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Sample records for alec christie julian

  1. Sir Alec Clegg

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brighouse, Tim

    2008-01-01

    This article is a personal view of the career of Sir Alec Clegg. It outlines some of Clegg's achievements in the West Riding, and why he was so influential on those that he worked with. Finally, it retells one of Alec Clegg's favourite stories "The fable of Fred".

  2. Corpus Christi, Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This near vertical view of the south Texas coast shows the city of Corpus Christi (28.0N, 97.0W) and Corpus Christi Bay. Mustang Island and the Gulf of Mexico are seen in the Southeast corner of the view. The Nueces River flows into the bay from the west. The light toned squiggly lines in Corpus Christi Bay are mud trails caused by shrimp boats dragging their nets along the shallow bottom of the bay.

  3. President of Council-Sir Alec

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    En décembre 1983 le président de l'Association du Personnel du Cern a suggéré d'inviter le président du conseil à une réunion du personnel dans le but d'améliorer la communication entre le conseil et le personnel. Le DG H.schopper remercie le président du conseil, Sir Alec, d'avoir accepté l'invitation malgré ses nombreux occupations.

  4. 130. Julian Price Memorial Park. Fortyseven acre Julian Price Lake ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    130. Julian Price Memorial Park. Forty-seven acre Julian Price Lake created by an impoundment. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  5. Corpus Christi oil port eyed

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, M.B.

    1993-07-05

    The Port of Corpus Christi, Texas, with the support of several oil companies and the blessing of the US Coast Guard, plans to build a $600-million deepwater harbor to accommodate supertankers. The proposed port, Safeharbor, is touted as an environmentally sound solution to current risks associated with off-loading crude oil from very large tankers at shore ports. In a system called lightering, crude now is transferred from supertankers in deep water to smaller vessels that can negotiate shallow channels. While smaller tankers need only 45 ft of water, supertankers need 80 ft. Corpus Christi has the advantage of being closer to deep water than other Gulf ports, but nevertheless, half the proposed project's cost, $300 million, would be for dredging a 10-mile channel to deep water.

  6. 33 CFR 165.808 - Corpus Christi Ship Channel, Corpus Christi, TX, safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (c) The Captain of the Port will notify the maritime community of periods during... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Corpus Christi Ship Channel... § 165.808 Corpus Christi Ship Channel, Corpus Christi, TX, safety zone. (a) The following areas...

  7. 33 CFR 165.808 - Corpus Christi Ship Channel, Corpus Christi, TX, safety zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR 165.23 apply. (c) The Captain of the Port will notify the maritime community of periods during... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Corpus Christi Ship Channel... § 165.808 Corpus Christi Ship Channel, Corpus Christi, TX, safety zone. (a) The following areas...

  8. The man behind the DNA fingerprints: an interview with Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this interview we talk with Professor Sir Alec Jeffreys about DNA fingerprinting, his wider scientific career, and the past, present and future of forensic DNA applications. The podcast with excerpts from this interview is available at: http://www.biomedcentral.com/biome/alec-jeffreys. PMID:24245655

  9. H. Julian Allen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen stands beside the observation window of the 8 x 7 foot test section of the NACA Ames Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  10. 77 FR 2448 - Special Local Regulation; HITS Triathlon; Corpus Christi Bayfront, Corpus Christi, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation; HITS Triathlon; Corpus Christi... from portions of the Corpus Christi Bayfront area during the HITS Triathlon on February 18th and 19th, 2012. This Special Local Regulation is necessary to ensure the safety of HITS Triathlon...

  11. Corpus Christi, Nueces, and Aransas Bays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Handley, Lawrence R.; Spear, Kathryn A.; Eleonor Taylor; Thatcher, Cindy

    2015-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay and Nueces Bay comprise the middle estuarine portion of Texas’ Coastal Bend region (Figure 1; Burgan and Engle, 2006). Aransas Bay is part of the upper estuarine portion of the region. These bays make up part of the Coastal Bend Bays and Estuaries Program, one of the many estuarine areas in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuary Program (Holt, 1998). The Coastal Bend region is sub-humid and sub-tropical. Summers are long, hot, and humid, and winters are short and mild. The landscape around the estuaries is dominated by row crops, pastures, and brushy rangeland (Handley and others, 2007). The Nueces River, along with other smaller rivers and creeks, provides freshwater inflow—along with essential nutrients and sediment— into Nueces Bay, which feeds into Corpus Christi Bay (Holt, 1998). Freshwater inflow into the Aransas Bay comes from Mission River, Aransas River, and Copano Creek. The region is relatively dry otherwise and prone to droughts. Corpus Christi receives an average of 76.2 cm (30 in) of rain annually; evaporation usually exceeds 177.8 cm (70 in) (Holt, 1998; Handley and others, 2007). The San Antonio-Nueces Coastal Basin drains into Aransas Bay. The Nueces River basin covers 43,253 km2 (16,700 miles2 ), from northwest of San Antonio, flowing southeast to where it drains into Nueces and Corpus Christi Bays (Holt, 1998). The Nueces-Rio Grande basin covers approximately 18,648 1 U.S. Geological Survey National Wetlands Research Center, 700 Cajundome Blvd., Lafayette, LA 70506 2 Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies, Texas A&M University - Corpus Christi, 6300 Ocean Drive, Unit 5869, Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 2 km2 (7,200 miles2 ) and flows partially into Corpus Christi Bay (as well as the upper Laguna Madre). The inflow from Nueces River has declined by approximately 20 percent over the past several decades, partly due to construction of lakes and reservoirs, particularly Lake Corpus Christi

  12. 77 FR 34034 - Corpus Christi Liquefaction, LLC; Cheniere Corpus Christi Pipeline, L.P.; Notice of Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ....; Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment for the Planned Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and... assessment (EA) that will discuss the environmental impacts of the planned Corpus Christi LNG Terminal and... (LNG) export and import terminal, and a natural gas transmission pipeline in Nueces and San...

  13. EEAP lighting survey study at the Corpus Christi Army Depot, Corpus Christi, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-05

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-0015. The study was conducted at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) in Corpus Christi, Texas, between October 3, 1994 and April 5, 1995. The site survey and data collection was performed by C.A. Pieper, P.E. and Tom Luckett, Lighting Designer. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were limited to building interior lighting and it`s effects on the heating, ventilating and air conditioning.

  14. EEAP-lighting survey study at the Corpus Christi Army Depot Corpus Christi, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-04-05

    This energy conservation study was performed by Huitt-Zollars Inc, for the U.S. Army Engineer District (USAED), Fort Worth, under contract number DACAC63-94-D-00l5. The study was conducted at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) in Corpus Christi, Texas, between October 3, 1994 and April 5, 1995. The site survey and data collection was performed by C.A. Pieper, P.E. and Tom Luckett, Lighting Designer. The purpose of the study was to perform a limited site survey of specific buildings at the facility, identify specific Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) that exist, and then evaluate these ECOs for technical and economic feasibility. These ECOs were limited to building interior lighting and its effects on the heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

  15. "The Middle School Cometh"...and Goeth: Alec Clegg and the Rise and Fall of the English Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crook, David

    2008-01-01

    This article identifies Alec Clegg as the leading figure behind the English middle-school movement from the late 1960s. It is argued that the rise of middle schools was sustained by Clegg's astute understanding, which he transmitted to other local education authorities, that the political imperative of comprehensive reorganisation need not…

  16. Subsurface geology of Corpus Christi Bay, Neuces County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, J.W.

    1996-09-01

    Prolific production in Corpus Christi Bay has occurred mainly in the regressive Frio Barrier Bar System and the associated shore face-shelf environment. All production in Corpus Christi Bay area is below the Anahuac transgressive wedge with the greatest accumulation in the 1st Marg. sand, which has produced a minimum of 680 BCF of gas in the Red Fish Bay-Mustang Island Common 10 reservoir, the largest single reservoir in South Texas. The 1st Marg. sands have produced in excess of 990 BCFG from four fields in Corpus Christi Bay. Shallow hydrocarbons in Corpus Christi Bay are associated with the South Texas Frio Barrier Bar System and are structurally trapped on large fault bound anticlines or up-to-the-coast relief faults. Deeper production from the Frio Sands is mainly on the Barrier Bar shoreface and associated with fault bounded anticlinal closures. Structural complexity increases with depth especially along the large strike aligned growth faults, some up to 4000 ft displacement, and the associated rollover anticlines. subsidiary faults, and shale plugs. These deeper reservoirs are usually pressure-depletion drives. The oil industry can point with pride to the co-existence with the fragile bay environment while extracting huge reserves. Most of the wells are on State of Texas marine leases and are controlled by State rules and City of Corpus Christi Bay drilling ordinances.

  17. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Long, Chuck

    2014-03-29

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  18. ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment

    ScienceCinema

    Long, Chuck

    2014-06-13

    Results of the ARM Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE) field campaign are contributing significantly to concurrent national and international research efforts addressing questions about how the MJO initiates and changes as it passes phenomenon differs in observations versus models.

  19. Beginning Again: A Response to Rosen and Christie

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doecke, Brenton; Breen, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Genre theory has been around for a long time now. The exchange between Michael Rosen and Frances Christie recently featured in "Changing English" is the latest in a series of exchanges between advocates of genre and their critics over the past three decades or so. Our aim in this response-essay is not to weigh up the merits of the cases…

  20. Initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    2015-12-14

    Many storms around the world have roots in the Indian Ocean, where they are churned up by the atmospheric process called the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). PNNL is working to unlock the secrets of the MJO, particularly how it initiates in the Indian Ocean every 30-60 days. Better prediction of the MJO will help resource managers, weather forecasters and people worldwide better prepare for its effects.

  1. Madden-Julian Variability in Coupled Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Li, W; Slingo, J M

    2001-12-12

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a dominant mode of tropical variability (Madden and Julian 1971, 1972). It is manifested on a timescale of {approx}30-70 days through large-scale circulation anomalies which occur in conjunction with eastward propagating convective anomalies over the eastern hemisphere. Recent evidence has suggested that an interactive ocean may be important for the simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (Flatau et al. 1997, Sperber et al. 1997, Waliser et al. 1999, Inness et al. 2002). As part of an initiative to the CLIVAR Working Group on Coupled Modeling, we examine ocean-atmosphere GCMs to ascertain the degree to which they can represent the 4-dimensional space-time structure of the MJO. The eastward propagation of convection is also examined with respect to the surface fluxes and SST, and we compare and contrast the behavior over the Indian Ocean and the western Pacific. Importantly, the results are interpreted with respect to systematic error of the mean state.

  2. A Conversation with Robert F. Christy Part II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippincott, Sara

    2006-12-01

    Robert F. Christy, Institute Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at Caltech, recalls his wartime work at Los Alamos on the critical assembly for the plutonium bomb (“the Christy bomb”); the Alamogordo test, July 16, 1945; the postwar concerns of ALAS (Association of Los Alamos Scientists); his brief return to the University of Chicago and move to Caltech; friendship with and later alienation from Edward Teller; work with Charles and Tommy Lauritsen and William A. Fowler in Caltech’s Kellogg Radiation Laboratory; Freeman Dyson’s Orion Project; work on the meson and RR Lyrae stars; fellowship at Cambridge University; 1950s Vista Project at Caltech; his opposition to the Strategic Defense Initiative; and his post-retirement work for the National Research Council’s Committee on Dosimetry and on inertial-confinement fusion.

  3. A Conversation with Robert F. Christy Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippincott, Sara

    2006-09-01

    Robert F. Christy, Institute Professor of Theoretical Physics Emeritus at Caltech, recalls his childhood in British Columbia; his undergraduate years at the University of British Columbia; his graduate work with J. Robert Oppenheimer at Berkeley; and his work on the Manhattan Project, first with Enrico Fermi at the Metallurgical Laboratory of the University of Chicago and then as a member of the Theoretical Division at Los Alamos.

  4. Percy Julian, Robert Robinson, and the Identity of Eserethole

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ault, Addison

    2008-01-01

    The Nova production "Percy Julian--Forgotten Genius" included the very public disagreement between Percy Julian, an unknown American chemist, and Robert Robinson, possibly the best known organic chemist of the day, as to the identity of "eserethole", the key intermediate for the synthesis of the alkaloid physostigmine. The Nova production,…

  5. Julian B. Rotter (1916-2014).

    PubMed

    Strickland, Bonnie R

    2014-01-01

    One of the most influential psychologists of the 20th century, Julian B. Rotter, died at the age of 97 on January 6, 2014, at his home in Mansfield, Connecticut. Jules was born on October 22, 1916, in Brooklyn, New York, the third son of Jewish immigrant parents. As noted in the citation for his American Psychological Association (APA) Award for Distinguished Scientific Contributions, "his pioneering social learning framework...transformed behavioral approaches to personality and clinical psychology. He integrated the concepts of expectancy and reinforcement and built an enduring early bridge between the psychology of learning and its diverse social, clinical, and personality applications. His seminal studies of the variable of internal versus external locus of control provided the foundation for years of prolific research on choice and perceived control in several disciplines...Julian Rotter, by his writing, teaching, and personal example,...profoundly changed theory and practice in the field" (American Psychologist, 1989, p. 625). He was devoted to his family and shared his insights, his empathy, his compassion, and his admirable social conscience with them, as he did with his myriad friends and students. PMID:25046717

  6. PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE C. 1893 HOTEL JULIAN, LOCATED AT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PERSPECTIVE VIEW OF THE C. 1893 HOTEL JULIAN, LOCATED AT 103-107 SECOND STREET, VIEW LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Corvallis Downtown Historic District, Bounded by First & Sixth Streets, Van Buren & Western Avenues, Corvallis, Benton County, OR

  7. H. Julian Allen with Blunt Body Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1957-01-01

    H. Julian Allen is best known for his 'Blunt Body Theory' of aerodynamics, a design technique for alleviating the severe re-entry heating problem which was then delaying the development of ballistic missiles. His findings revolutionized the fundamental design of ballistic missle re-entry shapes. Subsequently, applied research led to applications of the 'blunt' shape to ballistic missles and spacecraft which were intended to re-enter the Earth's atmosphere. This application led to the design of ablative heat shields that protected the Mercury, Gemini and Apollo astronauts as their space capsules re- entered the Earth's atmosphere. 'Harvey' Allen as he was called by most, was not only a brilliant scientist and aeronautical engineer but was also admired for his kindness, thoughtfulness and sense of humor. Among his many other accomplishments, Harvey Allen served as Center Director of the NASA Ames Research Center from 1965 to 1969. He died of a heart attack on January 29, 1977 at the age of 66.

  8. EFFECTS OF CORPUS CHRISTI BAY SEDIMENTS ON SURVIVAL, GROWTH AND REPRODUCTION OF THE MYSID, MYSIDOPSIS BAHIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study described here examined effects on mortality, growth, reproduction, and behavior of Americamysis bahi exposed under extended static conditions to bedded sediments from Corpus Christi Bay.

  9. Giants of the past: Percy Lavon Julian (1899-1975) a forgotten pioneer in soy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The common thread running through African American chemist Percy Lavon Julian's life is one about outstanding achievements in the face of great obstacles. Racial oppression forced Julian to repeatedly pick up broken fragments of chance and turn them into opportunity. Percy Julian was a luminary in...

  10. Quarantine Controversy: Kaci Hickox v. Governor Chris Christie.

    PubMed

    Gatter, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Nurse Kaci Hickox is among the "Ebola Fighters" honored by Time magazine as its 2014 Person of the Year, having treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone while volunteering with Médecins Sans Frontieres. When she returned to the United States in October 2014, she was quarantined in New Jersey for three days before returning home to Maine under the terms of a negotiated release. A year later, in October 2015, Hickox filed suit in federal court against Governor Chris Christie and New Jersey health officials, claiming that the quarantine violated her civil rights. Her complaint asserts that New Jersey officials lacked the authority to quarantine her because she did not pose a significant risk of transmission. The lawsuit raises important questions about disease-transmission risk, the inability of science to rule out certain theoretical risks, and the state's power to quarantine. It also demonstrates that population health depends on respecting individual liberty and using the best available epidemiological data to set public health policy. PMID:27150412

  11. 129. Julian Price Memorial Park. Price Lake Dam. A concrete ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    129. Julian Price Memorial Park. Price Lake Dam. A concrete slab bridge crosses the top of the dam impounding a forty-seven acre lake. Looking west. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  12. Teaching Margery and Julian in Anthology-Based Survey Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petersen, Zina

    2006-01-01

    Recognizing that many of us teach the medieval English women mystics Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich in survey courses, this essay attempts to put these writers in context for teachers who may have only a passing familiarity with the period. Focusing on passages of their writings found in the Longman and Norton anthologies of British…

  13. Hydrodynamic characterization of Corpus Christi Bay through modeling and observation.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad S; Bonner, James S; Edge, Billy L; Page, Cheryl A

    2014-11-01

    Christi Bay is a relatively flat, shallow, wind-driven system with an average depth of 3-4 m and a mean tidal range of 0.3 m. It is completely mixed most of the time, and as a result, depth-averaged models have, historically, been applied for hydrodynamic characterization supporting regulatory decisions on Texas coastal management. The bay is highly stratified during transitory periods of the summer with low wind conditions. This has important implications on sediment transport, nutrient cycling, and water quality-related issues, including hypoxia which is a key water quality concern for the bay. Detailed hydrodynamic characterization of the bay during the summer months included analysis of simulation results of 2-D hydrodynamic model and high-frequency (HF) in situ observations. The HF radar system resolved surface currents, whereas an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measured current at different depths of the water column. The developed model successfully captured water surface elevation variation at the mouth of the bay (i.e., onshore boundary of the Gulf of Mexico) and at times within the bay. However, large discrepancies exist between model-computed depth-averaged water currents and observed surface currents. These discrepancies suggested the presence of a vertical gradient in the current structure which was further substantiated by the observed bi-directional current movement within the water column. In addition, observed vertical density gradients proved that the water column was stratified. Under this condition, the bottom layer became hypoxic due to inadequate mixing with the aerated surface water. Understanding the disparities between observations and model predictions provides critical insights about hydrodynamics and physical processes controlling water quality. PMID:25096643

  14. 76 FR 55909 - CITGO Refining and Chemicals Company L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... CITGO Refining and Chemicals Company L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, Texas... ``Complainant,'' against the Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, Texas (PCCA) hereinafter... charges, CITGO has been forced to subsidize costs associated with services provided to other users of...

  15. Investigation of ground-water contamination at a drainage ditch, Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, 2005–06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Casey, Clifton C.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Naval Facilities Engineering Command Southeast, used newly developed sampling methods to investigate ground-water contamination by chlorobenzenes beneath a drainage ditch on the southwestern side of Installation Restoration Site 4, Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Corpus Christi, Texas, during 2005-06. The drainage ditch, which is a potential receptor for ground-water contaminants from Installation Restoration Site 4, intermittently discharges water to Corpus Christi Bay. This report uses data from a new type of pore-water sampler developed for this investigation and other methods to examine the subsurface contamination beneath the drainage ditch. Analysis of ground water from the samplers indicated that chlorobenzenes (maximum detected concentration of 160 micrograms per liter) are present in the ground water beneath the ditch. The concentrations of dissolved oxygen in the samples (less than 0.05-0.4 milligram per liter) showed that the ground water beneath and near the ditch is anaerobic, indicating that substantial chlorobenzene biodegradation in the aquifer beneath the ditch is unlikely. Probable alternative mechanisms of chlorobenzene removal in the ground water beneath the drainage ditch include sorption onto the organic-rich sediment and contaminant depletion by cattails through uptake, sorption, and localized soil aeration.

  16. 40 CFR 81.136 - Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Corpus Christi-Victoria Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.136 Section 81.136 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... County, Jackson County, Jim Wells County, Kenedy County, Kleberg County, Lavaca County, Live Oak...

  17. IMPACT OF STORM-WATER OUTFALLS ON SEDIMENT QUALITY IN CORPUS CHRISTI BAY, TEXAS, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industr...

  18. Factors associated with birth defects in the region of Corpus Christi, Texas

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, the Birth Defects Epidemiology & Surveillance Branch of the Texas Department of State Health Services (DSHS) has documented a high prevalence of certain birth defects in the Corpus Christi, TX region. We conducted a case-control study to evaluate associations...

  19. 78 FR 44523 - Reorganization of Foreign-Trade Zone 122 Under Alternative Site Framework; Corpus Christi, Texas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ...; Whereas, notice inviting public comment was given in the Federal Register (78 FR 13015-13016, 02/26/2013..., Kleberg and Bee Counties, Texas, within and adjacent to the Corpus Christi Customs and Border...

  20. A Madden-Julian Oscillation in Tropospheric Ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ziemke, J. R.; Chandra, S.

    2003-01-01

    This is the first study to indicate a Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric ozone is derived using differential measurements of total column ozone and stratospheric column ozone measured from total ozone mapping spectrometer (TOMS) and microwave limb sounder (MLS) instruments. Two broad regions of significant MJO signal are identified in the tropics, one in the western Pacific and the other in the eastern Pacific. Over both regions, MJO variations in tropospheric ozone represent 5-10 Dobson Unit (DU) peak-to-peak anomalies. These variations are significant compared to mean background amounts of 20 DU or less over most of the tropical Pacific. MJO signals of this magnitude would need to be considered when investigating and interpreting particular pollution events since ozone is a precursor of the hydroxyl (OH) radical, the main oxidizing agent of pollutants in the lower atmosphere.

  1. Statistical forecasts of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Carvalho, L.; Higgins, W.; Waliser, D.; Schemm, J.-K.

    2003-04-01

    Tropical intraseasonal convective anomalies (TICA) play a significant role in the coupled ocean-atmosphere system and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the primary mode of this variability. The two main aspects investigated in this study are: 1) differences in predictive skill of TICA events with different eastward propagation characteristics; 2) differences in predictive skill of TICA events occurring in different phases of El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO). Twenty two years of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) is used to identify eastward propagating convective anomalies. A statistical forecast model based on lagged linear regression of the first two principal components from a combined empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis of intraseasonally filtered OLR, zonal wind components at 200 hPa and 850 hPa anomalies is developed. The forecast model shows useful skill out to about 25 days when validated against filtered anomalies. The presentation will also discuss the statistical forecast skill in real-time.

  2. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Modulate Stratospheric Gravity Waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Andrew; Wright, Corwin; Mitchell, Nicholas

    2016-04-01

    The circulation of the stratosphere is strongly influenced by the fluxes of gravity waves propagating from tropospheric sources. In the tropics, these gravity waves are primarily generated by convection. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) dominates the intra-seasonal variability of this convection. However, the connection between the MJO and the variability of stratospheric gravity waves is largely unknown. Here we examine gravity-wave potential energy at a height of 26 km and the upper tropospheric zonal-wind anomaly of the MJO at the 200 hPa level, sorted by the relative phase of the MJO using the RMM MJO indices. We show that a strong anti-correlation exists between gravity-wave potential energy and the MJO eastward wind anomaly. We propose that this correlation is a result of the filtering of ascending waves by the MJO winds. The study provides evidence that the MJO contributes significantly to the variability of stratospheric gravity waves in the tropics.

  3. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation modulate stratospheric gravity waves?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Andrew C.; Wright, Corwin J.; Mitchell, Nicholas J.

    2016-04-01

    The circulation of the stratosphere is strongly influenced by the fluxes of gravity waves propagating from tropospheric sources. In the tropics, these gravity waves are primarily generated by convection. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) dominates the intraseasonal variability of this convection. However, the influence of the MJO on the variability of stratospheric gravity waves is largely unknown. Here we examine gravity wave potential energy at 26 km and the upper tropospheric zonal wind anomaly of the MJO at 200 hPa, sorted by the relative phase of the MJO using the Real Multivariate MJO indices. We show that a strong anticorrelation exists between gravity wave potential energy and the MJO eastward wind anomaly. We propose that this correlation is a result of the filtering of upward propagating waves by the MJO winds. The study provides the first observational evidence that the MJO contributes significantly to the global variability of stratospheric gravity waves in the tropics.

  4. Climbing the Mountain - The Scientific Biography of Julian Schwinger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehra, Jagdish; Milton, Kimball

    2000-08-01

    This is the first biography ever written on the distinguished physicist Julian Schwinger. Schwinger was one of the most important and influential scientists of the twentieth century. The list of his contributions is staggering, from his early work leading to the Schwinger action principle, Euclidean quantum field theory, and the genesis of the standard model, to later valuable work on magnetic charge and the Casimir effect. He also shared the 1965 Nobel Prize in Physics with Richard Feynman. However, even among physicists, understanding and recognition of his work remains limited. This book by Mehra and Milton, both of whom were personally acquainted with Schwinger, presents a unique portrait that sheds light on both his personality and his work through discussion of his lasting influence on science. Anyone who wishes to gain a deeper understanding of one of the great physicists of this century needs to read this book.

  5. Julian Lennon Is Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... Julian Lennon Is Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of ... now serving as Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America. What do you hope to achieve ...

  6. The heliocentric system from the Orphic Hymns and the Pythagoreans to emperor Julian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, Efstratios; Dacanalis, Aris; Dimitrijević, Milan, S.; Mantarakis, Petros

    The evolution of the heliocentric theory in the antiquity has been analyzed, from the first seeds in the Orphic Hymns to the emperor Julian, also called "the Apostate" in the 4th century A.D. In particular the Orphic Hymns, views of Pythagoreans, as well as the heliocentric ideas of Philolaus of Croton, Icetas, Ecphantus, Heraclides of Pontos, Anaximander, Seleucus of Seleucia, Aristarchus of Samos and Emperor Julian were analyzed.

  7. Geology and nickel mineralization of the Julian-Cuyamaca area, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Creasey, S.C.

    1946-01-01

    The Julian-Cuyamaca area is in the San Diego Mountains, one of the Peninsular Ranges of southern California. It lies in San Diego County, about 3 miles south of Julian, and approximately 60 miles northeast of San Diego. The area was mapped, and its nickel mineralization studied, from March to June, 1944; the work was part of the U. S. Geological Survey's program of strategic mineral investigations.

  8. The ethnobotany of Christ's Thorn Jujube (Ziziphus spina-christi) in Israel

    PubMed Central

    Dafni, Amots; Levy, Shay; Lev, Efraim

    2005-01-01

    This article surveys the ethnobotany of Ziziphus spina-christi (L.) Desf. in the Middle East from various aspects: historical, religious, philological, literary, linguistic, as well as pharmacological, among Muslims, Jews, and Christians. It is suggested that this is the only tree species considered "holy" by Muslims (all the individuals of the species are sanctified by religion) in addition to its status as "sacred tree " (particular trees which are venerated due to historical or magical events related to them, regardless of their botanical identity) in the Middle East. It has also a special status as "blessed tree" among the Druze. PMID:16270941

  9. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Warming World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chuing-Wen June; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Hsu, Huang-Hsiung; Keenlyside, Noel; Tsuang, Ben-Jei

    2015-04-01

    Climate models remain challenged by accurate simulation of the Madden- Julian oscillation (MJO). This has limited the study of the impact of global warming on this phenomenon. He we apply the newly developed ECHAM5-SIT coupled model that is able simulate the MJO with realistic strength, structure, period, and propagation speed. The model consists of a high-resolution one-column ocean model (SIT) coupled to the ECHAM5 atmospheric model. Numerical experiments were conducted to explore the changes in the MJO by the end of 21st Century under the RCP8.5 scenario. In the warming climate, the MJO remains wavenumber-one structure with larger amplitude and stronger circumglobal propagation, and faster eastward propagation. The convection develops higher in the upper troposphere and the overturning circulation expands zonally but contracts meridionally. The shallow and deep convective heating are both enhanced and a stronger low-level convergence enhances westward tilting with height. Enhancement of MJO amplitude and extent can be explained by enhanced intraseasonal low-level convergence and increased mean moisture under global warming. The moister mean state contributes to the enhancement of deep convection, which excites stronger Kelvin waves. This reinforces low-level convergence through the enhanced Frictional Convergence Mechanism and leads to the more efficient and timely preconditioning of the deep convection, and therefore to a faster development and enhancement of the deep convection in MJO.

  10. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gleckler, P J; Doutriaux, C; Groups, A M; Groups, C M; Slingo, J M; Inness, P M; Gualdi, S; Li, W

    2003-10-27

    A methodology is utilized to analyze in a standardized fashion the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in general circulation models. This is attained by projecting 20-100 day bandpass filtered outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from the models onto the two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOF's) of observed OLR that characterize the propagation of MJO convection from the Indian Ocean to the central Pacific Ocean. The resulting principal component time series are then screened to isolate boreal winters during which they exhibit a lead-lag relationship consistent with observations. This PC subset is used for linear regression to determine the ability of the models to simulate the observed spacetime variability of the MJO. The vast majority of models underestimate the amplitude of the MJO convective anomalies by a factor of two or more, and the eastward propagation of convection is less coherent than observed, typically. For a given family of models, coupling to an ocean leads to better organization of the large-scale convection. The low-level moisture convergence mechanism for eastward propagation is represented in limited cases, as is the vertical structure of the MJO.

  11. Julian Huxley, Uca pugnax and the allometric method.

    PubMed

    Packard, Gary C

    2012-02-15

    The allometric method, which often is attributed to Julian Huxley, entails fitting a straight line to logarithmic transformations of the original bivariate data and then back-transforming the resulting equation to form a power function in the arithmetic scale. Development of the technique was strongly influenced by Huxley's own research on growth by the enlarged 'crusher' claw in male fiddler crabs (Uca pugnax). Huxley reported a discontinuity in the log-log plot of chela mass vs body mass, which he interpreted as an abrupt change in relative growth of the chela at about the time crabs attain sexual maturity. My analysis of Huxley's arithmetic data indicates, however, that the discontinuity was an artifact caused by logarithmic transformation and that dynamics of growth by the crusher claw do not change at any point during development. Arithmetic data are well described by a power function fitted by nonlinear regression but not by one estimated by back-transforming a line fitted to logarithms. This finding and others like it call into question the continued reliance on the allometric method in contemporary research. PMID:22279062

  12. The Hydrological Cycle of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliser, D.; Tian, B.; Schwartz, M.; Liu, T.; Fetzer, E.

    2007-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant form of intra-seasonal variability in the Tropics and it impacts a wide range of phenomena, such as El Nino/La Nina, Asian-Australian monsoons, mid-latitude weather, and tropical cyclones. Despite the prominent impacts of the MJO and its potential predictability with lead times on the order of weeks, our weather and climate models have a relatively poor representation of the MJO and our environmental predictions suffer from this shortcoming. To date, the large-scale MJO convection and circulation characteristics have been relatively well documented and in some cases understood. For the most part, these studies have focused on quantities such as upper and lower level winds, outgoing longwave radiation and precipitation, and surface heat budget processes. In recent years, a number of studies have also documented aspects of the MJO's vertical structure impacts on biology and composition. In this study, we focus on the hydrological cycle of the MJO. With the addition of a number of new satellite products in recent years, it is possible to more completely describe most aspects of the hydrological cycle of the MJO. We build on recent work with AIRS water vapor and MLS cloud ice profiles to document and discuss the variations in rainfall (TRMM, CMAP), surface evaporation (derived via SSM/I etc), vertical profiles of moisture (AIRS), column moisture convergence (QuikScat, SSM/I), and cloud liquid (SSM/I) and ice water (MLS).

  13. Tracking Pulses of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoneyama, Kunio; Zhang, Chidong; Long, Charles N.

    2013-12-13

    An international field campaign aiming at atmospheric and oceanic processes associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) was conducted in and around the tropical Indian Ocean (IO) during October 2011 - March 2012. The objective of the field campaign was to collect observations urgently needed to expedite the progress of understanding the key processes of the MJO, focusing on its initiation but also including propagation and maturation, and ultimately to improve skills of numerical simulation and prediction of the MJO. Primary targets of the field campaign include interaction of atmospheric deep convection with its environmental moisture, evolution of cloud populations, and air-sea interaction. Several MJO events were captured by ground-based, airborne, and oceanic instruments with advanced observing technology. Numerical simulations and real-time forecasts were integrated components of the field campaign in its design and operation. Observations collected during the campaign provide unprecedented opportunities to reveal detailed processes of the MJO and to assist evaluation, improvement and development of weather and climate models. The data policy of the campaign encourages the broad research community to use the field observations to advance the MJO study.

  14. Maps showing textural characteristics of benthic sediments in the Corpus Christi Bay estuarine system, south Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shideler, Gerald L.; Stelting, Charles E.; McGowen, Joseph H.

    1981-01-01

    Corpus Christi Bay is a heavily used estuary on the south Texas coast in the northwest Gulf of Mexico (fig. 1).  The Bay is stressed by diverse activities which could substantially affect its ecosystem.  Such activities include shipping, resource production (oil, gas, and construction aggregate), commercial and sport fishing, and recreation.  Shipping activities alone have had a substantial impact on the bay.  For example, the past maintenance of navigation channels has required extensive dredging and spoil disposal within the estuarine system.  Numerous subaqueous spoil disposal sites and subaerial spoil banks are present throughout the bay (fig. 1), and the selection of future spoil disposal sites is becoming a critical local problem.  As activities in the bay increase, the need for effective environmental management becomes increasingly important, and effective management necessitates a good understanding of the bay's physical characteristics.  The objective of this study is to provide detailed information about the textural composition of bottom sediments within the estuarine system, information which could be used in making environmental-management decisions.  Visual descriptions of bottom sediments in Corpus Christi Bay and adjacent areas have been presented by McGowen and Morton (1979).  Additionally, a study of the textures of sediments on the Inner Continental Shelf adjacent to the bay has been presented by Shideler and Berryhill (1977).

  15. 33 CFR 3.40-35 - Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-35 Section 3.40-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT...

  16. 33 CFR 3.40-35 - Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.40-35 Section 3.40-35 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY GENERAL COAST GUARD AREAS, DISTRICTS, SECTORS, MARINE INSPECTION ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT...

  17. The life cycle of the Madden-Julian oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendon, Harry H.; Salby, Murry L.

    1994-01-01

    A composite life cycle of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is constructed from the cross covariance between outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), wind, and temperature. To focus on the role of convection, the composite is based on episodes when a discrete signal in OLR is present. The composite convective anomaly possesses a predominantly zonal wavenumber 2 structure that is confined to the eastern hemisphere. There, it propagates eastward at about 5 m/s and evolves through a systematic cycle of amplification and decay. Unlike the convective anomaly, the circulation anomaly is not confined to the eastern hemisphere. The circulation anomaly displays characteristics of both a forced response, coupled to the convective anomaly as it propagates across the eastern hemisphere, and a radiating response, which propagates away from the convective anomaly into the western hemisphere at about 10 m/s. The forced response appears as a coupled Rossby-Kelvin wave while the radiating response displays predominantly Kelvin wave features. When it is amplifying, the convective anomaly is positively correlated to the temperature perturbation, which implies production of eddy available potential energy (EAPE). A similar correlation between upper-tropospheric divergence and temperature implies conversion of EAPE to eddy kinetic energy during this time. When it is decaying, temperature has shifted nearly into quadrature with convection, so their correlation and production of EAPE are then small. The same correspondence to the amplification and decay of the disturbance is mirrored in the phase relationship between surface convergence and anomalous convection. The correspondence of surface convergence to the amplification and decay of the convective anomaly suggests that frictional wave- Conditional Instability of the Second Kind (CISK) plays a key role in generating the MJO.

  18. Modulation of Atlantic Aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tian, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Wong, S.

    2010-01-01

    Much like the better-known EI Nino-Southern Oscillation, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is a global-scale atmospheric phenomenon. The MJO involves periodic, systematic changes in the distribution of clouds and precipitation over the western Pacific and Indian oceans, along with differences in wind intensity over even more extensive areas, including the north and subtropical Atlantic Ocean. The lead authors of this paper developed a sophisticated mathematical technique for mapping the spatial and temporal behavior of changes in the atmosphere produced by the MJO. In a previous paper, we applied this technique to search for modulation of airborne particle amount in the eastern hemisphere associated with the "wet" (cloudy) vs. "dry" phases of the MJO. The study used primarily AVHRR, MODIS, and TOMS satellite-retrieved aerosol amount, but concluded that other factors, such as cloud contamination of the satellite signals, probably dominated the observed variations. The current paper looks at MJO modulation of desert dust transport eastward across the Atlantic from northern Africa, a region much less subject to systematic cloud contamination than the eastern hemisphere areas studied previously. In this case, a distinct aerosol signal appears, showing that dust is transported westward much more effectively during the MJO phase that favors westward-flowing wind, and such transport is suppressed when the MJO reduces these winds. Aside form the significant achievement in identifying such an effect, the result implies that an important component of global dust transport can be predicted based on the phase of the MJO. As a consequence, the impact of airborne dust on storm development in the Atlantic, and on dust deposition downwind of the desert sources, can also be predicted and more accurately modeled.

  19. Intraseasonal isotopic variation associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Naoyuki; Noone, David; Risi, Camille; Schmidt, Gavin A.; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Yoneyama, Kunio

    2011-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of intraseasonal variability in the tropical atmosphere. This study examines the evolution of the hydrologic regime from before the onset of the MJO (pre-onset period) to the MJO onset period, using deuterated water vapor (HDO) measurements from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and from ground-based stations. Ground-based observations reveal a clear transition between high HDO/H2O isotope ratios during the pre-onset period to a period of repeated abrupt decreases in the HDO/H2O isotope ratio associated with intense convection. Each observed minimum in the HDO/H2O ratio corresponded to a maximum in stratiform rainfall fraction, which was derived independently from radar precipitation coverage area. The ground-based observations are consistent with the satellite observations of the HDO/H2O ratio. In order to attribute the mechanisms that bring about the isotopic changes within the MJO convection, an isotope-enabled general circulation model (GCM) constrained by observed meteorological fields was used to simulate this MJO period. The GCM reproduced many of the observed isotopic features that accompanied the onset of an MJO. After the development of deep convection, large-scale stratiform cloud cover appears, and isotope ratios respond, as a consequence of diffusive exchange between stratiform raindrops and the surrounding vapor. In this diffusive exchange process, heavy isotopes tend to become enriched in precipitation and depleted in the surrounding vapor, and thus successive stratiform rainfall results in decreasing isotope values in the middle and lower troposphere. On the basis of these characteristics, isotope tracers can be used to partition stratiform and convective rainfall from observed isotope data and to validate the simulated proportions of convective/stratiform rainfall.

  20. Does the Madden-Julian Oscillation Influence Aerosol Variability?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, B.; Waliser, D. E.; Kahn, R. A.; Li, Q.; Yung, Y. L.; Tyranowski, T.; Geogdzhayev, I. V.; Mishchenko, M. I.; Torres, O.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-12-01

    We investigate the modulation of aerosols by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) using satellite-based global aerosol products, including aerosol index (AI) from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) on Nimbus-7, and aerosol optical thickness (AOT) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on Terra and Aqua and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on NOAA satellites. A composite analysis is performed for boreal winter, and the global pentad rainfall data from the NOAA Climate Prediction Center (CPC) Merged Analysis of Precipitation (CMAP) are used to identify MJO events. The MJO composites exhibit large variations in the TOMS AI and MODIS/AVHRR AOT over the equatorial Indian and western Pacific Oceans where MJO convection is active, as well as the tropical Africa and Atlantic Ocean where MJO convection is relatively weak but the background aerosol level is relatively high. A strong inverse linear relationship between the TOMS AI and rainfall anomalies, but a weaker, less coherent positive correlation between the MODIS/AVHRR AOT and rainfall anomalies, were found. The Aerosol Robotic Network AOT pattern at Kaashidoo (73.5°E, 4.9°N) and Nauru (167°E, 0.5°S) is more consistent with MODIS and AVHRR. These results indicate a connection between the MJO, its associated rainfall and circulation variability, and the observed aerosol variations. Several physical and non-physical factors that may contribute to the observed aerosol-rainfall relationship, such as aerosol humidification effect, wet deposition, surface wind speed, phytoplankton, different sensor sensitivities (absorbing versus non-absorbing aerosols and upper versus lower tropospheric aerosols), sampling issue, and cloud contamination, are discussed. However, a clear causal explanation for the observed patterns remains elusive. Further investigation is needed to unravel this complex aerosol-rainfall relationship.

  1. 78 FR 37792 - Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number #95749-279, CI Big Spring, Corrections Institution...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... Bureau of Industry and Security Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache, Inmate Number 95749-279, CI Big Spring... 15, 2012, in the U.S. District Court, Southern District of Texas, Mario Julian Martinez-Bernache (``Martinez-Bernache'') was convicted of violating Section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C....

  2. Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment reconnaissance basic data for Corpus Christi NTMS quadrangle, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-05-31

    Results of a reconnaissance geochemical survey of the Corpus Christi Quadrangle, Texas, are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 119 groundwater samples and 57 stream sediment samples. Also included is a brief discussion on the geology and hydrology of the quadrangle. Groundwater data indicate that uranium concentrations above the 85th percentile occur primarily in a trend in western Nueces County. With one exception, waters in the trend are produced from the Evangeline aquifer and have high values for selenium and strontium. Owing to urbanization, low topographic relief, and the presence of Recent-to-Pleistocene surface material, stream sediment data were found to be less than optimum for the determination of the potential for uranium mineralization, and variation in uranium concentrations between units may simply reflect lithologic differences.

  3. A mobile monitoring system to understand the processes controlling episodic events in Corpus Christi Bay.

    PubMed

    Islam, Mohammad Shahidul; Bonner, James S; Ojo, Temitope O; Page, Cheryl

    2011-04-01

    Corpus Christi Bay (TX, USA) is a shallow wind-driven bay and thereby, can be characterized as a highly pulsed system. It cycles through various episodic events such as hypoxia, water column stratification, sediment resuspension, flooding, etc. Understanding of the processes that control these events requires an efficient observation system that can measure various hydrodynamic and water quality parameters at the multitude of spatial and temporal scales of interest. As part of our effort to implement an efficient observation system for Corpus Christi Bay, a mobile monitoring system was developed that can acquire and visualize data measured by various submersible sensors on an undulating tow-body deployed behind a research vessel. Along with this system, we have installed a downward-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler to measure the vertical profile of water currents. Real-time display of each measured parameter intensity (measured value relative to a pre-set peak value) guides in selecting the transect route to capture the event of interest. In addition, large synchronized datasets measured by this system provide an opportunity to understand the processes that control various episodic events in the bay. To illustrate the capability of this system, datasets from two research cruises are presented in this paper that help to clarify processes inducing an inverse estuary condition at the mouth of the ship channel and hypoxia at the bottom of the bay. These measured datasets can also be used to drive numerical models to understand various environmental phenomena that control the water quality of the bay. PMID:20556650

  4. Simplified metrics for the identification of the Madden-Julian oscillation in models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Kim, Daehyun

    2012-07-01

    We propose simplified metrics to evaluate the fidelity with which the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) is simulated in climate models. These metrics are based on lag correlation analysis of principal component time series (PCs). The PCs are obtained by projecting simulated 20–100 day bandpass filtered daily outgoing longwave radiation onto the two leading empirical orthogonal functions of observed MJO variability. The simplified MJO metrics, the maximum positive correlation and time lag at which it occurs, provide consistent information relative to more complex diagnostics developed by the Madden–Julian Oscillation Working Group (CLIVAR MJOWG) and by Kim et al.

  5. Madden Julian Oscillation impacts on global ocean surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Durrant, Tom H.; Hemer, Mark A.

    2015-12-01

    We assess the impact of the tropical Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global ocean wind waves using 30 years of wave data from a wave model hindcast that is forced with high resolution surface winds from the NCEP-CFSR reanalysis. We concentrate on the boreal winter season when the MJO has its greatest amplitude and is potentially a source of predictable wave impacts at intra-seasonal lead times. Statistically significant anomalies in significant wave height (Hs), peak wave period (Tp) and zonal wave energy flux (CgE) are found to covary with the intra-seasonal variation of surface zonal wind induced by the MJO as it traverses eastward from the western tropical Indian Ocean to the eastern tropical Pacific. Tp varies generally out of phase with Hs over the life cycle of the MJO, indicating that these MJO-wave anomalies are locally wind-generated rather than remotely generated by ocean swell. Pronounced Hs anomalies develop on the northwest shelf of Australia, where the MJO is known to influence sea level and surface temperatures, and in the western Caribbean Sea and Guatemalan-Panama Seas with enhanced wave anomalies apparent in the vicinity of the Tehuantepec and Papagayo gaps. Significant wave anomalies are also detected in the North Pacific and North Atlantic oceans in connection with the MJO teleconnection to the extratropics via atmospheric wave propagation. The impact in the north Atlantic stems from induction of the high phase of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) about 1 week after MJO convection traverses the Indian Ocean, and the low phase of the NAO about one week after suppressed convection traverses the Indian Ocean. Strong positive Hs anomalies maximize on the Northern European coast in the positive NAO phase and vice versa for the negative NAO phase. The MJO also influences the occurrence of daily low (below the 5th percentile) and high (above the 95th percentile) wave conditions across the tropics and in the North Pacific and North Atlantic

  6. Establishment of the United States Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Kosclski, J.L.; Boyer, R.; Sloger, W.

    1997-08-01

    The proposed establishment of the US Navy Mine Warfare Center of Excellence (MWCE) in the Corpus Christi Bay Area, Texas, involved the collocation of the Navy`s Mine Warfare and Mine Counter Measures assets in proximity to each other at Naval Station (NAVSTA) Ingleside and Naval Air Station (NAS) Corpus Christi, Texas. Collocation of these Navy forces would provide significant advantages in meeting mission and operational requirements. This action would improve the operational training and readiness of the forces. In addition to new construction or modifications at NAVSTA Ingleside, NAS Corpus Christi, and off-base; the establishment of offshore training and operating areas was required. When the project was first proposed in 1993, considerable concern was expressed by environmental interests, shrimpers, and state and federal resource agencies regarding the impact of the proposed training activities within Gulf waters. The Navy and Turner Collie and Braden, Inc., under contract to the Navy, conducted several technical studies and extensive coordination with concerned interests during the environmental impact statement process to identify and document the potential intensity, magnitude, and duration of impact from each proposed training activity.

  7. Impact of storm-water outfalls on sediment quality in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, R.S.; Montagna, P.A.; Biedenbach, J.M.; Kalke, R.; Kennicutt, M.C.; Hooten, R.; Cripe, G.

    2000-03-01

    To determine the quality of sediments and extent of contaminant impacts, a Sediment Quality Triad (SQT) study was conducted at 36 sites in the Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, USA, system. Fifteen of the 36 sites were located near storm-water outfalls, but 13 other sites (i.e., industrial and domestic outfalls, oil field-produced water discharges, and dredging activity) and eight reference sites were also evaluated. Sediment samples were collected and analyzed for physical-chemical characteristics, contaminant concentrations (metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons [PAHs], polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs], and pesticides), toxicity, and a benthic index of biotic integrity (BIBI) composed of 10 independent metrics calculated for each site. This large data matrix was reduced using multivariate analysis to create new variables for each component representing overall means and containing most of the variance in the larger data set. The new variables were used to conduct the correlation analysis. Toxicity was significantly correlated with both chemistry and ecological responses, whereas no correlations between the benthic metrics and sediment chemistry were observed. Using the combined information from the SQT, four of the five most degraded sites were storm-water outfall sites. Although estuaries are naturally stressful environments because of salinity and temperature fluctuations, this ecosystem appears to have been compromised by anthropogenic influences similar to what has been observed for other heavily urbanized bay systems along the Texas and Gulf coast.

  8. Julian Lennon Is Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... turn JavaScript on. Feature: Lupus Julian Lennon Is Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America Past ... disease. You mentioned you are now serving as Global Ambassador for the Lupus Foundation of America. What ...

  9. Cytotoxicity of different extracts of arial parts of Ziziphus spina-christi on Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian, Abbas; Zolfaghari, Behzad; Shirani, Kobra

    2014-01-01

    Background: It has been shown that plants from the family Rhamnaceae possess anticancer activity. In this study, we sought to determine if Ziziphus spina-christi, a species from this family, has cytotoxic effect on cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods: Using maceration method, different extracts of leaves of Z. spina-christi were prepared. Hexane, chloroform, chloroform-methanol (9:1), methanol-water (7:1) methanol, butanol and water were used for extraction, after preliminary phytochemical analyses were done. The cytotoxic activity of the extracts against Hela and MDA-MB-468 tumor cells was evaluated by MTT assay. Briefly, cells were seeded in microplates and different concentrations of extracts were added. After incubation of cells for 72 h, their viability was evaluated by addition of tetrazolium salt solution. After 3 h medium was aspirated, dimethyl sulfoxide was added and absorbance was determined at 540 nm with an ELISA plate reader. Extracts were considered cytotoxic when more than 50% reduction on cell survival was observed. Results: Hexane, chloroform, chloroform-methanol, butanol, methanol-water and aqueous extracts of Z. spina-christi significantly and concentration-dependently reduced viability of Hela and MAD-MB-468 cells. In the both cell lines, chloroform-methanol extract of Z. spina-christi was more potent than the other extracts. Results: From the finding of this study it can be concluded that Z. spina-christi is a good candidate for further study for new cytotoxic agents. PMID:24627846

  10. Evaluation of electrodialysis for chronic acid recovery and purification at Corpus Christi Army Depot. Final report, Oct 89-Apr 91

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.S.

    1991-09-01

    A large quantity of hazardous waste is generated during the maintenance, repair, and overhaul of a wide variety of military equipment at Army depots. Some of this waste is generated by the use of chromic acid solutions for chromium electroplating and the application and removal of chromate conversion coatings. Hazardous waste results when metal contamination builds up in the solutions to such a degree that the solutions must be disposed of as hazardous waste. Removal of this metal contamination should result in a lengthened bath life and reduced hazardous wate generation. As part of its pollution abatement and environmental control mission, the U.S. Army Toxic and Hazardous Materials Agency (USATHAMA) is pursuing R and D projects to assist depots in meeting the Army goal of a 50 percent reduction in hazardous waste by the end of 1992 compared with 1985 baseline levels. In one project, USATHAMA purchased, installed, operated, and evaluated an electrodialysis system on two chromic acid process solutions at Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) in Corpus Christi, Texas. The objective of this task was to evaluate the system's ability to remove metal contamination and oxidize trivalent chromium (an impurity) to hexavalent chromium (chromic acid).

  11. Geologic map of the Julian 7.5' quadrangle, San Diego County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, Victoria R.

    2015-01-01

    Jurassic plutons in the Julian quadrangle underwent synkinematic metamorphism with the result that plutonic contacts and foliation are concordant with those in the surrounding metamorphosed country rocks. Foliation in Jurassic plutons consists of the planar orientation of recrystallized mineral grains and aggregates; deformation textures include augen gneiss, mylonitic gneiss, and mylonite. Structural studies indicate that a significant part of this deformation took place in the Cretaceous and, therefore, the regional foliation in this part of the batholith clearly postdates intrusion of many Cretaceous plutons.

  12. 76 FR 68188 - Valero Refining-Texas, L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION Valero Refining-Texas, L.P. v. Port of Corpus Christi Authority of Nueces County, TX; Notice of Filing of Complaint and Assignment Notice is given that a complaint has been filed with the Federal Maritime Commission (Commission) by...

  13. Distribution, abundance, and resting microhabitat of burbot on Julian's Reef, southwestern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Horns, William H.

    1993-01-01

    We used a remotely operated submersible vehicle equipped with a color video camera to videotape the lake bed and document the distribution and abundance of burbot Lota lota on a 156-hectare portion of Julian's Reef in southwestern Lake Michigan. The substrates and bathymetry of the study area had been mapped recently by side-scan sonar. Burbot density determined from videotapes covering 6,900 m2 of lake bed at depths of 23-41 m averaged 139 individuals/ hectare (range, 0-571/hectare). This density was substantially higher than the highest burbot density (59-95/hectare) reported in the literature. Burbot were present on the lake bed at depths of 23-36 m, but were most abundant near the crest of the reef at 23-28 m, where the water temperature was 8-13°C, their preferred summer temperature range. Substrates in that temperature range on the reef were bedrock, bedrock ridges, and bedrock and rubble. Burbot were most abundant on the bedrock and rubble. Small fish and macroinvertebrates typically eaten by burbot elsewhere in western Lake Michigan were distributed on the reef according to their summer preferred temperatures and were not seen in abundance where burbot density was highest. We saw no lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on Julian's Reef, although large numbers of juvenile lake trout have been stocked there annually and temperatures on the reef were in the preferred summer temperature range for lake trout.

  14. Distribution, abundance, and resting microhabitat of burbot on Julian's Reef, southwestern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.; Horns, William H.

    1993-01-01

    We used a remotely operated submersible vehicle equipped with a color video camera to videotape the lake bed and document the distribution and abundance of burbot Lota lotaon a 156-hectare portion of Julian's Reef in southwestern Lake Michigan. The substrates and bathymetry of the study area had been mapped recently by side-scan sonar. Burbot density determined from videotapes covering 6,900 m2 of lake bed at depths of 23–41 m averaged 139 individuals/ hectare (range, 0–571/hectare). This density was substantially higher than the highest burbot density (59–95/hectare) reported in the literature. Burbot were present on the lake bed at depths of 23–36 m, but were most abundant near the crest of the reef at 23–28 m, where the water temperature was 8–13°C, their preferred summer temperature range. Substrates in that temperature range on the reef were bedrock, bedrock ridges, and bedrock and rubble. Burbot were most abundant on the bedrock and rubble. Small fish and macroinvertebrates typically eaten by burbot elsewhere in western Lake Michigan were distributed on the reef according to their summer preferred temperatures and were not seen in abundance where burbot density was highest. We saw no lake trout Salvelinus namaycush on Julian's Reef, although large numbers of juvenile lake trout have been stocked there annually and temperatures on the reef were in the preferred summer temperature range for lake trout.

  15. Heavy-metal contamination of Crassostrea virginica and associated sediments of the Corpus Christi Bay system, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, G.; Martin, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    In a preliminary survey, Crassostrea virginica from areas of the Corpus Christi Bay system of Texas show significant concentrations of Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn in their tissues and shells; concentrations of these same metals in associated sediments are also high in certain areas of the bay system. Zn and Cd concentrations in tissue show a high negative correlation to each other, whereas Zn and Pb in tissue and shell show a high positive correlation to one another. Sediment contents of Pb and Zn best reflect tissue values of the heavy metals; sediment concentrations of Cd and Cu show a poor inverse correlation to tissue concentrations. Some possible factors influencing these correlations are suspended-sediment type, physiological changes, water quality, and Ca intake.

  16. Is Julian Assange an International Version of Daniel Ellsberg and WikiLeaks the Modern Equivalent of the Pentagon Papers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freivogel, William H.

    2011-01-01

    History has placed the stamp of approval on the publication of the Pentagon Papers, the top-secret history of the Vietnam War. If WikiLeaks editor-in-chief Julian Assange is another Daniel Ellsberg, then it is possible the website's disclosures will be viewed over time as similarly in the public interest. A classroom discussion on the release of…

  17. Modulation of the boreal wintertime Madden-Julian oscillation by the stratospheric quasi-biennial oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Changhyun; Son, Seok-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), the dominant mode of intraseasonal variability in the tropical troposphere, has a significant impact on global weather and climate. Here we present that the year-to-year variation of the MJO activity shows significant changes with the quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO) in the tropical stratosphere. Specifically, the boreal winter MJO amplitude, evaluated by various metrics, is typically stronger than normal during the QBO easterly phase at 50 hPa and weaker than normal during the QBO westerly phase at 50 hPa. This relationship, which is possibly mediated by the QBO-related static stability and/or vertical wind shear changes in the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, is robust whether or not the activeness of the MJO or QBO is taken into account. This result suggests a new potential route from the stratosphere that regulates the organized tropical convection, helping to improve the prediction skill of the boreal winter MJO.

  18. Using AMIE data to study cloud processes within the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Houze, Robert A.

    2015-12-17

    This study uses AMIE data to show how the small clouds in the Madden-Julian Oscillation first organize into lines and other patterns, how they develop the first rainshowers, how those showers deposit cool air over the ocean surface, how this cool air spreads and triggers deeper convection, how the deep convection develops into mesoscale systems, how the mesoscale systems modify the heating profile through the depth of the troposphere, and how the development of the clouds responds to and interacts with large-scale waves circumnavigating the globe at upper levels, and how equatorial trapped waves at lower levels modulates the development of the cloud population. The techniques used to analyze the radar and sounding data collected in AMIE to achieve the above results are innovative, and to obtain more general results we have used regional modeling with a variety of cloud microphysical schemes in combination with the data analyses.

  19. Low-order stochastic model and "past-noise forecasting" of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondrashov, D.; Chekroun, M. D.; Robertson, A. W.; Ghil, M.

    2013-10-01

    This paper presents a predictability study of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) that relies on combining empirical model reduction (EMR) with the "past-noise forecasting" (PNF) method. EMR is a data-driven methodology for constructing stochastic low-dimensional models that account for nonlinearity, seasonality and serial correlation in the estimated noise, while PNF constructs an ensemble of forecasts that accounts for interactions between (i) high-frequency variability (noise), estimated here by EMR, and (ii) the low-frequency mode of MJO, as captured by singular spectrum analysis (SSA). A key result is that—compared to an EMR ensemble driven by generic white noise—PNF is able to considerably improve prediction of MJO phase. When forecasts are initiated from weak MJO conditions, the useful skill is of up to 30 days. PNF also significantly improves MJO prediction skill for forecasts that start over the Indian Ocean.

  20. Exploring the Madden Julian Oscillation through superparameterized global hindcasts during the Year of Tropical Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. S.; Bretherton, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    The Superparameterized* (SP) Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) v. 3.0 has been shown to produce intriguingly realistic signatures of MJO variability in composited multidecadal simulations. Here, SPCAM is applied in intraseasonal forecast mode for the first time, to examine its skill in representing real-world Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) episodes highlighted by the Year of Tropical Convection. The phase-dependence of simulated forecast skill indicates that the SP-MJO may be a more valid physical analog for the initiating phases of the MJO than during other phases. Sensitivity tests reconfiguring the interior cloud model in three dimensions document the unexplored effect of incorporating convective momentum transport (CMT) on the SP-MJO. Some RMM skill benefits of incorporating CMT are evident at lead times of two weeks and greater. (* Superparameterization means embedding thousands of cloud resolving arrays in a global climate model, in place of conventional cumulus / boundary layer parameterizations.)

  1. Multiscale asymptotics for Madden-Julian Oscillations and Tropical-Extratropical Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shengqian; Majda, Andrew; Stechmann, Samuel

    2015-11-01

    A new model is derived and analyzed for tropical-extratropical interactions involving the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). The MJO has a time scale of 30-60 days and hence is important for extended-range forecasts on weekly to monthly time scales. The model combines (i) the tropical dynamics of the MJO and equatorial baroclinic waves and (ii) the dynamics of barotropic Rossby waves with significant extratropical structure, and the combined system has a conserved energy. The method of multiscale asymptotics is applied to systematically derive an ODE system for three-wave resonant interactions. Several examples illustrate applications to MJO initiation and termination, including cases of (i) the MJO, equatorial baroclinic Rossby waves, and barotropic Rossby waves interacting, and (ii) the MJO, baroclinic Kelvin waves, and barotropic Rossby waves interacting.

  2. Feature Tracking and Visualization of Madden-Julian Osciallation in Climate Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Teng-Yok; Tong, Xin; Shen, Han-Wei; Wong, Pak C.; Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-06-20

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is one of the less understood aspects of tropical meteorology, which plays a significant role in tropical intra-seasonal variations in rain, temperature and winds over the Indian and Pacific Oceans. In this paper, we present an integrated analysis and visualization framework for MJO episodes simulated by a high resolution regional model. To distinguish MJOs from other weather phenomena, our framework utilizes domain knowledge to track MJOs as finding the globally optimized properties in the data. In addition to enhancing the animation with feature tracking, our visualization system also integrates different visualization components such as Virtual Globe and Hovmoller Diagrams to visualize large scale events both in space and time. By linking all of these visualization components on a web-based interface, scientists can identify cloud and environmental processes associated with the initiation and eastward propagation of MJO more easily.

  3. Influence of Madden-Julian Oscillation on Southeast Asia rainfall extremes: Observations and predictability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Prince; Rahmat, Raizan; Cheong, Wee Kiong; Wallace, Emily

    2014-06-01

    The influence of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on the rainfall distribution of Southeast Asia is studied using TRMM satellite-derived rainfall and rain gauge data. It is shown that convectively active (suppressed) phases of MJO can increase (decrease) the probability of extreme rain events over the land regions by about 30-50% (20-25%) during November-March season. The influence of MJO on localized rainfall extremes are also observed both in rainfall intensity and duration. The Met Office Global Seasonal forecasting system seasonal forecasting system is shown to reproduce the MJO influence on rainfall distribution well despite the model biases over land. Skills scores for forecasting 90th percentile extreme rainfall shows significant skills for convective phases. This study demonstrates the feasibility of deriving probabilistic forecasts of extreme rainfall at medium range.

  4. Interpreting the upper level structure of the Madden-Julian oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monteiro, Joy M.; Adames, Ángel F.; Wallace, John M.; Sukhatme, Jai S.

    2014-12-01

    The nonlinear response of a spherical shallow water model to an imposed heat source in the presence of realistic zonal mean zonal winds is investigated numerically. The solutions exhibit elongated, meridionally tilted ridges and troughs indicative of a poleward dispersion of wave activity. As the speed of the jets is increased, the equatorial Kelvin wave is unaffected but the global Rossby wave train coalesces to form a compact, amplified quadrupole structure that bears a striking resemblance to the observed upper level structure of the Madden-Julian oscillation. In the presence of strong subtropical westerly jets, the advection of planetary vorticity by the meridional flow and relative vorticity by the zonally averaged background flow conspire to create the distinctive quadrupole configuration of flanking Rossby waves.

  5. Spontaneous onset of a Madden-Julian oscillation event in a cloud-system-resolving simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Hiroaki; Satoh, Masaki; Katsumata, Masaki

    2009-07-01

    Spontaneous onset of a Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) event in November 2006 was reproduced at a proper location and time by a global cloud-resolving model (CRM) used with a relatively coarse horizontal grid. Preconditioning of moisture was simulated about 4-days prior to the onset in the Indian Ocean, which agreed with data obtained in an in-situ observation. To investigate influence of zonal Sea Surface Temperature (SST) gradient in the Indian Ocean, we conducted a sensitivity study comparing composites made from five ensemble simulations. It was found that the eastward-moving signal of this MJO event could be obscured if SST were zonally uniform in the western Indian Ocean. Zonal SST gradient has not been considered important in the previous studies about the MJO onset, but SST distribution locating cooler SST in the west side possibly help enhance convection in slow eastward-moving envelopes of the MJO.

  6. Disruptions of El Niño–Southern Oscillation teleconnections by the Madden–Julian Oscillation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoell, Andrew; Barlow, Mathew; Wheeler, Mathew; Funk, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) is the leading mode of interannual variability, with global impacts on weather and climate that have seasonal predictability. Research on the link between interannual ENSO variability and the leading mode of intraseasonal variability, the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO), has focused mainly on the role of MJO initiating or terminating ENSO. We use observational analysis and modeling to show that the MJO has an important simultaneous link to ENSO: strong MJO activity significantly weakens the atmospheric branch of ENSO. For weak MJO conditions relative to strong MJO conditions, the average magnitude of ENSO-associated tropical precipitation anomalies increases by 63%, and the strength of hemispheric teleconnections increases by 58%. Since the MJO has predictability beyond three weeks, the relationships shown here suggest that there may be subseasonal predictability of the ENSO teleconnections to continental circulation and precipitation.

  7. Assessing exposure to disinfection by-products in women of reproductive age living in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Cobb county, Georgia: descriptive results and methods.

    PubMed Central

    Lynberg, M; Nuckols, J R; Langlois, P; Ashley, D; Singer, P; Mendola, P; Wilkes, C; Krapfl, H; Miles, E; Speight, V; Lin, B; Small, L; Miles, A; Bonin, M; Zeitz, P; Tadkod, A; Henry, J; Forrester, M B

    2001-01-01

    We conducted a field study in Corpus Christi, Texas, and Cobb County, Georgia, to evaluate exposure measures for disinfection by-products, with special emphasis on trihalomethanes (THMs). Participants were mothers living in either geographic area who had given birth to healthy infants from June 1998 through May 1999. We assessed exposure by sampling blood and water and obtaining information about water use habits and tap water characteristics. Two 10-mL whole blood samples were collected from each participant before and immediately after her shower. Levels of individual THM species (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform) were measured in whole blood [parts per trillion (pptr)] and in water samples (parts per billion). In the Corpus Christi water samples, brominated compounds accounted for 71% of the total THM concentration by weight; in Cobb County, chloroform accounted for 88%. Significant differences in blood THM levels were observed between study locations. For example, the median baseline blood level of bromoform was 0.3 pptr and 3.5 pptr for participants in Cobb County and Corpus Christi, respectively (p = 0.0001). Differences were most striking in blood obtained after showering. For bromoform, the median blood levels were 0.5 pptr and 17 pptr for participants in Cobb County and Corpus Christi, respectively (p = 0.0001). These results suggest that blood levels of THM species vary substantially across populations, depending on both water quality characteristics and water use activities. Such variation has important implications for epidemiologic studies of the potential health effects of disinfection by-products. PMID:11445514

  8. Integrating Sensor Data and Informatics to Improve Understanding of Hypoxia in the WATERS Network Testbed at Corpus Christi Bay, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coopersmith, E.; Kulis, P.; Brouwer, A.; Montagna, P.; Hodges, B. R.; Minsker, B.; Maidment, D.

    2007-12-01

    The goal of the WATERS Network Testbed in Corpus Christi Bay (Texas) is to better understand hypoxia by creating a prototype Environmental Information System (EIS) that links field data collection, real-time modeling techniques, and cyberinfrastructure. In this paper, we explore the connection between the bay's bottom-water hypoxia and wind mixing by integrating several field data sets within a machine-learning model and exploring the mechanisms leading to the model results using an independent data set. K-nearest neighbor machine learning models applied to several long-term data sets indicate that wind velocities are instrumental in forecasting hypoxic events. Additionally, statistical analysis suggests that the impacts of wind vary spatially throughout the bay. Forecasting algorithms can be employed to predict not only the expected value of dissolved oxygen levels throughout the bay, but also the probability of observing hypolimnetic hypoxia. Prior values of dissolved oxygen, salinity, wind direction, wind velocity, and water temperature have been shown to play a meaningful role in influencing the DO value twenty-four hours hence. Visualizing spatial maps of expected means and variances not only illustrate potentially hypoxia regions, but areas where future sampling would be most beneficial as well. We use a short-term field data set to explore the possible mechanisms controlling the observed statistical trends in long-term data sets. Field data taken from July 2006 document a specific hypoxic episode that follows a high wind event. Analyses of temporal changes in the vertical water column support the suspected connections between wind, salinity, and hypoxia, and suggest some possible mechanisms for this connection. It is suspected that wind controls the sinking of heavy, saline water into the bottom of Corpus Christi Bay from Laguna Madre, a nearby shallower bay. This isolation of dense water from surface oxygen replenishment may be critical in hypoxia

  9. Mercury bioaccumulation and bioaccumulation factors for Everglades mosquitofish as related to sulfate: a re-analysis of Julian II (2013).

    PubMed

    Pollman, Curtis D; Axelrad, Donald M

    2014-11-01

    The Everglades, an ecosystem of international significance, has elevated biota mercury levels representing risk to human and wildlife consumers of fish. Given the critical role of sulfate in the methylation of mercury, and because there is a significant agricultural contribution, one potential means of reducing these mercury levels is reducing Everglades sulfate inputs. Julian II (Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 90:329-332, 2013) conducted regression modeling of the relationship between surface water sulfate concentrations and Gambusia spp. mercury bioconcentration factors across the major hydrologic subunits of the Everglades, and used those results to draw conclusions about the role of sulfate in the cycling of mercury in the Everglades. We however demonstrate a number of fundamental problems with the analysis, interpretation and conclusions. As a result, we strongly caution against using the results of Julian II (Bull Environ Contam Toxicol 90:329-332, 2013) to formulate management decisions regarding mitigation of the Everglades mercury problem. PMID:25260994

  10. Significance of organochlorine and heavy metal residues in wintering shorebirds at Corpus Christi, Texas, 1976-77

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; King, K.A.; Prouty, R.M.

    1980-01-01

    Organochlorine and heavy metal residues were determined in 103 shorebirds of seven species collected at Corpus Christi, Texas, during the winter of 1976-77 to evaluate their potential effects on population survival, DDE and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were detected in most samples. Chlordane isomers, dieldrin, toxaphene, and heptachlor epoxide also occurred, but less frequently. In general, organochlorine residues were low in skinned carcasses. Geometric means on a wet weight basis ranged from 0.25 ppm to 4.76 ppm for DDE and from 0.67 ppm to 6.64 ppm for PCBs; residues of the other compounds averaged less than 1 ppm in all instances. Mercury, lead, arsenic and vanadium occurred in all shorebird livers, and selenium and cadmium were detected in all kidneys. Residues of these metals, except selenium, were low in most tissue samples. Selenium averages varied from 1.77 ppm to 5.62 ppm (wet weight) in kidneys; residues in this range may be sufficient to inhibit reproduction or to induce other forms of toxicity, especially at the higher levels.

  11. Dynamics of Large-Scale Convective Onset in the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Scott Wayne

    The role of large-scale circulation anomalies in the convective onset of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) over the Indian Ocean during the Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign, conducted Oct. 2011--Feb. 2012, is explained using radar and rawinsonde observations, reanalysis, and regional model simulations. Convective onset was characterized by two episodic and rapid increases in the vertical growth of the cumuliform cloud population over the Indian Ocean: First, the areal coverage of moderately deep (~5 km) convection increased; about 1 week later, the areal coverage of deep (up to the tropopause) convection increased rapidly. Deep tropospheric wavenumber 1 anomalies in zonal wind and vertical velocity circumnavigated the tropics repeatedly during DYNAMO. MJO convective onset occurred when the upward branch of this wavenumber 1 circulation arrived over the Indian Ocean because a reduction in large-scale subsidence cooled the troposphere and steepened the lapse rate below 500 hPa. This made the environment more conducive to development of moderately deep convection. The moderately deep convection moistened the environment during week-long transition periods by transporting moisture vertically from the boundary layer to the free troposphere and detraining it into the clear-air environment, particularly between 650--850 mb. Regional cloud-permitting model simulations of convection during MJO onsets reproduced the distinct transition periods. The modeling results confirmed that rapid cooling of the environment enhanced the areal coverage of, and thus total vertical transport of water within, moderately deep convection at the beginning of transition periods. Evaporation of cloud condensate via entrainment or dissipation of clouds was directly responsible for environmental moistening. Cooling of the climatologically stable layer between 700--850 mb was particularly important because it allowed a greater number of cumulus elements growing

  12. Contribution of tropical cyclone for the preconditioning of the Madden-Julian Oscillation during CINDY2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Yoneyama, K.; Hamada, J.

    2012-12-01

    During the international field experiment "Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011)", three Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) were generated over the Indian Ocean. In this study, the preconditioning process of the third MJO is investigated. After the second active phase of MJO reached maritime continent in early December 2011, its eastward propagation became unclear. Different convections were activated over the maritime continent in mid-December and third MJO was generated in late December over the Indian Ocean. During the preconditioning stage of the third MJO, westward propagating disturbances were observed from Sumatera Island to the central Indian Ocean and moistened the atmosphere. Convections over the Sumatera Island were activated from December 15th when the moist air mass reached from South China Sea. The origin of the moist air mass was tropical cyclone which was formed in South China Sea in December 10th. The high moisture associated with tropical cyclone activated the convection over Sumatera Island, promoted westward propagating disturbances, and acted a favorable environment for the preconditioning of the MJO.

  13. Predictability of the Madden-Julian Oscillation index: seasonality and dependence on MJO phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Eric C. J.; Thompson, Keith R.

    2016-01-01

    We describe here a damped harmonic oscillator model for the Wheeler and Hendon (Mon Weather Rev 132(8):1917-1932, 2004) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) index in order to gain new insights into the predictability of the MJO. Building on a tradition of idealized models, the model for the MJO state consists of a bivariate autoregressive process, equivalent to a finite difference approximation to a dynamical underdamped harmonic oscillator, as represented by a second order ordinary differential equation. The statistical properties of the model, namely the ensemble mean, ensemble variance, and within-ensemble correlation, are used to develop predictability time scales for canonical MJO events. We explore the model under both white noise and coloured noise forcing and the model parameters are estimated using maximum likelihood estimation, as a function of season and initial MJO event amplitude and phase. The model provides a significantly better fit using coloured noise forcing, which is equivalent to using a higher order model, indicating that the MJO index is not a simple order-1 coupled autoregressive process. Using the fitted model we map the predictability times scales for the mean, variance, and correlation as a function of initial MJO position in phase space. It is shown that the predictability time scales, and thus MJO predictability, vary as a function of MJO phase space and season which is a novel result for empirical models of the MJO. The result that MJO predictability varies with MJO state also has relevance for the interpretation of the Maritime Continent prediction barrier.

  14. Potential spawning habitat for lake trout on Julian's Reef, Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edsall, Thomas A.; Kennedy, Gregory W.

    1996-01-01

    Julian's Reef is an historical spawning ground for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in southwestern Lake Michigan. It is a designated lake trout refuge and is the focus of lake trout restoration efforts in Illinois waters of the lake. We studied the reef to determine its potential as spawning habitat for stocked lake trout. We used side-scan sonar and a remotely operated vehicle equipped with a video camera to survey and map 156 ha of lake bed on the southeast portion of the reef, where an earlier study revealed the presence of loose-rock substrate potentially suitable for use by spawning lake trout. Our survey showed that the substrate on the reef that most closely resembled that described in the literature as suitable for spawning by stocked lake trout in the Great Lakes was rubble patches with interstitial depths greater than 20 cm. These rubble patches occupied about 2 ha of the 13-ha expanse of bedrock and rubble substrate near the reef crest in the surveyed area. We estimated that these rubble patches, if fully used by spawning lake trout, could accommodate egg deposition by at least 1,300–3,300 2.7-kg females.

  15. The Madden-Julian Oscillation and its Impact on Northern Hemisphere Weather Predictability during Wintertime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Charles; Waliser, Duane E.; Lau, K. M.; Stern, W.

    2003-01-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is known as the dominant mode of tropical intraseasonal variability and has an important role in the coupled-atmosphere system. This study used twin numerical model experiments to investigate the influence of the MJO activity on weather predictability in the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere during boreal winter. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard laboratory for the Atmospheres (GLA) general circulation model was first used in a 10-yr simulation with fixed climatological SSTs to generate a validation data set as well as to select initial conditions for active MJO periods and Null cases. Two perturbation numerical experiments were performed for the 75 cases selected [(4 MJO phases + Null phase) _ 15 initial conditions in each]. For each alternative initial condition, the model was integrated for 90 days. Mean anomaly correlations in the midlatitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (2O deg N_60 deg.N) and standardized root-mean-square errors were computed to validate forecasts and control run. The analyses of 500-hPa geopotential height, 200-hPa Streamfunction and 850-hPa zonal wind component systematically show larger predictability during periods of active MJO as opposed to quiescent episodes of the oscillation.

  16. Atmosphere-ocean coupled processes in the Madden-Julian oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMott, Charlotte A.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steven J.

    2015-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is a convectively coupled 30-70 day (intraseasonal) tropical atmospheric mode that drives variations in global weather but which is poorly simulated in most atmospheric general circulation models. Over the past two decades, field campaigns and modeling experiments have suggested that tropical atmosphere-ocean interactions may sustain or amplify the pattern of enhanced and suppressed atmospheric convection that defines the MJO and encourage its eastward propagation through the Indian and Pacific Oceans. New observations collected during the past decade have advanced our understanding of the ocean response to atmospheric MJO forcing and the resulting intraseasonal sea surface temperature fluctuations. Numerous modeling studies have revealed a considerable impact of the mean state on MJO ocean-atmosphere coupled processes, as well as the importance of resolving the diurnal cycle of atmosphere-upper ocean interactions. New diagnostic methods provide insight to atmospheric variability and physical processes associated with the MJO but offer limited insight on the role of ocean feedbacks. Consequently, uncertainty remains concerning the role of the ocean in MJO theory. Our understanding of how atmosphere-ocean coupled processes affect the MJO can be improved by collecting observations in poorly sampled regions of MJO activity, assessing oceanic and atmospheric drivers of surface fluxes, improving the representation of upper ocean mixing in coupled model simulations, designing model experiments that minimize mean state differences, and developing diagnostic tools to evaluate the nature and role of coupled ocean-atmosphere processes over the MJO cycle.

  17. The Onset of the Madden-Julian Oscillation Within an Aquaplanet Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Edward; Lindesay, James; Suarez, Max

    1997-01-01

    A series of numerical experiments using a two-level atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) were performed for the purpose of investigating the coupling between sea surface temperature (SST) profile and the onset of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The AGCM was modified to run as an aquaplane with all seasonal forcing removed. SST distributions based on the New Global Sea-Ice and Sea Surface Temperature (GISST) Data Set for 1903-1994 were generated then modified to vary the north-south gradient and tropical temperatures. It was found that the MJO signal did not depend on the SST temperature gradients but rather on the absolute temperature of the equatorial region, EOF analysis revealed that the SST distribution which generated the strongest MJO signal produced a periodic fluctuation in velocity potential at the 250 millibar level with a phase speed of 15 m/s, and a periodicity of 30 days which falls within the shortest limit of observed oscillations. This distribution also possessed the coolest equatorial SSTs which suggests that increased stability in the atmosphere favors the occurrence of organized MJO propagation.

  18. Possible Influences of the Madden-Julian Oscillation on Global Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chidong; McKinney, Matthew; Lasslop, Gitta; Kreidenweis, Sonia

    2015-04-01

    Possible influences of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on global wildfire are investigated. Glob fire potential and activities are measured by the Nesterov Index (NI), fire danger index (FDI), fire number (FN), and burned area (BA) from the output of a process-based fire regime model (SPITFIRE). The MJO is described using the Real-Time Multivariate MJO (RMM) index. Eight MJO phases defined by the RMM index correspond to different longitudinal locations of positive and negative anomalies in its rainfall as it propagates eastward from the Indian to Pacific Oceans. Phase 0 is defined as periods without MJO signals. Potential influences of the MJO on global fire are demonstrated as the differences of the four fire parameters between each of the eight MJO phases and phase 0. Statistically significant (at the 95% confidence level) differences are identified in various MJO phases in the following regions: tropical Africa, the Amazonia, Siberia, western Russia, and North America. Potential implications and caveats of these signals are discussed.

  19. Role of Longwave Cloud-Radiation Feedback in the Simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Daehyun; Ahn, Min-Seop; Kang, In-Sik; Del Genio, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the cloud-radiation interaction in the simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is investigated. A special focus is on the enhancement of column-integrated diabatic heating due to the greenhouse effects of clouds and moisture in the region of anomalous convection. The degree of this enhancement, the greenhouse enhancement factor (GEF), is measured at different precipitation anomaly regimes as the negative ratio of anomalous outgoing longwave radiation to anomalous precipitation. Observations show that the GEF varies significantly with precipitation anomaly and with the MJO cycle. The greenhouse enhancement is greater in weak precipitation anomaly regimes and its effectiveness decreases monotonically with increasing precipitation anomaly. The GEF also amplifies locally when convection is strengthened in association with the MJO, especially in the weak precipitation anomaly regime (less than 5 mm day(exp -1)). A robust statistical relationship is found among CMIP5 climate model simulations between the GEF and the MJO simulation fidelity. Models that simulate a stronger MJO also simulate a greater GEF, especially in the weak precipitation anomaly regime (less than 5 mm day(exp -1)). Models with a greater GEF in the strong precipitation anomaly regime (greater than 30 mm day(-1)) represent a slightly slower MJO propagation speed. Many models that lack the MJO underestimate the GEF in general and in particular in the weak precipitation anomaly regime. The results herein highlight that the cloud-radiation interaction is a crucial process for climate models to correctly represent the MJO.

  20. Modification of a Madden-Julian Oscillation index and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Thomas

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant component of the intraseasonal atmospheric variability in the tropics. The MJO signal consists of deep convection and overturning atmospheric zonal circulations propagating slowly eastward along the equator. Wheeler and Hendon (2004) developed a method of extracting the MJO signal based on the two leading empirical orthogonal functions (EOFs) of the combined fields of near-equatorially averaged zonal wind at 850-hPa and 200-hPa as well as the observed outgoing long wave radiation (OLR). The length of this index in time is severely limited by the inclusion of the OLR data, as this time series only goes back to June 1974 and becomes a problem when trying to study the long-term aspects of the MJO. A modified index based on a combined EOF analysis of the 200-hPa and 850-hPazonal wind fields is developed and validated against Wheeler and Hendon's index. This allows the limitation of the relatively short OLR data set to be circumvented, as wind reanalysis data extends back farther in time, while keeping the benefit of a high MJO signal extraction through combined EOF analysis. As the results show, the new index yields nearly identical results to the older, more restrictive index. Therefore, the modified index is used to analyze the behavior of the MJO on time scales longer than the inter-annual, MJO- ENSO interaction and the ability of the Global Environmental Multiscale (GEM) model to represent the MJO.

  1. Future change in the Madden-Julian oscillation using CMIP5 simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, E. J.; Seo, K. H.; Lee, H. J.; Kim, G. U.

    2014-12-01

    Future changes in the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) have been examined using CMIP5 simulations. To represent future MJO change, historical experiment data from 1979 to 2005 and representative concentration pathway 8.5 (RCP 8.5) run data from 2071 to 2100 are compared. Several changes and associated processes are investigated: 1) MJO will strengthen. For this, the following three aspects are presented. First, in wavenumber-frequency power spectrum analysis for 30-90 days filtered precipitation over [15°S-15°N], spectral power tends to increase significantly. Second, the explained variance of combined EOF1 and EOF2 using 30-90 days filtered zonal winds at 200 and 850 hPa and OLR increases from 46% to 54%. Lastly, the days of MJO index (defined as the amplitude of PC1 and 2 in combined EOF) that is larger than 1.0 increase. 2) Changes in the MJO phase speed are unclear, because different models in CMIP5 show different results. The main process for controlling the phase speed of the MJO will be examined using two and half layer model. Other characteristics of the MJO will be discussed through the moist static energy and moisture budget analyses.

  2. Respective roles of shallow convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulation of Madden-Julian Oscillation.

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Joshua Xiouhua [IPRC Wang, Bin [IPRC&DM Yeh, Hsi-Chyi

    2010-03-15

    Respective Roles of Shallow Convection and Stratiform Rainfall on the Simulation of Madden Julian Oscillation Joshua Xiouhua Fu IPRC, SOEST, University of Hawaii The IPRC/UH Hybrid-coupled GCM (HcGCM), which combined ECHAM-4 AGCM with UH intermediate ocean model, produces robust Tropical Intra-Seasonal Oscillations including the boreal-winter MJO and boreal-summer Monsoon Intra-Seasonal Oscillation. In this study, two sets of sensitivity experiments (i.e., short-term retrospective forecast of one MJO event observed during TOGA COARE and long-term free integrations) have been carried out to understand the respective roles of shallow-convection and stratiform rainfall on the simulations and predictions of the MJO. Major findings are summarized as following: Shallow-convection ahead of MJO deep convection moistens the lower-troposphere and preconditions the movement of the MJO. Present study shows that this process is very important to the eastward propagating speed of the MJO. A significant fraction of stratiform rainfall (~30%; stratiform part vs. total rainfall) is needed for ECHAM-4 to have a robust MJO. The above findings suggest that in addition to deep convection, shallow convection and stratiform rainfall needs to be well represented in conventional GCMs to ensure a robust model MJO.

  3. Global-scale convective aggregation: Implications for the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Nathan P.; Randall, David A.

    2015-12-01

    Previous work has shown that convection will self-organize in cloud-system-resolving model simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium, and it has been suggested that the convective envelope of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) may be organized by similar processes on a much larger scale. Here we present support for that hypothesis based on simulations with SP-CAM with globally uniform SST. Without rotation, convection self-organizes into large (˜4000 km) clusters surrounded by dry regions, while with Earth-like rotation the model produces a robust MJO. The nonrotating aggregation and MJO are found to have similar budgets of moist static energy, both being supported by diabatic feedbacks, particularly cloud-longwave interaction. Mechanism denial experiments show that longwave heating anomalies associated with high clouds are essential to the nonrotating aggregation, and amplify the MJO. Simulations using the conventional CAM show a weaker MJO and a much weaker tendency for nonrotating aggregation, and both MJO activity and aggregation intensity are found to increase with the entrainment rate in the deep convection parameterization.

  4. Past- and present-day Madden-Julian Oscillation in CNRM-CM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Eun-Ji; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-04-01

    Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the past (nineteenth century) and present day (twentieth century) is examined using preindustrial and historical experiments of Centre National de Recherches Météorologiques-Coupled Models, version 5 (CNRM-CM5) in Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). The present-day MJO is stronger than the past MJO by 33% and it is ~10% more frequent. In particular, the MJO phases 4-7 signifying deep convection situated over the Maritime continent and western Pacific (WP) are considerably enhanced. These changes are due mainly to greenhouse gas forcing with little impact from nature forcing. Dynamical mechanisms for this change are investigated. A peculiar strengthening of MJO over WP comes from increased basic-state sea surface temperature (SST) over the Central Pacific (CP) and EP. The increase in precipitation over WP results from both the response to enhanced SST over CP and the inverted Walker circulation induced by the EP and CP SST increase. The latter causes a pair of anticyclonic Rossby waves straddling the equator, leading to moisture convergence over WP.

  5. Multidecadal variations in the modulation of Alaska wintertime air temperature by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver, Eric C. J.

    2015-07-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), the dominant mode of intraseasonal variability in the tropics, is known to influence extratropical air temperature in the Northern Hemisphere. In particular, it has been shown that intraseasonal variations in wintertime Alaska surface air temperature (SAT) is linked with variations in cross-shore surface wind and that this mechanism is driven by a train of Rossby waves originating in the tropics due to MJO forcing. We show, using long station records of Alaska SAT and an independent reconstruction of the MJO index over the twentieth century, that the MJO-SAT connection in Alaska has undergone significant multidecadal variability over the last century. The Pacific Decadal Oscillation appears to explain some of the observed multidecadal variability but fails to capture a large proportion of it. We identify four distinct periods between the years 1910 and 2000 that exhibit either a weak, moderate or strong MJO-SAT connection. The nature of our method ensures that the detected multidecadal variability is due to changes in the teleconnection mechanism and not due to changes in the strength of the MJO index. Finally, we speculate on the mechanism which may bring about such multidecadal variations in the teleconnection mechanism.

  6. Essential-Oil Variability in Natural Populations of Pinus mugo Turra from the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Bojović, Srdjan; Jurc, Maja; Ristić, Mihailo; Popović, Zorica; Matić, Rada; Vidaković, Vera; Stefanović, Milena; Jurc, Dušan

    2016-02-01

    The composition and variability of the terpenes and their derivatives isolated from the needles of a representative pool of 114 adult trees originating from four natural populations of dwarf mountain pine (Pinus mugo Turra) from the Julian Alps were investigated by GC-FID and GC/MS analyses. In total, 54 of the 57 detected essential-oil components were identified. Among the different compound classes present in the essential oils, the chief constituents belonged to the monoterpenes, comprising an average content of 79.67% of the total oil composition (74.80% of monoterpene hydrocarbons and 4.87% of oxygenated monoterpenes). Sesquiterpenes were present in smaller amounts (average content of 19.02%), out of which 16.39% were sesquiterpene hydrocarbons and 2.62% oxygenated sesquiterpenes. The most abundant components in the needle essential oils were the monoterpenes δ-car-3-ene, β-phellandrene, α-pinene, β-myrcene, and β-pinene and the sesquiterpene β-caryophyllene. From the total data set of 57 detected compounds, 40 were selected for principal-component analysis (PCA), discriminant analysis (DA), and cluster analysis (CA). The overlap tendency of the four populations suggested by PCA, was as well observed by DA. CA also demonstrated similarity among the populations, which was the highest between Populations I and II. PMID:26880430

  7. Optimal Initial Perturbations for Ensemble Prediction of the Madden-Julian Oscillation during Boreal Winter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ham, Yoo-Geun; Schubert, Siegfried; Chang, Yehui

    2012-01-01

    An initialization strategy, tailored to the prediction of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO), is evaluated using the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, version 5 (GEOS-5), coupled general circulation model (CGCM). The approach is based on the empirical singular vectors (ESVs) of a reduced-space statistically determined linear approximation of the full nonlinear CGCM. The initial ESV, extracted using 10 years (1990-99) of boreal winter hindcast data, has zonal wind anomalies over the western Indian Ocean, while the final ESV (at a forecast lead time of 10 days) reflects a propagation of the zonal wind anomalies to the east over the Maritime Continent an evolution that is characteristic of the MJO. A new set of ensemble hindcasts are produced for the boreal winter season from 1990 to 1999 in which the leading ESV provides the initial perturbations. The results are compared with those from a set of control hindcasts generated using random perturbations. It is shown that the ESV-based predictions have a systematically higher bivariate correlation skill in predicting the MJO compared to those using the random perturbations. Furthermore, the improvement in the skill depends on the phase of the MJO. The ESV is particularly effective in increasing the forecast skill during those phases of the MJO in which the control has low skill (with correlations increasing by as much as 0.2 at 20 25-day lead times), as well as during those times in which the MJO is weak.

  8. Sea Surface Temperature Coupling to Madden-Julian Oscillations over the Indonesian Maritime Continent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitu, A. M.; Gordon, A. L.; Pujiana, K.

    2014-12-01

    The intraseasonal SST characteristics within the Indonesian Seas and their responses to the Madden-Julian Oscillations [MJO] are examined through analyses of observed and reanalysis datasets. Intraseasonal variation accounts for about 30% of SST variability, with the strongest signature is observed in Banda and Timor seas. The MJO signature in SST is evident in the form of energy peak at 35-45 days, amplification during the Northwest Monsoon (boreal winter), and eastward propagation. SST responds to sea-air heat flux associated with MJO with net heat flux into the ocean (atmosphere) characterizing the suppressed (active) phase of MJO. The influence of MJO on Banda Sea SST is greatest during La Niña periods, which are favorable for deeper thermocline conditions, which diminish the role of ocean processes driving vertical heat transfer between subsurface and surface layers. Diminished influence of ocean processes results in dominance of surface heat fluxes associated with MJO in governing intraseasonal SST variability. During El Niño, the role of ocean processes is favorable to mediate heat transfer between lower and upper layer of the ocean surface as thermocline is shallower. The ocean component heat fluxes then compete with MJO forced heat fluxes in governing SST variability as indicated by less pronounced eastward propagation.

  9. Modulation of Global Fire Probability by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chidong

    2014-05-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an atmospheric phenomenon that dominates the subseasonal (20 - 90 day) variability in the tropics. Its main feature includes an eastward moving large-scale center of deep convection from the Indian Ocean to the western and central Pacific Ocean. As its convection center moves eastward, the MJO exerts influences on many weather, climate and other phenomena in the Earth system, both in the tropics and extratropics. Satellite-based global fire data sets (MODIS, ATSR) have revealed that probability of fire in many regions of the world undergoes systematic changes through the life cycle of the MJO. For example, when MJO convection center is located over the Indian Ocean, fire probability is anomalous high in West Africa and northern Australia, but anomalously low in central Africa, the Amazonia, and Alaska. In the tropics, such changes are directly related to rainfall fluctuations of the MJO itself in the eastern hemisphere, and are consequences of atmospheric equatorial waves excited by MJO convection that propagate into the western hemisphere. In the extratropics, the changes are mainly due to teleconnection patterns in the atmosphere established by anomalous convection of the MJO. Simultaneous perturbations in rainfall, surface temperature and humidity suggest that no single meteorological variable can fully explain the modulation of fire probability by the MJO. Current efforts are being made to related wild fire to lightening frequencies, which are also modulated by the MJO.

  10. The boreal winter Madden-Julian Oscillation's influence on summertime precipitation in the greater Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curtis, Scott; Gamble, Douglas W.

    2016-07-01

    Precipitation totals in the greater Caribbean are known to be affected by interannual variability. In particular, dry conditions in the spring-summer have been physically linked to the positive phase of North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) in the literature. In this study, it was found through regression analysis that an active Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in winter geographically focused over the Maritime Continent contributes to a positive NAO in March via the generation of Rossby waves in the Northern Hemisphere. Specifically, a negative Pacific-North American pattern develops in the winter and transitions to an Atlantic pattern in spring. The positive NAO is a transient feature of this evolving wave train, but a center of significant positive 200 hPa geopotential heights is entrenched over the southeast U.S. throughout the February to May time period and is manifested as high pressure at the surface. The southern flank of this system increases the speeds of the trade winds and leads to a cooling of the Caribbean sea surface temperatures and, thus, convection suppression and reduced precipitation. Thus, this study advances our understanding of the climate of the greater Caribbean by using climate teleconnections to relate the MJO to rainfall in the region.

  11. Detail isotopic stratigraphy of snowpack - case study from Julian Alps (Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreča, P.; Brenčič, M.; Sinjur, I.; Sokratov, S.

    2012-04-01

    In temperate humid catchments the storage of precipitation in snowpack, and the subsequent melting, both highly variable in space and time, substantially impacts the water cycle. Recent climate warming and changes in atmospheric circulation patterns have resulted in reductions in the duration of the snow cover season, the amount of water stored in the snowpack, as well as a widespread trend toward earlier melt. Comparison of water balance for periods 1961-90 and 1971-2000 showed that in Slovenia average precipitation amount remained the same in both periods while runoff decreased and the evaporation increased recently. The area of Julian Alps (NW Slovenia) represents the upper catchment area of river Sava. The area is locally characterised as one with the highest annual precipitation amount in Europe, rapid runoffs and low evaporation. Snow cover is regular, starts to accumulate in late autumn and lasts more than 100 days, at the upper tree line usually more than 150 days. Due to positive air temperature trend snow cover period is changing and consequently the discharge regime is affected. Spatial and temporal variability of snow, as well as snow cover contribution to the water balance in Julian Alps remains poorly investigated. Isotopes of O and H have been used to study snow deposition and the subsequent alteration of snowpack and its influence on runoff. Despite their potential, environmental isotopes were only rarely used in investigations of water cycle in mountain areas of Slovenia in the past. To improve the knowledge on snowpack isotope characteristics and processes in it, and consequently to enable better understanding of water balance with emphasize on recharge of important Slovene aquifers, in 2011 at selected site in the area of Triglav National Park (Planina Javornik) the first isotope research of snowpack has been started. We performed detail sampling of snowpack at two locations with different canopy structures (e.g. clearing and forest stand

  12. Analysis of extreme rainfall in South America associated with Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leutwiler Silva, Elaine; Siqueira Silva, Maria Elisa

    2014-05-01

    Since the early Twentieth Century, the scientific community has recorded the observation of atmospheric and oceanic oscillations related to climatic behavior in remote areas with influence on intraseasonal, interannual and decadal scales, as indicated by [Walker, (1924); Bjerkness (1969); Gutzler and Wallace (1981); Rogers and Van Loon (1978, 1979)]. On the intraseasonal scale, Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) plays a key role in the modulation of rainfall in the tropics and subtropics (Kayano et al., 2009) being characterized by an east shift in a zonal large-scale and thermally direct cell on the Pacific Ocean. This oscillation was first detected in the work of Madden and Julian (1971, 1972) through the application of spectral analysis on daily radiosonde data provided by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), for the stations at Canton island. The analysis allowed the detection and documentation of oscillations with periods from 40 to 50 days with strong associations between the surface pressure, zonal wind and temperature at different atmospheric levels. Although Souza and Ambrizzi (2006) indicate that South America (SA) has its convective activity altered due to the passage of the MJO, at the present moment, the existing models of climate prediction have not been able to correctly reproduce the propagation of the MJO. This study aims to analyze the periods of occurrence of extreme precipitation and drought in SA associated with OMJ and check the ability of Regional Circulation Model (RegCM4) to simulate this climate variability both diagnostically and prognostically. Daily rainfall data compiled by Liebmann and Allured (2005) will be used for the period 1978-2005 for the detection of MJO influence on SA precipitation. The analysis of atmospheric fields (wind at 200 and 850 hPa and omega at 500 and 850 hPa) of the Reanalysis I data set (Kalnay, 1996) obtained from the Physical Sciences Division (PSD) will be performed in order to verify the

  13. A Multi-Scale Interaction Model for Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Liu, F.

    2010-12-01

    Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is an equatorial, planetary scale circulation system coupled with a multi-scale convective complex. The nature and roles of multi-scale interaction (MSI) on MJO dynamics has not been well understood. Here we formulate a prototype theoretical model to advance our understanding the MSI in MJO. The model integrates three essential elements: a) large scale equatorial wave dynamics driven by boundary layer frictional convergence instability (FCI), b) effects of multi-cloud heating and an instability arising from synoptic system-induced convective momentum transfer (CMT), and c) interaction between the planetary and synoptic systems. We show that the CMT mechanism tends to yield a growing stationary mode with a quadrupole-vortex horizontal structure (enhanced Rossby wave component); whereas the FCI favors a fast eastward-moving mode with a Gill-Pattern structure (enhanced Kelvin wave response). The MSI instability can stem from either FCI or CMT mechanisms or both, depending on the ratio of deep convective versus stratiform/congestus heating. With increasing stratiform/congestus heating, the FCI weakens while the CMT becomes more effective. A growing MSI mode has a mixed horizontal structure of CMT and FCI and prefers slow eastward propagation. The FCI sets the eastward propagation, and CMT plays a vital role in slowing down the propagation speed. These results encourage further observational diagnosis of multi-cloud structure and heating profiles in the MJO convective complex and improvement of models’ capability in reproducing correct partitioning of cloud amounts between deep convective and stratiform/congestus clouds.

  14. Analysis of rainfall characteristics of the Madden Julian oscillation using TRMM satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Juntaro; Takayabu, Yukari N.; Shige, Shoichi; Kodama, Yasumasa

    2006-12-01

    Rainfall characteristics of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) are analyzed primarily using tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM) precipitation radar (PR), TRMM microwave imager (TMI) and lighting imaging sensor (LIS) data. Latent heating structure is also examined using latent heating data estimated with the spectral latent heating (SLH) algorithm. The zonal structure, time evolution, and characteristic stages of the MJO precipitation system are described. Stratiform rain fraction increases with the cloud activity, and the amplitude of stratiform rain variation associated with the MJO is larger than that of convective rain by a factor of 1.7. Maximum peaks of both convective rain and stratiform rain precede the minimum peak of the outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) anomaly which is often used as a proxy for the MJO convection. Stratiform rain remains longer than convective rain until ˜4000 km behind the peak of the mature phase. The stratiform rain contribution results in the top-heavy heating profile of the MJO. Associated with the MJO, there are tri-pole convective rain top heights (RTH) at 10-11, ˜7 and ˜3 km, corresponding to the dominance of afternoon showers, organized systems, and shallow convections, respectively. The stratiform rain is basically organized with convective rain, having similar but slightly lower RTH and slightly lags the convective rain maximum. It is notable that relatively moderate (˜7 km) RTH is dominant in the mature phase of the MJO, while very tall rainfall with RTH over 10 km and lightning frequency increase in the suppressed phase. The rain-yield-per flash (RPF) varies about 20-100% of the mean value of ˜2-10 × 10 9 kg fl -1 over the tropical warm ocean and that of ˜2-5 × 10 9 kg fl -1 over the equatorial Islands, between the convectively suppressed phase and the active phase of MJO, in the manner that RPF is smaller in the suppressed phase and larger in the active phase.

  15. Influence of the Madden Julian Oscillation on precipitation and surface air temperature in South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, Mariano S.; Vera, C. S.; Kiladis, G. N.; Liebmann, B.

    2016-01-01

    The regional influence of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) on South America is described. Maps of probability of weekly-averaged rainfall exceeding the upper tercile were computed for all seasons and related statistically with the phase of the MJO as characterized by the Wheeler-Hendon real-time multivariate MJO (RMM) index and with the OLR MJO Index. The accompanying surface air temperature and circulation anomalies were also calculated. The influence of the MJO on regional scales along with their marked seasonal variations was documented. During December-February when the South American monsoon system is active, chances of enhanced rainfall are observed in southeastern South America (SESA) region mainly during RMM phases 3 and 4, accompanied by cold anomalies in the extratropics, while enhanced rainfall in the South Atlantic Convergence Zone (SACZ) region is observed in phases 8 and 1. The SESA (SACZ) signal is characterized by upper-level convergence (divergence) over tropical South America and a cyclonic (anticyclonic) anomaly near the southern tip of the continent. Impacts during March-May are similar, but attenuated in the extratropics. Conversely, in June-November, reduced rainfall and cold anomalies are observed near the coast of the SACZ region during phases 4 and 5, favored by upper-level convergence over tropical South America and an anticyclonic anomaly over southern South America. In September-November, enhanced rainfall and upper-level divergence are observed in the SACZ region during phases 7 and 8. These signals are generated primarily through the propagation of Rossby wave energy generated in the region of anomalous heating associated with the MJO.

  16. Thermodynamics in the Suppressed Phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation Using a Multiplatform Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, J. Brent; Robertson, Franklin R.; Clayson, Carol Anne; Taylor, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) represents a prominent mode of intraseasonal tropical variability. It is manifest by coherent large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation, convection, and thermodynamic processes. Preconditioning of the environment prior to the active phase of the MJO has been noted, but the balance of theorized mechanisms to accomplish this process remains unresolved. Further, there is a lack of consensus on the means by which primary initiation of an MJO event occurs. Observational and modeling efforts have recently been undertaken to advance our understanding of the physical underpinnings governing MJO development. However these intensive studies are often limited in space and/or time and are potentially subject to model deficiencies. Satellite observations, especially those providing vertical resolution of temperature and moisture, provide an opportunity to expand our knowledge of processes critical to MJO initiation and preconditioning. This work will provide an analysis of suppressed phase thermodynamics with an emphasis on the use of a complementary suite of satellite observations including AIRS/AMSU-A profiles, CERES radiative fluxes, and cloud properties observed by MODIS. Emphasis of this work will regard the distribution of cloud regimes, their radiative-convective effects, and their relationship to moist static energy during the recharge and suppressed stages of MJO initiation and eastward propagation. The analyses will make use of cloud regimes from MODIS observations to provide a compositing technique that enables the identification of systematic connections between different cloud regimes and the larger scale environment. Within these cloud regimes, the relationship between the associated cloud-radiative effects observed by CERES, vertically-resolved and vertically-integrated thermodynamics using AIRS/AMSU-A observations, and atmospheric boundary layer fluxes will be demonstrated.

  17. Thermodynamics in the Suppressed Phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation Using a Multiplatform Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J. B.; Robertson, F. R.; Clayson, C. A.; Taylor, P. C.

    2014-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) represents a prominent mode of intraseasonal tropical variability. It is manifest by coherent large-scale changes in atmospheric circulation, convection, and thermodynamic processes. Preconditioning of the environment prior to the active phase of the MJO has been noted, but the balance of theorized mechanisms to accomplish this process remains unresolved. Further, there is a lack of consensus on the means by which primary initiation of an MJO event occurs. Observational and modeling efforts have recently been undertaken to advance our understanding of the physical underpinnings governing MJO development. However these intensive studies are often limited in space and/or time and are potentially subject to model deficiencies. Satellite observations, especially those providing vertical resolution of temperature and moisture, provide an opportunity to expand our knowledge of processes critical to MJO initiation and preconditioning. This work will provide an analysis of suppressed phase thermodynamics with an emphasis on the use of a complementary suite of satellite observations including AIRS/AMSU-A profiles, CERES radiative fluxes, and cloud properties observed by MODIS. Emphasis of this work will regard the distribution of cloud regimes, their radiative-convective effects, and their relationship to moist static energy during the recharge and suppressed stages of MJO initiation and eastward propagation. The analyses will make use of cloud regimes from MODIS observations to provide a compositing technique that enables the identification of systematic connections between different cloud regimes and the larger scale environment. Within these cloud regimes, the relationship between the associated cloud-radiative effects observed by CERES, vertically-resolved and vertically-integrated thermodynamics using AIRS/AMSU-A observations, and atmospheric boundary layer fluxes will be demonstrated.

  18. Realistic initiation and dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a coarse resolution aquaplanet GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayamohan, R. S.; Khouider, Boualem; Majda, Andrew J.

    2013-12-01

    The main mechanisms for the initiation and propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are still widely debated. The capacity of operational global climate models (GCMs) to correctly simulate the MJO is hindered by the inadequacy of the underlying cumulus parameterizations. Here we show that a coarse resolution GCM, coupled to a simple multicloud model parameterization mimicking the observed dynamics and physical structure of organized tropical convection, simulates the MJO in an idealized setting of an aquaplanet without ocean dynamics. We impose a fixed nonhomogeneous sea-surface temperature replicating the Indian Ocean/Western Pacific warm pool. This results in a succession of MJOs with realistic phase speed, amplitude, and physical structure. Each MJO event is initiated at a somewhat random location over the warm pool and dies sometimes near the eastern boundary of the warm pool and sometimes at a random location way beyond the warm pool. Also occasionally the MJO events stall at the center of maximum heating. This is reminiscent of the fact that in nature some MJOs stall over the maritime continent while others reach the central Pacific Ocean and beyond. The initiation mechanism in the model is believed to be a combination of persistent intermittent convective events interacting with observed large-scale flow patterns and internal tropical dynamics. The large-scale flow patterns are associated with planetary-scale dry Kelvin waves that are triggered by preceding MJO events and circle the globe, while congestus cloud decks on the flanks of the warm pool are believed to force Rossby gyres which then funnel moisture toward the equatorial region.

  19. Links Between the Madden-Julian Oscillation and Severe Convective Storms in the U.S.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, B.

    2015-12-01

    Recent research has shown a tendency for severe convective storms to vary intraseasonally, including by phase of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The MJO is the leading mode of atmospheric intraseasonal variability and is characterized by large regions (1000-5000 km) of anomalous convective activity that generally propagate eastward along the equator. Anomalous upper-troposphere heating associated with this convection generates poleward-propagating Rossby waves that interact with the preexisting extratropical circulation. The projection of this interaction onto the synoptic scale - via the favoring of troughs and ridges at certain positions - is the hypothesized mechanism by which the MJO modulates severe convection. However, one unexplored aspect of this modulation is the extent to which severe convection in winter and early-spring months, especially Jan-Mar, may be influenced by different phases of the MJO. While climatologically rarer than events later in spring, severe thunderstorms in winter and early spring still have potential to be high-impact weather events, especially as they often occur in populated areas of the southeast U.S. that have shown more vulnerability than other regions such as the southern or central plains. Results from other studies (not necessarily focused on the question of severe convective storms) have indicated statistically significant modulation of upper- and mid-tropospheric circulation (from 200 hPa to 700 hPa), surface temperature, and sea level pressure. Thus, it is possible that the MJO's influence also extends to severe storms, as these are ingredients known to affect the likelihood of convective activity in the U.S. Using a methodology similar to other recent MJO studies, the impacts of the MJO on tornado, hail, and wind activity from Jan-Mar will be tested as part of this larger project to understand intraseasonal variability of severe storms.

  20. Characteristics of Precipitation, Cloud, and Latent Heating Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, K-M.; Wu, H-T.

    2010-01-01

    This study investigates the evolution of cloud and rainfall structures associated with Madden Julian oscillation (MJO) using Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data. Two complementary indices are used to define MJO phases. Joint probability distribution functions (PDFs) of cloud-top temperature and radar echo-top height are constructed for each of the eight MJO phases. The genesis stage of MJO convection over the western Pacific (phases 1 and 2) features a bottom-heavy PDF, characterized by abundant warm rain, low clouds, suppressed deep convection, and higher sea surface temperature (SST). As MJO convection develops (phases 3 and 4), a transition from the bottom-heavy to top-heavy PDF occurs. The latter is associated with the development of mixed-phase rain and middle-to-high clouds, coupled with rapid SST cooling. At the MJO convection peak (phase 5), a top-heavy PDF contributed by deep convection with mixed-phase and ice-phase rain and high echo-top heights (greater than 5 km) dominates. The decaying stage (phases 6 and 7) is characterized by suppressed SST, reduced total rain, increased contribution from stratiform rain, and increased nonraining high clouds. Phase 7, in particular, signals the beginning of a return to higher SST and increased warm rain. Phase 8 completes the MJO cycle, returning to a bottom-heavy PDF and SST conditions similar to phase 1. The structural changes in rain and clouds at different phases of MJO are consistent with corresponding changes in derived latent heating profiles, suggesting the importance of a diverse mix of warm, mixed-phase, and ice-phase rain associated with low-level, congestus, and high clouds in constituting the life cycle and the time scales of MJO.

  1. The effect of atmospheric radiative heating by clouds on the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crueger, Traute; Stevens, Bjorn

    2015-06-01

    This article explores how atmospheric radiative heating, due to the presence of clouds, influences the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) as simulated by four comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models. Simulations in which clouds are transparent to electromagnetic radiation ("clouds-off") are compared with control simulations in which clouds are allowed to interact with radiation ("clouds-on"). Making clouds transparent to radiation leads to robust changes of the mean state: the westerly winds in the equatorial Indo-Pacific area weaken and the precipitation reveals a shift from single to double Intertropical Convergence Zones. These changes are accompanied by weaker MJOs. Also, the moisture sensitivity of precipitation changes, however not consistently within our group of models. Further analyses show that within the active phase of intraseasonal variability, cloud-radiative effects amplify the heating profiles compared to clouds-off. Heating from nonradiative processes is dominated by the parameterized convection, but large-scale heating associated with cloud microphysical processes acting on the grid-scale modifies the shape of the heating profile, leading to a top-heaviness when cloud-radiative effects are accounted for. The radiative heating due to clouds slows down the phase speed of the MJO. Averaged over the entire MJO life cycle, the column-integrated radiative heating due to clouds lags the vertically integrated moist static energy by 40°-60° of longitude (equivalently 7-10 days assuming a period of 60 days). All four models studied reveal more pronounced Kelvin waves when clouds are transparent to radiation, suggesting that cloud-radiative effects on large-scale heating profiles damp smaller scale, or faster, Kelvin waves and amplify MJO-like disturbances.

  2. The impact of cloud radiative heating on the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crueger, Traute; Stevens, Bjorn

    2015-04-01

    We explore how atmospheric radiative heating, due to the presence of clouds, influences the Madden-Julian-Oscillation (MJO) as simulated by four comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models. For that reason we compare simulations in which clouds are transparent to electromagnetic radiation ('clouds-off') with control simulations in which clouds are allowed to interact with radiation ('clouds-on"). Making clouds transparent to radiation leads to robust changes of the mean state and the MJO: tropical precipitation in the Indian ocean is displaced off the equator, leading to two symmetric bands of precipitation in this basin. In addition, in clouds-off, the MJO weakens compared to clouds-on. Within the MJO cloud radiative effects lead to stronger convective heating profiles. Heating from non-radiative processes is dominated by the parameterized convection, but large-scale heating associated with cloud microphysical processes acting on the grid-scale, modifies the shape of the profile, leading to a top-heaviness when cloud radiative effects are accounted for. The radiative heating due to clouds slows down the phase speed of the MJO. Averaged over the entire MJO life-cycle the column-integrated radiative heating due to clouds lags the vertically integrated moist static energy by 40° to 60° of longitude (equivalently 7 to 10 days assuming a period of 60 days). All four models studied reveal more pronounced Kelvin waves when clouds are transparent to radiation (clouds-off) suggesting that cloud-radiative effects on large-scale heating profiles acts to damp smaller scale, or faster, Convectively Coupled Equatorial Waves and amplify MJO-like disturbances.

  3. Prediction skill of the Madden and Julian Oscillation in dynamical extended range forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, C.; Waliser, D. E.; Schemm, J.-K. E.; Lau, W. K. M.

    The Madden and Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the most prominent mode of intraseasonal variations in the tropical region. It plays an important role in climate variability and has a significant influence on medium-to-extended ranges weather forecasting in the tropics. This study examines the forecast skill of the oscillation in a set of recent dynamical extended range forecasts (DERF) experiments performed by the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The present DERF experiments were done with the reanalysis version of the medium range forecast (MRF) model and include 50-day forecasts, initialized once-a-day (0Z) with reanalyses fields, for the period between 1 January, 1985, and 31 December, 1989. The MRF model shows large mean errors in representing intraseasonal variations of the large-scale circulation, especially over the equatorial eastern Pacific Ocean. A diagnostic analysis has considered the different phases of the MJO and the associated forecast skill of the MRF model. Anomaly correlations on the order of 0.3 to 0.4 indicate that skillful forecasts extend out to 5 to 7 days lead-time. Furthermore, the results show a slight increase in the forecast skill for periods when convective anomalies associated with the MJO are intense. By removing the mean errors, the analysis shows systematic errors in the representation of the MJO with weaker than observed upper level zonal circulations. The examination of the climate run of the MRF model shows the existence of an intraseasonal oscillation, although less intense (50-70%) and with faster (nearly twice as fast) eastward propagation than the observed MJO. The results indicate that the MRF model likely has difficulty maintaining the MJO, which impacts its forecast. A discussion of future work to improve the representation of the MJO in dynamical models and assess its prediction is presented.

  4. OP09STEREOTACTIC RADIOSURGERY FOR BRAIN METASTASES AT THE CHRISTIE AT SALFORD ROYAL HOSPITAL: OUR TWO-YEAR EXPERIENCE

    PubMed Central

    Helbrow, J.; McBain, C.; Gattamaneni, R.; Tran, A.; McCarthy, C.; Edwards, R.; Redikin, J.; Handley, J.; O'Hara, C.; Kennedy, J.; Mills, S.; Soh, C.; Leggate, J.; Whitfield, G.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for brain metastases (BMs) commenced at The Christie at Salford in Dec 11 using the Novalis TxTM and BrainLab ExacTrac® system. We report our first 2 years' data. METHOD: Patients meeting NHS commissioning criteria were referred via MDT for assessment and if suitable consent. We used the BrainLab mask, CT and MRI. Gross tumour volumes (GTVs) were grown by 2mm if <4cm3 and by 1mm if >4cm3 to a planning target volume. The dose to the 80% isodose was 21Gy/1 fraction(#), 18Gy/1# and 25.5Gy/3# alternate days for PTVs <7cm3, 7-13cm3 and >13cm3 respectively and 30Gy/5# on alternate days to the 90% isodose in critical locations or where organ at risk constraints were exceeded. Follow up was 3-monthly with MRI and clinic review. Radiological response was classified as complete, unequivocal, enlargement consistent with treatment, enlargement suspicious of progression or unequivocal progression. RESULTS: Between Dec 11-Jan 14, 89 patients were consented, 51% female. Median age was 61 years (range 16-81). Primaries included lung (34%), breast (22%) and melanoma (15%), which was controlled in 67%; 42% had no extracranial metastases. A total of 170 BMs were treated (1 a retreat); per course a median of 2 (1-5) BMs were treated with median total GTV 4.87cm3 (0.05-29.9cm3). Prescribed dose was 21Gy/1# in 101 BMs, 18Gy/1# in 43, 25.5Gy/3# in 10 and 30Gy/5# in 16. One year survival from first SRS was: overall 48% (95% CI 34%-60%), lung 39% (18%-59%), breast 89% (62%-97%) and melanoma 44% (10%-75%). CONCLUSION: Overall survival results are encouraging and suggest appropriate patient selection. More detailed analysis including toxicity and time to intracranial progression will be presented.

  5. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in ECHAM4 Coupled and Uncoupled GCMs

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R; Gualdi, S; Legutke, S; Gayler, V

    2004-10-13

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) dominates tropical variability on timescales of 30-70 days. During the boreal winter/spring it is manifested as an eastward propagating disturbance, with a strong convective signature over the eastern hemisphere. The space-time structure of the MJO is analyzed using simulations with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model run with observed monthly mean sea-surface temperatures, and coupled to three different ocean models. The coherence of the eastward propagation of MJO convection is sensitive to the ocean model to which ECHAM4 is coupled. For ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, models for which {approx}100 years of daily data is available, Monte Carlo sampling indicates that their metrics of eastward propagation are different at the 1% significance level. The flux-adjusted coupled simulations, ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, maintain a more realistic mean-state, and have a more realistic MJO simulation than the non-adjusted SINTEX coupled runs. The SINTEX model exhibits a cold bias in Indian Ocean and tropical West Pacific Ocean sea-surface temperature of {approx}0.5 C. This cold bias affects the distribution of time-mean convection over the tropical Eastern Hemisphere. Furthermore, the eastward propagation of MJO convection in this model is not as coherent as in the two models that used flux adjustment or compared to an integration of ECHAM4 with prescribed observed SST. This result suggests that simulating a realistic basic state is at least as important as air-sea interaction for organizing the MJO. While all of the coupled models simulate the warm (cold) SST anomalies that precede (succeed) the MJO convection, the interaction of the components of the net surface heat flux that lead to these anomalies are different over the Indian Ocean. The ECHAM4/OPYC model, in which the atmospheric model is run at a horizontal resolution of T42, has eastward propagating zonal wind anomalies and latent heat flux anomalies. However, the integrations

  6. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) dominates tropical variability on timescales of 30–70 days. During the boreal winter/spring, it is manifested as an eastward propagating disturbance, with a strong convective signature over the eastern hemisphere. The space–time structure of the MJO is analyzed using simulations with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model run with observed monthly mean sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), and coupled to three different ocean models. The coherence of the eastward propagation of MJO convection is sensitive to the ocean model to which ECHAM4 is coupled. For ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, models for which ~100 years of daily data is available, Monte Carlo sampling indicates that their metrics of eastward propagation are different at the 1% significance level. The flux-adjusted coupled simulations, ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, maintain a more realistic mean-state, and have a more realistic MJO simulation than the nonadjusted scale interaction experiment (SINTEX) coupled runs. The SINTEX model exhibits a cold bias in Indian Ocean and tropical West Pacific Ocean sea-surface temperature of ~0.5°C. This cold bias affects the distribution of time-mean convection over the tropical eastern hemisphere. Furthermore, the eastward propagation of MJO convection in this model is not as coherent as in the two models that used flux adjustment or when compared to an integration of ECHAM4 with prescribed observed SST. This result suggests that simulating a realistic basic state is at least as important as air–sea interaction for organizing the MJO. While all of the coupled models simulate the warm (cold) SST anomalies that precede (succeed) the MJO convection, the interaction of the components of the net surface heat flux that lead to these anomalies are different over the Indian Ocean. The ECHAM4/OPYC model in which the atmospheric model is run at a horizontal resolution of T42, has eastward propagating zonal wind anomalies and latent heat flux

  7. Assessment of Madden-Julian oscillation simulations with various configurations of CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaojing; Tang, Youmin; Zhou, Lei; Chen, Dake; Yao, Zhixiong; Islam, Siraj Ul

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) simulated in five experiments using the Community Earth System Model under different model settings. The analysis focused on the effects of air-sea coupling, resolution and atmospheric physics on the basic characteristics of the MJO, including intraseasonal variance, wavenumber-frequency characteristics and eastward propagation, using outgoing longwave radiation (OLR), zonal winds at 850 hPa (U850) and at 200 hPa (U200). Five experiments are conducted for this purpose including one atmospheric model—Community Atmosphere model version 4 (CAM4), two coupled models with CAM4 or Community Atmosphere model version 5 (CAM5) as the atmospheric component at a low resolution (CLP4_2d, CPL5_2d) and two the same coupled model with a high resolution (CPL4_1d and CLP5_1d). The results show that all models have better intraseasonal characteristics in U850 than in OLR. The uncoupled model CAM4 has lower fidelity than the coupled models in characterizing MJO basic features including the temporal and spatial intraseasonal variability and the eastward propagation. With ocean feedback, the coherence of convection and circulation is improved in the coupled models. The higher resolution is helpful in improving ISV spatial distribution and eliminating low frequency bias in the frequency-wavenumber spectra although it has little improvement to MJO-band variance (power) in frequency-wavenumber spectra. The new shallow convection scheme in CAM5 improves the moisture process of the lower troposphere so that CPL5_2d and CPL5_1d have more realistic eastward propagation speed in the boreal winter and better northward propagation in the boreal summer than other models. However, the strength of the convective MJO signal in CPL5_2d and CPL5_1d are weaker than other models and observations, which is probably one of the most spurious features in CPL5_2d and CPL5_1d experiments, suggesting that the CAM5 has a weaker

  8. Precursor Environmental Conditions Associated with the Termination of Madden-Julian Oscillation Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachnik, J. P.; Waliser, D. E.; Majda, A.

    2014-12-01

    Current generations of global climate models continue to struggle with simulating many of the observed features of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and suffer from low skill regarding initiation forecasts. While recent work has focused on those mechanisms thought to be important for MJO initiation, fewer studies have examined the large-scale conditions associated with quiescent periods of the MJO and the decay of existing events. Understanding these mechanisms may provide a valuable context toward improving simulations of MJO initiation and propagation in climate and operational weather forecast models. This study presents an analysis of the precursor environmental conditions related to the termination of MJO events. A simple climatology is created using a real-time MJO monitoring index, documenting the locations and frequencies of MJO decay. Lead-lag composites of several atmospheric variables including temperature, moisture, and intraseasonal wind anomalies are generated from three reanalyses. Long-term, lower tropospheric moisture deficits over the local domain best identify terminating events over the Indian Ocean, with a northward shift of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and corresponding lead times as much as 20 days prior to MJO decay. Statistically significant differences are also identified more than 10 days in advance of MJO termination events in the west Pacific, though the vertical velocity and moisture anomalies are more symmetric about the equator. We also present results for those MJOs that terminate over the maritime continent. Unlike the Indian Ocean and west Pacific, the likelihood of an MJO to cross the maritime continent appears related to its own intensity, rather than the upstream environmental conditions, with only the strongest MJOs propagating into the warm pool region. Finally, a budget analysis is performed on the three-dimensional moisture advection equation in order to better elucidate what time-scales and physical

  9. The Madden-Julian oscillation in ECHAM4 coupled and uncoupled general circulation models

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sperber, Kenneth R.; Gualdi, Silvio; Legutke, Stephanie; Gayler, Veronika

    2005-06-29

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) dominates tropical variability on timescales of 30–70 days. During the boreal winter/spring, it is manifested as an eastward propagating disturbance, with a strong convective signature over the eastern hemisphere. The space–time structure of the MJO is analyzed using simulations with the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model run with observed monthly mean sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), and coupled to three different ocean models. The coherence of the eastward propagation of MJO convection is sensitive to the ocean model to which ECHAM4 is coupled. For ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, models for which ~100 years of daily data is available, Montemore » Carlo sampling indicates that their metrics of eastward propagation are different at the 1% significance level. The flux-adjusted coupled simulations, ECHAM4/OPYC and ECHO-G, maintain a more realistic mean-state, and have a more realistic MJO simulation than the nonadjusted scale interaction experiment (SINTEX) coupled runs. The SINTEX model exhibits a cold bias in Indian Ocean and tropical West Pacific Ocean sea-surface temperature of ~0.5°C. This cold bias affects the distribution of time-mean convection over the tropical eastern hemisphere. Furthermore, the eastward propagation of MJO convection in this model is not as coherent as in the two models that used flux adjustment or when compared to an integration of ECHAM4 with prescribed observed SST. This result suggests that simulating a realistic basic state is at least as important as air–sea interaction for organizing the MJO. While all of the coupled models simulate the warm (cold) SST anomalies that precede (succeed) the MJO convection, the interaction of the components of the net surface heat flux that lead to these anomalies are different over the Indian Ocean. The ECHAM4/OPYC model in which the atmospheric model is run at a horizontal resolution of T42, has eastward propagating zonal wind anomalies and latent heat

  10. Vertical Structure and Physical Processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: A Model Evaluation Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolnough, S. J.; Waliser, D. E.; Klingaman, N. P.; Jiang, X.; Petch, J.; Xavier, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    The fundamental physics of the generation, maintenance and propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation are intensely debated. Many theories focus on instabilities arising from interactions between components of the vertical diabatic heating from convection and the large-scale circulation. Most general circulation models (GCMs) exhibit biases in diabatic-heating profiles against observed or reanalysis products, but those products also exhibit considerable discrepancies with one another. The Vertical structure and physical processes of the MJO project is a novel model-evaluation project, designed to assess relationships between diabatic processes in GCMs and their representations of the MJO. A key advantage of the project is the acquisition of temperature, moisture and momentum tendencies from each of the model sub-grid physics schemes. The project has three components, designed to take advantage of known links between biases in short-range forecasts and climate simulations: (1) 20-year AMIP-type simulations to assess the representation of the MJO in each GCM; (2) 2-day hindcasts of two YoTC MJO events to investigate the timestep-level behaviour of physical parameterisations; (3) 20-day hindcasts of the same events to identify links between degradations in forecast skill and the representation of diabatic processes. Analysis of the three component has identified several over-arching conclusions. First, many process-oriented MJO diagnostics derived from past studies using one or several GCMs fail to distinguish between the GCMs in this project that simulate the MJO well and those that do so poorly, whether for initialised hindcasts or 20-year simulations. Second, there is little correlation between GCM hindcast skill for these cases and the fidelity of the MJO representation in climate simulations. Third, all three components have demonstrated that a reliable representation of the moistening profile, particularly lower- and mid-tropospheric moistening during the

  11. Influence of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on Rainfall Variability over West Africa at Intraseasonal Timescale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niang, C.

    2015-12-01

    Intraseasonal variability of rainfall over West Africa plays a significant role in the economy of the region and is highly linked to agriculture and water resources. This research study aims to investigate the relationship between Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) and rainfall over West Africa during the boreal summer in the the state-of-the-art Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project (AMIP) type simulations performed by Atmosphere General Circulation Models (GCMs) forced with prescribed Sea Surface Temperature (SST). It aims to determine the impact of MJO on rainfall and convection over West Africa and identify the dynamical processes which are involved in the state-of-the-art climate simulations. The simulations show in general good skills in capturing its main characteristics as well as its influence on rainfall over West Africa. On the global scale, most models simulated an eastward spatio-temporal propagation of enhanced and suppressed convection similar to the observed. However, over West Africa the MJO signal is weak in few of the models although there is a good coherence in the eastward propagation. The influence on rainfall is well captured in both Sahel and Guinea regions thereby adequately producing the transition between positive and negative rainfall anomalies through the different phases as seen in the observation. Furthermore, the results show that strong active convective phase is clearly associated with the African Easterly Jet (AEJ) but the weak convective phase is associated with a much weaker AEJ particularly over coastal Ghana. In assessing the mechanisms which are involved in the above impacts the convectively equatorial coupled waves (CCEW) are analysed separately. The analysis of the longitudinal propagation of zonal wind at 850hPa and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) shows that the CCEW are very weak and their extention are very limited beyong West African region. It was found that the westward coupled equatorial Rossby waves are needed to

  12. Madden-Julian oscillation and sea surface temperature interactions in a multi-scale framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Lei

    2009-12-01

    The ocean-atmosphere coupling can play a role in initiating and sustaining the Madden-Julian Oscillations (MJOs), which are the major intraseasonal oscillations in the atmosphere. In this thesis, the oceanic influence on MJOs is studied with reanalysis products, numerical models, and idealized theoretical models. The energy sources for MJOs are calculated with NCEP reanalysis. The perturbed potential energy is found to be the most important energy source for most MJO events. In some MJO events, the sea surface is warmed due to the reduced latent heat flux during the suppressed phase of MJOs. As a result, warm sea surface temperature anomalies (SSTAs) occur, which appear to prolong the life time of these MJO events. In a minority of the MJO events, warm SSTAs can drive the atmosphere actively and trigger MJO events. In these events, the warm SSTAs are attributable to the internal oceanic processes influenced by the warm Indonesian Throughflow (ITF), which spreads from the southeastern Indian Ocean to the western Indian Ocean and modifies the subtle balance between stratification and mixing in the western Indian Ocean. In addition, during the transit period between monsoon seasons, a few MJO events are sustained by the energy obtained from the mean kinetic energy. Since the MJO events have different energy sources, their mechanisms should be considered in the context of these energy sources. While the spatial scale of the SSTAs in the Indian Ocean is only of order 100 km, the scale of MJOs is of order 1000 km, raising the potential for interactions between the oceanic and the atmospheric oscillations with different scales and this is demonstrated to be possible with analytical solutions to idealized linear governing equations. With a reasonable choice of parameters, the meso-scale oceanic and the large-scale atmospheric oscillations can interact with each other and lead to unstable waves in the intraseasonal band in this linear coupled model. The coupling and

  13. A Momentum Budget Analysis of Westerly Wind Events Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Ji-Hyun; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane; Moncrieff, Mitchell; Johnson, Richard; Ciesielski, Paul

    2016-04-01

    Three Madden-Julian Oscillation events during Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO) field campaign were investigated to understand the contributions of the dynamical processes involved in the wind evolution associated with the MJO over the Indian Ocean (IO). The DYNAMO field campaign was conducted from October 2011 to February 2012 over the IO to shed light on the initiation of the MJO. Based on European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts analysis, a momentum budget analysis of three MJOs that occurred in late October, late November, and late December shows that westerly acceleration at lower levels associated with the MJO active phase generally appears to be maintained by the pressure gradient force (PGF), which could be partly canceled by meridional advection of the zonal wind. Westerly acceleration in the midtroposphere tends to be mostly attributable to vertical advection. In particular, the dynamical contribution of synoptic-scale equatorial waves to the WWEs is illuminated by diagnosing the MJO in November (MJO2), accompanied by two WWEs (WWE1 and WWE2) spaced a few days apart. Unlike other WWEs during DYNAMO, horizontal advection is more responsible for the westerly acceleration in the lower troposphere for WWE2 than the PGF. Different interactions between the MJO2 envelope and convectively coupled waves (CCWs) can be responsible for different developing processes among WWEs.

  14. Geometry of the Paleo-Nueces River Incised-Valley, Corpus Christi Bay, Texas as it Relates to Quaternary Sea Level History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugrin, L.; Gulick, S. S.; Goff, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    CHIRP subbottom seismic data were collected on the 2009 and 2011 Marine Geophysics Field courses at the University of Texas at Austin within the Corpus Christi Bay along the central Texas coast in order to study the geometry of the ancestral Nueces River incised valley and its evolution over Quaternary sea level history. Since the late Pleistocene, the Nueces River valley experienced a gradual infill due to sea level rise, interrupted by two major flooding events that represent periods of rapid sediment influx. These flooding events are recognizable based on abrupt changes in seismic facies. Discontinuous, chaotic fluvial lag deposits present underneath a fairly continuous, stratified, sub-horizontal estuarine coastal plain facies mark what is interpreted to be the Pleistocene/Holocene unconformity. Above the P/H boundary, oyster reefs thrive within the estuary until capped by a strong reflector, marking the second flooding surface that allowed enough incoming sediment to discontinue oyster reef growth. The estuarine deposits within the paleo-Nueces river valley exhibit a landward migration as the Holocene transgression proceeded. As infill continued, the bay-head delta prograded seaward and the flood-tidal delta extended progressively further up the estuary until the central estuarine basin was capped. The earlier flooding events provide strong reflectors that can be linked to the draining of Lake Agassiz around 8.2 k.a.. This event flooded the Gulf of Mexico with freshwater, and interrupted the estuarine infilling of the Nueces paleo-channel. Cores from previous studies have found at least two species of oyster reefs in Corpus Christi Bay: euryhaline species Crassostrea virginica, and Ostrea equestris, a species known to thrive in higher salinity waters. The presence of both species at the flooding boundary suggests the sudden pulse of freshwater mixed with higher salinity oceanic water. The second flooding surface is interpreted to be associated with an increase

  15. Impact of Sea Level Rise on the Attenuation of Hurricane Storm Surge by Wetlands in Corpus Christi, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, C.; Irish, J. L.; Olivera, F.

    2011-12-01

    Celso Ferreira1, Jennifer L. Irish2, Francisco Olivera3 1 Graduate Research Assistant, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: celsoferreira@tamu.edu. 2 Associate Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061, email: jirish@vt.edu 3 Associate Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843, email: folivera@civil.tamu.edu. Texas has historically faced severe hurricanes with Ike being the most recent major storm example. It is believed that coastal wetlands might reduce the impact of the storm surge on coastal areas, acting as a natural protection against hurricane flooding, especially for small hurricanes and tropical storms. Considering the expected rise in the mean sea level, wetland composition and spatial distribution are also expected to change as the environmental conditions change along the coast. We analyzed a range of Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) projections for sea level rise (SLR) to simulate wetland alterations and evaluate their impact on hurricane storm surge. The analyses was conducted for Corpus Christi Bay using a pre-validated, physically based, hydrodynamic model (ADCIRC) and a wind and pressure field model (PBL) representing the physical properties of historical hurricane Bret. The calculations were performed using an unstructured numerical grid with 3.3 million nodes covering part of the Atlantic Ocean and the entire Gulf of Mexico (resolution from 2000 km to 50 meters at the coast). Wetlands are represented in the numerical model through their influence on the frictional resistance proprieties and bathymetric changes. To characterize the wetland types and their spatial distribution along the coast, we used six different land use databases from the National Land Cover Dataset (NLCD) (1992, 2001), the National Wetlands Inventory (NWI) (1993) and the Coastal Change Analysis Program (C

  16. Delineation of marsh types of the Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River in 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Brasher, Michael G.; Visser, Jenneke M.; Mitchell, Michael K.; Ballard, Bart M.; Parr, Mark W.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Wilson, Barry C.

    2014-01-01

    Coastal zone managers and researchers often require detailed information regarding emergent marsh vegetation types for modeling habitat capacities and needs of marsh-reliant wildlife (such as waterfowl and alligator). Detailed information on the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation zones throughout the Texas coast has been historically unavailable. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation and collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service via the Gulf Coast Joint Venture, Texas A&M University-Kingsville, the University of Louisiana-Lafayette, and Ducks Unlimited, Inc., has produced a classification of marsh vegetation types along the middle and upper Texas coast from Corpus Christi Bay to the Sabine River. This study incorporates approximately 1,000 ground reference locations collected via helicopter surveys in coastal marsh areas and about 2,000 supplemental locations from fresh marsh, water, and “other” (that is, nonmarsh) areas. About two-thirds of these data were used for training, and about one-third were used for assessing accuracy. Decision-tree analyses using Rulequest See5 were used to classify emergent marsh vegetation types by using these data, multitemporal satellite-based multispectral imagery from 2009 to 2011, a bare-earth digital elevation model (DEM) based on airborne light detection and ranging (lidar), alternative contemporary land cover classifications, and other spatially explicit variables believed to be important for delineating the extent and distribution of marsh vegetation communities. Image objects were generated from segmentation of high-resolution airborne imagery acquired in 2010 and were used to refine the classification. The classification is dated 2010 because the year is both the midpoint of the multitemporal satellite-based imagery (2009–11) classified and the date of the high-resolution airborne imagery that was used to develop image objects. Overall accuracy corrected for bias (accuracy

  17. Walter Max Dale (formerly Deutsch) (1894-1969): pioneer and eminent radiobiochemist at the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute, Manchester.

    PubMed

    Shreeve, David R

    2010-05-01

    The political upheaval in Germany in 1933 and subsequent movement of medical scholars with the support of the Rockefeller Foundation allowed Manchester to benefit from the arrival of Dr Walter Deutsch, later known as Dr Walter Dale. His research background enabled him to develop a radiobiochemistry laboratory at the Christie Hospital and Holt Radium Institute where he became a world authority on the effects of X-rays on enzymes and also the protective effect of additional solutes. In 1959 he initiated and then edited the International Journal of Radiation Biology. By the time of his retirement in 1962 the strength of his research resulted in his laboratory being recognized by the Medical Research Council. PMID:20519710

  18. Precipitation microstructure in different Madden-Julian Oscillation phases over Sumatra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki; Hashiguchi, Hiroyuki; Kozu, Toshiaki; Shimomai, Toyoshi; Shibagaki, Yoshiaki; Takahashi, Yukihiro

    2016-02-01

    Intraseasonal variations of precipitation and its microstructure are investigated using measurements of the Equatorial Atmospheric Radar (EAR) facilities at Kototabang, west Sumatra, Indonesia (0.20°S, 100.32°E, 864 m above sea level). Raindrop size distribution (DSD) observations are obtained from a 2D-Video Disdrometer (2DVD) with a near continuous record of operation over eight consecutive years (2003-2010). Precipitation types are classified using 1.3-GHz wind profiler observation, and are partitioned according to active and inactive convective phases of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). It is found that precipitation systems during the inactive phase are more continental in nature than those during the active phase. Cloud propagation from brightness temperature data indicates that Sumatra receives the rainfall mainly from maritime clouds during the active phase, while it is mainly from the continental clouds (land-based convection) during the inactive phase. Other remarkable differences between active and inactive phase precipitation systems are also observed from the vertical structure of precipitation. The precipitation during the inactive phase has deeper storms, a higher reflectivity aloft, more lightning activity and less stratiform characteristics, as compared to the active phase. Assessment of cloud effective radius of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data also shows a slight difference in the cloud droplet between the active and the inactive MJO phases. Different convective storms in different MJO phases lead to different DSD characteristics and Z-R relationships. The DSD during the inactive phase tends to have a higher concentration of medium and large-size drops than the active counterpart, consistent with the previous study during the first campaign of Coupling Processes in the Equatorial Atmosphere project. Although the DSD parameters and coefficient of Z-R relationships fall within the range of tropical maritime

  19. Madden Julian Oscillation impact on South America precipitation and its associated teleconnections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimm, A. M.

    2013-12-01

    The anomalies in daily precipitation and in the frequency of its extreme events associated with the different phases of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) are calculated with unprecedented temporal and spatial coverage for South America. These anomalies are shown to be produced by tropics-tropics and tropics-extratropics teleconnections. Besides, teleconnections are detected between intraseasonal precipitation anomalies in South America and southern Africa. The observational analysis of the MJO impact is based on daily precipitation station data over South America in the period 1979-2009, gridded to 1 degree, and submitted to a bandpass Lanczos filter, which retains intraseasonal oscillations in the 20-90 day band. The main modes of rainfall variability in this time scale are consistent with the anomalies during the different phases of the MJO, which are determined through indices based on the first two empirical orthogonal functions of the combined fields of zonal wind at 850 hPa and 200 hPa and OLR, between 15S e 15N, after removal of the annual cycle and interannual variability. Composites of anomalies in precipitation and in the frequency of extreme events are made for each phase, and their significance is assessed. The associated composites of global streamfunction, velocity potential and OLR anomalies give insights on the mechanisms of the impact. Teleconnections responsible for the impact are searched with the help of influence functions (IFs) of a vorticity equation model that includes the divergence of the basic state and the advection by anomalous divergent wind. The IFs are calculated for the action centers of wavetrains associated with the highest impact on South America, and indicate the regions in which upper level anomalous divergence associated with anomalous tropical convection is most efficient in producing the observed wavetrains. These source regions contain significant MJO-related OLR anomalies in the central subtropical southern Pacific

  20. A Smart ALEC Threatens Public Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Underwood, Julie; Mead, Julie F.

    2012-01-01

    Public education has historically been in the public and political eye. Then came 2011 and the high profile and well televised protests in Wisconsin, Ohio and Indiana. In each case Republican Governors and Republican controlled state legislatures had introduced substantially similar bills that sought sweeping changes to each state's collective…

  1. Surprising Resilience of the Madden-Julian Oscillation to Extreme Climate Cooling in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pritchard, M. S.; Yang, D.

    2014-12-01

    We test the hypothesis that radiative convective equilibrium (RCE) self-aggregation is a good metaphor for the maintenance of the Madden-Julian Oscillation by imposing extreme cooling in the Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model (SPCAM) v. 3.0 in a uniform SST configuration. The expectation is that - like RCE self-aggregation - SPCAM's simulated MJO should shut down at sea surface temperatures significantly less than 25 degrees Celsius. Remarkably, the MJO in SPCAM is resilient to extreme cooling down to one degree Celsius. With cooling, the simulated MJO becomes more barotropic and its zonal wavelength decreases. The amplitude decrease and horizontal scale contraction are consistent with the theoretical prediction from Yang and Ingersoll (2014, GRL).

  2. A mechanism-denial study on the Madden-Julian Oscillation with reduced interference from mean state changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, D.; Kuang, Z.

    2016-03-01

    Mechanism-denial experiments using Superparameterized Community Atmosphere Model are conducted to investigate the importance of extratropical and circumnavigating waves, wind-evaporation feedback, and radiative-convective feedback to the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A common issue with mechanism-denial studies is the interference from mean state changes when processes are turned off in the model. Here time-invariant forcing and nudging on effective timescales longer than the intraseasonal timescale are implemented to maintain the mean state. The MJO activity remains largely unchanged with suppressed extratropical and circumnavigating waves when the mean state is maintained to be close to that of the control run, suggesting that excitation of MJO by extratropical and circumnavigating waves is not necessary for the existence of MJO in this model. It is also shown that the wind-evaporation feedback slows down eastward propagation of the MJO, and the radiative-convective feedback amplifies the MJO.

  3. Interannual variability of the Madden-Julian Oscillation and its impact on the North Atlantic Oscillation in the boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hai; Brunet, Gilbert; Yu, Bin

    2015-07-01

    Interannual variability of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and its influence on the extratropical teleconnection are analyzed. It is found that there is an interannual shift of the MJO activity between the Indian Ocean and the western central Pacific. This is reflected by the year-to-year changes in the occurrence frequency of individual MJO phases. The leading mode of an empirical orthogonal function analysis of occurrence frequency of MJO phases shows an out-of-phase relationship between MJO phase 7 and phases 3-5. During winters when the MJO convection occurs more frequently in the Indian Ocean (phases 3-5), a winter mean positive North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) tends to occur. These results indicate that the seasonal mean convection activity over the Indian Ocean related to the MJO is a possible driving forcing for the seasonal mean NAO variability in the boreal winter.

  4. On the role of anomalous ocean surface temperatures for promoting the record Madden-Julian Oscillation in March 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Andrew G.; Hendon, Harry H.; Wang, Guomin

    2016-01-01

    A Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) event dramatically amplified at the beginning of March 2015 as the convective phase traversed an unusually warm central Pacific Ocean. This record amplification also resulted in record amplitude of the MJO based on index measurements since 1974. We explore the possible role of the anomalously high ocean surface temperatures in the equatorial central Pacific for promoting the extraordinary amplification of this MJO event. Forecast sensitivity experiments with the Predictive Ocean Atmosphere Model for Australia show that the enhanced growth of the MJO resulted from amplification of the convective anomaly as it encountered the unusually warm central Pacific. Our results indicate that anomalous sea surface temperature (SST) at the onset of El Niño 2015 promoted the intensification of the MJO. We suggest a two-way interaction whereby initial SST anomalies promoted enhanced MJO activity which then possibly led to enhanced El Niño development.

  5. The Madden-Julian oscillation wind-convection coupling and the role of moisture processes in the MM5 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, Erwan; Weare, Bryan C.; Gustafson, William I.

    2010-08-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) produced by a mesoscale model is investigated using standardized statistical diagnostics. Results show that upper- and lower-level zonal winds display the correct MJO structure, phase speed (8 m s-1) and space-time power spectrum. However, the simulated free atmosphere moisture, outgoing longwave radiation and precipitation do not exhibit any clear MJO signal. Yet, the boundary layer moisture, moist static energy and atmospheric instability, measured using a moist static energy instability index, have clear MJO signals. A significant finding is the ability of the model to simulate a realistic MJO phase speed in the winds without reproducing the MJO wind-convection coupling or a realistic propagation in the free atmosphere water vapor. This study suggests that the convergence of boundary layer moisture and the discharge and recharge of the moist static energy and atmospheric instability may be responsible for controlling the speed of propagation of the MJO circulation.

  6. The Madden-Julian oscillation wind-convection coupling and the role of moisture processes in the MM5 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E.; Weare, B. C.; Gustafson, W. I.

    2009-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) produced by a mesoscale model is investigated using standardized statistical diagnostics. Results show that upper- and lower-level zonal winds display the correct MJO structure, phase speed (8 m/s) and space-time power spectrum. However, the simulated free atmosphere moisture, outgoing longwave radiation and precipitation do not exhibit any clear MJO signal. Yet, the boundary layer moisture, moist static energy and atmospheric instability, measured using a moist static energy instability index, have clear MJO signals. A significant finding is the ability of the model to simulate a realistic MJO phase speed in the winds without reproducing the MJO wind-convection coupling or a realistic propagation in the free atmosphere water vapor. This study suggests that the convergence of boundary layer moisture and the discharge and recharge of the moist static energy and atmospheric instability may be responsible for controlling the speed of propagation of the MJO circulation.

  7. Advection, Moistening, and Shallow-to-deep Convection Transitions During the Initiation and Propagation of Madden-Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Landu, Kiranmayi; Long, Charles N.

    2014-09-11

    Using observations from the 2011 AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign over the Indian Ocean and a high-resolution regional model simulation, the processes that lead to the rapid shallow-to-deep convection transitions associated with the initiation and eastward propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are examined. By tracking the evolution of the depth of several thousand individual model simulated precipitation features, the role of and the processes that control the observed midtropospheric moisture buildup ahead of the detection of deep convection are quantified at large and convection scales. The frequency of shallow-to-deep convection transitions is found to be sensitive to this midlevel moisture and large-scale uplift. This uplift along with the decline of large-scale drying by equator-ward advection causes the moisture buildup leading to the initiation of the MJO. Convection scale moisture variability and uplift, and large-scale zonal advection play secondary roles.

  8. The impact of the Madden-Julian oscillation on polar surface air temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Changhyun

    This dissertation investigates the impact of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on the extratropical surface air temperature (SAT). The underlying idea of this study is that tropical convective heating is linked to the extratropical circulation and SAT through poleward propagating Rossby waves. Given this perspective, two questions are addressed. One is the extent to which the MJO contribute to interdecadal time scale polar amplification of SAT (Chapters 2 and 3) and the other is the mechanism by which the MJO alters the intraseasonal time scale extratropical SAT change (Chapters 4 and 5). Polar amplification, i.e., interdecadal time-scale SAT increase being greatest at high latitudes, is one of prominent features of current climate change. Numerous observational and modeling studies have documented this phenomenon. However, its cause remains uncertain. The surface albedo feedback, which is associated with retreats in snow and ice cover and hence increases in surface albedo with a warmer climate, is the most prominent explanation. However, one of important characteristics of polar amplification is that its maximum amplitude is retained during the winter season when incoming solar radiation is minimal. In Chapters 2 and 3, we show that polar amplification during the 1979--2008 winters is tropically excited. More specifically, we show evidence that polar amplification is linked to interdecadal time scale change in the MJO phase frequency of occurrence. We present both the extended boreal winter (November to March) and austral winter (May to September), with our focus being on winter Hemisphere, where the MJO has strong influence. First, during the 30-year boreal winter, MJO phases 4--6 have occurred with an increased frequency of occurrence while phases 1 and 2 have showed a moderate decrease in their frequency of occurrence. Using lagged composites of the SAT, we show that Arctic warming takes place 1--2 weeks after MJO passes its phases 4--6. Similarly, MJO phases

  9. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-04-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  10. Monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities in mountain lakes: a case of the Fifth Triglav Lake in the Julian Alps.

    PubMed

    Ravnikar, Tina; Bohanec, Marko; Muri, Gregor

    2016-03-01

    The Fifth Triglav Lake is a remote mountain lake in the Julian Alps. The area of the Julian Alps where the lake is situated is protected by law and lies within the Triglav National Park. Mountain lakes in Slovenia were considered for a long time as pristine, unpolluted lakes, but analyses in the last decade revealed considerable human impact even in such remote places. Eutrophication or excessive accumulation of nutrients is the main problem of most lakes in the temperate climatic zone, also in Slovenia. Since the introduction of fish in 1991, the lake is going through a series of changes for which we do not know exactly where they lead, so the monitoring and assessment of anthropogenic activities are of great importance. For this purpose, a qualitative multiattribute decision model was developed with DEX method to assess ecological effects on the lake. The extent of the ecological effects on the lake is assessed using four main parameters: the trophic state, lake characteristics, environmental parameters, and anthropogenic stressors. Dependence of environmental impact on various external factors beyond human control, such as temperature, precipitation, retention time, and factors on which we have influence, such as the amount of wastewater and the presence of fish in the lake, were also evaluated. The following data were measured: chlorophyll a, nutrients, TP, oxygen, C/N ratio, nutrients in sediment, temperature, precipitation, retention time, and volume. We made assumptions about fish and wastewater, which we could not measure. The main contributions of this work are the designed model and the obtained findings for the Fifth Triglav Lake that can help not only scientists in understanding the complexity of lake-watershed systems and interactions among system components but also local authorities to manage and monitor the lake aquatic environment in an effective and efficient way. The model is flexible and can be also used for other lakes, assuming that the used

  11. Sources of suspended-sediment loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, south Texas, 1958–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.

    2013-01-01

    The HSPF model was calibrated to simulate suspended sediment using suspended-sediment data collected at the Mathis, Bluntzer, and Calallen gages during 2006-7. Model simulated suspended-sediment loads at the Calallen gage were within 5 percent of loads that were estimated, by regression, from suspended-sediment sample analysis and measured streamflow. The calibrated watershed model was used to estimate streamflow and suspended-sediment loads for 1958-2010, including loads transported to the Nueces Estuary. During 1958-2010, on average, an estimated 288 tons per day (tons/d) of suspended sediment were delivered to the lower Nueces River; an estimated 278 tons/d were delivered to the estuary. The annual suspended-sediment load was highly variable, depending on the occurrence of runoff events and high streamflows. During 1958-2010, the annual total sediment loads to the estuary varied from an estimated 3.8 to 2,490 tons/d. On average, 113 tons/d, or about 39 percent of the estimated annual suspended-sediment contribution, originated from cropland in the study watershed. Releases from Lake Corpus Christi delivered an estimated 94 tons/d of suspended sediment or about 33 percent of the 288 tons/d estimated to have been delivered to the lower Nueces River. Erosion of stream-channel bed and banks accou

  12. Effective control parameters in deep convection scheme for the improved simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHOI, J.; Seo, K. H.

    2015-12-01

    This work seeks for the most effective parameters in a deep convection scheme (relaxed Arakawa-Schubert convection scheme) of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System model for the improved simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A suite of sensitivity experiments are performed in a coupled free run format. Two parameters are found to lead to a significant improvement: a threshold of relative humidity of the boundary layer and a fraction of re-evaporation of convective precipitation. Increasing the strength of these two parameters increases a supply of water vapor and condensate from deep cumulus ensembles to environment in the lower troposphere (especially, 700 hPa), and reduces light rainfall amount that prevents complete organization of convective system. Under a more humid environment (or positive moisture-convection feedback), the space-time spectral signal, eastward propagation, tilted vertical structure of dynamic and thermodynamic variables associated with the MJO are more comparable to observations and a recharge-discharge theory.

  13. Assessing the Importance of the Evaporation-Wind Feedback Mechanism in the Modulation of Simulated Madden-Julian Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colon, Edward; Lindesay, James; Suarez, Max J.

    1998-01-01

    An examination of simulated Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) response to active and suppressed air-sea interactions is made using an aquaplanet model employing a realistic representation of the hydrologic cyle. In general, the evaporation-wind feedback (EWF) results from a coupling between tropical zonal surface wind stresses and evaporation anomalies. Recent observational and theoretical studies have questioned the significance of EWF in sustaining the predominantly wavenumber 1 eastward propagating mode commonly attributed to the interaction between large scale convergence and cumulus-scale convection (conditional instability of the second kind, CISK). To ascertain the nature of the EWF dependence on lower boundary conditions and thus quantify its effect on MJO development, a series of numerical experiments were conducted employing various zonally symmetric sea surface temperature (SST) distributions with active and suppressed EWF mechanisms. Results suggest that a correlation exists between tropical SSTs and the efficacy of the EWF in vertically redistributing heat acquired through surface wind stresses. It has been determined that the removal of the EWF is not a crucial factor in the dampening of the simulated MJO at high equatorial SSTs. The additional energy fed into the developing convective mode by the EWF selectively amplifies higher order wave modes in all numerical experiments thus boosting overall variances in oscillatory responses.

  14. Effective control parameters in a deep convection scheme for improved simulation of the Madden-Julian oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jin-Ho; Seo, Kyong-Hwan

    2016-07-01

    This work seeks to find the most effective parameters in a deep convection scheme (relaxed Arakawa-Schubert scheme) of the National Centers of Environmental Prediction Climate Forecast System model for improved simulation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). A suite of sensitivity experiments are performed by changing physical components such as the relaxation parameter of mass flux for adjustment of the environment, the evaporation rate from large-scale precipitation, the moisture trigger threshold using relative humidity of the boundary layer, and the fraction of re-evaporation of convective (subgrid-scale) rainfall. Among them, the last two parameters are found to produce a significant improvement. Increasing the strength of these two parameters reduces light rainfall that inhibits complete formation of the tropical convective system or supplies more moisture that help increase a potential energy to large-scale environment in the lower troposphere (especially at 700 hPa), leading to moisture preconditioning favorable for further development and eastward propagation of the MJO. In a more humid environment, more organized MJO structure (i.e., space-time spectral signal, eastward propagation, and tilted vertical structure) is produced.

  15. Regulation of H2O and CO in Tropical Tropopause Layer by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Sun; Dessler, Andrew E.

    2007-01-01

    Impacts of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) on the water vapor (H2O) and carbon monoxide (CO) abundances in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) are investigated using Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) data for November 2004 to May 2005. The effects of the eastward propagation of MJO on H2O and CO abundances in the TTL are evident. Deep convection transports H20 into the upper troposphere up to about the 355-365 K level. Around the 365-375 K level, a dry anomaly is collocated with a cold anomaly, which is above a warm anomaly located near the region of convection enhancement. Tropical mean H20 at 375 K is regulated by the MJO through convection enhancement and coherent with the local MJO-related temperature variation. The locations of dehydration follow the eastward propagation of convection enhancement and its area extent depends on the phase of the MJO. Enhancement of deep convection associated with the MJO also injects CO from the lower troposphere to the TTL up to 375 K. However, tropical mean CO at 375 K responds instantaneously to the large injection event occurring over the African continent.

  16. Aquarius surface salinity and the Madden-Julian Oscillation: The role of salinity in surface layer density and potential energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Bin; Lee, Tong; Halkides, Daria J.; Waliser, Duane E.

    2014-04-01

    Sea surface salinity (SSS) data from the Aquarius satellite are analyzed along with auxiliary data to investigate the SSS signature of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian and Pacific Oceans, the effect of evaporation-minus-precipitation (E-P), the implication for the role of ocean dynamics, and the SSS influence on surface density and potential energy. MJO-related SSS changes are consistent with E-P forcing in the western Indian Ocean throughout the MJO cycle and in the central Indian Ocean during the wet phase of the MJO cycle. However, SSS changes cannot be explained by E-P in the central Indian Ocean during the dry phase and in the eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans throughout the MJO cycle, implying the importance of ocean dynamics. SSS has an overall larger contribution to MJO-related surface density and potential energy anomalies than SST. It partially offsets the SST effect in the western-to-central Indian Ocean and reinforces the SST effect in the eastern Indian and western Pacific Oceans. Ocean modeling and assimilation need to properly account for salinity effects in order to correctly represent mixed layer variability associated with the MJO. Our results also clarify some discrepancy in previous studies about the E-P effect on MJO-related SSS variations.

  17. Extended-range forecast of spring rainfall in southern China based on the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenkai; Hsu, Pang-chi; He, Jinhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenjun

    2015-11-01

    Spring (March-May) rainfall after a dry period in winter has a substantial impact on agriculture and water management in populous southern China. The occurrence of low-frequency spring rainfall anomalies has been linked with the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) through its modulation of large-scale circulation and moisture supply over southern China. Using the spatial and temporal information of the MJO as a predictor, an empirical model for extended-range forecasting of spring rainfall in southern China was constructed. We first obtained the coupled patterns between the preceding MJO evolutions (real-time multivariate MJO index) and the succeeding rainfall variability in southern China based on singular value decomposition analysis. Then, a prediction was carried out by projecting the predictor onto the spatiotemporal coupled patterns. Useful skill, in terms of the temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) between the predicted and observed rainfall over southern China, persisted up to a forecast lead-time of six pentads. The forecast amplitude bias in terms of root-mean-square error was around 1.0 standard deviation. Also, the forecast skill was highly dependent on the strength of the MJO signal. During active MJO periods, the TCC skill was around twofold larger than that during weak MJO periods. The current statistical model shows encouraging ability, but additional work is required to improve its forecasting skill.

  18. Madden–Julian Oscillation prediction skill of a new-generation global model demonstrated using a supercomputer

    PubMed Central

    Miyakawa, Tomoki; Satoh, Masaki; Miura, Hiroaki; Tomita, Hirofumi; Yashiro, Hisashi; Noda, Akira T.; Yamada, Yohei; Kodama, Chihiro; Kimoto, Masahide; Yoneyama, Kunio

    2014-01-01

    Global cloud/cloud system-resolving models are perceived to perform well in the prediction of the Madden–Julian Oscillation (MJO), a huge eastward -propagating atmospheric pulse that dominates intraseasonal variation of the tropics and affects the entire globe. However, owing to model complexity, detailed analysis is limited by computational power. Here we carry out a simulation series using a recently developed supercomputer, which enables the statistical evaluation of the MJO prediction skill of a costly new-generation model in a manner similar to operational forecast models. We estimate the current MJO predictability of the model as 27 days by conducting simulations including all winter MJO cases identified during 2003–2012. The simulated precipitation patterns associated with different MJO phases compare well with observations. An MJO case captured in a recent intensive observation is also well reproduced. Our results reveal that the global cloud-resolving approach is effective in understanding the MJO and in providing month-long tropical forecasts. PMID:24801254

  19. Influence of the Madden–Julian oscillation on Tibetan Plateau snow cover at the intraseasonal time-scale

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenkai; Guo, Weidong; Hsu, Pang-chi; Xue, Yongkang

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP), known as the third pole of the Earth, has snow cover with intraseasonal to decadal variability that affects weather and climate both inside and outside the TP. However, the factors that generate the TP snow cover (TPSC) anomalies at the intraseasonal time-scale are unclear. This report reveals the influence of the Madden‒Julian oscillation (MJO), which is the most dominant component of the tropical intraseasonal variability, on TPSC. We focus on wintertime snow cover over the central and eastern TP, where the intraseasonal variability is large. TPSC increases/decreases in the MJO phases 8‒1/4–5, when the eastward-propagating MJO suppressed/enhanced convection locates over the Maritime Continent. Such a change in TPSC leads to the most dominant positive/negative anomalies of TPSC in the following phases 2‒3/6‒7 due to the non-significant change of TPSC in these phases. There is anomalous moisture advection over the upstream of the TP caused by MJO-excited large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection process generates the low-frequency eastward-propagating anomalous water vapour from upstream to the TP that influences precipitation and, eventually, TPSC. PMID:27464569

  20. Extended-range forecast of spring rainfall in southern China based on the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenkai; Hsu, Pang-chi; He, Jinhai; Zhu, Zhiwei; Zhang, Wenjun

    2016-06-01

    Spring (March-May) rainfall after a dry period in winter has a substantial impact on agriculture and water management in populous southern China. The occurrence of low-frequency spring rainfall anomalies has been linked with the tropical Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) through its modulation of large-scale circulation and moisture supply over southern China. Using the spatial and temporal information of the MJO as a predictor, an empirical model for extended-range forecasting of spring rainfall in southern China was constructed. We first obtained the coupled patterns between the preceding MJO evolutions (real-time multivariate MJO index) and the succeeding rainfall variability in southern China based on singular value decomposition analysis. Then, a prediction was carried out by projecting the predictor onto the spatiotemporal coupled patterns. Useful skill, in terms of the temporal correlation coefficient (TCC) between the predicted and observed rainfall over southern China, persisted up to a forecast lead-time of six pentads. The forecast amplitude bias in terms of root-mean-square error was around 1.0 standard deviation. Also, the forecast skill was highly dependent on the strength of the MJO signal. During active MJO periods, the TCC skill was around twofold larger than that during weak MJO periods. The current statistical model shows encouraging ability, but additional work is required to improve its forecasting skill.

  1. Influence of the Madden-Julian oscillation on Tibetan Plateau snow cover at the intraseasonal time-scale.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenkai; Guo, Weidong; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Xue, Yongkang

    2016-01-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP), known as the third pole of the Earth, has snow cover with intraseasonal to decadal variability that affects weather and climate both inside and outside the TP. However, the factors that generate the TP snow cover (TPSC) anomalies at the intraseasonal time-scale are unclear. This report reveals the influence of the Madden‒Julian oscillation (MJO), which is the most dominant component of the tropical intraseasonal variability, on TPSC. We focus on wintertime snow cover over the central and eastern TP, where the intraseasonal variability is large. TPSC increases/decreases in the MJO phases 8‒1/4-5, when the eastward-propagating MJO suppressed/enhanced convection locates over the Maritime Continent. Such a change in TPSC leads to the most dominant positive/negative anomalies of TPSC in the following phases 2‒3/6‒7 due to the non-significant change of TPSC in these phases. There is anomalous moisture advection over the upstream of the TP caused by MJO-excited large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection process generates the low-frequency eastward-propagating anomalous water vapour from upstream to the TP that influences precipitation and, eventually, TPSC. PMID:27464569

  2. Influence of the Madden–Julian oscillation on Tibetan Plateau snow cover at the intraseasonal time-scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenkai; Guo, Weidong; Hsu, Pang-Chi; Xue, Yongkang

    2016-07-01

    The Tibetan Plateau (TP), known as the third pole of the Earth, has snow cover with intraseasonal to decadal variability that affects weather and climate both inside and outside the TP. However, the factors that generate the TP snow cover (TPSC) anomalies at the intraseasonal time-scale are unclear. This report reveals the influence of the Madden‒Julian oscillation (MJO), which is the most dominant component of the tropical intraseasonal variability, on TPSC. We focus on wintertime snow cover over the central and eastern TP, where the intraseasonal variability is large. TPSC increases/decreases in the MJO phases 8‒1/4–5, when the eastward-propagating MJO suppressed/enhanced convection locates over the Maritime Continent. Such a change in TPSC leads to the most dominant positive/negative anomalies of TPSC in the following phases 2‒3/6‒7 due to the non-significant change of TPSC in these phases. There is anomalous moisture advection over the upstream of the TP caused by MJO-excited large-scale atmospheric circulation. The advection process generates the low-frequency eastward-propagating anomalous water vapour from upstream to the TP that influences precipitation and, eventually, TPSC.

  3. Tropical Atlantic Dust and Smoke Aerosol Variations Related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in MODIS and MISR Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yanjuan; Tian, Baijun; Kahn, Ralph A.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Wong, Sun; Waliser, Duane E.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) fine mode fraction and Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) nonspherical fraction data are used to derive dust and smoke aerosol optical thickness (T(sub dust) and T(sub smoke)) over the tropical Atlantic in a complementary way: due to its wider swath, MODIS has 3-4 times greater sampling than MISR, but MISR dust discrimination is based on particle shape retrievals, whereas an empirical scheme is used for MODIS. MODIS and MISR show very similar dust and smoke winter climatologies. T(sub dust) is the dominant aerosol component over the tropical Atlantic, accounting for 40-70 percent of the total aerosol optical thickness (AOT), whereas T(sub smoke) is significantly smaller than T(sub dust). The consistency and high correlation between these climatologies and their daily variations lends confidence to their use for investigating the relative dust and smoke contributions to the total AOT variation associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). The temporal evolution and spatial patterns of the tdus anomalies associated with the MJO are consistent between MODIS and MISR: the magnitude of MJO-realted T(sub dust) anomalies is comparable to or even larger than that of the total T, while the T(sub smoke) anomaly represents about 15 percent compared to the total, which is quite different from their relative magnitudes to the total T on the climatological time scale. This suggests that dust and smoke are not influenced by the MJO in the same way. Based on correlation analysis, dust is strongly influenced by the MJO-modulated trade wind and precipitation anomalies, and can last as long as one MJO phase, whereas smoke is less affected.

  4. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian oscillation: Exploring key model physics in climate simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steven J.; Guan, Bin; Bellon, Gilles; Crueger, Traute; DeMott, Charlotte; Hannay, Cecile; Lin, Hai; Hu, Wenting; Kim, Daehyun; Lappen, Cara-Lyn; Lu, Mong-Ming; Ma, Hsi-Yen; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Ridout, James A.; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Scinocca, John; Seo, Kyong-Hwan; Shindo, Eiki; Song, Xiaoliang; Stan, Cristiana; Tseng, Wan-Ling; Wang, Wanqiu; Wu, Tongwen; Wu, Xiaoqing; Wyser, Klaus; Zhang, Guang J.; Zhu, Hongyan

    2015-05-01

    Aimed at reducing deficiencies in representing the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) in general circulation models (GCMs), a global model evaluation project on vertical structure and physical processes of the MJO was coordinated. In this paper, results from the climate simulation component of this project are reported. It is shown that the MJO remains a great challenge in these latest generation GCMs. The systematic eastward propagation of the MJO is only well simulated in about one fourth of the total participating models. The observed vertical westward tilt with altitude of the MJO is well simulated in good MJO models but not in the poor ones. Damped Kelvin wave responses to the east of convection in the lower troposphere could be responsible for the missing MJO preconditioning process in these poor MJO models. Several process-oriented diagnostics were conducted to discriminate key processes for realistic MJO simulations. While large-scale rainfall partition and low-level mean zonal winds over the Indo-Pacific in a model are not found to be closely associated with its MJO skill, two metrics, including the low-level relative humidity difference between high- and low-rain events and seasonal mean gross moist stability, exhibit statistically significant correlations with the MJO performance. It is further indicated that increased cloud-radiative feedback tends to be associated with reduced amplitude of intraseasonal variability, which is incompatible with the radiative instability theory previously proposed for the MJO. Results in this study confirm that inclusion of air-sea interaction can lead to significant improvement in simulating the MJO.

  5. The global response to vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation derived from TRMM estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, J.; Woolnough, S.; Inness, P.

    2013-12-01

    The anomalous global atmospheric circulation associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is examined using composite vertical anomalous diabatic heating structures based on Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) estimates and reanalysis datasets and integrating a primitive equations model. Variations in the dynamical response from the observational and reanalysis products are investigated in relation to the detailed structure of the vertical structure of heating of the MJO, with specific focus of the role of the westward tilting with altitude in the heating, clearly evident in three reanalysis heating structures but is less well pronounced in the TRMM heating structures. It was found that the atmospheric response to the reanalysis heatings were far more consistent compared to the responses from the TRMM heating estimates. Examination of the moisture flux during the main active phase of the MJO revealed a surplus in moisture convergence ahead of the anomalous heating from each of the reanalysis integrations, which was found to be directly attributed to the vertical tilt in heating structure. In contrast, the response to the TRMM heatings showed no phase shift in moisture convergence in relation to the convective heating and was understood to be a consequence of the weaker representation of vertical tilting in heating structure. It was suggested that the westward tilt in heating could therefore play an important role in promoting convection east of the main heating region. The dynamical response to composite vertical diabatic heating structures associated with the MJO from simulations with Unified Model (UM) HadGEM3 with standard and enhanced (x1.5) entrainment rates are also examined to investigate the relationship between the dynamical response to the heating profile and quality of MJO simulations.

  6. Tropical Atlantic Dust and Smoke Aerosol Variabilities Related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in MODIS and MISR Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Yanjuan; Tian, Baijun; Kahn, Ralph A.; Kalashnikova, Olga; Wong, Sun; Waliser, Duane E.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, MODIS fine mode fraction and MISR non-spherical fraction are 2used to derive dust and smoke AOT components (tau(sub dust) and tau(sub smoke)) over the tropical Atlantic, and their variabilities related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) are then investigated. Both MODIS and MISR show a very similar dust and smoke winter climatology. tau(sub dust) is found to be the dominant aerosol component over the tropical Atlantic while tau(sub smoke) is significantly smaller than tau(sub dust). The daily MODIS and MISR tau(sub dust) are overall highly correlated, with the correlation coefficients typically about 0.7 over the North Atlantic. The consistency between the MODIS and MISR dust and smoke aerosol climatology and daily variations give us confidence to use these two data sets to investigate their relative contributions to the total AOT variation associated with the MJO. However, unlike the MISR dust discrimination, which is based on particle shape retrievals, the smoke discrimination is less certain, based on assumed partitioning of maritime aerosol for both MISR and MODIS. The temporal evolution and spatial patterns of the tau(sub dust) anomalies associated with the MJO are consistent between MODIS and MISR. The tau(sub dust) anomalies are very similar to those of tau anomalies, and are of comparable magnitude. In contrast, the MJO-related tau(sub smoke) anomalies are rather small, and the tau(sub mar) anomalies are negligible. The consistency between the MODIS and MISR results suggests that dust aerosol is the dominant component on the intra-seasonal time scale over the tropical Atlantic Ocean.

  7. Storm track activity over the North Pacific associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation under ENSO conditions during boreal winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Chiharu; Shirooka, Ryuichi

    2014-09-01

    The present study investigates modulation by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) of storm track activity (STA) over the North Pacific (NP) during boreal winter for El Niño and La Niña periods. STA defined by vertically averaged synoptic eddy kinetic energy (EKE) greatly intensifies over the western North Pacific (WNP) and central eastern North Pacific during La Niña and El Niño years, respectively, when the MJO convection is located over the central Indian Ocean (IO)-Maritime Continent. When the MJO moves into the western central Pacific, the STA in La Niña years is suppressed (enhanced) at higher (lower) latitudes than in El Niño years. Diagnoses of EKE and eddy available potential energy budgets indicate that the difference in STA over the WNP for the MJO phases between El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) years is mainly contributed by baroclinic energy conversion and potential energy conversion between background and eddy (BCPE). We reveal that BCPE is mainly attributed to intraseasonal baroclinicity and eddy heat flux (EHF) anomalies and their interactions with strong winter mean baroclinic fields in the WNP. Through the EHF, synoptic eddies act to counterbalance an intraseasonal temperature that is primarily caused by the anomalous horizontal advection of mean temperature by MJO-related flow. The intraseasonal circulation and associated temperature and EHF anomalies dominate in northwest (southeast) portion of the NP during La Niña (El Niño), leading to BCPE difference. Changes in the spatial pattern and strength of the NP circulation and STA are caused by dominance of strong MJO amplification over the IO (central Pacific) during La Niña (El Niño).

  8. Satellite measurements of the Madden-Julian oscillation in wintertime stratospheric ozone over the Tibetan Plateau and East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuli; Liu, Yi; Liu, Chuanxi; Sofieva, V. F.

    2015-11-01

    We investigate the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) signal in wintertime stratospheric ozone over the Tibetan Plateau and East Asia using the harmonized dataset of satellite ozone profiles. Two different MJO indices—the all-season Real-Time multivariate MJO index (RMM) and outgoing longwave radiation-based MJO index (OMI)—are used to compare the MJO-related ozone anomalies. The results show that there are pronounced eastward-propagating MJO-related stratospheric ozone anomalies (mainly within 20-200 hPa) over the subtropics. The negative stratospheric ozone anomalies are over the Tibetan Plateau and East Asia in MJO phases 4-7, when MJO-related tropical deep convective anomalies move from the equatorial Indian Ocean towards the western Pacific Ocean. Compared with the results based on RMM, the MJO-related stratospheric column ozone anomalies based on OMI are stronger and one phase ahead. Further analysis suggests that different sampling errors, observation principles and retrieval algorithms may be responsible for the discrepancies among different satellite measurements. The MJO-related stratospheric ozone anomalies can be attributed to the MJO-related circulation anomalies, i.e., the uplifted tropopause and the northward shifted westerly jet in the upper troposphere. Compared to the result based on RMM, the upper tropospheric westerly jet may play a less important role in generating the stratospheric column ozone anomalies based on OMI. Our study indicates that the circulation-based MJO index (RMM) can better characterize the MJO-related anomalies in tropopause pressure and thus the MJO influence on atmospheric trace gases in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere, especially over subtropical East Asia.

  9. Linkages between the Madden Julian Oscillation, process-level diagnostics and GCM parameterization behavior in YOTC simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neale, R. B.; Hannay, C.

    2014-12-01

    The simulation of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) remains a significant challenge in climate models. The primary difficulty lies in relating MJO skill to parameterized physical processes - the main access point for model development. One theory of the MJO relies on scale-interactions from small to large scales. The expectation is that GCMs should reproduce the correct relationships at the smallest resolved scales and this will translate through increasing scales and lead to a skillful simulation of the MJO. So-called 'process-based' diagnostics have recently been applied to simple model fields in order to relate accurate simulation of the MJO to accurate, small-scale process-level relationships (Kim et al., 2014). In this presentation we will take this technique further to provide greater insight into how the underlying physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) conspire to provide the process-level responses in the model, particularly as it relates to precipitation and humidity dependent processes. This provides the potential for a range of dependencies between parameterization tendencies and MJO skill. Furthermore, these dependencies are examined to quantify the effect of model biases. This entails performing the same process-level analysis on simply initialized and nudged CAM simulations that make use of YOTC analysis. These techniques enable diagnosis of the relationship between degrading model simulation (basic state and MJO) and changes in the parameterized response at the process level. In summary, this talk will show the most promising relationships between MJO simulation performance and the fidelity with which the parameterized physics produce observed process-scale relationships.

  10. Evidence for a modulation of the intraseasonal summer temperature in Eastern Patagonia by the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques-Coper, Martín.; Brönnimann, Stefan; Martius, Olivia; Vera, Carolina S.; Cerne, S. Bibiana

    2015-08-01

    We describe the relationship between the intraseasonal component of surface air temperature (SAT) variability in Eastern Patagonia and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) during austral summer based on ~50 years of daily instrumental records, the Twentieth Century Reanalysis, and a century-long MJO index reconstruction. Our results show that the summer SAT variability in Patagonia is highly driven by the intraseasonal activity (~80%), especially by that associated with the MJO. The active MJO phases modulate the spatial mean intraseasonal temperature signal in Eastern Patagonia with ~1.5°C of amplitude. In most of the region, the warmest (coldest) conditions are found during active phase 8 (4). These opposite states of the temperature perturbations are related to almost inverse midlevel circulation anomalies over southern South America and the southwest Atlantic, which are part of a large-scale Rossby-like wave train of alternating circulation anomalies extended along the South Pacific. The corresponding outgoing longwave radiation anomalies suggest that these structures may be triggered by anomalous convection in the tropics. Furthermore, we show that intraseasonal heat waves in southeastern Patagonia tend to occur during active MJO phase 8. These events are also induced by a wave train pattern over the South Pacific, associated with other intraseasonal variability sources. Hence, as shown in a case study, circulation anomalies over the South Pacific triggered, in general, by tropical convection variability and, in particular, by the MJO activity may constructively interact with circulation patterns resulting from the extratropical dynamics, eventually leading to intraseasonal heat waves in southeastern Patagonia.

  11. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; Kim, Daehyun; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Pritchard, Michael S.; Roehrig, Romain; Shindo, Eiki; Vitart, Frederic; Wang, Hailan

    2015-05-01

    An analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models are presented as part of the "Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)" project. A lead time of 12-36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests that the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. The wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. In addition, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.

  12. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    SciTech Connect

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; Kim, Daehyun; Miyakawa, Tomoki; Pritchard, Michael S.; Roehrig, Romain; Shindo, Eiki; Vitart, Frederic; Wang, Hailan

    2015-05-26

    We present an analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models as part of the “Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)” project. A lead time of 12–36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests that the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. In conclusion, the wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. Additionally, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.

  13. Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation: Biases and uncertainties at short range

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xavier, Prince K.; Petch, Jon C.; Klingaman, Nicholas P.; Woolnough, Steve J.; Jiang, Xianan; Waliser, Duane E.; Caian, Mihaela; Cole, Jason; Hagos, Samson M.; Hannay, Cecile; et al

    2015-05-26

    We present an analysis of diabatic heating and moistening processes from 12 to 36 h lead time forecasts from 12 Global Circulation Models as part of the “Vertical structure and physical processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO)” project. A lead time of 12–36 h is chosen to constrain the large-scale dynamics and thermodynamics to be close to observations while avoiding being too close to the initial spin-up of the models as they adjust to being driven from the Years of Tropical Convection (YOTC) analysis. A comparison of the vertical velocity and rainfall with the observations and YOTC analysis suggests thatmore » the phases of convection associated with the MJO are constrained in most models at this lead time although the rainfall in the suppressed phase is typically overestimated. Although the large-scale dynamics is reasonably constrained, moistening and heating profiles have large intermodel spread. In particular, there are large spreads in convective heating and moistening at midlevels during the transition to active convection. Radiative heating and cloud parameters have the largest relative spread across models at upper levels during the active phase. A detailed analysis of time step behavior shows that some models show strong intermittency in rainfall and differences in the precipitation and dynamics relationship between models. In conclusion, the wealth of model outputs archived during this project is a very valuable resource for model developers beyond the study of the MJO. Additionally, the findings of this study can inform the design of process model experiments, and inform the priorities for field experiments and future observing systems.« less

  14. Comment on "Methodology and results of calculating Central California surface temperature trends: evidence of human-induced climate change?" by Christy et al. (2006)

    SciTech Connect

    Bonfils, C; Duffy, P; Lobell, D

    2006-03-28

    Understanding the causes of observed regional temperature trends is essential to projecting the human influences on climate, and the societal impacts of these influences. In their recent study, Christy et al. (2006, hereinafter CRNG06) hypothesized that the presence of irrigated soils is responsible for rapid warming of summer nights occurring in California's Central Valley over the last century (1910-2003), an assumption that rules out any significant effect due to increased greenhouse gases, urbanization, or other factors in this region. We question this interpretation, which is based on an apparent contrast in summer nighttime temperature trends between the San Joaquin Valley ({approx} +0.3 {+-} 0.1 C/decade) and the adjacent western slopes of the Sierra Nevada (-0.25 {+-} 0.15 C/decade), as well as the amplitude, sign and uncertainty of the Sierra nighttime temperature trend itself. We, however, do not dispute the finding of other Sierra and Valley trends. Regarding the veracity of the apparent Sierra nighttime temperature trend, CRNG06 generated the Valley and Sierra time-series using a meticulous procedure that eliminates discontinuities and isolates homogeneous segments in temperature records from 41 weather stations. This procedure yields an apparent cooling of about -0.25 {+-} 0.15 C/decade in the Sierra region. However, because removal of one of the 137 Sierra segments, from the most elevated site (Huntington Lake, 2140m), causes an increase in nighttime temperature trend as large as the trend itself (of +0.25 C/decade, CH06), and leads to a zero trend, the apparent cooling of summer nights in the Sierra regions seems, in fact, largely uncertain.

  15. Response to Julian et al. (2015) "Comment on and Reinterpretation of Gabriel et al. (2014) `Fish Mercury and Surface Water Sulfate Relationships in the Everglades Protection Area'"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabriel, Mark C.; Axelrad, Don; Orem, William; Osborne, Todd Z.

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this forum is to respond to a rebuttal submitted by Julian et al., Environ Manag 55:1-5, 2015 where they outlined their overall disagreement with the data preparation, methods, and interpretation of results presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014). Here, we provide background information on the research premise presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) and provide a defense for this work using five themes. In spite of what Julian et al. perceive as limitations in the sampling methods and analytical tools used for this work, the relationships found between fish total mercury and surface water sulfate concentrations in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) are comparable to relationships between pore water methylmercury (MeHg) and pore water sulfate found in past studies indicating that sulfate is important to MeHg production and bioaccumulation in the Everglades. Julian et al. state "…there is no way to justify any ecosystem-wide sulfur strategy as a management approach to reduce mercury risk in the (Everglades) as suggested by Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014), Corrales et al. (Sci Tot Environ 409:2156-2162, 2011) and Orem et al. (Rev Environ Sci Technol 41 (S1):249-288, 2011)." We disagree, and having stated why sulfate input reduction to the Everglades may be the most effective means of reducing mercury in Everglades fish, it is important that research on sulfur and mercury biogeochemistry continues. If further studies support the relationship between sulfate loading reduction and MeHg reduction, sulfur mass balance studies should commence to (1) better quantify agricultural and connate seawater sulfate inputs and (2) define opportunities to reduce sulfate inputs to the Everglades ecosystem.

  16. Response to Julian et al. (2015) "comment on and reinterpretation of Gabriel et al. (2014) 'fish mercury and surface water sulfate relationships in the everglades protection area'".

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Mark C; Axelrad, Don; Orem, William; Osborne, Todd Z

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this forum is to respond to a rebuttal submitted by Julian et al., Environ Manag 55:1-5, 2015 where they outlined their overall disagreement with the data preparation, methods, and interpretation of results presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014). Here, we provide background information on the research premise presented in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) and provide a defense for this work using five themes. In spite of what Julian et al. perceive as limitations in the sampling methods and analytical tools used for this work, the relationships found between fish total mercury and surface water sulfate concentrations in Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014) are comparable to relationships between pore water methylmercury (MeHg) and pore water sulfate found in past studies indicating that sulfate is important to MeHg production and bioaccumulation in the Everglades. Julian et al. state "…there is no way to justify any ecosystem-wide sulfur strategy as a management approach to reduce mercury risk in the (Everglades) as suggested by Gabriel et al. (Environ Manag 53:583-593, 2014), Corrales et al. (Sci Tot Environ 409:2156-2162, 2011) and Orem et al. (Rev Environ Sci Technol 41 (S1):249-288, 2011)." We disagree, and having stated why sulfate input reduction to the Everglades may be the most effective means of reducing mercury in Everglades fish, it is important that research on sulfur and mercury biogeochemistry continues. If further studies support the relationship between sulfate loading reduction and MeHg reduction, sulfur mass balance studies should commence to (1) better quantify agricultural and connate seawater sulfate inputs and (2) define opportunities to reduce sulfate inputs to the Everglades ecosystem. PMID:25860595

  17. The Modulation of Tropical Storm Activity in the Western North Pacific by the Madden-Julian Oscillation in GEOS-5 AGCM Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Dongmin; Lee, Myong-In; Kim, Hye-Mi; Schubert, Siegfried D.; Yoo, Jin H.

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the influence of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on tropical storm (TS) activity in the western North Pacific, using observations and GEOS-5 simulations at 50-km horizontal resolution. While GEOS-5 produces an MJO of faster propagation and weaker amplitude, it nevertheless reproduces the observed modulation of TS activity by the MJO with the highest TS genesis and increased track density in the active phases of MJO. The study suggests that the simulation of the sub-seasonal variability of TS activity could be improved by improving the simulations of the MJO in climate models.

  18. Role of the Atmospheric Mean State on the Initiation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation in a Tropical Channel Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Pallav; Zhang, Chidong; Moncrieff, Mitch; Dudhia, Jimy; Caron, Julie M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bruyere, Cindy

    2010-06-08

    Tropical channel models, defined as models that are global in the zonal direction but bounded in the meridional direction, are particularly useful for simulating the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) and understanding its physical and dynamical basis. Influences from the extratropics through the lateral boundaries have been found to be essential to the reproduction of the initiation of certain MJO events. This led to a hypothesis that multi-year simulations using a tropical channel model would reproduce reasonable MJO statistics under the influence of prescribed lateral boundary conditions derived from global reanalyses. Interestingly, the MJO statistics in such a multi-year simulation by a high-resolution tropical channel model are not better than those from global climate models. The error in the atmospheric mean state is found to be a possible reason for the poor MJO statistics in the simulation. Nevertheless, even with a large error in the mean state, the multi-year simulation captures two MJO events previously found to be initiated by extratropical influences. However, the model does not reproduce a third event, whose initiation is not directly influenced by the extratropics. This implies that in the absence of dynamical interactions between the MJO and the lateral boundary conditions, the error in the mean state could be sufficient to prevent the MJO initiation. To explore this third MJO event further, a series of sensitivity tests are conducted. These tests show that the simulation of this event is neither critically influenced by the cumulus parameterization employed, nor the initial conditions when the model is integrated 2 weeks prior to the MJO initiation. The model captures this event when the MJO signal is already present in the initial conditions. The use of highresolution sea surface temperature does not improve the simulation of the third MJO event. A higher-resolution nested domain covering the Indo-Pacific warm pool region and including a cloud

  19. Response to ?A Madden-Julian Oscillation Event Realistically Simulated by a Global Cloud-Resolving Model?

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K R

    2007-12-18

    I agree with the authors that forecasting the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in a high resolution global model is important for numerous reasons, including improved weather forecast skill beyond 10 days, and resolving small scale features embedded in the MJO that coarse resolution ({approx}100-300km horizontal grid spacing) climate models do not (e.g., tropical cyclones). Unfortunately, the authors promote the (incorrect) overall impression that coarse resolution climate models cannot simulate the MJO by (a) only discussing aspects of works that indicate the poor ability of coarse resolution climate models to simulate the MJO, and (b) by promoting the use of higher resolution models, and the use of embedded two-dimensional cloud resolving models embedded in coarse resolution climate models as the principal methods for realistically representing the MJO because of the difficulty of coarse resolution models 'to estimate the vertical redistribution of heat and moisture by unresolved convective clouds'. Regarding items (a) and (b), I have co-authored two of the works cited by Miura et al. that bemoan the poor ability of coarse resolution climate models to simulate the MJO, and indeed simulating the MJO in coarse resolution climate models is a grand challenge. However, I would like to draw to their attention to work that has demonstrated that two different coarse resolution climate models, using conventional parameterizations of convection and clouds, can represent the MJO with high fidelity. In the later study, where more complete model diagnostics were available, important aspects of the MJO that were realistically represented included the relationship between convection and low-level moisture convergence, surface fluxes, the vertical structure of winds and divergence, and important air-sea interactions. Additionally, regarding item (b), convection is certainly of central importance in representing the MJO, but it is the interaction of convection (parameterized or

  20. On the predictability of the interannual behaviour of the Madden-Julian oscillation and its relationship with El Nino

    SciTech Connect

    Sperber, K.R., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of tropical variability at intraseasonal timescales. It displays substantial interannual variability in intensity which may have important implications for the predictability of the coupled system. The reasons for this interannual variability are not understood. The aim of this paper is to investigate whether the interannual behavior of the MJO is related to tropical sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies, particularly El Nino, and hence whether it is predictable. The interannual behavior of the MJO has been diagnosed initially in the 40-year NCEP/ NCAR Reanalysis. The results suggest that prior to the mid-1970s the activity of the MJO was consistently lower than during the latter part of the record. This may be related to either inadequacies in the data coverage, particularly over the tropical Indian Ocean prior to the introduction of satellite observations, or to the real effects of a decadal timescale warming in the tropical SSTs. The teleconnection patterns between interannual variations in MJO activity and SST show only a weak, barely significant, influence of El Nino in which the MJO is more active during the cold phase. As well as the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis, a 4-member ensemble of 45 year integrations with the Hadley Centre climate model (HadAM2a), forced by observed SSTs for 1949-93, has been used to investigate the relationship between MJO activity and SST. HadAM2a is known to give a reasonable simulation of the MJO and the extended record provided by this ensemble of integrations allows a more robust investigation of the predictability of MJO activity than was possible with the 40-year NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis. The results have shown that, for the uncoupled system, with the atmosphere being driven by imposed SSTS, there is no reproducibility for the activity of the MJO from year to year. The interannual behavior of the MJO is not controlled by the phase of El Nino and would appear to be chaotic in

  1. Geomorphological map and preliminary analysis of Quaternary sediments in the Planica-Tamar valley (Julian Alps, NW Slovenia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Andrej; Šmuc, Andrej

    2016-04-01

    The Planica-Tamar valley is located in the Julian Alps in north-west Slovenia. The Planica-Tamar valley represents typical mountain glacial valley bounded by steep, mainly carbonate cliffs with some glacial deposits still preserved. The valley is currently being filled with numerous Holocene sediments deposited by rock falls, landslides, mass gravity flows and fluvial flows. These deposits are forming active or inactive interfingering talus slopes, alluvial and debris-flow fans, all of them with a complex history of sedimentation and erosion forming unconformity bounded sedimentary units. In order to make a thorough analysis of these deposits a detailed geomorphological map in a scale of 1:10 000 has been made. Six different types of sedimentary deposits were defined and mapped. These are moraines, lacustrine sediments, fluvio-glacial deposits, talus slopes, debris fans and alluvial fans. Other mapped features also include shape of ravines, their depths, ridges and direction of sedimentary flow. Additionally areas of active, semi-active and inactive sedimentation were marked. Moraines forms a ridge in the bottom of the valleys and are composed of unconsolidated, poorly sorted, subangular grains ranging from clay size to a few cubic meters big blocks. Lacustrine sediments are represented by laminated well sorted sand and silt, while fluvio-glacial deposits are composed of washed out subrounded sands and gravels. Talus slope deposits are characterised by clast-supported poorly sorted very angular gravel. Debris flow fans are represented by extremely poorly sorted matrix-supported gravels with grain size ranging from clay to few cubic meters big blocks. Alluvial fans are composed by variety of sedimentary textures. Sediments at the fan apex are clast-supported poorly sorted very angular gravels with up to a few cubic meters big block. In the middle part of the fan the sieve deposits are common, while in the distal parts a few centimeters thick layers of sand and

  2. Exploring the Utility of the Planned CYGNSS Mission for Investigating the Initiation and Development of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy; Mecikalski, John; Li, Xuanli; Chronis, Themis; Brewer, Alan; Churnside, James; Rutledge, Steve

    2014-01-01

    CYGNSS is a planned constellation consisting of multiple micro-satellites that leverage the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide rapidly updated, high resolution (approx. 15-50 km, approx. 4 h) surface wind speeds (via bi-static scatterometry) over the tropical oceans in any weather condition, including heavy rainfall. The approach of the work to be presented at this conference is to utilize a limited-domain, cloud-system resolving model (Weather Research and Forecasting or WRF) and its attendant data assimilation scheme (Three-Dimensional Variational Assimilation or 3DVAR) to investigate the utility of the CYGNSS mission for helping characterize key convectiveto- mesoscale processes - such as surface evaporation, moisture advection and convergence, and upscale development of precipitation systems - that help drive the initiation and development of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The proposed work will focus on three scientific objectives. Objective 1 is to produce a high-resolution surface wind dataset resolution (approx. 0.5 h, approx. 1-4 km) for multiple MJO onsets using WRF-assimilated winds and other data from the DYNAmics of the MJO (DYNAMO) field campaign, which took place during October 2011 - March 2012. Objective 2 is to study the variability of surface winds during MJO onsets at temporal and spatial scales of finer resolution than future CYGNSS data. The goal is to understand how sub-CYGNSS-resolution processes will shape the observations made by the satellite constellation. Objective 3 is to ingest simulated CYGNSS data into the WRF model in order to perform observing system simulation experiments (OSSEs). These will be used to test and quantify the potential beneficial effects provided by CYGNSS, particularly for characterizing the physical processes driving convective organization and upscale development during the initiation and development of the MJO. The proposed research is ideal for answering important

  3. AMIE (ARM MJO Investigation Experiment): Observations of the Madden-Julian Oscillation for Modeling Studies Science Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Long, C; Del Genio, A; Gustafson, W; Houze, R; Jakob, C; Jensen, M; Klein, S; Leung, L Ruby; Liu, X; Luke, E; May, P; McFarlane, S; Minnis, P; Schumacher, C; Vogelmann, A; Wang, Y; Wu, X; Xie, S

    2010-03-22

    Deep convection in the tropics plays an important role in driving global circulations and the transport of energy from the tropics to the mid-latitudes. Understanding the mechanisms that control tropical convection is a key to improving climate modeling simulations of the global energy balance. One of the dominant sources of tropical convective variability is the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), which has a period of approximately 30–60 days. There is no agreed-upon explanation for the underlying physics that maintain the MJO. Many climate models do not show well-defined MJO signals, and those that do have problems accurately simulating the amplitude, propagation speed, and/or seasonality of the MJO signal. Therefore, the MJO is a very important modeling target for the ARM modeling community geared specifically toward improving climate models. The ARM MJO Investigation Experiment (AMIE) period coincides with a large international MJO initiation field campaign called CINDY2011 (Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011) that will take place in and around the Indian Ocean from October 2011 to January 2012. AMIE, in conjunction with CINDY2011 efforts, will provide an unprecedented data set that will allow investigation of the evolution of convection within the framework of the MJO. AMIE observations will also complement the long-term MJO statistics produced using ARM Manus data and will allow testing of several of the current hypotheses related to the MJO phenomenon. Taking advantage of the expected deployment of a C-POL scanning precipitation radar and an ECOR surface flux tower at the ARM Manus site, we propose to increase the number of sonde launches to eight per day starting in about mid-October of the field experiment year, which is climatologically a period of generally suppressed conditions at Manus and just prior to the climatologically strongest MJO period. The field experiment will last until the end of the MJO

  4. Physical Mechanisms for the Maintenance of GCM-Simulated Madden-Julian Oscillation over the Indian Ocean and Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liping; Wu, Xiaoqing

    2011-05-05

    The kinetic energy budget is conducted to analyze the physical processes responsible for the improved Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) simulated by the Iowa State University general circulation models (ISUGCM). The modified deep convection scheme that includes the revised convection closure, convection trigger condition and convective momentum transport (CMT) enhances the equatorial (10oS-10oN) MJO-related perturbation kinetic energy (PKE) in the upper troposphere and leads to more robust and coherent eastward propagating MJO signal. In the MJO source region-the Indian Ocean (45oE-120oE), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is maintained by the vertical convergence of wave energy flux and the barotropic conversion through the horizontal shear of mean flow. In the convectively active region-the western Pacific (120oE-180o), the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is supported by the convergence of horizontal and vertical wave energy fluxes. Over the central-eastern Pacific (180o-120oW), where convection is suppressed, the upper-tropospheric MJO PKE is mainly due to the horizontal convergence of wave energy flux. The deep convection trigger condition produces stronger convective heating which enhances the perturbation available potential energy (PAPE) production and the upward wave energy fluxes, and leads to the increased MJO PKE over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. The trigger condition also enhances the MJO PKE over the central-eastern Pacific through the increased convergence of meridional wave energy flux from the subtropical latitudes of both hemispheres. The revised convection closure affects the response of mean zonal wind shear to the convective heating over the Indian Ocean and leads to the enhanced upper-tropospheric MJO PKE through the barotropic conversion. The stronger eastward wave energy flux due to the increase of convective heating over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific by the revised closure is favorable to the eastward propagation of MJO and the

  5. Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Hagos, Samson M.; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Gregory

    2014-11-12

    Regional cloud permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 ARM Madden Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/ Dynamics of Madden-Julian Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against radar and ship-based measurements. Sensitivity of model simulated surface rain rate statistics to parameters and parameterization of hydrometeor sizes in five commonly used WRF microphysics schemes are examined. It is shown that at 2 km grid spacing, the model generally overestimates rain rate from large and deep convective cores. Sensitivity runs involving variation of parameters that affect rain drop or ice particle size distribution (more aggressive break-up process etc) generally reduce the bias in rain-rate and boundary layer temperature statistics as the smaller particles become more vulnerable to evaporation. Furthermore significant improvement in the convective rain-rate statistics is observed when the horizontal grid-spacing is reduced to 1 km and 0.5 km, while it is worsened when run at 4 km grid spacing as increased turbulence enhances evaporation. The results suggest modulation of evaporation processes, through parameterization of turbulent mixing and break-up of hydrometeors may provide a potential avenue for correcting cloud statistics and associated boundary layer temperature biases in regional and global cloud permitting model simulations.

  6. Evaluation of convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation using data collected during the AMIE/DYNAMO field campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagos, Samson; Feng, Zhe; Burleyson, Casey D.; Lim, Kyo-Sun Sunny; Long, Charles N.; Wu, Di; Thompson, Greg

    2014-11-01

    Regional convection-permitting model simulations of cloud populations observed during the 2011 Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation Investigation Experiment/Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation Experiment (AMIE/DYNAMO) field campaign are evaluated against ground-based radar and ship-based observations. Sensitivity of model simulated reflectivity, surface rain rate, and cold pool statistics to variations of raindrop breakup/self-collection parameters in four state-of-the-art two-moment bulk microphysics schemes in the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model is examined. The model simulations generally overestimate reflectivity from large and deep convective cells, and underestimate stratiform rain and the frequency of cold pools. In the sensitivity experiments, introduction of more aggressive raindrop breakup or decreasing the self-collection efficiency increases the cold pool occurrence frequency in all of the simulations, and slightly reduces the reflectivity and precipitation statistics bias in some schemes but has little effect on the overall mean surface precipitation. Both the radar observations and model simulations of cloud populations show an approximate power law relationship between convective echo-top height and equivalent convective cell radius.

  7. Moist static energy and the Madden-Julian oscillation: Understanding initiation, maintenance and propagation through the application of novel diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolding, Brandon

    As the dominant mode of tropical intraseasonal variability, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) has enormous societal impacts. Despite four decades of research motivated by these impacts, the processes that drive the initiation, maintenance and propagation of the MJO are still poorly understood. The development of large scale moisture anomalies plays an important role in many recent theories of the MJO, including moisture mode theory. This study identifies processes that support the development, maintenance and propagation of moisture anomalies associated with the MJO. A new set of objective MJO diagnostics, obtained as an extension of CEOF analysis, are introduced. These diagnostics provide useful measures of previously overlooked information yielded by CEOF analysis, including an objective measure that allows geographically disparate locations to be compared and contrasted throughout a reference MJO lifecycle. Compositing techniques based on this measure are applied to the MJO in an attempt to determine key physical processes affecting the MSE budget, identify prominent geographical variability of these processes, and highlight changes in the mean state winds and moisture field that explain this variability. The MSE budget reveals that variations in MSE associated with the MJO are largely the result of variations in column integrated moisture content (~90%), the majority of which occur between 850-500 hPa (~75%). Easterly(westerly) low level wind anomalies to the east(west) of the MJO result in a reduction(enhancement) of drying due to horizontal advection, which is only partially offset by a reduction(enhancement) of surface latent heat flux. In the deep tropics (5°N-5°S) of the eastern hemisphere, anomalous horizontal advection is primarily the result of the anomalous winds acting on the mean state moisture gradient. Over the broader tropics (15°N-15°S), the anomalous horizontal advection appears to result primarily from the modulation of synoptic scale

  8. The 'Vertical Structure and Diabatic Processes of the Madden-Julian Oscillation' model evaluation project: Overview and key results (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingaman, N. P.; Jiang, X.; Xavier, P.; Petch, J.; Waliser, D. E.; Woolnough, S.

    2013-12-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is the dominant mode of tropical sub-seasonal (30-60 day) variability. By modulating regional monsoon circulation and precipitation, interacting with ENSO and influences modes of extra-tropical variability (e.g., the NAO), the MJO provides a key source of weekly and monthly predictability globally. Despite this, most weather and climate models exhibit large biases in their simulations of the MJO. We will introduce a model evaluation project, endorsed by YoTC and GASS, designed to identify and reduce sources of error in the models' MJO representations. A key advantage of this project over previous intercomparisons is that temperature, moisture and momentum tendencies have been requested from all sub-grid parameterization schemes. This allows detailed analysis of the links between biases in MJO activity and biases in the vertical profiles of diabatic heating, moistening and momentum. The project comprises three components: 20-year simulations, from which the overall level of MJO activity can be assessed; serial 2-day hindcasts of two strong events in winter 2009-2010, in which the behavior of model parameterizations can be evaluated close to the initial, observed state; and serial 20-day hindcasts of the same two MJO events, which bridge the gap between the other two components by permitting analysis of the degradation of the simulated MJO from the initial state towards the model's climatology. Analysis of the 20-year simulations suggests that many proposed process-oriented MJO metrics, such as the relationship between precipitation and the vertical structure of relative humidity, do not sufficiently distinguish between those models that simulate the MJO well and those that simulate it poorly. It is assumed that the processes described by these metrics are necessary, but not sufficient, for an adequate simulation of the MJO in GCMs. Analysis of the 2-day hindcasts demonstrates that models develop substantial biases in upper

  9. [Julian Kosiński (1833-1914)--especially meritorious surgeon for the development of otorhinolaryngology. His achievements in therapy of ear, nose, throat and borderland diseases].

    PubMed

    Kierzek, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The professional and scientific activities of Julian Kosiński (1833-1914), an eminent Varsovian surgeon, his thorough medical education in various European countries is shortly outlined. He was the versatile surgeon, the head of Surgical Clinic in the Main School and in the Imperial Warsaw University. Kosiński was the creator of "Varsovian surgical school". Kosiński's successful surgical treatment of otorhinopharyngeal diseases and the borderland (such as auricle's fibroma, keloid and periauricular atheroma, carcinomas of nasi and other parts of face, sarcomas of nasopharyngeal cavity and pharynx and maxillary sinus, syphilis of face, tuberculous ulceration of tongue, osteomas of palate and pharynx, foreign bodies of oesophagus, inflammations of parotid gland and other) are described in some more detail. The surgical therapy in that region such as plastic reconstruction of face, oesophagotomy was performed according to contemporary world-wide standards. PMID:18637452

  10. A Critical Role of Dry Air Intrusion for Propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation Based on Multi-model Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, X.

    2015-12-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) exerts pronounced influences on global climate and extreme weather systems. Our current general circulation models (GCMs), however, exhibit rather limited capability in representing this prominent tropical variability mode. Meanwhile, fundamental physics of the MJO are still elusive. In this presentation, by analyzing 27 climate models that participated in the WCRP-WWRP/THORPEX YOTC MJO Task Force and GEWEX GASS global MJO model inter-comparison project, key processes responsible for realistic MJO simulations are explored based on budget analysis of moist static energy (MSE). Results suggest that horizontal advection of MSE, particularly the dry air intrusion from the west of the MJO convection, plays a crucial role for realistic eastward propagation of the MJO in GCM simulations. Due to model deficiencies in simulating both the MJO circulation and spatial distribution of background MSE, the horizontal advection of MSE is greatly underestimated in the poor MJO models, and largely offset by effects from radiative and surface fluxes, leading to rather weak eastward or even westward propagation of MJO convection in those models.

  11. The self-organizing map, a new approach to apprehend the Madden-Julian Oscillation influence on the intraseasonal variability of rainfall in the southern African region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettli, Pascal; Tozuka, Tomoki; Izumo, Takeshi; Engelbrecht, Francois A.; Yamagata, Toshio

    2014-09-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the major mode of intraseasonal variability (30-60 days) in the tropics, having large rainfall impacts globally, and possibly on southern Africa. However, the latter impact is not well understood and needs to be further explored. The life cycle of the MJO, known to be asymmetric, has been nevertheless analyzed usually through methods constrained by both linearity and orthogonality, such as empirical orthogonal function analysis. Here we explore a non-linear classification method, the self-organizing map (SOM), a type of artificial neural network used to produce a low-dimensional representation of high-dimensional datasets, to capture more accurately the life cycle of the MJO and its global impacts. The classification is applied on intraseasonal anomalies of outgoing longwave radiation within the tropical region over the 1980-2009 period. Using the SOM to describe the MJO is a new approach, complimentary to the usual real-time multivariate MJO index. It efficiently captures this propagative phenomenon and its seasonality, and is shown to provide additional temporal and spatial information on MJO activity. For each node, the subtropical convection is analyzed, with a particular focus on the southern Africa region. Results show that the convection activity over the central tropical Indian Ocean is a key factor influencing the intraseasonal convective activity over the southern African region. Enhanced (suppressed) convection over the central Indian Ocean tends to suppress (enhance) convection over the southern African region with a 10-day lag by modulating the moisture transport.

  12. The Madden-Julian Oscillation in the National Center for Atmospheric Research Community Atmospheric Model-2 with the Tiedtke Convective Scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, P; Wang, B; Sperber, K R; Li, T; Meehl, G A

    2004-07-26

    The boreal winter Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) remains very weak and irregular in structure in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmosphere Model version 2 (CAM2) as in its direct predecessor, the Community Climate Model version 3 (CCM3). The standard version of CAM2 uses the deep convective scheme of Zhang and McFarlane (1995), as in CCM3, with the closure dependent on convective available potential energy (CAPE). Here, sensitivity tests using several versions of the Tiedtke (1989) convective scheme are conducted. Typically, the Tiedtke convection scheme gives an improved mean state, intraseasonal variability, space-time power spectra, and eastward propagation compared to the standard version of the model. Coherent eastward propagation of MJO related precipitation is also much improved, particularly over the Indian-western Pacific Oceans. Sensitivity experiments show that enhanced downdrafts in the Tiedtke scheme reduces the amplitude of the MJO but to a lesser extent than when this scheme is closed on CAPE to represent deep convections. A composite life cycle of the model MJO indicates that over the Indian Ocean wind induced surface heat exchange functions, while over the western/central Pacific Ocean aspects of frictional moisture convergence are evident in the maintenance and eastward propagation of the oscillation.

  13. Overview of Proposal on High Resolution Climate Model Simulations of Recent Hurricane and Typhoon Activity: The Impact of SSTs and the Madden Julian Oscillation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schubert, Siegfried; Kang, In-Sik; Reale, Oreste

    2009-01-01

    This talk gives an update on the progress and further plans for a coordinated project to carry out and analyze high-resolution simulations of tropical storm activity with a number of state-of-the-art global climate models. Issues addressed include, the mechanisms by which SSTs control tropical storm. activity on inter-annual and longer time scales, the modulation of that activity by the Madden Julian Oscillation on sub-seasonal time scales, as well as the sensitivity of the results to model formulation. The project also encourages companion coarser resolution runs to help assess resolution dependence, and. the ability of the models to capture the large-scale and long-terra changes in the parameters important for hurricane development. Addressing the above science questions is critical to understanding the nature of the variability of the Asian-Australian monsoon and its regional impacts, and thus CLIVAR RAMP fully endorses the proposed tropical storm simulation activity. The project is open to all interested organizations and investigators, and the results from the runs will be shared among the participants, as well as made available to the broader scientific community for analysis.

  14. The vertical structure of diabatic heating associated with the Madden-Julian oscillation simulated by the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres climate model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Tsing-Chang; Yen, Ming-Cheng; Pfaendtner, James; Sud, Y. C.

    1993-01-01

    The diabatic heating structure of the nine-layer Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres model of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO) is illustrated with composite charts made for those times when this low-frequency mode reaches its maximum and minimum amplitudes. These composite charts compare the vertically integrated diabatic heating with potential functions, the vertical distribution of diabatic heating with the east-west mass flux function in the tropics, and the vertical profiles of diabatic heating at the centers of maximum and minimum MJO amplitude. Three interesting features of the model MJO's diabatic heating are revealed: (1) the maximum heating rate of this low-frequency mode is located over the Asian monsoon region and its amplitude is about a half of the maximum value of the seasonal mean heating rate in this region, (2) the vertical diabatic heating rate profile has a maximum at 500 mbar and resembles the seasonal mean total heating profile, and (3) the total diabatic heating is for the most part composed of the latent heat released by cumulus convection.

  15. Rap and Orality in a Post-NCLB/ALEC World

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paul, Dierdre Glenn

    2013-01-01

    Rigid foci on accountability, accreditation, and customer service pose significant challenges for literacy educators today. The most consequential identified as the snuffing out of scholastic innovation and erosion of academic freedom. This article recounts a recent experience that occurred while the author prepared a lesson for an undergraduate…

  16. Follow up of premature babies treated with artificial surfactant (ALEC).

    PubMed Central

    Morley, C J; Morley, R

    1990-01-01

    Of 235 survivors who had taken part in a randomised trial of artificial surfactant and who were born in Cambridge, follow up information was available for 231 (98%) infants. In 12 cases information came from local doctors; all others were assessed at 9 and 18 months (n = 212) or 9 months only (n = 7). There was no difference between those who had been treated with surfactant and control babies in the incidence of neurological impairment, mental impairment, respiratory infections, allergies, or hospital admissions up to 18 months after full term. In those born before 30 weeks' gestation (where surfactant most improves survival) the number of surviving randomised children who were normal was 35 of 61 in the treated group (57%) compared with 25 of 61 in the control group (41%). Improved neonatal survival after prophylactic surfactant treatment is not associated with an increased incidence of neurodevelopmental impairment. PMID:2201266

  17. Simulation of streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary, South Texas, 1958-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ockerman, Darwin J.; Heitmuller, Franklin T.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers-Fort Worth District, City of Corpus Christi, Guadalupe-Blanco River Authority, San Antonio River Authority, and San Antonio Water System, developed, calibrated, and tested a Hydrological Simulation Program ? FORTRAN (HSPF) watershed model to simulate streamflow and suspended-sediment concentrations and loads during 1958-2008 in the lower Nueces River watershed, downstream from Lake Corpus Christi to the Nueces Estuary in South Texas. Data available to simulate suspended-sediment concentrations and loads consisted of historical sediment data collected during 1942-82 in the study area and suspended-sediment concentration data collected periodically by the USGS during 2006-07 at three USGS streamflow-gaging stations, Nueces River near Mathis, Nueces River at Bluntzer, and Nueces River at Calallen. The Nueces River near Mathis station is downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam, completed in 1958 to impound Lake Corpus Christi. Suspended-sediment data collected before and after completion of Wesley E. Seale Dam provide insights to the effects of the dam and reservoir on suspended-sediment loads transported by the lower Nueces River from downstream of the dam to the Nueces Estuary. Annual suspended-sediment loads at a site near the Nueces River at Mathis station were considerably lower, for a given annual mean discharge, after the dam was completed than before the dam was completed. Most of the suspended sediment transported by the Nueces River downstream from Wesley E. Seale Dam occurred during high-flow releases from the dam or during floods. During October 1964-September 1971, about 532,000 tons of suspended sediment were transported by the Nueces River near Mathis. Of this amount, about 473,000 tons, or about 89 percent, were transported by large runoff events (mean streamflow exceeding 1,000 cubic feet per second). To develop the watershed model to simulate suspended

  18. Evaluation of the impacts of the Madden-Julian Oscillation on rainfall and hurricanes in Central and South America and the Atlantic Ocean using ICI-RAFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovannettone, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Based on the method of Regional Frequency Analysis (RFA) and L-moments (Hosking & Wallis, 1997), a tool was developed to estimate the frequency/intensity of a rainfall event of a particular duration using ground-based rainfall observations. Some of the code used to develop this tool was taken from the FORTRAN code provided by Hosking & Wallis and rewritten in Visual Basic 2010. This tool was developed at the International Center for Integrated Water Resources Management (ICIWaRM) and is referred to as the ICIWaRM Regional Analysis of Frequency Tool (ICI-RAFT) (Giovannettone & Wright, 2012). In order to study the effectiveness of ICI-RAFT, three case studies were selected for the analysis. The studies take place in selected regions within Argentina, Nicaragua, and Venezuela. Rainfall data were provided at locations throughout each country; total rainfall for specific periods were computed and analyzed with respect to several global climate indices using lag times ranging from 1 to 6 months. Each analysis attempts to identify a global climate index capable of predicting above or below average rainfall several months in advance, qualitatively and using an equation that is developed. The index that had the greatest impact was the MJO (Madden-Julian Oscillation), which is the focus of the current study. The MJO is considered the largest element of intra-seasonal (30 - 90 days) variability in the tropical atmosphere and, unlike other indices, is characterized by the eastward propagation of large areas of convective anomalies near the equator, propagating from the Indian Ocean east into the Pacific Ocean. The anomalies are monitored globally using ten different indices located on lines of longitude near the equator, with seven in the eastern hemisphere and three in the western hemisphere. It has been found in previous studies that the MJO is linked to summer rainfall in Southeast China (Zhang et al., 2009) and southern Africa (Pohl et al., 2007) and to rainfall patterns

  19. Influence of Madden-Julian Oscillation on water budget transported by the Somali low-level jet and the associated Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ordonez, Paulina; Ribera, Pedro; Gallego, David; Pena-Ortiz, Cristina

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies suggest that there is a strong linkage between the moisture uptake over the equatorial area of the Somali low level jet (SLLJ) and the rainfall variability over most of continental India. Additionally, the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) strongly modulates the intraseasonal variability of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall, since the northward propagation of the boreal summer MJO is closely associated with the active and break phases of monsoon rainfall. But a question remains open: is there a relationship between the moisture transported by the SLLJ and the MJO evolution? In this paper, a Lagrangian approach is used to track the evaporation minus precipitation (E - P) evolution along trajectories of particles initially situated over the equatorial region of SLLJ. The impact of the MJO on the water budget transport of the SLLJ is examined by making composites of the obtained (E-P) fields for the different MJO phases. The spatial structures of the boreal summer intraseasonal oscillation are revealed in our results, which strongly suggest that the main responsible for the rainfall variability associated to the MJO in these regions are the changes in the moisture advected by the SLLJ. In order to assess the MJO-SLLJ interaction, an analysis of the total-column mass and the total-column specific humidity transported by the SLLJ during the MJO life cycle is performed. While a systematic difference between air mass advected to India during active and break phases of MJO is not detected, changes in the moisture of particles are found, with wet (dry) anomalies over enhanced (suppressed) convection region. This result implicitly leads to assume air-sea interaction processes.

  20. The response of the equatorial tropospheric ozone to the Madden-Julian Oscillation in TES satellite observations and CAM-chem model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, W.; Hess, P.; Tian, B.

    2014-06-01

    The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is the dominant form of the atmospheric intra-seasonal oscillation, manifested by slow eastward movement (about 5 m s-1) of tropical deep convection. This study investigates the MJO's impact on equatorial tropospheric ozone (10° N-10° S) in satellite observations and chemical transport model (CTM) simulations. For the satellite observations, we analyze the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) level-2 ozone profile data for the period of January 2004 to June 2009. For the CTM simulations, we run the Community Atmosphere Model with chemistry (CAM-chem) driven by the GOES-5 analyzed meteorological fields for the same data period as the TES measurements. Our analysis indicates that the behavior of the Total Tropospheric Column (TTC) ozone at the intraseasonal time scale is different from that of the total column ozone, with the signal in the equatorial region comparable with that in the subtropics. The model simulated and satellite measured ozone anomalies agree in their general pattern and amplitude when examined in the vertical cross section (the average spatial correlation coefficient among the 8 phases is 0.63), with an eastward propagation signature at a similar phase speed as the convective anomalies (5 m s-1). The ozone anomalies on the intraseasonal time scale are about five times larger when lightning emissions of NOx are included in the simulation than when they are not. Nevertheless, large-scale advection is the primary driving force for the ozone anomalies associated with the MJO. The variability related to the MJO for ozone reaches up to 47% of the total variability (ranging from daily to interannual), indicating the MJO should be accounted for in simulating ozone perturbations in the tropics.

  1. Effects of moisture feedback in a frictional coupled Kelvin-Rossby wave model and implication in the Madden-Julian oscillation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fei; Wang, Bin

    2016-03-01

    The authors extend the original frictional wave dynamics and implement the moisture feedback (MF) to explore the effects of planetary boundary layer (PBL) process and the MF on the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). This new system develops the original frictional wave dynamics by including the moisture tendency term (or the MF mode), along with a parameterized precipitation based on the Betts-Miller scheme. The linear instability analysis of this model provides solutions to elucidate the behaviors of the "pure" frictional convergence (FC) mode and the "pure" MF mode, respectively, as well as the behaviors of the combined FC-MF mode or the dynamical moisture mode. These results show that without the PBL frictional moisture convergence, the MF mode is nearly stationary and damped. Not only does the PBL frictional feedback make the damping MF mode grow with preferred planetary scale but it also enables the nearly stationary MF mode to move eastward slowly, resulting in an oscillation with a period of 30-90 days. This finding suggests the important role of the frictional feedback in generating eastward propagating unstable modes and selecting the preferred planetary scales. The MF process slows down the eastward-propagating short-wave FC mode by delaying the occurrence of deep convection and by enhancing the Rossby wave component. However, the longest wave (wavenumber one) is insensitive to the MF or the convective adjustment time, indicating that the unstable longest wave is primarily controlled by PBL frictional feedback process. Implications of these theoretical results in MJO simulation in general circulation models are discussed.

  2. Variation of tropical cyclone activity in the South Indian Ocean: El Niño-Southern Oscillation and Madden-Julian Oscillation effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Chang-Hoi; Kim, Joo-Hong; Jeong, Jee-Hoon; Kim, Hyeong-Seog; Chen, Deliang

    2006-11-01

    The present study examines variation of tropical cyclone (TC) activity in the South Indian Ocean (SIO) during TC seasons (December-March) for the period 1979-2004. The impact of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation and the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) on the variation is revealed through a composite analysis. During El Niño periods TC genesis was shifted westward, enhancing the formation west of 75°E and reducing it east of 75°E. These changes in the genesis correspond to a westward shift of convection. It may be explained by a remote effect on the SIO; that is, the increase in sea surface temperature in the central eastern Pacific alters the Walker circulation and forms an anomalous anticyclonic circulation in the east SIO during El Niño. The spatial difference in TC passages between El Niño and La Niña shows a significant decrease to the southeast of Madagascar but a moderate increase in the central midlatitude SIO, indicating that TCs move farther east during El Niño. This change is possibly due to the anomalous southwesterlies east of Madagascar. Variation of TC activity also depends on various MJO phases: frequent TC passages for phases 2-4 (strong convective activity straddles along the equatorial Indian Ocean) versus infrequent TC passages for other phases. TC tracks tend to be more south oriented in phase 3 compared with those in phases 2 and 4. This is possibly caused by the increased steering northerlies which are a part of the anticyclonic Rossby wave of Gill type in response to the suppressed MJO-related convection in the maritime continent.

  3. Comparison of Moist Static Energy and Budget between the GCM-Simulated Madden–Julian Oscillation and Observations over the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Xiaoqing; Deng, Liping

    2013-07-01

    The moist static energy (MSE) anomalies and MSE budget associated with the Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) simulated in the Iowa State University General Circulation Model (ISUGCM) over the Indian and Pacific Oceans are compared with observations. Different phase relationships between MJO 850-hPa zonal wind, precipitation, and surface latent heat flux are simulated over the Indian Ocean and western Pacific, which are greatly influenced by the convection closure, trigger conditions, and convective momentum transport (CMT). The moist static energy builds up from the lower troposphere 15–20 days before the peak of MJO precipitation, and reaches the maximum in the middle troposphere (500–600 hPa) near the peak of MJO precipitation. The gradual lower-tropospheric heating and moistening and the upward transport of moist static energy are important aspects of MJO events, which are documented in observational studies but poorly simulated in most GCMs. The trigger conditions for deep convection, obtained from the year-long cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations, contribute to the striking difference between ISUGCM simulations with the original and modified convection schemes and play the major role in the improved MJO simulation in ISUGCM. Additionally, the budget analysis with the ISUGCM simulations shows the increase in MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the western Pacific, while out of phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over the Indian Ocean. However, the NCEP analysis shows that the tendency of MJO MSE is in phase with the horizontal advection of MSE over both oceans.

  4. Modulation of equatorial Pacific westerly/easterly wind events by the Madden-Julian oscillation and convectively-coupled Rossby waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puy, Martin; Vialard, J.; Lengaigne, M.; Guilyardi, E.

    2016-04-01

    Synoptic wind events in the equatorial Pacific strongly influence the El Niño/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) evolution. This paper characterizes the spatio-temporal distribution of Easterly (EWEs) and Westerly Wind Events (WWEs) and quantifies their relationship with intraseasonal and interannual large-scale climate variability. We unambiguously demonstrate that the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and Convectively-coupled Rossby Waves (CRW) modulate both WWEs and EWEs occurrence probability. 86 % of WWEs occur within convective MJO and/or CRW phases and 83 % of EWEs occur within the suppressed phase of MJO and/or CRW. 41 % of WWEs and 26 % of EWEs are in particular associated with the combined occurrence of a CRW/MJO, far more than what would be expected from a random distribution (3 %). Wind events embedded within MJO phases also have a stronger impact on the ocean, due to a tendency to have a larger amplitude, zonal extent and longer duration. These findings are robust irrespective of the wind events and MJO/CRW detection methods. While WWEs and EWEs behave rather symmetrically with respect to MJO/CRW activity, the impact of ENSO on wind events is asymmetrical. The WWEs occurrence probability indeed increases when the warm pool is displaced eastward during El Niño events, an increase that can partly be related to interannual modulation of the MJO/CRW activity in the western Pacific. On the other hand, the EWEs modulation by ENSO is less robust, and strongly depends on the wind event detection method. The consequences of these results for ENSO predictability are discussed.

  5. Multi-Reanalysis Comparison of Variability in Analysis Increment of Column-Integrated Water Vapor Associated with Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokoi, S.

    2014-12-01

    This study conducts a comparison of three reanalysis products (JRA-55, JRA-25, and ERA-Interim) in representation of Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO), focusing on column-integrated water vapor (CWV) that is considered as an essential variable for discussing MJO dynamics. Besides the analysis fields of CWV, which exhibit spatio-temporal distributions that are quite similar to satellite observations, CWV tendency simulated by forecast models and analysis increment calculated by data assimilation are examined. For JRA-55, it is revealed that, while its forecast model is able to simulate eastward propagation of the CWV anomaly, it tends to weaken the amplitude, and data assimilation process sustains the amplitude. The multi-reanalysis comparison of the analysis increment further reveals that this weakening bias is probably caused by excessively weak cloud-radiative feedback represented by the model. This bias in the feedback strength makes anomalous moisture supply by the vertical advection term in the CWV budget equation too insensitive to precipitation anomaly, resulting in reduction of the amplitude of CWV anomaly. ERA-Interim has a nearly opposite feature; the forecast model represents excessively strong feedback and unrealistically strengthens the amplitude, while the data assimilation weakens it. These results imply the necessity of accurate representation of the cloud-radiative feedback strength for a short-term MJO forecast, and may be evidence to support the argument that this feedback is essential for the existence of MJO. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the multi-reanalysis comparison of the analysis increment will provide useful information for identifying model biases and, potentially, for estimating parameters that are difficult to estimate solely from observation data, such as gross moist stability.

  6. MM5 Modeling of the Madden-Julian Oscillation in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans: Model Description and Control Run Results

    SciTech Connect

    Gustafson, William I.; Weare, B. C.

    2004-03-01

    A new methodology to study the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is introduced. While previous MJO studies typically have involved highly simplified mathematical models or general circulation models, this new approach seeks to reproduce the MJO using a regional model with prescribed boundary conditions. This paper reports initial control run results for this methodology using the Fifth Generation Pennsylvania State/NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) for a domain extending from the western Indian Ocean to the Dateline. The control run boundaries are forced using the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis (NRA) data set for a 24 month time period. The climatology for the 24 month period is examined to establish the robustness of the MM5 model for this region. Results indicate good agreement in the mean winds between the model and the forcing data set. The primary differences are an easterly bias at 850 hPa and altered flow patterns in the Indian monsoon region. Mean OLR results are good for the model interior with larger discrepancies near the western and eastern boundaries. These discrepancies lead to a reversal of the OLR gradient along the equator. Thirty to seventy day bandpassed data is examined to determine how MM5 reproduces the MJO. The modeled and comparison data 30–70 day zonal wind and OLR have similar MJO periodicities, exhibit eastward propagation, and possess the observed seasonal character and vertical structure of the MJO. The “Matthews EOF” technique reveals good similarity between the model and observed OLR. Analysis of vertical profiles of 30-70 day zonal wind reveals lower tropospheric winds blow in the opposite direction of upper level winds for both the model and NRA. Vertical profiles of 30-70 day moist static energy exhibit a peak near the top of the boundary layer. Differences between the model simulated and observed MJO events are a tendency for the OLR to be relatively noisy and for peak OLR intensity to occur in the west Indian Ocean in the model as opposed to

  7. MM5 Modeling of the Madden Julian Oscillation in the Indian and West Pacific Oceans: Implications of 30 70-Day Boundary Effects on MJO Development.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafson, William I., Jr.; Weare, Bryan C.

    2004-03-01

    The results of an experiment designed to isolate the initiation phase of the Madden Julian oscillation (MJO) from 30 70-day boundary effects is presented. The technique used to accomplish this involves employing the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5), as first presented in the companion paper to this paper. Two runs, each 2 yr long, are integrated forward from 1 June 1990. The first run, called the control, uses the unmodified National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) NCAR reanalysis (NRA) dataset for boundary conditions. The second run, called the notched, uses the same NRA dataset for the boundary conditions, with the exception that all signals with periodicities in the 30 70-day range have been removed. Any signals in the 30 70-day range subsequently generated by the notched run are then solely due to signals generated from within the model domain or from signals entering through the domain boundaries with frequencies outside of the MJO band. Comparisons between 2-yr means from each run indicate that filtering the boundaries does not significantly modify the model climatology. The mean wind structure, thermodynamic state, and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are almost identical in the control and notched runs. A 30 70-day bandpass filter is used to isolate MJO-like signals in the runs. Comparisons of 30 70-day bandpassed zonal wind, moist static energy (MSE), and OLR reveal that the notched run develops many of the expected characteristics of MJO episodes, but with a weaker signal. Large-scale, organized structures develop that possess seasonal shifts in amplitude, mirroring observed MJO activity, have opposite wind directions in the upper and lower troposphere, and propagate eastward during most strong episodes. The results suggest that neither remnants from previous MJO episodes nor extratropical feedbacks within the MJO time band are necessary for MJO initiation

  8. Modelling the Madden Julian Oscillation

    SciTech Connect

    Slingo, J M; Inness, P M; Sperber, K R

    2004-05-21

    The MJO has long been an aspect of the global climate that has provided a tough test for the climate modelling community. Since the 1980s there have been numerous studies of the simulation of the MJO in atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs), ranging from Hayashi and Golder (1986, 1988) and Lau and Lau (1986), through to more recent studies such as Wang and Schlesinger (1999) and Wu et al. (2002). Of course, attempts to reproduce the MJO in climate models have proceeded in parallel with developments in our understanding of what the MJO is and what drives it. In fact, many advances in understanding the MJO have come through modeling studies. In particular, failure of climate models to simulate various aspects of the MJO has prompted investigations into the mechanisms that are important to its initiation and maintenance, leading to improvements both in our understanding of, and ability to simulate, the MJO. The initial focus of this chapter will be on modeling the MJO during northern winter, when it is characterized as a predominantly eastward propagating mode and is most readily seen in observations. Aspects of the simulation of the MJO will be discussed in the context of its sensitivity to the formulation of the atmospheric model, and the increasing evidence that it may be a coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Later, we will discuss the challenges regarding the simulation of boreal summer intraseasonal variability, which is more complex since it is a combination of the eastward propagating MJO and the northward propagation of the tropical convergence zone. Finally some concluding remarks on future directions in modeling the MJO and its relationship with other timescales of variability in the tropics will be made.

  9. H. Julian Allen: An Appreciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, Walter G.; Boyd, John W.; Bugos, Glenn E.

    2007-01-01

    Harvey Allen is best known as the genius behind the blunt-body concept, published in 1953, which enables spacecraft to return safely home through Earth's dense atmosphere. He was also an extraordinary research leader, who led a world-class research program in hypersonics at the NACA Ames Aeronautical Laboratory. This paper reviews his career as one of America's leading theorists and experimenters, including his engineering education at Stanford, his work on the inverse problem of calculating the airfoil profile to obtain a desired pressure distribution, his hand in constructing wind tunnels and experimental facilities at Ames, and his pioneering and wide-ranging work on atmospheric re-entry. It concludes with an appreciation of his uniquely inspirational style of research management, and of his magnetic personality.

  10. On the roles of the northeast cold surge, the Borneo vortex, the Madden-Julian Oscillation, and the Indian Ocean Dipole during the extreme 2006/2007 flood in southern Peninsular Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangang, Fredolin T.; Juneng, Liew; Salimun, Ester; Vinayachandran, P. N.; Seng, Yap Kok; Reason, C. J. C.; Behera, S. K.; Yasunari, T.

    2008-05-01

    The mid-December 2006 to late January 2007 flood in southern Peninsular Malaysia was the worst flood in a century and was caused by three extreme precipitation episodes. These extreme precipitation events were mainly associated with strong northeasterly winds over the South China Sea. In all cases, the northeasterlies penetrated anomalously far south and followed almost a straight trajectory. The elevated terrain over Sumatra and southern Peninsular Malaysia caused low-level convergence. The strong easterly winds near Java associated with the Rossby wave-type response to Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) inhibited the counter-clockwise turning of the northeasterlies and the formation of the Borneo vortex, which, in turn, enhanced the low-level convergence over the region. The abrupt termination of the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) in December 2006 played a secondary role as warmer equatorial Indian Ocean helped in the MJO formation.

  11. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the use of shock waves to study planetary interiors and impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, California on November 24, 2010, at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, formally emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of hypervelocity impact, arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth and - in many cases - surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were primarily conducted in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with development of nuclear weapons. The shock wave laboratory at Caltech was noted for key measurements addressing major questions in planetary geophysics. Equation-of-state studies on silicate melts showed that magma deep in Earth's mantle could be denser than the coexisting crystals, implying downward transport of melts (and associated heat) rather than the upward eruption of lavas observed in volcanic regions at Earth's surface. Shock-melting experiments on iron at pressures of Earth's core provide a crucial constraint on the temperature at the center of our planet. And studies of hydrous, carbonate and sulphate minerals under shock compression document how climate-altering molecules can be released by major impacts, such as the K/T event associated with the most recent mass extinction of biota in Earth history. In addition, Tom was a leader in numerical simulation of cratering, bringing the most recent laboratory measurements into the modeling of planetary impacts. Tom's training was in geophysics and applied experimental physics, as exemplified by the ultrasonic wave-velocity measurements of his Ph.D. research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (geophysics Ph.D. in 1962, following a B.S. in geology and geophysics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1957, and M.S. in geophysics from Caltech in 1958). He served in the U.S. Army (1959-60) and was employed at Stanford Research Institute (1962-67), where he conducted shock wave experiments, before joining the faculty at Caltech in 1967. With such a broad background, Tom combined condensed-matter physics, continuum mechanics, petrology and seismology, for instance in characterizing polymorphic phase transformations in Earth's mantle (1967 J. Geophys. Res. Paper with Y. Syono); using shock wave measurements to interpret seismological data on Earth's deep interior (1969 Rev. Geophysics paper with D. L. Anderson and A. E. Ringwood); modeling geodynamic effects of phase-transition kinetics (1975 Rev. Geophysics paper with G. Shubert); characterizing the effects of gravity and crustal strength on crater formation (1981 Rev. Geophysics paper with J. D. O'Keefe); and quantifying impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres (1993 Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences). The span of his science was also reflected in collaborations with - among others - Paul D. Asimow, George R. Rossman and Edward M. Stolper at Caltech, as well as Arthur C. Mitchell and William J. Nellis at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His accomplishments included conducting the first shock-wave experiments on lunar samples and solid hydrogen; measuring the first absorption spectra of minerals under shock loading; discovering major phase changes in CaO, FeO, KAlSi3O8, and KFeS2; measuring shock temperatures in silicates, metals, and oxides; conducting the first planetary cratering calculations for mass of melted and vaporized material, and mass and energy of ejecta as a function of planetary escape velocity; experimentally documenting shock vaporization on volatile-bearing minerals, and applying the results to understanding the formation of oceans and atmosph

  12. Obituary: Thomas Julian Ahrens (1936-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeanloz, Raymond; Asimow, Paul

    2011-12-01

    Thomas J. Ahrens, a leader in the use of shock waves to study planetary interiors and impact phenomena, died at his home in Pasadena, California on November 24, 2010, at the age of 74. He was the California Institute of Technology's Fletcher Jones Professor of Geophysics, formally emeritus since 2005 but professionally active to the end. Tom was a pioneer in experimental and numerical studies of the effects of hypervelocity impact, arguably the most important geophysical process in the formation, growth and - in many cases - surface evolution of planets. As a professor at Caltech, he established the foremost university laboratory for shock wave experiments, where students and research associates from around the world pursued basic research in geophysics, planetary science and other disciplines. Previously, high-pressure shock experiments were primarily conducted in national laboratories, where they were initially associated with development of nuclear weapons. The shock wave laboratory at Caltech was noted for key measurements addressing major questions in planetary geophysics. Equation-of-state studies on silicate melts showed that magma deep in Earth's mantle could be denser than the coexisting crystals, implying downward transport of melts (and associated heat) rather than the upward eruption of lavas observed in volcanic regions at Earth's surface. Shock-melting experiments on iron at pressures of Earth's core provide a crucial constraint on the temperature at the center of our planet. And studies of hydrous, carbonate and sulphate minerals under shock compression document how climate-altering molecules can be released by major impacts, such as the K/T event associated with the most recent mass extinction of biota in Earth history. In addition, Tom was a leader in numerical simulation of cratering, bringing the most recent laboratory measurements into the modeling of planetary impacts. Tom's training was in geophysics and applied experimental physics, as exemplified by the ultrasonic wave-velocity measurements of his Ph.D. research at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (geophysics Ph.D. in 1962, following a B.S. in geology and geophysics from Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1957, and M.S. in geophysics from Caltech in 1958). He served in the U.S. Army (1959-60) and was employed at Stanford Research Institute (1962-67), where he conducted shock wave experiments, before joining the faculty at Caltech in 1967. With such a broad background, Tom combined condensed-matter physics, continuum mechanics, petrology and seismology, for instance in characterizing polymorphic phase transformations in Earth's mantle (1967 J. Geophys. Res. Paper with Y. Syono); using shock wave measurements to interpret seismological data on Earth's deep interior (1969 Rev. Geophysics paper with D. L. Anderson and A. E. Ringwood); modeling geodynamic effects of phase-transition kinetics (1975 Rev. Geophysics paper with G. Shubert); characterizing the effects of gravity and crustal strength on crater formation (1981 Rev. Geophysics paper with J. D. O'Keefe); and quantifying impact erosion of terrestrial planetary atmospheres (1993 Annual Review of Earth and Planetary Sciences). The span of his science was also reflected in collaborations with - among others - Paul D. Asimow, George R. Rossman and Edward M. Stolper at Caltech, as well as Arthur C. Mitchell and William J. Nellis at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. His accomplishments included conducting the first shock-wave experiments on lunar samples and solid hydrogen; measuring the first absorption spectra of minerals under shock loading; discovering major phase changes in CaO, FeO, KAlSi3O8, and KFeS2; measuring shock temperatures in silicates, metals, and oxides; conducting the first planetary cratering calculations for mass of melted and vaporized material, and mass and energy of ejecta as a function of planetary escape velocity; experimentally documenting shock vaporization on volatile-bearing minerals, and applying the results to understanding the formation of oceans and atmospheres; conducting the first dynamic-compression experiments on molten silicates, with applications to characterizing the maximum depth of volcanism on terrestrial planets, as well as the crystallization sequence of magma oceans; performing the first thermodynamic calculations delineating the impact-shock conditions for melting and vaporization of planetary materials; carrying out the first smoothed particle hydrodynamic calculations to investigate energy partitioning upon impact in self-gravitating planetary systems; and conducting the first quantitative tensile failure studies for brittle media, relating crack-density to elastic velocity deficits and the onset of damage. Tom was also Co-Investigator on the NASA Cosmic Dust Analyzer Experiment, and the NASA/ESA Cassini Mission to Saturn. Honors included the AGU Hess Medal, Geological Society of America Day Medal, Meteoritical Society Barringer Medal, APS Shock Compression of Condensed Matter' Topical Groups's Duvall Medal and AAAS Newcomb-Cleveland Prize. He had been President of AGU's Tectonophysics Section, Editor of Journal of Geophysical Research, founding member of both the Mineral and Rock Physics and Study of Earth's Deep Interior focus groups, and Editor - more like key driving force - for AGU's Handbook of Physical Constants. He was a fellow of the AGU, American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Association for the Advancement of Science, and Geochemical Society; and member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences, as well as Foreign Associate of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Main-belt asteroid 4739 Tomahrens (1985 TH1) was named after him. Tom made it clear, however, that it was his students (more than 30), research associates (15 or more) and many collaborators who were the real mark of success. No doubt driven by the need to sustain a major, expensive research facility, as well as to satisfy an inner drive, he maintained a daunting work schedule - including evenings, weekends and holidays - that challenged and stimulated so many around him, perhaps even frightening or frustrating some. He could play as hard as he worked, enjoying sailing, skiing and other outdoor activities over the years.

  13. Observations of the temporal variability in aerosol properties and their relationships to meteorology in the summer monsoonal South China Sea/East Sea: the role of monsoonal flows, the Madden-Julian Oscillation, tropical cyclones, squall lines and cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. S.; Lagrosas, N. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Reid, E. A.; Sessions, W. R.; Simpas, J. B.; Uy, S. N.; Boyd, T. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Blake, D. R.; Campbell, J. R.; Cliff, S. S.; Holben, B. N.; Holz, R. E.; Hyer, E. J.; Lynch, P.; Meinardi, S.; Posselt, D. J.; Richardson, K. A.; Salinas, S. V.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, Q.; Yu, L. E.; Zhang, J.

    2014-08-01

    In a joint NRL/Manila Observatory mission, as part of the 7 SouthEast Asian Studies program (7SEAS), a two-week, late September~2011 research cruise in the northern Palawan Archipelago was undertaken to observe the nature of southwest monsoonal aerosol particles in the South China Sea/East Sea (SCS/ES) and Sulu Sea region. Previous analyses suggested this region as a~receptor for biomass burning from Borneo and Sumatra for boundary layer air entering the monsoonal trough. Anthropogenic pollution and biofuel emissions are also ubiquitous, as is heavy shipping traffic. Here, we provide an overview of the regional environment during the cruise, a time series of key aerosol and meteorological parameters, and their interrelationships. Overall, this cruise provides a~narrative of the processes that control regional aerosol loadings and their possible feedbacks with clouds and precipitation. While 2011 was a moderate El Nino/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) La Nina year, higher burning activity and lower precipitation was more typical of neutral conditions. The large-scale aerosol environment was modulated by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and its associated tropical cyclone (TC) activity in a manner consistent with the conceptual analysis performed by Reid et al. (2012). Advancement of the MJO from phase 3 to 6 with accompanying cyclogenesis during the cruise period strengthened flow patterns in the SCS/ES that modulated aerosol lifecycle. TC inflow arms of significant convection sometimes span from Sumatra to Luzon, resulting in very low particle concentrations (minimum condensation nuclei CN < 150 cm-3, non-sea salt PM2.5=1μg m-3). However, elevated carbon monoxide levels were occasionally observed suggesting passage of polluted air masses whose aerosol particles had been rained out. Conversely, two drier periods occurred with higher aerosol particle concentrations originating from Borneo and Southern Sumatra (CN > 3000 cm-3 and non-sea salt PM2.510-25 μg m-3). These

  14. "You Don't Want a Smart Alec": Selecting Examiners to Assess Doctoral Dissertations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiley, Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The use of external examiners in the doctoral assessment process is seen as a quality assurance process in most higher education systems. This article suggests that the selection of examiners is a critical aspect of that process. Interview analysis highlights the professional/academic considerations involved in selecting suitable examiners, as…

  15. Christi Makes Sense of Sixth-Grade Mathematics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ridlon, Candice L.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses experiences using a new mathematics curriculum with sixth grade students for nine weeks. Presents a student's discovery of her power in mathematics through this problem-centered curriculum. (ASK)

  16. 76 FR 18395 - Safety Zone; Naval Air Station Corpus Christi Air Show, Oso Bay, Corpus Christi, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... necessary to provide for the safety of other vessels and users of the waterway. Persons and vessels would be...: The owners or operators of vessels intending to transit the affected waterway during the time of...., specifications of materials, performance, design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and...

  17. Madden-Julian Oscillation simulated in BCC climate models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongbo; Ren, Hong-Li; Song, Lianchun; Wu, Jie

    2015-12-01

    This study evaluates the ability of four versions BCC (Beijing Climate Center or National Climate Center) models (BCC_AGCM2.1, BCC_AGCM2.2, BCC_CSM1.1 and BCC_CSM1.1m) in simulating the MJO phenomenon using the outputs of the AMIP (Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project) and historical runs. In general, the models can simulate some major characteristics of the MJO, such as the intensity, the periodicity, the propagation, and the temporal/spatial evolution of the MJO signals in the tropics. There are still some biases between the models and the observation/reanalysis data, such as the overestimated total intraseasonal variability, but underestimated MJO intensity, shorter significant periodicity, and excessive westward propagation. The differences in the ability of simulating the MJO between AMIP and historical experiments are also significant. Compared to the AMIP runs, the total intraseasonal variability is reduced and more realistic, however the ratio between the MJO and its westward counterpart decreases in the historical runs. This unrealistic simulation of the zonal propagation might have been associated with the greater mean precipitation over the Pacific and corresponded to the exaggeration of the South Pacific Convergence Zone structure in precipitation mean state. In contrast to the T42 versions, the improvement of model resolution demonstrate more elaborate topography, but the enhanced westward propagation signals over the Arabia Sea followed. The underestimated (overestimated) MJO variability over eastern Indian Ocean (Pacific) was assumed to be associated with the mean state. Three sets of sensitive experiments using BCC_CSM1.1m turn out to support this argument.

  18. Observations of the temporal variability in aerosol properties and their relationships to meteorology in the summer monsoonal South China Sea/East Sea: the scale-dependent role of monsoonal flows, the Madden-Julian Oscillation, tropical cyclones, squall lines and cold pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. S.; Lagrosas, N. D.; Jonsson, H. H.; Reid, E. A.; Sessions, W. R.; Simpas, J. B.; Uy, S. N.; Boyd, T. J.; Atwood, S. A.; Blake, D. R.; Campbell, J. R.; Cliff, S. S.; Holben, B. N.; Holz, R. E.; Hyer, E. J.; Lynch, P.; Meinardi, S.; Posselt, D. J.; Richardson, K. A.; Salinas, S. V.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, Q.; Yu, L.; Zhang, J.

    2015-02-01

    In a joint NRL/Manila Observatory mission, as part of the Seven SouthEast Asian Studies program (7-SEAS), a 2-week, late September 2011 research cruise in the northern Palawan archipelago was undertaken to observe the nature of southwest monsoonal aerosol particles in the South China Sea/East Sea (SCS/ES) and Sulu Sea region. Previous analyses suggested this region as a receptor for biomass burning from Borneo and Sumatra for boundary layer air entering the monsoonal trough. Anthropogenic pollution and biofuel emissions are also ubiquitous, as is heavy shipping traffic. Here, we provide an overview of the regional environment during the cruise, a time series of key aerosol and meteorological parameters, and their interrelationships. Overall, this cruise provides a narrative of the processes that control regional aerosol loadings and their possible feedbacks with clouds and precipitation. While 2011 was a moderate El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) La Niña year, higher burning activity and lower precipitation was more typical of neutral conditions. The large-scale aerosol environment was modulated by the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) and its associated tropical cyclone (TC) activity in a manner consistent with the conceptual analysis performed by Reid et al. (2012). Advancement of the MJO from phase 3 to 6 with accompanying cyclogenesis during the cruise period strengthened flow patterns in the SCS/ES that modulated aerosol life cycle. TC inflow arms of significant convection sometimes span from Sumatra to Luzon, resulting in very low particle concentrations (minimum condensation nuclei CN < 150 cm-3, non-sea-salt PM2.5 < 1 μg m-3). However, elevated carbon monoxide levels were occasionally observed suggesting passage of polluted air masses whose aerosol particles had been rained out. Conversely, two drier periods occurred with higher aerosol particle concentrations originating from Borneo and Southern Sumatra (CN > 3000 cm-3 and non-sea-salt PM2.5 10-25 μg m

  19. 76 FR 18391 - Safety Zone; Texas International Boat Show Power Boat Races; Corpus Christi Marina, Corpus...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... zone will be implemented for the 15 minutes before each race or race heat. The same methods of... safety zone approximately 15 minutes following the conclusion of each race or race heat when the power... race heat. Vessels may transit through the safety zone with permission from the Captain of the...

  20. "Cisneros v. CCISD" the Desegregation of the Corpus Christi Independent School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevino, John Albert

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this historical case study was to add to the literature an analysis of the landmark legal case of Jose Cisneros v. CCISD. The outcome of this case established Mexican Americans as an ethnic minority and set the legal precedent that the 1954 Brown v. Board of Education Topeka ruling could be extended to other minorities beyond…

  1. Delineation of marsh types from Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, to Perdido Bay, Alabama, in 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Enwright, Nicholas M.; Hartley, Stephen B.; Couvillion, Brady R.; Michael G. Brasher; Jenneke M. Visser; Michael K. Mitchell; Bart M. Ballard; Mark W. Parr; Barry C. Wilson

    2015-01-01

    This study incorporates about 9,800 ground reference locations collected via helicopter surveys in coastal wetland areas. Decision-tree analyses were used to classify emergent marsh vegetation types by using ground reference data from helicopter vegetation surveys and independent variables such as multitemporal satellite-based multispectral imagery from 2009 to 2011, bare-earth digital elevation models based on airborne light detection and ranging (lidar), alternative contemporary land cover classifications, and other spatially explicit variables. Image objects were created from 2010 National Agriculture Imagery Program color-infrared aerial photography. The final classification is a 10-meter raster dataset that was produced by using a majority filter to classify image objects according to the marsh vegetation type covering the majority of each image object. The classification is dated 2010 because the year is both the midpoint of the classified multitemporal satellite-based imagery (2009–11) and the date of the high-resolution airborne imagery that was used to develop image objects. The seamless classification produced through this work can be used to help develop and refine conservation efforts for priority natural resources.

  2. Contribution of the maritime continent convection during the preconditioning stage of the Madden-Julian Oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, H.; Yoneyama, K.; Nasuno, T.; Hamada, J.

    2013-12-01

    During the international field experiment 'Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011)', the preconditioning process of the MJO was observed. In this study, the contribution of the maritime continent convection was focused on the preconditioning process of the third MJO. During the preconditioning stage of the MJO, westward propagating disturbances were observed from Sumatera Island to the central Indian Ocean and moistened the atmosphere. Convections over the Sumatera Island were activated around December 15th when the moist air mass reached from South China Sea. The origin of the moist air mass was tropical cyclone which was formed in South China Sea in December 10th. The high moisture associated with tropical cyclone activated the convection over Sumatera Island, promoted westward propagating disturbances, and acted a favorable environment for the preconditioning of the MJO. This preconditioning stage of the MJO is simulated by Nonhydrostatic ICosahedral Atmospheric Model (NICAM) and investigated the moistening process.

  3. The Living and the Dead in Education: Commentary on Julian Williams

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Peter E.

    2011-01-01

    Jean Lave and Ray McDermott (2002) did a service with their powerful reading of Marx's 1844 essay on "Estranged Labour" (Marx, 1964). In reworking Marx's critique of "alienated labour" in terms of "alienated learning," they reminded everyone of Marx's own impassioned revolt against the inhumanity of the capitalist order and found a novel way of…

  4. Characteristics Associated with the Madden-Julian Oscillation at Manus Island

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Liping; McFarlane, Sally A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

    2013-05-15

    Ground-based high temporal and vertical resolution datasets from 2002 to 2008 of observations at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) site on Manus Island, Papua New Guinea are used to examine the evolution of clouds and rainfall associated with the MJO life cycle. A composite MJO event is developed based on the NOAA MJO Index 4 using 13 events. The analysis shows that the cloud evolution during the composited MJO life cycle depicts a two-phase structure consisting of a development phase and a mature phase. During the development phase, congestus is the most important cloud type; during the mature phase, deep convection is the dominant cloud type. Consistent with this two-phase structure, the heavy rainfall frequency also shows a two-peak structure during the MJO life cycle. Light rainfall does not show a clear relation to the MJO life cycle, but shows variability on shorter time scales. From the development phase to the mature phase, the MJO structure shifts from the Type I to Type II structure, showing a different phase relationship between convection and dynamic fields (or wave motion) in the development and mature phases. During the shift, mid-level clouds play an important role in moving moisture to the mid-troposphere and preparing the atmosphere for the following deep convection. The discharge-recharge theory explains some of observed features of the MJO evolution at the ARM TWP Manus Island site.

  5. Interaction of deep and shallow convection is key to Madden-Julian Oscillation simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guang J.; Song, Xiaoliang

    2009-05-01

    This study investigates the role of the interaction between deep and shallow convection in MJO simulation using the NCAR CAM3. Two simulations were performed, one using a revised Zhang-McFarlane convection scheme for deep convection and the Hack scheme for shallow convection, and the other disallowing shallow convection below 700 mb in the tropical belt. The two simulations produce dramatically different MJO characteristics. While the control simulation produces realistic MJOs, the simulation without shallow convection has very weak MJO signals in the Indian Ocean and western Pacific. Composite analysis finds that shallow convection serves to precondition the lower troposphere by moistening it ahead of deep convection. It also produces enhanced low-level mass convergence below 850 mb ahead of deep convection. This work, together with previous studies, suggests that a correct simulation of the interaction between deep and shallow convection is key to MJO simulation in global climate models.

  6. Application of terrestrial photogrammetry for the mass balance calculation on Montasio Occidentale Glacier (Julian Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piermattei, Livia; Carturan, Luca; Calligaro, Simone; Blasone, Giacomo; Guarnieri, Alberto; Tarolli, Paolo; Dalla Fontana, Giancarlo; Vettore, Antonio

    2014-05-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs) of glaciated terrain are commonly used to measure changes in geometry and hence infer the mass balance of glaciers. Different tools and methods exist to obtain information about the 3D geometry of terrain. Recent improvements on the quality and performance of digital cameras for close-range photogrammetry, and the development of automatic digital photogrammetric processing makes the 'structure from motion' photogrammetric technique (SfM) competitive for high quality 3D models production, compared to efficient but also expensive and logistically-demanding survey technologies such as airborn and terrestrial laser scanner (TLS). The purpose of this work is to test the SfM approach, using a consumer-grade SLR camera and the low-cost computer vision-based software package Agisoft Photoscan (Agisoft LLC), to monitor the mass balance of Montasio Occidentale glacier, a 0.07km2, low-altitude, debris-covered glacier located in the Eastern Italian Alps. The quality of the 3D models produced by the SfM process has been assessed by comparison with digital terrain models obtained through TLS surveys carried out at the same dates. TLS technique has indeed proved to be very effective in determining the volume change of this glacier in the last years. Our results shows that the photogrammetric approach can produce point cloud densities comparable to those derived from TLS measurements. Furthermore, the horizontal and vertical accuracies are also of the same order of magnitude as for TLS (centimetric to decimetric). The effect of different landscape characteristics (e.g. distance from the camera or terrain gradient) and of different substrata (rock, debris, ice, snow and firn) was also evaluated in terms of SfM reconstruction's accuracy vs. TLS. Given the good results obtained on the Montasio Occidentale glacier, it can be concluded that the terrestrial photogrammetry, with the advantageous features of portability, ease of use and above all low costs, allows to obtain high-resolution DEMs which enable good mass balance estimations on glaciers with similar characteristics.

  7. Variability of Madden Julian Oscillations (MJO) observed over southern India using radiosonde observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leena, P. P.; Ratnam, M. Venkat; Krishna Murthy, B. V.; Bhaskara Rao, S. Vijaya

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, characteristics of 30-50 day oscillations (referred to as the MJO) in tropospheric and lower stratospheric wind and temperature have been studied using long-term high resolution radiosonde observations at a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5°N, 79.2°E) for the period 2006-2012. Wind and temperature perturbations showed clear features of the MJO with higher amplitudes between 10 and 18 km altitude. Interestingly, the MJO signal is confined vertically to different altitudes in different seasons. Variability in the perturbations of wind and temperature similar to that of outgoing long-wave radiation (OLR) with a few cases showing an out of phase relation. The amplitudes of these oscillations are larger in the winter and pre-monsoon seasons than in the monsoon season where the largest amplitudes are confined below the Tropical Easterly Jet (~16 km). There also exists a large inter-annual variability in the MJO. Spatio-temporal variability of OLR not only showed the features of the MJO but also northward and eastward propagation in the monsoons and winter seasons, respectively, in a few cases. It is found that convection leads the MJO in the zonal wind by 8-12 days in all the seasons except in winter. One intriguing result observed is the vitiation of the MJO pattern by the presence of strong wind shears during monsoon season. We expect this study would be helpful in representing the MJO features in the vertical in the general circulation models (GCMs) which is still a major challenge.

  8. Archive of digital and digitized analog boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 96CCT02 in Copano, Corpus Christi, and Nueces Bays and Corpus Christi Bayou, Texas, July 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Morton, Robert A.; Blum, Mike D.; Wiese, Dana S.; Subiño, Janice A.

    2007-01-01

    In June of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys from Nueces to Copano Bays, Texas. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, cruise log, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles and high resolution scanned TIFF images of the original paper printouts are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  9. Regular and Novel Metonymy: Can You Curl up with a Good Agatha Christie in Your Second Language?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slabakova, Roumyana; Cabrelli Amaro, Jennifer; Kyun Kang, Sang

    2016-01-01

    This article presents results of two off-line comprehension tasks investigating the acceptability of unconventional and conventional metonymy by native speakers of Korean and Spanish who speak English as a second language. We are interested in discovering whether learners differentiate between conventional and unconventional metonymy, and whether…

  10. 33 CFR 3.40-35 - Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the junction of the sea and the east bank of the Colorado River at latitude 28°35′44″ N, longitude 95°58′48″ W, proceeding north along the east bank of the Colorado River to Colorado County, TX; thence... boundaries of Colorado, Fayette, Bastrop, Travis, Burnet, Llano, Mason, Menard, Schletcher, Irion,...

  11. 33 CFR 3.40-35 - Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the junction of the sea and the east bank of the Colorado River at latitude 28°35′44″ N, longitude 95°58′48″ W, proceeding north along the east bank of the Colorado River to Colorado County, TX; thence... boundaries of Colorado, Fayette, Bastrop, Travis, Burnet, Llano, Mason, Menard, Schletcher, Irion,...

  12. 33 CFR 3.40-35 - Sector Corpus Christi Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... the junction of the sea and the east bank of the Colorado River at latitude 28°35′44″ N, longitude 95°58′48″ W, proceeding north along the east bank of the Colorado River to Colorado County, TX; thence... boundaries of Colorado, Fayette, Bastrop, Travis, Burnet, Llano, Mason, Menard, Schletcher, Irion,...

  13. 78 FR 13015 - Foreign-Trade Zone 122-Corpus Christi, Tx; Application for Reorganization Under Alternative Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... February 20, 2013. FTZ 122 was approved by the Board on September 5, 1985 (Board Order 310, 50 FR 38020, 9/19/1985) and expanded on December 6, 1991 (Board Order 545, 56 FR 65884, 12/19/1991), and on September 1, 1995 (Board Order 764, 60 FR 47149, 9/11/1995). The current zone includes the following...

  14. Convective Characteristics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation over the Central Indian Ocean Observed by Shipborne Radar during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Rutledge, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    This study is motivated to quantify cloud population and convective properties throughout different MJO phases, and examine their relationships with the environment (e.g., moisture, SST, and CAPE). This study is based on C-band shipborne radar observations during the 2011-2012 international DYNAMO field campaign (collected on board the R/V Roger Revelle). In this study, we provide information about the MJO convection such as the cloud morphology (both height and size), convective intensity, rainfall contributions by different cloud type (including convective and stratiform), and lightning frequency. In addition, variability of all convective quantities as a function of MJO phase will be further related to environmental changes, e.g., sea surface temperature (SST), tropospheric humidity and CAPE. These high-resolution radar measurements collected on the R/V Revelle located ~600 km to the east of the Gan Island. Hence we can also examine the regional variability of convective population within the MJO initiation key area by comparing with studies based on the Gan Island radars deployed for DYNAMO. Preliminary results indicate close relations among changes of atmospheric moisture, SST, and the convective population. For example, the moistening of the lower troposphere from the suppressed stage (phase 5-7) to inactive pre-onset stage (phase 8-1) coincides with the growth of shallow or isolated convection. Similarly, significant mid-to-upper troposphere moistening occurs immediately after the onset of the deep convective phase (phase 2). The upper troposphere becomes the moistest during the phase 2 when number of deep convective cells, the population of MCSs and total precipitation reach their peak. At phase 3 (still active phase), though large MCSs are still prevailing, convection becomes slightly shallower and stratiform precipitation is dominating. These findings are generally consistent to the conceptual model of MJO initiation and those findings in the literature. The convective structures and relationships with the atmospheric and upper ocean conditions in different MJO phase will be analyzed in more depth.

  15. 33 CFR 165.809 - Security Zones; Port of Port Lavaca-Point Comfort, Point Comfort, TX and Port of Corpus Christi...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS Specific Regulated Navigation Areas and Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.809 Security Zones; Port of Port.... The Captain of the Port may be contacted via VHF Channel 16 or via telephone at (361) 888-3162 to...

  16. Simulated effects of projected pumping on the availability of freshwater in the Evangeline Aquifer in an area southwest of Corpus Christi, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Groschen, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    This study is an investigation of the continued availability of freshwater in the Evangeline aquifer along the Texas Gulf Coast and the potential for degradation of the water quality by saline water intrusion. Recharge to the aquifer occurs by the infiltration of precipitation in the outcrop area and by cross-formational flow from deeper aquifers. The pre-development recharge rate is about 6 to 8 cu ft/sec. Discharge, under natural conditions, is upward into the Chicot aquifer and to the Nueces River or Gulf of Mexico. Intensive pumping by irrigators, industries, and municipalities over the last 80 yr has created a cone of depression as deep as 219 ft below sea level under the city of Kingsville in Kleberg County. The total rate of pumpage in 1982 was 29.6 cu ft/sec. A mathematical model of the flow and water quality in the Evangeline aquifer was developed using available data to simulate the historical effect of pumping on the potentiometric surface and water quality, and to simulate the effect of projected pumping on the potentiometric surface and water quality to the year 2020. The water quality in the aquifer is only marginally suitable for drinking water. The chloride concentration before development in the 1930 's and 1940's, ranged from 9 to 1,971 mg/L. The mean chloride concentration was 353 (standard deviation 262) mg/L. The potential sources of water quality degradation on a regional scale are: saline water intrusion from under the Gulf of Mexico; movement of poor quality water within outlying sections of the aquifer; and downward leakage from the overlying Chicot aquifer. Leakage from the Chicot is the most likely to cause serious regional water quality degradation. The simulations and the sensitivity tests of the aquifer properties, conditions, and assumptions indicate that vertical conductivity of the Chicot aquifer is the most sensitive and least well known part of the system. Two simulations of the projected pumping--a low estimate , as much as 46.2 cu ft/sec during 2011-20; and a high estimate, as much as 60.0 cu ft/sec during the same period--indicate that no further regional water quality deterioration is likely to occur. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Step 1: Learn About Diabetes | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... from prediabetes to type 2 diabetes in 2013. Photo By: Frazer Harrison In 1995, singer Patti LaBelle ... manages the disease with healthy foods and exercise. Photo By: Frazer Harrison When Alec Baldwin was diagnosed ...

  18. Book Review: The end of time: the next revolution in our understanding of the universe. Julian Barbour, Weidenfeld and Nicholson, London, 384 pp., 16.95, ISBN 0195145925

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, G. F. R.

    In the early part of this century, physicists, led notably by Albert Einstein and the pioneers of quantum theory-in particular Neils Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Paul Dirac-discovered that the underlying nature of physical reality is stranger than anyone had ever imagined. A series of brilliant insights led to the realisation, on the one hand, of the relative nature of space and time measurements, and hence of our basic concepts of space and time (ultimately leading to the discovery of nuclear energy), and on the other hand, of the quantum nature of matter, with its associated quantum statistics and uncertainty of prediction (leading to transistors and lasers). Combining these views ultimately led to a realisation of the necessity of the existence of anti-matter, and of the dynamic nature of the vacuum. Further developments led to an understanding of the existence of symmetries characterising the various families of elementary particles, and of the unified nature of the fundamental interactions when described as gauge theories with forces mediated by exchange of gauge bosons. These properties have all been confirmed by carefully controlled experiments.

  19. Drug Prevention, Rehabilitation, Interdiction, and Law Enforcement (Corpus Christi, TX). Hearing before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (December 12 and 13, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control.

    This document provides transcripts of two consecutive days of Congressional hearings on narcotics abuse and control. Opening statements from Representatives Benjamin A. Gilman, Kent Hance, and Solomon P. Ortiz are presented. Testimony and prepared statements of 61 counselors and administrators in the field of substance abuse, public officials, law…

  20. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 VIEW FROM CORNER OF WHITAKER AND ST JULIAN SHOWING NORTH FACADE - Gibbons Block, Congress, Saint Julian, Barnard, Whitaker Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  1. Students in Austin, Texas Learn About Space Exploration and Science

    NASA Video Gallery

    From NASA's International Space Station Mission Control Center, Christie Sauers, Orion Cockpit Working Group Deputy, participates in a Digital Learning Network (DLN) event with students at the Ann ...

  2. 77 FR 58368 - Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Application Corpus Christi Liquefaction, LLC Docket No. CP12-507... 77002, filed with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission) an application in Docket No... terminal. In the same application, Cheniere Corpus Christi Pipeline, L.P. (CCP) (together Corpus...

  3. America Reads Reading Recovery Right To Read = Quality Tutoring. A Pilot Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Jack; Linton, Thomas

    This chapter is part of a book that recounts the year's work at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi. Rather than an "elitist" laboratory school for the children of university faculty, the dual-language ECDC is a collaboration between the Corpus Christi Independent School District and the…

  4. A University Lab School for the 21st Century: The Early Childhood Development Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Jack; Sanders, Jana

    This chapter is part of a book that recounts the year's work at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi. Rather than an "elitist" laboratory school for the children of university faculty, the ECDC is a collaboration between the Corpus Christi Independent School District and the university with an…

  5. 33 CFR 165.801 - Annual fireworks displays and other events in the Eighth Coast Guard District requiring safety...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... marker 172.4 to 170.3.2 on the Ohio River. (See 33 CFR 100). Sector UpperMississippi River Date Sponsor... 3rd Louisville Bats Baseball Club/Louisville Bats Fireworks Louisville, KY Ohio River Mile 603.0-604.0... Hooks Baseball Team/Friday Night Fireworks Corpus Christi Ship Channel, Corpus Christi, TX All...

  6. Nature Study: A Science Curriculum for Three and Four-Year-Olds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, JoAnn Montes; McDonald, Robert B.

    This chapter is a part of a book that recounts the year's work at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi. Rather than an "elitist" laboratory school for the children of university faculty, the dual-language ECDC is a collaboration between the Corpus Christi Independent School District and the…

  7. Developing Partnerships for Adult Literacy Training: College/Community Cooperation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flores, Agnes L.; And Others

    The Corpus Christi Literacy Council (CCLC) is an independent, non-profit educational organization operating through joint partnership and grant activities with Del Mar College (DMC) and community and government organizations in the Corpus Christi (Texas) area. The major purposes of the council are to establish comprehensive reading programs for…

  8. Early Childhood Literacy: Programs & Strategies To Develop Cultural, Linguistic, Scientific and Healthcare Literacy for Very Young Children & their Families, 2001 Yearbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassidy, Jack, Ed.; Garrett, Sherrye D., Ed.

    This yearbook recounts the work in 2001 at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi. Rather than an "elitist" laboratory school for the children of university faculty, the ECDC is a collaboration between the Corpus Christi Independent School District and the university, with an enrollment…

  9. A School Healthcare Program for Low Income Families of Very Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Esperanza Villanueva

    This chapter is part of a book that recounts the year's work at the Early Childhood Development Center (ECDC) at Texas A & M University-Corpus Christi. Rather than an "elitist" laboratory school for the children of university faculty, the dual-language ECDC is a collaboration between the Corpus Christi Independent School District and the…

  10. A Bibliometric Analysis of the Academic Influences of and on Evaluation Theorists' Published Works

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heberger, Anne E.; Christie, Christina A.; Alkin, Marvin C.

    2010-01-01

    As is the case with other fields, there is motivation for studying the impact that the body of evaluation theory literature has within and outside the field. The authors used journal articles written by theorists included on the evaluation theory tree by Alkin and Christie (2004; Christie & Alkin, 2008) and published in the Web of Science, an…

  11. Privatizing Schooling and Policy Making: The American Legislative Exchange Council and New Political and Discursive Strategies of Education Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Gary L.; Donchik, Liliana Montoro

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we examine the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) as an example of a unique node within larger policy networks composed of new policy entrepreneurs (e.g., venture philanthropists, think tanks, private "edubusinesses" and their lobbyists, advocacy organizations, and social entrepreneurs). These new policy…

  12. Policy Shop Casts Long K-12 Shadow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ujifusa, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    In nearly 40 years of legislative advocacy, the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC)--a free-market, limited-government group now drawing intense scrutiny for its support of a controversial self-defense law--has had a significant influence on K-12 education through its model legislation and work with state lawmakers to promote such…

  13. NAREM Journal. Volume 1, 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Narem Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Eight articles are included in the journal of the National Association for Remedial Education, Malaysia (NAREM). Chua Tee Tee describes the history and objectives of NAREM. Alec Williams reviews philosophical issues in remedial education. Khoo Phon Sai discusses cognitive, social, and emotional characteristics of slow learners and considers…

  14. Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science (Charlotte, North Carolina, January 10-13, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubba, Peter A., Ed.; Rye, James A., Ed.; DiBiase, Warren J., Ed.; Crawford, Barbara A., Ed.

    This document contains the proceedings of the 2002 Annual International Conference of the Association for the Education of Teachers in Science which was held in Charlotte, North Carolina, January 10-13, 2002. Papers include: (1) "Teaching Science Methods Courses with Web-Enhanced Activities" (Alec M. Bodzin); (2) "How Is Your Lawnmower Working?…

  15. 76 FR 28002 - Privacy Act of 1974; System of Records

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Liaison Officer, Department of Defense. S500.10 System name: Personnel Security Files (June 8, 2009; 74 FR... identification and password or smart card technology protocols. ] Retention and disposal: Records of security...: Automated Listing of Eligibility and Clearances (ALEC) (June 8, 2009; 74 FR 27121)....

  16. What Works for Me.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vishwanadha, Hari; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Provides suggestions on various English instruction topics. Includes (1) "Argumentation Exercise," Hari Vishwanadha; (2) "How to Survive Developmental (or Any Other) English," Sally Russell; (3) "Reach Out to an Expert," Norma A. Register; (4) "Summary and Response Writing," Alec Valentine; (5) "The Living Journal," Blair Spencer Ray; and (6)…

  17. Education and Immigrant Integration in the United States and Canada. Proceedings of a Conference sponsored by the Division of United States Studies and the Canada Institute, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and The Migration Policy Institute (April 25, 2005)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strum, Philippa, Ed.; Biette, David, Ed.

    2005-01-01

    The Conference proceedings include an Introduction by Demetrios Papademetriou. Two panels presented speakers as follows: Panel I: Elementary and Secondary (K-12) Education: (1) Immigrant Integration and "Bilingual" Education (Alec Ian Gershberg); (2) Absent Policies: Canadian Strategies for the Education and Integration of Immigrant Children and…

  18. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW AFTER 1919 STORM (SOUTHWEST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  19. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey, Arthur W. Stewart, Photographer June 26, 1936 GENERAL VIEW PRIOR TO 1919 STORM (EAST ELEVATION). - Conrad Meuly House & Store, 210 Chaparral Street, Corpus Christi, Nueces County, TX

  20. Using The "Little Grey Cells."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardesty, Susan M.

    1983-01-01

    Finds that Agatha Christie's mysteries can be used to encourage discussion of characterization and human values, to promote reading and literary analysis skills, and to develop both writing and problem-solving skills. Suggests several language arts activities. (MM)

  1. Enumeration of Mars years and seasons since the beginning of telescopic exploration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piqueux, Sylvain; Byrne, Shane; Titus, Timothy N.; Hansen, Candice J.; Kieffer, Hugh H.

    2015-01-01

    A clarification for the enumeration of Mars Years prior to 1955 is presented, along with a table providing the Julian dates associated with Ls = 0° for Mars Years -183 (beginning of the telescopic study of Mars) to 100. A practical algorithm for computing Ls as a function of the Julian Date is provided. No new science results are presented

  2. Investigations of Possible Low-Level Temperature and Moisture Anomalies During the AMIE Field Campaign on Manus Island

    SciTech Connect

    Long, CN; Holdridge, DJ

    2012-11-19

    This document discusses results stemming from the investigation of near-surface temperature and moisture “oddities” that were brought to light as part of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) Investigation Experiment (AMIE), Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (DYNAMO), and Cooperative Indian Ocean experiment on intraseasonal variability in the Year 2011 (CINDY2011) campaigns.

  3. Satellite-derived photosynthetically available and total solar irradiance at the surface during FIFE's intensive field campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, Robert; Mcpherson, J.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite-derived photosynthetically available and total solar irradiance at the surface during First International Satellite Land Surface Climatology Project (ISLSCP) Field Experiment's (FIFE) intensive field compaigns are addressed. Graphs showing photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) vs. Julian Day and insolation vs. Julian Day are included.

  4. 78 FR 72914 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-04

    ... 16801. Texas: Bexar City of San The Honorable Department of http:// December 19, 2013......... 480045 Antonio (13-06- Julian Castro, Public Works, www.msc.fema.gov/ 3092P). Mayor, City of Storm Water lomc............ 480045 Antonio (13-06- Julian Castro, Public Works, www.msc.fema.gov/ 3094P). Mayor, City of Storm...

  5. [Speech by Oscar Julian Bardeci, director of the Centro Latinoamericano de Demografia (CELADE), at the Latinamerican Regional Meeting prior to the International Conference on Population in recognition of the Second Meeting on Population by the Committee of Upper-Level Government Experts (CEGAN), Havana, Cuba, November 16-19, 1983].

    PubMed

    Bardeci, O J

    1983-12-01

    This work examines the relationship between population growth and economic development in Latin America and assesses progress in the 10 years since the Bucharest World Population Conference. The Latin American population increased from about 159 million in 1950 to 275 million in 1970 and around 325 million in 1980. The rate of growth reached a maximum of 2.8%/year in the early 1970s and has now declined to about 2.3%/year. The regional growth rate is a product of population dynamics that differ greatly in individual countries. Crude birth rates declined in every country of Latin America between 1975-80, but still exceeded 40/1000 in 1980-85 in Bolivia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Haiti, Honduras, and Nicaragua. Current fertility is the result of the different trajectories of the demographic transition in different countries. While fertility in Argentina, Cuba, and Uruguay underwent a slow but sustained decline that began prior to 1960, other countries including Colombia, Costa Rica, Chile, and Venezuela began an accelerated fertility decline in the 1960s that diffused rapidly through all age and social groups. Other countries have still not entered a definite phase of fertility decline. Mortality rates have declined appreciably in Latin America in the past few decades although they remain high in some countries. After the end of World War II and until the mid-1970s, most countries of the region experienced rapid economic growth coupled with profound changes in the productive structure. The industrial labor force grew in almost all countries along with urbanization, the decline of agricultural employment, and the increase of the tertiary sector. These and other important economic advances through the mid-1970s occurred despite rapid population growth, and the beginning of the fertility decline coincided with slowing economic growth that saw negative rates in 1981-82. Various studies have shown that not all population sectors were incorporated in the process of economic and social development. The proportion of the population in active age groups has increased dramatically, but no corresponding increase in employment opportunities has occurred. The informal sector has absorbed most of the excess growth, a trend reflected in the exclusion of a large segment of the population from the fruits of economic progress. Population growth and increased life expectancy have created demands for more retirement benefits, health and educational services, transportation, recreation, and housing. Nevertheless, it cannot be concluded that rapid population growth necessarily has negative consequences for economic development or social welfare. There are indications that the problem of poverty in Latin America could be solved if the political will to do so existed; obstacles to overcoming poverty are not primarily material or population-related. Urbanization, settlement of marginal areas, and relative decline of agricultural areas are 3 trends in spatial distribution of varying intensity and repercussions in different countries. PMID:12339528

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Ollier disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... JV, Pansuriya TC, Grimer RJ, Ozger H, Jutte PC, San Julian M, Biau DJ, van der Geest ... Gouin FG, Campanacci DA, Marec-Berard P, Hogendoorn PC, Brand R, Taminiau AH. Incidence, predictive factors, and ...

  7. Genetics Home Reference: Maffucci syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... JV, Pansuriya TC, Grimer RJ, Ozger H, Jutte PC, San Julian M, Biau DJ, van der Geest ... Gouin FG, Campanacci DA, Marec-Berard P, Hogendoorn PC, Brand R, Taminiau AH. Incidence, predictive factors, and ...

  8. INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 2. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF BATHROOM 2. NOTE THE ORIGINAL MOSAIC PATTERN FLOOR TILE, EXPOSED-CORNER TUB, FLUSH VALVE TOILET, TILE WAINSCOT, AND CERAMIC ACCESSORIES. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type B, 704 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 3. FIRST FLOOR, LIVING ROOM, VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND CUPBOARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. FIRST FLOOR, LIVING ROOM, VIEW OF FIREPLACE AND CUPBOARD PRIOR TO RESTORATION - Hampton Lillibridge House, No. 1, 507 East Julian Street (moved from 310 East Bryan Street), Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  10. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey L. D. Andrew, Photographer Dec. 30, 1936 VIEW FROM MORRISON'S CAF? (CORNER OF WHITAKER & CONGRESS) SHOWING S. FACADE - Gibbons Block, Congress, Saint Julian, Barnard, Whitaker Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. The State of Scientific Visualization with Regard to the NASA EOS Mission to Planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christy, John R.; Botts, Michael E.; Newchurch, Michael; McNider, Richard T.

    1996-01-01

    In support of the mission to better understand the dynamics of the global atmosphere, John R. Christy and Nathaniel D. Reynolds investigated a wide range of topics. Christy worked closely with NASA scientist Roy Spencer to develop a data set of precision temperature measurements using the NASA built Microwave Sounding Unit. The data from this effort has received international recognition as they provide a source of precise information for the most difficult of environmental issues in the global climate change arena. In addition, Christy coordinated modeling research with NASA scientist Franklin Robertson with research focusing on the validation of global model output using various satellite data with sophisticated statistical techniques. Reynolds worked with NASA scientist Timothy Miller on idealized flows in a rotating annulus and the application of the results to the general circulation of the atmosphere. Additional work was carried out in investigation of stratospheric ozone fluctuations due to dynamical causes.

  12. Microwave sounding units and global warming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, Bruce L.; Keihm, Stephen J.

    1991-01-01

    A recent work of Spencer and Christy (1990) on precise monitoring of global temperature trends from satellites is critically examined. It is tentatively concluded in the present comment that remote sensing using satellite microwave radiometers can in fact provide a means for the monitoring of troposphere-averaged air temperature. However, for this to be successful more than one decade of data will be required to overcome the apparent inherent variability of global average air temperature. It is argued that the data set reported by Spencer and Christy should be subjected to careful review before it is interpreted as evidence of the presence or absence of global warming. In a reply, Christy provides specific responses to the commenters' objections.

  13. Chemical Laws, Idealization and Approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, Emma

    2013-07-01

    This paper examines the notion of laws in chemistry. Vihalemm ( Found Chem 5(1):7-22, 2003) argues that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally the same as the laws of physics they are all ceteris paribus laws which are true "in ideal conditions". In contrast, Scerri (2000) contends that the laws of chemistry are fundamentally different to the laws of physics, because they involve approximations. Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34-50, 2000) agree that the laws of chemistry are operationally different to the laws of physics, but claim that the distinction between exact and approximate laws is too simplistic to taxonomise them. Approximations in chemistry involve diverse kinds of activity and often what counts as a scientific law in chemistry is dictated by the context of its use in scientific practice. This paper addresses the question of what makes chemical laws distinctive independently of the separate question as to how they are related to the laws of physics. From an analysis of some candidate ceteris paribus laws in chemistry, this paper argues that there are two distinct kinds of ceteris paribus laws in chemistry; idealized and approximate chemical laws. Thus, while Christie ( Stud Hist Philos Sci 25:613-629, 1994) and Christie and Christie ( Of minds and molecules. Oxford University Press, New York, pp. 34--50, 2000) are correct to point out that the candidate generalisations in chemistry are diverse and heterogeneous, a distinction between idealizations and approximations can nevertheless be used to successfully taxonomise them.

  14. Managing Curriculum: Rapid Implementation and Sustainability of a Districtwide Data Initiative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayman, Jeffrey C.; Conoly, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    In March 2003, the Corpus Christi Independent School District (CCISD) received a Curriculum Management Audit report from the Texas Curriculum Management Audit Center of the Texas Association of School Administrators. One of the findings of this audit was that CCISD lacked a clear comprehensive management plan to define and guide the design,…

  15. Nominees Set High Standards, Support Student Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Carla

    2003-01-01

    Describes the winner and other nominees for the "Administrator of the Year" award presented nationally by the Journalism Education Association. Explains that W. Charles Dill, Don Senti, Juan Gonzales, Christy Slagle, Linda Quinn, Gary Davis, and Lucinda Lee Katz all set high standards, valued student press rights, and supported students. (PM)

  16. Politics and Play: Meditations on Rhetorical Bodily Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauliny, Tara

    2013-01-01

    Focusing on the drag king performances of Christie Whisman, who lived and worked in Columbus, Ohio, USA, from 1999 to 2001, this essay argues that rhetorical bodily performances have the capacity not only to subvert normalised notions of identity categories, but that such performances can also create alternate pedagogical sites that persuasively…

  17. Young Children. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational, cognitive, and brain research with implications for early childhood educators, including those who work with limited-English-proficient, minority, and economically disadvantaged children. "Coming to Grips with Reading Instruction at the Early Grades" (Christie L. Goodman) reports…

  18. nursingstandard.com.

    PubMed

    2016-06-22

    1 Staff nurse Sammy Christie swapped ward rounds at Swansea's Morriston Hospital for flexing her muscles to win her first bodybuilding competition. Her victory at the Physical Culture Association's Welsh Championships was all the more impressive as she only took up the sport 18 months ago. Read more tinyurl.com/bodybuilding-nurse. PMID:27332571

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Robinow syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... 4):419-22. Citation on PubMed Bunn KJ, Daniel P, Rösken HS, O'Neill AC, Cameron-Christie ... Brunoni D, Martelli L, de Andrade CE, Colin G, Otto PA. Clinical characterization of autosomal dominant and ...

  20. Papers in Syntax. Working Papers in Linguistics No. 42.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathol, Andreas, Ed.; Pollard, Carl, Ed.

    1993-01-01

    This collection of working papers in syntax includes: "Null Objects in Mandarin Chinese" (Christie Block); "Toward a Linearization-Based Approach to Word Order Variation in Japanese" (Mike Calcagno); "A Lexical Approach to Inalienable Possession Constructions in Korean" (Chung, Chan); "Chinese NP Structure" (Gao, Qian); "Linearization and…

  1. 75 FR 16700 - Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long Island Sound, Port Jefferson, NY to Captain...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulation, Swim Across the Sound, Long... Long Island Sound between Port Jefferson, NY and Captain's Cove Seaport, Bridgeport, CT due to the..., Prevention Department, USCG Sector Long Island Sound at 203-468-4459, e-mail christie.m.dixon@uscg.mil ....

  2. COASTAL BEND BAYS & ESTUARIES PROGRAM IMPLEMENTATION REVIEW 2004

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, Inc. (CBBEP) is a nonprofit 501(c)(3)organization. The CBBEP project area encompasses 12 counties coincident with the Coastal Bend Council of Governments and extends from the Land-Cut in the Laguna Madre, through the Corpus Christi Bay s...

  3. Enhanced Teacher Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Ingrid

    2013-01-01

    Teacher preparation and preparedness have been the focus of much research connecting quality teaching and learning, retention, and teacher satisfaction (Halsey, 2005; Hayes, Mills, Christie, & Lingard, 2006; MCEETYA, 2006). The successful recruitment and retention of teachers to rural and remote schools Australia-wide has been problematic for…

  4. Lifelong Learning and Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on programs that promote lifelong learning through literacy education, parent empowerment, or parent leadership training. "Adult Literacy Outreach Innovations: Porque Significa Tanto" (Christie L. Goodman) describes a Texas outreach project that focuses on raising public awareness about adult education and literacy,…

  5. Piloting Exercise Physiology in the Web-Based Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pankey, Robert B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the development of an exercise physiology class offered via the Internet at Texas A&M University Corpus Christi. Topics include cognitive evaluations, laboratory assignments, student interactions, differences in examination scores with traditional lecture classes, post-class surveys, and the need for training educators and providing…

  6. Asteroids Lightcurves at OAVdA: 2013 December - 2014 June

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carbognani, Albino

    2014-10-01

    Twelve asteroids, main-belt (MBA) and near-Earth (NEA), were observed at OAVdA from 2013 December through 2014 June: 1678 Hveen, 2834 Christy Carol, 3744 Horn-d'Arturo, 7436 Kuroiwa, (21374) 1997 WS22, (53435) 1999 VM40, (143649) 2003 QQ47, (242708) 2005 UK1, (243566) 1995 SA, (251346) 2007 SJ, 2013 XY8, and 2014 CU13.

  7. Taking Chances with Sex. Title No. 502.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeVault, Christine

    This story, one of three in The Sexuality Decision-Making Series for Teens, contains several different possible plot lines depending on the decisions the reader makes for the characters at varous "choice points." The study focuses on the theme of birth control: when Christy and David decide to have sex, they have to face the responsibilities that…

  8. The Virtual University: A Corporate Perspective on Learning at Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestoungrange, Gordon, Ed.; Sandelands, Eric, Ed.; Teare, Richard, Ed.

    2000-01-01

    Includes "The Knowledge Harvest: Ensuring You Reap What You Sow" (Christie, Sandelands); "Credit Mapping: Validating Work-Based Training Using Action Learning Outcomes" (Wills); "Customer Orientation and Motivation: The Key to Effective Learning Organisations" (Prestoungrange); "Barriers to Entry: Implications for Private Finance Initiatives in…

  9. Freshman Composition for the Learning Disabled.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gore, Robert C.

    In fall 1992, Del Mar College (DMC), in Corpus Christi, Texas, offered for the first time a college-level composition class for students clinically diagnosed as learning disabled (LD), with the rationale that if LD students were first grouped together to learn the fundamentals of college-level writing and find success among their peers, they would…

  10. The Attempt to Reform School Councils in the 1980s: A Rehearsal for the Furore That Greeted the Proposals for School Boards?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brien, Jim

    2014-01-01

    In the light of the Scottish Government's commitment to the principles enshrined in the Christie Commission and developing approaches worldwide to public administration, this article considers the forces at work and the major arguments for suggesting the need for increased and enhanced participation by parents in educational decision-making and…

  11. Teaching the Puritan Captivity Narrative: A History of the American Hero.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckley, J. F.

    How educators teach and talk about the Puritans tends to promulgate a view of them that does not exist in all their texts. From the beginning of the Puritans' arrival in 1630 in New England until Cotton Mather's 1702 publication "Magnalia Christi Americana," there are literary treatments of the idealism and the hardship constituting Puritan life…

  12. A British national observatory: the building of the New Physical Observatory at Greenwich, 1889-1898.

    PubMed

    Higgitt, Rebekah

    2014-12-01

    Over its long history, the buildings of the Royal Observatory in Greenwich were enlarged and altered many times, reflecting changing needs and expectations of astronomers and funders, but also the constraints of a limited site and small budgets. The most significant expansion took place in the late nineteenth century, overseen by the eighth Astronomer Royal, William Christie, a programme that is put in the context of changing attitudes toward scientific funding, Christie's ambitious plans for the work and staffing of the Observatory and his desire to develop a national institution that could stand with more recently founded European and American rivals. Examination of the archives reveals the range of strategies Christie was required to use to acquire consent and financial backing from the Admiralty, as well as his opportunistic approach. While hindsight might lead to criticism of his decisions, Christie eventually succeeded in completing a large building - the New Physical Observatory - that, in its decoration, celebrated Greenwich's past while, in its name, style, structure and contents, it was intended to signal the institution's modernization and future promise. PMID:25546998

  13. High Poverty, High Performing Schools. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles on high performance by poor Texas schools. In "Principal of National Blue Ribbon School Says High Poverty Schools Can Excel" (interview with Robert Zarate by Christie L. Goodman), the principal of Mary Hull Elementary School (San Antonio, Texas) describes how the high-poverty, high-minority school…

  14. ECS Prepares to Set Agenda, Find President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The ECS, like other nonprofit groups serving state officials, has faced financial difficulties in recent years, starting when states faced severe revenue shortfalls early in the decade. But its problems became public this spring when Kathy Christie, the group's No. 2 official and a 17-year ECS employee, resigned and said in a letter to the ECS…

  15. Vegetation dynamics of restored and remnant Willamette Valley, OR wet prairie wetlands

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet prairie wetlands are now one of the rarest habitat types in the Willamette Valley of Oregon, USA. Less than two percent of their historic extent remains, with most having been converted into agricultural fields (Christy and Alverson 2011, ONHP 1983). This habitat is the obl...

  16. Developing Civic Engagement in General Education Political Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huerta, Juan Carlos; Jozwiak, Joseph

    2008-01-01

    How can we promote student and civic engagement amongst our students? At Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, the political science courses in the First Year Learning Communities Program have been using the "New York Times" as a supplemental reader to increase student engagement both inside and outside the classroom. The paper will examine the…

  17. Lipid Analysis: Isolation, separation, identification and lipidomic analysis - Fourth Edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Review of book, Lipid Analysis, Isolation, separation, identification and lipidomic analysis - Fourth Edition, by W.W. Chrisitie and X. Han, 2010. William W. Christie is considered by many to be the most prominent international authority on lipid analysis. The co-author, Dr. Xianlin Han, is a pion...

  18. Meeting Individual Needs Fosters Retention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artman, Johanne I.; Gore, Robert C.

    A 1991 study of non-returning students at Del Mar College (DMC), in Corpus Christi, Texas, revealed that only 37.9% of these students were actual dropouts (i.e., had failed to accomplish their educational goals, and had no plans to take up further study). Retention studies conducted in Texas between 1985 and 1989 have shown that DMC has…

  19. DNA ARRAYS TO MONITOR GENE EXPRESSION IN RAT BLOOD AND UTERUS FOLLOWING 17-BETA-ESTRADIOL EXPOSURE: BIOMONITORING ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS USING SURROGATE TISSUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    DNA arrays to monitor gene expression in rat blood and uterus following 17-b-estradiol exposure - biomonitoring environmental effects using surrogate tissues
    John C. Rockett, Robert J. Kavlock, Christy R. Lambright, Louise G. Parks, Judith E. Schmid, Vickie S. Wilson, Carmen W...

  20. Measuring and Facilitating Vocabulary Acquisition of Basic Skills Reading Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snouffer, Nancy Kendall; And Others

    A vocabulary improvement project, comprised of three components, was initiated at Del Mar College (DMC) in Corpus Christi, Texas, in spring 1991. Component 1 consisted of a baseline study of vocabulary knowledge among students in two levels of remedial reading classes. The test instrument measured content-specific vocabulary in English/literature,…

  1. EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL PROCHLORAZ ADMINISTRATION ON MALE REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN RATS. IN VIVO ASSESSMENTS OF A FUNGICIDE WITH MULTIPLE IN VITRO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Gestational Prochloraz Administration on Male Reproductive Development in Rats. In Vivo Assessments of a Fungicide with multiple In Vitro effects.

    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson,and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.gov<...

  2. THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ: IN VITRO ANDROGEN ANTAGONISM, PARTURITION DELAYS, AND MALE REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Fungicide Prochloraz: In vitro Androgen Antagonism, Parturition Delays, and Male Reproductive Malformations in Rats.
    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.gov
    US EPA
    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imid...

  3. EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL PROCHLORAZ ADMINISTRATION ON MALE REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN RATS: IN VIVO ASSESSMENTS OF A FUNGICIDE WITH MULTIPLE IN VITRO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Gestational Prochloraz Administration on Male Reproductive Development in Rats. In Vivo Assessments of a Fungicide with multiple In Vitro effects.

    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson,and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.gov<...

  4. EFFECTS OF GESTATIONAL PROCHLORAZ ADMINISTRATION ON MALE REPRODUCTIVE DEVELOPMENT IN RATS. IN VIVO ASSESSMENTS OF A FUNGICIDE WITH MULTIPLE IN VITRO EFFECTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Gestational Prochloraz Administration on Male Reproductive Development in Rats. In Vivo Assessments of a Fungicide with multiple In Vitro effects.

    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,
    noriega.nigel@epa.go...

  5. LATE GESTATIONAL EXPOSURE TO THE FUNGICIDE PROCHLORAZ DELAYS THE ONSET OF PARTURITION AND CAUSES REPRODUCTIVE MALFORMATIONS IN MALE RAT OFFSPRING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Late gestational exposure to the fungicide prochloraz delays the onset of parturition and causes reproductive malformations in male rat offspring.
    Nigel C. Noriega, Joseph Ostby, Christy Lambright, Vickie S. Wilson, and L. Earl Gray Jr.,

    Prochloraz (PZ) is an imidazol...

  6. 77 FR 59931 - Single Source Program Expansion Supplement Award to Nurse Education, Practice, Quality and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-01

    ... Corpus Christi (TAMUCC), College of Nursing and Health Science (CONHS). SUMMARY: The Health Resources and... feasibility study, Transitioning Enlisted Health Care Training into Academic Credit for Nursing Education... training with civilian nursing program requirements. In fiscal year (FY) 2012, $178,374 will be...

  7. An REU Experience with Micro Assembly Workcell Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stapleton, William; Asiabanpour, Bahram; Jimenez, Jesus; Um, Dugan

    2010-01-01

    Under an NSF REU center grant REU-0755355 entitled "Micro/Nano Assembly Workcell Via Micro Visual Sensing and Haptic Feedback", Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and Texas State University-San Marcos collaboratively hosted two groups of 10 students from different backgrounds for 10 weeks each in Summer 2008 and 2009 respectively.…

  8. A Cross-Case Analysis of Growth Model Programs in Three States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardella, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Signed into Law on January 8, 2002, the 1,180 page No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) shifted the course of public education in America. For the first time accountability was firmly placed at the center of school operations by requiring a systematic approach to achieving reform and improving all areas of school life (Wanker & Christie, 2005). As…

  9. Popular Literature: Its Compatibility with the Basics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Dorothy, Ed.

    1983-01-01

    This special journal issue contains nine articles on the subject of using popular literature in the classroom. Subjects covered in the articles include (1) using vernacular supernatural literature to teach the skills of literary analysis, (2) teaching Agatha Christie's "Curtain," (3) pairing the classics with detective fiction, (4) using fantasy…

  10. Ariadne's Thread: Using Social Presence Indices to Distinguish Learning Events in Face-to-Face and ICT-Rich Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskin, Colin; Henderson, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Drawing on ancient Greek mythology, this article traces the learning experiences of 164 pre-service education students as they make the transition from a conventional face-to-face (f-2-f) learning environment to an Information and Communication Technology (ICT) rich setting. Influenced by Social Presence Theory (Short, Williams & Christie, 1976)…

  11. PERIPUBERTAL DI (2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE EXPOSURE INHIBITS ANDROGEN SENSITIVE TISSUE DEVELOPMENT AND DELAYS PUBERTY IN MALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    EPA Science Inventory

    PERIPUBERTAL DI (2-ETHYLHEXYL) PHTHALATE EXPOSURE INHIBITS ANDROGEN SENSITIVE TISSUE DEVELOPMENT AND DELAYS PUBERTY IN MALE SPRAGUE-DAWLEY RATS

    Nigel Noriega, Jonathan Furr, Christy Lambright, Vickie Wilson, L. Earl Gray Jr.

    The plasticizer Di (2-ethylhexyl) phtha...

  12. PHTHALATE ESTER-INDUCED GUBERNACULAR LIGAMENT LESIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH REDUCED INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT TESTIS DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate ester-induced gubernacular ligament lesions are associated with reduced Insl3 gene expression in the fetal rat testis during sexual differentiation.
    Vickie S Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Joseph Ostby, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, L.Earl Gray Jr.
    U.S. EPA,...

  13. PHTHALATE ESTER-INDUCED MALFORMATIONS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH CHANGES IN GENE EXPRESSION AND STEROID HORMONE PRODUCTION IN THE FETAL RAT TESTIS DURING SEXUAL DIFFERENTIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Phthalate ester-induced gubernacular ligament lesions are associated with reduced Insl3 gene expression in the fetal rat testis during sexual differentiation.
    Vickie S Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Joseph Ostby, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, L.Earl Gray Jr.
    U.S. EPA,...

  14. Facility fence-line monitoring using passive samplers

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2009, the U.S. EPA executed a year-long field study at a refinery in Corpus Christi, Texas, to evaluate the use of passive diffusive sampling technology for assessing time-averaged benzene concentrations at the facility fence line. The study utilized 14-day time-integrated Car...

  15. Sleep: The E-ZZZ Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergin, Christi A.; Bergin, David A.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that students who do not get enough sleep are more likely to misbehave in school and have lower academic achievement than their peers with healthy sleeping habits. In this article, Christi A. Bergin and David A. Bergin share research into students' sleep habits and conclude that helping students get adequate sleep has potential…

  16. 76 FR 34177 - Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-13

    ... made available to the public on http://dolregs.ideascale.com . Authority: E.O. 13653, 76 FR 3821, Jan. 21, 2011; E.O. 12866, 58 FR 51735, Oct. 4, 1993. Dated: June 7, 2011. e. christi cunningham... empirical evidence and data to support responses, whenever possible. The Department will consider...

  17. Proceeding of the 2014 sorghum improvement conference of north america (SICNA)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2014 Sorghum Improvement Conference of North America (SICNA 2014) meeting was held at the Texas A&M AgriLife Research and Extension Center , Agnes, Corpus Christi, TX on June 25-27, 2014. The meeting was attended by about 80 participants representing a diverse cross section of the sorghum indus...

  18. ECS Resignations Raise Questions of Fiscal Health: Leader of State Policy Group Says Problems Can Be Fixed

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Kathy Christie, senior vice president at the Education Commission of the States (ECS), resigned on May 1, 2006, saying that the Denver-based group faces a financial crisis, and that she doubts the current ECS president can fix it. By the end of the week, the accounting manager had also resigned, expressing similar concerns, and two policy analysts…

  19. It's (Not Just) the Economy, Stupid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Malik

    2010-01-01

    Just as the recession has taken a toll in other states, New Jersey state budget coffers are shriveling up as public colleges and other state-supported services are asked to do more with less. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's slashing of $173 million from public colleges and universities has drawn the ire of higher education leaders, educators and…

  20. Learning My Way. Papers from the National Conference on Adult Aboriginal Learning (Perth, Western Australia, September 1988). A Special Edition of Wikaru 16.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harvey, Barbara, Comp.; McGinty, Suzanne, Comp.

    These 31 papers dealing with adult aboriginal learning are divided into three sections. The keynote speakers' papers appear first in each section. Section 1, Learning Our Way, contains these papers: "The Invasion of Aboriginal Education" (Christie); "The Drover's Daughter" (Bedford); "Nyungar Women Returning to Education" (Bennell); "Learning…

  1. Choreographing Change One Step at a Time: Integrating Technology in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falba, Christy J.; Zehm, Stanley J.; Bean, Tom; Markos, Patricia A.; Dixon, Juli K; McKinney, Marilyn

    The papers presented as part of this symposium explore several aspects of integrating technology in teacher education. The title paper, presented by Christy J. Falba, reports on a study to investigate the process and progress of integrating technology into university level teacher education courses from the perspective of the university…

  2. Share and Share Alike: Educators Can Share Methods and Materials with Greater Ease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntire, Todd

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, Corpus Christi Independent School District (CCISD) met its Adequate Yearly Progress targets under No Child Left Behind for the third year in a row. All but one of the district's 61 schools was rated "academically acceptable" or better, and more than one quarter achieved a ranking of "recognized" or "exemplary." CCISD's excellent…

  3. The Link: Connecting Juvenile Justice and Child Welfare. Volume 3, Number 3, Summer/Fall 2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Welfare League of America (NJ-L1), 2004

    2004-01-01

    This issue of "The Link" newsletter contains the following articles: (1) "Youth in Foster Care Who Commit Delinquent Acts: Study Findings and Recommendations" (Leslee Morris); (2) "Director's Message" (Christy Sharp); (3) "Juvenile Justice News and Resources"; (4) "The Nurse-Family Partnership: Pennsylvania's Investment in Families (Ruth R.…

  4. Don Hammill: A Personal Perspective on the Field of Learning Disabilities, 3-Tier, and RTI

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intervention in School and Clinic, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Don D. Hammill received all of his formal education in Texas schools, culminating in a doctorate in educational psychology-special education from the University of Texas at Austin in 1963. He had previously served as a teacher in the Corpus Christi (Texas) public schools and as a speech and language therapist in the Deer Park (Texas) public…

  5. Verde plant bug (Hemiptera: Miridae) feeding injury to cotton bolls charcterized by boll age, size and damage ratings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our studies over 2 years (2009 and 2010) and 2 locations (Weslaco and Corpus Christi, TX) investigated the relationship of feeding-injury of the verde plant bug, Creontiades signatus Distant, to a range of cotton boll age classes further defined by boll diameter and accumulated degree-days (anthesis...

  6. The Gates' Foundation and the Future of U.S. Public Education: A Call for Scholars to Counter Misinformation Campaigns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kovacs, Philip E.; Christie, H. K.

    2008-01-01

    Int his essay, the authors identify and problematize the claims and activities of four think tanks supported by contributions from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Kovacs and Christie attempt to show that these contributions support scholars and research of dubious quality, engage in political science abuse, and perpetuate discourses and…

  7. Beyond Learning to Canoe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, Dale

    2007-01-01

    Franki Lodge and her coworkers help run Toronto's Inner City Outtripping Centre (ICOC), an outdoor education program aimed at innercity youth. Started in 1995 to reduce conflict between rival gangs in Christie Pits Park, the organization has since grown to include the Paddle and Picnic program (day camps where kids, teens and even seniors canoe up…

  8. 77 FR 48586 - Notice of Final Federal Agency Actions on United States Highway 77

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Corpus Christi, Texas to US 83 in Harlingen, Texas. Those actions grant licenses, permits, and approvals..., Room 826, Austin, Texas 78701; telephone: (512) 536-5960; email: gregory.punske@dot.gov . The FHWA Texas Division Office's normal business hours are 7:45 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. (central time) Monday...

  9. 77 FR 71497 - Standard Instrument Approach Procedures, and Takeoff Minimums and Obstacle Departure Procedures...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-03

    ... rule '' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,1979); and (3)does not..., Orig Kingston, NY, Kingston-Ulster, VOR OR GPS-A, Amdt 1A, CANCELED Rome, NY, Griffiss Intl, ILS OR LOC RWY 33, Amdt 2 Rome, NY, Griffiss Intl, RNAV (GPS) RWY 33, Amdt 2 Corpus Christi, TX, Corpus...

  10. Tax Breaks for Parents of Private School Students: Who Favors Them and Who Would Take Advantage of Them?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bezdek, Robert; Cross, Ray

    1983-01-01

    A sample of Corpus Christi, Texas, citizens were interviewed for their views on granting income tax breaks to parents of private school students. Results indicate that, while low-income Hispanics are most in favor of the tax breaks, upper income Anglos are most likely to take advantage of them. (KH)

  11. Q & A with Ed Tech Leaders: Interview with Bryant Griffith

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaughnessy, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Bryant Griffith is a Regents Professor at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi and Director of the Curriculum and Instruction Doctoral Program. Previously, he was Professor and Director of the School of Education at Acadia University, and Professor and Associate Dean at the University of Calgary. His research interests include situated…

  12. MALFORMATIONS IN GUBERNACULAR LIGAMENT DEVELOPMENT INDUCED BY DEHP, DBP, AND BBP ARE ASSOCIATED WITH DECREASES IN INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN THE FETAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Malformations in gubernacular ligament development induced by DEHP, DBP, and BBP are associated with decreases in insl3 gene expression in the fetal rat testis.
    Vickie S.Wilson, Christy Lambright, Johnathan Furr, Carmen Wood, Gary Held, L. Earl Gray Jr. U.S. EPA, ORD, NHEER...

  13. 76 FR 29257 - Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a Commercial Gauger and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of Inspectorate America Corporation... Homeland Security. ACTION: Notice of accreditation and approval of Inspectorate America Corporation, as a... 151.13, Inspectorate America Corporation, 4717 Santa Elena, Corpus Christi, TX 78405, has...

  14. 75 FR 13770 - Accreditation and Approval of SGS North America, Inc., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-23

    ... SECURITY Customs and Border Protection Accreditation and Approval of SGS North America, Inc., as a.... ACTION: Notice of accreditation and approval of SGS North America, Inc., as a commercial gauger and... America, Inc., 925 Corn Product Road, Corpus Christi, TX 78409, has been approved to gauge and...

  15. DNA fingerprinting in anthropological genetics: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Michael H; Beaty, Kristine G

    2013-01-01

    In 1985, Sir Alec Jeffreys developed the variable-number tandem repeat method used to identify individuals and giving researchers the first DNA fingerprints. These initial methods were used in anthropological genetics, a field that uses a comparative approach to answer questions about human history, including the discernment of the origin of Native American populations and the discrimination of clan affiliation from individuals in Siberia. The technological and methodological advances since this time have led to the use of many more markers, including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Y chromosomal and autosomal short tandem repeats, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and direct sequencing not only to identify individuals, but to examine frequencies and distributions of markers (or "prints") of entire populations. In the field of anthropological genetics these markers have been used to reconstruct evolutionary history and answer questions concerning human origins and diaspora, migration, and the effects of admixture and adaptation to different environments, as well as susceptibility and resistance to disease. This review discusses the evolution of DNA markers since their application by Sir Alec Jeffreys and their applications in anthropological genetics. PMID:24245746

  16. DNA fingerprinting in anthropological genetics: past, present, future

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In 1985, Sir Alec Jeffreys developed the variable-number tandem repeat method used to identify individuals and giving researchers the first DNA fingerprints. These initial methods were used in anthropological genetics, a field that uses a comparative approach to answer questions about human history, including the discernment of the origin of Native American populations and the discrimination of clan affiliation from individuals in Siberia. The technological and methodological advances since this time have led to the use of many more markers, including restriction fragment length polymorphisms, Y chromosomal and autosomal short tandem repeats, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and direct sequencing not only to identify individuals, but to examine frequencies and distributions of markers (or “prints”) of entire populations. In the field of anthropological genetics these markers have been used to reconstruct evolutionary history and answer questions concerning human origins and diaspora, migration, and the effects of admixture and adaptation to different environments, as well as susceptibility and resistance to disease. This review discusses the evolution of DNA markers since their application by Sir Alec Jeffreys and their applications in anthropological genetics. PMID:24245746

  17. DNA fingerprinting in zoology: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Geoffrey K; Curtis, Caitlin; Millar, Craig D; Huynen, Leon; Lambert, David M

    2014-01-01

    In 1962, Thomas Kuhn famously argued that the progress of scientific knowledge results from periodic 'paradigm shifts' during a period of crisis in which new ideas dramatically change the status quo. Although this is generally true, Alec Jeffreys' identification of hypervariable repeat motifs in the human beta-globin gene, and the subsequent development of a technology known now as 'DNA fingerprinting', also resulted in a dramatic shift in the life sciences, particularly in ecology, evolutionary biology, and forensics. The variation Jeffreys recognized has been used to identify individuals from tissue samples of not just humans, but also of many animal species. In addition, the technology has been used to determine the sex of individuals, as well as paternity/maternity and close kinship. We review a broad range of such studies involving a wide diversity of animal species. For individual researchers, Jeffreys' invention resulted in many ecologists and evolutionary biologists being given the opportunity to develop skills in molecular biology to augment their whole organism focus. Few developments in science, even among the subsequent genome discoveries of the 21st century, have the same wide-reaching significance. Even the later development of PCR-based genotyping of individuals using microsatellite repeats sequences, and their use in determining multiple paternity, is conceptually rooted in Alec Jeffreys' pioneering work. PMID:24490906

  18. DNA fingerprinting in zoology: past, present, future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In 1962, Thomas Kuhn famously argued that the progress of scientific knowledge results from periodic ‘paradigm shifts’ during a period of crisis in which new ideas dramatically change the status quo. Although this is generally true, Alec Jeffreys’ identification of hypervariable repeat motifs in the human beta-globin gene, and the subsequent development of a technology known now as ‘DNA fingerprinting’, also resulted in a dramatic shift in the life sciences, particularly in ecology, evolutionary biology, and forensics. The variation Jeffreys recognized has been used to identify individuals from tissue samples of not just humans, but also of many animal species. In addition, the technology has been used to determine the sex of individuals, as well as paternity/maternity and close kinship. We review a broad range of such studies involving a wide diversity of animal species. For individual researchers, Jeffreys’ invention resulted in many ecologists and evolutionary biologists being given the opportunity to develop skills in molecular biology to augment their whole organism focus. Few developments in science, even among the subsequent genome discoveries of the 21st century, have the same wide-reaching significance. Even the later development of PCR-based genotyping of individuals using microsatellite repeats sequences, and their use in determining multiple paternity, is conceptually rooted in Alec Jeffreys’ pioneering work. PMID:24490906

  19. Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study [Julian, et al., 2003; Julian, et al., 2004] comparing data from 1996 and 2003 found significant variations in the ratio of the seismic wave-speeds, Vp/Vs, at shallow depths over this time interval. This report describes results of a more detailed study of each year from 1996 through 2004.

  20. Digital Archiving: Where the Past Lives Again

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxson, K. B.

    2012-06-01

    The process of digital archiving for variable star data by manual entry with an Excel spreadsheet is described. Excel-based tools including a Step Magnitude Calculator and a Julian Date Calculator for variable star observations where magnitudes and Julian dates have not been reduced are presented. Variable star data in the literature and the AAVSO International Database prior to 1911 are presented and reviewed, with recent archiving work being highlighted. Digitization using optical character recognition software conversion is also demonstrated, with editing and formatting suggestions for the OCR-converted text.

  1. Cracking the MJO nut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chidong; Gottschalck, Jon; Maloney, Eric D.; Moncrieff, Mitchell W.; Vitart, Frederic; Waliser, Duane E.; Wang, Bin; Wheeler, Matthew C.

    2013-03-01

    The Madden-Julian oscillation poses great challenges to our understanding and prediction of tropical convection and the large-scale circulation. Several internationally coordinated activities were recently formed to meet the challenges from the perspectives of numerical simulations, prediction, diagnostics, and virtual and actual field campaigns. This article provides a brief description of these activities and their connections, with the motivation in part to encourage the next generation of physical scientists to help solve the grand challenging problem of the Madden-Julian oscillation.

  2. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67–73 and Nature 1985, 316:76–79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined “Fingerprint News” was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on “DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications”. Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting (“the past”) was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as “DNA fingerprinting in the present”, and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA

  3. DNA fingerprinting in botany: past, present, future.

    PubMed

    Nybom, Hilde; Weising, Kurt; Rotter, Björn

    2014-01-01

    Almost three decades ago Alec Jeffreys published his seminal Nature papers on the use of minisatellite probes for DNA fingerprinting of humans (Jeffreys and colleagues Nature 1985, 314:67-73 and Nature 1985, 316:76-79). The new technology was soon adopted for many other organisms including plants, and when Hilde Nybom, Kurt Weising and Alec Jeffreys first met at the very First International Conference on DNA Fingerprinting in Berne, Switzerland, in 1990, everybody was enthusiastic about the novel method that allowed us for the first time to discriminate between humans, animals, plants and fungi on the individual level using DNA markers. A newsletter coined "Fingerprint News" was launched, T-shirts were sold, and the proceedings of the Berne conference filled a first book on "DNA fingerprinting: approaches and applications". Four more conferences were about to follow, one on each continent, and Alec Jeffreys of course was invited to all of them. Since these early days, methodologies have undergone a rapid evolution and diversification. A multitude of techniques have been developed, optimized, and eventually abandoned when novel and more efficient and/or more reliable methods appeared. Despite some overlap between the lifetimes of the different technologies, three phases can be defined that coincide with major technological advances. Whereas the first phase of DNA fingerprinting ("the past") was dominated by restriction fragment analysis in conjunction with Southern blot hybridization, the advent of the PCR in the late 1980s gave way to the development of PCR-based single- or multi-locus profiling techniques in the second phase. Given that many routine applications of plant DNA fingerprinting still rely on PCR-based markers, we here refer to these methods as "DNA fingerprinting in the present", and include numerous examples in the present review. The beginning of the third phase actually dates back to 2005, when several novel, highly parallel DNA sequencing

  4. Student experimenter stands near middeck lockers in JSC Bldg 9A mockup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Student experimenter Constantine Costes, STS-42 Commander Ronald J. Grabe, STS-42 Mission Specialist (MS) William F. Readdy, and Integration Engineer Neal Christie discuss Coates' student experiment 83-02 (SE 83-02) entitled 'Zero-G Capillary Rise of Liquid through Granular Porous Media' in JSC Mockup and Integration Laboratory Bldg 9A Full Fuselage Trainer (FFT). On FFT middeck, Costes stands behind Readdy (kneeling) as Christie demonstrates experiment setup and Grabe looks on (47326). The team also examines experiment components at middeck stowage locker (47323) and at FFT open side hatch (47324, 47325). The experiment is designed to investigate the capillary and forced flow characteristics of blue-tinted water in three glass tubes with three sizes of glass beads. SE 83-02 is scheduled to be flown on STS-42 aboard Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  5. RR Lyrae stars - A theoretical study of Bailey type c variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubickyj, Olenka; Stothers, Richard B.

    1986-01-01

    New theoretical models of stars pulsating in the first overtone have been constructed to simulate RR Lyr variables of Bailey type c. Despite the use of different opacities, these new models agree very well with earlier models built by Christy and Stellingwerf. Quantitative comparisons using empirical light curves and velocity curves of metal-poor type c variables confirm the validity of the models. Masses of 0.55-0.65 solar mass and luminosities of 40-50 solar luminosities derived here for the type c variables, are consistent with previous results obtained for type ab variables. A Christy echo of the kind normally associated with fundamental-mode pulsators was detected in the interior velocity structure of one first-overtone model that happens to have a large velocity amplitude.

  6. A triumphant debut.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Thelma

    Nurse Christie Watson won the prestigious Costa first novel award for her book Tiny Sunbirds Far Away last month. In it she tells the story of a 12-year-old girl in Nigeria who trains to be a traditional midwife. Here, Ms Watson explains that nursing and writing are complementary careers, as both require resilience, hard work and an understanding of humanity. PMID:22413682

  7. Dr. John Stack and other NASA Langley Research Center Visitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Front Row, left to right: Mrs. Elsa Hoare and Major Philip L. Teed - staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England: Dr. Barnes Wallis - Chief of Aeronautical Research, Vicers-Armstrong, Ltd., Weybridge, England. Back Row, left to right: Norman W. Boorer and Cecil W. Hayes - Staff members, Vickers-Armstrongs, Ltd., Weybridge, England; John R. Christie - Ministry of Supply, London, England; Philip A. Hufton - Chief Supt., Royal Aircraft Establishment, Bedford, England; Lindsey I. Turner, Jr. - Langley Research Center. Photographed November 13, 1958.

  8. Deposition of zinc and cadmium by marine bacteria in estuarine sediments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLerran, C.J.; Holmes, Charles W.

    1974-01-01

    Mixed cultures of marine bacteria isolated from the sediments of Corpus Christi Harbor were examined for their ability to assimilate or precipitate radioactive zinc and cadmium from solution. Test data indicate that during summer, when bacterial activity is at a maximum, the bacteria and their metabolic byproducts play a significant role in the removal of zinc and cadmium from seawater and their subsequent deposition in marine sediments.

  9. 76 FR 55082 - Re-Accreditation and Re-Approval Intertek Testing Services as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-06

    ...Notice is hereby given that, pursuant to 19 CFR 151.12 and 151.13, Intertek Testing Services/Caleb Brett, Corpus Christi, Texas 78406, has been re-approved to gauge petroleum and petroleum products, organic chemicals and vegetable oils, and to test petroleum and petroleum products for customs purposes, in accordance with the provisions of 19 CFR 151.12 and 151.13. Anyone wishing to employ this......

  10. Securing the Future of Seversk and Zheleznogorsk After Reactor Shutdown. Conference Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hund, Gretchen; Stein, Steven L.

    2005-01-31

    Seversk and Zheleznogorsk, two Russian closed nuclear cities, are home to the last three operating plutonium production reactors in Russia. The reactors are now scheduled for shutdown. Closing these reactors presents the world community with a significant nonproliferation achievement, but at the same time poses environmental, economic, and security challenges for the local communities. This conference is an opportunity for the international community to provide crucial support to facilitate these aspects of the plutonium reactor shutdown. Projects proposed complement the reactor shutdown process or assist with worker transition from plutonium production to nonweapons-related careers. Switzerland graciously offered to host the conference with the participation of both the Federal Atomic Energy Agency, Russian Federation and the United States Department of Energy. The one-and-a-half day event was held in Spiez, Switzerland, 8-9 February 2005. Dr. Alec Baer of Switzerland moderated the conference.

  11. Working Papers in Educational Linguistics, Volume 11, Number 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nabors, Leslie K., Ed.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Five papers on applied linguistics in educational contexts are presented. "What Can Second Language Learners Learn from Each Other? Only Their Researcher Knows for Sure" (Teresa Pica, Felicia Lincoln-Porter, Diana Paninos, Julian Linnell) presents further research on interaction and negotiation among language learners. "Collaborative Effort…

  12. 75 FR 9563 - Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement; Safeguarding Unclassified Information (DFARS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-03

    ... Defense Acquisition Regulations System 48 CFR Parts 204 and 252 Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation... Regulations System, Department of Defense (DoD). ACTION: Advance notice of proposed rulemaking (ANPR) and... Regulations System, Attn: Mr. Julian Thrash, OUSD (AT&L) DPAP (DARS), 3060 Defense Pentagon, Room...

  13. The Duke University Talent Identification Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putallaz, Martha; Baldwin, Joy; Selph, Hollace

    2005-01-01

    The Duke University Talent Identification Program (Duke TIP) holds the distinguished position of being the first "transplant" of the Center for Talented Youth (CTY) regional talent search model developed by Professor Julian Stanley at Johns Hopkins University. Duke TIP was established in 1980, one year after CTY officially began. This article…

  14. The sources of Schwinger's Green's functions

    PubMed Central

    Schweber, Silvan S.

    2005-01-01

    Julian Schwinger's development of his Green's functions methods in quantum field theory is placed in historical context. The relation of Schwinger's quantum action principle to Richard Feynman's path-integral formulation of quantum mechanics is reviewed. The nonperturbative character of Schwinger's approach is stressed as well as the ease with which it can be extended to finite temperature situations. PMID:15930139

  15. Young Workers: Varieties of Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barling, Julian, Ed.; Kelloway, E. Kevin, Ed.

    This book contains nine papers devoted to the psychological experience of youth employment and its role in shaping future employment experiences and expectations. "Introduction" (Julian Barling, E. Kevin Kelloway) emphasizes the diversity of young people as a group and the diversity of individual youth's employment experience. "The Nature of Youth…

  16. Career Vitalization and Stress among Professors: An Attributional Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bumpus, J. Frank

    A model that conceptualizes career stress for faculty members and that suggests options for enhancing career vitality is considered. The model draws upon attribution theory, the locus of control in work of Julian Rotter and the literature of depression by Martin E. P. Seligman. It suggests that perceived causes, or attributions, are directly…

  17. Papers and Studies in Contrastive Linguistics. Volume Twenty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisiak, Jacek, Ed.

    Papers on contrastive linguistics in this volume include: "Contrastive Discourse Analysis in Language Usage" (Juliane House); "Typology and Contrastive Analysis" (Vlasta Strakova); "On the Tenability of the Notion 'Pragmatic Equivalence' in Contrastive Analysis" (Karol Janicki); "On the Relevance of Phonetic, Phonological, and Morphological Levels…

  18. Eventos de Agosto (August Events).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toro, Leonor; Pla, Myrna

    Written in Spanish, this booklet contains brief information on seven August events celebrated by Puerto Ricans: Herbert Hoover's birthdate (August 10); Acta del Seguro Social (Social Security Act, August 14); Julian E. Blanco (August 14), Enmienda 19 Sufragia de la Mujer (Amendment 19, Women's Suffrage, August 26); Benjamin Harrison (August 20);…

  19. Conference Highlights of the National Energy Education, Business and Labor Conference (Washington, D.C., January 15-17, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    Included in this document are texts of speeches given at the conference. The speakers whose remarks appear are: (1) John F. O'Leary, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy; (2) Cecil D. Andrus, Secretary of Interior; (3) Julian M. Carroll, Governor of Kentucky; (4) Arnold Packer, Assistant Secretary, Department of Labor; and (5) James…

  20. Education for the Gifted: Patterns for the Future. Proceedings, Annual Summer Conference (4th, Eugene, Oregon, July 25-27, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon Univ., Eugene. Coll. of Education.

    This collection consists of 11 conference papers on issues pertaining to education of talented and gifted children; 6 are from "general interest" sessions and 5 are from "special interest" sessions. The general interest papers are primarily theoretical in focus. Titles include: Julian C. Stanley's "Finding Intellectually Talented Youths and…

  1. The Center for Talent Development at Northwestern University: An Example of Replication and Reformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2005-01-01

    This article describes implementation of the talent search model developed by Julian Stanley at the Center for Talent Development of Northwestern University. While remaining true to the basic components of the talent search, the talent center at Northwestern has emphasized using talent search as a means to influence programming in local schools…

  2. Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Management process invaded Ames as the Center shifted from NACA to NASA oversight. Ames constructed a review room in its headquarters building where, in the graphical style that prevailed in the 1960's, Ames leadership could review progress against schedule, budget and performance measures. Shown, in October 1965 is Merrill Mead chief of Ames' program and resources office. (for H Julian Allen Retirement album)

  3. A National Picture of Talent Search and Talent Search Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon-Young; Matthews, Michael S.; Olszewski-Kubilius, Paula

    2008-01-01

    This article presents a comprehensive portrait of talent search testing and associated educational programs in the United States, now some 35 years after Dr. Julian Stanley originated the concept. Survey data from the six major talent search centers in the United States were used to examine the scope of talent search educational offerings,…

  4. Radical Hope and Teaching: Learning Political Agency from the Politically Disenfranchised

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgoose, Julian

    2009-01-01

    If teaching is a political act, how can teachers hope to make a difference through their work? In this review essay, Julian Edgoose explores this question of hope in relation to three recent books: David Halpin's "Hope and Education," Jonathan Kozol's "Letters to a Young Teacher," and Jonathan Lear's "Radical Hope." Halpin describes how hope comes…

  5. Whatever Happened to School Camping? An Occasional Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, George W.; Donaldson, Louise E.

    1982-01-01

    School camping began with three movements in American society: children's camping, which has been traced back as far as 1823; the Nature Study Movement, which is thought to have begun as early as 1839; and the holistic "new education." In 1940, L. B. Sharp opened National Camp in New Jersey and Julian W. Smith initiated the Clear Lake camp near…

  6. Marking Time: Using Music to Create Inclusive Religious Education and Inclusive Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, Julian

    2004-01-01

    Religious education (RE) is a vital subject in the inclusion of pupils and staff alike, as it brings together ways of life and communities, the personal and the social. Based on the philosophy of community of John Macmurray, and the philosophy of dialogue of Martin Buber, Julian Stern investigates ways of marking time, understanding and…

  7. Il Calcolo della Pasqua: Vittorio d'Aquitania Dionigi il Piccolo e Abbone di Fleury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2014-05-01

    The Easter calculus is a story of ephemerides approximations, with appropriate algorithms, as well as the reformations of the calendar dealed with tropical year's approximations. The calculus made by Victorius of Aquitania, Dyonisius Exiguus and Abbo of Fleury, based on 532 years Easter period in Julian calendar are discussed, including the corrections ad hoc of the algorithms, like the saltus lunae.

  8. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE DINING ROOM LOOKING TOWARD THE SCREEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE DINING ROOM LOOKING TOWARD THE SCREEN PORCH SHOWING THE DOUBLE SLIDING DOORS WITH SIDE LIGHTS. NOTE THE TYPICAL VINYL SHUTTERS ON THE INTERIOR OF THE WINDOW. VIEW FACING SOUTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type E, 301 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  9. INTERIOR VIEW OF DINING ROOM WITH PANTRY ON THE RIGHT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF DINING ROOM WITH PANTRY ON THE RIGHT. NOTE THE TONGUE-AND-GROOVE WOOD FLOORING, PAIRED SLINGING DOORS TO THE LANAI, AND TELEPHONE NICHE IN THE BEDROOM HALL (LEFT BACKGROUND). VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type B, 704 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  10. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ENTRY HALL AND STAIRS TO SECOND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ENTRY HALL AND STAIRS TO SECOND FLOOR. TAKEN FROM THE DINING ROOM. NOTE THE TONGUE-AND-GROOVE WOOD FLOORING AND THE TELEPHONE NICHE. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type L, 702 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  11. The Illusion of Inclusion: A Critical Race Theory Textual Analysis of Race and Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heilig, Julian Vasquez; Brown, Keffrelyn D.; Brown, Anthony L.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, Julian Vasquez Heilig, Keffrelyn Brown, and Anthony Brown offer findings from a close textual analysis of how the Texas social studies standards address race, racism, and communities of color. Using the lens of critical race theory, the authors uncover the sometimes subtle ways that the standards can appear to adequately address…

  12. Everything but the Kitchen Sink: An Exploration of Significant Events.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Dianne

    2000-01-01

    Describes an art activity in which elementary students create collages similar to those of Julian Schnabel, learning to appreciate his work's meaning. Students select a symbol to represent an event or experience in their lives. Collages are created with acrylic paint and broken plates. (CMK)

  13. The Talent Search Model of Gifted Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assouline, Susan G.; Lupkowski-Shoplik, Ann

    2012-01-01

    The Talent Search model, founded at Johns Hopkins University by Dr. Julian C. Stanley, is fundamentally an above-level testing program. This simplistic description belies the enduring impact that the Talent Search model has had on the lives of hundreds of thousands of gifted students as well as their parents and teachers. In this article, we…

  14. Faculty Accountability for Culturally Inclusive Pedagogy and Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quaye, Stephen John; Harper, Shaun R.

    2007-01-01

    The authors' goal is to personalize some concerns of diverse student populations and encourage faculty to intentionally incorporate cultural inclusion into their pedagogy and their courses. Here, they share Julian's story, which is a composite of perspectives shared by the 219 participants in the National Black Male College Achievement Study, many…

  15. 2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Early Space Exploration Conference Center at the KSC Visitor Complex, Dr. Julian M. Earls (left), deputy director for Operations, Glenn Research Center, receives a plaque from astronaut Joan Higginbotham (right) during the 2000 African American History Month Celebration Luncheon. Dr. Earls was guest speaker at the luncheon.

  16. Learning at Not-School: A Review of Study, Theory, and Advocacy for Education in Non-Formal Settings. The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Reports on Digital Media and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sefton-Green, Julian

    2013-01-01

    Schools do not define education, and they are not the only institutions in which learning takes place. After-school programs, music lessons, Scouts, summer camps, on-the-job training, and home activities all offer out-of-school educational experiences. In "Learning at Not-School," Julian Sefton-Green explores studies and scholarly research on…

  17. Profiles of Influence in Gifted Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karnes, Frances A., Ed.; Nugent, Stephanie A., Ed.

    2004-01-01

    This book, written to coincide with the 50th Anniversary the National Association for Gifted Children, recognizes many of the most prominent contributors to the field of gifted education over the past century. Those included are pioneers such as Lewis M. Terman and Leta S. Hollingworth, Julian Stanley, and Paul Torrance, through to more…

  18. Symptoms, Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Lupus | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... box NIH Accelerating Medicines Partnership www.nih.gov/science/amp/index.htm Lupus Foundation of America (LFA) and Julian Lennon www.lupus.org www.lupus.org/lennon American College of Rheumatology www.rheumatology.org Alliance for Lupus Research, Inc www.lupusresearch.org Lupus ...

  19. Drawing entitled "Planting Plan Pine Hills, Gd. Sta. U.S. Department ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Drawing entitled "Planting Plan Pine Hills, Gd. Sta. U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Region 5. L. Glenn Hall, landscape engineer. 11-5-35. - Pine Hills Station, Barracks, West Side of Boulder Creek Road at Engineers Road, Julian, San Diego County, CA

  20. Embodied Spirituality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trousdale, Ann

    2013-01-01

    This article explores the concept of embodied spirituality from early Celtic traditions through the British medieval mystic Julian of Norwich to the present day. A "high theology" of the body in early Christianity and early Christian understandings of the relation among body, soul and spirit gave way to the influences of Greek thought with its…

  1. Reflecting Visions. New Perspectives on Adult Education for Indigenous Peoples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Linda, Ed.

    This book contains 14 papers: "Indigenous Peoples and Adult Education: A Growing Challenge" (Rodolfo Stavenhagen); "Indigenous Peoples: Progress in the International Recognition of Human Rights and the Role of Education" (Julian Burger); "Adult Learning in the Context of Indigenous Societies" (Linda King); "Linguistic Rights and the Role of…

  2. IFLA General Conference, 1987. Division of Special Libraries. Art Libraries Section. Round Table on Audiovisual Media. Administrative Libraries Section. Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations, The Hague (Netherlands).

    Seven of the 13 papers in this collection discuss art libraries; the remaining six papers are concerned with administrative and special libraries. The papers from the Section of Art Libraries appear first in this list: (1) "SCOAD (Standing Committee on Art Documentation): Its Inception and Aims" (Julian Gardner, United Kingdom); (2) "The Pictorial…

  3. JALT96 Introduction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1997

    The introductory section of the conference proceedings contains two essays. "Crossing Borders: Some Values To Declare" (Julian Edge) is a personal statement about cultural diversity, offering personal perspectives as a teacher of English as a Second Language and the perspectives of several colleagues of different cultural backgrounds and…

  4. Knaves or Knights, Pawns or Queens?: An Evaluation of Australian Higher Education Reform Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dollery, Brian; Murray, David; Crase, Lin

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To invoke Julian Le Grand's conceptual model of the interaction between human motivation and policy formulation in order to explain how motivational endogeneity in the university environment has distorted policy outcomes in the Australian higher education reform program. Design/methodology/approach: Le Grand contends that changes in the…

  5. DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES

    EPA Science Inventory

    26th Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture
    DEVELOPING MECHANISTIC DATA FOR INCORPORATION INTO CANCER AND
    GENETIC RISK ASSESSMENTS: OLD PROBLEMS AND NEW APPROACHES
    R. Julian Preston, Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection
    Agency, NHEERL, Research Tr...

  6. BYSTANDER EFFECTS GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIAION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    BYSTANDER EFFECTS, GENOMIC INSTABILITY, ADAPTIVE RESPONSE AND CANCER RISK ASSESSMENT FOR RADIATION AND CHEMICAL EXPOSURES

    R. Julian Preston
    Environmental Carcinogenesis Division, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, N.C. 27711, USA

    There ...

  7. Action Research. Case Studies in TESOL Practice Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edge, Julian, Ed.

    Chapter titles in this book include the following: "Attitude and Access: Building a New Teaching/Learning Community in TESOL" (Julian Edge); "Here It Is, Rough Though It May Be: Basic Computer for ESL" (Alison Perkins); "An 'It's Not Action Research Yet, but I'm Getting There' Approach to Teaching Writing" (Neil Cowie); "Early Reflections:…

  8. VizieR Online Data Catalog: BVR polarimetry of HD 48099 (Berdyugin+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berdyugin, A.; Piirola, V.; Sadegi, S.; Tsygankov, S.; Sakanoi, T.; Kagitani, M.; Yoneda, M.; Okano, S.; Poutanen, J.

    2016-05-01

    Normalized Stokes parameters of linear polarization (q, u) measured in the B, V and R pass-bands are presented with their errors. For each measurement the heliocentric Julian date, phase of the orbital period at the time of the observation and the name of the telescope are given. (1 data file).

  9. Knaves, Knights or Networks: Which Assumption of Lecturer and Manager Motivation Should Underlie Further Education Policy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boocock, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Julian Le Grand, a well-known economist, identifies two types of public sector employee: knights (with altruistic motives) and knaves (with self-interested motives). He argues that the quasi-market, predicated on the assumption of knavish behaviour (or agent self-interest), is the most effective way of directing school managers and teachers…

  10. Examining Guidelines for Developing Accurate Proficiency Level Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ercikan, Kadriye

    2006-01-01

    One attempt to make scores from large-scale assessments more interpretable has been to provide proficiency level scores to describe the meaning of student performance on tests. This study has examined the accuracy of Ercikan and Julian's (2002) guidelines for developing proficiency level scores and the classification accuracy of proficiency level…

  11. Anamorphic Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2006-01-01

    During the 17th century, Baroque decoration used anamorphism to combine actual architectural elements with illusionistic painting. When viewed from a particular point in space, the architecture blends with painting to form a combined image. In this article, Julian Beever, a leading anamorphic pavement artist, explains to the author the principles…

  12. 78 FR 57645 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ..., PA of Supervisors, 16403. 29393 Miller Station Road, Cambridge Springs, PA 16403. Texas: Bexar City... Castro, Public Works, www.msc.fema.gov/ 3120P). Mayor, City of Storm Water lomc. San Antonio, Engineering...- Julian Castro, Public Works, www.msc.fema.gov/ 0091P). Mayor, City of Storm Water lomc. San...

  13. The Birch Street Irregulars: mysteries found and resolved in the AAVSO data archives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Sara J.; Saladyga, Michael; Mattei, Janet A.

    As they evaluate AAVSO data, AAVSO technical staff members run across several kinds of errors. This paper takes a humorous and Sherlock Holmes-style look at some of the most common kinds of errors detected, from observers recording the wrong Julian Date, misidentifying stars, transposing entries on the observer form, to garden-variety data entry errors.

  14. INTERIOR VIEW OF SECOND FLOOR STAIR HALL. SHOWING THE IRON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF SECOND FLOOR STAIR HALL. SHOWING THE IRON STAIR RAILS AND NEWEL POSTS WITH INCISED LINES. NOTE THE TONGUE-AND-GROOVE WOOD FLOORING. VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, Officers' Housing Type L, 702 Julian Avenue, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  15. Hunting and Outdoor Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Bruce E.

    1991-01-01

    This article addresses the controversy over including hunting as a part of outdoor education. Historically, figures such as Julian Smith, of the Outdoor Education Project of the 1950's, advocated hunting as a critical element of educating children and youth about care and protection of natural resources. Henry David Thoreau saw hunting experiences…

  16. Africana Acquisitions; Report of a Publication Survey Trip to Nigeria, Southern Africa, and Europe, 1972.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witherell, Julian W.

    A publication survey trip to Nigeria, Southern Africa, and Europe was taken by Julian W. Witherell of the African Section of the Library of Congress in 1972. The purpose of the trip was to improve the flow of publications about Africa to the Library of Congress. The trip was successful in that personal contacts helpful in obtaining local materials…

  17. Black Achievers in Science, Teachers Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago, IL.

    In this guide, 16 historical and contemporary black scientists and engineers are highlighted as role models. Four scientists are represented in each of four technical fields: life sciences (Ernest E. Just; Harvey M. Pickrum; George W. Carver; Patricia S. Cowings); physical science (George R. Carruthers; Percy L. Julian; Walter E. Massey; Warren M.…

  18. Biological and environmental influences on parturition date and birth mass of a seasonal breeder.

    PubMed

    Wolcott, Daniel M; Reitz, Ryan L; Weckerly, Floyd W

    2015-01-01

    Natal features (e.g. Julian birth date and birth mass) often have fitness consequences and can be influenced by endogenous responses by the mother to seasonal fluctuations in nutritional quality and photoperiodic cues. We sought to further understand the biological and environmental factors that influence the natal features of a polytocous species in an environment with constant nutritional resources and limited seasonal variation. During a 36-year study we assessed the influence of biological factors (maternal age and litter type [i.e., litter size and sexual composition]) and environmental factors (total precipitation and mean maximum temperature during months encompassing conception, the last trimester of gestation, and the entire length of gestation) on Julian birth date and birth mass using linear-mixed effects models. Linear and quadratic functions of maternal age influenced both natal features with earliest Julian birth dates and heaviest birth masses occurring at prime-age and older individuals, which ranged from 5-9 years of age. Litter type influenced Julian birth date and birth mass. Interestingly, environmental factors affected Julian birth date and birth mass even though mothers were continuously allowed access to a high-quality diet. Random effects revealed considerable variation among mothers and years. This study demonstrates that, in long-lived polytocous species, environmental factors may have a greater influence on natal features than previously supposed and the influence from biological factors is also complex. The documented responses to environmental influences provide unique insights into how mammalian seasonal reproductive dynamics may respond to current changes in climate. PMID:25885545

  19. Biological and Environmental Influences on Parturition Date and Birth Mass of a Seasonal Breeder

    PubMed Central

    Wolcott, Daniel M.; Reitz, Ryan L.; Weckerly, Floyd W.

    2015-01-01

    Natal features (e.g. Julian birth date and birth mass) often have fitness consequences and can be influenced by endogenous responses by the mother to seasonal fluctuations in nutritional quality and photoperiodic cues. We sought to further understand the biological and environmental factors that influence the natal features of a polytocous species in an environment with constant nutritional resources and limited seasonal variation. During a 36-year study we assessed the influence of biological factors (maternal age and litter type [i.e., litter size and sexual composition]) and environmental factors (total precipitation and mean maximum temperature during months encompassing conception, the last trimester of gestation, and the entire length of gestation) on Julian birth date and birth mass using linear-mixed effects models. Linear and quadratic functions of maternal age influenced both natal features with earliest Julian birth dates and heaviest birth masses occurring at prime-age and older individuals, which ranged from 5–9 years of age. Litter type influenced Julian birth date and birth mass. Interestingly, environmental factors affected Julian birth date and birth mass even though mothers were continuously allowed access to a high-quality diet. Random effects revealed considerable variation among mothers and years. This study demonstrates that, in long-lived polytocous species, environmental factors may have a greater influence on natal features than previously supposed and the influence from biological factors is also complex. The documented responses to environmental influences provide unique insights into how mammalian seasonal reproductive dynamics may respond to current changes in climate. PMID:25885545

  20. KSC-04PD-1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Julian Earls (left), a school board member of Ronald E. McNair High School in Atlanta, and Sarah Copelin-Wood (far left), chair of the Board of Education, sign a Memorandum of Understanding after a presentation by KSC Deputy Director Dr. Woodrow Whitlow Jr., astronaut Leland Melvin and Dr. Julian Earls, director of NASA Glenn Research Center. McNair is a NASA Explorer School (NES). Whitlow visited the school to share the vision for space exploration with the next generation of explorers. He talked with students about our destiny as explorers, NASAs stepping stone approach to exploring Earth, the Moon, Mars and beyond, how space impacts our lives, and how people and machines rely on each other in space. Dr. Earls discussed the future and the vision for space, plus the NASA careers needed to meet the vision. Melvin talked about the importance of teamwork and what it takes for mission success.

  1. Parsley: a Command-Line Parser for Astronomical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deich, William

    Parsley is a sophisticated keyword + value parser, packaged as a library of routines that offers an easy method for providing command-line arguments to programs. It makes it easy for the user to enter values, and it makes it easy for the programmer to collect and validate the user's entries. Parsley is tuned for astronomical applications: for example, dates entered in Julian, Modified Julian, calendar, or several other formats are all recognized without special effort by the user or by the programmer; angles can be entered using decimal degrees or dd:mm:ss; time-like intervals as decimal hours, hh:mm:ss, or a variety of other units. Vectors of data are accepted as readily as scalars.

  2. Royal Belgium observatory calendar: 156th year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    A multitude of astronomical dates and information for the year 1993 are presented and include the following: important dates in the Israelite, Gregorian, Julian, and Muslim calendars; religions and civil holidays and saints' days; astronomical seasons; the situation, rising, setting etc. of the Sun; the dates and times of certain positions of the Moon; planetary orbits and visibility; and conditions of observations of comets and meteorites.

  3. Detours to the unification of calendars: The ``Improved Calendar'' (1700 bis 1775) and the foundation of the Berlin Astronomical Observatory. (German Title: Umwege zur Kalendereinheit: Der ``Verbesserte Kalender'' (1700 bis 1775) und die Gründung der Berliner Sternwarte)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokott, Wolfgang

    The refusal of most protestant communities in Germany and other countries to accept the calendar reform decreed by Pope Gregor XIII in 1582 was finally circumvented by the introduction of an ``Improved (Julian) Calendar''. It did provide for astronomical rather than cyclical calculation of the date of Easter. While for most years both calendars were identical except in name, some conflicts did eventually occur. This led finally, in 1775, to a decision in favour of the Gregorian mode of calculation.

  4. Jehovah's Witnesses and autonomy: honouring the refusal of blood transfusions.

    PubMed

    Bock, Gregory L

    2012-11-01

    This paper explores the scriptural and theological reasons given by Jehovah's Witnesses (JWs) to refuse blood transfusions. Julian Savulescu and Richard W Momeyer argue that informed consent should be based on rational beliefs and that the refusal of blood transfusions by JWs is irrational, but after examining the reasons given by JWs, I challenge the claim that JW beliefs are irrational. I also question whether we should give up the traditional notion of informed consent. PMID:22790086

  5. Erratum: High-Precision Photometry of Extreme Kbo 2003 EL61" (2008, AJ, 135, 1749)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David; Peixinho, Nuno

    2008-10-01

    We report an error in Table 3 of the original paper: the UT and Julian dates, Columns 1 and 2, and the photometry, Column 3, are misaligned below row 153. The corrected version of Table 3 is presented herein. These corrections are only typographical in nature, and none of the results or conclusions of the paper are affected. We acknowledge Daniel C. Fabrycky for detecting this error.

  6. Non-Prevailable Political Calendrical Systems in the European History

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodossiou, E.; Manimanis, V. N.; Danezis, E.

    2010-07-01

    In the history of calendrical reforms the Julian calendar that prevailed for centuries was gradually replaced by the Gregorian one from 1582 onwards. After these two calendars, some other calendrical systems were introduced in Europe, none of which prevailed beyond its limited (in time and place) political environment. In this work the following such unsuccessful calendars are reviewed: The French Revolutionary Calendar, the Theosebic Calendar invented by Th. Kairis and the Revolutionary Calendar of the Soviet Union.

  7. In San Antonio, Pre-K Initiative Sets Steep Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blair, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Most Texans would rather sell a favorite horse than vote for a tax hike that promises bigger government. Yet San Antonio Mayor Julian Castro has not only persuaded his constituents to spend $248 million to pay for an unusual and ambitious preschool program for poor 4-year-olds, but he is also going to open doors in August--a mere nine months after…

  8. New approach for determination of an optimum honeybee colony’s carrying capacity based on productivity and nectar secretion potential of bee forage species

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed; Adgaba, Nuru; Getachew, Awraris; Tadesse, Yilma

    2014-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine an optimum honeybee colony’s carrying capacity of selected valleys dominated by Ziziphus spina-christi and Acacia tortilis in the Al-Baha region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted based on the assessment of the number of colonies kept, their productivities and the existing productive bee forage resources in the target valleys with its economic implication. In the existing beekeeping practice, the average number of managed honeybee colonies introduced per square kilometer was 530 and 317 during the flowering period of Z. spina-christi and A. tortilis, respectively. Furthermore, the overall ratios of productive bee forage plants to the number of honeybee colonies introduced were 0.55 and 11.12 to Ziziphus trees and A. tortilis shrubs respectively. In the existing situation the average honey production potential of 5.21 and 0.34 kg was recorded per Ziziphus and A. tortilis plants per flowering season, respectively. The present study, revealed that the number of honeybee colonies introduced in relation to the existing bee forage potential was extremely overcrowding which is beyond the carrying capacity of bee forage resources in selected valleys and it has been observed to affect the productivities and subsequent profitability of beekeeping. The study infers that, by keeping the optimum honeybee colony’s carrying capacity of valleys (88 traditional hives/km2 or 54 Langstroth hives/km2 in Ziziphus field and 72 traditional hives/km2 or 44 Langstroth hives/km2 in A. tortilis field), profitability of beekeeping can be boosted up to 130.39% and 207.98% during Z. spina-christi and A. tortilis, flowering seasons, respectively. PMID:26858544

  9. New approach for determination of an optimum honeybee colony's carrying capacity based on productivity and nectar secretion potential of bee forage species.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed; Adgaba, Nuru; Getachew, Awraris; Tadesse, Yilma

    2016-01-01

    The present study was carried out to determine an optimum honeybee colony's carrying capacity of selected valleys dominated by Ziziphus spina-christi and Acacia tortilis in the Al-Baha region, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The study was conducted based on the assessment of the number of colonies kept, their productivities and the existing productive bee forage resources in the target valleys with its economic implication. In the existing beekeeping practice, the average number of managed honeybee colonies introduced per square kilometer was 530 and 317 during the flowering period of Z. spina-christi and A. tortilis, respectively. Furthermore, the overall ratios of productive bee forage plants to the number of honeybee colonies introduced were 0.55 and 11.12 to Ziziphus trees and A. tortilis shrubs respectively. In the existing situation the average honey production potential of 5.21 and 0.34 kg was recorded per Ziziphus and A. tortilis plants per flowering season, respectively. The present study, revealed that the number of honeybee colonies introduced in relation to the existing bee forage potential was extremely overcrowding which is beyond the carrying capacity of bee forage resources in selected valleys and it has been observed to affect the productivities and subsequent profitability of beekeeping. The study infers that, by keeping the optimum honeybee colony's carrying capacity of valleys (88 traditional hives/km(2) or 54 Langstroth hives/km(2) in Ziziphus field and 72 traditional hives/km(2) or 44 Langstroth hives/km(2) in A. tortilis field), profitability of beekeeping can be boosted up to 130.39% and 207.98% during Z. spina-christi and A. tortilis, flowering seasons, respectively. PMID:26858544

  10. Impact of the MJO on the Boreal Winter Extratropical Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garfinkel, Chaim; Benedict, Jim; Maloney, Eric

    2015-04-01

    This talk will focus on the potential for intraseasonal prediction of the polar vortex and the North Atlantic Oscillation from the Madden-Julian Oscillation. Phase 7 of the Madden-Julian Oscillation leads to a trough in the Northwest Pacific sea level pressure pattern, and subsequently to enhanced tropospheric wavenumber 1 wave driving of the vortex. This enhanced planetary wave flux can then force a weakened stratospheric vortex. Phase 3 has largely opposite opposite impacts. These effects are present in both reanalysis data and a comprehensive atmospheric general circulation model. The anomalies propagate down to the surface, such that the surface Arctic Oscillation is significantly modified 50 days after certain MJO phases. Such a 50 day timescale for the potential for more accurate intraseasonal forecasts is longer than has been previously acknowledged. Garfinkel, C. I., J. J. Benedict, and E. D. Maloney (2014), Impact of the MJO on the Boreal Winter Extratropical Circulation **, Geophys. Res. Let., 41, 6055-6062, doi:10.1002/2014GL061094. Garfinkel C. I., S. B. Feldstein, D. W. Waugh, C. Yoo, S. Lee (2012), Observed Connection between Stratospheric Sudden Warmings and the Madden-Julian Oscillation**, GRL, 39, http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2012GL053144.

  11. Host Suitability of Eight Prunus spp. and One Pyrus communis Rootstocks to Pratylenchus vulnus, P. neglectus, and P. thornei

    PubMed Central

    Pinochet, J.; Verdejo-Lucas, S.; Marull, J.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of Pratylenchus vulnus on rootstocks of eight commonly used Prunus spp. and one Pyrus communis were evaluated under greenhouse conditions during a 15-month period. In a first experiment, two almonds (Moncayo and Garrigues), one peach (GF-305), and two peach-almond hybrids (GF-677 and Adafuel) inoculated with 2,000 nematodes per plant proved to be good hosts of P. vulnus. Highest (P < 0.05) numbers of nematodes per gram of fresh root weight were recovered from Adafuel and GF-677. Root weights were higher in uninoculated compared to inoculated plants of all rootstocks, whereas top weights of uninoculated Garrigues, GF-305, and GF-677 differed (P < 0.05) from those of inoculated plants. In a second experiment, three plum (Marianna 2624, Myrobalan 605, and San Julian 655-2) and one pear (OHF-333) rootstocks were also found to be good hosts of P. vulnus, although significantly fewer nematodes were recovered from Myrohalan 605 roots than from the other three materials. Inoculated OHF-333 and San Julian 655-2 differed (P < 0.05) in root weights over uninoculated plants. Only inoculated San Julian 655-2 showed differences in top weights over uninoculated treatments. Rootstocks were poor or non-hosts for P. neglectus and P. thornei. PMID:19283165

  12. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-12-31

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency ``Madden-Julian oscillation`` observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  13. Low-frequency oscillations in radiative-convective models

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Qi; Randall, D.A.

    1991-01-01

    Although eastward propagation is usually regarded as an essential feature of the low-frequency Madden-Julian oscillation'' observed in the tropical atmosphere, many observations indicate that there is an important stationary or quasi-stationary component of the oscillation. Yasunari (1979), for example, investigated the stationary 30--60 day variation in upper tropospheric cloudiness in the Asian summer monsoon region. In a case study of the 30--60 day oscillation. Hsu et al. (1990) found a strong stationary oscillation of the divergence, outgoing longwave mdiadon and other fields. A recent observational study by Weickmann and Khalsa (1990) offers further evidence that the Madden-Julian oscillation has an important stationary component. In this paper, we present evidence that intraseasonal oscillations can be produced by local radiative and convective processes. This suggests that the observed propagating Madden-Julian wave is produced by interactions between these local processes and the large scale motion field, and is not essential for the existence of the observed oscillation.

  14. 33 CFR 334.802 - Ingleside Naval Station, Ingleside, Texas; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Christi Bay beginning at a point at latitude 27°49′15.0″ N, longitude 97°12′6.0″ W, thence southerly to latitude 27°49′7.3″ N, longitude 97°12′5.4″ W, thence south-southwesterly to latitude 27°49′01″ N, longitude 97°12′39.4″ W, thence west-northwesterly to latitude 27°49′02.4″ N, longitude 97°12′48.3″...

  15. 33 CFR 334.802 - Ingleside Naval Station, Ingleside, Texas; restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Christi Bay beginning at a point at latitude 27°49′15.0″ N, longitude 97°12′6.0″ W, thence southerly to latitude 27°49′7.3″ N, longitude 97°12′5.4″ W, thence south-southwesterly to latitude 27°49′01″ N, longitude 97°12′39.4″ W, thence west-northwesterly to latitude 27°49′02.4″ N, longitude 97°12′48.3″...

  16. Offshore Texas and Louisiana marine ecosystem data synthesis. Volume 3: Annotated bibliography. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, N.W.; James, B.M.

    1988-11-01

    This study provided a synthesis of available environmental information for the continental shelf from the shallow sublittoral to a depth of 500 m for the area between Corpus Christi Bay, Texas and the Mississippi River Delta. The Annotated Bibliography, which contains 1,535 references, was compiled through a combination of computer searches, telephone contacts, library visits, and submissions from chapter authors. The bibliographic data set is presented in hard copy and on IBM-compatible floppy disks that have been indexed with a computer program (FYI 3000 Plus) to allow searching by author, data, topic and geographic keywords, or words in the title, source, or annotation.

  17. National Spill Control School. A pilot program in environmental training. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Oberholtzer, G.R.; Acuff, J.T.

    1980-01-01

    Increased environmental awareness and the amended Federal Water Pollution Control Act of 1972 required an increased level of expertise by the American Public in the field of oil spill prevention and control. The National Spill Control School was created at Corpus Christi State University to help meet this need. Drawing on the talents of a nationwide sample of experts in this field, the project team created a unique management oriented course. A review of the origination and experiences of two years of classes of this pilot program is provided in this report.

  18. Electron-beam-deposited thin polymer films - Electrical properties vs bombarding current.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babcock, L. E.; Christy, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Polymer films about 150 A thick, deposited on glass substrates by electron bombardment of tetramethyltetraphenyltrisiloxane, were studied, after being sandwiched between evaporated aluminum electrodes, the top one semitransparent. The capacitance, conductance, and photoconductance of the sandwiches were measured at room temperature as a function of the electron bombarding current which formed the polymer. The polymer thickness was obtained independently from Christy's (1960) empirical formula for the rate of formation. The obtained results indicate that, with increasing bombarding current, the polymer undergoes an increase in both crosslinking bonds and dangling bonds. Exposure to air drastically reduces the density of dangling bonds, but does not affect the crosslinking.

  19. Neutron Physics. A Revision of I. Halpern's notes on E. Fermi's lectures in 1945

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Beckerley, J.G.

    1951-10-16

    In the Fall of 1945 a course in Neutron Physics was given by Professor Fermi as part of the program of the Los Alamos University. The course consisted of thirty lectures most of which were given by Fermi. In his absence R.F. Christy and E. Segre gave several lectures. The present revision is based upon class notes prepared by I. Halpern with some assistance by B.T. Feld and issued first as document LADC 255 and later with wider circulation as MDDC 320.

  20. Period Determination of Six Main Belt Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Observations of six main-belt asteroids (MBA) produced lightcurve parameters of: 487 Venetia, P = 13.34 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.20 mag; 684 Hildburg, P = 15.89 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.22 mag; 772 Tanete, P = 8.629 ± 0.001 h, A = 0.18 mag.; 1181 Lilith, P = 15.04 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.11 mag.; 1246 Chaka, P = 25.44 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.25 mag.; and 2834 Christy Carol, P = 12.79 ± 0.01 h, A = 0.39 mag.

  1. Fast Tracking Data to Informed Decisions: An Advanced Information System to Improve Environmental Understanding and Management (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsker, B. S.; Myers, J.; Liu, Y.; Bajcsy, P.

    2010-12-01

    Emerging sensing and information technology are rapidly creating a new paradigm for environmental research and management, in which data from multiple sensors and information sources can guide real-time adaptive observation and decision making. This talk will provide an overview of emerging cyberinfrastructure and three case studies that illustrate their potential: combined sewer overflows in Chicago, hypoxia in Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, and sustainable agriculture in Illinois. An advanced information system for real-time decision making and visual geospatial analytics will be presented as an example of cyberinfrastructure that enables easier implementation of numerous real-time applications.

  2. Space Research and You outreach event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Christi Parker of CST Inc. of Huntsville, AL, and Angel Abbud-Madrid, of the Center for Commercial Applications of Combustion in Space (CCACS) at the Colorado school of Mines, prepare a demonstration of the CCACS Water Mist experiment scheduled to fly on the STS-107 space research mission in 2003. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107. (Digital camera image; no film original.

  3. In-vitro antimicrobial activity screening of some ethnoveterinary medicinal plants traditionally used against mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal tract complication in Tigray Region, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kalayou, Shewit; Haileselassie, Mekonnen; Gebre-egziabher, Gebremedhin; Tiku'e, Tsegay; Sahle, Samson; Taddele, Habtamu; Ghezu, Mussie

    2012-01-01

    Objective To screen the antibacterial activity of nine ethnoveterinary plants traditionally used for the treatment of mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications. Methods Hydroalcoholic exctracts of medicinal plants namely, Achyranthes aspera (A. aspera) L. (Family Asparagaceae), Ficus caria (F. caria) (Family Moraceae), Malvi parviflora (M. parviflora) (Family Malvaceae), Vernonia species (V. species) (local name Alakit, Family Asteraceae), Solanum hastifolium (S. hastifolium) (Family Solanaceae), Calpurinia aurea (C. aurea) (Ait) Benth (Family Fabaceae), Nicotiana tabacum (N. tabacum) L. (Family Solanaceae), Ziziphus spina-christi (Z. spina-christi) (Family Rhamnaceae), Croton macrostachys (C. macrostachys) (Family Euphorbiaceae), were screened against clinical bacterial isolates of veterinary importance from October 2007 to April 2009. The antibacterial activity was tested using disc diffusion at two concentrations (200 mg/mL and 100 mg/mL) and broth dilution methods using 70% methanol macerated leaf extracts. Results With the exception of S. hastifolium all plant extracts exhibited antibacterial activity. Among the medicinal plants tested C. aurea, C. macrostachyus, A. aspera, N. tabacum and vernonia species (Alakit) showed the most promising antimicrobial properties. Conclusions It can be concluded that many of the tested plants have antibacterial activity and supports the traditional usage of the plants for mastitis, wound and gastrointestinal complications treatment. Further studies into their toxicity and phytochemistry is advocated. PMID:23569962

  4. Value of biomedical scientists providing on-site specimen adequacy assessment for fine-needle aspirations.

    PubMed

    Narine, N; Rana, D N; Perera, D M; Irshad, A

    2012-01-01

    Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) is accepted as a first-line investigation in patients with superficial or deep-seated mass lesions. One of the fundamental principles of successful aspiration is harvesting sufficient numbers of cells that are representative of the lesion being investigated. Central Manchester University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust provides FNA services to Christie Hospital, including non-attended and biomedical scientist-attended aspirations, some of which are assessed on-site for specimen adequacy. This study audits the FNA coverage provided to Christie Hospital by exploring the contribution of biomedical scientist on-site specimen adequacy assessment to successful aspirations and identifies potential areas for service improvement such that unsatisfactory sampling is reduced. Satisfactory sampling rates varied between biomedical scientist-attended (79%) and non-attended (70%) procedures. Within the former group, 100% satisfactory sampling was achieved with on-site assessment, falling to 77% without on-site assessment. The highest unsatisfactory sampling rate was identified at 33% for thyroid aspirations in endocrinology, while rates elsewhere varied between 21% and 23%. This audit demonstrated the value of on-site specimen adequacy assessment as the ultimate goal of any FNA is to negate the need for more invasive procedures. In terms of flexibility and economic value, having adequately trained biomedical scientists to perform on-site assessment is quite feasible. Extending this biomedical scientist-led service to other departments would reduce unsatisfactory sample rates and the requirement for more invasive procedures. PMID:23057157

  5. Population Genetics of Seaside Sparrow (Ammodramus maritimus) Subspecies along the Gulf of Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Woltmann, Stefan; Stouffer, Philip C.; Bergeon Burns, Christine M.; Woodrey, Mark S.; Cashner, Mollie F.; Taylor, Sabrina S.

    2014-01-01

    Seaside Sparrows (Ammodramus maritimus) along the Gulf of Mexico are currently recognized as four subspecies, including taxa in Florida (A. m. juncicola and A. m. peninsulae) and southern Texas (Ammodramus m. sennetti), plus a widespread taxon between them (A. m. fisheri). We examined population genetic structure of this “Gulf Coast” clade using microsatellite and mtDNA data. Results of Bayesian analyses (Structure, GeneLand) of microsatellite data from nine locations do not entirely align with current subspecific taxonomy. Ammodramus m. sennetti from southern Texas is significantly differentiated from all other populations, but we found evidence of an admixture zone with A. m. fisheri near Corpus Christi. The two subspecies along the northern Gulf Coast of Florida are significantly differentiated from both A. m. sennetti and A. m. fisheri, but are not distinct from each other. We found a weak signal of isolation by distance within A. m. fisheri, indicating this population is not entirely panmictic throughout its range. Although continued conservation concern is warranted for all populations along the Gulf Coast, A. m. fisheri appears to be more secure than the far smaller populations in south Texas and the northern Florida Gulf Coast. In particular, the most genetically distinct populations, those in Texas south of Corpus Christi, occupy unique habitats within a very small geographic range. PMID:25412194

  6. Temperature Trends in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, J.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    TOVS (Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder) is the suite of infra-red and microwave sounding instruments, including HIRS-2 and MSU, that have flown on the NOAA Polar orbiting operational satellites TIROS-N, NOAA 6-14 from November 1978 to the present day. Data has been analyzed for the entire time period using a consistent methodology to produce twice daily per satellite global fields of surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature-moisture profile, cloud top pressure, and fractional cloud cover, OLR and clear sky OLR, and precipitation. All parameters were found to depend on the orbit time of observation which differed as a function of time both because of differing initial satellite orbits and orbit drift. This must be accounted for before one can attempt to find trends in the data. Methodology to account for orbit drift will be shown. Trends will then be shown, over the 21 year period 1979-1999, for surface skin temperature and atmospheric temperature profile. There has been global warming near the surface which falls off rapidly with height. Trends will also be shown for values of MSU2R and MSU4 which are computed from the soundings. These will be compared to trends of MSU2R and MSU4 observed by Spencer and Christy. There is generally good agreement between Spencer and Christy MSU2R trends and those computed from the TOVS Pathfinder data set, with the largest differences over the tropics.

  7. Electromagnetic pulse-induced current measurement device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gandhi, Om P.; Chen, Jin Y.

    1991-08-01

    To develop safety guidelines for exposure to high fields associated with an electromagnetic pulse (EMP), it is necessary to devise techniques that would measure the peak current induced in the human body. The main focus of this project was to design, fabricate, and test a portable, self-contained stand-on device that would measure and hold the peak current and the integrated change Q. The design specifications of the EMP-Induced Current Measurement Device are as follows: rise time of the current pulse, 5 ns; peak current, 20-600 A; charge Q, 0-20 microcoulombs. The device uses a stand-on parallel-plate bilayer sensor and fast high-frequency circuit that are well-shielded against spurious responses to high incident fields. Since the polarity of the incident peak electric field of the EMP may be either positive or negative, the induced peak current can also be positive or negative. Therefore, the device is designed to respond to either of these polarities and measure and hold both the peak current and the integrated charge which are simultaneously displayed on two separate 3-1/2 digit displays. The prototype device has been preliminarily tested with the EMP's generated at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory (ALECS facility) at Kirtland AFB, New Mexico.

  8. Precision autophagy: Will the next wave of selective autophagy markers and specific autophagy inhibitors feed clinical pipelines?

    PubMed Central

    Lebovitz, Chandra B; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Bosc, Damien; Rothe, Katharina; Singh, Jagbir; Bally, Marcel; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Young, Robert N; Lum, Julian J; Gorski, Sharon M

    2015-01-01

    Research presented at the Vancouver Autophagy Symposium (VAS) 2014 suggests that autophagy's influence on health and disease depends on tight regulation and precision targeting of substrates. Discussions recognized a pressing need for robust biomarkers that accurately assess the clinical utility of modulating autophagy in disease contexts. Biomarker discovery could flow from investigations of context-dependent triggers, sensors, and adaptors that tailor the autophagy machinery to achieve target specificity. In his keynote address, Dr. Vojo Deretic (University of New Mexico) described the discovery of a cargo receptor family that utilizes peptide motif-based cargo recognition, a mechanism that may be more precise than generic substrate tagging. The keynote by Dr. Alec Kimmelman (Harvard Medical School) emphasized that unbiased screens for novel selective autophagy factors may accelerate the development of autophagy-based therapies. Using a quantitative proteomics screen for de novo identification of autophagosome substrates in pancreatic cancer, Kimmelman's group discovered a new type of selective autophagy that regulates bioavailable iron. Additional presentations revealed novel autophagy regulators and receptors in metabolic diseases, proteinopathies, and cancer, and outlined the development of specific autophagy inhibitors and treatment regimens that combine autophagy modulation with anticancer therapies. VAS 2014 stimulated interdisciplinary discussions focused on the development of biomarkers, drugs, and preclinical models to facilitate clinical translation of key autophagy discoveries. PMID:26506897

  9. DNA fingerprints come to court

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-04-15

    DNA fingerprinting, a new technique, which produces a visual representation of a person's genome, enables the identification of perpetrators from as little as a single hair root, providing they have left some biologic evidence-hair, skin cells, blood, or semen-at the scene of the crime. DNA fingerprinting was developed by British geneticist Alec Jeffreys, PhD, in 1985. Jeffreys, professor genetics at the University of Leicester, built upon a discovery, five years earlier, of certain hypervariable regions called minisatellites in unexpressed areas of DNA. The hypervariability was evidenced in the number of repetitions of certain sequences of base pairs. It was this aspect that revealed to Jeffreys something that had eluded other investigators. He realized that these minisatellite regions had a potential for identification far greater than that of conventional genetic markers, which are defined by restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs). RFLPs are characterized by the substitution of one base pair for another, resulting in the presence or absence of a restriction enzyme site. Thus, each offers a limited number of alleles. In contrast, minisatellite regions have an accordion-like range of length, as the number of repetitions of a given sequence varies widely from person to person.

  10. ASTP Onboard Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription is presented of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project voice communications as recorded on the command module data storage equipment. Data from this recorder are telemetered (dumped) to Space Tracking and Data Network sites for retransmission to the Johnson Space Center. The transcript is divided into three columns -- time, speaker, and text. The Greenwich mean time column consists of three two-digit numbers representing hours, minutes, and seconds (e.g., 22 34 14) for the Julian dates shown at the top of the page on which a new day begins. The speaker column indicates the source of a transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications.

  11. Astronomical Calendar Cluj-Napoca 2003 (July - December)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turcu, Vlad; Csillik, Iharka; Moldovan, Dan

    The content of the calendar is as follows: Astronomical constants; Constelations;Guide of use; Calendar for Cluj Napoca which includes: Sunrise, The transit of the Sun, Sunset for the Sun and for the Moon; The Julian Date; Twilights Civil, Nautical and Astronomic Maps of the sky and phenomena with explanations; General data concerning the Sun, Moon and planets; Meteors and Meteors flows; Eclipses and ocultations; Time and Time scales; The magnitude of the stars; Distances on the sky, Galaxies; Astronomical Phenomena during 2003-2010. Bibliography 15 titles.

  12. Planck Surveyor On Its Way to Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    Borrill, Julian

    2009-01-01

    An Ariane 5 rocket carried the Planck Surveyor and a companion satellite into space May 14, 2009 from the European Space Agency (ESA) base on the northwest coast of South America. Once in orbit beyond the moon, Planck will produce the most accurate measurements ever made of the relic radiation from the big bang, plus the largest set of CMB data ever recorded. Berkeley Labs long and continuing involvement with Planck began when George Smoot of the Physics Division proposed Plancks progenitor to ESA and continues with preparations for ongoing data analysis for the U.S. Planck team at NERSC, led by Julian Borrill, co-leader of the Computational Cosmology Center.

  13. ". . . How narrow the strait!". The God machine and the spirit of liberty.

    PubMed

    Harris, John

    2014-07-01

    This article explores the consequences of interventions to secure moral enhancement that are at once compulsory and inescapable and of which the subject will be totally unaware. These are encapsulated in an arresting example used by Ingmar Perrson and Julian Savulescu concerning a "God machine" capable of achieving at least three of these four objectives. This article demonstrates that the first objective--namely, moral enhancement--is impossible to achieve by these means and that the remaining three are neither moral nor enhancements nor remotely desirable. Along the way the nature of morality properly so called is further explored. PMID:24866787

  14. G. Ledyard Stebbins and the evolutionary synthesis.

    PubMed

    Smocovitis, V B

    2001-01-01

    More than any other individual, Stebbins synthesized knowledge from a disparate set of areas that included plant genetics, systematics, and evolution. This work culminated in 1950 with the appearance of his magnum opus, Variation and Evolution in Plants. This book gave plant evolution a coherent framework that was compatible with that emerging from the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky, Ernst Mayr, G. G. Simpson, and Julian Huxley, and others associated with establishing the synthetic theory of evolution. For this work he is regarded as the botanical "architect" of the evolutionary synthesis. PMID:11700300

  15. Planck Surveyor On Its Way to Orbit

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2010-01-08

    An Ariane 5 rocket carried the Planck Surveyor and a companion satellite into space May 14, 2009 from the European Space Agency (ESA) base on the northwest coast of South America. Once in orbit beyond the moon, Planck will produce the most accurate measurements ever made of the relic radiation from the big bang, plus the largest set of CMB data ever recorded. Berkeley Labs long and continuing involvement with Planck began when George Smoot of the Physics Division proposed Plancks progenitor to ESA and continues with preparations for ongoing data analysis for the U.S. Planck team at NERSC, led by Julian Borrill, co-leader of the Computational Cosmology Center

  16. Nicola Cusano e il foro astronomico al castello di Andraz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dona', G.

    Cardinal Nicolas from Cues (1401-1464) was friend of Paolo Toscanelli and one of the first supporters of heliocentrism. He carved a tube in the south western wall of a room of the castle of Andraz. It was possibly used to calculate the date of the winter solstice, in order to evaluate the corrections needed to the Julian calendar then in use. The astronomical use of this tube is described. The accuracy achievable in the measurement of the solstice is surprising. It is possible that the tubes made by Gerbert of Aurillac (945-1003) were used with similar awareness.

  17. Apollo 11 Celebration at Mission Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    NASA and Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Office of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ.

  18. [E.S.BOTKIN, A SPECIMEN OF FIDELITY TO PROFESSIONAL DUTY AND OATH OF LOYALTY, AN EXAMPLE OF COURAGE AND HONOUR OF THE RUSSIAN DOCTOR].

    PubMed

    Vologdin, A A; Simonenko, V B

    2015-01-01

    Evgeny Sergeevch Botkin, son of the legendary Russian internist Sergey Petrovich Botkin, was a court physician for Tsar Nikolai II. After Nikolai abdicated the throne on 15 March (2 March in the Julian calendar) 1917, E.S. Botkin felt it was his duty to accompany the Romanovs into exile to Siberia and continued to selflessly treat the crown prince Aleksey, other members of the Romanov family and all those who applied for his advice. He was shot together with the Romanovs in the basement room of the Ipatiev house, Ekaterinburg, remaining loyal to professional duty and the word given to the Emperor. PMID:27008749

  19. The Electric Fields of Radio Pulsars with Asymmetric Nondipolar Magnetic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantor, E. M.; Tsygan, A. I.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of the curvature of open magnetic field lines on the generation of electric fields in radio pulsars is considered in the framework of a Goldreich-Julian model, for both a regime with a free outflow of electrons from the neutron-star surface and the case of a small thermoemission current. An expression for the electron thermoemission current in a strong magnetic field is derived. The electric field associated with the curvature of the magnetic flux tubes is comparable to the field generated by the relativistic dragging of the inertial frames.

  20. A new astronomical dating of Odysseus return to Ithaca.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papamarinopoulos, St. P.; Preka-Papadema, P.; Antonopoulos, P.; Mitropetrou, H.; Tsironi, A.; Mitropetros, P.

    The annular solar eclipse, of 30 October 1207 B.C. (Julian Day-JD 1280869), calculated by NASA together with the analysis of the weather's and the environment's description (long nights, plants, animals and peoples' habits) and the astronomical data (guiding constellations and Venus in the east horizon) mentioned by Homer in the epic, constitute an autumn return of Odysseus to Ithaca five days before the above characterized day. The latter offers a precise astronomical dating of the event and dates the legendary Trojan War's end as well.

  1. Influence of Global Vegetation on Mid-Tropospheric CO2 Early Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pagano, Thomas S.; Nguyen, Hai; Olsen, Ed

    2012-01-01

    AIRS Mid-Tropospheric CO2 shows a high degree of horizontal variability. Ongoing efforts show AIRS data influenced by global circulation patterns including El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) What is the influence of global vegetation cycle on CO2 seasonal behavior? (1) Can we correlate mid-trop CO2 seasonal variability with global vegetation for different regions? (2) For now: First look at zonal averages and Land Vegetation (ocean biomass later) (3) Goal: Sanity Check on AIRS Data Seasonal Cycle, Solicit interest by carbon cycle community

  2. Preface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrie, Will

    2016-07-01

    This is Part B of a 2-part Special Issue on ocean waves presenting new results on a variety of topics. Manuscripts discuss a variety of topics: wave physics; source terms for state-of-the-art-operational wave forecast models; stochastic modelling of inhomogeneous waves; wave-current interactions; shallow water waves; wave impacts on Stokes drift; coupled wave and surge models; wave-ice interactions; waves and sub-grid obstacles; wave-atmosphere-ocean coupling; ensemble wave forecast systems; data assimilation and wave prediction; wave model validation; Madden-Julian Oscillation impacts on waves; spectral wave partitioning and long term wave statistics; and wave climate projections.

  3. ASTP Technical Air-To-Ground Voice Transcription

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The transcription of the technical air-to-ground voice communication of the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project mission was presented. The transcript was divided into three columns giving, respectively, the time, speaker, and text. All times are expressed in Greenwich mean time for the appropriate Julian dates. The speaker column indicates the source of transmission; the text column contains the verbatim transcript of the communications. Special symbols were used to report garbling, pauses or self-interruptions, interruptions by other speakers or abrupt terminations, emphasized words, obliterations, and material translated from Russian.

  4. Correction.

    PubMed

    1992-12-11

    Last month, the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) prompted a 13 November Random Sample naming a group of scientists whose faces were appearing, USPS said, on stamps belonging to its Black Heritage Series. Among them: chemist Percy Lavon Julian; George Washington Carver; physician Charles R. Drew; astronomer and mathematician Benjamin Banneker; and inventor Jan Matzeliger. Science readers knew better. Two of the quintet appeared years ago: a stamp bearing Carver's picture was issued in 1948, and Drew appeared in the Great Americans Series in 1981. PMID:17831650

  5. Language and medicine in the Zamenhof family.

    PubMed

    Wincewicz, Andrzej; Lebard Zamenhof, Pierre; Zaleski-Zamenhof, Maryse Wanda; Zaleski-Zamenhof, Ludwik Krzysztof; Lieberman, James; Zamenhof, Robert; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Sulkowska, Mariola; Sulkowski, Stanislaw

    2010-01-01

    The Zamenhof family is famous for Dr Ludwik Lejzer Zamenhof (1859-1917), who created the artificial language Esperanto and who initiated a social movement for peace and against any sort of discrimination. Ludwik was an ophthalmologist. Adam, Leon, Alexander, and Julian Zamenhof were medical doctors and noted surgeons, while Sophia Zamenhof was a paediatrician. Ludwik Zamenhof often referred to the biblical story of the Tower of Babel, in which diversity of languages was the punishment for builders who were arrogant and uncaring. With the help of Esperanto, the Zamenhofs metaphorically wanted to overcome the curse of Babel and restore the sense of human unity. PMID:21192117

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Transiting extrasolar planet WASP-33b (Kovacs+, 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, G.; Kovacs, T.; Hartman, J. D.; Bakos, G. A.; Bieryla, A.; Latham, D.; Noyes, R. W.; Regaly, Zs.; Esquerdo, G. A.

    2013-03-01

    Light curves (LCs) used in the time series analysis of WASP-33 are presented. All LCs are on magnitude scale. The material constitutes of: (1) the TFA-filtered/reconstructed (see Kovacs, Bakos & Noyes, 2005MNRAS.356..557K) HATNet LC in approximate Ic (Cousins) color; (2) LCs given in Table 1: except for the FLWO data (lc02) all LCs are corrected for linear trends, shifted to zero magnitude at the out-of-transit level. Time is in Heliocentric Julian Date, colors are given in Table 1. (3) Grand-averaged LC, as shown in Fig. 10 of the paper. (4 data files).

  7. New AGU Fellows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-02-01

    Fellows of AGU are members who have attained acknowledged eminence in the Earth and space sciences. On 8 December 2007, the Fellows Committee elected 51 members for the class of 2008. Candidates are nominated by colleagues and then vetted by relevant sections and focus groups, who forward the top nominees to the Fellows Committee, which comprises 11 Fellows. Members of the 2006-2008 Fellows Committee are Tuija Pulkkinen, chair, and Shaw Liu, Andrea Rinaldo, Roberta Rudnick, Barbara Romanowicz, Lawrence Mysak, Steve Running, Thomas Herring, Lisa Tauxe, Julian McCreary, and Maria Zuber.

  8. Planck Surveyor On Its Way to Orbit

    ScienceCinema

    Borrill, Julian

    2013-05-29

    An Ariane 5 rocket carried the Planck Surveyor and a companion satellite into space May 14, 2009 from the European Space Agency (ESA) base on the northwest coast of South America. Once in orbit beyond the moon, Planck will produce the most accurate measurements ever made of the relic radiation from the big bang, plus the largest set of CMB data ever recorded. Berkeley Labs long and continuing involvement with Planck began when George Smoot of the Physics Division proposed Plancks progenitor to ESA and continues with preparations for ongoing data analysis for the U.S. Planck team at NERSC, led by Julian Borrill, co-leader of the Computational Cosmology Center.

  9. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Light curve of (2060) Chiron (Ortiz+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, J. L.; Duffard, R.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Alvarez-Candal, A.; Santos-Sanz, P.; Morales, N.; Fernandez-Valenzuela, E.; Licandro, J.; Campo Bagatin, A.; Thirouin, A.

    2015-01-01

    Photometry results for the CAHA and CASLEO observations, respectively. In this sample table we list the Julian date (JD, corrected for light time), the Relative magnitude (Rel. Mag in magnitudes) and the 1sigma error associated (Err. in magnitude), topocentric (delta) and heliocentric (r_h) distances (both distances expressed in AU) and the solar phase angle, in degrees. object.dat : -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Code Name H i e a mag deg AU -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 2060 Chiron 6.10 6.938408 0.38209890 13.63836652 (1 data file).

  10. Planck Surveyor On Its Way to Orbit

    SciTech Connect

    2009-05-14

    An Ariane 5 rocket carried the Planck Surveyor and a companion satellite into space May 14, 2009 from the European Space Agency (ESA) base on the northwest coast of South America. Once in orbit beyond the moon, Planck will produce the most accurate measurements ever made of the relic radiation from the big bang, plus the largest set of CMB data ever recorded. Berkeley Labs long and continuing involvement with Planck began when George Smoot of the Physics Division proposed Plancks progenitor to ESA and continues with preparations for ongoing data analysis for the U.S. Planck team at NERSC, led by Julian Borrill, co-leader of the Computational Cosmology Center

  11. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2016-01-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik’s 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative properties of pristine silver, due to tarnishing on air exposure. We demonstrate techniques, including use of silicon-nitride membranes, to access the full capabilities of multiple-angle, spectrometric-ellipsometry to generate an improved data set, representative of overlayer-protected, freshly-deposited silver films on silicon-nitride and glass. PMID:27470307

  12. Alchemy in Cambridge. An Annotated Catalogue of Alchemical Texts and Illustrations in Cambridge Repositories.

    PubMed

    Timmermann, Anke

    2015-01-01

    Alchemy in Cambridge captures the alchemical content of 56 manuscripts in Cambridge, in particular the libraries of Trinity College, Corpus Christi College and St John's College, the University Library and the Fitzwilliam Museum. As such, this catalogue makes visible a large number of previously unknown or obscured alchemica. While extant bibliographies, including those by M.R. James a century ago, were compiled by polymathic bibliographers for a wide audience of researchers, Alchemy in Cambridge benefits from the substantial developments in the history of alchemy, bibliography, and related scholarship in recent decades. Many texts are here identified for the first time. Another vital feature is the incorporation of information on alchemical illustrations in the manuscripts, intended to facilitate research on the visual culture of alchemy. The catalogue is aimed at historians of alchemy and science, and of high interest to manuscript scholars, historians of art and historians of college and university libraries. PMID:26245008

  13. Health Detectives: Uncovering the Mysteries of Disease (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    SciTech Connect

    Bissell, Mina; Canaria, Christie; Celnicker, Susan; Karpen, Gary

    2012-04-23

    In this April 23, 2012 Science at the Theater event, Berkeley Lab scientists discuss how they uncover the mysteries of disease in unlikely places. Speakers and topics include: World-renowned cancer researcher Mina Bissell's pioneering research on the role of the cellular microenvironment in breast cancer has changed the conversation about the disease. How does DNA instability cause disease? To find out, Christie Canaria images neural networks to study disorders such as Huntington's disease. Fruit flies can tell us a lot about ourselves. Susan Celniker explores the fruit fly genome to learn how our genome works. DNA is not destiny. Gary Karpen explores how environmental factors shape genome function and disease through epigenetics.

  14. Effects of oilfield brinewater discharges on Western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) in Nueces Bay, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Capizzi, J.L.; King, K.A.; Melancon, M.J.; Rattner, B.A.; LeCaptain, L.

    1993-01-01

    Western sandpipers (Calidris mauri) were studied at an oilfield brinewater discharge site near Corpus Christi, Texas, and at a reference site near Galveston, Texas. Morphological indices, hepatic monooxygenase activities, and contaminant burdens were quantified to evaluate exposure and effects. Pooled stomach contents of birds collected at the discharge site contained higher concentrations of petroleum hydrocarbons than the reference site. Total pristane concentration, and the ratio of pristane:n-heptadecane in sandpiper carcasses were significantly greater at the oil discharge site, indicative of chronic exposure. Concentrations of other organic contaminants (petroleum aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls and organochlorine pesticides and metabolites) in carcasses at both study sites were relatively low. Neither body weight, bill length or hepatic monooxygenase activities differed between sites, although liver weight and liver weight:body weight ratio were significantly lower at the discharge site. These data suggest that oilfield brinewater discharges have only limited toxicity to sandpipers wintering near the site.

  15. Health Detectives: Uncovering the Mysteries of Disease (LBNL Science at the Theater)

    ScienceCinema

    Bissell, Mina; Canaria, Christie; Celnicker, Susan; Karpen, Gary

    2014-05-06

    In this April 23, 2012 Science at the Theater event, Berkeley Lab scientists discuss how they uncover the mysteries of disease in unlikely places. Speakers and topics include: World-renowned cancer researcher Mina Bissell's pioneering research on the role of the cellular microenvironment in breast cancer has changed the conversation about the disease. How does DNA instability cause disease? To find out, Christie Canaria images neural networks to study disorders such as Huntington's disease. Fruit flies can tell us a lot about ourselves. Susan Celniker explores the fruit fly genome to learn how our genome works. DNA is not destiny. Gary Karpen explores how environmental factors shape genome function and disease through epigenetics.

  16. Pulse!!: a model for research and development of virtual-reality learning in military medical education and training.

    PubMed

    Dunne, James R; McDonald, Claudia L

    2010-07-01

    Pulse!! The Virtual Clinical Learning Lab at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, in collaboration with the United States Navy, has developed a model for research and technological development that they believe is an essential element in the future of military and civilian medical education. The Pulse!! project models a strategy for providing cross-disciplinary expertise and resources to educational, governmental, and business entities challenged with meeting looming health care crises. It includes a three-dimensional virtual learning platform that provides unlimited, repeatable, immersive clinical experiences without risk to patients, and is available anywhere there is a computer. Pulse!! utilizes expertise in the fields of medicine, medical education, computer science, software engineering, physics, computer animation, art, and architecture. Lab scientists collaborate with the commercial virtual-reality simulation industry to produce research-based learning platforms based on cutting-edge computer technology. PMID:23634475

  17. Structural styles of the Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends in Texas: Constraints on geopressured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, T.E.

    1986-01-01

    In this report the wide variability in structural styles within the growth-faulted, geopressured trends of the Texas Gulf Coast is illustrated by detailed structural maps of Wilcox and Frio growth-fault trends and quantified by statistical analysis of fault compartment geometries. Within the Frio growth-fault trend the Sarita, Corpus Christi, and Port Arthur areas, together with the previously studied Blessing and Pleasant Bayou prospects, span nearly the entire range of Frio depositional systems. The Frio and Wilcox growth-fault trends show distinct differences. The author concludes that Wilcox sandstones tend to be dip-elongate, whereas fault compartments are highly strike-elongate; the probability of large reservoirs is consequently low. Frio sandstones are of mixed geometry, and fault compartments are larger and more equant, suggesting an increased chance of finding large reservoirs.

  18. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A

    2016-01-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik's 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative properties of pristine silver, due to tarnishing on air exposure. We demonstrate techniques, including use of silicon-nitride membranes, to access the full capabilities of multiple-angle, spectrometric-ellipsometry to generate an improved data set, representative of overlayer-protected, freshly-deposited silver films on silicon-nitride and glass. PMID:27470307

  19. Water quality dynamics in an urbanizing subtropical estuary(Oso Bay, Texas).

    PubMed

    Wetz, Michael S; Hayes, Kenneth C; Fisher, Kelsey V B; Price, Lynn; Sterba-Boatwright, Blair

    2016-03-15

    Results are presented from a study of water quality dynamics in a shallow subtropical estuary, Oso Bay, Texas, which has a watershed that has undergone extensive urbanization in recent decades. High inorganic nutrient, dissolved organic matter and chlorophyll concentrations, as well as low pH (<8), were observed in a region of Oso Bay that receives wastewater effluent. Despite being shallow (<1 m) and subjected to strong winds on a regular basis, this region also exhibited episodic hypoxia/anoxia. The low oxygen and pH conditions are likely to impose significant stress on benthic organisms and nekton in the affected area. Signatures of eutrophied water were occasionally observed at the mouth of Oso Bay, suggesting that it may be exported to adjacent Corpus Christi Bay and contribute to seasonal hypoxia development in that system as well. These results argue for wastewater nutrient input reductions in order to alleviate the symptoms of eutrophication. PMID:26876558

  20. T55 power turbine rotor multiplane-multispeed balancing study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1982-01-01

    A rotordynamic analysis of the T55-L-11C engine was used to evaluate the balancing needs of the power turbine and to optimize the balancing procedure. As a result, recommendations were made for implementation of a multiplane-multispeed balancing plan. Precision collars for the attachment of trial weights to a slender rotor were designed enabling demonstration balancing on production hardware. The quality of the balance was then evaluated by installing a high speed balanced power turbine in an engine and running in a test cell at the Corpus Christi Army depot. The engine used had been tested prior to the turbine changeout and showed acceptable overall vibration levels for the engine were significantly reduced, demonstrating the ability of multiplane-multispeed balancing to control engine vibration.

  1. High Speed Balancing Applied to the T700 Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, J.; Lee, C.; Martin, M.

    1989-01-01

    The work performed under Contracts NAS3-23929 and NAS3-24633 is presented. MTI evaluated the feasibility of high-speed balancing for both the T700 power turbine rotor and the compressor rotor. Modifications were designed for the existing Corpus Christi Army Depot (CCAD) T53/T55 high-speed balancing system for balancing T700 power turbine rotors. Tests conducted under these contracts included a high-speed balancing evaluation for T700 power turbines in the Army/NASA drivetrain facility at MTI. The high-speed balancing tests demonstrated the reduction of vibration amplitudes at operating speed for both low-speed balanced and non-low-speed balanced T700 power turbines. In addition, vibration data from acceptance tests of T53, T55, and T700 engines were analyzed and a vibration diagnostic procedure developed.

  2. Cloning of ligand-specific cell lines via gene transfer: identification of a D2 dopamine receptor subtype.

    PubMed Central

    Todd, R D; Khurana, T S; Sajovic, P; Stone, K R; O'Malley, K L

    1989-01-01

    Using rat genomic DNA, we have established a transfected mouse fibroblast cell line that expresses a spiperone binding site with the pharmacological characteristics of a D2 dopamine receptor. The expressed D2 receptors are the product of a gene that is distinct from that reported by Bunzow et al. [Bunzow, J. R., Van Tol, H. H. M., Granoly, D. K., Albert, P., Salon, J., Christie, M., Machida, C. A., Neve, K. A. & Civelli, O. (1988) Nature (London) 336, 783-787]. Flow cytometry with the Ca2+-sensitive dye indo-1 demonstrated that activation of the expressed D2 sites resulted in increases in intracellular calcium that were dependent on the influx of external Ca2+. These general cloning procedures should be applicable to the production of cell lines expressing a variety of genes for which only functional assays are available. Images PMID:2532359

  3. Validation of Interannual Differences of AIRS Monthly Mean Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Susskind, Joel; Iredell, Lena; Keita, Fricky; Molnar, Gyula

    2005-01-01

    Monthly mean fields of select geophysical parameters derived from analysis of AIRS/AMSU data, and their interannual differences, are shown and compared with analogous fields derived from other sources. All AIRS fields are derived using the AIRS Science Team Version 4 algorithm. Monthly mean results are shown for January 2004, as are interannual differences between January 2004 and January 2003. AIRS temperature and water vapor profile fields are compared with monthly mean collocated ECMWF 3 hour forecast and monthly mean TOVS Pathfinder Path A data. AIRS Tropospheric and Stratospheric coarse climate indicators are compared with analogous MSU products derived by Spencer and christy and found in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A data set. Total ozone is compared with results produced by TOMS. OLR is compared with OLR derived using CERES data and found in the TOVS Pathfinder Path A data set. AIRS results agree well in all cases, especially in the interannual difference sense.

  4. Realistic Silver Optical Constants for Plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yajie; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2016-07-01

    Silver remains the preferred conductor for optical and near-infrared plasmonics. Many high-profile studies focus exclusively on performance simulation in such applications. Almost invariably, these use silver optical data either from Palik’s 1985 handbook or, more frequently, an earlier Johnson and Christy (J&C) tabulation. These data are inconsistent, making it difficult to ascertain the reliability of the simulations. The inconsistency stems from challenges in measuring representative properties of pristine silver, due to tarnishing on air exposure. We demonstrate techniques, including use of silicon-nitride membranes, to access the full capabilities of multiple-angle, spectrometric-ellipsometry to generate an improved data set, representative of overlayer-protected, freshly-deposited silver films on silicon-nitride and glass.

  5. Desertification and its effect on the erosion of vegetation in the south-western region of Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Salam, Magda Magdy; Elhakem, Abeer Hamdy

    2016-03-01

    This study was conducted in Jazan region of south-western Saudi Arabia. Vegetation cover, frequency, abundance and soil characteristics were analysed at three locations with different quantitative and descriptive vegetation characteristics. Plant species were classified into three primary communities dominated by Salvadora persic, Acacia tortilis and Ziziphus spini-Christi. The results indicated that the distribution of plant species is controlled by soil characteristics. Very limited water resources are also limiting factor in vegetation growth. Among the three studied sites, desert and coastal environments are affected by desertification. Rehabilitation of the degraded lands requires collaborative efforts and support from the different related governmental sectors. Ecological conservation and sustainable development must be adopted as tools of rehabilitation. PMID:26879985

  6. Recognizing face identity from natural and morphed smiles.

    PubMed

    Lander, Karen; Chuang, Lewis; Wickham, Lee

    2006-05-01

    It is easier to identify a degraded familiar face when it is shown moving (smiling, talking; nonrigid motion), than when it is displayed as a static image (Knight & Johnston, 1997; Lander, Christie, & Bruce, 1999). Here we explore the theoretical underpinnings of the moving face recognition advantage. In Experiment 1 we show that the identification of personally familiar faces when shown naturally smiling is significantly better than when the person is shown artificially smiling (morphed motion), as a single static neutral image or as a single static smiling image. In Experiment 2 we demonstrate that speeding up the motion significantly impairs the recognition of identity from natural smiles, but has little effect on morphed smiles. We conclude that the recognition advantage for face motion does not reflect a general benefit for motion, but suggests that, for familiar faces, information about their characteristic motion is stored in memory. PMID:16608747

  7. Isolation of pathogenic Listeria monocytogenes in faeces of wild animals in captivity.

    PubMed

    Kalorey, D R; Kurkure, N V; Warke, S R; Rawool, D B; Malik, S V S; Barbuddhe, S B

    2006-11-01

    The isolation of pathogenic Listeria spp. in faecal samples of captive wild animals was studied. Isolation of the pathogen was attempted from the samples by selective enrichment in University of Vermont Medium and plating onto Dominguez-Rodriguez isolation agar, PALCAM agar and modified McBride Listeria agar. Pathogenicity of the isolates was tested by Christie, Atkins, Munch Petersen test, phosphotidylinositol-specific phospholipase C assay, mice inoculation test and chick embryo bioassay. Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from eight (16%) of 50 faecal samples from six different mammals and one bird. Out of eight isolates, one isolate from jackal proved to be pathogenic by all the pathogenicity testing assays. PCR amplification of virulence genes suggested that the isolate was potentially pathogenic. PMID:17034860

  8. Hudson River PCB clean-up to begin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christie Whitman signed the Record of Decision on 1 February to clean up a stretch of the Hudson River that has been contaminated by polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). The decision calls for dredging 2 million cubic meters of PCB-contaminated sediment from a 64-kilometer stretch of the upper Hudson to remove about 68,000 kilograms of PCBs.The plan follows years of scientific study about whether the PCBs were safely encased in the sediment or posed a continuing hazard, and concern over whether the PCBs can be safely removed without stirring up a larger pollution problem along the river. The EPA found that PCBs in the sediment are not safely buried because erosion and river flows can redistribute river sediment. The agency also found that although PCBs break down naturally over time, this degradation does not render them harmless.

  9. Organochlorine and metal residues in royal terns nesting on the central Texas coast

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, K.A.; LeFever, C.A.; Mulhern, B.M.

    1983-01-01

    Royal Tern eggs collected from Pelican and Sundown islands on the central Texas coast in 1978 contained relatively low levels of organochlorine and metal pollutants. DDE and PCBs were found most frequently, but levels were below those known to have an adverse effect on avian reproduction and survival. Average metal residues did not vary significantly between study areas, and with the possible exception of mercury, were present only at background levels. Shells of eggs collected in 1978 were no thinner than eggshells collected before 1947. There was a significant imporvement in mean eggshell thickness from 1970 to 1978 and a corresponding decline in DDE and PCB residues. No deformed or abnormal young were observed. Although elevated levels of industrial contaminants were reported in sediments and sea grasses of Corpus Christi Bay, little of those contaminants appear to have accumulated in the Royal Tern.

  10. Thin film battery/fuel cell power generation system. Topical report covering Task 5: the design, cost and benefit of an industrial cogeneration system, using a high-temperature solid-oxide-electrolyte (HTSOE) fuel-cell generator

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-25

    A literature search and review of the studies analyzing the relationship between thermal and electrical energy demand for various industries and applications resulted in several applications affording reasonable correlation to the thermal and electrical output of the HTSOE fuel cell. One of the best matches was in the aluminum industry, specifically, the Reynolds Aluminum Production Complex near Corpus Christi, Texas. Therefore, a preliminary design of three variations of a cogeneration system for this plant was effected. The designs were not optimized, nor were alternate methods of providing energy compared with the HTSOE cogeneration systems. The designs were developed to the extent necessary to determine technical practicality and economic viability, when compared with alternate conventional fuel (gas and electric) prices in the year 1990.

  11. Confronting pediatric brain tumors: parent stories.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Gigi

    2014-01-01

    This narrative symposium brings to light the extreme difficulties faced by parents of children diagnosed with brain tumors. NIB editorial staff and narrative symposium editors, Gigi McMillan and Christy A. Rentmeester, developed a call for stories that was distributed on several list serves and posted on Narrative Inquiry in Bioethics' website. The call asks parents to share their personal experience of diagnosis, treatment, long-term effects of treatment, social issues and the doctor-patient-parent dynamic that develops during this process. Thirteen stories are found in the print version of the journal and an additional six supplemental stories are published online only through Project MUSE. One change readers may notice is that the story authors are not listed in alphabetical order. The symposium editors had a vision for this issue that included leading readers through the timeline of this topic: diagnosis-treatment-acute recovery-recurrence-treatment (again)-acute recovery (again)-long-term quality of life-(possibly) end of life. Stories are arranged to help lead the reader through this timeline.Gigi McMillan is a patient and research subject advocate, co-founder of We Can, Pediatric Brain Tumor Network, as well as, the mother of a child who suffered from a pediatric brain tumor. She also authored the introduction for this symposium. Christy Rentmeester is an Associate Professor of Health Policy and Ethics in the Creighton University School of Medicine. She served as a commentator for this issue. Other commentators for this issue are Michael Barraza, a clinical psychologist and board member of We Can, Pediatric Brain Tumor Network; Lisa Stern, a pediatrician who has diagnosed six children with brain tumors in her 20 years of practice; and Katie Rose, a pediatric brain tumor patient who shares her special insights about this world. PMID:24748242

  12. Culturally relevant science: An approach to math science education for Hispanics. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz de Montellano, B.

    1996-11-14

    As planned a letter was sent out to 17 teachers who had participated in a Summer 1994 workshop on ``Culturally Relevant Science for Hispanics`` at Michigan State. These teachers were supposed to have spent the intervening time developing lesson plans and curricula. The letter requested a report of any activities undertaken and copies of lesson plans and materials developed by February 1996 with a stipend of $400 for satisfactory reports. It was a disappointment to only get 9 responses and not all of them demonstrating a satisfactory level of activity. Diana Marinez, Dean of Science at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi, who is the other developer of this curriculum and the author reviewed the submitted materials and chose those showing the most promise to be invited to participate in the Summer Writing Workshop. Spring of 1996 and particularly in May--June, the author wrote a partial first draft of a companion volume for the teacher`s manual which would provide a rationale for doing culturally relevant science, present the cultural and the scientific background that teachers would need in order to be able to teach. One of the goals of this curriculum is that it should be off-the-shelf ready to teach and that teachers would not have to do extra research to encourage its adoption. The outline of the book is appendix 1. The Writing Workshop was held at Texas A and M University, Corpus Christi from July 14 to July 27, 1996. Participating teachers chose topics that they were interested in developing and wrote first drafts. These were distributed to all participants and critiqued by the workshop directors before being rewritten. Some teachers were more productive than others depending on their science background. In total an impressive number of lesson plans were written. These lesson plans are listed in Appendix 3. Appendix 4 is a sample lesson. Work still needs to be done on both the source book and the teachers` manual.

  13. Freshwater Sustainability under Climate Change in the Nueces River Basin, TX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, D. A.; Sinha, T.; Ji, J. H.

    2015-12-01

    Freshwater sustainability in arid and semi-arid regions is threatened due to climate change as well as competing water demands for agriculture, urban development, industrial use and ecosystem needs. Such changes have forced the local water supply systems to update their water supply plans once in five years. Developments of such water supply plans not only require reliable assessment of water availability and demands but also incorporate uncertainties due to regional climate change projections. In this study, we focus our analysis on one of the basins in the South Texas - Nueces River Basin (NRB) which provide inflows to the Choke Canyon - Lake Corpus Christi reservoir system. This reservoir system is the major freshwater source for the coastal communities in the basin and the Nueces Bay, which serve as a habitat for several key fish species such as blue crab, brown shrimp, and southern flounder. Freshwater inflows in the NRB have decreased in the past decades, resulting in increased salinity of the Nueces Bay, thus impacting the natural habitat for several fish species. Therefore, estimating the impacts of climate change in the NRB is critical to develop sustainable water resources management in the region. We will implement a physically based hydrologic model under historical climate change scenarios from multiple General Circulation Models (GCMs) over the past 30 years to understand how well we could have used large scale climate change projections in improving water resources management over the overlapping observations. A water management model will be developed for the Choke Canyon - Lake Corpus Christi Reservoir System, which will be ingested with inflow projections under multiple GCM scenarios over the past 30 years to incorporate uncertainty in water resources management. Finally, water management scenarios will be developed to minimize deficits between water availability and demands in the region.

  14. State of Water Molecules and Silanol Groups in Opal Minerals: a Near Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Opals from Slovakia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobon, Miroslav; Christy, Alfred A.; Kluvanec, Daniel; Illasova, L'udmila

    2011-06-01

    Recently near infrared spectroscopy in combination with double derivative technique has been effectively used by Christy [1] to differentiate between free silanol groups and hydrogen bonded silanol groups on silica gel. The method has given some insight into the type of functionalities and their location in silica gel samples. The inportant information in this respect comes from the overtones of the OH groups of water molecules hydrogen bonded to free silanol groups, and hydrogen bonded silanol groups absorbing in the region 5500- 5100 Cm-1 region. The approach was adapted to study the state of water and silanol functionalities and their locations in opals from Slovakia. Twenty opal samples classified into CT and A classes and one quartz sample were used in this work. The samples were crushed using a hydrolic press and powderised. Each sample was then subjected to evacuation process to remove surface adsorbed water at 200°C and the near infrared spectrum of the sample was measured using a Perkin Elmer NTS near infrared spectrometer equipped with a transflectance accessory. The detailed analysis of the sample was carried out using the second derivative profile of the spectrum. The samples were also heated to 750°C to study the state of water molecules in Opal minerals. The results indicate that the opal samples contain 1) surface adsorbed water 2) free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups on the surface 3) Trapped water in the bulk 4) free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups in the cavity surfaces in the bulk. A part of the water molecules found in the bulk of opal minerals are free molecules and the rest are found in hydrogen bonded state to free and hydrogen bonded silanol groups. [1] A. A. Christy, New insights into the surface functionalities and adsorption evolution of water molecules on silica gel surface: A study by second derivative Near Infrared Spectroscopy, Vib. Spectrosc. 54 (2010) 42-49.

  15. Indicator species of essential forest tree species in the Burdur district.

    PubMed

    Negiz, Mehmet Güvenç; Eser, Yunus; Kuzugüdenll, Emre; Izkan, Kürşad

    2015-01-01

    The forests of Burdur district for long have been subjected to over grazing and individual selection. As a result of this, majority of the forest areas in the district were degraded. In the district, afforestation efforts included majority of forestry implementations. It is well known that selecting suitable species plays an important role for achieving afforestation efforts. In this context, knowing the indicator species among the target species would be used in afforestation efforts, studies on the interrelationships between environmental factors and target species distribution is vital for selecting suitable species for a given area. In this study, Anatolian Black pine (Pinus nigra), Red pine (Pinus brutia), Crimean juniper (Juniperus excelsa) and Taurus cedar (Cedrus libani), essential tree species, were considered as target species. The data taken from 100 sample plots in Burdur district was used. Interspecific correlation analysis was performed to determine the positive and negative indicator species among each of the target species. As a result of ICA, 2 positive (Berberis crataegina, Juniperus oxycedrus), 2 negative (Phillyrea latifolia, Quercus coccifera) for Crimean Juniper, I positive (Juniperus oxycedrus), 3 negative (Onopordium acanthium, Fraxinus ornus, Phillyrea latifolia) for Anatolian black pine, 3 positive (Paliurus spina-christi, Quercus coccifer, Crataegus orientalis), 2 negative (Berberis crataegina, Astragalus nanus) for Red pine and 3 positive (Berberis crataegina, Rhamnus oleoides, Astragalus prusianus) 2 negative (Paliurus spina-christi, Quercus cerris) for Taurus cedarwere defined as indicator plant species. In this way, practical information was obtained for selecting the most suitable species, among the target species, for afforestation efforts in Burdur district. PMID:26591889

  16. Flood Risk Due to Hurricane Flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivera, Francisco; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Irish, Jennifer

    2015-04-01

    In this study, we evaluated the expected economic losses caused by hurricane inundation. We used surge response functions, which are physics-based dimensionless scaling laws that give surge elevation as a function of the hurricane's parameters (i.e., central pressure, radius, forward speed, approach angle and landfall location) at specified locations along the coast. These locations were close enough to avoid significant changes in surge elevations between consecutive points, and distant enough to minimize calculations. The probability of occurrence of a surge elevation value at a given location was estimated using a joint probability distribution of the hurricane parameters. The surge elevation, at the shoreline, was assumed to project horizontally inland within a polygon of influence. Individual parcel damage was calculated based on flood water depth and damage vs. depth curves available for different building types from the HAZUS computer application developed by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Parcel data, including property value and building type, were obtained from the county appraisal district offices. The expected economic losses were calculated as the sum of the products of the estimated parcel damages and their probability of occurrence for the different storms considered. Anticipated changes for future climate scenarios were considered by accounting for projected hurricane intensification, as indicated by sea surface temperature rise, and sea level rise, which modify the probability distribution of hurricane central pressure and change the baseline of the damage calculation, respectively. Maps of expected economic losses have been developed for Corpus Christi in Texas, Gulfport in Mississippi and Panama City in Florida. Specifically, for Port Aransas, in the Corpus Christi area, it was found that the expected economic losses were in the range of 1% to 4% of the property value for current climate conditions, of 1% to 8% for the 2030's and

  17. Analogue Materials Measured Under Simulated Lunar and Asteroid Environments: Application to Thermal Infrared Measurements of Airless Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Pieters, C. M.; Patterson, W., III; Moriarty, D.

    2012-12-01

    Remote sensing observations provide key insights into the composition and evolution of planetary surfaces. A fundamentally important component to any remote sensing study of planetary surfaces is laboratory measurements of well-characterized samples measured under the appropriate environmental conditions. The near-surface vacuum environment of airless bodies like the Moon and asteroids creates a thermal gradient in the upper hundred microns of regolith. Lab studies of particulate rocks and minerals as well as selected lunar soils under vacuum and lunar-like conditions have identified significant effects of this thermal gradient on thermal infrared (TIR) spectral measurements [e.g. Logan et al. 1973, Salisbury and Walter 1989, Thomas et al. 2010, Donaldson Hanna et al. 2012]. Compared to ambient conditions, these effects include: (1) the Christiansen feature (CF), an emissivity maximum diagnostic of mineralogy and average composition, shifts to higher wavenumbers and (2) an increase in spectral contrast of the CF relative to the Reststrahlen bands (RB), the fundamental molecular vibration bands due to Si-O stretching and bending. Such lab studies demonstrate the high sensitivity of TIR emissivity spectra to environmental conditions under which they are measured. The Asteroid and Lunar Environment Chamber (ALEC) is the newest addition to the RELAB at Brown University. The vacuum chamber simulates the space environment experienced by the near-surface soils of the Moon and asteroids. The internal rotation stage allows for six samples and two blackbodies to be measured without breaking vacuum (<10-4 mbar). Liquid nitrogen is used to cool the interior of the chamber, creating a cold, low emission environment (mimicking the space environment) for heated samples to radiate into. Sample cups can be heated in one of three configurations: (1) from below using heaters embedded in the base of the sample cup, (2) from above using a solar-like radiant heat source, and (3) from

  18. Seismic moment tensor for anisotropic media: implication for Non-double-couple earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cai, M.

    2008-12-01

    It is often found that the inversion results of seismic moment tensor from real seismic recorded data show the trace of seismic moment tensor M is not zero, a phenomenon called non-double-couple earthquake sources mechanism. Recently we have derived the analytical expressions of M in transversely isotropic media with the titled axis of symmetry and the results shows even only pure shear-motion of fault can lead to the implosive components determined by several combined anisotropic elastic constants. Many non-double-couple earthquakes from observations often appear in volcanic and geothermal areas (Julian, 1998), where there exist a mount of stress-aligned fluid-saturated parallel vertical micro-cracks identical to transversely isotropic media (Crampin, 2008), this stress-aligned crack will modify the seismic moment tensor. In another word, non-double-couple earthquakes don't mean to have a seismic failure movement perpendicular to the fault plane, while traditional research of seismic moment tensor focus on the case of isotropy, which cannot provide correct interpretation of seismic source mechanism. Reference: Julian, B.R., Miller, A.D. and Foulger, G.R., 1998. Non-double-couple earthquakes,1. Theory, Rev. Geophys., 36, 525¨C549. Crampin,S., Peacock,S., 2008, A review of the current understanding of seismic shear-wave splitting in the Earth's crust and common fallacies in interpretation, wave motion, 45,675-722

  19. Water Quality: 2007 Data, BPA-51; Preliminary Report, January 26, 2009.

    SciTech Connect

    Holderman, Charles

    2009-02-10

    Print Out No.1 presents a listing of the initial data. The variables included were: SITE, REP, NH4, NO2{_}3, SRP, TDP, TN, TP, and JULIAN , representing site code, replication number, ammonia nitrogen, nitrate and nitrite nitrogen, soluble reactive phosphorus, total dissolved phosphorus, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, and Julian date, respectively. All values for nitrogen, phosphorus, and carbon variables are recorded as {micro}g/L. The 2007 water quality data received by SCS required considerable manipulation and data management prior to analysis. If it is anticipated that water quality data received by SCS in the future will be of the same format, the time to carry out the necessary reformatting of the data should be taken into consideration. The levels of SRP from water quality data of previous years were often below detection limits. The data from 2007 showed elevated levels for this and other responses. This pattern was seemingly unrelated to nutrient addition treatments, however, as they appeared consistently across the study area. The river fertilization program was begun in 2005. Because the procedures for detection of nutrients and metals are quite sensitive, SCS recommends that any future water quality samples taken on, or close to, the dates of fertilizer application be carried out with the utmost care to avoid contamination issues. Doing so will ensure consistency and reliability in the resulting data.

  20. Geological structure and prospect of the oil and gas bearing of the Falkland Islands region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabanbark, A.

    2011-06-01

    In the region of the Falkland Islands, resulting from the breaking up of Gondwana and the separation of the South American and African continents, a series of rift basins was formed, such as, the Austral (Magallanes), Falkland (Malvinas), South Falkland (Malvinas), East Falkland (Malvinas), North Falkland (Malvinas), and San Julian. The sedimentary cover of the basins is represented by Phanerozoic deposits 4-7 km thick. The principle productive series are the sandstones of the Springhill Formation (Jurassic-Late Cretaceous), as well as the Tertiary mainly turbidite deposits. There are numerous types of traps dome, stratigraphic, lithologic, tectonically screened, and other types. These basins, except for the North Falkland and San Julian, form a specific producing trend extending from the west to east, which is represented by sandstones of the Springhill Formation (Jurassic-Late Cretaceous), by the maturate source rock Inoceramus Formation, and by high-quality reservoirs and caprock. This trend contains all the prerequisites for highly productive stratum; therefore, the oil and gas bearing potential of these basins is significant and the exploration works will be successful.

  1. Increasing Climate Literacy in Introductory Oceanography Classes Using Ocean Observation Data from Project Dynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hams, J. E.

    2015-12-01

    This session will present educational activities developed for an introductory Oceanography lecture and laboratory class by NOAA Teacher-at-Sea Jacquelyn Hams following participation in Leg 3 of Project DYNAMO (Dynamics of the Madden-Julian Oscillation) in November-December 2011. The Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) is an important tropical weather phenomenon with origins in the Indian Ocean that impacts many other global climate patterns such as the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), Northern Hemisphere monsoons, tropical storm development, and pineapple express events. The educational activities presented include a series of lessons based on the observational data collected during Project DYNAMO which include atmospheric conditions, wind speeds and direction, surface energy flux, and upper ocean turbulence and mixing. The lessons can be incorporated into any introductory Oceanography class discussion on ocean properties such as conductivity, temperature, and density, ocean circulation, and layers of the atmosphere. A variety of hands-on lessons will be presented ranging from short activities used to complement a lecture to complete laboratory exercises.

  2. Book Review: The history of the Quaternary Research Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, D. Q.

    2016-06-01

    This is a book that should be in the library of every member of the QRA as well as their institutions. This volume is a celebration of 50 years of the Quaternary Studies Field Group (1964), which was renamed the Quaternary Research Association (QRA) in 1969. What follows is a combination of a review with some further information based on the recollection of someone who was there. In examining the origins of the QSFG due credit is paid to Richard Hey and Richard West, but an inexplicable omission is the earlier discussion between Hey, Allan Straw and others during the field meeting of the Yorkshire Geological Society in September 1962 (Worsley, 2014). It is said that history is always written by the victors, or in modern parlance by those who write the minutes! But, in the writing of history there are only degrees of unsuccess. In Chapter 2 John Catt comments on the less than perfect early archival records of the QRA. So it is to his credit that 50 years of archival material has been diligently sifted and edited. In this he was assisted by memories of some named QRA members who are thanked. Wider consultation may have filled some of the gaps. At earlier meetings it was always a pleasure to greet long retired colleagues, such as Archie Lamont at the Carlops glacial drainage system when being demonstrated by Brian Sissons in 1966, or Tony Farringdon at Ballycotton Bay in 1968, or Hallam Movius in 1971 at a London discussion meeting. Similarly, who can forget the field meeting at Canterbury in 1967 when Alec Skempton demonstrated the Sevenoaks by-pass late-glacial slope failures, and John Hutchinson's use of Pomatias elegans for dating the Folkestone Warren landslips? Jan Mangerud's first QRA meeting on the Isle of Man (1971) was notable for his prescient recognition of glaciomarine deposits.

  3. Sunspot numbers based on historic records in the 1610s: Early telescopic observations by Simon Marius and others

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, R.; Neuhäuser, D. L.

    2016-07-01

    Hoyt & Schatten (1998) claim that Simon Marius would have observed the sun from 1617 Jun 7 to 1618 Dec 31 (Gregorian calendar) all days, except three short gaps in 1618, but would never have detected a sunspot - based on a quotation from Marius in Wolf (1857), but mis-interpreted by Hoyt & Schatten. Marius himself specified in early 1619 that for one and a half year ... rather few or more often no spots could be detected ... which was never observed before (Marius 1619). The generic statement by Marius can be interpreted such that the active day fraction was below 0.5 (but not zero) from fall 1617 to spring 1619 and that it was 1 before fall 1617 (since August 1611). Hoyt & Schatten cite Zinner (1952), who referred to Zinner (1942), where observing dates by Marius since 1611 are given but which were not used by Hoyt & Schatten. We present all relevant texts from Marius where he clearly stated that he observed many spots in different form on and since 1611 Aug 3 (Julian) = Aug 13 (Greg.) (on the first day together with Ahasverus Schmidnerus); 14 spots on 1612 May 30 (Julian) = Jun 9 (Greg.), which is consistent with drawings by Galilei and Jungius for that day, the latter is shown here for the first time; at least one spot on 1611 Oct 3 and/or 11 (Julian), i.e. Oct 13 and/or 21 (Greg.), when he changed his sunspot observing technique; he also mentioned that he has drawn sunspots for 1611 Nov 17 (Julian) = Nov 27 (Greg.); in addition to those clearly datable detections, there is evidence in the texts for regular observations. For all the information that can be compared to other observers, the data from Marius could be confirmed, so that his texts are highly credible. We also correct several shortcomings or apparent errors in the database by Hoyt & Schatten (1998) regarding 1612 (Harriot), 1615 (Saxonius, Tardé), 1616 (Tardé), 1617-1619 (Marius, Riccioli/Argoli), and Malapert (for 1618, 1620, and 1621). Furthermore, Schmidnerus, Cysat, David & Johann Fabricius

  4. Utilizing a Lagrangian View of Moisture Dynamics to Study the MJO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannah, W.; Mapes, B. E.

    2014-12-01

    Tropical precipitation has a strongly non-linear dependence on column moisture, such that it increases rapidly above a critical threshold of column moisture. Thus, the enhanced phase of the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO) can be thought of as a large contiguous area, in which most air columns have crossed over this moisture threshold. What processes dictate how this threshold is crossed at intraseasonal timescales? To begin answering this, we introduce a Lagrangian perspective on the column moisture budget of the MJO. As opposed to conventional Eulerian metrics, a Lagrangian perspective allows us to consider moistening processes with respect to air columns that are being advected by the flow. Techniques are introduced for estimating the column moisture tendencies using analysis and satellite observations, and estimates are compared for validation. We then examine how the critical column moisture threshold can influence how we think about MJO dynamics. Implications for MJO compositing methods will also be discussed.

  5. Crop status evaluations and yield predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haun, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    A model was developed for predicting the day 50 percent of the wheat crop is planted in North Dakota. This model incorporates location as an independent variable. The Julian date when 50 percent of the crop was planted for the nine divisions of North Dakota for seven years was regressed on the 49 variables through the step-down multiple regression procedure. This procedure begins with all of the independent variables and sequentially removes variables that are below a predetermined level of significance after each step. The prediction equation was tested on daily data. The accuracy of the model is considered satisfactory for finding the historic dates on which to initiate yield prediction model. Growth prediction models were also developed for spring wheat.

  6. Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES). Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Cummings, Julian C.

    2012-01-14

    The Center for Plasma Edge Simulation (CPES) project was a multi-institutional research effort funded jointly by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (OASCR) and the Office of Fusion Energy Sciences (OFES) within the Department of Energy's Office of Science. The effort was led by our Principal Investigator, CS Chang, at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at New York University. The Center included participants from Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Columbia University, Lehigh University, Rutgers University, University of Colorado, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, University of California at Davis, University of California at Irvine, North Carolina State University, and Georgia Institute of Technology. This report concerns the work performed by Dr. Julian C. Cummings, who was the institutional Principal Investigator for the CPES project at Caltech.

  7. Intraseasonal variations in the surface layer heat balance of the central equatorial Indian Ocean: The importance of zonal advection and vertical mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, M. J.; Foltz, G. R.

    2013-06-01

    examine the ocean mixed layer response to intraseasonal atmospheric forcing using moored time series data in the central equatorial Indian Ocean for October 2004 to March 2005, a period coincident with two active phases of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Both MJO events were accompanied by a sea surface temperature decrease that was partially the consequence of reduced net surface heat flux. In addition, during the first event in October-November 2004, advection by an enhanced Wyrtki Jet contributed substantial cooling, while during the second event in December 2004 to January 2005, vertical processes, most likely related to entrainment mixing, were pronounced. Heavy rainfall at the mooring location during the first event may have contributed to the formation of a 30-40 m thick barrier layer that limited turbulent vertical transfers between the mixed layer and the thermocline. There was no barrier layer present during the second event, which presumably allowed for much freer vertical turbulent exchanges.

  8. Schizophrenia, evolution and the borders of biology: on Huxley et al.'s 1964 paper in Nature.

    PubMed

    De Bont, Raf

    2010-06-01

    In October 1964, Julian Huxley, Ernst Mayr, Humphrey Osmond and Abram Hoffer co-published a controversial paper in Nature, in which they tried to explain the persistence of schizophrenia from an evolutionary perspective. This article will elucidate how the reputed authors composed this paper to make it a strong argument for biological psychiatry. Through a close reading of their correspondence, it will furthermore clarify the elements which remained unspoken in the paper, but which were elementary in its genesis. The first was the dominance of psychoanalytical theory in (American) psychiatry--a dominance which the authors wanted to break. The second was the ongoing discussion on the boundaries of biological determinism and the desirability of a new kind of eugenics. As such, the Huxley et al. paper can be used to study the central issues of psychiatry in a pivotal era of its history. PMID:21877369

  9. Time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere for use in orbit lifetime and sustenance studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culp, R. D.; Stewart, A. I.

    1984-01-01

    A time-dependent model of the Martian atmosphere suitable for calculation of long-term aerodynamic effects on low altitude satellites is presented. The atmospheric model is both position dependent, through latitude and longitude effects, and time dependent. The time dependency includes diurnal and seasonal effects, effects of annual motion, long and short term solar activity effects, and periodic dust storm effects. Nine constituent gases are included in the model. Uncertainties in exospheric temperature, turbidity, and turbopause altitude are used to produce bounds on the expected density. A computer model - a Fortran subroutine which, when given the Julian date, Cartesian position of the sun and the spacecraft in aerocentric coordinates, returns the local values of mass density, temperature, scale height, and upper and lower bounds on the mass density is presented.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Positions of satellites of giant planets (Gomes-Junior+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes-Junior, A. R.; Assafin, M.; Vieira Martins, R.; Arlot, J.-E.; Camargo, J. I. B.; Braga-Ribas, F.; da Silva Neto, D. N.; Andrei, A. H.; Dias-Oliveira, A.; Morgado, B. E.; Benedetti-Rossi, G.; Duchemin, Y.; Desmars, J.; Lainey, V.; Thuillot, W.

    2015-05-01

    Tables contain the topocentric ICRS coordinates of the irregular satellites, the position error estimated from the dispersion of the ephemeris offsets of the night of observation, the UTC time of the frame's mid-exposure in julian date, the estimated magnitude, the filter used, the telescope origin and correspondent IAU code. The filters may be U, B, V, R or I following the Johnson system; C stands for clear (no filter used), resulting in a broader R band magnitude, RE for the broad-band R filter ESO#844 with λ=651.725nm and Δλ=162.184nm (full width at half maximum) and "un" for unknown filter. E, OH, PE, BC and Z stand respectively for the ESO, OHP (Observatoire de Haute-Provence), Perkin-Elmer, Bollen & Chivens and Zeiss telescopes from the Observatorio do Pico dos Dias. (2 data files).

  11. Calendrical calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dershowitz, N.; Reingold, E. M.

    The purpose of this book is to present, in a unified, completely algorithmic form, a description of fourteen calendars and how they relate to one another: the present civil calendar (Gregorian), the recent ISO commercial calendar, the old civil calendar (Julian), the Coptic and Ethiopic calendars, the Islamic (Moslem) calendar, the modern Persian (solar) calendar, the Bahá'í calendar, the Hebrew (Jewish) calendar, the Mayan calendars, the French Revolutionary calendar, the Chinese calendar, and both the old (mean) and new (true) Hindu (Indian) calendars. Easy conversion among these calendars is a by-product of the approach, as is the determination of secular and religious holidays, The book makes accurate calendrical algorithms readily available for computer use.

  12. View of Mission Control Center celebrating conclusion of Apollo 11 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    Overall view of the Mission Operations Control Room in the Mission Control Center, bldg 30, Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC), at the conclusion of the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission. The television monitor shows President Richard M. Nixon greeting the Apollo 11 astronauts aboard the U.S.S. Hornet in the Pacific recovery area (40301); NASA and MSC Officials join the flight controllers in celebrating the conclusion of the Apollo 11 mission. From left foreground Dr. Maxime A. Faget, MSC Director of Engineering and Development; George S. Trimble, MSC Deputy Director; Dr. Christopher C. Kraft Jr., MSC Director fo Flight Operations; Julian Scheer (in back), Assistant Adminstrator, Offic of Public Affairs, NASA HQ.; George M. Low, Manager, Apollo Spacecraft Program, MSC; Dr. Robert R. Gilruth, MSC Director; and Charles W. Mathews, Deputy Associate Administrator, Office of Manned Space Flight, NASA HQ (40302).

  13. Creation, detection, and evolution of Jupiter Trojan families

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, O.

    2011-07-01

    An investigation is carried out looking at correlations between the orbital elements of collisional targets and projectiles, estimating the number of interlopers in Trojan collisional families, and at the possibility of determining the ages of the Jupiter Trojan families by orbital integration. Real Trojans are integrated and close encounters are recorded in order to evaluate collisional circumstances between Trojans. Fictitious collisional families are created and integrated for 10 MJyr (million Julian years) forward in time and back again to the time of the collision in order to check the performance of the integrator, and the behaviour of the fictitious collisional fragments. Proper elements are calculated for the detection of family clustering using the hierarchically clustering method.

  14. Fixing Images Observation Dates Thanks to Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derriere, S.

    2015-09-01

    An important piece of metadata for any astronomical image is the date and time at which it was observed (and the exposure time). Unfortunately, the values of the observation epoch found in the FITS headers of digitized photographic plates, for example, are not always accurate. There can be many different sources of error: mistakes in the original observation log, errors when converting between different dates and time format (calendar date, Julian days, decimal years, etc.). We present in this paper an analysis of the different values that can be found for the observation epoch of several image sets in various metadata sources. We show how the presence of known asteroids in the field of view can be used to recover the correct time values with a good accuracy.

  15. Electrodynamics of disk-accreting magnetic neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, M. Coleman; Lamb, Frederick K.; Hamilton, Russell J.

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the electrodynamics of magnetic neutron stars accreting from Keplerian disks and the implications for particle acceleration and gamma-ray emission by such systems. We argue that the particle density in the magnetospheres of such stars is larger by orders of magnitude than the Goldreich-Julian density, so that the formation of vacuum gaps is unlikely. We show that even if the star rotates slowly, electromotive forces (EMFs) of order 10(exp 15) V are produced by the interaction of plasma in the accretion disk with the magnetic field of the neutron star. The resistance of the disk-magnetosphere-star circuit is small, and hence these EMFs drive very large conduction currents. Such large currents are likely to produce magnetospheric instabilities, such as relativistic double layers and reconnection events, that can accelerate electrons or ions to very high energies.

  16. The best possible child

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Julian Savulescu argues for two principles of reproductive ethics: reproductive autonomy and procreative beneficence, where the principle of procreative beneficence is conceptualised in terms of a duty to have the child, of the possible children that could be had, who will have the best opportunity of the best life. Were it to be accepted, this principle would have significant implications for the ethics of reproductive choice and, in particular, for the use of prenatal testing and other reproductive technologies for the avoidance of disability, and for enhancement. In this paper, it is argued that this principle should be rejected, and it is concluded that while potential parents do have important obligations in relation to the foreseeable lives of their future children, these obligations are not best captured in terms of a duty to have the child with the best opportunity of the best life. PMID:17470505

  17. Gravitational spurs and resonances - Effects of small mass disturbers in spiral galaxy disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byrd, G. G.; Smith, B. F.; Miller, R. H.

    1984-01-01

    In the present simulations of a disturber in a complete stellar disk without the restrictive assumption, the disturber parameters of the NGC 206 cloud in M 31 were assumed as a realistic example. The resulting spur around the disturber was comparable in shape, size, and strength to Julian and Toomre's (1966) results. In addition, a complicated evolving pattern of strong density peaks appeared well inside and outside the disturber's orbit. Simulation with a ten-times-more-massive disturber showed a more clearly defined version of the same initial pattern, two spiral arms of density peaks rotating with the disturber in the stronger arm. The orbital radii of the density peaks correspond to those of epicyclic resonances with the orbiting disturber potential.

  18. Analytical probability density function for the statistics of the ENSO phenomenon: Asymmetry and power law tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, M.

    2016-01-01

    This letter has two main goals. The first one is to give a physically reasonable explanation for the use of stochastic models for mimicking the apparent random features of the El Ninõ-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phenomenon. The second one is to obtain, from the theory, an analytical expression for the equilibrium density function of the anomaly sea surface temperature, an expression that fits the data from observations well, reproducing the asymmetry and the power law tail of the histograms of the NIÑO3 index. We succeed in these tasks exploiting some recent theoretical results of the author in the field of the dynamical origin of the stochastic processes. More precisely, we apply this approach to the celebrated recharge oscillator model (ROM), weakly interacting by a multiplicative term, with a general deterministic complex forcing (Madden-Julian Oscillations, westerly wind burst, etc.), and we obtain a Fokker-Planck equation that describes the statistical behavior of the ROM.

  19. Effects of explicit atmospheric convection at high CO2

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, Nathan P.; Branson, Mark; Burt, Melissa A.; Abbot, Dorian S.; Kuang, Zhiming; Randall, David A.; Tziperman, Eli

    2014-01-01

    The effect of clouds on climate remains the largest uncertainty in climate change predictions, due to the inability of global climate models (GCMs) to resolve essential small-scale cloud and convection processes. We compare preindustrial and quadrupled CO2 simulations between a conventional GCM in which convection is parameterized and a “superparameterized” model in which convection is explicitly simulated with a cloud-permitting model in each grid cell. We find that the global responses of the two models to increased CO2 are broadly similar: both simulate ice-free Arctic summers, wintertime Arctic convection, and enhanced Madden–Julian oscillation (MJO) activity. Superparameterization produces significant differences at both CO2 levels, including greater Arctic cloud cover, further reduced sea ice area at high CO2, and a stronger increase with CO2 of the MJO. PMID:25024204

  20. MJO Modulation of Ocean Chlorophyll: Can the fishing industry benefit from subseasonal forecasts?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waliser, D.; Murtugudde, R.; Strutton, P.; Li, F.

    2005-05-01

    Previous studies have noted considerable influences by the Madden-Julian Oscillation on a number of weather and climate processes. These include a considerable influence over low-frequency weather variations over much of the Tropics, the onsets and breaks of the Asian-Australian monsoon systems, extra-tropical synoptic variability, tropical storm and hurricane development in the Pacific and Atlantic sectors, and possibly the timing and strength of El Nino / La Nina events. The material in this presentation will show that the MJO also produces a significant basin-wide influence on the tropical Indo-Pacific chlorophyll distribution. Diagnostic analysis will also be shown that indicates that vertical mixing associated with wind variations are in part responsible for these variations. These results, in conjunction with recent studies indicating the MJO may have useful predictability with lead times up to 2-3 weeks, indicate that operational predictions of the MJO may also be of use to the commercial fishing industry.