed albumin in podocytes, and lysosomal dysfunction may contribute to podocyte injury and

  7. Complexation of serum albumins and triton X-100: Quenching of tryptophan fluorescence and analysis of the rotational diffusion of complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, I. M.; Vlasov, A. A.; Saletskii, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    The polarized and nonpolarized fluorescence of bovine serum albumin and human serum albumin in Triton X-100 solutions is studied at different pH values. Analysis of the constants of fluorescence quenching for BSA and HSA after adding Triton X-100 and the hydrodynamic radii of BSA/HSA-detergent complexes show that the most effective complexation between both serum albumins and Triton X-100 occurs at pH 5.0, which lies near the isoelectric points of the proteins. Complexation between albumin and Triton X-100 affects the fluorescence of the Trp-214 residing in the hydrophobic pockets of both BSA and HSA.

  8. Crystals of Serum Albumin for Use in Genetic Engineering and Rational Drug Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Serum albumin crystal forms have been produced which exhibit superior x-ray diffraction quality. The crystals are produced from both recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, canine, and baboon serum albumin and allow the performance of drug-binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies. The crystals are grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol or ammonium sulphate within prescribed limits during growth times from one to several weeks and include the following space groups: P2(sub 1), C2, P1.

  9. Spontaneous formation of small sized albumin/acacia coacervate particles.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D J; Singh, O N

    1993-07-01

    Microgel coacervate particles form spontaneously on mixing aqueous solutions of oppositely charged albumin and acacia, under specific conditions of pH, ionic strength, and polyion concentration, close to but not at the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield. The mean particle diameter of these coacervate particles is approximately 6 microns when suspended in aqueous media, as determined by HIAC/Royco particle analysis. The geometric standard deviation of the particles falls in the range 1.2-1.9 microns. The particle size was not dependent on the method of emulsification of the coacervate in the equilibrium phase, or on the stirring speed applied during the manufacturing process. The microgel particles were stable on storage, for periods up to forty-six days, without the addition of a chemical cross-linking agent, or the application of heat. Stability was measured with respect to the change in particle size of samples stored at different temperatures. The non-cross-linked microcapsules were also shown to be stable on pH change, to pH values outside the coacervation pH range. At the optimum conditions for maximum coacervate yield the albumin/acacia system formed a very viscous coacervate phase, which was unsuitable for microcapsule preparation. The rheological properties of albumin/acacia and gelatin/acacia complex coacervates optimized for maximum coacervate yield were compared. The albumin/acacia coacervate was shown to be three orders of magnitude more viscous than the gelatin/acacia system. PMID:8105049

  10. Megalin mediates transepithelial albumin clearance from the alveolar space of intact rabbit lungs

    PubMed Central

    Buchäckert, Yasmin; Rummel, Sebastian; Vohwinkel, Christine U; Gabrielli, Nieves M; Grzesik, Benno A; Mayer, Konstantin; Herold, Susanne; Morty, Rory E; Seeger, Werner; Vadász, István

    2012-01-01

    The alveolo-capillary barrier is effectively impermeable to large solutes such as proteins. A hallmark of acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome is the accumulation of protein-rich oedema fluid in the distal airspaces. Excess protein must be cleared from the alveolar space for recovery; however, the mechanisms of protein clearance remain incompletely understood. In intact rabbit lungs 29.8 ± 2.2% of the radio-labelled alveolar albumin was transported to the vascular compartment at 37°C within 120 min, as assessed by real-time measurement of 125I-albumin clearance from the alveolar space. At 4°C or 22°C significantly lower albumin clearance (3.7 ± 0.4 or 16.2 ± 1.1%, respectively) was observed. Deposition of a 1000-fold molar excess of unlabelled albumin into the alveolar space or inhibition of cytoskeletal rearrangement or clathrin-dependent endocytosis largely inhibited the transport of 125I-albumin to the vasculature, while administration of unlabelled albumin to the vascular space had no effect on albumin clearance. Furthermore, albumin uptake capacity was measured as about 0.37 mg ml−1 in cultured rat lung epithelial monolayers, further highlighting the (patho)physiological relevance of active alveolar epithelial protein transport. Moreover, gene silencing and pharmacological inhibition of the multi-ligand receptor megalin resulted in significantly decreased albumin binding and uptake in monolayers of primary alveolar type II and type I-like and cultured lung epithelial cells. Our data indicate that clearance of albumin from the distal air spaces is facilitated by an active, high-capacity, megalin-mediated transport process across the alveolar epithelium. Further understanding of this mechanism is of clinical importance, since an inability to clear excess protein from the alveolar space is associated with poor outcome in patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome. PMID:22826129

  11. A Humanized Mouse Model to Study Human Albumin and Albumin Conjugates Pharmacokinetics.

    PubMed

    Low, Benjamin E; Wiles, Michael V

    2016-01-01

    Albumin is a large, highly abundant protein circulating in the blood stream which is regulated and actively recycled via the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). In humans this results in serum albumin having an exceptional long half-life of ~21 days. Some time ago it was realized that these intrinsic properties could be harnessed and albumin could be used as a privileged drug delivery vehicle. However, active development of albumin based therapeutics has been hampered by the lack of economic, relevant experimental models which can accurately recapitulate human albumin metabolism and pharmacokinetics. In mice for example, introduced human albumin is not recycled and is catabolized rapidly. This is mainly due to the failure of mouse FcRn to bind human albumin consequently, human albumin has a half-life of only 2-3 days in mice. To overcome this we developed and characterized a humanized mouse model which is null for mouse FcRn and mouse albumin, but is transgenic for, and expressing functional human FcRn. Published data clearly demonstrate that upon injection of human albumin into this model animal that it accurately recapitulates human albumin FcRn dependent serum recycling, with human albumin now having a half-life ~24 days, closely mimicking that observed in humans. In this practical review we briefly review this model and outline its use for pharmacokinetic studies of human albumin. PMID:27150087

  12. γ-Secretase inhibition promotes fibrotic effects of albumin in proximal tubular epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Slattery, C; Jang, Y; Kruger, W A; Hryciw, D H; Lee, A; Poronnik, P

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose Albuminuria is an important biomarker of renal dysfunction and is a major mediator of renal damage and fibrosis during kidney disease. The mechanisms underlying albumin-induced renal fibrosis remain unclear. There has been significant interest in γ-secretase activity in tubular epithelial cells in recent times; however, its potential role in albumin-induced fibrosis has not been investigated. Experimental Approach The primary aim of this study was to examine the role of γ-secretase in albumin-induced fibrotic effects in proximal tubular cells. The effects of increasing albumin concentrations on fibrosis indicators and mediators in the human HK-2 cell line were examined in the presence and absence of a γ-secretase inhibitor, compound E. Key Results Treatment with albumin resulted in a number of pro-fibrotic effects, including up-regulation of fibronectin, TGF-β1 and the EGF-R. Interestingly, similar effects were observed in response to treatment with the γ-secretase inhibitor, compound E. Co-treatment of cells with albumin and an EGF-R inhibitor, AG-1478, resulted in significant inhibition of the observed pro-fibrotic effects, suggesting a major role for the EGF-R in albumin-induced fibrotic events. Albumin-induced effects on the EGF-R appeared to be mediated through inhibition of γ-secretase activity and were dependent on ERK-MAPK signalling. Conclusions and Implications These results provide novel insights into the mechanisms of albumin-induced fibrotic effects in tubular epithelial cells, suggesting important roles for the γ-secretase and the EGF-R. These results suggest that the proposed use of γ-secretase inhibitors as anti-fibrotic agents requires further investigation. PMID:23594166

  13. Shank2 Regulates Renal Albumin Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Dobrinskikh, Evgenia; Lewis, Linda; Doctor, R Brian; Okamura, Kayo; Lee, Min Goo; Altmann, Christopher; Faubel, Sarah; Kopp, Jeffrey B; Blaine, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria is a strong and independent predictor of kidney disease progression but the mechanisms of albumin handling by the kidney remain to be fully defined. Previous studies have shown that podocytes endocytose albumin. Here we demonstrate that Shank2, a large scaffolding protein originally identified at the neuronal postsynaptic density, is expressed in podocytes in vivo and in vitro and plays an important role in albumin endocytosis in podocytes. Knockdown of Shank2 in cultured human podocytes decreased albumin uptake, but the decrease was not statistically significant likely due to residual Shank2 still present in the knockdown podocytes. Complete knockout of Shank2 in podocytes significantly diminished albumin uptake in vitro. Shank2 knockout mice develop proteinuria by 8 weeks of age. To examine albumin handling in vivo in wild-type and Shank2 knockout mice we used multiphoton intravital imaging. While FITC-labeled albumin was rapidly seen in the renal tubules of wild-type mice after injection, little albumin was seen in the tubules of Shank2 knockout mice indicating dysregulated renal albumin trafficking in the Shank2 knockouts. We have previously found that caveolin-1 is required for albumin endocytosis in cultured podocytes. Shank2 knockout mice had significantly decreased expression and altered localization of caveolin-1 in podocytes suggesting that disruption of albumin endocytosis in Shank2 knockouts is mediated via caveolin-1. In summary, we have identified Shank2 as another component of the albumin endocytic pathway in podocytes. PMID:26333830

  14. Exact Solutions of the 5d Space-Time Universe and Their Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Takao

    2008-09-01

    What can the exact solutions of the 5D STM Universe imply when they are compared to the field equations of a Corrected Metric Tensor Universe? The comparison implies the possibility of clarifying the meaning of the cosmological term.

  15. Implications of solution chemistry effects: Direction-specific restraints on the step kinetics of calcite growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Mina; Teng, H. Henry

    2014-09-01

    Classical crystallization models successfully depict the dependence of growth kinetics on thermodynamic driving force but cannot predict the roles of solution chemistry. Yet, it has become increasingly clear that crystal growth rate at fixed supersaturations depends on pH, ionic strength, and the relative abundance of cations and anions in the parent solutions. We conducted experiments to isolate the effect of individual solution-chemistry parameters on calcite step growth kinetics. Our results revealed a distinct correlation between step velocity and pH in acute and obtuse directions and a simultaneous trend change at pH ∼9.5. Step speeds varied with solution stoichiometry, and each direction reached its maximal rate at a different [Ca]/[CO32-] value. In addition, the solution cation/anion at which maximal step speed occurred appeared to be pH dependent as well. Limited effect of ionic strength on step growth was observed in the obtuse direction at low background electrolyte concentrations, but no obvious change was found for growth at the acute side. We proposed a growth model based upon independent incorporation of cations and anions and interpreted these observations as: (1) solute constituents enter kinks through direct solution diffusion at obtuse steps but surface diffusion at acute steps; (2) growth is limited by Ca2+ dehydration at the obtuse side, but by surface adsorption and reorientation and rearrangement of CO32- in the acute direction; and (3) background electrolyte (NaCl in our study) competes with solutes for surface sites at more easily accessible kinks.

  16. Perceptions of injury causes and solutions in a Johannesburg township: implications for prevention.

    PubMed

    Butchart, A; Kruger, J; Lekoba, R

    2000-02-01

    As with other diseases, citizen perceptions of injury causes and solutions are important determinants of their response to the problem. This study explores qualitative responses to questions about the causes and solutions for injuries due to violence, transport, and unintentional burns, falls and other causes from 1,075 residents in six neighbourhoods of a low-income area in Johannesburg, South Africa. These included council houses, council apartment blocks and informal settlements. Data were analysed using content analytic procedures. Perceived causes of injury varied sharply between neighbourhoods. Violence was seen as an outcome of unemployment, socialisation, drug abuse and drug dealing in the formal housing areas, while in the informal settlements it was attributed to unemployment, poor housing and environmental conditions, and excessive alcohol consumption. In the formal housing areas, suggested solutions for violence emphasised increased policing and other repressive measures that contradicted the attribution of causes to environmental factors. In the informal areas, solutions were more congruent with perceived causes, emphasising housing development, education and employment. Perceived causes and solutions for transport injuries reflected the specific context of each neighbourhood, and indicated strong support for the implementation of environmental modifications to reduce the speed of motor vehicles and thus the number of pedestrian injuries. Where perceived causes and solutions for violence and transport-related injuries were located beyond the community in the broader environment, unintentional injuries due to other causes were seen as more in the sphere of potential personal control, except in the informal areas where electrification and formal housing provision were the most commonly suggested solutions. Popular constructions of the causes and solutions for major categories of injury are important in shaping injury prevention responses, and their

  17. Automated calibration of a stream solute transport model: Implications for interpretation of biogeochemical parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, D.T.; Gooseff, M.N.; Bencala, K.E.; Runkel, R.L.

    2003-01-01

    The hydrologic processes of advection, dispersion, and transient storage are the primary physical mechanisms affecting solute transport in streams. The estimation of parameters for a conservative solute transport model is an essential step to characterize transient storage and other physical features that cannot be directly measured, and often is a preliminary step in the study of reactive solutes. Our study used inverse modeling to estimate parameters of the transient storage model OTIS (One dimensional Transport with Inflow and Storage). Observations from a tracer injection experiment performed on Uvas Creek, California, USA, are used to illustrate the application of automated solute transport model calibration to conservative and nonconservative stream solute transport. A computer code for universal inverse modeling (UCODE) is used for the calibrations. Results of this procedure are compared with a previous study that used a trial-and-error parameter estimation approach. The results demonstrated 1) importance of the proper estimation of discharge and lateral inflow within the stream system; 2) that although the fit of the observations is not much better when transient storage is invoked, a more randomly distributed set of residuals resulted (suggesting non-systematic error), indicating that transient storage is occurring; 3) that inclusion of transient storage for a reactive solute (Sr2+) provided a better fit to the observations, highlighting the importance of robust model parameterization; and 4) that applying an automated calibration inverse modeling estimation approach resulted in a comprehensive understanding of the model results and the limitation of input data.

  18. Enhanced agglutination reaction of ABO subgroups by gold nanoparticle solution: implication for identification of ABO subgroups.

    PubMed

    Ammaranond, P; Sriyarak, J; Saejong, S; Deesin, P; Seereemaspun, A; Rojanathanes, R

    2011-12-01

    Although the ABO blood group is the most significant in blood group system in human, other subgroups system is also important to be concerned in blood banking laboratory. ABO subgroups have weak antigen potency on red blood cell. In some cases, they could not been detected by cell grouping and serum grouping methods. This may lead to misinterpretation of ABO typing which will cause serious problems for transfusion and transplantation. Gold nanoparticle solution can increase the agglutination reaction of ABO typing. Thus far, the investigation of ABO blood group system has been performed using gold nanoparticle solution. Samples were tested comparing between with and without gold nanoparticle solution. After reading the agglutination reaction, supernatants were collected and measured at the optical density at 760 nm by spectrophotometer. The optical density of 2-5% cell suspension and monoclonal antibody was higher than in the tube of 2-5% cell suspension, monoclonal antibody and gold nanoparticle solution. By adding the gold nanoparticle solution, the agglutination reaction was increased ranging from 7.0-37.7% (median 15.0%) for ABO grouping system whereas 12.1-50.9% (median 23.4%) was observed in ABO subgroups. It could decrease the chance of misinterpretation by 33.3%. By using gold nanoparticle solution might be the alternative way for investigation of weak antigen potency on red blood cell. PMID:22416584

  19. Characterization of Th carbonate solutions using XAS and implications for thermodynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, N.J.; Felmy, A.R.; Rai, D.; Conradson, S.D.

    1997-12-31

    The chemical behavior of actinide elements in tank solutions, in soil, and in groundwater is dependent upon the chemical species that form when aqueous solutions come in contact with the actinide compounds. In particular the chemical speciation of the reduced actinide oxidation states (III and IV) are important, for example, to DOE waste tank processing and, more generally, to nuclear waste disposal issues. Predicting the solubility of the actinides in these solutions requires identification of the strong aqueous complexes, such as carbonates and organic chelating agents, that can form in aqueous solution. Previous speciation work has often relied on indirect techniques such as potentiometric titrations or solubility measurements. Recent XAS experiments determine directly the speciation of the Th carbonato species of seven solutions under a range of carbonate concentrations and pH conditions. The presence of the pentacarbonato complex is confirmed and the complex`s stability at low carbonate concentrations is determined. These experimental results support a proposed thermodynamic model that describes the solubility of Th(IV) hydrous oxide in the aqueous Na{sup +}-HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}}-CO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}-OH{sup {minus}}-ClO{sub 4}{sup {minus}}-H{sub 2}O system extending to high concentrations at 25 C. This model is relatively simple in that only two aqueous species are included Th(OH){sub 3}CO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} and Th(CO{sub 3}){sub 5}{sup 6{minus}}.

  20. Redox activity distinguishes solid-state electron transport from solution-based electron transfer in a natural and artificial protein: cytochrome C and hemin-doped human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Amdursky, Nadav; Ferber, Doron; Pecht, Israel; Sheves, Mordechai; Cahen, David

    2013-10-28

    Integrating proteins in molecular electronic devices requires control over their solid-state electronic transport behavior. Unlike "traditional" electron transfer (ET) measurements of proteins that involve liquid environments and a redox cycle, no redox cofactor is needed for solid-state electron transport (ETp) across the protein. Here we show the fundamental difference between these two approaches by macroscopic area measurements, which allow measuring ETp temperature dependence down to cryogenic temperatures, via cytochrome C (Cyt C), an ET protein with a heme (Fe-porphyrin) prosthetic group as a redox centre. We compare the ETp to electrochemical ET measurements, and do so also for the protein without the Fe (with metal-free porphyrin) and without porphyrin. As removing the porphyrin irreversibly alters the protein's conformation, we repeat these measurements with human serum albumin (HSA), 'doped' (by non-covalent binding) with a single hemin equivalent, i.e., these natural and artificial proteins share a common prosthetic group. ETp via Cyt C and HSA-hemin are very similar in terms of current magnitude and temperature dependence, which suggests similar ETp mechanisms via these two systems, thermally activated hopping (with ~0.1 eV activation energy) >190 K and tunneling by superexchange <190 K. Also, ET rates to and from the Fe redox centres (Fe(2+) <=> Fe(3+) + e(-)), measured by electrochemistry of HSA-hemin are only 4 times lower than those for Cyt C. However, while removing the Fe redox centre from the porphyrin ring markedly affects the ET rate, it hardly changes the ETp currents through these proteins, while removing the macrocycle (from HSA, which retains its conformation) significantly reduces ETp efficiency. These results show that solid-state ETp across proteins does not require the presence of a redox cofactor, and that while for ET the Fe ion is the main electron mediator, for ETp the porphyrin ring has this function. PMID:24008341

  1. Correlating polymer solution conformation and thin film nanostructure: Implications for BHJ processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattani, Rajeev; Nedoma, Alisyn; Stingelin, Natalie; Nelson, Jenny; Cabral, Joao

    2013-03-01

    We study the solution properties of polymer-fullerene mixtures by a combination of dynamic light scattering, viscometry, small angle neutron scattering and microscopy. Specifically, the kinetics of polymer conformation (Rg and Rh) and interaction changes are mapped as function of polymer-particle concentration, overall concentration in solution and age. A model system of polystyrene and C60 fullerene was selected for this study, in addition to the P3HT/PCBM pair, which is currently explored in photovoltaic applications. The solution properties show a clear correlation to the resulting thin film nanostructured composite morphology. Our future work will further link it to bulk heterojunction solar cell performance. EPSRC and Plastic Electronics DTC

  2. Ligation activity of fragmented ribozymes in frozen solution: implications for the RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Vlassov, Alexander V.; Johnston, Brian H.; Landweber, Laura F.; Kazakov, Sergei A.

    2004-01-01

    A vexing difficulty of the RNA world hypothesis is how RNA molecules of significant complexity could ever have evolved given their susceptibility to degradation. One way degradation might have been reduced is through low temperature. Here we report that truncated and fragmented derivatives of the hairpin ribozyme can catalyze ligation of a wide variety of RNA molecules to a given sequence in frozen solution despite having little or no activity under standard solution conditions. These results suggest that complex RNAs could have evolved in freezing environments on the early earth and perhaps elsewhere. PMID:15161960

  3. Contextual approach to technology assessment: Implications for one-factor fix solutions to complex social problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayo, L. H.

    1975-01-01

    The contextual approach is discussed which undertakes to demonstrate that technology assessment assists in the identification of the full range of implications of taking a particular action and facilitates the consideration of alternative means by which the total affected social problem context might be changed by available project options. It is found that the social impacts of an application on participants, institutions, processes, and social interests, and the accompanying interactions may not only induce modifications in the problem contest delineated for examination with respect to the design, operations, regulation, and use of the posited application, but also affect related social problem contexts.

  4. PROPERTY CHANGES IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS DUE TO SURFACTANT TREATMENT OF PCE: IMPLICATIONS TO GEOPHYSICAL MEASUREMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Select physicochemical properties of aqueous solutions composed of surfactants, dye, and

    perchloroethylene (PCE) were evaluated through a response surface quadratic design

    model of experiment. Nine surfactants, which are conventionally used in the

    remediation...

  5. Reentrant condensation of lysozyme: Implications for studying dynamics of lysozyme in aqueous solutions of lithium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Mamontov, Eugene; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have outlined the use of eutectic solution of lithium chloride in water to study microscopic dynamics of lysozyme in an aqueous solvent that is remarkably similar to pure water in many respects, yet allows experiments over a wide temperature range without the solvent crystallization. The eutectic point in (H2O)R(LiCl) system corresponds to R 7.3, and it is of interest to investigate whether less concentrated aqueous solutions of LiCl could be employed in low-temperature studies of a solvated protein. We have investigated a range of concentrations of lysozyme and LiCl in aqueous solutions to identify systems that do not show phase separation and avoid solvent crystallization on cooling down. Compared to the lysozyme concentration in solution, the concentration of LiCl in the aqueous solvent plays the major role in determining systems suitable for low-temperature studies. We have observed interesting and rich phase behavior reminiscent of reentrant condensation of proteins.

  6. Solution-Focused Brief Counseling: Guidelines, Considerations, and Implications for School Psychologists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Camille N.; Hart, Shelley R.; Jimerson, Shane R.; Dowdy, Erin; Earhart, James, Jr.; Renshaw, Tyler L.; Eklund, Katie; Anderson, Doug

    2009-01-01

    The increasing emphasis on school-based mental health services is likely to increase the demand for school psychologists to provide counseling with students. Providing counseling in the school context can be challenging, especially given time constraints and limited number of sessions. Solution-focused brief counseling (SFBC) is an approach that…

  7. Raman microspectroscopy of nanodiamond-induced structural changes in albumin.

    PubMed

    Svetlakova, Anastasiya S; Brandt, Nikolay N; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Chikishev, Andrey Yu

    2015-04-01

    Nanodiamonds (NDs) are promising agents for theranostic applications due to reported low toxicity and high biocompatibility, which is still being extensively tested on cellular, tissue, and organism levels. It is presumed that for experimental and future clinical applications, NDs will be administered into the organism via the blood circulation system. In this regard, the interaction of NDs with blood components needs to be thoroughly studied. We studied the interaction of carboxylated NDs (cNDs) with albumin, one of the major proteins of blood plasma. After 2-h long in vitro incubation in an aqueous solution of the protein, 100-nm cNDs were dried and the dry samples were studied with the aid of Raman microspectroscopy. The spectroscopic data indicate significant conformational changes that can be due to cND–protein interaction. A possible decrease in the functional activity of albumin related to the conformational changes must be taken into account in the in vivo applications. PMID:25901656

  8. Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin Ratio Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio Share this ... Globulin Ratio; A/G Ratio Formal name: Total Protein; Albumin to Globulin Ratio Related tests: Albumin ; Liver ...

  9. Is albumin administration in the acutely ill associated with increased mortality? Results of the SOAP study

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, Jean-Louis; Sakr, Yasser; Reinhart, Konrad; Sprung, Charles L; Gerlach, Herwig; Ranieri, V Marco

    2005-01-01

    Introduction Albumin administration in the critically ill has been the subject of some controversy. We investigated the use of albumin solutions in European intensive care units (ICUs) and its relationship to outcome. Methods In a cohort, multicenter, observational study, all patients admitted to one of the participating ICUs between 1 May and 15 May 2002 were followed up until death, hospital discharge, or for 60 days. Patients were classified according to whether or not they received albumin at any time during their ICU stay. Results Of 3,147 admitted patients, 354 (11.2%) received albumin and 2,793 (88.8%) did not. Patients who received albumin were more likely to have cancer or liver cirrhosis, to be surgical admissions, and to have sepsis. They had a longer length of ICU stay and a higher mortality rate, but were also more severely ill, as manifested by higher simplified acute physiology score (SAPS) II and sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) scores than the other patients. A Cox proportional hazard model indicated that albumin administration was significantly associated with decreased 30-day survival. Moreover, in 339 pairs matched according to a propensity score, ICU and hospital mortality rates were higher in the patients who had received albumin than in those who had not (34.8 versus 20.9% and 41.3 versus 27.7%, respectively, both p < 0.001). Conclusion Albumin administration was associated with decreased survival in this population of acutely ill patients. Further prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to examine the effects of albumin administration in sub-groups of acutely ill patients. PMID:16356223

  10. Ultrasonic frequency analysis for estimating pH in albumin-rich biofluids.

    PubMed

    Rackov, Andrien A; Burns, David H

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound is known as a non-invasive imaging modality capable of propagating through highly scattering media such as tissue, blood, and other biological fluids, yet currently provides little chemical information. We have developed a straightforward and rapid methodology for estimating pH in albumin-rich biofluids based on analysis of ultrasonic frequencies. Albumin is the most abundant protein in serum and undergoes conformational changes with pH. It was shown that when ultrasound propagated through albumin solutions, the attenuation of collected ultrasound signals increased with pH. By measuring the ultrasound frequency spectra at several albumin concentrations and pH values, the pH of the solutions could be determined by multilinear regression. Differences in absolute protein content contributed to signal differences in the frequency profiles and were minimized through normalization of each spectrum by the sum of all its frequency intensities. This strategy was applied to human serum samples from multiple donors, for which a multilinear regression model was developed with a coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.93 and a standard error of estimate (SEE) of 0.08 pH units. The use of albumin as a pH indicator opens the doors for estimations in other albumin-rich media, such as amniotic fluid and cerebrospinal fluid. PMID:26717815

  11. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  12. Cisplatin loaded albumin mesospheres for lung cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Yen; Mohammed, Kamal A; Goldberg, Eugene P; Kaye, Frederic; Nasreen, Najmunnisa

    2015-01-01

    The low solubility of cisplatin in aqueous solution limits the treatment effectiveness and the application of cisplatin in various kinds of drug-eluting devices. Although cisplatin has a high solubility in Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), the toxicity of cisplatin can be greatly reduced while dissolved in DMSO. In this study, the solid powder of cisplatin-loaded albumin mesospheres (CDDP/DMSO-AMS), in a size range of 1 to 10 µm, were post-loaded with cisplatin and showed high cisplatin content (16% w/w) and effective cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells. Cisplatin were efficiently absorbed into the albumin mesospheres (AMS) in DMSO and, most importantly, the toxicity of cisplatin was remained at 100% after the loading process. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS was designed for the intratumoral injection through the bronchoscopic catheter or dry powder inhalation (DPI) due to its high stability in air or in solution. This CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed a fast cisplatin release within 24 hours. In the in vitro study, CDDP/DMSO-AMS showed high effectiveness on killing the lung cancer cells including the non-small cell lung cancer (NCL-H23 and A549), malignant mesothelioma (CRL-2081) and the mouse lung carcinoma (Lewis lung carcinoma) cell lines. The albumin based mesospheres provide an ideal loading matrix for cisplatin and other metal-based drugs due to the high swelling degree and fast uptake rate in the organic solvents with high polarity. In addition, to investigate the effects of polysaccharides, such as chitosan and chondroitin, on enhancing loading efficiency and lasting cytotoxicity of cisplatin, the polysaccharide-modified albumin mesospheres were synthesized and loaded with cisplatin in this study. PMID:25973300

  13. Glycated Serum Albumin and AGE Receptors.

    PubMed

    Vetter, Stefan W

    2015-01-01

    In vivo modification of proteins by molecules with reactive carbonyl groups leads to intermediate and advanced glycation end products (AGE). Glucose is a significant glycation reagent due to its high physiological concentration and poorly controlled diabetics show increased albumin glycation. Increased levels of glycated and AGE-modified albumin have been linked to diabetic complications, neurodegeneration, and vascular disease. This review discusses glycated albumin formation, structural consequences of albumin glycation on drug binding, removal of circulating AGE by several scavenger receptors, as well as AGE-induced proinflammatory signaling through activation of the receptor for AGE. Analytical methods for quantitative detection of protein glycation and AGE formation are compared. Finally, the use of glycated albumin as a novel clinical marker to monitor glycemic control is discussed and compared to glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) as long-term indicator of glycemic status. PMID:26471084

  14. Tolerability of Oral Xylitol Solution in Young Children: Implications for Otitis Media Prophylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Vernacchio, Louis; Vezina, Richard M.; Mitchell, Allen A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. Xylitol, given as two grams orally five times-a-day, significantly reduces the incidence of acute otitis media (AOM) in children. A less frequent dosing schedule, if tolerable and efficacious, would promote the more widespread use of this treatment. We sought to determine the tolerability and acceptability in young children of oral xylitol solution at doses of 5 grams three times-a-day (TID) and 7.5 grams once daily (QD). Methods. The study was a three-month randomized placebo-controlled trial of the tolerability and acceptability of oral xylitol solution in 120 children 6-36 months of age performed in the SCOR Network. Results. Study withdrawals and unscheduled medical visits for gastrointestinal complaints did not differ significantly among the study groups. The proportions of subjects in the xylitol TID group who experienced excessive gas or diarrhea at months one, two, and three were 22.7%, 10.0%, and 14.3%, respectively, and in the xylitol QD group were 27.3%, 17.4%, and 14.3%, respectively, and these did not differ from the placebo groups. The proportions who accepted the study solution easily or with only minor difficulty at one, two, and three months in the xylitol TID group were 77.3%, 90.0%, and 90.5% and in the xylitol QD group, 77.3%, 82.6%, and 90.5%, respectively. Conclusions. Oral xylitol solution at dosages of 5 grams TID and 7.5 grams QD is well-tolerated by young children. Given the potential for xylitol as a safe, inexpensive option for AOM prophylaxis, clinical trials using these dosages of xylitol can be conducted. PMID:17097152

  15. In vivo biocompatibility, clearance, and biodistribution of albumin vehicles for pulmonary drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Woods, A.; Patel, A.; Spina, D.; Riffo-Vasquez, Y.; Babin-Morgan, A.; de Rosales, R.T.M.; Sunassee, K.; Clark, S.; Collins, H.; Bruce, K.; Dailey, L.A.; Forbes, B.

    2015-01-01

    The development of clinically acceptable albumin-based nanoparticle formulations for use in pulmonary drug delivery has been hindered by concerns about the toxicity of nanomaterials in the lungs combined with a lack of information on albumin nanoparticle clearance kinetics and biodistribution. In this study, the in vivo biocompatibility of albumin nanoparticles was investigated following a single administration of 2, 20, and 390 μg/mouse, showing no inflammatory response (TNF-α and IL-6, cellular infiltration and protein concentration) compared to vehicle controls at the two lower doses, but elevated mononucleocytes and a mild inflammatory effect at the highest dose tested. The biodistribution and clearance of 111In labelled albumin solution and nanoparticles over 48 h following a single pulmonary administration to mice was investigated by single photon emission computed tomography and X-ray computed tomography imaging and terminal biodistribution studies. 111In labelled albumin nanoparticles were cleared more slowly from the mouse lung than 111In albumin solution (64.1 ± 8.5% vs 40.6 ± 3.3% at t = 48 h, respectively), with significantly higher (P < 0.001) levels of albumin nanoparticle-associated radioactivity located within the lung tissue (23.3 ± 4.7%) compared to the lung fluid (16.1 ± 4.4%). Low amounts of 111In activity were detected in the liver, kidneys, and intestine at time points > 24 h indicating that small amounts of activity were cleared from the lungs both by translocation across the lung mucosal barrier, as well as mucociliary clearance. This study provides important information on the fate of albumin vehicles in the lungs, which may be used to direct future formulation design of inhaled nanomedicines. PMID:25980621

  16. Serum albumin binding of structurally diverse neutral organic compounds: data and models.

    PubMed

    Endo, Satoshi; Goss, Kai-Uwe

    2011-12-19

    Binding to serum albumin has a strong influence on freely dissolved, unbound concentrations of chemicals in vivo and in vitro. For neutral organic solutes, previous studies have suggested a log-log correlation between the albumin-water partition coefficient and the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)) and postulated highly nonspecific binding that is mechanistically analogous to dissolution into solvents. These relationships and concepts were further explored in this study. Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-water partition coefficients (K(BSA/w)) were measured for 83 structurally diverse neutral organic chemicals in consistent experimental conditions. The correlation between log K(BSA/w) and log K(ow) was moderate, with R(2) = 0.76 and SD = 0.43. The log K(BSA/w) of low-polarity compounds including a series of chlorobenzenes and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons increased with log K(ow) linearly up to log K(ow) = 4-5, but then the linear relationship apparently broke off, and the increase became gradual. The fitting of polyparameter linear free energy relationship models with five solute descriptors was just comparable to that of the log K(ow) model (R(2) = 0.78-0.79, SD = 0.41-0.42); the relatively high SD obtained suggests that solvent dissolution models are not capable of modeling albumin binding accurately. A size limitation of the binding site(s) of albumin is suggested as a possible reason for the high SD. An equilibrium distribution model indicates that serum albumin generally has high contributions to the binding in the serum of polar compounds and relatively small low-polarity compounds, whereas albumin binding for large low-polarity compounds is outcompeted by the strong partitioning into lipids due to low relative affinity of albumin for these compounds. PMID:22070391

  17. Investigation of Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) Attachment onto Self-Assembled Monolayers (SAMs) Using Combinatorial Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation (QCM-D) and Spectroscopic Ellipsometry (SE)

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Hanh T. M.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon; Rodenhausen, Keith B.; Schubert, Mathias; Bartz, Jason C.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding protein adsorption kinetics to surfaces is of importance for various environmental and biomedical applications. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin to various self-assembled monolayer surfaces including neutral and charged hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces was investigated using in-situ combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry. Adsorption of bovine serum albumin varied as a function of surface properties, bovine serum albumin concentration and pH value. Charged surfaces exhibited a greater quantity of bovine serum albumin adsorption, a larger bovine serum albumin layer thickness, and increased density of bovine serum albumin protein compared to neutral surfaces at neutral pH value. The quantity of adsorbed bovine serum albumin protein increased with increasing bovine serum albumin concentration. After equilibrium sorption was reached at pH 7.0, desorption of bovine serum albumin occurred when pH was lowered to 2.0, which is below the isoelectric point of bovine serum albumin. Our data provide further evidence that combinatorial quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation and spectroscopic ellipsometry is a sensitive analytical tool to evaluate attachment and detachment of adsorbed proteins in systems with environmental implications. PMID:26505481

  18. Protease Inhibition by Oleic Acid Transfer From Chronic Wound Dressings to Albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Howley, Phyllis; Davis, Rachel M.; Mashchak, Andrew D.; Goheen, Steven C.

    2007-08-01

    High elastase and cathepsin G activities have been observed in chronic wounds. These levels can inhibit healing through degradation of growth factors, cytokines, and extracellular matrix proteins. Oleic acid (18:1) is a non-toxic elastase inhibitor with some potential for redressing the imbalance of elastase activity found in chronic wounds. Cotton wound dressing material was characterized as a transfer carrier for affinity uptake of 18:1 by albumin under conditions mimicking chronic wounds. 18:1-treated cotton was examined for its ability to bind and release the fatty acid in the presence of albumin. The mechanism of 18:1 uptake from cotton and binding by albumin was examined with both intact dressings and cotton fiber-designed chromatography. Raman spectra of the albumin-18:1 complexes under liquid-liquid equilibrium conditions revealed fully saturated albumin-18:1 complexes with a 1:1 weight ratio of albumin:18:1. Cotton chromatography under liquid-solid equilibrium conditions revealed oleic acid transfer from cotton to albumin at 27 mole equivalents of 18:1 per mole albumin. Cotton was contrasted with hydrogel, and hydrocolloid wound dressing for its comparative ability to lower elastase activity. Each dressing material evaluated was found to release 18:1 in the presence of albumin with significant inhibition of elastase activity. The 18:1-formulated wound dressings lowered elastase activity in a dose dependent manner in the order cotton gauze > hydrogel > hydrocolloid. In contrast the cationic serine protease Cathepsin G was inihibited by 18:1 within a narrow range of 18:1-cotton formulations. Four per cent Albumin solutions were most effective in binding cotton bound-18:1. However, 2% albumin was sufficient to transfer quantities of 18:1 necessary to achieve a significant elastase-lowering effect. Formulations with 128 mg 18:1/g cotton gauze had equivalent elastase lowering with 1 - 4% albumin. 18:1 bound to cotton wound dressings may have promise in the

  19. Water movement and solute transport in permafrost wetlands: implications for inorganic carbon cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jessen, Søren; Dahl Holmslykke, Hanne; Rasmussen, Kristine; Richardt, Niels; Engelund Holm, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Carbon dioxide emissions from thawing permafrost wetlands are an expected consequence of global warming. Addressing the pathways by which carbon is emitted, we investigated the hydrological and geochemical controls on the pore water chemistry of a permafrost wetland, with a shallow geological sequence comprising loam overlain by sphagnum peat, in Ilulissat, Greenland. A 400 m transect parallel to the general flow direction was established, along which water table measurements and slug tests were conducted, and the active layer thickness recorded (typically ~0.5 m). Also, in three detailed profiles along the transect, the vertical distributions of stable isotopes of water and major ion chemistry were investigated, by analysis of active layer pore water and water of melted core sections of permafrost. Concentrations of chloride (0.3-0.4 mM) did not show variation with depth, dismissing solute movement by ion freeze-out during fall freeze-up as a main control on the water chemistry. In addition, the observed vertical δ18O distribution did not to any extent conform to modelled Rayleigh distillation curves for the preferential inclusion of H218O into ice, which could be a scenario for fall freeze-up. The δ18O data therefore suggests either a rapid freeze-up or a simultaneous phase transition at all depths of the active layer, which in either case also would minimize potential ion freeze-out effects. Nevertheless, concentrations of major ions generally increased with depth. A conceptual model for water and solute transport was therefore established, according to which solutes are mobilized by weathering reactions in the loam and then transported upwards to the peat by diffusion. In the peat, lateral advective solute transport dominates. We applied the model to observed profiles of Ca, Mg, HCO3 and the partial CO2 pressure (PCO2). Concentrations of Ca, Mg and HCO3 increased with depth, reaching ~2 mM, ~2 mM and ~8 meq/L at the bottom of the active layer. Pore water at

  20. Organics Produced by Irradiation of Frozen and Liquid HCN Solutions: Implications for Chemical Evolution Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colín-García, M.; Negrón-Mendoza, A.; Ramos-Bernal, S.

    2009-04-01

    Hydrogen cyanide (HCN), an important precursor of organic compounds, is widely present in extraterrestrial environments. HCN is also readily synthesized in prebiotic simulation experiments. To gain insight into the radiation chemistry of one of the most important and highly versatile constituents of cometary ices, we examined the behavior of over-irradiated frozen and liquid HCN solutions under ionizing radiation. The samples were exposed to gamma radiation at a dose range from 0 up to 419 kGy. Ultraviolet spectroscopy and gas chromatography were used to follow the process. The analyses confirmed that gamma-ray irradiation of liquid HCN solutions generates several organic products. Many of them are essential to life; we verified the presence of carboxylic acids (some of them members of the Krebs cycle) as well as free amino acids and urea. These are the first studies to reveal the presence of these compounds in experiments performed at low temperatures and bulk irradiation. Organic material was produced even at low temperatures and low radiation doses. This work strongly supports the presumption that, as a parent molecule, HCN played a central essential role in the process of chemical evolution on early Earth, comets, and other extraterrestrial environments.

  1. Experimental calibration of Mg isotope fractionation between dolomite and aqueous solution and its geological implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Weiqiang; Beard, Brian L.; Li, Chengxiang; Xu, Huifang; Johnson, Clark M.

    2015-05-01

    Hydrothermal experiments at 220, 160, and 130 °C were performed to calibrate the Mg isotope fractionation factor between dolomite and aqueous Mg. Hydrothermal experiments included synthesis of dolomite using different starting materials, as well as exchange experiments that used poorly-ordered proto-dolomite. The morphology of synthesized dolomite was dependent on starting mineralogy, suggesting that dolomite was synthesized by different pathways. Hydrothermally synthesized dolomite was initially fine-grained disordered or poorly-ordered dolomite that, with time, recrystallized to coarser-grained ordered dolomite. Isotopic exchange was monitored using 87Sr/86Sr ratios and 25Mg tracers, and these indicated near-complete isotope exchange between dolomite and aqueous solutions at the end of most hydrothermal experiments. The Mg isotope fractionation factor between dolomite and aqueous solution obtained from synthesis and exchange experiments converged with time and was independent of dolomite morphology, suggesting attainment of isotopic equilibrium. Combining results from synthesis and exchange experiments, the temperature dependent Mg isotope fractionation factor for ordered dolomite is:

  2. Albumin microspheres for oral delivery of iron.

    PubMed

    Shivakumar, H N; Vaka, Siva Ram Kiran; Murthy, S Narasimha

    2010-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA) microspheres of ferric pyrophosphate (FPP) intended for passive targeting to the Peyer's patches has been proposed for oral iron supplementation. Microspheres prepared by emulsification chemical cross linking method were characterized for surface topography, entrapment efficiency, particle size, particle charge and in vitro drug release. Microspheres of batch C with FPP to BSA ratio of 1:5 were found to be most suitable for targeting as they exhibited high entrapment (83.88 +/- 4.31), high monodispersity (span = 1.24 +/- 0.01), and least particle size (d(vm) = 4.40 +/- 0.01). In addition the amount of iron retained in these microspheres despite exposure to simulated gastrointestinal conditions for 5 h was found to be 83.72 +/- 4.22%, the highest in the three batches. The in vivo serum iron profiles in normal rats following oral administration displayed a reduced T(max) (2 h), elevated C(max) (106.06 +/- 12.18 mug/dL) and increased AUC (0-16 h) (647.44 +/- 52.33 mug.h/dL) for these microspheres which significantly differed (P <0.05) from FPP solution indicating a higher iron repletion potential of the BSA microspheres. PMID:19635031

  3. Early albumin infusion to infants at risk for respiratory distress

    PubMed Central

    Bland, R. D.; Clarke, T. L.; Harden, L. B.; Mayer, Judith L.; Ries, J. P.; Madden, W. A.; Crast, F. W.; Coyer, W. F.; Bass, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    In a randomized prospective study, 100 high-risk infants (selected on the basis of a cord serum protein level of 4·6 g/100 ml or less, gestational age under 37 weeks, birthweight 2500 g or less, and/or arterial pH below 7·25) received 8 ml/kg of either 25% salt-poor albumin or 5% dextrose in water before the age of 2 hours. All infants were then managed supportively with warmth, appropriate oxygen supplementation, isotonic fluid infusion, and close monitoring, without further administration of colloid or hypertonic alkali solutions over the first 4 hours of life. No statistically significant difference was shown between early colloid and early dextrose-water administration for either the incidence of idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) or the mortality of high-risk infants, suggesting no apparent advantage of albumin over simple glucose-water infusion to hypoproteinaemic newborns shortly after birth. However, among the infants of 28 weeks' gestation or less admitted to the study, 3 of 4 albumin-treated patients survived, while 5 comparable infants in the dextrose-water group died within 12 hours of birth. For the 100 infants taken together there was a significant improvement in morbidity and mortality from previous experience in the same nursery, indicating that prompt supportive care, including early fluid administration, may be instrumental in reducing the incidence and severity of RDS. PMID:4749684

  4. Human serum albumin crystals and method of preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) crystals are provided in the form of tetragonal plates having the space groups P42(sub 1)2, the crystals being grown to sizes in excess of 0.5 mm in two dimensions and a thickness of 0.1 mm. Growth of the crystals is carried out by a hanging drop method wherein a precipitant solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a phosphate buffer is mixed with an HSA solution, and a droplet of mixed solution is suspended over a well of precipitant solution. Crystals grow to the desired size in 3 to 7 days. Concentration of reagents, pH and other parameters are controlled within prescribed limits. The resulting crystals exhibit a size and quality such as to allow performance of x ray diffraction studies and enable the conduct of drug binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies.

  5. Comparative Study of Laterite and Bentonite Based Organoclays: Implications of Hydrophobic Compounds Remediation from Aqueous Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Nafees, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Khan, Abdur Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well. PMID:24302867

  6. Comparative study of laterite and bentonite based organoclays: implications of hydrophobic compounds remediation from aqueous solutions.

    PubMed

    Nafees, Muhammad; Waseem, Amir; Khan, Abdur Rehman

    2013-01-01

    Four cost effective organoclays were synthesized, characterized, and studied for the sorption of hydrophobic compounds (edible oil/grease and hydrocarbon oil) from aqueous solutions. Organoclays were prepared by cation exchange reaction of lattice ions (present onto the surface of laterite and bentonite clay minerals) with two surfactants, hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (HDTMA-Cl) and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (TDTMA-Br). Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were used for the characterization of synthesized organoclays. It was found that the amount of surfactant loading and the nature of the surfactant molecules used in the syntheses of organoclay strongly affect the sorption capacity of the clay mineral. Further, it was found that both the laterite and bentonite based organoclays efficiently removed the edible and hydrocarbon oil content from lab prepared emulsions; however, the adsorption capacity of clay mineral was greatly influenced by the nature of hydrophobic compounds as well. PMID:24302867

  7. Hierarchical simulation of aquifer heterogeneity: implications of different simulation settings on solute-transport modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comunian, Alessandro; De Micheli, Leonardo; Lazzati, Claudio; Felletti, Fabrizio; Giacobbo, Francesca; Giudici, Mauro; Bersezio, Riccardo

    2016-03-01

    The fine-scale heterogeneity of porous media affects the large-scale transport of solutes and contaminants in groundwater and it can be reproduced by means of several geostatistical simulation tools. However, including the available geological information in these tools is often cumbersome. A hierarchical simulation procedure based on a binary tree is proposed and tested on two real-world blocks of alluvial sediments, of a few cubic meters volume, that represent small-scale aquifer analogs. The procedure is implemented using the sequential indicator simulation, but it is so general that it can be adapted to various geostatistical simulation tools, improving their capability to incorporate geological information, i.e., the sedimentological and architectural characterization of heterogeneity. When compared with a standard sequential indicator approach on bi-dimensional simulations, in terms of proportions and connectivity indicators, the proposed procedure yields reliable results, closer to the reference observations. Different ensembles of three-dimensional simulations based on different hierarchical sequences are used to perform numerical experiments of conservative solute transport and to obtain ensembles of equivalent pore velocity and dispersion coefficient at the scale length of the blocks (meter). Their statistics are used to estimate the impact of the variability of the transport properties of the simulated blocks on contaminant transport modeled on bigger domains (hectometer). This is investigated with a one-dimensional transport modeling based on the Kolmogorov-Dmitriev theory of branching stochastic processes. Applying the proposed approach with diverse binary trees and different simulation settings provides a great flexibility, which is revealed by the differences in the breakthrough curves.

  8. Surface tension in situ in flooded alveolus unaltered by albumin.

    PubMed

    Kharge, Angana Banerjee; Wu, You; Perlman, Carrie E

    2014-09-01

    In the acute respiratory distress syndrome, plasma proteins in alveolar edema liquid are thought to inactivate lung surfactant and raise surface tension, T. However, plasma protein-surfactant interaction has been assessed only in vitro, during unphysiologically large surface area compression (%ΔA). Here, we investigate whether plasma proteins raise T in situ in the isolated rat lung under physiologic conditions. We flood alveoli with liquid that omits/includes plasma proteins. We ventilate the lung between transpulmonary pressures of 5 and 15 cmH2O to apply a near-maximal physiologic %ΔA, comparable to that of severe mechanical ventilation, or between 1 and 30 cmH2O, to apply a supraphysiologic %ΔA. We pause ventilation for 20 min and determine T at the meniscus that is present at the flooded alveolar mouth. We determine alveolar air pressure at the trachea, alveolar liquid phase pressure by servo-nulling pressure measurement, and meniscus radius by confocal microscopy, and we calculate T according to the Laplace relation. Over 60 ventilation cycles, application of maximal physiologic %ΔA to alveoli flooded with 4.6% albumin solution does not alter T; supraphysiologic %ΔA raise T, transiently, by 51 ± 4%. In separate experiments, we find that addition of exogenous surfactant to the alveolar liquid can, with two cycles of maximal physiologic %ΔA, reduce T by 29 ± 11% despite the presence of albumin. We interpret that supraphysiologic %ΔA likely collapses the interfacial surfactant monolayer, allowing albumin to raise T. With maximal physiologic %ΔA, the monolayer likely remains intact such that albumin, blocked from the interface, cannot interfere with native or exogenous surfactant activity. PMID:24970853

  9. Solubility of HOBr in Acidic Solution and Implications for Liberation of Halogens Via Aerosol Processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iraci, Laura T.; Michelsen, R. R.; Rammer, T. A.; Ashbourn, S. F. M.

    2004-01-01

    Halogen species are known to catalytically destroy ozone in several regions of the atmosphere. In addition to direct catalytic losses, bromine compounds can indirectly enhance ozone loss through coupling to other radical families. Hypobromous acid (HOBr) is a key species in the linkage of BrOx to ClOx and HOx. The aqueous- phase coupling reaction HOBr + HCI (right arrow) BrCl + H2O may provide a pathway for chlorine activation on sulfate aerosols at temperatures warmer than those required for polar stratospheric cloud formation. We have measured t h e solubility of HOBr in 45 - 70 wt% sulfuric acid solutions. Over the temperature range 201 - 252 K, HOBr is quite soluble in sulfuric acid, H* = 10(exp 4) - 10(exp 7) mol dm(exp -3) atm(exp -1). The expected inverse dependence of H* on temperature was observed, but only a weak dependence on acidity was found. The solubility of HOBr is comparable to that of HBr, indicating that equilibrium concentrations of HOBr could equal or exceed those of HBr in upper tropospheric and lower stratospheric aerosols. Despite the high solubility of HOBr, aerosol volumes are not large enough to sequester a significant fraction of inorganic bromine from the gas phase. Our measurements of HOBr uptake in aqueous sulfuric acid in the presence of other brominated gases show the evolution of gaseous products including Br2O and Br2.

  10. Analytical Solutions for Radiative Transfer: Implications for Giant Planet Formation by Disk Instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boss, Alan P.

    2009-03-01

    The disk instability mechanism for giant planet formation is based on the formation of clumps in a marginally gravitationally unstable protoplanetary disk, which must lose thermal energy through a combination of convection and radiative cooling if they are to survive and contract to become giant protoplanets. While there is good observational support for forming at least some giant planets by disk instability, the mechanism has become theoretically contentious, with different three-dimensional radiative hydrodynamics codes often yielding different results. Rigorous code testing is required to make further progress. Here we present two new analytical solutions for radiative transfer in spherical coordinates, suitable for testing the code employed in all of the Boss disk instability calculations. The testing shows that the Boss code radiative transfer routines do an excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the radial temperature and radiative flux profiles for a spherical cloud with high or moderate optical depths, including the transition from optically thick to optically thin regions. These radial test results are independent of whether the Eddington approximation, diffusion approximation, or flux-limited diffusion approximation routines are employed. The Boss code does an equally excellent job of relaxing to and maintaining the analytical results for the vertical (θ) temperature and radiative flux profiles for a disk with a height proportional to the radial distance. These tests strongly support the disk instability mechanism for forming giant planets.

  11. Paclitaxel Albumin-stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation and a collection of links to more information about the use of this drug, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  12. Efficient solution of large-scale electromagnetic Eigenvalue problems using the implicity restarted Arnoldi method

    SciTech Connect

    White, D; Koning, J

    1999-10-21

    The authors are interested in determining the electromagnetic fields within closed perfectly conducting cavities that may contain dielectric or magnetic materials. The vector Helmholtz equation is the appropriate partial differential equation for this problem. It is well known that the electromagnetic fields in a cavity can be decomposed into distinct modes that oscillate in time at specific resonant frequencies. These modes are referred to as eigenmodes, and the frequencies of these modes are referred to as eigenfrequencies. The authors' present application is the analysis of linear accelerator components. These components may have a complex geometry; hence numerical methods are require to compute the eigenmodes and the eigenfrequencies of these components. The Implicitly Restarted Arnoldi Method (IRAM) is a robust and efficient method for the numerical solution of the generalized eigenproblem Ax = {lambda}Bx, where A and B are sparse matrices, x is an eigenvector, and {lambda} is an eigenvalue. The IRAM is an iterative method for computing extremal eigenvalues; it is an extension of the classic Lanczos method. The mathematical details of the IRAM are too sophisticated to describe here; instead they refer the reader to [1]. A FORTRAN subroutine library that implements various versions of the IRAM is freely available, both in a serial version named ARPACK and parallel version named PARPACK. In this paper they discretize the vector Helmholtz equation using 1st order H(curl) conforming edge elements (also known as Nedelec elements). This discretization results in a generalized eigenvalue problem which can be solved using the IRAM. The question of so-called spurious modes is discussed, and it is shown that applying a spectral transformation completely eliminates these modes, without any need for an additional constraint equation. Typically they use the IRAM to compute a small set (n < 30) of eigenvalues and eigenmodes for a very large systems (N > 100,000).

  13. Solution structure of eggcase silk protein and its implications for silk fiber formation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zhi; Huang, Weidong; Zhang, Jingfeng; Fan, Jing-Song; Yang, Daiwen

    2009-01-01

    Spider silks are renowned for their excellent mechanical properties and biomimetic and industrial potentials. They are formed from the natural refolding of water-soluble fibroins with α-helical and random coil structures in silk glands into insoluble fibers with mainly β-structures. The structures of the fibroins at atomic resolution and silk formation mechanism remain largely unknown. Here, we report the 3D structures of individual domains of a ≈366-kDa eggcase silk protein that consists of 20 identical type 1 repetitive domains, one type 2 repetitive domain, and conserved nonrepetitive N- and C-terminal domains. The structures of the individual domains in solution were determined by using NMR techniques. The domain interactions were investigated by NMR and dynamic light-scattering techniques. The formation of micelles and macroscopic fibers from the domains was examined by electron microscopy. We find that either of the terminal domains covalently linked with at least one repetitive domain spontaneously forms micelle-like structures and can be further transformed into fibers at ≥37 °C and a protein concentration of >0.1 wt%. Our biophysical and biochemical experiments indicate that the less hydrophilic terminal domains initiate the assembly of the proteins and form the outer layer of the micelles whereas the more hydrophilic repetitive domains are embedded inside to ensure the formation of the micelle-like structures that are the essential intermediates in silk formation. Our results establish the roles of individual silk protein domains in fiber formation and provide the basis for designing miniature fibroins for producing artificial silks. PMID:19458259

  14. Therapeutic effect of bovine albumin in the experimental fat embolism syndrome.

    PubMed

    Agnantis, N; Gyras, M; Tserkezoglou, A; Apostolikas, N; Papacharalampous, N

    1988-01-01

    The toxic effects of the free fatty acids (FFA) are responsible for the initiation and the clinical manifestations of the fat embolism syndrome (FES). Serum albumin binds to the FFA and by producing atoxic compounds it has a therapeutic effect on the syndrome. In this study we applied bovine albumin to 48 Sprague-Dawley rats which were previously submitted to intravenous infusions of FFA solutions (oleic, palmitic, stearic). The histopathologic lesions observed in their lungs were compared to those of 50 control animals suffering from the FES. The administration of 0.5% bovine albumin solution intravenously and 0.2% intraperitoneally, especially when it was synchronous to the FFA infusion and not metachronous, resulted in substantial and statistically significant therapeutic effects. PMID:3387690

  15. Gold nanoparticles with different amino acid surfaces: serum albumin adsorption, intracellular uptake and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Cai, Huanxin; Yao, Ping

    2014-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles with aspartate, glycine, leucine, lysine, and serine surfaces were produced from the mixed solutions of HAuCl4 and respective amino acids via UV irradiation. The amino acids bind to the nanoparticle surfaces via amine groups and their carboxylic groups extend out to stabilize the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles have diameters of 15-47 nm in pH 7.4 aqueous solution and have diameters of 62-73 nm after 48 h incubation in cell culture containing serum. The nanoparticles adsorb human and bovine serum albumins on their surfaces by specific interactions, characterized by the intrinsic fluorescence quenching of the albumins. The albumin adsorption effectively decreases the aggregation of the nanoparticles in cell culture and also decreases the intracellular uptake of the nanoparticles. The gold nanoparticles produced from leucine and lysine, which have amphiphilic groups on their surfaces, present better biocompatibility than the other gold nanoparticles. PMID:25466455

  16. Three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Munson, Sibyl H.; Twigg, Pamela D.; Gernert, Kim M.; Broom, M. Beth; Miller, Teresa Y.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been solved at 6.0 A resolution by the method of multiple isomorphous replacement. Crystals were grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol in the infrequently observed space group P42(1)2 and diffracted X-rays to lattice d-spacings of less than 2.9 A. The electron density maps are of high quality and revealed the structure as a predominantly alpha-helical globin protein in which the course of the polypeptide can be traced. The binding loci of several organic compounds have been determined.

  17. Experimental evidence on interaction between xenon and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wołoszyn, Łukasz; Ilczyszyn, Marek; Ilczyszyn, Maria M.

    Xenon gas interacts with bovine serum albumin (BSA) dissolved in a physiological buffer solution. The fluorescence quenching related to the Trp emission is reversible and depends linearly on the time of saturation by Xe. The most probable site of this interaction is Trp212. The common emission of all BSA fluorophores is also influenced by Xe but this quenching is more complex and suggests: (i) at least two sites occupied by Xe and related to the Tyr and Trp residues; (ii) structural variations of BSA induced by the Xe guest atoms.

  18. Interstitial albumin concentration measured during growth of perivascular cuffs in liquid-filled rabbit lung.

    PubMed

    Moe, Sonja M; Conhaim, Robert L; Lai-Fook, Stephen J

    2004-01-01

    The growth rate and albumin concentration of interstitial fluid cuffs were measured in isolated rabbit lungs inflated with albumin solution (3 g/dl) to constant airway (Paw) and vascular pressures for up to 10 h. Cuff size was measured from images of frozen lung sections, and cuff albumin concentration (Cc) was measured from the fluorescence of Evans blue labeled albumin that entered the cuffs from the alveolar space. At 5-cmH2O Paw, cuff size peaked at 1 h and then decreased by 75% in 2 h. The decreased cuff size was consistent with an osmotic absorption into the albumin solution that filled the vascular and alveolar spaces. At 15-cmH2O Paw, cuff size peaked at 0.25 h and then remained constant. Cc rose continuously at both pressures, but was greater at the higher pressure. The increasing Cc with a constant cuff size was modeled as diffusion through epithelial pores. Initial Cc-to-airway albumin concentration ratio was 0.1 at 5-cmH2O Paw and increased to 0.3 at 15 cmH2O, a behavior that indicated an increased permeability with lung inflation. Estimated epithelial reflection coefficient was 0.9 and 0.7, and equivalent epithelial pore radii were 4.5 and 6.1 nm at 5- and 15-cmH2O Paw, respectively. The initial cuff growth occurred against an albumin colloid osmotic pressure gradient because a high interstitial resistance reduced the overall epithelial-interstitial reflection coefficient to the low value of the interstitium. PMID:14660494

  19. Factors influencing the immune response. II. Effects of the physical state of the antigen and of lymphoreticular cell proliferation on the response to intraperitoneal injection of bovine serum albumin in rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Pinckard, R. N.; Weir, D. M.; McBride, W. H.

    1967-01-01

    The injection of Corynebacterium parvum at the same time as centrifuged bovine albumin has been shown not to have the adjuvant effect found when C. parvum is injected 6 days before. The implication of this is discussed and related to mechanisms of antibody synthesis. Whereas particulate alum-precipitated centrifuged bovine albumin was shown to be more effective than centrifuged bovine albumin in inducing primary antibody stimulation, the reverse was true for secondary stimulation by the intraperitoneal route. PMID:6035197

  20. Simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis of urinary albumin using dye-binding reaction.

    PubMed

    Ratanawimarnwong, Nuanlaor; Ponhong, Kraingkrai; Teshima, Norio; Nacapricha, Duangjai; Grudpan, Kate; Sakai, Tadao; Motomizu, Shoji

    2012-07-15

    A new four-channel simultaneous injection effective mixing flow analysis (SIEMA) system has been assembled for the determination of urinary albumin. The SIEMA system consisted of a syringe pump, two 5-way cross connectors, four holding coils, five 3-way solenoid valves, a 50-cm long mixing coil and a spectrophotometer. Tetrabromophenol blue anion (TBPB) in Triton X-100 micelle reacted with albumin at pH 3.2 to form a blue ion complex with a λ(max) 625nm. TBPB, Triton X-100, acetate buffer and albumin standard solutions were aspirated into four individual holding coils by a syringe pump and then the aspirated zones were simultaneously pushed in the reverse direction to the detector flow cell. Baseline drift, due to adsorption of TBPB-albumin complex on the wall of the hydrophobic PTFE tubing, was minimized by aspiration of Triton X-100 and acetate buffer solutions between samples. The calibration graph was linear in the range of 10-50μg/mL and the detection limit for albumin (3σ) was 0.53μg/mL. The RSD (n=11) at 30μg/mL was 1.35%. The sample throughput was 37/h. With a 10-fold dilution, interference from urine matrix was removed. The proposed method has advantages in terms of simple automation operation and short analysis time. PMID:22817927

  1. Antagonism of insulin action on muscle by the albumin-bound B chain of insulin

    PubMed Central

    Ensinck, J. W.; Mahler, R. J.; Vallance-Owen, J.

    1965-01-01

    1. The presence of a substance associated with human albumin that exerts anti-insulin activity on the isolated rat diaphragm has been confirmed. This factor has been removed from albumin, thereby providing a source of non-antagonistic carrier protein. 2. Derivatives of the polypeptide B chain of insulin obtained by chemical scission of the interchain disulphide bonds have been separated by conventional techniques. In the presence of non-antagonistic albumin, the reduced and sulpho-B chain preparations inhibited insulin action on muscle. 3. The B chain resulting from reductive cleavage of insulin by bovine-liver extracts, in association with human albumin, exhibited a comparable anti-insulin effect. 4. It is postulated that the B chain interacts with albumin to enable solubilization of the chain and that inhibition of insulin action on muscle may occur as a result of competition for cellular receptor sites by the B chain. 5. The implication of these findings in relation to a circulating insulin antagonist is discussed. PMID:14342222

  2. Adsorption of small biological molecules on silica from diluted aqueous solutions: Quantitative characterization and implications to the Bernal's hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiuk, Vladimir A.; Gromovoy, Taras Yu.; Khil'Chevskaya, Elena G.

    1995-08-01

    To describe quantitatively the adsorption of prebiotically important compounds of low molecular weight (amino acids, short linear peptides, cyclic dipeptides, the Krebs's cycle and other carboxylic acids, nucleosides and related phosphates) on silica surface from diluted neutral aqueous solutions, equilibrium constants (K) and free energies (-ΔG) of adsorption were determined from the retention values measured by means of high-performance liquid chromatography on a silica gel column and from the isotherms measured under static conditions. For most carboxylic acids (including amino acids and linear peptides) -ΔG values were negative and K<1, thus showing very weak adsorption. Cyclic dipeptides (2,5-piperazinediones) exhibited higher adsorbability; -ΔG>0 and K>1 were found for most of them. Influence of the structure of α-substituent on the adsorbability is analyzed. A linear dependence of -ΔG on the number of aliphatic carbon atoms in a sorbate molecule was found for the series of aliphatic bifunctional amino acids, related dipeptides and 2,5-piperazinediones, as well as for the row from glycine to triglycyl glycine. The adsorption of nucleosides and their phosphates is characterized by much higherK and -ΔG values (of the order of 102 and 104, respectively). The adsorption data available from our work and literature are summarized and discussed with implications to the Bernal's hypothesis on the roles of solid surfaces in the prebiotic formation of biopolymers from monomeric ‘building blocks’.

  3. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Capetanaki, Y G; Flytzanis, C N; Alonso, A

    1982-01-01

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin [32P]cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements. Images PMID:6180302

  4. A novel biosensor for bovine serum albumin based on fluorescent self-assembled sandwich bilayers.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiangying; Liu, Bin; He, Fei

    2009-01-01

    Fluorescent dyes butyl rhodamine B were assembled via a DL-cystenine intermediate onto quartz wafers whose surface had first adsorbed gold nanoparticles. Hence self-assembled sandwich bilayers with nanocomposite structure were constructed which can be used as a biosensor for bovine serum albumin. The biosensor-based self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) are regenerable and have high sensitivity, five orders of magnitude higher than that of bulk solution phase sensing. The effects of existing forms of dyes on the fluorescence spectra of bilayers in the presence of bovine serum albumin were investigated. PMID:18785615

  5. Induced Long-Range Attractive Potentials of Human Serum Albumin by Ligand Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Takaaki; Komatsu, Teruyuki; Nakagawa, Akito; Tsuchida, Eishun

    2007-05-18

    Small-angle x-ray scattering and dielectric spectroscopy investigation on the solutions of recombinant human serum albumin and its heme hybrid revealed that heme incorporation induces a specific long-range attractive potential between protein molecules. This is evidenced by the enhanced forward intensity upon heme binding, despite no hindrance to rotatory Brownian motion, unbiased colloid osmotic pressure, and discontiguous nearest-neighbor distance, confirming monodispersity of the proteins. The heme-induced potential may play a trigger role in recognition of the ligand-filled human serum albumins in the circulatory system.

  6. Preliminary crystallographic studies of four crystal forms of serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. C.; Chang, B.; Ho, J. X.; Keeling, K.; Krishnasami, Z.

    1994-01-01

    Several crystal forms of serum albumin suitable for three-dimensional structure determination have been grown. These forms include crystals of recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, baboon serum albumin, and canine serum albumin. The intrinsic limits of X-ray diffraction for these crystals are in the range 0.28-0.22 nm. Two of the crystal forms produced from human and canine albumin include incorporated long-chain fatty acids. Molecular replacement experiments have been successfully conducted on each crystal form using the previously determined atomic coordinates of human serum albumin illustrating the conserved tertiary structure.

  7. Preliminary crystallographic studies of four crystal forms of serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Carter, D C; Chang, B; Ho, J X; Keeling, K; Krishnasami, Z

    1994-12-15

    Several crystal forms of serum albumin suitable for three-dimensional structure determination have been grown. These forms include crystals of recombinant and wild-type human serum albumin, baboon serum albumin, and canine serum albumin. The intrinsic limits of X-ray diffraction for these crystals are in the range 0.28-0.22 nm. Two of the crystal forms produced from human and canine albumin include incorporated long-chain fatty acids. Molecular replacement experiments have been successfully conducted on each crystal form using the previously determined atomic coordinates of human serum albumin illustrating the conserved tertiary structure. PMID:7813459

  8. Polymerized soluble venom--human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.; Suszko, I.M.; Grammer, L.C.

    1985-03-01

    Extensive previous studies have demonstrated that attempts to produce polymers of Hymenoptera venoms for human immunotherapy resulted in insoluble precipitates that could be injected with safety but with very limited immunogenicity in allergic patients. We now report soluble polymers prepared by conjugating bee venom with human serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The bee venom-albumin polymer (BVAP) preparation was fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 to have a molecular weight range higher than catalase. /sup 125/I-labeled bee venom phospholipase A was almost completely incorporated into BVAP. Rabbit antibody responses to bee venom and bee venom phospholipase A were induced by BVAP. Human antisera against bee venom were absorbed by BVAP. No new antigenic determinants on BVAP were present as evidenced by absorption of antisera against BVAP by bee venom and albumin. BVAP has potential immunotherapeutic value in patients with anaphylactic sensitivity to bee venom.

  9. Bovine Serum Albumin binding to CoCrMo nanoparticles and the influence on dissolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simoes, T. A.; Brown, A. P.; Milne, S. J.; Brydson, R. M. D.

    2015-10-01

    CoCrMo alloys exhibit good mechanical properties, excellent biocompatibility and are widely utilised in orthopaedic joint replacements. Metal-on-metal hip implant degradation leads to the release of metal ions and nanoparticles, which persist through the implant's life and could be a possible cause of health complications. This study correlates preferential binding between proteins and metal alloy nanoparticles to the alloy's corrosion behaviour and the release of metal ions. TEM images show the formation of a protein corona in all particles immersed in albumin containing solutions. Only molybdenum release was significant in these tests, suggesting high dissolution of this element when CoCrMo alloy nanoparticles are produced as wear debris in the presence of serum albumin. The same trend was observed during extended exposure of molybdenum reference nanoparticles to albumin.

  10. Effect of different albumin concentrations in extracorporeal circuit prime on perioperative fluid status in young children.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kun; Liu, Yinglong; Hei, Feilong; Li, Jingwen; Long, Cun

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the effects of different dosages of albumin priming for extracorporeal circuit (ECC) on perioperative fluid status and fluid management in young children. A total of 151 consecutive pediatric patients (2-36 months old) scheduled for open heart surgery, were divided into two groups randomly, to receive either a 3% albumin solution (L group, n = 68) or a 5% albumin (H group, n = 83). Perioperative fluid intake, urine output, blood loss, diuretic dosage, the use of allogeneic blood products, ultrafiltration, and daily balance were recorded for 24 hrs in intensive care unit (ICU). Serial hematocrits, colloid osmotic pressure (COP) were measured. Outcomes and complications were documented. There were no significant differences in demographics, types of surgical procedures, baseline data such as hemoglobin, COP, and serum albumin. Patients in H group had significantly higher COPs, less urine output and more diuretic usage during operation and postoperatively (p < 0.05); at 6 hrs postoperatively, there were no differences between two groups. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in blood loss and the amount of allogenic blood products infused, length of mechanical ventilation, ICU or hospital stay, complications, or mortality. Higher concentration of albumin prime in ECC showed decreased positive fluid balances, but produced less urine output and required more diuretic usage postoperatively. Thus, no significant clinical benefit resulted from the increased dosage. PMID:18812733

  11. Adsorbed serum albumin is permissive to macrophage attachment to perfluorocarbon polymer surfaces in culture.

    PubMed

    Godek, M L; Michel, R; Chamberlain, L M; Castner, D G; Grainger, D W

    2009-02-01

    Monocyte/macrophage adhesion to biomaterials, correlated with foreign body response, occurs through protein-mediated surface interactions. Albumin-selective perfluorocarbon (FC) biomaterials are generally poorly cell-conducive because of insufficient receptor-mediated surface interactions, but macrophages bind to albumin-coated substrates and also preferentially to highly hydrophobic fluorinated surfaces. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMO) and IC-21, RAW 264.7, and J774A.1 monocyte/macrophage cells were cultured on FC surfaces. Protein deposition onto two distinct FC surfaces from complex and single-component solutions was tracked using fluorescence and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) methods. Cell adhesion and growth on protein pretreated substrates were compared by light microscopy. Flow cytometry and integrin-directed antibody receptor blocking were used to assess integrins critical for monocyte/macrophage adhesion in vitro. Albumin predominantly adsorbs onto both FC surfaces from 10% serum. In cultures preadsorbed with albumin or serum-dilutions, BMMO responded similar to IC-21 at early time points. Compared with Teflon AF, plasma-polymerized FC was less permissive to extended cell proliferation. The beta(2) integrins play major roles in macrophage adhesion to FC surfaces: antibody blocking significantly disrupted cell adhesion. Albumin-mediated cell adhesion mechanisms to FC surfaces could not be clarified. Primary BMMO and secondary IC-21 macrophages behave similarly on FC surfaces, regardless of preadsorbed protein biasing, with respect to adhesion, cell morphology, motility, and proliferation. PMID:18306309

  12. Adsorbed serum albumin is permissive to macrophage attachment to perfluorocarbon polymer surfaces in culture

    PubMed Central

    Godek, M.L.; Michel, R.; Chamberlain, L. M.; Castner, D. G.; Grainger, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Monocyte/macrophage adhesion to biomaterials, correlated with foreign body response, occurs through protein-mediated surface interactions. Albumin-selective perfluorocarbon (FC) biomaterials are generally poorly cell-conducive due to insufficient receptor-mediated surface interactions, but macrophages bind to albumin-coated substrates and also preferentially to highly hydrophobic fluorinated surfaces. Bone marrow macrophages (BMMO) and IC-21, RAW 264.7 and J774A.1 monocyte/macrophage cells were cultured on FC surfaces. Protein deposition onto two distinct FC surfaces from complex and single-component solutions was tracked using fluorescence and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) methods. Cell adhesion and growth on protein pre-treated substrates were compared by light microscopy. Flow cytometry and integrin-directed antibody receptor blocking assessed integrins critical for monocyte/macrophage adhesion in vitro. Albumin predominantly adsorbs onto both FC surfaces from 10% serum. In cultures pre-adsorbed with albumin or serum-dilutions, BMMO responded similar to IC-21 at early time points. Compared to Teflon® AF, plasma-polymerized FC was less permissive to extended cell proliferation. The β2 integrins play major roles in macrophage adhesion to FC surfaces: antibody blocking significantly disrupted cell adhesion. Albumin-mediated cell adhesion mechanisms to FC surfaces could not be clarified. Primary BMMO and secondary IC-21 macrophages behave similarly on FC surfaces, regardless of pre-adsorbed protein biasing, with respect to adhesion, cell morphology, motility and proliferation. PMID:18306309

  13. Electrostatic unfolding and interactions of albumin driven by pH changes: a molecular dynamics study.

    PubMed

    Baler, K; Martin, O A; Carignano, M A; Ameer, G A; Vila, J A; Szleifer, I

    2014-01-30

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  14. Electrostatic Unfolding and Interactions of Albumin Driven by pH Changes: A Molecular Dynamics Study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of protein aggregation is bound to translate into critical advances in several areas, including the treatment of misfolded protein disorders and the development of self-assembling biomaterials for novel commercial applications. Because of its ubiquity and clinical potential, albumin is one of the best-characterized models in protein aggregation research; but its properties in different conditions are not completely understood. Here, we carried out all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of albumin to understand how electrostatics can affect the conformation of a single albumin molecule just prior to self-assembly. We then analyzed the tertiary structure and solvent accessible surface area of albumin after electrostatically triggered partial denaturation. The data obtained from these single protein simulations allowed us to investigate the effect of electrostatic interactions between two proteins. The results of these simulations suggested that hydrophobic attractions and counterion binding may be strong enough to effectively overcome the electrostatic repulsions between the highly charged monomers. This work contributes to our general understanding of protein aggregation mechanisms, the importance of explicit consideration of free ions in protein solutions, provides critical new insights about the equilibrium conformation of albumin in its partially denatured state at low pH, and may spur significant progress in our efforts to develop biocompatible protein hydrogels driven by electrostatic partial denaturation. PMID:24393011

  15. Interaction of some cardiovascular drugs with bovine serum albumin at physiological conditions using glassy carbon electrode: A new approach.

    PubMed

    Afsharan, Hadi; Hasanzadeh, Mohammad; Shadjou, Nasrin; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2016-08-01

    In this report, for the first time, the non-modified glassy carbon electrode was used for detection of cardiovascular drug interaction with bovine serum albumin (BSA). These interactions were tested at physiological conditions (T=37°C and pH=7.4 phosphate buffer solution) in different incubation times (0-4h) by cyclic voltammetry (CV), differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV). The applications of DPV for quantitative investigation of some cardiovascular drug interaction with BSA (as a model of serum albumin proteins) were discussed. The herein described approach is expected to promote the exploitation of electrochemically-based methods for the study of drug-serum albumin protein interaction which is necessary in biochemical and biosensing studies. This report may open a new window to application of electrochemical sensors towards interactions of cardiovascular drugs with BSA and human serum albumin (HAS) in the near future. PMID:27157732

  16. Comparison of antioxidant properties of different therapeutic albumin preparations.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Jean-Luc; Duretz, Véronique; Devos, Véronique; Urbain, Rémi; Jorieux, Sylvie

    2016-07-01

    Albumin displays several important functions for homeostasis amongst which the maintenance of the plasma redox-state. The study aim was to compare the redox state of pharmaceutical human albumin preparations since it reflects the oxidation-reduction status of the surrounding environment. Using an array of analytical methods, four commercially available albumins were compared with respect to their structural characteristics (cobalt ion binding, glycation, spectrophotometric and fluorometric profiles) and their ability to scavenge hydroxyl, peroxyl or free radicals. The different albumins exhibited a similar structural profile as well as hydroxyl and peroxyl scavenging activities. By contrast, the albumin from LFB (Vialebex(®)) possessed a significantly higher capacity to transfer electrons to DPPH, as compared with other albumins that was correlated with the level of free cysteine-34. Commercially available albumins differed for some of their antioxidant properties. The albumin preparation possessing the highest level of free cysteine-34 exhibited the highest antioxidant potential. PMID:27156143

  17. Trajectories of Serum Albumin Predict Survival of Peritoneal Dialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Chiu, Ping-Fang; Tsai, Chun-Chieh; Wu, Chia-Lin; Yang, Tse-Yen; Liou, Hung-Hsiang; Chen, Hung-Lin; Kor, Chew-Teng; Chang, Chia-Chu; Chang, Horng-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although initial serum albumin level is highly associated with overall and cardiovascular mortality in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients, we consider that the dynamic change and trend of albumin after initiation of PD are also essential. We enrolled patients who received PD for more than 3 months from January 1999 to March 2014. We categorized these patients into 2 groups by the difference in serum albumin level (Δalbumin = difference between peak with initial albumin level = peak albumin level − initial albumin level) after PD. The patients with Δalbumin < 0.2 g/dL (median level) were considered as group A (n, number = 238) and those with Δalbumin ≥ 0.2 g/dL were considered as group B (n = 278). Further, we stratified these patients into quartiles: Q1 Δalbumin < −0.2 g/dL; Q2, −0.2 ≦∼ <0.2 g/dL; Q3, 0.2 ≦∼ <0.6 g/dL; and Q4, ≥0.6 g/dL. Regression analysis was performed to determine the correlation of initial albumin and Δalbumin. Group A patients presented with higher levels of serum albumin (3.71 ± 0.54 vs 3.04 ± 0.55 g/dL; P < 0.001) and hematocrit as well as better initial residual renal function. However, those in group A had lower serum albumin increment and downward-sloped trends after dialysis. In contrast, the albumin trend was upward sloped and the increment of albumin was remarkable in group B, despite the high prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and diabetes. Overtime, group A patients had poorer survival and experienced more frequent and longer hospitalizations. Group Q1 patients with least albumin increment had worst survival. Group Q4 patients with lowest initial albumin also had poor survival. Age, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, BMI, initial albumin, and Δalbumin could affect patient outcomes independently. Regression analysis showed a better outcome can be obtained if the initial albumin level is at least above 3.15 g/dL. (Initial albumin level

  18. Micropinocytic Ingestion of Glycosylated Albumin by Isolated Microvessels: Possible Role in Pathogenesis of Diabetic Microangiopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Stuart K.; Devenny, James J.; Bitensky, Mark W.

    1981-04-01

    Microvessels isolated from rat epididymal fat exhibit differential vesicular ingestion rates for unmodified and nonenzymatically glycosylated rat albumin. While unmodified rat albumin is excluded from ingestion by endothelial micropinocytic vesicles, glycosylated albumin is avidly taken up by endocytosis. Interaction of albumin and glycosylated albumin with endothelium was studied with a double-label fluorescence assay of micropinocytosis. When glycosylated albumin was present at a concentration of 6% with respect to total albumin (the level found in ``non diabetic'' serum), only glycosylated albumin was ingested. At higher concentrations of glycosylated albumin (those found in diabetic serum), both albumin and glycosylated albumin are ingested. Glycosylation of endothelial membrane components results in stimulated ingestion of glycosylated albumin, persistent exclusion of unmodified albumin, and unaltered micropinocytic ingestion of native ferritin. These results indicate that nonenzymatic glycosylation of serum albumin may result in rapid vesicle-mediated extravasation of albumin. Chronic microvascular leakage of glycosylated albumin could contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic microangiopathy.

  19. Lymphatic albumin clearance from psoriatic skin

    SciTech Connect

    Staberg, B.; Klemp, P.; Aasted, M.; Worm, A.M.; Lund, P.

    1983-12-01

    In nine patients with untreated psoriasis vulgaris, human serum albumin labelled with /sup 125/I or /sup 131/I was injected intradermally in symmetrically located involved and uninvolved skin. The activity of the depots was followed by external detection, and the arrival of labelled albumin in plasma was monitored. In involved psoriatic skin the local mean half-time (T1/2) for tracer disappearance was 20.8 +/- 8.2 (S.D.) hr and in clinically normal skin, 29.1 +/- 9.6 (S.D.) hr. The difference was significant (p less than 0.002). Accordingly, the tracer from involved skin reached higher plasma levels than the tracer from uninvolved skin. However, under slight lymphatic stasis the appearance rate of radiolabelled albumin in plasma from both tissues was minimal during 1 to 2 hours after the injection, indicating that a local direct transvascular drainage of plasma albumin from the interstitium of diseased and normal skin was negligible. We conclude that the previously demonstrated increased extravasation of plasma proteins in involved psoriatic skin is compensated by an increased lymphatic drainage of plasma proteins, and not by an increased local transvascular return.

  20. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Poór, Miklós; Lemli, Beáta; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3) and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I). In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions. PMID:26633504

  1. Design of Albumin-Coated Microbubbles Loaded With Polylactide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marianne; Yin, Qian; Cheng, Jianjun; O'Brien, William D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives A protocol was designed to produce albumin-coated microbubbles (MBs) loaded with functionalized polylactide (PLA) nanoparticles (NPs) for future drug delivery studies. Methods Microbubbles resulted from the sonication of 5% bovine serum albumin and 15% dextrose solution. Functionalized NPs were produced by mixing fluorescent PLA and PLA-polyethylene glycol-carboxylate conjugates. Nanoparticle-loaded MBs resulted from the covalent conjugation of functionalized NPs and MBs. Three NP/MB volume ratios (1/1, 1/10, and 1/100) and unloaded MBs were produced and compared. Statistical evaluations were based on quantitative analysis of 3 parameters at 4 time points (1, 4, 5, and 6 days post MB fabrication): MB diameter using a circle detection routine based on the Hough transform, MB number density using a hemocytometer, and NP-loading yield based on MB counts from fluorescence and light microscopic images. Loading capacity of the albumin-coated MBs was evaluated by fluorescence. Results Loaded MB sizes were stable over 6 days after production and were not significantly different from that of time-matched unloaded MBs. Number density evaluation showed that only 1/1 NP/MB volume ratio and unloaded MB number densities were stable over time, and that the 1/1 MB number density evaluated at each time point was not significantly different from that of unloaded MBs. The 1/10 and 1/100 NP/MB volume ratios had unstable number densities that were significantly different from that of unloaded MBs (P < .05). Fluorescence evaluation suggested that 1/1 MBs had a higher NP-loading yield than 1/10 and 1/100 MBs. Quantitative loading evaluation suggested that the 1/1 MBs had a loading capacity of 3700 NPs/MB. Conclusions A protocol was developed to load albumin MBs with functionalized PLA NPs for further drug delivery studies. The 1/1 NP/MB volume ratio appeared to be the most efficient to produce stable loaded MBs with a loading capacity of 3700 NPs/MB. PMID:26206822

  2. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5040 Albumin immunological test system. (a) Identification. An albumin immunological test system is a device that consists...

  3. Drug Delivery Vehicles Based on Albumin-Polymer Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yanyan; Stenzel, Martina

    2016-06-01

    Albumin has been a popular building block to create nanoparticles for drug delivery purposes. The performance of albumin as a drug carrier can be enhanced by combining protein with polymers, which allows the design of carriers to encompass a broader spectrum of drugs while features unique to synthetic polymers such as stimuli-responsiveness are introduced. Nanoparticles based on polymer-albumin hybrids can be divided into two classes: one that carries album as a bioactive surface coating and the other that uses albumin as biocompatible, although nonbioactive, building block. Nanoparticles with bioactive albumin surface coating can either be prepared by self-assembly of albumin-polymer conjugates or by postcoating of existing nanoparticles with albumin. Albumin has also been used as building block, either in its native or denatured form. Existing albumin nanoparticles are coated with polymers, which can influence the degradation of albumin or impact on the drug release. Finally, an alternative way of using albumin by denaturing the protein to generate a highly functional chain, which can be modified with polymer, has been presented. These albumin nanoparticles are designed to be extremely versatile so that they can deliver a wide variety of drugs, including traditional hydrophobic drugs, metal-based drugs and even therapeutic proteins and siRNA. PMID:26947019

  4. Zinc inhibits glycation induced structural, functional modifications in albumin and protects erythrocytes from glycated albumin toxicity.

    PubMed

    Tupe, Rashmi; Kulkarni, Amruta; Adeshara, Krishna; Sankhe, Neena; Shaikh, Shamim; Dalal, Sayli; Bhosale, Siddharth; Gaikwad, Sushama

    2015-08-01

    The present work aims to investigate the concentration and time dependant effect of zinc on the in vitro non enzymatic modifications of albumin by diabetic levels of glucose. Further, preventive and curative effect of zinc was studied by adding zinc before and after initiation of glycation respectively. Glycation of albumin was done at different concentrations of zinc (125, 250 and 500 μM) at different time intervals (21, 28 and 35 days) with appropriate controls. The antiglycation potential of zinc was assessed by estimating different markers of albumin glycation (fructosamines, carbonyls, bound sugar, AGEs), structural modifications (free amino, thiol group, β amyloid, native PAGE, ANS binding, fluorescence lifetime decay and CD analysis) and functional properties (antioxidant activity, hemolysis). Zinc at highest concentration (500 μM) significantly reduced modifications of albumin which was comparable to aminoguanidine and also protected secondary and tertiary structure of albumin after 28 days of incubation. Zinc exhibited significant protective effect on erythrocytes by inhibiting hemolysis. Thus the present study indicate preventive mode of albumin glycation inhibition by zinc. PMID:26027608

  5. Hydraulic conductivity, albumin reflection and diffusion coefficients of pig mediastinal pleura.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, S; Brown, L V; Ibbott, G S; Lai-Fook, S J

    1999-09-01

    Hydraulic conductivity (L), albumin reflection coefficient (sigma), and albumin diffusion coefficient (D) were measured across pig mediastinal pleura. The tissue (7 mm diameter) was bonded between two chambers. Flow (Q) of lactated Ringer solution between the chambers was measured in turn at driving pressures (DeltaP) of 2, 4, and 6 cm H(2)O. Value of L was proportional to the slope of the Q-DeltaP curve. Then Q was measured in turn at three albumin osmotic pressure differences (Deltapi equivalent to -1, -2, and -3 g/dl albumin concentration difference, DeltaC) with DeltaP constant at either 2, 3, 4, or 6 cm H(2)O. From Starling's equation, magnitude of sigma was the slope of the Q-Deltapi curve divided by the slope of the Q-DeltaP curve. We measured the diffusion of 0, 2, 5, and 10 g/dl albumin with tracer (125)I-albumin. Tracer mass (M) that diffused across the pleura was measured for 10 h using a well-type NaI(T1) detector. D was calculated from the slope of the M-time curve. Values of L averaged 2.0 x 10(-8) cm(3). s(-1). dyne(-1) (n = 23). Values of sigma were small (0.02-0.05) and sigma increased as flow increased 20-fold. D (n = 24) increased 3-fold from 2.7 x 10(-8) cm(2)/s as DeltaC increased from 0 to 10 g/dl. The small values of sigma indicated that mediastinal pleura provided little restriction to the passage of protein. PMID:10458927

  6. ATTIRE: Albumin To prevenT Infection in chronic liveR failurE: study protocol for a single-arm feasibility trial

    PubMed Central

    Muirhead, Nicola; Shabir, Zainib; PH De Maeyer, Roel; Maini, Alexander AN; W Gilroy, Derek; J O'Brien, Alastair

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Circulating prostaglandin E2 levels are elevated in acutely decompensated cirrhosis and have been shown to contribute to immune suppression. Albumin binds and inactivates this hormone. Human albumin solution could thus be repurposed as an immune restorative drug in these patients. This feasibility study aims to determine whether it is possible and safe to restore serum albumin to >30 g/L and maintain it at this level in patients admitted with acute decompensated cirrhosis using repeated 20% human albumin infusions according to daily serum albumin levels. Methods and analysis Albumin To prevenT Infection in chronic liveR failurE (ATTIRE) stage 1 is a multicentre, open label dose feasibility trial. Patients with acutely decompensated cirrhosis admitted to hospital with a serum albumin of <30 g/L are eligible, subject to exclusion criteria. Daily intravenous human albumin solution will be infused, according to serum albumin levels, for up to 14 days or discharge in all patients. The primary end point is daily serum albumin levels for the duration of the treatment period and the secondary end point is plasma-induced macrophage dysfunction. The trial will recruit 80 patients. Outcomes will be used to assist with study design for an 866 patient randomised controlled trial at more than 30 sites across the UK. Ethics and dissemination Research ethics approval was given by the London-Brent research ethics committee (ref: 15/LO/0104). The clinical trials authorisation was issued by the medicines and healthcare products regulatory agency (ref: 20363/0350/001-0001). Results Will be disseminated through peer reviewed journals and international conferences. Recruitment of the first participant occurred on 26/05/2015. Trial registration number The trial is registered with the European Medicines Agency (EudraCT 2014-002300-24) and has been adopted by the NIHR (ISRCTN 14174793). This manuscript refers to V.4.0 of the protocol; Pre-results. PMID:26810999

  7. Hydrophobic conjugated microporous polymers for sorption of human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunli; Du, Miaomiao; Feng, Shanshan; Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; He, Chi; Zhang, TianCheng; Wang, Qiaorui; Wei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigated the sorption of human serum albumin (HSA) from water by three kinds of conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) with surface hydrophobicity and intrinsic porosity. It was found that the three CMPs captured HSA with fast sorption kinetics and good working capacity. Equilibrium was obtained at 80 min for all the tests, and the maximum sorption quantity (qm) ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 mg/mg. With the increase in the particle external surface area of the CMPs, a greater extent of HSA sorption was achieved. Moreover, promoting the dispersion of CMPs in HSA aqueous solution was also beneficial to the extraction. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy verified the interactions between the CMPs and the Nsbnd H, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd N groups of HSA. This paper might provide fundamental guidance for the practical application of CMPs to proteins separation and recovery.

  8. A Dual Electrochemical Sensor Based on a Test-strip Assay for the Quantitative Determination of Albumin and Creatinine.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Tomoyuki; Kiba, Yuya; Mizutani, Fumio

    2015-01-01

    A dual-electrochemical sensor based on a test-strip assay with immunochemistry and enzyme reactions has been developed for the determination of albumin and creatinine. Each nitrocellulose membrane with an immobilization area of an anti-albumin antibody or three enzymes was prepared in the device with three working electrodes for measuring albumin, creatinine, and ascorbic acid, as well as an Ag/AgCl electrode used as a counter/pseudo-reference electrode. The reactions of three enzymes were initiated by flowing a solution containing creatinine to detect an oxidation current of hydrogen peroxide. A sandwich-type immunocomplex was formed by albumin and antibody labeled with glucose oxidase (GOx). Captured GOx catalyzed the reduction of Fe(CN)6(3-) to Fe(CN)6(4-), which was oxidized electrochemically to determine the captured albumin. The responses for creatinine and albumin increased with the concentrations in millimolar order and over the range 18.75 - 150 μg mL(-1), respectively. The present sensor would be a distinct demonstration for producing quantitative dual-assays for various biomolecules used for clinical diagnoses. PMID:26165278

  9. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  10. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Horse Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Horse Serum Albumin crystals grown during the USML-1 (STS-50) mission's Protein Crystal Growth Glovebox Experiment. These crystals were grown using a vapor diffusion technique at 22 degrees C. The crystals were allowed to grow for nine days while in orbit. Crystals of 1.0 mm in length were produced. The most abundant blood serum protein, regulates blood pressure and transports ions, metabolites, and therapeutic drugs. Principal Investigator was Edward Meehan.

  11. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  12. The role of albumin in nutritional support.

    PubMed

    Mobarhan, S

    1988-12-01

    Hypoalbuminemia is considered one of the hallmarks of protein-calorie malnutrition and chronic liver disease. Recently, serum albumin has also been proposed as a critical predictor of the response to nutritional support and tolerance to enteral feeding in critically ill patients. Albumin is essential for maintenance of plasma colloidal osmotic pressure, prevention of edema, and transport of certain drugs and nutrients. Experimental studies have shown that rapid plasma expansion and reduced plasma protein concentration and osmotic pressure induce a net secretion of sodium and water into the small intestinal lumen. However, the effects of chronic hypoalbuminemia per se on intestinal absorption, independent of malnutrition, have not been fully studied. It is documented that both chronic illness and malnutrition may profoundly affect intestinal anatomical structure and function, inducing some degree of malabsorption. In the last few years, some have advocated albumin infusion to improve clinical response to patients with hypoalbuminemia receiving parenteral nutritional support or to reduce intestinal intolerance and diarrhea in patients receiving enteral tube feeding. A review of the literature shows that both clinical and experimental data to support these suggestions are scarce and further investigations are needed. Hypoalbuminemia is one of many parameters of malnutrition, and it is unlikely that correction of a single parameter for a short time would lead to major clinical benefits. PMID:3147998

  13. Megalin/Cubulin-Lysosome-mediated Albumin Reabsorption Is Involved in the Tubular Cell Activation of NLRP3 Inflammasome and Tubulointerstitial Inflammation*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dan; Wen, Yi; Tang, Tao-Tao; Lv, Lin-Li; Tang, Ri-Ning; Liu, Hong; Ma, Kun-Ling; Crowley, Steve D.; Liu, Bi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Albuminuria contributes to the development and progression of chronic kidney disease by inducing tubulointerstitial inflammation (TI) and fibrosis. However, the exact mechanisms of TI in response to albuminuria are unresolved. We previously demonstrated that NLRP3 and inflammasomes mediate albumin-induced lesions in tubular cells. Here, we further investigated the role of endocytic receptors and lysosome rupture in NLRP3 inflammasome activation. A murine proteinuric nephropathy model was induced by albumin overload as described previously. The priming and activation signals for inflammasome complex formation were evoked simultaneously by albumin excess in tubular epithelial cells. The former signal was dependent on a albumin-triggered NF-κB pathway activation. This process is mediated by the endocytic receptor, megalin and cubilin. However, the silencing of megalin or cubilin inhibited the albumin-induced NLRP3 signal. Notably, subsequent lysosome rupture and the corresponding release of lysosomal hydrolases, especially cathepsin B, were observed in tubular epithelial cells exposed to albumin. Cathepsin B release and distribution are essential for NLRP3 signal activation, and inhibitors of cathepsin B suppressed the NLRP3 signal in tubular epithelial cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that megalin/cubilin and lysosome rupture are involved in albumin-triggered tubular injury and TI. This study provides novel insights into albuminuria-induced TI and implicates the active control of albuminuria as a critical strategy to halt the progression of chronic kidney disease. PMID:26025362

  14. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  15. Process monitor in thermal denaturation of albumin using dynamic speckle method based on wavelet entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinzhong; Chen, Qingdong; Zhen, Zhiqiang; Yan, Haitao; Liu, Huihui; Li, Liben

    2009-11-01

    The process of thermal denaturation of the albumin was investigated using dynamic speckle method based on wavelet entropy and analyzed by light scattering theory. In experiments, the dynamic speckle patterns sequences generated by albumin colloid during denaturing were acquired using a CCD camera. By analyzing the variations of wavelet entropy values of the THSPs (the time history of speckle patterns), the thermal denaturation process of albumin could be divided into two stages. At former heating process, the values of wavelet entropy were bigger; correspondingly, the protein particles were aggregated and flocculated quickly. Conversely, at latter heating process, the wavelet entropy values decreased drastically, which meant there was slow aggregation. According to those, the movement properties of the protein molecule ensemble were analyzed during thermal denaturation of the albumin. The results show that this method is effective to analyze the process of movement and aggregation of protein molecules quantitatively. The experiment proved that this method is an useful tool to investigate the particles motion in solution.

  16. Patterns of the adsorption of bovine serum albumin on carboxymethyl dextran and carboxymethyl cellulose films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paribok, I. V.; Solomyanskii, A. E.; Zhavnerko, G. K.

    2016-02-01

    Patterns of the adsorption of bovine serum albumin on carboxymethyl dextran and carboxymethyl cellulose films are studied by means of microcontact printing, atomic force microscopy, and quartz crystal microbalance. It is shown that both the charge of polysaccharide macromolecules and the technique for deposition of their films onto the surface (via adsorption from a solution or covalent cross-linking) are factors that determine the degree of nonspecific adsorption of the protein on such films.

  17. Changes in methylation pattern of albumin and alpha-fetoprotein genes in developing rat liver and neoplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Vedel, M; Gomez-Garcia, M; Sala, M; Sala-Trepat, J M

    1983-01-01

    To determine whether methylation changes in specific DNA sequences of the albumin and AFP genes are implicated in the modulation of transcriptional activity during rat liver development and neoplasia we have analysed the methylation pattern of C-C-G-G sequences within these genes in DNA isolated from fetal and adult hepatocytes, from adult kidney and from a clonal hepatoma cell line which produces AFP but no albumin. We have assayed for methylation of the internal cytosine of this sequence by using the restriction enzyme isoschizomers HpaII and MspI. 32P-labelled cloned cDNA probes were used to reveal the albumin and AFP gene containing fragments. Genomic subclones of the albumin gene were also utilized as molecular probes to measure quantitatively the level of methylation of 6 specific sites within the albumin gene in the different DNA samples. The results indicate that methylation changes at the sites analysed are not responsible for the changes in gene activity during rat liver development. Further they demonstrate that: 1) extensively methylated genes can be actively transcribed; 2) prominent changes in methylation of specific genes during normal development are not necessarily related to alterations in gene activity. Images PMID:6191280

  18. Stimulation of proximal tubular cell apoptosis by albumin-bound fatty acids mediated by peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma.

    PubMed

    Arici, Mustafa; Chana, Ravinder; Lewington, Andrew; Brown, Jez; Brunskill, Nigel John

    2003-01-01

    In nephrotic syndrome, large quantities of albumin enter the kidney tubule. This albumin carries with it a heavy load of fatty acids to which the proximal tubule cells are exposed at high concentration. It is postulated that exposure to fatty acids in this way is injurious to proximal tubule cells. This study has examined the ability of fatty acids to interact with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR) in primary cultures of human proximal tubule cells. Luciferase reporter assays in transiently transfected human proximal tubule cells were used to show that albumin bound fatty acids and other agonists activate PPARgamma in a dose-dependent manner. One of the consequences of this activation is apoptosis of the cells as determined by changes in cell morphology, evidence of PARP cleavage, and appearance of DNA laddering. Overexpression of PPARgamma in these cells also results in enhanced apoptosis. Both fatty acid-induced PPAR activation and apoptosis in these cells can be blocked by PPAR response element decoy oligonucleotides. Activation of PPARgamma by the specific agonist PGJ(2) is associated with inhibition of cell proliferation, whereas activation by albumin bound fatty acids is accompanied by increased proliferation. However, the net balance of apoptosis/proliferation favors deletion of cells. These results implicate albumin-bound fatty acids as important mediators of tubular injury in nephrosis and provide fresh impetus for pursuit of lipid-lowering strategies in proteinuric renal disease. PMID:12506134

  19. Superhydrophobic Effect on the Adsorption of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Leibner, Evan S.; Barnthip, Naris; Chen, Weinan; Baumrucker, Craig R.; Badding, John V.; Pishko, Michael; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical protocol greatly influences measurement of human-serum albumin (HSA) adsorption to commercial expanded polytetrafluororethylene (ePTFE) exhibiting superhydrophobic wetting properties. Degassing of buffer solutions and evacuation of ePTFE adsorbent to remove trapped air immediately prior to contact with protein solutions are shown to be essential. Results obtained with ePTFE as a prototypical superhydrophobic test material suggest that vacuum degassing should be applied in the measurement of protein adsorption to any surface exhibiting superhydrophobicity. Solution depletion quantified using radiometry (I-125 labeled HSA) or electrophoresis yield different measures of adsorption, with nearly four-fold higher surface concentrations of unlabeled HSA measured by the electrophoresis method. This outcome is attributed to the influence of the radiolabel on HSA hydrophilicity which decreases radiolabeled-HSA affinity for a hydrophobic adsorbent in comparison to unlabeled HSA. These results indicate that radiometry underestimates the actual amount of protein adsorbed to a particular material. Removal of radiolabeled HSA adsorbed to ePTFE by 3X serial buffer rinses also shows that the remaining “bound fraction” was about 35% lower than the amount measured by radiometric depletion. This observation implies that measurement of protein bound after surface rinsing significantly underestimates the actual amount of protein concentrated by adsorption into the surface region of a protein-contacting material. PMID:19135420

  20. Controlled delivery of bovine serum albumin from carboxymethyl xanthan microparticles.

    PubMed

    Maiti, Sabyasachi; Ray, Somasree; Sa, Biswanath

    2009-01-01

    Bovine serum albumin (BSA)-loaded carboxymethyl xanthan (CMX) microparticles were prepared following gelation of sodium carboxymethyl xanthan (SCMX) gum with different concentrations (1-5%) of aluminium chloride (AlCl3). The microparticles prepared using 1% AlCl3 were subsequently coated with 0.5% aqueous solution of either SCMX gum or sodium alginate. Both uncoated and coated microparticles were characterized for entrapment efficiency, surface morphology, particle size, in vitro release and protein stability. The uncoated microparticles became non-spherical and the mean diameter was found to increase with increasing AlCl3 concentration. Higher concentration of AlCl3 decreased BSA entrapment efficiency of the uncoated microparticles from 86-61%. Furthermore, BSA entrapment in coated microparticles was found lower (78-79%) than uncoated microparticles prepared using 1% AlCl3. Although, the uncoated microparticles released almost half of its content in NaCl-HCl buffer solution (pH 1.2) in 2 h, the alginate and xanthan coated microparticles did not liberate a substantial amount of entrapped protein within the same period and prolonged the release in PBS solution (pH 7.4) up to 10 and 12 h, respectively. The microparticles released the protein via diffusion and swelling of the polymer matrix. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis showed that BSA integrity was well retained in the CMX microparticles. PMID:19562833

  1. Cu(II) Bis(thiosemicarbazone) Radiopharmaceutical Binding to Serum Albumin: Further Definition of Species-Dependence and Associated Substituent Effects

    PubMed Central

    Basken, Nathan E.; Green, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Cu-PTSM (pyruvaldehyde bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) and Cu-ATSM (diacetyl bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceuticals exhibit strong, species-dependent binding to the IIA site of human serum albumin (HSA), while the related Cu-ETS (ethylglyoxal bis(thiosemicarbazonato)copper(II)) radiopharmaceutical appears to only exhibit non-specific binding to human and animal serum albumins. Methods To further probe the structural basis for the species-dependence of this albumin binding interaction, protein binding of these three radiopharmaceuticals was examined in solutions of albumin and/or serum from a broader array of mammalian species (rat, sheep, donkey, rabbit, cow, pig, dog, baboon, mouse, cat, elephant). We also evaluated the albumin binding of several copper(II) bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelates offering more diverse substitution of the ligand backbone. Results Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM exhibit a strong interaction with HSA that is not apparent with the albumins of other species, while the binding of Cu-ETS to albumin is much less species-dependent. The strong interaction of Cu-PTSM with HSA does not appear to simply correlate with variation, relative to the animal albumins, of a single amino acid lining HSA's IIA site. Those agents that selectively interact with HSA share the common feature of only methyl or hydrogen substitution at the carbon atoms of the diimine fragment of the ligand backbone. Conclusions The interspecies variations in albumin binding of Cu-PTSM and Cu-ATSM are not simply explained by unique amino acid substitutions in the IIA binding pocket of the serum albumins. However, the specific affinity for this region of HSA is disrupted when substituents bulkier than a methyl group appear on the imine carbons of the copper bis(thiosemicarbazone) chelate. PMID:19520290

  2. Surface receptors for serum albumin in group C and G streptococci show three different types of albumin specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Wideback, K; Kronvall, G

    1982-01-01

    A total of 100 bacterial strains were tested for binding uptake of radiolabeled albumin preparations from 15 mammalian species. Three types of surface structures with specific binding sites for albumin were defined. A previously described receptor for albumin was separated into type a in Streptococcus equisimilis strains and in human group G streptococcal strains and type b in bovine group C streptococci. A new type of albumin receptor, type c, was found in Streptococcus dysgalactiae strains, the only receptor type so far with high affinity for bovine serum albumin. Type of albumin receptor correlated with bacterial species. The three receptor types showed high binding capacities; 2 X 10(8) bacterial organisms bound from 5 to 16 micrograms of albumin. All types of albumin receptors were stable to heat treatment at 80 degrees C for 5 min, but susceptible to both pepsin and trypsin treatment. Bacteria-bound albumin preparations were eluted at various concentrations of KSCN, reflecting differences in affinity. Up to 500 micrograms of human fibrinogen or polyclonal human immunoglobulin G had no inhibitory effect on the uptake of albumin, indicating a separate molecular localization of receptors for these proteins. PMID:6295942

  3. Use of 125I- and 51Cr-Labeled Albumin for the Measurement of Gastrointestinal and Total Albumin Catabolism*

    PubMed Central

    Kerr, Robert M.; Bois, John J. Du; Holt, Peter R.

    1967-01-01

    A method for the simultaneous measurement of gastrointestinal protein loss and total albumin turnover entailing the use of a combination of 125iodine- and 51chromium-labeled albumin is described. Albumin turnover was calculated by the measurement of albumin-125I plasma decay and cumulative urinary excretion, and the results obtained agreed closely with previous studies utilizing albumin-131I. Gastrointestinal catabolism was calculated from the rate of fecal excretion of 51Cr and the specific activity of plasma albumin-51Cr, and these data were related to the calculated albumin turnover results. During the period of 6-14 days after administration, the ratio of specific activties of albumin-125I and -51Cr in plasma and in extravascular spaces or gastric and biliary secretions remained almost identical. Fecal excretion of 51Cr was also quite stable at this time. In six normal subjects gastrointestinal catabolism accounted for less than 10% of total albumin catabolism. Excessive gastrointestinal protein losses did not contribute to the low serum albumin in three patients with cirrhosis or in two adults with the nephrotic syndrome. Multiple mechanisms leading to hypoalbuminemia were demonstrated in other subjects with a variety of gastrointestinal disorders. Images PMID:5630419

  4. Mechanisms of albumin uptake by proximal tubular cells.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, N

    2001-01-01

    The likely role of albumin in the induction tubulo-interstitial injury in proteinuria has stimulated considerable interest in the entry of albumin into the proximal tubule and its subsequent uptake by proximal tubular cells. Currently, there is considerable controversy over the degree of glomerular permeability to albumin. After filtration, however, albumin binds to megalin and cubulin, two giant receptors in the apical membrane of proximal tubular cells. Albumin is subsequently re-absorbed by proximal tubular cells by receptor-mediated endocytosis, a process subject to complex regulation. The interaction of albumin with proximal tubule cells also leads to the generation of intracellular signals. The understanding of these pathways may provide important insights into the pathogenesis of renal scarring in proteinuria. PMID:11158855

  5. Investigation of Cu(II) Binding to Bovine Serum Albumin by Potentiometry with an Ion Selective Electrode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jie Liu

    2004-01-01

    A laboratory project that investigates Cu(II) bind to bovine serum albumin (BSA) in an aqueous solution is developed to assist undergraduate students in gaining better understanding of the interaction of ligands with biological macromolecule. Thus, students are introduced to investigation of Cu(II) binding to BSA by potentiometry with the Cu(II)…

  6. Influence of saline infusion on blood-tissue albumin transport.

    PubMed

    Renkin, E M; Rew, K; Wong, M; O'Loughlin, D; Sibley, L

    1989-08-01

    Anesthetized rats were infused with lactated Ringer solution (LR) at constant rate for 30 or 60 min; delivered volume loads ranged from 0.03 to 0.08 ml/g body wt. Controls were given only a sustaining infusion of saline at 0.002 ml.g-1.h-1. Only 7-14% of the LR remained in the plasma at the end of the infusion; 76-88% entered the interstitial compartment, and 7-17% was excreted. The amount of plasma protein lost from the circulation with the extravasated fluid was studied simultaneously by two methods: 1) material balance in the whole animal and 2) changes in 131I-labeled albumin uptake (VA) and water content (VW) in individual tissues. The extravasation of 0.03-0.06 ml fluid/g body wt (75-160% initial plasma volume) did not significantly increase plasma protein extravasation in the whole rat. Nearly all of the sampled tissues of LR-infused rats had higher VW than controls. Tissue VA tended to increase with VW, but the regression slopes (delta VA/delta VW), a measure of the tracer albumin concentration of capillary filtrate relative to plasma, were low; skin, 0.006; paw, 0.018; skeletal muscles, 0.007; heart, 0.057; jejunum, 0.095; ileum, 0.045; cecum, 0.026; and colon, 0.027. These ratios are consistent with the very small loss of total plasma protein observed and attest to high solvent-drag reflection coefficients (sigma approximately equal to 1 - delta VA/delta VW): greater than 0.98 in capillaries of skeletal muscles, skin, and paw and 0.91-0.97 in heart and intestine. PMID:2764135

  7. Pressure solution inhibition in a limestone-chert composite multilayer: Implications for the seismic cycle and fluid flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petracchini, Lorenzo; Antonellini, Marco; Billi, Andrea; Scrocca, Davide; Trippetta, Fabio; Mollo, Silvio

    2015-04-01

    Pressure solution seams (PSSs) are frequent features in carbonate rocks undergoing tectonic shortening. In particular, pervasive, anticline-axis-parallel, bed-normal PSSs are known to develop during layer-parallel-shortening of (marly) carbonate rocks in fold-thrust belts. These pressure solution features can impact subsequent fracture development, fluid circulation, and strain localization including the seismic cycle. It is here demonstrated that the occurrence of frequent and continuous chert layers may strengthen a limestone sequence and inhibit pressure solution under layer-parallel-shortening. Field observations and laboratory determinations are reported from marly limestone with continuous chert layers of the Scaglia Fm. (Cingoli anticline, northern Apennines, Italy) exhumed from a depth of c. 1 km. In these outcrops, bed-normal solution seams do not occur or they occur only where infrequent chert layers have been shortened by small thrusts. In analogy with laminae-reinforced composite materials, a model is developed explaining the field observations with the strengthening effect of chert in the chert-limestone composite multilayer. During layer-parallel-shortening, the composite multilayer deforms under equal strain boundary conditions. In this situation, the tectonic load is mostly supported by the stiff and frequent chert layers and the strain of the whole chert-limestone composite remains in the elastic field, so that pressure solution seam development is prevented in the limestone beds. Our model may be applied down to a depth of a few kilometers in the upper crust that is relevant for the seismic cycle and fluid flow.

  8. Photoinduced conformational changes to porphyrin-bound albumin reduces albumin binding to Osteonectin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Low intensity laser irradiation of photoactive ligands bound non-covalently to proteins can generate a structural change in the proteins, which is detectable spectroscopically. This light induced protein modification could help to study the structure/function relationship in proteins or to prompt non-native protein properties. That is, only if we can determine if and how protein function is effected. Much work has shown small light-induced secondary and tertiary structural changes to albumin have occurred when the protein is bound to a porphyrin such as protoporphyrin IX or meso-tetra(4- sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (TSPP) and irradiated. This Affinity-Depletion study aims to explore the conformational change of TSPP-bound albumin after visible-light irradiation by testing its ability to bind the biologically relevant albumin receptor, osteonectin. Osteonectin has been covalently attached to magnetic beads, forming an affinity column, but after ten trials (of varied protocol) no substantial albumin-to-osteonectin binding could be achieved.

  9. Thermodynamics of Highly Supersaturated Aqueous Solutions of Poorly Water-Soluble Drugs-Impact of a Second Drug on the Solution Phase Behavior and Implications for Combination Products.

    PubMed

    Trasi, Niraj S; Taylor, Lynne S

    2015-08-01

    There is increasing interest in formulating combination products that contain two or more drugs. Furthermore, it is also common for different drug products to be taken simultaneously. This raises the possibility of interactions between different drugs that may impact formulation performance. For poorly water-soluble compounds, the supersaturation behavior may be a critical factor in determining the extent of oral absorption. The goal of the current study was to evaluate the maximum achievable supersaturation for several poorly water-soluble compounds alone, and in combination. Model compounds included ritonavir, lopinavir, paclitaxel, felodipine, and diclofenac. The "amorphous solubility" for the pure drugs was determined using different techniques and the change in this solubility was then measured in the presence of differing amounts of a second drug. The results showed that "amorphous solubility" of each component in aqueous solution is substantially decreased by the second component, as long as the two drugs are miscible in the amorphous state. A simple thermodynamic model could be used to predict the changes in solubility as a function of composition. This information is of great value when developing co-amorphous or other supersaturating formulations and should contribute to a broader understanding of drug-drug physicochemical interactions in in vitro assays as well as in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26059413

  10. Implications of long-term land-use change for the hydrology and solute budgets of small catchments in Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germer, Sonja; Neill, Christopher; Vetter, Tobias; Chaves, Joaquín; Krusche, Alex V.; Elsenbeer, Helmut

    2009-01-01

    SummaryThe replacement of undisturbed tropical forest with cattle pasture has the potential to greatly modify the hydrology of small watersheds and the fluxes of solutes. We examined the fluxes of water, Cl -, NO3--N, SO42--S, NH4+-N, Na +, K +, Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ in different flow paths in ˜1 ha catchments of undisturbed open tropical rainforest and a 20 year-old pasture established from forest in the southwestern Brazilian Amazon state of Rondônia. Storm flow discharge was 18% of incident rainfall in pasture, but only 1% in forest. Quickflow predominated over baseflow in both catchments and in both wet and dry seasons. In the pasture, groundwater and quickflow were important flow paths for the export of all solutes. In the forest, quickflow was important for NO3--N export, but all other solutes were exported primarily by groundwater outflow. Both catchments were sinks for SO42--S and Ca 2+, and sources of Na +. The pasture catchment also lost K + and Mg 2+ because of higher overland flow frequency and volume and to cattle excrement. These results show that forest clearing dramatically influences small watershed hydrology by increasing quickflow and water export to streams. They also indicate that tropical forest watersheds are highly conservative for most solutes but that pastures continue to lose important cations even decades after deforestation and pasture establishment.

  11. Implications of Stream Gains and Losses for Hydrologic Turnover and Solute Retention/Transport at the Stream Network Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Covino, T. P.; McGlynn, B. L.; Mallard, J.

    2010-12-01

    The exchange of water between streams and groundwater can influence streamwater quality, hydrologic mass balances, and attenuate solute export from watersheds. We used conservative tracer injections (chloride, Cl-) across 10 stream reaches to investigate streamwater gains and losses at larger spatial and temporal scales than typically associated with hyporheic exchanges. We found strong relationships between reach discharge, median tracer velocity, and gross hydrologic loss across a broad range of stream types and sizes in the 11.7 km2 Bull Trout Watershed of central ID. We used these empirical relationships to constrain a network model that simulates streamwater gains and losses and subsequent fractional hydrologic turnover across the stream network. We found that variable gains and losses can influence solute signatures across stream networks and lead to increasing dissolved solute concentration inertia moving downstream. These results also elucidate the proportional influence and distance support to stream discharge and solute signatures from runoff generation locations across the stream network and can provide insight into the internal mechanisms that partially control the hydrologic and biogeochemical signals observed at watershed outlets.

  12. The Future Labor Force and Workplace and the Scientific and Engineering Workforce: Implications for Society and Business and Potential Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lightle, Juliana

    This report examines the future shortages of scientists and engineers and suggests potential solutions to the shortage. The first section presents general demographic data and trends and interprets what this information suggests for the future economy and business in general. The second section considers the supply of physical scientists and…

  13. Interactions of aptamers with sera albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Célia Martins; Silva, Dilson; Silva, Camila M. C.; Missailidis, Sotiris

    2012-09-01

    The interactions of two short aptamers to human and bovine serum albumins were studied by fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. Intrinsic fluorescence of BSA and HSA were measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan residues. Gradual quenching was observed by titration of both proteins with aptamers. Aptamers are oligonucleic acid or peptide molecules that bind a specific target and can be used for both biotechnological and clinical purposes, since they present molecular recognition properties like that commonly found in antibodies. Two aptamers previously selected against the MUC1 tumour marker were used in this study, one selected for the protein core and one for the glycosylated MUC1. Stern-Volmer graphs were plotted and quenching constants were estimated. Plots obtained from experiments carried out at 25 °C and 37 °C showed the quenching of fluorescence of by aptamers to be a collisional phenomenon. Stern-Volmer constants estimated for HSA quenched by aptamer A were 1.68 × 105 (±5 × 103) M-1 at 37 °C, and 1.37 × 105 (±103) M-1 at 25 °C; and quenched by aptamer B were 1.67 × 105 (±5 × 103) M-1 at 37 °C, and 1.32 × 105 (±103) M-1 at 25 °C. Results suggest that the primary binding site for aptamers on albumin is close to tryptophan residues in sub domain IIA.

  14. Optimization of bovine serum albumin sorption and recovery by hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gündüz, Ufuk; Tolga, Asli

    2004-07-25

    Aqueous two-phase systems are composed of aqueous solutions of either two water-soluble polymers, usually polyethylene glycol (PEG) and dextran (Dx), or a polymer and a salt, usually PEG and phosphate or sulfate. Partitioning of proteins in such systems provides a powerful method for separating and purifying mixtures of biomolecules by extraction. If one of the phase forming polymers is a crosslinked gel, then the solution-controlled gel sorption may be considered as a modification of aqueous two-phase extraction. Since PEG/dextran systems are widely used in aqueous two-phase extraction and dextran gels (Sephadex) are common chromatographic media, we choose a PEG/dextran gel system as a model system in this study. The partitioning behavior of pure bovine serum albumin (BSA) in PEG/dextran gel systems is investigated to see the effects of variations in PEG and NaCl concentrations on the partition coefficient K. By making use of the Box-Wilson experimental design, K is shown to be maximized at 9.8 (%, w/w) PEG and 0.2 M NaCl concentrations, respectively, as 182. PMID:15177154

  15. Binding and hydrolysis of soman by human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Nachon, Florian; Froment, Marie-Thérèse; Verdier, Laurent; Debouzy, Jean-Claude; Brasme, Bernardo; Gillon, Emilie; Schopfer, Lawrence M; Lockridge, Oksana; Masson, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    Human plasma and fatty acid free human albumin were incubated with soman at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C. Four methods were used to monitor the reaction of albumin with soman: progressive inhibition of the aryl acylamidase activity of albumin, the release of fluoride ion from soman, 31P NMR, and mass spectrometry. Inhibition (phosphonylation) was slow with a bimolecular rate constant of 15 +/- 3 M(-1) min (-1). MALDI-TOF and tandem mass spectrometry of the soman-albumin adduct showed that albumin was phosphonylated on tyrosine 411. No secondary dealkylation of the adduct (aging) occurred. Covalent docking simulations and 31P NMR experiments showed that albumin has no enantiomeric preference for the four stereoisomers of soman. Spontaneous reactivation at pH 8.0 and 25 degrees C, measured as regaining of aryl acylamidase activity and decrease of covalent adduct (pinacolyl methylphosphonylated albumin) by NMR, occurred at a rate of 0.0044 h (-1), indicating that the adduct is quite stable ( t1/2 = 6.5 days). At pH 7.4 and 22 degrees C, the covalent soman-albumin adduct, measured by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, was more stable ( t1/2 = 20 days). Though the concentration of albumin in plasma is very high (about 0.6 mM), its reactivity with soman (phosphonylation and phosphotriesterase activity) is too slow to play a major role in detoxification of the highly toxic organophosphorus compound soman. Increasing the bimolecular rate constant of albumin for organophosphates is a protein engineering challenge that could lead to a new class of bioscavengers to be used against poisoning by nerve agents. Soman-albumin adducts detected by mass spectrometry could be useful for the diagnosis of soman exposure. PMID:18163544

  16. Allosteric Ligand Binding and Anisotropic Energy Flow in Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, Brian

    2014-03-01

    Protein allostery usually involves propagation of local structural changes through the protein to a remote site. Coupling of structural changes at remote sites is thought to occur through anisotropic energy transport, but the nature of this process is poorly understood. We have studied the relationship between allosteric interactions of remote ligand binding sites of the protein and energy flow through the structure of bovine serum albumin (BSA). We applied ultrafast infrared spectroscopy to probe the flow of energy through the protein backbone following excitation of a heater dye, a metalloporphyrin or malachite green, bound to different binding sites in the protein. We observe ballistic flow through the protein structure following input of thermal energy into the flexible ligand binding sites. We also observe anisotropic heat flow through the structure, without local heating of the rigid helix bundles that connect these sites. We will discuss the implications of this efficient energy transport mechanism with regard to the allosteric propagation of binding energy through the connecting helix structures.

  17. Influence of albumin and inorganic ions on electrochemical corrosion behavior of plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium for surgical implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Lin, Xiao; Tan, LiLi; Li, Lugee; Li, WeiRong; Yang, Ke

    2013-10-01

    Magnesium and its alloys are of great interest for biodegradable metallic devices. However, the degradation behavior and mechanisms of magnesium treated with coating in physiological environment in the presence of organic compound such as albumin have not been elucidated. In this study, the plasma electrolytic oxidation coated magnesium immersed in four different simulated body fluids: NaCl, PBS and with the addition of albumin to investigate the influence of protein and inorganic ions on degradation behavior by electrochemical methods. The results of electrochemical tests showed that aggressive corrosion took place in 0.9 wt.% NaCl solution; whereas albumin can act as an inhibitor, its adsorption impeded further dissolution of the coating. The mechanism was attributed to the synergistic effect of protein adsorption and precipitation of insoluble salts.

  18. The effects of Hespan on serum and lymphatic albumin, globulin, and coagulant protein.

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, C E; Denis, R; Ledgerwood, A M; Grabow, D

    1988-01-01

    The effects of hydroxyethyl starch (Hespan) resuscitation on serum and lymphatic proteins following hemorrhagic shock were studied in 34 splenectomized dogs. Following shock, five randomly assigned treatment groups received the shed blood plus 50 mL/kg of salt solution (RL) or RL with varying concentrations (0.22-1.5 gm/kg) of Hespan. Each dog received 50 ml/kg/d of the test solution for three days after shock. Prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, thrombin time, total serum protein, albumin, globulin, and coagulant protein activity of fibrinogen, prothrombin, and factor VIII were measured before shock, at the end of shock, following resuscitation, and on day 3; thoracic duct lymph values were obtained on day 3. Hespan-supplemented resuscitation lowered all serum proteins including albumin, globulin and coagulant proteins; concomitantly, the lymph protein rose after Hespan resuscitation. This decrease in serum proteins and rise in lymph proteins parallels similar results after albumin resuscitation in man and animals and suggests that Hespan induces an oncotically controlled extravascular protein relocation. Further studies on the significance of these findings need to be conducted. PMID:2451485

  19. The role of colloid particles in the albumin-lanthanides interaction: The study of aggregation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Tikhonova, Tatiana N; Shirshin, Evgeny A; Romanchuk, Anna Yu; Fadeev, Victor V

    2016-10-01

    We studied the interaction between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and lanthanide ions in aqueous solution in the 4.0÷9.5pH range. A strong increase of the solution turbidity was observed at pH values exceeding 6, which corresponds to the formation of Ln(OH)3 nanoparticles, while no changes were observed near the isoelectric point of BSA (pH 4.7). The results of the dynamic light scattering and protein adsorption measurements clearly demonstrated that the observed turbidity enhancement was caused by albumin sorption on the surface of Ln(OH)3 and colloid particles bridging via adsorbed protein molecules. Upon pH increase from 4.5 to 6.5, albumin adsorption on lanthanide colloids was observed, while the following increase of pH from 6.5 to 9.5 led to protein desorption. The predominant role of the electrostatic interactions in the adsorption and desorption processes were revealed in the zeta-potential measurements. No reversibility was observed upon decreasing pH from 9.5 to 4.5 that was suggested to be due to the other interaction mechanisms present in the system. It was shown that while for all lanthanide ions the interaction mechanism with BSA was similar, its manifestation in the optical properties of the system was significantly different. This was interpreted as a consequence of the differences in lanthanides hydrolysis constants. PMID:27419645

  20. Neo-epitopes on methylglyoxal modified human serum albumin lead to aggressive autoimmune response in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jyoti; Mir, Abdul Rouf; Habib, Safia; Siddiqui, Sheelu Shafiq; Ali, Asif; Moinuddin

    2016-05-01

    Glyco-oxidation of proteins has implications in the progression of diabetes type 2. Human serum albumin is prone to glyco-oxidative attack by sugars and methylglyoxal being a strong glycating agent may have severe impact on its structure and consequent role in diabetes. This study has probed the methylglyoxal mediated modifications of HSA, the alterations in its immunological characteristics and possible role in autoantibody induction. We observed an exposure of chromophoric groups, loss in the fluorescence intensity, generation of AGEs, formation of cross-linked products, decrease in α-helical content, increase in hydrophobic clusters, FTIR band shift, attachment of methylglyoxal to HSA and the formation of N(ε)-(carboxyethyl) lysine in the modified HSA, when compared to the native albumin. MG-HSA was found to be highly immunogenic with additional immunogenicity invoking a highly specific immune response than its native counterpart. The binding characteristics of circulating autoantibodies in type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients showed the generation of anti-MG-HSA auto-antibodies in the these patients, that are preferentially recognized by the modified albumin. We propose that MG induced structural perturbations in HSA, result in the generation of neo-epitopes leading to an aggressive auto-immune response and may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of diabetes type 2 associated complications. PMID:26861824

  1. Calorimetric investigation of diclofenac drug binding to a panel of moderately glycated serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Indurthi, Venkata S K; Leclerc, Estelle; Vetter, Stefan W

    2014-08-01

    Glycation alters the drug binding properties of serum proteins and could affect free drug concentrations in diabetic patients with elevated glycation levels. We investigated the effect of bovine serum albumin glycation by eight physiologically relevant glycation reagents (glucose, ribose, carboxymethyllysine, acetoin, methylglyoxal, glyceraldehyde, diacetyl and glycolaldehyde) on diclofenac drug binding. We used this non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug diclofenac as a paradigm for acidic drugs with high serum binding and because of its potential cardiovascular risks in diabetic patients. Isothermal titration calorimetry showed that glycation reduced the binding affinity Ka of serum albumin and diclofenac 2 to 6-fold by reducing structural rigidity of albumin. Glycation affected the number of drug binding sites in a glycation reagent dependent manner and lead to a 25% decrease for most reagent, expect for ribose, with decreased by 60% and for the CML-modification, increased the number of binding sites by 60%. Using isothermal titration calorimetry and differential scanning calorimetry we derived the complete thermodynamic characterization of diclofenac binding to all glycated BSA samples. Our results suggest that glycation in diabetic patients could significantly alter the pharmacokinetics of the widely used over-the-counter NSDAI drug diclofenac and with possibly negative implications for patients. PMID:24751671

  2. Production of Molecular Iodine and Tri-iodide in the Frozen Solution of Iodide: Implication for Polar Atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kitae; Yabushita, Akihiro; Okumura, Masanori; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A; Blaszczak-Boxe, Christopher S; Min, Dae Wi; Yoon, Ho-Il; Choi, Wonyong

    2016-02-01

    The chemistry of reactive halogens in the polar atmosphere plays important roles in ozone and mercury depletion events, oxidizing capacity, and dimethylsulfide oxidation to form cloud-condensation nuclei. Among halogen species, the sources and emission mechanisms of inorganic iodine compounds in the polar boundary layer remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the production of tri-iodide (I3(-)) via iodide oxidation, which is negligible in aqueous solution, is significantly accelerated in frozen solution, both in the presence and the absence of solar irradiation. Field experiments carried out in the Antarctic region (King George Island, 62°13'S, 58°47'W) also showed that the generation of tri-iodide via solar photo-oxidation was enhanced when iodide was added to various ice media. The emission of gaseous I2 from the irradiated frozen solution of iodide to the gas phase was detected by using cavity ring-down spectroscopy, which was observed both in the frozen state at 253 K and after thawing the ice at 298 K. The accelerated (photo-)oxidation of iodide and the subsequent formation of tri-iodide and I2 in ice appear to be related with the freeze concentration of iodide and dissolved O2 trapped in the ice crystal grain boundaries. We propose that an accelerated abiotic transformation of iodide to gaseous I2 in ice media provides a previously unrecognized formation pathway of active iodine species in the polar atmosphere. PMID:26745029

  3. Immobilization of Bovine Serum Albumin Upon Multiwall Carbon Nanotube for High Speed Humidity Sensing Application.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Sankhya; Sasmal, Milan

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-speed humidity sensor based on immobilization of bovine serum albumin upon multiwall carbon nanotube (IBC). A simple and versatile drop casting technique was employed to make the humidity sensor using novel material IBC at room temperature. IBC was synthesized using easy solution process technique. The working principle of the IBC humidity sensor depends upon the variation of output current or conductance with the exposure of different humidity level. Humidity sensing properties of our device is explained on the basis of charge transfer from water molecules to IBC and bovine serum albumin to multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT). Our sensor exhibits faster response time around 1.2 s and recovery time 1.5 s respectively. PMID:26841403

  4. Dialysate With High Dissolved Hydrogen Facilitates Dissociation of Indoxyl Sulfate From Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Tange, Yoshihiro; Takesawa, Shingo; Yoshitake, Shigenori

    2015-01-01

    Background: Protein-bound toxins such as indoxyl sulfate (IS) are not efficiently removed by conventional hemodialysis (HD). Objectives: To improve the removal of IS, we performed an in vitro study to evaluate the effects of high dissolved hydrogen on the dissociation of IS from albumin using simulated HD. Materials and Methods: Wasted dialysate from peritoneal dialysis was concentrated a hundred times using extracorporeal ultrafiltration method. Dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen was made by mixing concentrated dialysis solution and electrolyzed-reduced water. The amounts of free fractions of IS were determined by high performance liquid chromatography. Results: IS was significantly dissociated from albumin using dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen compared with conventional dialysate (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Effective removal of IS is expected using a dialysate with high dissolved hydrogen. PMID:25883914

  5. Spectral Fluorescence Properties of an Anionic Oxacarbocyanine Dye in Complexes with Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronkin, P. G.; Tatikolov, A. S.

    2015-07-01

    The spectral fluorescence properties of the anionic oxacarbocyanine dye 3,3'-di-(γ-sulfopropyl)-5,5'-diphenyl-9-ethyloxacarbocyanine betaine (OCC) were studied in solutions and in complexes with human serum albumin (HSA). Interaction with HSA leads to a significant increase in the fluorescence of the dye. We studied quenching of the fluorescence of OCC in a complex with HSA by ibuprofen and warfarin. Data on quenching of fluorescence by ibuprofen indicate binding of the dye to binding site II of subdomain IIIA in the HSA molecule. Synchronous fluorescence spectra of human serum albumin in the presence of OCC showed that complexation with OCC does not lead to appreciable rearrangement of the protein molecule at the binding site.

  6. Interaction of lipid vesicle with silver nanoparticle-serum albumin protein corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ran; Choudhary, Poonam; Schurr, Ryan N.; Bhattacharya, Priyanka; Brown, Jared M.; Chun Ke, Pu

    2012-01-01

    The physical interaction between a lipid vesicle and a silver nanoparticle (AgNP)-human serum albumin (HSA) protein "corona" has been examined. Specifically, the binding of AgNPs and HSA was analyzed by spectrophotometry, and the induced conformational changes of the HSA were inferred from circular dichroism spectroscopy. The fluidity of the vesicle, a model system for mimicking cell membrane, was found to increase with the increased exposure to AgNP-HSA corona, though less pronounced compared to that induced by AgNPs alone. This study offers additional information for understanding the role of physical forces in nanoparticle-cell interaction and has implications for nanomedicine and nanotoxicology.

  7. Spatial Connectivity and Temporal Response of Variable Source Areas (VSAs): Implications for Catchment Scale Water and Solute Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inamdar, S.; Mitchell, M.; McDonnell, J.; McGlynn, B.; Shanley, J.

    2001-05-01

    The significance of variable source areas (VSAs) in storm runoff generation and as loci for mixing of event and pre-event waters has long been recognized. Recent research suggests that VSAs may also play an important role in regulating the export of C and N solutes from catchments. We hypothesize that the spatial distribution of VSAs in the catchment and their connectedness with the stream network is a first order control on the temporal dynamics and expression of water and solutes from the catchment. We examined two contrasting scenarios of VSA distribution: (1) VSAs located lower in the catchment and well connected to the stream network, versus, (2) discrete VSAs located in the upper portions of the catchment and disconnected from the stream network. We evaluated the potential impact of these scenarios on: (a) the timing and peak of event water contributions, and (b) the timing and peak of solute signatures. We hypothesized that if VSAs are well connected to the stream network (Scenario 1), then event water contributions would be distinct and would predominate early on during the rising limb of the hydrograph of stream discharge. In contrast, if VSAs are isolated and disconnected (Scenario 2), then event water contributions would be damped and delayed and possibly continue to be observed through hydrograph recession. We believe solutes such as dissolved organic carbon (DOC), which are primarily flushed from near surface soil horizons, will follow an event water trajectory. We tested these hypotheses for a 135 ha forested headwater catchment in the Adirondack Mountains of New York. Detailed storm runoff and solute data for the catchment are available since 1994. A two-component separation model using base cations (Na, Mg, Ca, and K) was used to partition stormflow discharge into pre-event and event components. Event water contributions were small on the rising limb of the hydrograph, reached their maximum just after the discharge peak, and continued through the

  8. Human serum albumin and its relation with oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sitar, Mustafa Erinç; Aydin, Seval; Cakatay, Ufuk

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin, a negative acute phase reactant and marker of nutritive status, presents at high concentrations in plasma. Albumin has always been used in many clinical states especially to improve circulatory failure. It has been showed that albumin is involved in many bioactive functions such as regulation of plasma osmotic pressure, binding and transport of various endogenous or exogenous compounds, and finally extracellular antioxidant defenses. Molecules like transferrin, caeruloplasmin, haptoglobin, uric acid, bilirubin, alpha-tocopherol, glucose, and albumin constitute extracellular antioxidant defenses in blood plasma but albumin is the most potent one. Most of the antioxidant properties of albumin can be attributed to its unique biochemical structure. The protein possesses antioxidant properties such as binding copper tightly and iron weakly, scavenging free radicals, e.g., hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and Peroxynitrite (ONOOH) and providing thiol group (-SH). Whether it is chronic or acute, during many pathological conditions, biomarkers of oxidative protein damage increase and this observation continues with considerable oxidation of human serum albumin. There is an important necessity to specify its interactions with Reactive Oxygen Species. Generally, it may lower the availability of pro-oxidants and be preferentially oxidized to protect other macromolecules but all these findings make it necessary that researchers give a more detailed explanation of albumin and its relations with oxidative stress. PMID:24273915

  9. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases....

  10. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases....

  11. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases....

  12. 21 CFR 866.5040 - Albumin immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Albumin immunological test system. 866.5040 Section 866.5040 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... other body fluids. Measurement of albumin aids in the diagnosis of kidney and intestinal diseases....

  13. Investigation of bovine serum albumin glycation by THz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherkasova, Olga P.; Nazarov, Maxim M.; Shkurinov, Alexander P.

    2016-04-01

    Protein glycation is accelerated under hyperglycemic conditions resulting to loss in the structure and biological functions of proteins. The transmission THz spectroscopy has been used for measuring of bovine serum albumin glycation dynamics. It was found that amplitude of albumin THz absorption depends on type of sugars and incubation time.

  14. Effects of glycation on meloxicam binding to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trynda-Lemiesz, Lilianna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna

    2011-05-01

    The current study reports a binding of meloxicam a pharmacologically important new generation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to glycated form of the human serum albumin (HSA). The interaction of the meloxicam with nonglycated and glycated albumin has been studied at pH 7.4 in 0.05 M sodium phosphate buffer with 0.1 M NaCl, using fluorescence quenching technique and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results of the present study have shown that the meloxicam could bind both forms of albumin glycated and nonglycated at a site, which was close to the tryptophan residues. Similarly, how for native albumin glycated form has had one high affinity site for the drug with association constants of the order of 10 5 M -1. The glycation process of the HSA significantly has affected the impact of the meloxicam on the binding of other ligands such as warfarin and bilirubin. The affinity of the glycated albumin for bilirubin as for native albumin has been reduced by meloxicam but observed effect was weaker by half (about 20%) compared with nonglycated albumin. In contrast to the native albumin meloxicam binding to glycated form of the protein only slightly affected the binding of warfarin. It seemed possible that the effects on warfarin binding might be entirely attributable to the Lys 199 modification which was in site I.

  15. ALBUMIN CAUSES INCREASED MYOSIN LIGHT CHAIN KINASE EXPRESSION IN ASTROCYTES VIA P38 MITOGEN ACTIVATED PROTEIN KINASE

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Janet L.; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamala; Patel, Fatima; Chrzaszcz, MaryAnn; Venkatesan, Charu; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2011-01-01

    Myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) plays an important role in the reorganization of the cytoskeleton leading to disruption of vascular barrier integrity in multiple organs including the blood brain barrier (BBB) after traumatic brain injury (TBI). MLCK has been linked to transforming growth factor (TGF) and rho kinase signaling pathways, but the mechanisms regulating MLCK expression following TBI are not well understood. Albumin leaks into the brain parenchyma following TBI, activates glia and has been linked to TGF-β receptor signaling. We investigated the role of albumin in the increase in MLCK in astrocytes and the signaling pathways involved in this increase. Following midline closed-skull TBI in mice, there was a significant increase in MLCK-immunoreactive (IR) cells and albumin extravasation, which was prevented by treatment with the MLCK inhibitor ML-7. Using immunohistochemical methods, we identified the MCLK-IR cells as astrocytes. In primary astrocytes, exposure to albumin increased both isoforms of MLCK, 130 and 210. Inhibition of the TGF-β receptor partially prevented the albumin-induced increase in both isoforms, which was not prevented by inhibition of smad3. Inhibition of p38 MAPK, but not ERK, JNK or rho kinase also prevented this increase. These results are further evidence of a role of MCLK in the mechanisms of BBB compromise following TBI, and identify astrocytes as a cell type, in addition to endothelium in the BBB which express MLCK. These findings implicate albumin, acting through p38 MAPK, in a novel mechanism by which activation of MLCK following TBI may lead to compromise of the BBB. PMID:21360574

  16. Joint neutron crystallographic and NMR solution studies of Tyr residue ionization and hydrogen bonding: Implications for enzyme-mediated proton transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Michalczyk, Ryszard; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Bacik, John -Paul; Schrader, Tobias E.; Ostermann, Andreas; Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; McKenna, Robert; Fisher, Suzanne Zoe

    2015-05-05

    Proton transfer is a fundamental mechanism at the core of many enzyme-catalyzed reactions. It is also exquisitely sensitive to a number of factors, including pH, electrostatics, proper active-site geometry, and chemistry. Carbonic anhydrase has evolved a fast and efficient way to conduct protons through a combination of hydrophilic amino acid side chains that coordinate a highly ordered H-bonded water network. This study uses a powerful approach, combining NMR solution studies with neutron protein crystallography, to determine the effect of pH and divalent cations on key residues involved in proton transfer in human carbonic anhydrase. Lastly, the results have broad implications for our understanding of proton transfer and how subtle changes in ionization and H-bonding interactions can modulate enzyme catalysis.

  17. Fluorescence dilution technique for measurement of albumin reflection coefficient in isolated glomeruli.

    PubMed

    Fan, Fan; Chen, Chun Cheng Andy; Zhang, Jin; Schreck, Carlos M N; Roman, Eric A; Williams, Jan M; Hirata, Takashi; Sharma, Mukut; Beard, Daniel A; Savin, Virginia J; Roman, Richard J

    2015-12-15

    This study describes a high-throughput fluorescence dilution technique to measure the albumin reflection coefficient (σAlb) of isolated glomeruli. Rats were injected with FITC-dextran 250 (75 mg/kg), and the glomeruli were isolated in a 6% BSA solution. Changes in the fluorescence of the glomerulus due to water influx in response to an imposed oncotic gradient was used to determine σAlb. Adjustment of the albumin concentration of the bath from 6 to 5, 4, 3, and 2% produced a 10, 25, 35, and 50% decrease in the fluorescence of the glomeruli. Pretreatment of glomeruli with protamine sulfate (2 mg/ml) or TGF-β1 (10 ng/ml) decreased σAlb from 1 to 0.54 and 0.48, respectively. Water and solute movement were modeled using Kedem-Katchalsky equations, and the measured responses closely fit the predicted behavior, indicating that loss of albumin by solvent drag or diffusion is negligible compared with the movement of water. We also found that σAlb was reduced by 17% in fawn hooded hypertensive rats, 33% in hypertensive Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats, 26% in streptozotocin-treated diabetic Dahl SS rats, and 21% in 6-mo old type II diabetic nephropathy rats relative to control Sprague-Dawley rats. The changes in glomerular permeability to albumin were correlated with the degree of proteinuria in these strains. These findings indicate that the fluorescence dilution technique can be used to measure σAlb in populations of isolated glomeruli and provides a means to assess the development of glomerular injury in hypertensive and diabetic models. PMID:26447220

  18. Albumin adsorption on to aluminium oxide and polyurethane surfaces.

    PubMed

    Sharma, C P; Sunny, M C

    1990-05-01

    The changes in protein adsorption onto aluminium surfaces coated with different thicknesses of oxide layers were examined. The oxide layers on aluminium substrates were derived by the anodizing technique. Protein adsorption studies were conducted using 125I-labelled albumin and the amount of albumin adsorbed was estimated with the help of a gamma counter. An increase in albumin adsorption was observed on oxide layer coated aluminium surfaces. The effect of anti-Hageman factor on albumin and fibrinogen adsorption on to bare aluminium, oxide layer coated aluminium and bare polyether urethane urea surfaces was also investigated. It was observed that the presence of anti-Hageman factor increased the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on to all these substrates. PMID:2383620

  19. Interaction of coffee compounds with serum albumins. Part II: Diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Guercia, Elena; Forzato, Cristina; Navarini, Luciano; Berti, Federico

    2016-05-15

    Cafestol and 16-O-methylcafestol are diterpenes present in coffee, but whilst cafestol is found in both Coffea canephora and Coffea arabica, 16-O-methylcafestol (16-OMC) was reported to be specific of only C. canephora. The interactions of such compounds, with serum albumins, have been studied. Three albumins have been considered, namely human serum albumin (HSA), fatty acid free HSA (ffHSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). The proteins interact with the diterpenes at the interface between Sudlow site I and the fatty acid binding site 6 in a very peculiar way, leading to a significant change in the secondary structure. The diterpenes do not displace reference binding drugs of site 2, but rather they enhance the affinity of the site for the drugs. They, therefore, may alter the pharmacokinetic profile of albumin - bound drugs. PMID:26776001

  20. Interaction of sulpiride and serum albumin: Modeling from spectrofluorimetric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Viviane Muniz da Silva; Silva, Dilson

    2015-12-01

    We have applied the fluorescence quenching modeling to study the process of interaction of sulpiride with human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine (BSA). Albumin is more abundant protein in blood and it emits fluorescence when excited by 260-295 nm. Sulpiride is an atypical antipsychotic used in the treatment of many psychiatric disorders. As sulpiride is fluorescent, we developed a mathematical model to analyzing the interaction of two fluorescent substances. This model was able to separate the albumin fluorescence from the quencher fluorescence. Results have shown that sulpiride quenches the fluorescence of both albumins by a static process, due to the complex formation drugalbumin. The association constants calculated for sulpiride-HSA was 2.20 (± 0.08) × 104 M-1 at 37° C, and 5.46 (± 0.20) × 104 M-1, 25 ° C, and the primary binding site to sulpiride in the albumin is located closer to the subdomain IB.

  1. Universal fractal scaling in stream chemistry and its implications for solute transport and water quality trend detection

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, James W.; Neal, Colin

    2013-01-01

    The chemical dynamics of lakes and streams affect their suitability as aquatic habitats and as water supplies for human needs. Because water quality is typically monitored only weekly or monthly, however, the higher-frequency dynamics of stream chemistry have remained largely invisible. To illuminate a wider spectrum of water quality dynamics, rainfall and streamflow were sampled in two headwater catchments at Plynlimon, Wales, at 7-h intervals for 1–2 y and weekly for over two decades, and were analyzed for 45 solutes spanning the periodic table from H+ to U. Here we show that in streamflow, all 45 of these solutes, including nutrients, trace elements, and toxic metals, exhibit fractal 1/fα scaling on time scales from hours to decades (α = 1.05 ± 0.15, mean ± SD). We show that this fractal scaling can arise through dispersion of random chemical inputs distributed across a catchment. These 1/f time series are non–self-averaging: monthly, yearly, or decadal averages are approximately as variable, one from the next, as individual measurements taken hours or days apart, defying naive statistical expectations. (By contrast, stream discharge itself is nonfractal, and self-averaging on time scales of months and longer.) In the solute time series, statistically significant trends arise much more frequently, on all time scales, than one would expect from conventional t statistics. However, these same trends are poor predictors of future trends—much poorer than one would expect from their calculated uncertainties. Our results illustrate how 1/f time series pose fundamental challenges to trend analysis and change detection in environmental systems. PMID:23842090

  2. Leaching of lead metallurgical slag in citric solutions--implications for disposal and weathering in soil environments.

    PubMed

    Ettler, Vojtech; Komárková, Marie; Jehlicka, Jan; Coufal, Pavel; Hradil, David; Machovic, Vladimír; Delorme, Fabian

    2004-11-01

    Metallurgical slags from primary lead smelting were submitted to a 30-day batch leaching procedure in 20 and 8 mM citric solutions in order to determine the kinetics of release of Pb, Cu, Zn and As. The experiment was coupled with the PHREEQC-2 speciation-solubility modelling and mineralogical study of newly formed products (SEM/EDS, XRD, TEM/EDS and Raman spectrometry). A strong scavenging of metals and metalloids from the 8 mM citric leachate was observed due to the formation of newly formed products. The secondary precipitate consisted of well-developed calcite (CaCO3) crystals and amorphous organo-mineral matrix composed of hydrous ferric oxides and amorphous SiO2. Metals (Pb, Zn, Cu) and arsenic released into the solution were subsequently bound onto the newly formed product (adsorption on oxides) or trapped within the calcite structure (Zn, Mn). Similar scavenging mechanism can be taken into account in real soil systems with lower concentration of citric acid. Then, the covering of slag dumps with a thick soil layer and subsequent re-vegetation might be a possible scenario for slag management on some metallurgical sites. PMID:15488918

  3. Dynamics of Metal Partitioning at the Cell-Solution Interface: Implications for Toxicity Assessment under Growth-Inhibiting Conditions.

    PubMed

    Duval, Jérôme F L; Paquet, Nathalie; Lavoie, Michel; Fortin, Claude

    2015-06-01

    Metal toxicity toward microorganisms is usually evaluated by determining growth inhibition. To achieve a mechanistic interpretation of such toxic effects, the intricate coupling between cell growth kinetics and metal partitioning dynamics at the cell-solution interface over time must be considered on a quantitative level. A formalism is elaborated to evaluate cell-surface-bound, internalized, and extracellular metal fractions in the limit where metal uptake kinetics is controlled by internalization under noncomplexing medium conditions. Cell growth kinetics is tackled using the continuous logistic equation modified to include growth inhibition by metal accumulation to intracellular or cell surface sites. The theory further includes metal-proton competition for adsorption at cell-surface binding sites, as well as possible variation of cell size during exposure to metal ions. The formalism elucidates the dramatic impacts of initial cell concentration on metal bioavailability and toxicity over time, in agreement with reported algae bioassays. It further highlights that appropriate definition of toxicity endpoints requires careful inspection of the ratio between exposure time scale and time scale of metal depletion from bulk solution. The latter depends on metal internalization-excretion rate constants, microorganism growth, and the extent of metal adsorption on nonspecific, transporter, and growth inhibitory sites. As an application of the theory, Cd toxicity in the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata is interpreted from constrained modeling of cell growth kinetics and of interfacial Cd-partitioning dynamics measured under various exposure conditions. PMID:25945520

  4. Viscosity of supercooled aqueous glycerol solutions, validity of the Stokes-Einstein relationship, and implications for cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Trejo González, José A; Longinotti, M Paula; Corti, Horacio R

    2012-10-01

    The viscosity of supercooled glycerol aqueous solutions, with glycerol mass fractions between 0.70 and 0.90, have been determined to confirm that the Avramov-Milchev equation describes very well the temperature dependence of the viscosity of the binary mixtures including the supercooled regime. On the contrary, it is shown that the free volume model of viscosity, with the parameters proposed in a recent work (He, Fowler, Toner, J. Appl. Phys. 100 (2006) 074702), overestimates the viscosity of the glycerol-rich mixtures at low temperatures by several orders of magnitude. Moreover, the free volume model for the water diffusion leads to predictions of the Stokes-Einstein product, which are incompatible with the experimental findings. We conclude that the use of these free volume models, with parameters obtained by fitting experimental data far from the supercooled and glassy regions, lead to incorrect predictions of the deterioration rates of biomolecules, overestimating their life times in these cryopreservation media. PMID:22609516

  5. Terrestrial reference frame solution with the Vienna VLBI Software VieVS and implication of tropospheric gradient estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicakova, H.; Plank, L.; Nilsson, T.; Böhm, J.; Schuh, H.

    2011-07-01

    The Vienna VLBI Software (VieVS) has been developed at the Institute of Geodesy and Geophysics at TU Vienna since 2008. In this presentation, we present the module Vie_glob which is the part of VieVS that allows the parameter estimation from multiple VLBI sessions in a so-called global solution. We focus on the determination of the terrestrial reference frame (TRF) using all suitable VLBI sessions since 1984. We compare different analysis options like the choice of loading corrections or of one of the models for the tropospheric delays. The effect of atmosphere loading corrections on station heights if neglected at observation level will be shown. Time series of station positions (using a previously determined TRF as a priori values) are presented and compared to other estimates of site positions from individual IVS (International VLBI Service for Geodesy and Astrometry) Analysis Centers.

  6. Experimental investigation and planetary implications of the stability of clathrate hydrates in aqueous solution at icy satellite conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, M.; Choukroun, M.; Barmatz, M.; Hodyss, R. P.; Smythe, W. D.

    2012-12-01

    Clathrate hydrates consist of hydrogen-bonded water molecules forming cages in which gas molecules are trapped individually. They are among the favored volatile reservoirs in solar system bodies, and are expected to play an important role in many processes: accretion of volatiles in planetesimals, outgassing on Titan, Enceladus, and comets. Their insulating thermal properties and high mechanical strength also bear important implications for understanding the evolution of icy satellites like Europa. However, the conditions allowing for their formation and/or their dissociation and the release of volatiles to the atmosphere (Titan) or the plumes (Enceladus) are still poorly understood. This is mainly because of a lack of knowledge on the stability of mixed clathrate hydrates in presence of anti-freeze agents such as ammonia. We have developed a high-pressure cryogenic calorimeter to address this deficiency in the literature. This liquid nitrogen - cooled Setaram BT2.15 calorimeter is located at the JPL Ice Physics Laboratory. The temperature range achievable with this instrument is 77-473 K. This calorimeter uses Calvet elements (3D arrays of thermocouples) to measure the heat flow required to follow a predefined heating rate within a sample and a reference cell with a resolution of 0.1 μW. A gas handling system has been designed and fabricated in house to reach pressures up to 100 bars, corresponding to several km depth in icy satellites. The thermodynamic properties of CO2 and CH4 clathrates with ammonia are under investigation, and the results will be used to constrain a statistical thermodynamic model of clathrates for applications to planetary environments. Preliminary results will be shown at the meeting. This work has been conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contract to NASA. Support from the Minnesota Space Grant Consortium, the NASA Outer Planets Research program, and government sponsorship are gratefully

  7. Can biofuels be a solution to climate change? The implications of land use change-related emissions for policy

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Madhu; Crago, Christine L.; Black, Mairi

    2011-01-01

    Biofuels have gained increasing attention as an alternative to fossil fuels for several reasons, one of which is their potential to reduce the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the transportation sector. Recent studies have questioned the validity of claims about the potential of biofuels to reduce GHG emissions relative to the liquid fossil fuels they are replacing when emissions owing to direct (DLUC) and indirect land use changes (ILUC) that accompany biofuels are included in the life cycle GHG intensity of biofuels. Studies estimate that the GHG emissions released from ILUC could more than offset the direct GHG savings by producing biofuels and replacing liquid fossil fuels and create a ‘carbon debt’ with a long payback period. The estimates of this payback period, however, vary widely across biofuels from different feedstocks and even for a single biofuel across different modelling assumptions. In the case of corn ethanol, this payback period is found to range from 15 to 200 years. We discuss the challenges in estimating the ILUC effect of a biofuel and differences across biofuels, and its sensitivity to the assumptions and policy scenarios considered by different economic models. We also discuss the implications of ILUC for designing policies that promote biofuels and seek to reduce GHG emissions. In a first-best setting, a global carbon tax is needed to set both DLUC and ILUC emissions to their optimal levels. However, it is unclear whether unilateral GHG mitigation policies, even if they penalize the ILUC-related emissions, would increase social welfare and lead to optimal emission levels. In the absence of a global carbon tax, incentivizing sustainable land use practices through certification standards, government regulations and market-based pressures may be a viable option for reducing ILUC. PMID:22482030

  8. Albumin absorption and catabolism by isolated perfused proximal convoluted tubules of the rabbit.

    PubMed Central

    Park, C H; Maack, T

    1984-01-01

    Overall characteristics and kinetics of tubular absorption of albumin (Alb) were studied in isolated perfused proximal convoluted tubules of the rabbit. The fate of absorbed Alb was determined in tubules perfused with low [Alb]. Alb was labeled with tritium by reductive methylation ( [3H3C]Alb). At [Alb] = 0.03 mg/ml, approximately 80% of the absorbed [3H3C]Alb was released to the peritubular bathing solution as catabolic products. Transcellular transport of intact [3H3C]Alb was negligible. Iodoacetate (IAA, 4 mM) inhibited albumin absorption (JAlb) by greater than 95% and fluid reabsorption (JV) by 55%. At [Alb] = 0.1 mg/ml the absorption rate of a derivatized cationic Alb (pI = 8.4) was fivefold greater (P less than 0.01) than that of anionic Alb. Higher cationic [Alb] had deleterious effects on tubular functions. Overall Alb absorption was of high capacity and low affinity (JmaxAlb = 3.7 ng/min per mm tubule length, apparent Michaelis constant (Km) = 1.2 mg/ml). A low capacity system that saturates at near physiological loads was also detected (JmaxAlb = 0.064 ng/min per mm, apparent Km = 0.031 mg/ml). High [Alb] did not alter the rate of endocytic vesicle formation as determined by the tubular uptake of [14C]inulin. Results show that Alb absorption is a saturable process that is inhibited by high IAA concentrations and is affected by the charge of the protein. Absorbed Alb is hydrolyzed by tubular cells and catabolic products are readily released to the peritubular side. The dual kinetics of Alb absorption may be due to a combination of adsorptive endocytosis (low capacity system) and fluid endocytosis of albumin aggregates (high capacity system). Results indicate that albuminuria occurs much before albumin absorption is saturated. The kinetic characteristics of the process of tubular absorption of albumin helps to explain the concomitance of albuminuria, increased renal catabolic rates of albumin, and renal cell deposition of protein absorption droplets in

  9. Evaluating effective reaction rates of kinetically driven solutes in large-scale, anisotropic media: human health risk implications in CO2 leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siirila, E. R.; Maxwell, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    The role of high and low hydraulic conductivity (K) regions in heterogeneous, stratified and non-stratified flow fields and the subsequent effect of rate dependent geochemical reactions are investigated with regards to mobilized arsenic from CO2 leakage at a Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) site. Following the methodology of previous work, human health risk is used as an endpoint for comparison via a two-stage or nested Monte Carlo scheme, explicitly considering joint uncertainty and variability for a hypothetical population of individuals. This study identifies geo-hydrologic conditions where solute reactions are either rate limited (non-reactive), in equilibrium (linear equilibrium assumption, LEA, is appropriate), or are sensitive to time-dependent kinetic reaction rates. Potential interplay between multiple parameters (i.e. positive or negative feedbacks) is shown utilizing stochastic ensembles. In particular, the effect of preferential flow pathways and solute mixing on the field-scale (macrodispersion) and sub-grid (local dispersion) is examined for varying degrees of stratification and regional groundwater velocities. Results show effective reaction rates of kinetic ensembles are dissimilar from LEA ensembles with the inclusion of local dispersion, resulting in an additive tailing effect of the solute plume, a retarded peak time, and an increased cancer risk. This discrepancy between kinetic and LEA ensembles is augmented in highly anisotropic media, especially at intermediate regional groundwater velocities. The distribution, magnitude, and associated uncertainty of cancer risk are controlled by these factors, but are also strongly dependent on the regional groundwater velocity. We demonstrate a higher associated uncertainty of cancer risk in stratified domains is linked to higher aquifer connectivity and less macrodispersion in the flow field. This study has implications in CCS site selection and groundwater driven risk assessment modeling.

  10. Transport of nitrated albumin across continuous vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Predescu, Dan; Predescu, Sanda; Malik, Asrar B.

    2002-01-01

    Because modification of plasma albumin on tyrosine residues generates nitrated albumin (NOA) that may function as a mechanism of nitrogen monoxide clearance from microcirculation, we investigated biochemicaly and morphologically the cell surface binding and the transendothelial transport of NOA. An electron microscopic study was carried out with mouse lungs and hearts perfused in situ with NOA and NOA-Au complexes. The results indicate that NOA-Au can bind to the endothelial cell surface, and its binding can be blocked by albumin plus nitrotyrosine (NO-tyrosine) or abolished by excess NOA. We detected NOA-Au into perivascular spaces as early as 30 sec after the beginning of its perfusion. NOA, unlike native albumin, leaves the vascular lumina via both endothelial caveolae and open junctions. By cross-linking and ligand blotting analysis, we showed that NOA interacted with the same albumin binding proteins of 16–18, 30–32, 60, and 74 kDa as native albumin. ELISA performed on tissue homogenates obtained from the same specimens showed that NOA transport was 2- to 4-fold greater than native albumin. The augmented transendothelial transport of NOA reflects its transcytosis as well as its exit from the microcirculation via open junctions. The increased transport of NOA may serve as an important mechanism that protects a vascular bed against the damaging effects of nitrogen monoxide and peroxynitrite. PMID:12370442

  11. Albumin grafting on biomaterial surfaces using gamma-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kamath, K.R.

    1993-01-01

    Surface modification has been used extensively in various fields to introduce desirable surface properties without affecting the bulk properties of the material. In the area of biomaterials, the approach of surface modification offers an effective alternative to the synthesis of new biomaterials. The specific objective of this study was to modify different biomaterial surfaces by albumin grafting to improve their blood compatibility. The modified surfaces were characterized for surface-induced platelet activation and thrombus formation. This behavior was correlated with the conditions used for grafting. In particular, albumin was functionalized to introduce pendant double bonds into the molecule. The functionalized albumin was covalently attached to various surfaces, such as dimethyldichlorosilane-coated glass, polypropylene, polycarbonate, poly(vinyl chloride), and polyethylene by gamma-irradiation. Platelet adhesion and activation on these surfaces was examined using video microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The extent of grafting was found to be dependent on the albumin concentration used for adsorption and the gamma-irradiation time. Release of the grafted albumin during exposure to blood was minimal. The albumin-grafted fibers maintained their thromboresistant properties even after storage at elevated temperatures for prolonged time periods. Finally, the approach was used to graft albumin on the PLEXUS Adult Hollow Fiber Oxygenators (Shiley). The blood compatibility of the grafted oxygenators improved significantly when compared to controls.

  12. Investigation of the interaction between naringin and human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaheng; Li, Ying; Dong, Lijun; Li, Jiazhong; He, Wenying; Chen, Xingguo; Hu, Zhide

    2008-03-01

    The interaction between naringin and human serum albumin (HSA) has been thoroughly studied by fluorescence quenching technique in combination with UV absorption spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy and molecular modeling method. Under the simulative physiological conditions, fluorescence data revealed the presence of the binding site on HSA and its binding constants ( K) are 1.62 × 10 4, 1.68 × 10 4, 1.72 × 10 4, and 1.79 × 10 4 M -1 at 289, 296, 303, and 310 K, respectively. The alterations of protein secondary structure in the presence of naringin aqueous solution were qualitative and quantitative calculated by the evidence from CD and FT-IR spectroscopes. In addition, according to the Van't Hoff equation, the thermodynamic functions standard enthalpy (Δ H0) and standard entropy (Δ S0) for the reaction were calculated to be 3.45 kJ mol -1 and 92.52 J mol -1 K -1. These results indicated that naringin binds to HSA mainly by a hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, the displacement experiments confirmed that naringin could bind to the site I of HSA, which was also in agreement with the result of the molecular modeling study.

  13. Albumin contributes to kidney disease progression in Alport syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jarad, George; Knutsen, Russell H; Mecham, Robert P; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2016-07-01

    Alport syndrome is a familial kidney disease caused by defects in the collagen type IV network of the glomerular basement membrane. Lack of collagen-α3α4α5(IV) changes the glomerular basement membrane morphologically and functionally, rendering it leaky to albumin and other plasma proteins. Filtered albumin has been suggested to be a cause of the glomerular and tubular injuries observed at advanced stages of Alport syndrome. To directly investigate the role that albumin plays in the progression of disease in Alport syndrome, we generated albumin knockout (Alb(-/-)) mice to use as a tool for removing albuminuria as a component of kidney disease. Mice lacking albumin were healthy and indistinguishable from control littermates, although they developed hypertriglyceridemia. Dyslipidemia was observed in Alb(+/-) mice, which displayed half the normal plasma albumin concentration. Alb mutant mice were bred to collagen-α3(IV) knockout (Col4a3(-/-)) mice, which are a model for human Alport syndrome. Lack of circulating and filtered albumin in Col4a3(-/-);Alb(-/-) mice resulted in dramatically improved kidney disease outcomes, as these mice lived 64% longer than did Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/+) and Col4a3(-/-);Alb(+/-) mice, despite similar blood pressures and serum triglyceride levels. Further investigations showed that the absence of albumin correlated with reduced transforming growth factor-β1 signaling as well as reduced tubulointerstitial, glomerular, and podocyte pathology. We conclude that filtered albumin is injurious to kidney cells in Alport syndrome and perhaps in other proteinuric kidney diseases, including diabetic nephropathy. PMID:27147675

  14. Transfer of oleic acid between albumin and phospholipid vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, J.A.; Cistola, D.P.

    1986-01-01

    The net transfer of oleic acid between egg phosphatidylcholine unilamellar vesicles and bovine serum albumin has been monitored by TC NMR spectroscopy and 90% isotopically substituted (1- TC)oleic acid. The carboxyl chemical shifts of oleic acid bound to albumin were different from those for oleic acid in phospholipid vesicles. Therefore, in mixtures of donor particles, the equilibrium distribution of oleic acid was determined from chemical shift and peak intensity data without separation of donor and acceptor particles. In a system containing equal masses of albumin and phospholipid and a stoichiometry of 4-5 mol of oleic acid per mol of albumin, the oleic acid distribution was pH dependent, with greater than or equal to80% of the oleic acid associated with albumin at pH 7.4; association was greater than or equal to90% at pH 8.0. Decreasing the pH below 7.4 markedly decreased the proportion of fatty acid bound to albumin. The distribution was reversible with pH and was independent of whether vesicles or albumin acted as a donor. These data suggest that pH may strongly influence the partitioning of fatty acid between cellular membranes and albumin. The TC NMR method is also advantageous because it provides information about the structural environments of oleic acid bound to albumin or phospholipid, the ionization state of oleic acid in each environment, and the structural integrity of the vesicles. In addition, minimum and maximum limits for the exchange rates of oleic acid among different environments were obtained from the NMR data.

  15. African American Participation in Oncology Clinical Trials--Focus on Prostate Cancer: Implications, Barriers, and Potential Solutions.

    PubMed

    Ahaghotu, Chiledum; Tyler, Robert; Sartor, Oliver

    2016-04-01

    In the United States, the incidence and mortality rates of many cancers, especially prostate cancer, are disproportionately high among African American men compared with Caucasian men. Recently, mortality rates for prostate cancer have declined more rapidly in African American versus Caucasian men, but prostate cancer is still the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer deaths in African American men in the United States. Compared with Caucasian men, prostate cancer occurs at younger ages, has a higher stage at diagnosis, and is more likely to progress after definitive treatments in African American men. Reasons for racial discrepancies in cancer are multifactorial and potentially include socioeconomic, cultural, nutritional, and biologic elements. In addition to improving access to novel therapies, clinical trial participation is essential to adequately establish the risks and benefits of treatments in African American populations. Considering the disproportionately high mortality rates noted in these groups, our understanding of the natural history and responses to therapies is limited. This review will explore African American underrepresentation in clinical trials with a focus on prostate cancer, and potentially effective strategies to engage African American communities in prostate cancer research. Solutions targeting physicians, investigators, the community, and health care systems are identified. Improvement of African American participation in prostate cancer clinical trials will benefit all stakeholders. PMID:26786562

  16. Self-assembly behaviour of colistin and its prodrug colistin methanesulfonate: implications for solution stability and solubilization

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Stephanie J.; Li, Jian; Nation, Roger L.; Prankerd, Richard J.; Velkov, Tony; Boyd, Ben J.

    2010-01-01

    Colistin is an amphiphilic antibiotic that has re-emerged into clinical use due to the increasing prevalence of difficult-to-treat Gram-negative infections. The existence of self-assembling colloids in solutions of colistin and its derivative prodrug, colistin methanesulfonate (CMS) was investigated. Colistin and CMS reduced the air-water interfacial tension, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) studies showed the existence of 2.07 ± 0.3 nm aggregates above 1.5 mM for colistin, and of 1.98 ± 0.36 nm aggregates for CMS above 3.5 mM (mean ± SD). Above the respective critical micelle concentrations (CMC) the solubility of azithromycin, a hydrophobic antibiotic, increased approximately linearly with increasing surfactant concentration (5:1 mol ratio colistin:azithromycin), suggestive of hydrophobic domains within the micellar cores. Rapid conversion of CMS to colistin occurred below the CMC (60 % over 48 hr), while conversion above the CMC was less than 1 %. The formation of colistin and CMS micelles demonstrated in this study is the proposed mechanism for solubilization of azithromycin and the concentration-dependent stability of CMS. PMID:20302384

  17. SAM-II Riboswitch Samples at least Two Conformations in Solution in the Absence of Ligand: Implications for Recognition.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bin; LeBlanc, Regan; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2016-02-18

    Conformational equilibria are increasingly recognized as pivotal for biological function. Traditional structural analyses provide a static image of conformers in solution that sometimes present conflicting views. From (13) C and (1) H chemical exchange saturation transfer experiments, in concert with ligation and selective labeling strategies, we show that in the absence of metabolite, a Mg(2+) (0-0.5 mm)-bound apo SAM-II riboswitch RNA exists in a minor (≈10 %) partially closed state that rapidly exchanges with a predominantly (≈90 %) open form with a lifetime of ≈32 ms. The base and sugar (H6,C6, H1',C1') chemical shifts of C43 for the dominant conformer are similar to those of a free CMP, but those of the minor apo species are comparable to shifts of CMPs in helical RNA regions. Our results suggest that these transient, low populated states stabilized by Mg(2+) will likely enhance rapid ligand recognition and, we anticipate, will play potentially ubiquitous roles in RNA signaling. PMID:26800479

  18. Implications of alkaline solutions-induced etching on optical and minority carrier lifetime features of monocrystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachtouli, N.; Aouida, S.; Laajimi, R. Hadj; Boujmil, M. F.; Bessais, B.

    2012-09-01

    In this work, we search to optimize the surface textures of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) intended to be used in silicon solar cells. For this purpose, we studied the morphology of formed etch hillocks during anisotropic etching of silicon using alkaline solutions based on sodium hydroxide (NaOH), potassium hydroxide (KOH) and tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH). Such treatments lead to the formation of various pyramids-like textures that can be well optimized to improve the photocurrent of c-Si-based solar cells. The produced textures were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), UV-visible optical reflectivity and minority carrier lifetime measurements. These investigations allow evaluating the size and density of the formed pyramidal textures; the apex angles vary between 75° and 82°, while the heights and bases of the pyramids range from a few hundred nanometers to several micrometers. A minimum reflectivity value of about 6% was obtained at specific conditions using NaOH, whereas it was found that the apparent effective minority carrier lifetime (τeff) is sensitive to the injection level (Δn), which shows an apparent increase from 1.2 μs to 2.4 μs for a minority carrier density of about Δn = 21014 cm-3.

  19. Routes of drug delivery into the nail apparatus: Implications for the efficacy of topical nail solutions in onychomycosis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Aditya K; Simpson, Fiona C

    2016-01-01

    The route of antifungal drug entry into the nail plate and the underlying nail bed plays an important role in determining the efficacy of therapy. Oral antifungal agents reach the nail bed and nail plate by being ingested and achieving antifungal levels in the blood stream that are well in excess of the minimum inhibitory concentration. The reticular circulation at the distal end of the digit enables the drug to reach the nail bed, the proximal matrix and the lateral nail folds. The drug then diffuses into the proximal, ventral and lateral nail plate. The primary route of drug delivery for topical lacquers is transungual, with drug applied to the dorsal aspect of the nail plate and penetrating to the underlying nail bed. The new topical agents approved in the US for the treatment of onychomycosis are solutions with lower viscosity and increased nail penetration characteristics; therefore, these agents penetrate through the transungual route, but also through the space between the nail plate and the nail bed. This subungual route is an important method of drug delivery and is able to in part circumvent the thickness of the nail plate. PMID:25983025

  20. Chlorpromazine interactions to sera albumins. A study by the quenching of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Dilson; Cortez, Célia M.; Louro, Sônia R. W.

    2004-04-01

    Binding of chlorpromazine (CPZ) and hemin (Hmn) to human (HSA) and bovine (BSA) serum albumin was studied by fluorescence quenching technique. Intrinsic fluorescences of BSA and HSA were measured by selectively exciting their tryptophan residues. Gradual quenching was observed by titration of both proteins with CPZ and Hmn. CPZ is a widely used anti-psychosis drug that causes severe side effects and strongly interacts with biomembranes, both in its lipidic and proteic regions. CPZ also interacts with blood components, influences bioavailability, and affects the function of several biomolecules. Albumin plays an important role in the transport and storage of hormones, ions, fatty acids and others substances, including CPZ, affecting the regulation of their plasmatic concentration. Hmn is an important ferric residue of hemoglobin that binds within the hydrophobic region of albumin with great specificity. Hmn added to HSA and BSA solutions at a molar ratio of 1:1 quenched about half of their fluorescence. Stern-Volmer plots obtained from experiments carried out at 25 and 35 °C showed the quenching of fluorescence of HSA and BSA by CPZ to be a collisional phenomenon. Hmn quenches fluorescence by a static process, which specifically indicates the formation of a complex. Our results suggest the prime binding site for CPZ and Hmn on both HSA and BSA to be near tryptophan residues.

  1. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  2. Effective ADE models for first-order mobile-immobile solute transport: Limits on validity and modeling implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Scott K.

    2015-12-01

    Quasi-1D mobile-immobile transport processes which have exponentially distributed random waiting times in both mobile and immobile states are common in hydrologic models (for example, of transport subject to kinetic sorption). The central limit theorem implies that eventually such transport will be expressible with an effective ADE (i.e. a generalization of the common retardation factor approach with an added Fickian dispersion coefficient accounting for the effect of trapping). Previous works have determined formulae for the value of this coefficient based on the transport properties. However, the time until convergence to Gaussian behavior has not previously been quantified. To this end, exact Green's functions characterizing the transport at all times are derived for the case of pure advection. The Green's functions are expressed in terms of three dimensionless parameters, representing location, time, and capacity coefficient. In the pre-Gaussian regime, a parametric study characterizing concentration profile asymmetry as a function of the capacity coefficient is performed. Next, heuristics are presented in terms of the dimensionless parameters for the time until the effective ADE adequately reflects reality. For strongly retarded solute, the time until effective ADE validity is found inversely proportional to release (e.g., desorption) rate. The nature of the effective dispersion coefficient is examined, and the possibility of large trapping-driven dispersion even in cases where batch experiments would detect negligible trapping is demonstrated. Collectively, these results call into question reliance on retardation factors derived from batch experiments for many practical transport modeling efforts; knowledge of both the trapping and release kinetics appears essential.

  3. Preparation and characterization of albumin nanoparticles encapsulating curcumin intended for the treatment of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jithan, AV; Madhavi, K; Madhavi, M; Prabhakar, K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: For the real-time clinical utilization of curcumin (an ayurvedic natural product) to treat breast cancer, its dissolution, rate limited solubility, poor tissue absorption, and extensive in vivo metabolism that leads to its poor systemic bioavailability should be overcome. A polymer-based nanoparticle formulation using bovine serum albumin can increase its aqueous solubility and can achieve protected, sustained, and targeted therapy in breast cancer. Materials and Methods: Desolvation technique was optimized for the preparation of albumin nanoparticles. Particle size, drug release, encapsulation efficiency, drug polymer interaction were the in vitro properties that were determined. Cell culture studies, in vivo pharmacokinetics in rats were used for biological characterization of the formulation. Results: The formulations were successfully prepared using 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 drug: polymer ratios and the percent entrapment was found to be 74.76%, 91.01%, 85.36%, 86.42%, respectively, and particle size determined by zetasizer was found to be 225.1, 223.5, 226.3, 228.7 nm, respectively, and in vitro release was sustained for at least one month with drug release of 75.74%, 65.97%, 64.42%, 54%, respectively. The dissolution rate and aqueous solubility of curcumin was enhanced with this formulation. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) studies demonstrated that the drug was not changed in the formulation during the fabrication process. The proliferation assays in MDA-MB-231 tumor cell lines indicated more effectiveness of the formulation compared to its solution form. In rats, albumin nanoparticles sustained drug release, demonstrated more bioavailability, improved pharmacokinetic properties, and enhanced tissue targetability of the drug. Conclusions: An effective curcumin-albumin nanoparticle formulation was successfully developed using a desolvation technique. PMID:23071931

  4. Highlighting the implications of selenium dispersion from disposal of Kahota Industrial Triangle area, Islamabad, Pakistan using three-dimension solute transport model.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Kausar, Rubina; Ahmad, Iftikhar

    2010-08-01

    This study highlights the implications of selenium (Se) dispersion in groundwater flow regimes of Kahota Industrial Triangle area located adjacent to the Soan River, Islamabad. Initially, a regional groundwater 3-D flow model has been developed, calibrated to the known observed heads of 24 water wells, verified, and confirmed that convergence has actually arrived to satisfy the steady state condition. Later, the transient simulation was carried out adding in the known recharge, storage factor, porosity, and observed drawdown matched with the simulated drawdown that appears to fall in close agreement with a difference of 0.25 m. As such the steady state groundwater model has facilitated to understand the mechanism of groundwater flow regimes in reference to the implications of selenium dispersion from disposal of Kahota Industrial Triangle area. Thirty-five water samples were collected mainly from the industrial water wells for the evaluation of heavy metals. Selenium being the major contributor of pollution has been short listed to monitor its dispersion using a solute transport model modular three-dimensional transport model (MT3D). Chemical parameters related to selenium characteristics including horizontal and vertical transverse dispersivity/longitudinal dispersivity, effective molecular diffusion coefficient and bulk density of the porous medium of aquifers have been used in MT3D contaminant transport model. MT3D is run for 30 years in steady state condition. As usual first run did not produce the exact field conditions. Therefore, the contaminant transport model is calibrated against the 32 values of observed selenium concentrations in boreholes by minor adjustments in the chemical parameter values. The final calibration has been achieved with residual value of 3.88x10(-5) Kg/m3. Seven hypothetical observation wells are used to monitor the selenium concentrations over a long-term period of time. PMID:19593643

  5. Interaction between Albumin and Pluronic F127 Block Copolymer Revealed by Global and Local Physicochemical Profiling.

    PubMed

    Neacsu, Maria Victoria; Matei, Iulia; Micutz, Marin; Staicu, Teodora; Precupas, Aurica; Popa, Vlad Tudor; Salifoglou, Athanasios; Ionita, Gabriela

    2016-05-12

    The interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with amphiphilic block copolymer Pluronic F127 has been investigated by several physical methods. Interest in studying this system stems from a broad range of bioactivities involving both macromolecules. Serum albumins constitute a significant class of proteins in the circulatory system, acting as carriers for a wide spectrum of compounds or assemblies. Pluronic block copolymers have revealed their capacity to ferry a variety of biologically active compounds. Circular dichroism, rheological measurements, and differential scanning microcalorimetry (μDSC) were employed to get insight into the interaction betweeen the two macromolecules. The results reveal that Pluronic F127 induces conformational changes to albumin if it is organized in a micellar form, while albumin influences the self-assembly of Pluronic F127 into micelles or gels. F127 micelles, however, induce smaller conformational changes compared to ionic surfactants. The μDSC thermograms obtained for HSA and/or F127 show that HSA shifts the critical micellar temperature (cmt) to lower values, while concurrently the HSA denaturation behavior is influenced by F127, depending on its concentration. Rheological measurements on solutions of F127 17% have shown that a sol-to-gel transition occurs at higher temperatures in the presence of HSA and the resulting gel is weaker. The global profile on HSA/F127 systems was complemented by local information provided by EPR measurements. A series of X-band EPR experiments was performed with spin probes 4-(N,N'-dimethyl-N-hexadecyl)ammonium-2,2',6,6'-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl iodide (CAT16) and 5-doxyl stearic acid (5-DSA). These spin probes bind to albumin sites and are sensitive to phase transformations in Pluronic block copolymer solutions. For a given F127 concentration, the spin probe binds only to HSA below cmt and migrates to the F127 micelles above cmt. The collective data suggest soft interactions between the

  6. Structural basis of transport of lysophospholipids by human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shihui; Shi, Xiaoli; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Bian, Chuanbing; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-10-08

    Lysophospholipids play important roles in cellular signal transduction and are implicated in many biological processes, including tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, immunity, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cancer and neuronal survival. The intracellular transport of lysophospholipids is through FA (fatty acid)-binding protein. Lysophospholipids are also found in the extracellular space. However, the transport mechanism of lysophospholipids in the extracellular space is unknown. HSA (human serum albumin) is the most abundant carrier protein in blood plasma and plays an important role in determining the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs. In the present study, LPE (lysophosphatidylethanolamine) was used as the ligand to analyse the interaction of lysophospholipids with HSA by fluorescence quenching and crystallography. Fluorescence measurement showed that LPE binds to HSA with a K{sub d} (dissociation constant) of 5.6 {micro}M. The presence of FA (myristate) decreases this binding affinity (K{sub d} of 12.9 {micro}M). Moreover, we determined the crystal structure of HSA in complex with both myristate and LPE and showed that LPE binds at Sudlow site I located in subdomain IIA. LPE occupies two of the three subsites in Sudlow site I, with the LPE acyl chain occupying the hydrophobic bottom of Sudlow site I and the polar head group located at Sudlow site I entrance region pointing to the solvent. This orientation of LPE in HSA suggests that HSA is capable of accommodating other lysophospholipids and phospholipids. The study provides structural information on HSA-lysophospholipid interaction and may facilitate our understanding of the transport and distribution of lysophospholipids.

  7. Protein adsorption on low temperature isotropic carbon. III. Isotherms, competitivity, desorption and exchange of human albumin and fibrinogen.

    PubMed

    Feng, L; Andrade, J D

    1994-04-01

    In this paper we consider the adsorption of albumin and fibrinogen on low temperature isotropic carbon (LTIC). A subsequent paper considers the adsorption of other plasma proteins [Feng L, Andrade JD, Colloids and Surfaces (in press)]. Carbon fragments and silica plates were used as adsorbents. Adsorption was carried out by incubating the adsorbents in solutions of 125I-labelled and unlabelled proteins (single component system), or with buffer-diluted human plasma (multicomponent system). Adsorbed proteins then underwent displacement by buffer, by single protein solutions or by dilute plasma. Results show that the LTIC substrate adsorbs a large amount of proteins before saturation, which may be due to multilayer adsorption. LTIC also irreversibly holds adsorbed proteins against the exchange agents used; little adsorbed proteins can be displaced, even after a very short adsorption time. There is no preferential adsorption for either albumin or fibrinogen on LTIC from their binary solutions, suggesting that both proteins have high affinities for the surface. Such strong interactions between LTIC and proteins are not attributed to electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, protein adsorption on the silica surface is selective and reversible, with a much higher affinity for fibrinogen than albumin and an even higher affinity for some other plasma proteins. The paper also discusses the effect of sequential protein addition to a solution on the surface concentration and suppression of adsorption of both proteins in the presence of other plasma proteins. A very important conclusion is that the LTIC surface is very active towards proteins adsorption. PMID:8061122

  8. Development of FET-type albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis.

    PubMed

    Park, Keun-Yong; Sohn, Young-Soo; Kim, Chang-Kyu; Kim, Hong-Seok; Bae, Young-Seuk; Choi, Sie-Young

    2008-07-15

    An albumin biosensor based on a potentiometric measurement using Biofield-effect-transistor (BioFET) has been designed and fabricated, and its characteristics were investigated. The BioFET was fabricated using semiconductor integrated circuit (IC) technology. The gate surface of the BioFET was chemically modified by newly developed self-assembled monolayer (SAM) synthesized by a thiazole benzo crown ether ethylamine (TBCEA)-thioctic acid to immobilize anti-albumin. SAM formation, antibody immobilization, and antigen-antibody interaction were verified using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). The output voltage changes of the BioFET with respect to various albumin concentrations were obtained. Quasi-reference electrode (QRE) and reference FET (ReFET) has been integrated with the BioFET, and its output characteristic was investigated. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the BioFET as the albumin sensor for diagnosing nephritis. PMID:18440216

  9. Importance of albumin binding in the assay for carnitine palmitoyltransferase.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, K; Notar-Francesco, V J

    1983-01-01

    Alterations in the long-chain acyl-CoA binding to albumin in the carnitine palmitoyltransferase (CPT) assay appreciably affect the reaction at commonly used substrate concentrations. Since in the CPT assay the latter are typically well below saturation or Vmax. values, the measured enzyme activity depends on both the absolute quantity of albumin in the CPT assay and any biochemical modification of its binding. The present study verifies the striking dependence of the K0.5 for palmitoyl-CoA on albumin and the misleading 'activation' of the enzyme by compounds that also avidly bind to albumin. In assessing the intracellular physiological relevance of any modifier of CPT, the effects of protein binding in the assay assume particular importance. Indeed, any compound that alters CPT activity may do so, not directly, but as an assay artifact changing the free or unbound substrate concentrations. PMID:6661210

  10. 99M-technetium labeled macroaggregated human serum albumin pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Winchell, Harry S.; Barak, Morton; Van Fleet, III, Parmer

    1977-05-17

    A reagent comprising macroaggregated human serum albumin having dispersed therein particles of stannous tin and a method for instantly making a labeled pharmaceutical therefrom, are disclosed. The labeled pharmaceutical is utilized in organ imaging.