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Sample records for alfredo benso paolo

  1. Age constraints of the Wassa and Benso mesothermal gold deposits, Ashanti Belt, Ghana, West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parra-Avila, Luis A.; Bourassa, Yan; Miller, John; Perrouty, Stéphane; Fiorentini, Marco L.; Campbell McCuaig, T.

    2015-12-01

    The Ashanti Belt in Ghana hosts numerous multi-million ounce gold deposits and is one of the most richly gold endowed Paleoproterozoic belts of the West African Craton. This work shows that the Wassa mineralized intrusion is part of the Sefwi Group. This unit at Wassa is strongly magnetic and show a distinctly high response in regional magnetic data sets compared to other units of equivalent age within the belt. The unit is inferred to be a lateral extension of an exposed fragment of what defines the substrate to the Tarkwa Basin sediments. The Wassa deposit, located in the eastern limb of the belt, is hosted within mafic to intermediate volcanic flows that are interbedded with minor horizons of volcaniclastics, clastic sediments. The clastic sediments include wackes and magnetite rich sedimentary layers, presumably derived from banded iron formations. The previously described sequence is intruded by syn-volcanic mafic intrusives and felsic porphyries rocks that are all part of the Birimian stratigraphy. Two new key SHRIMP II U-Pb ages were determined as part of this study: a new age of 2191 ± 6 Ma was determined on magmatic zircon grains of the Wassa porphyry host rock, which now represents the oldest known felsic intrusion hosting gold mineralization in the Ashanti Belt region. The Benso gold deposit system, which is located in the eastern limb of the Ashanti Belt approximately 38 km southwest of Wassa is hosted within a series of volcanic units intruded by mafic to intermediate units. A SHRIMP II U-Pb age of 2157 ± 5 Ma was determined from magmatic zircons obtained from a granodiorite of the G-Zone of the Benso deposit. This granodiorite is the main host rock for gold mineralization and thus the age provides an upper constraint for mineral emplacement. The newly determined ages provide an upper constraint for the gold mineralization within this region of the Ashanti Belt. They also support recent structural studies that have interpreted that the Wassa

  2. [Paolo Zacchia--the spiritual father of forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Händel, Konrad

    2003-01-01

    Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) was the personal physician of the popes Innocent X and Alexander VII, legal advisor to the Rota Romana and head of the health system in the Papal States. His most important work, written in Latin, is entitled "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" and was published in 9 volumes between 1621 and 1651. Even after Zacchia's death comprehensive reprints were published at several places up to the late 18th century. Zacchia covered all the medicolegal issues of his time including the problem of "malpractice" and medical ethics. He is rightly considered an outstanding representative of his profession, whose "Quaestiones Medico-Legales" gave legal medicine its name. PMID:14639809

  3. Paolo Sarpi and the first Copernican tidal theory.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Ron

    2014-12-01

    Despite his demanding religious responsibilities, Paolo Sarpi maintained an active involvement in science between 1578 and 1598- as his Pensieri reveal. They show that from 1585 onwards he studied the Copernican theory and recorded arguments in its favour. The fact that for 1595 they include an outline of a Copernican tidal theory resembling Galileo's Dialogue theory is well known. But examined closely, Sarpi's theory is found to be different from that of the Dialogue in several important respects. That Sarpi was a Copernican by 1592 is revealed by other of his pensieri, whereas at that time we know that Galileo was not. The examination of Sarpi's tidal theory and of the work of Galileo in this period indicates that the theory Sarpi recorded in 1595 was of his own creation. The appreciation that the theory was Sarpi's and that Galileo subsequently came to change his views on the Copernican theory and adopted the tidal theory has major implications for our understanding of the significance of Sarpi's contribution to the Scientific Revolution. Moreover, it appears that several of the most significant theoretical features of the tidal theory published by Galileo in the Dialogue - and which proved of lasting value - were in reality Sarpi's. PMID:25547000

  4. Alfredo Dugès' type specimens of amphibians and reptiles revisited.

    PubMed

    Flores-Villela, Oscar; Ríos-Muñoz, César A; Magaña-Cota, Gloria E; Quezadas-Tapia, Néstor L

    2016-01-01

    The type specimens of amphibians and reptiles of the Museo de Historia Natural Alfredo Dugès, at the University of Guanajuato (MADUG) were reviewed following Smith & Necker's (1943) summary. Owing to this collection's eventful history and its historical importance as the oldest herpetological collection in Mexico, a review of its conservation status was needed. After many years, the collection has received proper recognition at the University of Guanajuato with a portion of the herpetological types considered "Precious Assets" of the university. We found 34 type specimens pertaining to 18 taxa; six are additional specimens to those previously reported; six herpetological types are missing, including the body of the type of Adelophis copei. All specimens are in good to reasonable condition except for the type of Rhinocheilus antonii, which has dried out completely. All specimens are illustrated to show their condition. PMID:27394365

  5. Master of Disaster: Paolo Bacigalupi's Dystopian Tales Are Infuriating, Disturbing, and Impossible to Put down

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Betty

    2011-01-01

    This article presents an interview with Paolo Bacigalupi, a rising sci-fi star who has walked away with the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award, and, most recently, the Michael L. Printz Award for Excellence in Young Adult Literature--the Young Adult Library Services Association's top prize for prose. That's pretty impressive for a guy who's published…

  6. [Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos: criminal and legal aspects of serial homicide with over 200 victims].

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Rodriguez y Rowinski, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the crimes of the homosexual paedophile sadist Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, based on a research stay of the authors in Columbia, and including discussions with the investigators, and the offender. Between 1992 and 1999, Garavito killed more than 200 children in the core age span between 8 and 13 years (as an exception, 6 to 16 years). His modus operandi remained stable. During daytime, he lured children of a lower social status out of crowded parts of the city into hidden areas that were overgrown with high plants. Garavito promised either payment for easy work, or drugs, or made other socially believable offers. The children were tied up, tortured, raped, and killed by at least one cut in the lateral part of the neck, or by decapitation. During the killings, Garavito was drunk. Even after his arrest (for attempted sexual abuse under a wrong identity) it was not immediately possible to track his crimes since Garavito had frequently changed his places of stay and his jobs. He also grew different hairdos and used wrong names. During his still ongoing confessions, he directs the investigators correctly to all scenes of crime spread over large parts of Columbia. In our report, we give an overview over the course of investigations, hint to similarities in the cases of the German serial killer Denke (1920's) and homosexual paedophile serial killer Jürgen Bartsch (1960's), and give preliminary impressions on the offender's personality. Furthermore, the violent environment and juridical peculiarities in Columbia are discussed. In spite of a total penalty of 2600 years in prison, it is formally well possible that Garavito will be released out of prison within the next 10 to 20 years, i.e. even before the maximum sentence of 40 years will be over. PMID:12462935

  7. An interview with Alfredo Falcone and Lisa Salvatore: RECOURSE and trifluridine/tipiracil in metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Falcone, Alfredo; Salvatore, Lisa

    2016-09-01

    Professor Alfredo Falcone and Dr Lisa Salvatore speak to Roshaine Gunawardana, Managing Commissioning Editor: Professor Alfredo Falcone is the Director of the Department of Oncology and the Specialization School at the University Hospital of Pisa, Italy. He trained in Pisa and Genoa, Italy, and has held major positions in Italian oncology since 2000. He currently has more than 300 publications, including papers in peer-reviewed international and national journals, book chapters, and more than 600 abstracts of presentations to international and national conferences. The majority of his papers regard clinical and translational research, with a particular focus on metastatic colorectal cancer. Dr Lisa Salvatore is a medical oncologist in the Department of Translational Research and New Technologies in Medicine and Surgery at the University of Pisa. She has been an author on about 40 publications in major peer-reviewed publications and has made numerous presentations in national and international conferences. Her main interest is focused on clinical and translational research in metastatic colorectal cancer. PMID:27266889

  8. Questioning medicine in seventeenth-century Rome: the consultations of Paolo Zacchia.

    PubMed

    Duffin, Jacalyn

    2011-01-01

    This paper surveys the life and contributions of Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) before analyzing 85 Latin consilia (or consultations) in his Quaestiones medico-legales. Topics include death, paternity, sexuality, disease, and miracles. Because the consilia cite the rest of his treatise, they open the entire work, elucidating applications of theory. This research relied on the construction of a database, built on subject, date, and citations. The paper closes with historiographic suggestions for why this prominent author has been ignored in North America. PMID:21595366

  9. The European accreditation of Istituto Tumori Giovanni Paolo II of Bari.

    PubMed

    Lacalamita, Rosanna; Quaranta, Antonio; Trisorio Liuzzi, Maria Pia; Nigro, Aldo; Simonetti, Umberto; Schirone, Massimiliano; Aloè, Ferruccio; Capochiani, Gianluca; De Francesco, Genoveffa; Gadaleta, Cosimo; Galetta, Domenico; Grammatica, Luciano; Guarini, Attilio; Mattioli, Vittorio; Milella, Piero; Moschetta, Antonio; Nardulli, Patrizia; Nigro, Vincenza; Silvestris, Nico; Paradiso, Angelo

    2015-12-31

    The National Cancer Institute of Bari (Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico, IRCCS) has been involved since the conception of the project of the Italian Ministry for Health aimed to validate the applicability of the Organisation of European Cancer Institutes (OECI) accreditation and designation (A&D) model to the Network of Italian Cancer Centers, IRCCS, of Alleanza Contro il Cancro. The self-assessment phase of the Institute started in September 2013 and ended in June 2014. All documents and tools were transferred to the OECI A&D Board in June 2014 and a 2-day peer review visit was conducted in October 2014 by an international qualified audit team. The Institute received its final designation and certification in June 2015. The OECI A&D Board, in its final report, came to the conclusion that Istituto Tumori "Giovanni Paolo II" of Bari has a strong research component with some essential elements of comprehensive cancer care still under development; the lack of a system for using outcome data for the strategic management approach to decision-making and missing a regular internal audit system eventually helping further quality improvement were reported as examples of areas with opportunities for improvement. The OECI A&D process represented a great opportunity for the cancer center to benchmark the quality of its performance according to standard parameters in comparison with other international centers and to further develop a participatory group identity. The common goal of accreditation was real and participatory with long-lasting positive effects. We agree with the OECI comments about the next areas of work in which the Institute could produce future further efforts: the use of its powerful IT system as a means for outcome analysis and empowerment projects for its cancer patients. PMID:27096266

  10. The woman who gave birth to a dog Monstrosity and bestiality in Quaestiones Medico-Legales by Paolo Zacchia.

    PubMed

    De Ceglia, Francesco Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The Italian Paolo Zacchia (1584-1659) is considered one of the fathers of forensic medicine. From a letter sent by the physician and botanist Pietro Castelli, the article seeks to reconstruct the opinions that Zacchia expressed about monsters in his monumental Quaestiones Medico-Legales. Although he did not seem too sure about the possibility that a hybrid could be born from the union of a man and a beast, he believed that God intervened, allowing the birth so that the abomination could be discovered. The opinion of Zacchia is related to the image that people had at the time of the relationship between humans and animals. PMID:25702383

  11. Career perspective: Paolo Cerretelli.

    PubMed

    Cerretelli, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    This article is an autobiographical account of my career as a human physiologist. I have spent 55 years traversing mountains, continents, seas, and skies, carrying out research in the laboratories of several international institutions as well as in the field. My scientific roots, approach to the mountains and altitude populations, both in Europe and in Asia, together with an account of my experimental studies at altitude, including extreme conditions, shall be presented together with pertinent occasional reflections of a personal nature. PMID:24438551

  12. Career perspective: Paolo Cerretelli

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    This article is an autobiographical account of my career as a human physiologist. I have spent 55 years traversing mountains, continents, seas, and skies, carrying out research in the laboratories of several international institutions as well as in the field. My scientific roots, approach to the mountains and altitude populations, both in Europe and in Asia, together with an account of my experimental studies at altitude, including extreme conditions, shall be presented together with pertinent occasional reflections of a personal nature. PMID:24438551

  13. Limiting factors to oxygen transport on Mount Everest 30 years after: a critique of Paolo Cerretelli's contribution to the study of altitude physiology.

    PubMed

    Ferretti, Guido

    2003-10-01

    In 1976, Paolo Cerretelli published an article entitled "Limiting factors to oxygen transport on Mount Everest" in the Journal of Applied Physiology. The paper demonstrated the role of cardiovascular oxygen transport in limiting maximal oxygen consumption (VO2max). In agreement with the predominant view of VO2max limitation at that time, however, its results were taken to mean that cardiovascular oxygen transport does not limit VO2max at altitude. So it was argued that the limiting factor could be in the periphery, and muscle blood flow was proposed as a possible candidate. Despite this suggestion, the conclusion generated a series of papers on muscle structural characteristics. These experiments demonstrated a loss of muscle oxidative capacity in chronic hypoxia, and thus provided an unambiguous refutation of the then widespread hypothesis that an increased muscle oxidative capacity is needed at altitude to compensate for the lack of oxygen. This analysis is followed by a short account of Cerretelli's more recent work, with a special attention to the subject of the so-called "lactate paradox". PMID:14530980

  14. Should the definition of "sleep hygiene" be antedated of a century? A historical note based on an old book by Paolo Mantegazza, rediscovered. To place in a new historical context the development of the concept of sleep hygiene.

    PubMed

    Gigli, Gian Luigi; Valente, Mariarosaria

    2013-05-01

    The article contains a historical note on the concept of sleep hygiene, developed in 1977 by Peter Hauri, who developed a set of sleep-promoting rules, considered the fundament for sleep-hygiene techniques. Somnologists, unanimously ascribed to Hauri the fatherhood of the lucky term, while numerous books included at least a section on sleep hygiene. "Inadequate sleep hygiene" was included as a nosological entity in the International Classification of Sleep Disorders. This article intends to demonstrate that the concept of sleep hygiene was developed many years before, thanks to the pioneering work of Paolo Mantegazza, a scientist and a professor in the Medical School of the University of Pavia, Italy. After presenting briefly the history of the University of Pavia and illustrating the profile of Paolo Mantegazza, the article presents the original book published by Mantegazza in 1864 (second edition in 1865). The authors report extensive citations of Mantegazza's original book dealing with sleep hygiene. Mantegazza's indications, compared with Hauri's rules show important similarities. The authors support the view that the fatherhood of sleep hygiene should be acknowledged to Mantegazza and antedated to 1864. Hauri keeps the merit of giving more solid scientific roots to the concept of sleep hygiene and of inserting it in the frame of modern sleep medicine. PMID:22752854

  15. A Storybook Romance: Dante's Paolo and Francesca. [Lesson Plan].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2000

    This lesson plan highlights one episode in the "Divine Comedy" to provide students with an introduction to Dante's poem. After a brief introduction to the opening of the "Divine Comedy," which portrays Dante as a pilgrim guided by the poet Virgil on a journey through the Christian afterlife toward God, students read Canto 5 of the "Inferno," which…

  16. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    Don DePaolo:

    2010-02-16

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  17. Carbon Cycle 2.0: Don DePaolo: Geo and Bio Sequestration

    ScienceCinema

    Don DePaolo:

    2010-09-01

    Feb. 4, 2010: Humanity emits more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future.

  18. The impossible interview with the man of the hidden biological structures. Interview by Paolo Mazzarello.

    PubMed

    Golgi, Camillo

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents an "impossible interview" to Professor Camillo Golgi, placed in time in December 1906. The Italian Professor Golgi from Pavia has been awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine ex aequo with the Spanish anatomist Santiago Ramón y Cajal. Both scientists have obtained the award for their work on the anatomy of the nervous system. However, they have opposite views on the mechanisms underlying nervous functions. Golgi believes that the axons stained by his "black reaction" form a continuous anatomical or functional network along which nervous impulses propagate. Ramón y Cajal is the paladin of the neuron theory, a hypothesis questioned by Golgi in his Nobel lecture of Tuesday, December 11. After the ceremony, an independent journalist has interviewed Professor Golgi in the Grand Hotel in Stockholm. Excerpts about his education, his main scientific discoveries, and his personal life are here given (reconstructing the "impossible interview" on the basis of Golgi's original writings). PMID:16997760

  19. The Transformative Experiences of Afghan Educators through Paolo Freire and William Perry's Lenses: Four Cases in a Research-Oriented U.S. Graduate School of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thinsan, Snea

    2009-01-01

    Conducted over a three-year period, this multiple-case study examined the previous professional backgrounds, transitional issues, and intellectual transformation of four Afghan university teachers during their graduate study in language education at a large Midwestern research university. An intellectual transformation coding scheme synthesized…

  20. Comment on «Tidal notches in the Mediterranean Sea: A comprehensive analysis» by Fabrizio Antonioli, Valeria Lo Presti, Alessio Rovere, Luigi Ferranti, Marco Anzidei, Stefano Furlani, Giuseppe Mastronuzzi, Paolo E. Orru, Giovanni Scicchitano, Gianmaria Sannino, Cecilia R. Spampinato, Rossella Pagliarulo, Giacomo Deiana, Eleonora de Sabata, Paolo Sansò, Matteo Vacchi and Antonio Vecchio. Quaternary Science Reviews 119 (2015) 66-84

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evelpidou, Niki; Pirazzoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The paper of Antonioli et al. (2015) presents observations of 73 sites with erosion notches, which are called tidal notches, which in fact appear to be of various genetic origins, because a combination of several physical chemical and biological processes of formation is considered including, in addition to intertidal bioerosion, also carbonate rock solution, wetting and drying and wave abrasion that would produce different types of notches. Among the erosion notches, some «roof notches», in which the notch lacks a floor, are distinguished. For these isolated roofs, we would tend to ascribe erosion to dissolution by a freshwater spring undercutting a limestone cliff at sea level. Accompanying a rise in sea level, dissolution by freshwater will tend to continuously displace the roof of the notch upwards, while the base of the notch, dissolved, will tend to be missing. For such isolated roof of a solution notch, protruding above the waterline, the term «visor» has been proposed by Evelpidou et al. (2011).

  1. Cinema and Pedagogy: An Urban Education Seminar

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Karen Ann; Vellani, Al-Munir

    2014-01-01

    In "Cinema Paradiso" (Tomatore, 1988), Salvatore's love of movies came from spending his earlier, young life inside a cinema with the fatherly projectionist Alfredo, now blind and bitter. Alfredo is right. Life is much harder, yes, yet still very much "like in the movies" filled with frustrated actions, performed inside blind…

  2. PREFACE: The IX Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amore, Paolo; Aranda, Alfredo; Bashir, Adnan; Mondragón, Myriam; Raya, Alfredo

    2006-05-01

    The IX Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields was held in the beautiful city of Colima, in the South-West of Mexico, from 17-22 November 2003. The proceedings of the Workshop were delayed due to problems with a previous publisher, we are very grateful that Journal of Physics: Conference Series kindly agreed to publish the proceedings rapidly at this late stage. The Workshop aimed to cover, through invited lectures delivered by internationally known experts, the most recent developments in the field. There was also a series of short seminars as well as a poster session, which allowed the whole community to participate with their most recent research results. A special session was dedicated to awarding the Division Medal to Professor Benjamin Grinstein, from The University of California, San Diego, for his outstanding contributions to the field. This volume contains the written version of the material presented at the Workshop. The Workshop was attended by more than 100 participants, including faculty members, postdocs and graduate students. It was organized by the Particles and Fields Division of the Mexican Physical Society, and generously sponsored by several institutions: Universidad de Colima, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás Hidalgo, Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (Conacyt). The Local Organizing Committee was integrated by Paolo Amore, Alfredo Aranda, Carlos Moisés Hernóndez Suórez (Director of the Physics Faculty), Arturo Gonzólez Larios, Enrique Farías Martínez, and Myriam Cruz Calvario, all from the University of Colima. The members of the National Organizing Committee were Adnan Bashir (IFM-UMSHN), Jens Erler (IF-UNAM), Heriberto Castilla Valdés (CINVESTAV-U.Zacatenco), Gabriel López Castro (CINVESTAV-U.Zacatenco), Myriam Mondragón (IF-UNAM) and Luis Villaseñ or (IFM-UMSHN). We gratefully acknowledge the help given by

  3. Three-dimensional modeling in the study of subsidence in mining Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West) - Francesco Muntoni (1) Teresa Balvis (2) Paolo Bevilacqua (3) (1) Geological, Mining Park of Sardinia - Via Monteverdi, 16 09016 - Iglesias (2) freelance (3) Department of Engineering and Architecture - University of Trieste, Via Valerio 10 - Trieste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntoni, F.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of subsidence and subsequent landslides in mining areas are very frequent, the study examines the proposed mining area of Acquaresi (Sardinia South - West), interested in the years between 1991 and 2003 by major subsidence phenomena and consequent events landslides. The valley of Acquaresi is particularly important, not only for its mines, but also for the aspect related to the geomorphological evolution morphotectonic in the context of Paleozoic lithologies, which have a rectangular structure parallel to the coastline. To make measurements and analysis of the evolution of human morphostructural and throughout the industry, it was considered appropriate to create a three-dimensional model that would allow a synoptic view with the different information available to the industry. E 'was created a model using the points listed extrapolated from the Regional Technical Map scale 1:10,000, the map at scale 1:2000 dell'IGEA and the values of a detailed survey of the study area, measured at a scale 1: 500. How MicroStation CAD software was used, with whom it is made of a TIN high detail taking into account then is, if possible, of quoted points, roads, major infrastructure, contour lines (lines-intermediate-auxiliary), buildings and lines coast. The model was supported and shaped (draping) image obtained by integrating the color orthophotos of the area in 1:10,000 scale of the Autonomous Region of Sardinia and photos to scale 1:2,000 made to run dall'IGEA spa at the last event of the landslide. The use of aerial photographs, a scale similar to that of cartography, has allowed us to achieve excellent results by superimposing the frames of the areas of interest on models made, with views that appear to be consistent with the technical papers, with a maximum error of less than that of the reference mapping. Moreover, to emphasize the tectonic lineations, morphological aspects and changes in landscape and environment, it was considered appropriate to use a three-dimensional model, thanks to software used in this trial, with a high detail 3D visualization. Starting from the Regional Technical Map has been possible to realize the DEM file, then perform an interpolation with a point layer containing elevation values recorded separately and then superimpose the orthophoto to 3D surface. It was also decided to use a terrain model DTM knitted irregular TIN compared to a regular grid pattern GRID, because the first best response to the need to have a shirt that exploited all possible points present and identifiable in the territory. With the use of a TIN was thus possible to insert also the points detected by the GPS in the country to verify the area of detachment of the landslide, thus being able to increase the detail in the area of observation. Getting a noticeable "jump" quality: moving from a two-dimensional to a three-dimensional display. The model thus obtained has allowed a very good point of the area: they are easy to locate the outcrops of the different lithological structures, facilitating the study and evaluation for interventions of recovery.

  4. Pepper Oil Surprise

    NASA Video Gallery

    Astronauts Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli perform the Pepper Oil Surprise experiment from Potlatch Elementary School in Potlatch, Idaho. This research investigates the interaction of liquid pepper/...

  5. Expedition 27 Undocks from the Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    After spending 157 days aboard the International Space Station, Dmitry Kondratyev, NASA Flight Engineer Cady Coleman and European Space Agency Flight Engineer Paolo Nespoli undocked from the statio...

  6. Expedition 27 Trains for Soyuz Undocking

    NASA Video Gallery

    Expedition 27 crew members Dmitry Kondratyev, Cady Coleman and Paolo Nespoli train inside the Soyuz TMA-20 spacecraft. They are preparing for their undocking and landing in Kazakhstan planned for M...

  7. Toward a Better Implementation of the Audio-Lingual Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valdman, Albert

    1970-01-01

    Revised version of a paper presented at the Fifth Symposium of the PILEI, Programa Interamericano de Linguistica y Ensenanza de Idiomas (Inter-American Program on Linguistics and Foreign Language Instruction), Sao Paolo, Brazil, January 11, 1969. (DS)

  8. Reducing Disproportionate Representation of Culturally Diverse Students in Special and Gifted Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J., Ed.; Zamora-Duran, Grace, Ed.

    This book discusses the disproportionate representation of students from minority backgrounds in special education and gifted classes, and presents strategies that practitioners can use to better address the educational needs of all students. Chapter 1, "Disproportionate Representation: A Contentious and Unresolved Predicament" (Alfredo J. Artiles…

  9. Cover Image, Volume 170A, Number 7, July 2016.

    PubMed

    Giorgio, Elisa; Ciolfi, Andrea; Biamino, Elisa; Caputo, Viviana; Di Gregorio, Eleonora; Belligni, Elga Fabia; Calcia, Alessandro; Gaidolfi, Elena; Bruselles, Alessandro; Mancini, Cecilia; Cavalieri, Simona; Molinatto, Cristina; Cirillo Silengo, Margherita; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Tartaglia, Marco; Brusco, Alfredo

    2016-07-01

    The cover image, by Alfredo Brusco et al., is based on the Original Article Whole exome sequencing is necessary to clarify ID/DD cases with de novo copy number variants of uncertain signifi cance: Two proof-of-concept examples, DOI: 10.1002/ajmg.a.37649. PMID:27311422

  10. "Making the Margins Chaos": Romantic and Antiromantic Readings of La Maravilla

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlston, Erin G.

    2005-01-01

    Alfredo Vea Jr.'s 1993 novel "La Maravilla" depicts a 1950s squatter community on the edge of Phoenix. The community, Buckeye Road, questions notions of U.S. American identity as middle-class, WASP, and heterosexual. Buckeye can easily be viewed as a romanticized utopia that offers an alternative to consumer capitalism, urban sprawl, the…

  11. The Educational Needs of Minority Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1974

    This publication contains three essays dealing with the educational problems and needs of Mexican Americans, black Americans, and American Indians. In his essay on Mexican Americans, Alfredo Castaneda discusses the undemocratic character of American public education, and stresses the need for democratic cultural pluralism. He devotes his essay…

  12. Paulo Freire on Higher Education: A Dialogue at the National University of Mexico. SUNY Series, Teacher Empowerment and School Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Escobar, Miguel; And Others

    This volume presents a dialogue in 1984 between internationally recognized philosopher/educator, Paulo Freire, and Miguel Escobar, Alfredo L. Fernandez, and Gilberto Guevara-Niebla, educators at the National University of Mexico, on educational emancipation and the role of higher education. The dialogues address the relationships between education…

  13. Salient Issues in Mathematics Education Research for Minorities. Proceedings from an NIE Sponsored Meeting (Seattle, Washington, April 18, 1980).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1980

    The six brief papers in this document were prepared for an NIE-sponsored meeting in April 1980. Claudette Bradley poses questions (but no answers) on factors affecting American Indians. Alberta Castaneda stresses the need to ascertain how young children learn mathematical ideas. Tony Alfredo Gallegos notes inadequacies of Spanish bilingual…

  14. Studying the active-site loop movement of the São Paolo metallo-β-lactamase-1† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Procedures for protein expression and purification, 19F-labelling, crystallisation, data collection, and structure determination, table of crystallographic data, table of crystallographic parameters and refinement statistics, figures showing binding mode and distances, procedures for mass spectrometry measurements, differential scanning fluorimetry measurements, stopped-flow measurements and other kinetics measurements. See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc01752h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Brem, Jürgen; Struwe, Weston B.; Rydzik, Anna M.; Tarhonskaya, Hanna; Pfeffer, Inga; Flashman, Emily; van Berkel, Sander S.; Spencer, James; Claridge, Timothy D. W.; McDonough, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs) catalyse the hydrolysis of almost all β-lactam antibiotics. We report biophysical and kinetic studies on the São Paulo MBL (SPM-1), which reveal its Zn(ii) ion usage and mechanism as characteristic of the clinically important di-Zn(ii) dependent B1 MBL subfamily. Biophysical analyses employing crystallography, dynamic 19F NMR and ion mobility mass spectrometry, however, reveal that SPM-1 possesses loop and mobile element regions characteristic of the B2 MBLs. These include a mobile α3 region which is important in catalysis and determining inhibitor selectivity. SPM-1 thus appears to be a hybrid B1/B2 MBL. The results have implications for MBL evolution and inhibitor design. PMID:25717359

  15. To Be a Co-Worker in the Kingdom of Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Witonsky, Trudi

    2013-01-01

    In 1903, in the introduction to his ground-breaking, seminal work, "The Souls of Black Folks", W.E. B. Du Bois calls for a vision of our country in which African Americans can become "co-worker[s] in the kingdom of culture." In this article I make the case that the use of a novel like "Gods Go Begging" by Alfredo Vea can help us better understand…

  16. Final LDRD Report for Projects %23 52797 and %23 93362: Rational Understanding and Control of the Magnetic Behavior of Nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z. John

    2006-11-01

    This is the final LDRD report for projects %23 52797 and %23 93362 that funded a five year research program directed by Prof. Z. John Zhang at the Georgia Institute of Technology Chemistry Department. Prof. Zhang was awarded this funding after winning a Presidential Early Career Award in Science and Engineering (PECASE) in 2001 with Sandia as the DOE sponsoring lab. The project PI was Blake Simmons and the PM was Alfredo Morales. The page intentionally left blank

  17. Mapping as a Means of Farmworker Education and Empowerment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cravey, Altha J.; Arcury, Thomas A.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on a mapping exercise based on the principles of Paolo Freire. It was used with non-student Latino North Carolina farmworkers to engage them in learning about health beliefs, behaviors, and injury prevention. Provides background information on the farmworkers' lives and the use of the mapping exercises. (CMK)

  18. The Pigna Paper Mill and the Exercise Books of the "New Italy" (1870-1960)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ascenzi, Anna

    2008-01-01

    For the very first time this in-depth paper studies the archives of the historic Paolo Pigna Paper Mill in Alzano Lombardo (Bergamo, Italy), which played a leading role in Italian history and culture: so much so that it ended up with fusing its own image to the very market where it operated, that is, the Italian schools. After being taken over by…

  19. 77 FR 54946 - Additional Designations of Individuals Pursuant to Executive Order 13581

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-06

    ... via facsimile through a 24-hour fax-on-demand service at (202) 622-0077. Background On July 24, 2011... Jun 1957; POB Casal di Principe, Italy (individual) DELL'AQUILA, Giuseppe (a.k.a. ``PEPPE 'O CIUCCIO''); DOB 20 Mar 1962; POB Giugliano Campania, Italy (individual) DI MAURO, Paolo; DOB 19 Oct 1952;...

  20. Community Service-Learning and Cultural-Historical Activity Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Alison

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the potential of cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT), to provide new insights into community service-learning (CSL) in higher education. While CSL literature acknowledges the influences of John Dewey and Paolo Freire, discussion of the potential contribution of cultural-historical activity theory, rooted in the work of…

  1. Museums and the Web 1999: Selected Papers from an International Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bearman, David, Ed.; Trant, Jennifer, Ed.

    Following an introduction by the editors entitled "Interactivity Comes of Age: Museums and World Wide Web at Five," this proceedings contains the following selected papers and case studies: "From the Mountains of the Moon to the Neon Paintbrush" (Peter Walsh); "Visiting a Museum Together: How To Share a Visit to a Virtual World" (Paolo Paolini,…

  2. Technical and Vocational Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocational Training, 1993

    1993-01-01

    This issue focuses on the various forms that secondary technical and vocational education takes in different European Community Member States. "The Future for Skilled Workers" is an interview with Burkart Lutz, a German researcher. Other articles are as follows: "Contradictions in Technical and Vocational Education: The Outlook" (Paolo Garonna);…

  3. Exploring Fear: Rousseau, Dewey, and Freire on Fear and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    English, Andrea; Stengel, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Fear is not the first feature of educational experience associated with the best-known progressive educational theorists--Jean-Jacques Rousseau, John Dewey, and Paolo Freire. But each of these important thinkers did, in fact, have something substantive to say about how fear functions in the processes of learning and growth. Andrea English and…

  4. Influence of Gender on Specialty Choices in a Brazilian Medical School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueiredo, Jose Fernando de Castro; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Specialty choices for medical school graduates of the University of Sao Paolo (Brazil) in 1975-84 and 1989-94 were analyzed by gender. Results showed women predominating in pediatrics and men in surgery and orthopedics in both periods, with no gender predominance in other specialties. Significant changes occurred in specialty choice patterns…

  5. Social Issues and Education: Commentary on the Use of Freirian, Hortonian and Boalian Pedagogies in a Graduate College Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Michael

    2004-01-01

    My purpose for writing this commentary is to reflect on how one teacher attempted to utilize the philosophies and practices of Paolo Freire, Augusto Boal, and Myles Horton in a graduate level, educational foundations classroom. I take as my premise the view that pedagogical practice is political and that the processes of studying and changing…

  6. Democratic Schooling Practices in the Republic of Ireland: The Gaps between the Rhetoric and Reality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Timothy

    2008-01-01

    Drawing upon the writings of Maxine Greene and Paolo Freire, this article explores the necessary conditions for the advancement of education for democracy in the context of modern post-industrial societies, with a focus on schooling in the Republic of Ireland. The article charts a general topography of the Republic of Ireland in relation to the…

  7. Teacher-Training Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Leslie

    1977-01-01

    The Sociedade Brasileira de Cultura Inglesa of Sao Paolo, Brazil, is an English teaching center which also runs an introductory course to train teachers of English. This article describes some of the projects completed by prospective teachers; they include language games, pictures, cartoons, role-playing and writing creative dialogue. (CHK)

  8. In Quest of the Universal Language: Romance and the History of an Idea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stillman, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    The new English translation of Paolo Rossi's classic study, "Logic and the Art of Memory," presents a useful opportunity to examine contemporary efforts to understand what its subtitle calls "the quest for universal language." At the same time, a seventeenth-century philosophical romance, Thomas Urquhart's, "Jewel," affords a good test case for…

  9. Capability through Participatory Democracy: Sen, Freire, and Dewey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glassman, Michael; Patton, Rikki

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores possible important relationships and sympathies between Amartya Sen's Capabilities Approach framework for understanding the human condition and the educational ideas of John Dewey and Paolo Freire. All three focus on the importance of democratic values in a fair, well-functioning society, while Sen and Freire especially…

  10. The Trouble with Disciplining Disciplines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longstreet, C. Shaun

    2011-01-01

    In this chapter, the author focuses on intersectionality as a heuristic means toward an open and affirming classroom and as a model grounded in a larger history of calls for anti-oppressive pedagogy. Three critical pivots set the background to this article. The first is Paolo Freire, who clearly connected social justice with pedagogy and contended…

  11. Constructing Knowledge with Silk Road Visuals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisland, Beverly Milner

    2008-01-01

    In this study a group of elementary teachers use illustrations, rather than written text, to introduce their students to the peoples and places of the ancient silk routes. The illustrations are from two picture books; "Marco Polo," written by Gian Paolo Cesaerani and illustrated by Piero Ventura (1977), and "We're Riding on a Caravan: An Adventure…

  12. EEK--A Cockroach!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St. Julien, Laurie

    2010-01-01

    Students from thirteen fifth-grade classrooms from six different elementary schools investigate the preferred escape routes of cockroaches. These identified routes of 90-, 120-, 150-, and 180-degrees are the research findings of Paolo Dominici, an Italian scientist. The students used rubber cockroaches and lizards to map out these escape routes.…

  13. RaPAL Bulletin, Numbers 5-13, 1988-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RaPAL Bulletin, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This document consists of a 3-year compilation (9 issues) of the RaPAL (Research and Practice in Adult Literacy) Bulletin. Typical articles are: "Student Involvement in Research" (a report of a workshop by Alex Golightly, Nick Nicola, and Marilyn Stone); part of a dialogue between Paolo Freire and Ira Shor, writer/educators of Brazil and the…

  14. PREFACE: First Mediterranean Conference on Classical and Quantum Gravity (MCCQG 2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basilakos, Spyros; Cadoni, Mariano; Cavaglia, Marco; Christodoulakis, Theodosios; Vagenas, Elias C.

    2010-04-01

    Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brasil) Antoniadis, Ignatios (CERN, Geneva, Switzerland) Arminjon, Mayeul (CNRS, Section of Theoretical Physics, France) Banados, Max (University of Oxford, UK) Basilakos, Spyros (RCAAM, Academy of Athens, Greece) Bastos, Catarina (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bertolami, Orfeu (IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Bevilaqua, Leandro Ibiapina (Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Brazil) Bezerra De Mello, Eugenio (Dept. de Física, CCEN Universidade Federal da Paraíba, Brazil) Blake, Russ (Readify Pty Ltd, Australia) Bogdanos, Charalampos (LPT-Orsay, France) Burinskii, Alexander (Gravity Research Group NSI, Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia) Cadonati, Laura (University of Massachusetts, Amherst, USA) Cadoni, Mariano (Università di Cagliari, Italy) Capone, Monica (University of Turin, Italy) Cavaglià, Marco (University of Mississippi, USA) Chirco, Goffredo (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Christodoulakis, Theodosios (University of Athens, Greece) Domingues Zarro, Carlos Augusto ((IST, Departamento de Física, Portugal) Durrer, Ruth (Université de Genève, Département de Physique Théorique, Switzerland) Fagnocchi, Serena (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Finazzi, Stefano (SISSA-International School for Advanced Studies, Italy) Francia, Dario (University Paris 7 - APC, France) Ghosh, Subir (Indian Statistical Institute, India) Gomberoff, Andres (Universidad Catolica de Chile, Chile) Grumiller, Daniel (Institute for Theoretical Physics Vienna University of Technology, Austria) Herrera-Aguilar, Alfredo (IFM, Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolas de Hidalgo, Mexico) Hsu, Steve (University of Oregon, USA) Ichinose, Shoichi (University of Shizuoka, SFNS, Japan) Kiefer, Claus (Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Cologne, Germany) Kokkotas, Kostas (Theoretical Astrophysics, Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen, Germany) Kothawala, Dawood (IUCAA, Pune

  15. Book Review: Book review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clevers, Jan G. P. W.

    2016-09-01

    For many years a good introductory book for undergraduate and postgraduate students on remote sensing of the Earth's land surface, which was not starting with an emphasis on traditional photographic techniques, was missing. In 2010 the first edition of the book Fundamentals of Satellite Remote Sensing by Emilio Chuvieco and Alfredo Huete was published by CRC Press and it was filling this gap. Now the second edition by Emilio Chuvieco was published by CRC Press. This second edition is made more attractive by the use of colour and including colour illustrations instead of the black-and-white ones in the first edition.

  16. First records of Synoeca septentrionalis Richards, 1978 (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Epiponini) in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Rodolpho S T; Andena, Sergio R; Carvalho, Antonio F; Costa, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Nests of Synoeca septentrionalis were collected in two Brazilian Atlantic Rain Forest localities (Itabuna and Santa Terezinha, in the state of Bahia and Alfredo Chaves in the state of Espírito Santo). Synoeca septentrionalis was previously recorded only from Central America and northwestern South America. This findingextends its geographical distribution to Northeast and Southeast regions of Brazil, and represents the first record for Synoeca septentrionalis in the Brazilian Atlantic Rain forest, raising to three the number of Synoeca species known from Bahia State. PMID:22368453

  17. ESO 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirey, R.

    2012-12-01

    To formally mark the 50th anniversary of the signing of the ESO Convention, a gala dinner was held in the Munich Residenz. A brief report of the event is presented and the speeches are reproduced. The speakers were the President of the Council, Xavier Barcons; the German Minister for Education and Research, Prof. Dr Annette Schavan; the Bavarian State Minister for Science, Research and the Arts, Dr Wolfgang Heubisch; physics Nobel Laureate, Brian Schmidt; the current Director General, Tim de Zeeuw and the Chilean Minister of Foreign Affairs, Alfredo Moreno Charme.

  18. Networks in Cell Biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; 1. Network views of the cell Paolo De Los Rios and Michele Vendruscolo; 2. Transcriptional regulatory networks Sarath Chandra Janga and M. Madan Babu; 3. Transcription factors and gene regulatory networks Matteo Brilli, Elissa Calistri and Pietro Lió; 4. Experimental methods for protein interaction identification Peter Uetz, Björn Titz, Seesandra V. Rajagopala and Gerard Cagney; 5. Modeling protein interaction networks Francesco Rao; 6. Dynamics and evolution of metabolic networks Daniel Segré; 7. Hierarchical modularity in biological networks: the case of metabolic networks Erzsébet Ravasz Regan; 8. Signalling networks Gian Paolo Rossini; Appendix 1. Complex networks: from local to global properties D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 2. Modelling the local structure of networks D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 3. Higher-order topological properties S. Ahnert, T. Fink and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 4. Elementary mathematical concepts A. Gabrielli and G. Caldarelli; References.

  19. VIII Workshop on Catastrophic Disruption in the Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; Nakamura, Akiko M.; Bagatin, Adriano Campo

    2015-03-01

    The Catastrophic Disruption (CD) Workshops have become a tradition for the various communities interested in collisional processes. The first one was organized in 1985 by the missed Prof. Paolo Farinella from the University of Pisa and his colleague Paolo Paolicchi, who understood the fundamental importance of collisional processes in the history of the Solar System. It was followed by subsequent workshops in Belgrade (Serbia, 1987), Kyoto (Japan, 1990), Gubbio (Italy, 1993), the Timberline Lodge (Oregon, USA, 1998), Cannes (France, 2003) and Alicante (Spain, 2007). The CD workshops are typically separated by 3-6 years, accounting for the required amount of time to perform subsequent advances in the field motivating the interest of the relevant scientific community for getting together to discuss new results and evolving directions in the field.

  20. Are there, or shall we discover, biomarkers to guide PD-1 inhibition?

    PubMed

    Ascierto, Paolo A; de Mello, Ramon Andrade

    2016-06-01

    Paolo A Ascierto and Ramon A de Mello speak to Ellen Clarke, Commissioning Editor Despite the recent success of PD-1/PD-L1-directed immunotherapy in a number of different malignancies, there are currently no effective biomarkers available to predict patient response to treatment. This question is particularly important because these immunotherapy agents are expensive and have significant toxicity profiles. Early data are emerging on biomarkers such as PD-L1 expression; however, it is clear that further studies are needed to identify alternative biomarkers and to improve understanding of the host immune system and tumor microenvironment. In a panel interview Paolo Ascierto and Ramon de Mello discuss this important clinical question. PMID:27197537

  1. KSC-03PD-3094

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. Members of the North American Treaty Organization (NATO) Parliamentary Assembly visit the Vehicle Assembly Building during their tour of KSC. They are listening to comments from Italian astronaut Paolo Angelo Nespoli, who is with the European Space Agency. The members are meeting in Orlando this year for their 49th annual gathering. They chose to visit KSC with their families during their one-day excursion break from meetings.

  2. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  3. The French Jesuit Mission to Thailand in the 1680s and the Establishment of a Major Astronomical Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Orchiston, Wayne; Komonjinda, Siramas

    2012-09-01

    The first great Thai ruler to encourage the adoption of Western culture and technology was King Narai, and his enlightened attitude led to the rapid development of Thailand. King Narai also had a passion for astronomy, and he pursued this interest by allowing French Jesuit missionaries to set up a large modern well-equipped astronomical observatory in Lopburi Province between AD 1685 and 1687. This was known as the Wat San Paolo Observatory, and King Narai and the missionaries observed a total lunar eclipse on 10 December 1685 and a partial solar eclipse on 30 April 1688. These observations and others made at Wat San Paolo Observatory during the 1680s marked the start of modern scientific astronomy in Thailand. In this paper we discuss King Narai's scientific and other interests, the founding of the Wat San Paolo Observatory, the missionaries who conducted the astronomical programs, their instruments and their observations. We also describe the surviving ruins of the Observatory and their interpretation as a site of national scientific importance in Thailand.

  4. Adaptive Optics for Industry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dainty, Christopher

    2008-01-01

    wavefront corrector ophthalmic adaptive optics: design and alignment (oral paper) / Alfredo Dubra and David Williams. High speed simultaneous SLO/OCT imaging of the human retina with adaptive optics (oral paper) / M. Pircher ... [et al.]. Characterization of an AO-OCT system (oral paper) / Julia W. Evans ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics optical coherence tomography for retina imaging (oral paper) / Guohua Shi ... [et al.]. Development, calibration and performance of an electromagnetic-mirror-based adaptive optics system for visual optics (oral paper) / Enrique Gambra ... [et al.]. Adaptive eye model (poster paper) / Sergey O. Galetskzy and Alexty V. Kudryashov. Adaptive optics system for retinal imaging based on a pyramid wavefront sensor (poster paper) / Sabine Chiesa ... [et al.]. Modeling of non-stationary dynamic ocular aberrations (poster paper) / Conor Leahy and Chris Dainty. High-order aberrations and accommodation of human eye (poster paper) / Lixia Xue ... [et al.]. Electromagnetic deformable mirror: experimental assessment and first ophthalmic applications (poster paper) / L. Vabre ... [et al.]. Correcting ocular aberrations in optical coherence tomography (poster paper) / Simon Tuohy ... [et al.] -- pt. 4. Adaptive optics in optical storage and microscopy. The application of liquid crystal aberration compensator for the optical disc systems (invited paper) / Masakazu Ogasawara. Commercialization of the adaptive scanning optical microscope (ASOM) (oral paper) / Benjamin Potsaid ... [et al.]. A practical implementation of adaptive optics for aberration compensation in optical microscopy (oral paper) / A. J. Wright ... [et al.]. Active focus locking in an optically sectioning microscope using adaptive optics (poster paper) / S. Poland, A. J. Wright, J. M. Girkin. Towards four dimensional particle tracking for biological applications / Heather I. Campbell ... [et al.]. Adaptive optics for microscopy (poster paper) / Xavier Levecq -- pt. 5. Adaptive optics in lasers

  5. The People's Library of Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Last, John M

    2012-03-01

    The People's Library of Epidemiology is in the process of development. It consists of a website (http://www.jameslindlibrary.org) with links to online excerpts of papers and monographs of historical and scientific importance in epidemiology and related public health sciences that are held by the library of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. This paper reflects the lively panel discussion which took place on 9 August 2011. The panel members who opened the discussion were Alfredo Morabia, Anne Hardy, Roger Bernier, Jan Vandenbroucke, George Davey Smith, Esther Villalonga and Stephen Walter, who had won the prize awarded by Epidemiology Monitor for an essay on the People's Library of Epidemiology. PMID:22326598

  6. New occurrences of microvertebrate fossil accumulations in Bauru Group, Late Cretaceous of western São Paulo state, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alveş, Y. M.; Bergqvist, L. P.; Brito, P. M.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we present the results of several palaeontological expeditions to four Upper Cretaceous fossil microsites of the Adamantina and Presidente Prudente formations in western São Paulo State, Brazil. Despite the fragmentary condition of the fossils recovered, they represent an important record of vertebrate microremains. The material, recovered through screen washing, comprises teeth and scales of Lepisosteidae; two morphotypes of Halecostomi teeth with similarities to Characiformes and Amiiformes; a Teleostei tooth of molariform shape; fin spines of Siluriformes; teeth of possible Baurusuchidae, Notosuchia (probably Adamantinasuchus or Mariliasuchus), Neosuchia (probably Itasuchus or Goniopholis), and other Mesoeucrocodylia indet.; probable teeth of Abelisauroidea, other Theropoda indet., and a phalanx of Aves. The comparative microvertebrate fossil accumulation from western São Paulo State provides evidence that: 1) floodplain channels accumulate large concentrations of microremains; 2) coarse sandstone privileges enamel tissues like teeth and scales; 3) new vertebrate fossil records have been discovered in Florida Paulista, Alfredo Marcondes, and Alvares Machado outcrops.

  7. Faunistic catalog of the caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) of Parque Nacional do Itatiaia and its surroundings in southeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Leandro Lourenço; Nessimian, Jorge Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is considered one of the world's biological diversity hotspots, and is increasingly threatened by the rapid destruction and fragmentation of its natural areas. The caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Itatiaia massif, an Atlantic Forest highland area, are inventoried and cataloged here. The catalog is based on examination of bibliographies, field work on many localities of Itatiaia massif (including Parque Nacional do Itatiaia - PNI), and the entomological collection Professor José Alfredo Pinheiro Dutra (DZRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. A total of 92 species are recorded, representing about 17% of the known Brazilian Trichoptera fauna. Leptoceridae, Hydropsychidae, and Philopotamidae are the families most represented. The high species richness, as well as the remarkable patterns of species distribution, may be related to the characteristics of Mantiqueira mountain range. PMID:22958122

  8. Committees and sponsors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-10-01

    International Advisory Committee Richard F CastenYale, USA Luiz Carlos ChamonSão Paulo, Brazil Osvaldo CivitareseLa Plata, Argentina Jozsef CsehATOMKI, Hungary Jerry P DraayerLSU, USA Alfredo Galindo-UribarriORNL & UT, USA James J KolataNotre Dame, USA Jorge López UTEP, USA Joseph B NatowitzTexas A & M, USA Ma Esther Ortiz IF-UNAM Stuart PittelDelaware, USA Andrés SandovalIF-UNAM Adam SzczepaniakIndiana, USA Piet Van IsackerGANIL, France Michael WiescherNotre Dame, USA Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (Chair)IF-UNAM Roelof BijkerICN-UNAM Ruben FossionICN-UNAM David LizcanoININ Sponsors Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, UNAMInstituto de Física, UNAMInstituto Nacional de Investigaciones NuclearesDivisión de Física Nuclear de la SMFCentro Latinoamericano de Física

  9. Faunistic Catalog of the Caddisflies (Insecta: Trichoptera) of Parque Nacional do Itatiaia and its Surroundings in Southeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Leandro Lourenço; Nessimian, Jorge Luiz

    2012-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is considered one of the world's biological diversity hotspots, and is increasingly threatened by the rapid destruction and fragmentation of its natural areas. The caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Itatiaia massif, an Atlantic Forest highland area, are inventoried and cataloged here. The catalog is based on examination of bibliographies, field work on many localities of Itatiaia massif (including Parque Nacional do Itatiaia — PNI), and the entomological collection Professor José Alfredo Pinheiro Dutra (DZRJ), Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro. A total of 92 species are recorded, representing about 17% of the known Brazilian Trichoptera fauna. Leptoceridae, Hydropsychidae, and Philopotamidae are the families most represented. The high species richness, as well as the remarkable patterns of species distribution, may be related to the characteristics of Mantiqueira mountain range. PMID:22958122

  10. Nova in Puppis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, Matthew R.

    2007-11-01

    Nova Puppis 2007 was discovered visually by Alfredo Jose Serra Pereira, Carnaxide, Portugal, on November 14.23 UT at visual magnitude 7.0. The discovery was announced in IAU Circular No. 8895 (Daniel W. E. Green, Ed.). The nova is located at 08:16:17.99 -34:15:25.0 (J2000, J. Young and H. Rhoades, Table Mountain Observatory, near Wrightwood, CA). Nothing was visible down to magnitude 8 on November 6.23, 7.22, 8.23, 10.23, and 11.22 UT. Young reports that a red image of the field from the Digitized Sky Survey contains a point source at an approximate magnitude of 20. No spectra have yet been published. Please report observations to the AAVSO International Database as N PUP 2007.

  11. Structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí region, northern Paraguay: Evidence of a new Brasiliano/Pan-African mobile belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanha, Ginaldo Ademar da Cruz; Warren, Lucas; Boggiani, Paulo César; Grohmann, Carlos Henrique; Cáceres, Alberto Arias

    The Neoproterozoic (Ediacaran) Itapucumí Group in northern Paraguay is composed of carbonate and siliciclastic rocks, including ooid grainstones, marls, shales and sandstones, containing Cloudina fossils in the eastern region. It is almost undeformed over the Rio Apa Cratonic Block but shows a strong deformational pattern at its western edge. A detailed structural analysis of the Itapucumí Group was conducted in the Vallemí Mine, along with a regional survey in other outcrops downstream in the Paraguay River and in the San Alfredo, Cerro Paiva and Sargento José E. López regions. In the main Vallemí quarry, the structural style is characterized by an axial-plane slaty cleavage in open to isoclinal folds, sometimes overturned, associated with N-S trending thrust faults and shear zones of E-vergence and with a low-grade chlorite zone metamorphism. The structural data presented here are compatible with the hypothesis of a newly recognized mobile belt on the western side of the Rio Apa Cratonic Block, with opposite vergence to that of the Paraguay Mobile Belt in Brazil. Both belts are related to the Late Brasiliano/Pan-African tectonic cycle with a Lower Cambrian deformation and metamorphism age. The deformation could be due to the late collision of the Amazonian Craton with the remainder of Western Gondwana or to the western active plate boundary related to the Pampean Belt. The structural and lithologic differences between the western Itapucumí Group in the Vallemí and Paraguay River region and the eastern region, near San Alfredo and Cerro Paiva, suggest that this group could be divided into two lithostratigraphic units, but more stratigraphic and geochronological analyses are required to confirm this possibility.

  12. An investigation of MAGSAT and complementary data emphasizing precambrian shields and adjacent areas of West Africa and South America

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hastings, D. A. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    Accomplishments with regard to the mapping and analysis of MAGSAT data for the investigation of correlations between the magnetic field characteristics of South American and African shields are reported. Significant results in the interpretation of the global total-field anomalies and the anomaly patterns of Africa and South America are discussed. The central position of the Brazilian shield tends to form a negative total-field anomaly, consistent with findings for shields in equatorial Africa. Sedimentary sequences in the Amazon basin and in the Rio de Janeiro-Sao Paolo areas exhibit positive anomalies, also consistent with equatorial Africa. Results for the Caribbean Sea and Guyana regions are also described.

  13. Nicola Cusano e il foro astronomico al castello di Andraz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Dona', G.

    Cardinal Nicolas from Cues (1401-1464) was friend of Paolo Toscanelli and one of the first supporters of heliocentrism. He carved a tube in the south western wall of a room of the castle of Andraz. It was possibly used to calculate the date of the winter solstice, in order to evaluate the corrections needed to the Julian calendar then in use. The astronomical use of this tube is described. The accuracy achievable in the measurement of the solstice is surprising. It is possible that the tubes made by Gerbert of Aurillac (945-1003) were used with similar awareness.

  14. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Don [Director, LBNL Earth Sciences Division

    2011-06-08

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  15. New Journal Editors Appointed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Major, Barbara

    2009-11-01

    New editors have been appointed for Geophysical Research Letters (GRL), Journal of Geophysical Research (JGR)-Solid Earth, Reviews of Geophysics, JGR-Space Physics, Paleoceanography, and Tectonics. At GRL, new editors Noah Diffenbaugh (Stanford University, Stanford, Calif.), Paolo D’Odorico (University of Virginia, Charlottesville), Ruth Harris (U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Menlo Park, Calif.), Wolfgang Knorr (University of Bristol, Bristol, UK), Geoffrey Tyndall (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo.), and Michael Wysession (Washington University, St. Louis, Mo.) have joined Editor-in-Chief Eric Calais and other editors Margaret Chen, Fabio Florindo, Anne Müller, Nikolai Ostgaard, Eric Rignot, and Meric Srokosz.

  16. Geologic Carbon Sequestration and Biosequestration (Carbon Cycle 2.0)

    SciTech Connect

    DePaolo, Don

    2010-02-03

    Don DePaolo, Director of LBNL's Earth Sciences Division, speaks at the Carbon Cycle 2.0 kick-off symposium Feb. 3, 2010. We emit more carbon into the atmosphere than natural processes are able to remove - an imbalance with negative consequences. Carbon Cycle 2.0 is a Berkeley Lab initiative to provide the science needed to restore this balance by integrating the Labs diverse research activities and delivering creative solutions toward a carbon-neutral energy future. http://carboncycle2.lbl.gov/

  17. [A Fragment Of De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus Copied by Toscanelli and Inserted in the Books of Leonardo (Codex Atlanticus, 611rb / 915ra)].

    PubMed

    Raynaud, Dominique

    2015-07-01

    This article studies a fragment on the conic sections that appear in the Codex Atlanticus, fols. 611rb/915ra. Arguments are put forward to assemble these two folios. Their comparison with the Latin texts available before 1500 shows that they derive from the De speculis comburentibus of Alhacen and the De speculis comburentibus of Regiomontanus, joined together in his autograph manuscript (Vienna, Oster. Nationalbibliothek, Cod. 5258). Having identified the sources, and discussed their mathematics, the issue of their transmission is targeted. It is shown that these notes were written by Paolo dal Pozzo Toscanelli, through whom they reached the notebooks of Leonardo da Vinci. PMID:26104302

  18. AGU members elected to Academy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six AGU members are among the sixty new members and fifteen foreign associates elected on April 27 to the National Academy of Sciences in recognition of their distinguished and continuing achievements in original research.AGU members elected were AGU Past-President G. Brent Dalrymple of USGS, Menlo Park, Calif.; Donald J . DePaolo, University of California, Berkeley; Ho-Kwang (David) Mao, Carnegie Institution, Washington, D.C.; Mario J . Molina, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge; and Alexandra Navrotsky, Princeton University, Princeton, N.J. Elected as foreign associates were Nikolai V. Sobolev, Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk, and Friedrich H. Busse, University of Bayreuth, Germany.

  19. L'espace du mouvement: Une analyse des conflits dans les interactions entre institutrice et eleves d'une ecole maternelle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Izabel

    1995-01-01

    The research described in this article, winner of the Gottfried Hausmann Prize for 1994, was carried out in a kindergarten in São Paolo, Brazil, using the theory developed by Henri Wallon. The aim was to examine how primary school children are affected in their development by: (a) unnecessary restrictions placed on their physical movements during lessons; and (b) failure to organize the classroom space in a way that assists the learning process. The author concludes that these factors lead to tensions in the classroom which could be avoided through a different approach to movement and space.

  20. The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive: Erratum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sambruna, Rita M.; Barr, Paul; Giommi, Paolo; Maraschi, Laura; Tagliaferri, Gianpiero; Treves, Aldo

    1995-07-01

    In the paper "The X-Ray Spectra of Blazars: Analysis of the Complete EXOSAT Archive" by Rita M. Sambruna, Paul Barr, Paolo Giommi, Laura Maraschi, Gianpiero Tagliaferri, and Aldo Treves (ApJS, 95,371 [1994]), the section regarding the object PKS 1510-08 (Section 4.4.14) contains an erroneous quotation. K. P. Singh, A.R. Rao, and M.N. Vahia (ApJ, 365,455 [1990]) in fact detected: emission line only in the 1984 data, and not in the 1985 spectrum, as stated.

  1. Towards a People-Centred Education: Possibilities and Struggles in the Philippines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, Swee-Hin; Floresca-Cawagas

    1997-09-01

    Focusing on the Philippines, the article describes the role played by people's movements and non-governmental organizations in empowering citizens and combating injustice. Educational programmes are an important element in this struggle. The authors cite examples of what Paolo Freire called the "pedagogy of dialogue", which seeks to develop creative, critical enquiry and self-reliant understanding. Such programmes have made an impact in areas such as women's empowerment, poverty-alleviation and the combating of environmental destruction. The authors argue that this type of education can also play an important role in challenging the materialist vision of progress and awakening people to deeper values.

  2. A psychoanalytic consideration of Pasolini's Salo.

    PubMed

    Salvage, David

    2005-01-01

    Salo represented the culmination of Pier Paolo Pasolini's career as a filmmaker and engages several questions concerning the nature of perversion and the excitement with the negative. Through exploration of Pasolini's motives and techniques for creating this film, an analysis is offered of the creative process that does not seek to create an aesthetically pleasing compromise formation of psychic conflict, nor a form of erotizing sadomasochism. Rather, this film is explored as an example of a lucid and psychoanalytically informed artwork that speaks to the psychic fascination with what is purely negative--thanatos--which is not mediated by libido. PMID:15953778

  3. Prefazione al quinto volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The act of the symposia dedicated to Gerbert of Aurillac in Rome on May 10, 2013 and May 12, 2014 are here published with contributions from Wojciech Janusiewicz on Gerbert and Poland, Flavio G. Nuvolone on Gerbert and Boethius, Gerbert and the violence, Marek Otisk on the use of Boethius Arithmetica in X century, Paolo Colona on the Poet Petrarca (XIV century) and Astronomy. Costantino Sigismondi contributes with several works dealing with history of astronomy and observational astronomy, especially the one of variable stars with naked eye, for the great didactical value of such observations.

  4. A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlman, Eric S.

    2003-01-01

    This document serves as a final technical report for NASA grants NAG5-9995 and NAG5-9533, entitled 'A Spectral Study of a New Class of Radio Quasars.' The purpose of these grants were to support observations made using the BeppoSAX satellite. The observations took place over two years and covered two SAX observing cycles, respectively AO-3 and AO-4. During this time, I was employed both at Johns Hopkins University (NAG5-9995) and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (NAG5-9533). As the research on these grants was on the same subject and my employment at JHU and UMBC has been consecutive, this document therefore covers both grants. The targets for these observations were four radio-loud quasars chosen from the first two X-ray selected samples of such objects. These were the brightest examples of the newly found class of X-ray loud flat-spectrum radio quasars, which prior to 1997, had never been seen before. However, my previous work with collaborators Paolo Padovani and Paolo Giommi on the DXRBS survey showed that they make up about 25% of the population of flat-spectrum radio quasars, but had not been seen before because of selection biases (all previous samples of these objects had been compiled in the radio). The purpose of the SAX observations was to investigate the shape of their X-ray spectrum, which would tell us where the peak of their synchrotron emission was located.

  5. Retracing diagenetic processes in marine porewaters using Ca isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ockert, C.; Teichert, B. M.; Kaufhold, S.; Gussone, N. C.

    2012-12-01

    Calcium (Ca) isotope ratios of marine organic and inorganic mineral precipitates are used to monitor changes in the oceanic Ca-budget and in paleo-temperature, and serve as a proxy for the trophic level of organisms in the food chain (c.f. Skulan et al., 1997; Zhu et al., 1998). However, during interaction between sediments and porewater, the Ca isotopic composition of marine porewaters might be shifted, bearing the potential to alter the Ca isotope proxy records. While processes, such as partial dissolution of calcareous shells and carbonate recrystallization have been studied (Fantle and DePaolo, 2007; Turchyn and DePaolo 2011), other diagenetic processes such as ion exchange with clay minerals have not been taken into account while studying Ca isotope profiles of porewaters. Nevertheless, first experiments and the investigation of natural porewaters indicate that this process has a significant effect on the Ca isotope composition in marine porewaters. Laboratory experiments aimed to determine if Ca isotope fractionation occurs during Ca adsorption and exchange with ammonium on clay minerals. The results show that Ca adsorption in a seawater environment is associated with fractionation, where light Ca is preferably adorbed. The addition of ammonium to the experimental set up caused partial release of Ca accompanied by isotope fractionation. Based on the results of the experiments, model calculations tested the impact of varying clay mineral type, content and sediment porosity, revealing that ion exchange processes with clay minerals predominantly shift the porewater signal to lighter values. This is in agreement with observations by Teichert et al. (2009), who found a correlation of ammonium-concentration and δ44/40Ca ratios in the porewater of drill core samples from the Cascadia accretionary margin (ODP Leg 204). Calcium isotope ratios of natural marine porewaters of three sites in the North Atlantic (IODP Expedition 303) show that the correlation between

  6. Careers and people

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-04-01

    'Past' prize for astrophysicists Three astrophysicists have won the "past" division of the 2009 Dan David Prize for their work on imaging the cosmic microwave background. Paolo de Bernardis of the University of Rome La Sapienza and Andrew Lange of the California Institute of Technology received the award for leading the BOOMERANG experiment, while Paul Richards of the University of California, Berkeley, was honoured for his work on the MAXIMA experiment. The trio will share a 1m prize from the Dan David Foundation based in Israel, which has given three such awards - for achievements with an impact on the world's past, present and future - every year since 2002. Some 10% of the prize will go to support outstanding astrophysics doctoral students. Other recipients of the 2009 prizes are former UK Prime Minister Tony Blair for "present leadership" in the Middle East; and Robert Gallo, an AIDS researcher at the University of Maryland, for "future global public health".

  7. Bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial fusion.

    PubMed

    Silva Ramos, Eduardo; Larsson, Nils-Göran; Mourier, Arnaud

    2016-08-01

    Mitochondria are bioenergetic hotspots, producing the bulk of ATP by the oxidative phosphorylation process. Mitochondria are also structurally dynamic and undergo coordinated fusion and fission to maintain their function. Recent studies of the mitochondrial fusion machinery have provided new evidence in detailing their role in mitochondrial metabolism. Remarkably, mitofusin 2, in addition to its role in fusion, is important for maintaining coenzyme Q levels and may be an integral player in the mevalonate synthesis pathway. Here, we review the bioenergetic roles of mitochondrial dynamics and emphasize the importance of the in vitro growth conditions when evaluating mitochondrial respiration. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060252

  8. STS-120 Crew Portrait

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    These seven astronauts took a break from training to pose for the STS-120 crew portrait. Pictured from the left are astronauts Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). The crew members were attired in training versions of their shuttle launch and entry suits. Tani joined Expedition 16 as flight engineer after launching to the International Space Station (ISS) and is scheduled to return home on mission STS-122. STS-120 launched October 23, 2007 with the main objectives of installing the U.S. Node 2, Harmony, and the relocation and deployment of the P6 truss to its permanent location.

  9. On spinors and null vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budinich, Marco

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the relations between spinors and null vectors in Clifford algebra of any dimension with particular emphasis on the conditions that a spinor must satisfy to be simple (also: pure). In particular, we prove: (i) a new property for null vectors: each of them bisects spinor space into two subspaces of equal size; (ii) that simple spinors form one-dimensional subspaces of spinor space; (iii) a necessary and sufficient condition for a spinor to be simple that generalizes a theorem of Cartan and Chevalley which becomes a corollary of this result. We also show how to write down easily the most general spinor with a given associated totally null plane. This paper is dedicated to the memory of my father Paolo Budinich who passed away in November 2013 not before transferring to me his enthusiasm for simple spinors.

  10. Shutting down the pore: The search for small molecule inhibitors of the mitochondrial permeability transition.

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Forte, Michael

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP) is now recognized as playing a key role in a wide variety of human diseases whose common pathology may be based in mitochondrial dysfunction. Recently, PTP assays have been adapted to high-throughput screening approaches to identify small molecules specifically inhibiting the PTP. Following extensive secondary chemistry, the most potent inhibitors of the PTP described to date have been developed. This review will provide an overview of each of these screening efforts, use of resulting compounds in animal models of PTP-based diseases, and problems that will require further study. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26924772

  11. An early literary description of emotional syncope in the Fifth Canto of Dante Alighieri's Commedia: 'E caddi come corpo morto cade'.

    PubMed

    Bruno, Estañol; Guillermo, Delgado; Eduardo, Jiménez-Mayo; Horacio, Sentíes-Madrid; Madrid, Horacio Sentíes

    2014-07-01

    Dante's Divine Comedy is universally acclaimed as one of the great masterpieces in world literature. It is written in first person singular and this gives an intimate acquaintance with the vision of the poet. In the Fifth Canto, he exquisitely describes the story of Paolo Malatesta and Francesca da Rimini, illicit lovers killed by Francesca's husband, Gianciotto Malatesta. The story, dramatically told by Francesca, deeply moves the poet, who suddenly faints. In the words of Dante himself: 'E caddi come corpo morto cade' (And fell, even as a dead body falls). This probably is the first literary description of an emotional syncope in world literature. We found that three great plastic artists (John Flaxman, William Blake and Gustave Doré) captured the crucial moment of the syncope in three extraordinary images left for posterity. PMID:24914636

  12. BCL-2 family proteins as regulators of mitochondria metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gross, Atan

    2016-08-01

    The BCL-2 family proteins are major regulators of apoptosis, and one of their major sites of action are the mitochondria. Mitochondria are the cellular hubs for metabolism and indeed selected BCL-2 family proteins also possess roles related to mitochondria metabolism and dynamics. Here we discuss the link between mitochondrial metabolism/dynamics and the fate of stem cells, with an emphasis on the role of the BID-MTCH2 pair in regulating this link. We also discuss the possibility that BCL-2 family proteins act as metabolic sensors/messengers coming on and off of mitochondria to "sample" the cytosol and provide the mitochondria with up-to-date metabolic information. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26827940

  13. STS-120 on Launch Pad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A photographer used a fisheye lens attached to an electronic still camera to record a series of photos of the Space Shuttle Discovery at the launch pad while the STS-120 crew was at Kennedy Space Center for the Terminal Countdown Demonstration Test in October 2007. The STS-120 mission launched from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad 39A at 11:38:19 a.m. (EDT) on October 23, 2007. The crew included Scott E. Parazynski, Douglas H. Wheelock, Stephanie D. Wilson, all mission specialists; George D. Zamka, pilot; Pamela A. Melroy, commander; Daniel M. Tani, Expedition 16 flight engineer; and Paolo A. Nespoli, mission specialist representing the European Space Agency (ESA). Major objectives included the installation of the P6 solar array of the port truss and delivery and installment of Harmony, the Italian-built U.S. Node 2 on the International Space Station (ISS).

  14. Red, White and Black: Colors of Beauty, Tints of Health and Cosmetic Materials in Early Modern English Art Writing.

    PubMed

    Sammern, Romana

    2015-01-01

    Alongside Richard Haydocke's translation of Giovanni Paolo Lomazzo's treatise on painting (1598), the article examines concepts of color concerning cosmetics, painting and complexion as they relate to aesthetics, artistic and medical practice in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Beginning with white and red as ideal colors of beauty in Agnolo Firenzuola's Discourse on the beauty of women (1541), the essay places color in relation to major issues in art, medicine and empiricism by discussing beauty as a quality of humoral theory and its colors as visual results of physiological processes. Challenging the relation of art and nature, gender and production, Lomazzo's account of complexion and Haydocke's additions on cosmetic practices and face-painting provide key passages that shed light on the relation of cosmetics colors, art writing and artistic practices at the convergence of the body, art and medicine in the context of the emerging English virtuosi around 1600. PMID:26856049

  15. The Risks of Childbirth:

    PubMed Central

    De Renzi, Silvia

    2010-01-01

    Summary In seventeenth-century Rome a popular financial scheme made it crucial to establish if pregnancy or childbirth had caused a woman's death. Courts sought medical advice, and this prompted physicians to reconsider the issues. Their disagreements provide historians with evidence from which to reassess received views of early modern doctors' involvement with birthing bodies. Among others, Paolo Zacchia intervened, revealing discord between physicians and jurists on how to establish the causes of death. One of his testimonies in a case shows more broadly how legal, medical, and lay views on pregnancy and childbirth intersected in courts of law. In Roman tribunals the very distinction between healthy and preternatural births was contentious, and the parties had an interest in having births either proved healthy in medical terms or construed as pathological. The controversies, the author argues, challenge historical expectations about early modern perceptions, including the boundaries between female and male, private and public, healthy and pathological. PMID:21196603

  16. Is there any relation between chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency and multiple sclerosis? – a critical review

    PubMed Central

    Jedynak, Waldemar; Cieszanowski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Summary Though the etiology of multiple sclerosis remains unknown, the widely accepted explanation is that it has an autoimmune inflammatory background. In 2006 Paolo Zamboni renewed the somewhat forgotten vascular theory of the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis, proposing the new entity of ‘chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency’. As a result of this hypothesis, Zamboni suggested an endovascular treatment for multiple sclerosis involving venoplasty of the internal jugular vein and the azygos vein. Unfortunately, several teams have tried to replicate Zamboni’s results without success. In this review, we present a chronological description of the results of the studies conducted by Zamboni and the later attempts to replicate his work. The main conclusion is that, taking into account results that are currently available, we should remain cautious and routine use of this treatment in patients should not be advisable. PMID:24917892

  17. Acknowledgements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-02-01

    Ackowledgement logos The organizers of the Young Researchers' Meeting in Rome would like to thank all the scientists who participated in the meetings. We thank the Universities of Roma "Tor Vergata" and "La Sapienza" for hosting the first two editions of the conference, and the Physics and Astronomy Doctoral Schools of "La Sapienza" for sponsoring the 2nd meeting. We are grateful to Prof. Roberto Capuzzo-Dolcetta (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Enzo Marinari (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Prof. Pasquale Mazzotta (Univ. "Tor Vergata"), Prof. Giancarlo Ruocco (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Sig.ra Fernanda Lupinacci (Univ. "La Sapienza"), Dott. Marco Veneziani (Lessico Intellettuale Europeo-CNR), Dott.sa Rossella Cossu (Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo-CNR) and Dott. Paolo Cabella (University of Rome "Tor Vergata") for logistical and technical support, and useful discussions. Conference photographs

  18. Cultural Alimentation in Latin America

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le Prof. Paolo Freire(nom?) a dirigé en Brésil un plan national d'alphabétisatation d'adultes. La base de sa méthode est d'essayer de ne pas rester sur la mécanique du mot, mais de le relier avec la réalité sociale et donner un réveillement critique de la conscience populaire en face de la réalité historique du pays. Il était professeur d'histoire et de philosophie de Récife, puis exilé et depuis il était prof. à Harvard, a travaillé à l'Unesco et est maintenant conseiller spécial à l'Office d'Education du centre oecuménique des églises

  19. Quantum physics and complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biamonte, Jacob

    2014-03-01

    There is a widely used and successful theory of ``chemical reaction networks,'' which provides a framework describing systems governed by mass action kinetics. Computer science and population biology use the same ideas under a different name: ``stochastic Petri nets.'' But if we look at these theories from the perspective of quantum theory, they turn out to involve creation and annihilation operators, coherent states and other well-known ideas--yet in a context where probabilities replace amplitudes. I will explain this connection as part of a detailed analogy between quantum mechanics and stochastic mechanics which we've produced several results on recently, including the recent analytical results uniting quantum physics and complex networks. Our general idea is about merging concepts from quantum physics and complex network theory to provide a bidirectional bridge between both disciplines. Support is acknowledged from the Foundational Questions Institute (FQXi) and the Compagnia di San Paolo Foundation.

  20. FUTURE PERSPECTIVES IN MELANOMA RESEARCH. Meeting report from the “Melanoma Research: a bridge from Naples to the World. Napoli, December 5th–6 th2011”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    After more than 30 years, landmark progress has been made in the treatment of cancer, and melanoma in particular, with the success of new molecules such as ipilimumab, vemurafenib and active specific immunization. After the first congress in December 2010, the second edition of “Melanoma Research: a bridge from Naples to the World” meeting, organized by Paolo A. Ascierto (INT, Naples, Italy), Francesco M. Marincola (NIH, Bethesda, USA), and Nicola Mozzillo (INT, Naples, Italy) took place in Naples, on 5–6 December 2011. We have identified four new topics of discussion: Innovative Approaches in Prevention, Diagnosis and Surgical Treatment, New Pathways and Targets in Melanoma: An Update about Immunotherapy, and Combination Strategies. This international congress gathered more than 30 international faculty members and was focused on recent advances in melanoma molecular biology, immunology and therapy, and created an interactive atmosphere which stimulated discussion of new approaches and strategies in the field of melanoma. PMID:22551296

  1. Pavia, September, 1961: a window on muscles and nerves

    PubMed Central

    Mazzarello, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Summary In September 1961, the First International Congress of Electromyography (EMG) was held at the University of Pavia. This event proved to be a sort of foundation stone for the further development of EMG as an organized field. Many of the most distinguished clinical neurophysiologists attended this congress and took an active part in it, delivering important lectures and scientific communications on the various aspects of EMG, including electroneurography. They included: Henri Gastaut, Fritz Buchthal, Jean Edouard Desmedt, Eric Kugelberg, Roger W. Gilliatt, John A. Simpson, Albrecht Struppler, Irena Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, and Howard Edward Lambert. The congress was organized by Paolo Pinelli, at the time a young and brilliant clinical neurophysiologist who had learned the EMG procedure in Copenhagen under the guidance of Fritz Buchthal. Various scientific and social aspects of this important congress are outlined in this paper. PMID:22687169

  2. The Crabtree and Warburg effects: Do metabolite-induced regulations participate in their induction?

    PubMed

    Hammad, Noureddine; Rosas-Lemus, Monica; Uribe-Carvajal, Salvador; Rigoulet, Michel; Devin, Anne

    2016-08-01

    The Crabtree and Warburg effects are two well-known deviations of cell energy metabolism that will be described herein. A number of hypotheses have been formulated regarding the molecular mechanisms leading to these cellular energy metabolism deviations. In this review, we will focus on the emerging notion that metabolite-induced regulations participate in the induction of these effects. All throughout this review, it should be kept in mind that no regulatory mechanism is exclusive and that it may vary in cancer cells owing to different cell types or oncogenic background. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27066942

  3. Emerging role of Lon protease as a master regulator of mitochondrial functions.

    PubMed

    Pinti, Marcello; Gibellini, Lara; Nasi, Milena; De Biasi, Sara; Bortolotti, Carlo Augusto; Iannone, Anna; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Lon protease is a nuclear-encoded, mitochondrial ATP-dependent protease highly conserved throughout the evolution, crucial for the maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis. Lon acts as a chaperone of misfolded proteins, and is necessary for maintaining mitochondrial DNA. The impairment of these functions has a deep impact on mitochondrial functionality and morphology. An altered expression of Lon leads to a profound reprogramming of cell metabolism, with a switch from respiration to glycolysis, which is often observed in cancer cells. Mutations of Lon, which likely impair its chaperone properties, are at the basis of a genetic inherited disease named of the cerebral, ocular, dental, auricular, skeletal (CODAS) syndrome. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27033304

  4. Phosphonium compounds as new and specific inhibitors of bovine serum amine oxidase

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    TPP+ (tetraphenylphosphonium ion) and its analogues were found to act as powerful competitive inhibitors of BSAO (bovine serum amine oxidase). The binding of this new class of inhibitors to BSAO was characterized by kinetic measurements. TPP+ can bind to the BSAO active site by hydrophobic and by coulombian interactions. The binding probably occurs in the region of the ‘cation-binding site’[Di Paolo, Scarpa, Corazza, Stevanato and Rigo (2002) Biophys. J. 83, 2231–2239]. Under physiological conditions, the association constant of TPP+ for this site is higher than 106 M−1, the change of enthalpy being the main free-energy term controlling binding. Analysis of the relationships between substrate structure and extent of inhibition by TPP+ reveals some new molecular features of the BSAO active site. PMID:15320876

  5. The evolution of the AIDS illness and the polarisation of values.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, L L

    1993-01-01

    This article is based on a study carried out in Sao Paolo, Brazil, from 1983 to 1986 among male homosexuals. It deals with the various practices and life-styles which constitute the homosexual world in Sao Paulo, and questions regarding AIDS. An analysis is made of the contrasting biographies of two patients suffering from the AIDS virus. The emphasis will be placed on the evolution of the illness and the changes in values that occur during this period. The ways in which the sexual life-style adopted prior to the illness influences the individual social course or mobility [i.e., trajectory] of the inflicted person will also be illustrated. PMID:8301091

  6. Division B Commission 6: Astronomical Telegrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Green, D. W. E.; Samus, N. N.; Aksnes, K.; Gilmore, A. C.; Nakano, S.; Sphar, T.; Tichá, J.; Williams, G. V.

    2016-04-01

    IAU Commission 6 ``Astronomical Telegrams'' had a single business meeting during Honolulu General Assembly of the IAU. It took place on Tuesday, 11 August 2015. The meeting was attended by Hitoshi Yamaoka (President), Daniel Green (Director of the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, CBAT, via Skype), Steven Chesley (JPL), Paul Chodas (JPL), Alan Gilmore (Canterbury University), Shinjiro Kouzuma (Chukyo University), Paolo Mazzali (Co-Chair of the Supernova Working Group), Elena Pian (Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa), Marion Schmitz (chair IAU Working Group Designations + NED), David Tholen (University of Hawaii), Jana Ticha (Klet Observatory), Milos Tichy (Klet Observatory), Giovanni Valsecchi (INAF\\slash Italy), Gareth Williams (Minor Planet Center). Apologies: Nikolai Samus (General Catalogue of Variable Stars, GCVS).

  7. Pasolini's Edipo Re: myth, play, and autobiography.

    PubMed

    Pipolo, Tony

    2013-08-01

    The pervasive influence of the Oedipus complex on world culture is a given, yet throughout the long history of motion pictures only one major filmmaker has tackled the literary source that inspired Freud. The film, Edipo Re, directed by Italian poet, novelist, and social and political activist Pier Paolo Pasolini, not only reconstructs the myth and adapts Sophocles' tragedy, but uses both as a basis of cinematic autobiography. This paper is a detailed analysis of the formal, stylistic, and thematic dimensions of this film, illustrating the complex manner in which Pasolini interweaves myth, play, and autobiography into a unique cinematic achievement. This analysis is followed by speculations on the implications of the film's structure and techniques and on what they reveal about Pasolini's character, his sexual profile, and the ignominious murder that ended his life. PMID:23865995

  8. Pb isotopic heterogeneity in basaltic phenocrysts

    SciTech Connect

    Bryce, Julia G.; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-06-01

    The Pb isotopic compositions of phenocrystic phases in young basaltic lavas have been investigated using the Getty-DePaolo method (Getty S. J. and DePaolo D. J. [1995] Quaternary geochronology by the U-Th-Pb method. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 59, 3267 3272), which allows for the resolution of small isotopic differences. Phenocryst, matrix, and whole rock analyses were made on samples from the 17 Myr-old Imnaha basalts of the Columbia River Group, a zero-age MORB from the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, and a ca. 260 kyr-old tholeiite from Mount Etna. Plagioclase feldspar phenocrysts have low-(U, Th)/Pb, and in each sample the plagioclase has significantly lower 206Pb/207Pb and 208Pb/207Pb values than whole rock, matrix, and magnetite-rich separates. The Pb isotopic contrast between plagioclase and matrix/whole rock is found in three samples with varying grain sizes (0.5 2 cm for the Imnaha basalt and MORB and <1 mm for the Etna sample) from different tectonic settings, suggesting that these results are not unique. The isotopic contrasts are only slightly smaller in magnitude than the variations exhibited by whole rock samples from the region. The Imnaha basalts also have Sr isotopic heterogeneity evident only in plagioclase phenocrysts, but the MORB and Etna lavas do not. The isotopic heterogeneities reflect magma mixing, and indicate that isotopically diverse magmas were mixed together just prior to eruption. The results reinforce indications from melt inclusion studies that magma source region isotopic heterogeneities have large amplitudes at short length scales, and that the isotopic variations imparted to the magmas are not entirely homogenized during segregation and transport processes.

  9. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-07-01

    Alba Paolo (Università di Torino) Becattini Francesco (Università di Firenze) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonaccorso Angela (INFN Pisa) Colonna Maria (INFN-LNS Catania) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) De Angelis Giacomo (INFN-LNL Legnaro) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Gattobigio Mario (INLN, Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, France) Gensini Paolo (INFN Lecce) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (Università del Salento) Giusti Carlotta (Università di Pavia) Greco Vincenzo (Università di Catania) Grossi Eduardo (Università di Firenze) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Lavagno Andrea (Politecnico di Torino) Logoteta Domenico (Universidade de Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Lombardo Maria Paola (INFN-LNF Frascati) Lo Meo Sergio (ENEA Bologna) Mannarelli Massimo (INFN-LNGS Assergi) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pirrone Sara (INFN Catania) Puglisi Armando (Università di Catania) Radici Marco (INFN Pavia) Rinaldi Matteo (Università di Perugia) Roggero Alessandro (Università di Trento) Rolando Valentina (Università di Ferrara) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Ruggieri Marco (Università di Catania) Salmè Gianni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Scopetta Sergio (Università di Perugia) Taiuti Mauro (Università di Genova) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Viviani Michele (INFN Pisa) Vorabbi Matteo (Università di Pavia)

  10. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors.

    PubMed

    Frausto-Reyes, C; Ortiz-Morales, M; Bujdud-Pérez, J M; Magaña-Cota, G E; Mejía-Falcón, R

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIEL*a*b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 microm x 246 microm) that was the case for the lead white pigment. PMID:19875330

  11. Raman spectroscopy for the identification of pigments and color measurement in Dugès watercolors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frausto-Reyes, C.; Ortiz-Morales, M.; Bujdud-Pérez, J. M.; Magaña-Cota, G. E.; Mejía-Falcón, R.

    2009-12-01

    Spectroscopic and colorimetric analysis of a representative set of Dugès watercolor paintings was performed. These paintings were the result of scientific studies carried out by the zoologist Alfredo Dugès, who recorded the fauna of the Mexican Republic between 1853 and 1910. Micro-Raman spectroscopy, with an excitation wavelength of 830 nm, and colorimetric techniques were employed in order to understand if different colors with the same hue were reproduced using the same pigments. The color coordinates of the measured areas were obtained in the CIE L* a* b* color space. Raman analysis showed that, in some cases, to reproduce colors with the same hue the pigment employed was not the same. Pigments identified in the watercolors were vermilion, carbon-based black, lead white, gamboge and chrome yellow, Prussian and ultramarine blue. Some of these pigments have been used since ancient times, others as Prussian blue, chrome yellow and synthetic ultramarine blue arrived to the market at the beginning of the 18th and 19th centuries, respectively. Furthermore, regarding the white color, instead of left the paper unpainted, lead white was detected in the eye of a bird. The green color was obtained by mixing Prussian blue with chrome yellow. The results of this work show the suitability of using Raman spectroscopy for watercolor pigment analysis and colorimetric techniques to measure the color of small areas (246 μm × 246 μm) that was the case for the lead white pigment.

  12. Interleukin-17A Exacerbates Ferric Chloride-Induced Arterial Thrombosis in Rat Carotid Artery

    PubMed Central

    Maione, Francesco; Parisi, Antonio; Caiazzo, Elisabetta; Morello, Silvana; Mascolo, Nicola; Cicala, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin-17A (IL-17A), the most widely studied member of the IL-17 cytokine family, is a cytokine which emerged to be critical for host defense as well as in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disorders. Moreover, IL-17A is involved in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, such as atherosclerosis and acute coronary syndrome and in the cardiovascular risk associated with systemic immunological disorders. Consistent with this, we have recently shown that IL-17A increases human and murine platelet response to ADP. In this study we expanded our previous observation and we describe for the first time an in vivo prothrombotic effect of the cytokine. Our results show that IL-17A is synergic with a low FeCl3 concentration in inducing carotid thrombus in rats and suggest that the effect is likely related to a downregulation of CD39 vascular expression and hydrolyzing activity. Our findings indicate that IL-17A might be an important molecule at the interface between hemostasis and inflammation. “This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Alfredo Colonna” PMID:24940514

  13. PREFACE: XXXVI Symposium on Nuclear Physics (Cocoyoc 2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrón-Palos, Libertad; Morales-Agiss, Irving; Martínez-Quiroz, Enrique

    2014-03-01

    logo The XXXVI Symposium on Nuclear Physics, organized by the Division of Nuclear Physics of the Mexican Physical Society, took place from 7-10 January, 2013. As it is customary, the Symposium was held at the Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, in the state of Morelos, Mexico. Conference photograph This international venue with many years of tradition was attended by outstanding physicists, some of them already regulars to this meeting and others who joined us for the first time; a total of 45 attendees from different countries (Argentina, Brazil, Canada, China, Germany, Italy, Japan, Mexico and the United States). A variety of topics related to nuclear physics (nuclear reactions, radioactive beams, nuclear structure, fundamental neutron physics, sub-nuclear physics and nuclear astrophysics, among others) were presented in 26 invited talks and 10 contributed posters. Local Organizing Committee Libertad Barrón-Palos (IF-UNAM)) Enrique Martínez-Quíroz (ININ)) Irving Morales-Agiss (ICN-UNAM)) International Advisory Committee Osvaldo Civitarese (UNLP, Argentina) Jerry P Draayer (LSU, USA)) Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri (ORNL, USA)) Paulo Gomes (UFF, Brazil)) Piet Van Isacker (GANIL, France)) James J Kolata (UND, USA)) Reiner Krücken (TRIUMF, Canada)) Jorge López (UTEP, USA)) Stuart Pittel (UD, USA)) W Michael Snow (IU, USA)) Adam Szczepaniak (IU, USA)) Michael Wiescher (UND, USA)) A list of participants is available in the PDF

  14. Invited commentary: The context and challenge of von Pettenkofer's contributions to epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Oppenheimer, Gerald M; Susser, Ezra

    2007-12-01

    Max von Pettenkofer is largely remembered for swallowing cholera vibrio, trying thereby to falsify the claim of his rival, the contagionist Robert Koch, that the bacillus he had isolated was cholera's sufficient cause. In this issue of the American Journal of Epidemiology, Alfredo Morabia reminds us that von Pettenkofer was more than this futile gesture. He was a 19th century public health leader whose multifactorial theory of cholera etiology deeply influenced the dominant anticontagionist school of disease transmission. His authority was undercut by the massive 1892 cholera epidemic in Hamburg, Germany. As it took off, the German government sent in Koch, who successfully contained the epidemic through interventions that von Pettenkofer regularly repudiated-quarantine, disinfection, and the boiling of water. The authors situate the antagonism between these two individuals within a broader scientific and political context that includes the evolution of miasma theory and debates over the role of governments confronted by epidemic disease. They also note that Koch's approach, which focused narrowly on the agent and its eradication, was missing key elements required for applying germ theory to public health. As scientists later incorporated biologic, host, and environmental factors into the germ theory paradigm, they reintroduced some of the complexity that had previously characterized the miasma model. PMID:17934199

  15. Sensory properties and consumer perception of wet and dry cheese sauces.

    PubMed

    Childs, Jessica L; Yates, Michele D; Drake, MaryAnne

    2009-08-01

    Flavor and texture lexicons and consumer perception for 2 cheese sauce categories, wet and dry, were determined and compared. Commercial and prototype, as well as homemade, wet (n = 24) and dry cheese sauces (n = 14) were evaluated by a trained descriptive panel (n = 9). Consumer acceptance testing was conducted on representative wet sauces (10) and dry sauces (8) on different days (n = 122 consumers each day). Cheese sauces were served over pasta for consumer testing. Univariate and multivariate statistical analyses were used to evaluate the collected data. Flavor and cheese flavor liking were highly correlated with overall liking for both wet and dry sauces. Salty taste was a key driver of liking for both cheese sauce categories. Flavor attributes of wet sauces that contributed most to higher acceptance were beefy/brothy, sweet/caramelized, and free fatty acid. Liking of dry sauces was driven by Alfredo sauce specific flavors such as onion/garlic and herbal for 2 of the consumer clusters, but beefy/brothy and free fatty acid were drivers for the traditional macaroni and cheese consumers. The impact of color/appearance and texture attributes had only a minor influence on consumer liking. By knowing what drives liking in wet and dry cheese sauces, researchers and product developers can more easily develop cheese sauces that appeal to all categories of consumers. PMID:19723225

  16. The mind as skills and dispositions: on normativity and mediation.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Svend

    2012-03-01

    On the occasion of the critique of Alfredo Gaete and Carlos Cornejo, this article explains and extends the hybrid theory of the mind that I recently presented in this journal. Taking inspiration from Rom Harré's program for a hybrid psychology, the theory is supposed to be integrative and aims to broaden Harré's hybrid psychology by including not just the brain, but also the body, social practices, and technological artifacts as mediators of the mind. The mind is understood not as a substance of any kind, but as a set of skills and dispositions to act, think, and feel. This implies a normative view of the mind, according to which psychological phenomena do not simply happen, but are done, and can consequently be done more or less well. I provide arguments in favor of grounding psychology in normativity rather than conscious experience, and I explain why the emphasis on mediators does not represent a threat to the ontological primacy of the person in psychology. PMID:21858422

  17. The UP College of Nursing Collaborating Center for Nursing Development in Primary Health Care.

    PubMed

    Yapchiongco, A S

    1990-01-01

    Officially designated as one of WHO's Collaborating Centers for Nursing Development (CCND), the UP College of Nursing in the Philippines will take on a leading role in achieving "health for all" through primary health care (PHC). The 1978 Declaration of Alma-Ata called for the goal of health for all by the year 2000, and recognized the key role of the nursing profession in this effort. In order to be designated a WHO collaborating center, an institution must be able to provide scientific and technical leadership at the national and international level, must be a stable institution, and must have the capacity to contribute to WHO programs. A WHO collaborating center forms part of an international network of institutions. Having become such a center, the UP College will form part of the Global Network for Nursing Development, organized in March 1987. The Global Network's functions include: 1) coordinating activities and promoting technical cooperation; 2) disseminating and exchanging informational; 3) monitoring trends in health services development and assessing their implications for nursing development; 4) supporting research; 5) gathering support and resources; and 6) promoting the goals of nursing development. As part of the Global Network, the UP College has developed a 4-year plan to fulfill the network's functions. During the June 1989 inauguration of the CCND, the Philippine Secretary of Health, Dr. Alfredo R. A. Bengzon, noted the country's lopsided ratio of health personnel per population, and issued a challenge to the UP College to lead the country in accelerating nursing development. PMID:2093189

  18. PREFACE: XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla-Rodal, E.; Bijker, R.

    2012-09-01

    Conference logo The XXXV Symposium on Nuclear Physics was held at Hotel Hacienda Cocoyoc, Morelos, Mexico from January 3-6 2012. Conceived in 1978 as a small meeting, over the years and thanks to the efforts of various organizing committees, the symposium has become a well known international conference on nuclear physics. To the best of our knowledge, the Mexican Symposium on Nuclear Physics represents the conference series with longest tradition in Latin America and one of the longest-running annual nuclear physics conferences in the world. The Symposium brings together leading scientists from all around the world, working in the fields of nuclear structure, nuclear reactions, physics with radioactive ion beams, hadronic physics, nuclear astrophysics, neutron physics and relativistic heavy-ion physics. Its main goal is to provide a relaxed environment where the exchange of ideas, discussion of new results and consolidation of scientific collaboration are encouraged. To celebrate the 35th edition of the symposium 53 colleagues attended from diverse countries including: Argentina, Australia, Canada, Japan, Saudi Arabia and USA. We were happy to have the active participation of Eli F Aguilera, Eduardo Andrade, Octavio Castaños, Alfonso Mondragón, Stuart Pittel and Andrés Sandoval who also participated in the first edition of the Symposium back in 1978. We were joined by old friends of Cocoyoc (Stuart Pittel, Osvaldo Civitarese, Piet Van Isacker, Jerry Draayer and Alfredo Galindo-Uribarri) as well as several first time visitors that we hope will come back to this scientific meeting in the forthcoming years. The scientific program consisted of 33 invited talks, proposed by the international advisory committee, which nicely covered the topics of the Symposium giving a balanced perspective between the experimental and the theoretical work that is currently underway in each line of research. Fifteen posters complemented the scientific sessions giving the opportunity

  19. Paraguay.

    PubMed

    1987-06-01

    In 1986, the population of Paraguay stood at 4 million, with an annual growth rate of 2.7%. The infant mortality rate was 64/1000 live births and life expectancy was 62 years. The literacy rate was 81%. Of the labor force of 1.2 million, 44% were employed in the agricultural sector, 34% were in industry and commerce, 18% were in the services sector, and 4% were employed by the government. The gross national product (GNP) was US $3.31 billion in 1985, with an annual growth rate of 5% and a per capita GNP of $660. The inflation rate was 25.2% in 1985. Paraguay is a constitutional republic with a powerful executive branch. Since assuming power in 1954, President Alfredo Stroessner has been concerned with the re-establishment of internal order as a basis for economic development. The Colorado Party, the military, and the government bureaucracy are the pillars of the Stroessner regime. Although this regime has brought stability and economic growth, this has been achieved at considerable cost to political rights and individual liberties. Obstacles to development have included fluctuating prices for major export items, the long and expensive river or land routes that foreign trade must traverse, a small domestic market, and internal and external trade barriers. Despite these limitations, agricultural production has grown rapidly, especially cotton and soybeans for export. Paraguay has exceptional hydroelectric potential and is expected to become the world's largest exporter of hydroelectric energy within the next decade. The country's stable government, conservative fiscal policies, and laissezfaire approach to trade and investment have brought economic improvement to a broad segment of society. In addition, the government has attempted to ameliorate rural poverty with a land program. PMID:12177917

  20. Analysis of CYP1A1 and COMT polymorphisms in women with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kleine, J P; Camargo-Kosugi, C M; Carvalho, C V; Silva, F C; Silva, I D C G

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this case-control study was to obtain a comprehensive panel of genetic polymorphisms present only in genes (cytochrome P-450 1A1--CYP1A1 and catechol-O-methyl transferase--COMT) within the metabolic pathway of sex steroids and determine their possible associations with the presence or absence of cervical cancer. Genotypes of 222 women were analyzed: a) 81 with cancer of the cervix treated at the Cancer Hospital Alfredo Abram, between June 2012 and May 2013, with diagnosis confirmed surgically and/or through histomorphological examination; and b) 141 healthy women who assisted at the Endocrine Gynecology and Climacteric Ambulatory, Department of Gynecology, UNIFESP-EPM. These polymorphisms were detected by polymerase chain reaction amplification-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and visualized on 3% agarose gels stained with ethidium bromide. We found a significant association between the frequency of the CYP1A1 polymorphism and the development of cervical cancer. A statistical difference was observed between patient and control groups for CYP1A1 polymorphism genotype distributions (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were found in the COMT gene polymorphism genotype distributions between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05) or between other risk variables analyzed. The CYP1A1 gene involved in the metabolic pathway of sex steroids might influence the emergence of pathological conditions such as cervical cancer in women who carry a mutated allele, and result in 1.80 and 13.46 times increased risk for women with heterozygous or homozygous mutated genotypes, respectively. PMID:26782546

  1. Swift: 10 Years of Discovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The conference Swift: 10 years of discovery was held in Roma at La Sapienza University on Dec. 2-5 2014 to celebrate 10 years of Swift successes. Thanks to a large attendance and a lively program, it provided the opportunity to review recent advances of our knowledge of the high-energy transient Universe both from the observational and theoretical sides. When Swift was launched on November 20, 2004, its prime objective was to chase Gamma-Ray Bursts and deepen our knowledge of these cosmic explosions. And so it did, unveiling the secrets of long and short GRBs. However, its multi-wavelength instrumentation and fast scheduling capabilities made it the most versatile mission ever flown. Besides GRBs, Swift has observed, and contributed to our understanding of, an impressive variety of targets including AGNs, supernovae, pulsars, microquasars, novae, variable stars, comets, and much more. Swift is continuously discovering rare and surprising events distributed over a wide range of redshifts, out to the most distant transient objects in the Universe. Such a trove of discoveries has been addressed during the conference with sessions dedicated to each class of events. Indeed, the conference in Rome was a spectacular celebration of the Swift 10th anniversary. It included sessions on all types of transient and steady sources. Top scientists from around the world gave invited and contributed talks. There was a large poster session, sumptuous lunches, news interviews and a glorious banquet with officials attending from INAF and ASI. All the presentations, as well as several conference pictures, can be found in the conference website (http://www.brera.inaf.it/Swift10/Welcome.html). These proceedings have been collected owing to the efforts of Paolo D’Avanzo who has followed each paper from submission to final acceptance. Our warmest thanks to Paolo for all his work. The Conference has been made possible by the support from La Sapienza University as well as from the ARAP

  2. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombaci, I.; Covello, A.; Marcucci, L. E.; Rosati, S.

    2009-07-01

    Armani Paolo (Università di Trento) Benhar Omar (INFN Roma) Bombaci Ignazio (Università di Pisa) Bonanno Luca (Università di Ferrara) Catara Francesco (Università di Catania) Cò Giampaolo (Università di Lecce) Colonna Maria (Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN Catania) Colonna Nicola (INFN Bari) Conti Francesco (Università di Pavia) Coraggio Luigi (INFN Napoli) Covello Aldo (Università di Napoli) Cristoforetti Marco (Technische Universität München, Germania) Cuofano Carmine (Università di Ferrara) Di Toro Massimo (Università di Catania) Drago Alessandro (Università di Ferrara) Faccioli Pietro (Università di Trento) Farina Nicola (INFN Roma) Finelli Paolo (Università di Bologna) Fiorentini Giovanni (Università di Ferrara) Fortunato Lorenzo (Università di Padova) Gambacurta Danilo (Università di Catania) Gandolfi Stefano (Università di Trento) Gargano Angela (INFN Napoli) Giannini Mauro (Università di Genova) Girlanda Luca (INFN Pisa) Giusti Carlotta (INFN Pavia) Illarionov Alexei (SISSA Trieste) Itaco Nunzio (Università di Napoli) Kievsky Alejandro (INFN Pisa) Lanza Edoardo (INFN Catania) Leidemann Winfried (Università di Trento) Lenzi Silvia (Università di Padova) Lipparini Enrico (Università di Trento) Lissia Marcello (Università di Cagliari) Lo Iudice Nicola (Università di Napoli) Maieron Chiara (Università di Lecce) Marcucci Laura Elisa (Università di Pisa) Matera Francesco (Università di Firenze) Millo Raffaele (Università di Trento) Orlandini Giuseppina (Università di Trento) Pacati Franco (Università di Pavia) Pastore Alessandro (Univeristy of Jyväskylä, Finlandia) Pederiva Francesco (Università di Trento) Pisent Gualtiero (Università di Padova) Prete Gianfranco (INFN Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro) Quarati Piero (Politecnico di Torino) Rosati Sergio (Università di Pisa) Salmè Giovanni (INFN Roma) Santopinto Elena (INFN Genova) Traini Marco (Università di Trento) Vigezzi Enrico (INFN Milano) Vitturi Andrea (Universit

  3. PREFACE: DISCRETE 2010: Symposium on Prospects in the Physics of Discrete Symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Domenico, Antonio; Bini, Cesare; Bloise, Caterina; Bossi, Fabio; Faccini, Riccardo; Gauzzi, Paolo; Isidori, Gino; Lipari, Paolo; Ludovici, Lucio; Silvestrini, Luca

    2011-12-01

    , Portugal, from 3 to 7 December 2012. Roma, November 2011 The Editors Antonio Di Domenico Cesare Bini Caterina Bloise Fabio Bossi Riccardo Faccini Paolo Gauzzi Gino Isidori Paolo Lipari Lucio Ludovici Luca Silvestrini The PDF file also contains committee, secretariat, sponsor and participant lists, plus the conference poster and photograph.

  4. The Hawaiian plume: a case study for geochemists and geophysicists (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farnetani, C. G.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2009-12-01

    Recent progress in understanding mantle plumes has been possible thanks to a tighter link between geochemical observations and geodynamic models. For the Hawaiian plume we moved from the conventional view, where entrainment of surrounding mantle governs the internal conduit structure, to one where the main process is stretching of deep-seated heterogeneities. A conduit structure with elongated, long-lived and isotopically distinct filaments is supported by geochemical observations (e.g., Abouchami et al., 2005) and by fluid dynamics numerical simulations (e.g. Farnetani and Hofmann, 2009). Another conventional view is that plumes are only weakly affected by large scale mantle convection. However, geophysical models (e.g., Steinberger 2000) predict that the Hawaiian plume should be tilted by the Pacific mantle wind. Our numerical simulations of a vigorous plume sheared by a fast moving oceanic lithosphere indeed show that the conduit is moderately tilted in the direction of plate motion. By calculating the trajectories of the upwelling material we find that a young volcano like Loihi does not sample the central part of the conduit but its upstream side. This, in turn poses a problem to another conventional view: that the highest 3He/4He ratios observed at Loihi indicate the plume center. A way to reconcile the observed 3He/4He ratios distribution in Hawaii (e.g., DePaolo et al., 2001) and the sheared plume flow is to invoke the role of carbonatite metasomatism. In a hot plume the earliest carbonatite liquid may form at 400 km depth (Dasgupta and Hirschmann, 2006) and, if helium behaves as a highly incompatible element, the liquid will sequester most of the helium from the plume center. We calculate the flow trajectories of the low density, low viscosity carbonatite liquid and find that it migrates quite vertically within the tilted plume conduit, leading to a significant off-axis displacement of the high 3He/4He ratios towards the front edge of the plume. Abouchami

  5. Exploring membrane respiratory chains.

    PubMed

    Marreiros, Bruno C; Calisto, Filipa; Castro, Paulo J; Duarte, Afonso M; Sena, Filipa V; Silva, Andreia F; Sousa, Filipe M; Teixeira, Miguel; Refojo, Patrícia N; Pereira, Manuela M

    2016-08-01

    Acquisition of energy is central to life. In addition to the synthesis of ATP, organisms need energy for the establishment and maintenance of a transmembrane difference in electrochemical potential, in order to import and export metabolites or to their motility. The membrane potential is established by a variety of membrane bound respiratory complexes. In this work we explored the diversity of membrane respiratory chains and the presence of the different enzyme complexes in the several phyla of life. We performed taxonomic profiles of the several membrane bound respiratory proteins and complexes evaluating the presence of their respective coding genes in all species deposited in KEGG database. We evaluated 26 quinone reductases, 5 quinol:electron carriers oxidoreductases and 18 terminal electron acceptor reductases. We further included in the analyses enzymes performing redox or decarboxylation driven ion translocation, ATP synthase and transhydrogenase and we also investigated the electron carriers that perform functional connection between the membrane complexes, quinones or soluble proteins. Our results bring a novel, broad and integrated perspective of membrane bound respiratory complexes and thus of the several energetic metabolisms of living systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27044012

  6. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  7. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) take a close look at displays in the Apollo/Saturn V Center at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  8. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the thermal protection system on the orbiters, such as Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  9. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo while standing under the engines of the Saturn V rocket on display. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters.

  10. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Clayton C. Anderson practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  11. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) get a close-up view of the tiles, part of the thermal protection system, on the underside of the orbiter Atlantis overhead. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  12. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft of a Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) (right). The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  13. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility, Ron Woods (left) shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) an Apollo-style space suit and how it differs from the current suits. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  14. 1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of the Project Mercury monument at Launch Complex 14 during a tour of the station's facilities. This 13-foot-high astronomical symbol for the planet Mercury was constructed by General Dynamics, the Atlas airframe contractor, and dedicated in 1964 in honor of those who flew in the Mercury 7 capsule. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  15. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Space Station Processing Facility (SSPF), members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) are shown future components of the International Space Station, such as the Multi- Purpose Logistics Module at right. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSPF. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  16. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) learn about the use of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility. At left is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  17. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) gather in the Space Shuttle Main Engine Processing (SSMEP) Facility. In the foreground is one of the main shuttle engines. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  18. 1998 astronaut candidates tour CCAS facilities copy form; photos beginning with 99PD are only availa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At Cape Canaveral Air Station, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) pose in front of what remains of the launch tower at Launch Complex 34 during a tour of the station's facilities. During the Apollo Program, Launch Complex 34 was the site of the first Saturn I and Saturn IB launches, as well as the tragic fire in which the Apollo I astronauts lost their lives. The class is at Kennedy Space Center taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, as well as touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  19. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On a raised platform in the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) look at the aft fuselage of the orbiter Atlantis. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  20. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  1. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility bay 3, Larry Osheim (right), who is with United Space Alliance, shows members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) a sample of Felt Reusable Surface Insulation (FRSI) blankets used on the orbiters. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  2. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) take part in fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  3. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    At the Apollo/Saturn V Center, some of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) line up for a photo during a tour of facilities at KSC. The U.S. candidates include Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and international candidates Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes. The class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF and the crew headquarters.

  4. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Sunita L. Williams practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  5. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch a demonstration as part of fire training. The class is taking part in training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  6. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On their tour of KSC, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (group 17) stop at the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Processing Facility for a close up look at a main shuttle engine. The class is taking part in training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, the crew headquarters, as well as the SSME Processing Facility. The U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  7. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  8. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the Orbiter Processing Facility, 1998 astronaut candidates (ASCAN) Barbara R. Morgan, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.) and Bjarni V. Tryggvason look at the hardware exhibits, such as the engine actuator on the table. Tryggvason is with the Canadian Space Agency. The 1998 ASCAN class is at KSC for training activities, including fire training and a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, SSME Processing Facility, VAB, SSPF, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center and the crew headquarters. Other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Alan G. Poindexter, Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the other international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, and Marcos Pontes.

  9. 1998 astronaut candidates tour KSC facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    On the grounds of the Kennedy Space Center, members of the 1998 astronaut candidate class (Group 17) watch as candidate Alan G. Poindexter practices using firefighting equipment during fire training. The class is at KSC for training activities, including a flight awareness program, plus touring the OPF, VAB, SSPF, SSME Processing Facility, launch pads, SLF, Apollo/Saturn V Center, and the crew quarters. The other U.S. candidates in the '98 class are Clayton C. Anderson, Lee J. Archambault, Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph.D.), Gregory E. Chamitoff (Ph.D.), Timothy J. Creamer, Christopher J. Ferguson, Michael J. Foreman, Michael E. Fossum, Kenneth T. Ham, Patricia C. Hilliard (M.D.), Gregory C. Johnson, Gregory H. Johnson, Stanley G. Love (Ph.D.), Leland D. Melvin, Barbara R. Morgan, William A. Oefelein, John D. Olivas (Ph.D.), Nicholas J.M. Patrick (Ph.D.), Garrett E. Reisman (Ph.D.), Steven R. Swanson, Douglas H. Wheelock, Sunita L. Williams, Neil W. Woodward III, George D. Zamka; and the international candidates are Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli, Hans Schlegel, Roberto Vittori, Bjarni V. Tryggvason, and Marcos Pontes.

  10. Clock-genes and mitochondrial respiratory activity: Evidence of a reciprocal interplay.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Rosella; Cela, Olga; Merla, Giuseppe; Augello, Bartolomeo; Rubino, Rosa; Quarato, Giovanni; Fugetto, Sabino; Menga, Marta; Fuhr, Luise; Relógio, Angela; Piccoli, Claudia; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Capitanio, Nazzareno

    2016-08-01

    In the past few years mounting evidences have highlighted the tight correlation between circadian rhythms and metabolism. Although at the organismal level the central timekeeper is constituted by the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei practically all the peripheral tissues are equipped with autonomous oscillators made up by common molecular clockworks represented by circuits of gene expression that are organized in interconnected positive and negative feed-back loops. In this study we exploited a well-established in vitro synchronization model to investigate specifically the linkage between clock gene expression and the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). Here we show that synchronized cells exhibit an autonomous ultradian mitochondrial respiratory activity which is abrogated by silencing the master clock gene ARNTL/BMAL1. Surprisingly, pharmacological inhibition of the mitochondrial OxPhos system resulted in dramatic deregulation of the rhythmic clock-gene expression and a similar result was attained with mtDNA depleted cells (Rho0). Our findings provide a novel level of complexity in the interlocked feedback loop controlling the interplay between cellular bioenergetics and the molecular clockwork. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060253

  11. Long-term Analysis of Aerosol Optical Thickness from Satellite Retrievals over selected large agglomerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vountas, Marco; von Hoyningen-Huene, Wolfgang; Yoon, Jongmin; Burrows, John P.

    Aside from adverse health effect urban aerosols have potential effects on the climate system. In this study Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrievals over land are performed to study the medium to long-term trends of aerosols in large agglomerations (aka megacities). This task is challenging because of the high variability of the surface reflectance. The Bremen AErosol Retrieval (BAER) algorithm has retrieved AOT successfully over land with different satellite data in other studies. Here, the annual-and long-term trend of AOT over several regions have been analyzed using BAER based on SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) L1b data over a period of 11 years. Among the regions analyzed were several European regions, as well as Sao Paolo, Brazil, and Perl River Delta in south China. Practically all regions investigated showed a week negative trend in AOT (validated by AERONET), except over Perl River Delta where a comparatively strong positive trend of up to 0.007/yr could be observed.

  12. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species: Do they extend or shorten animal lifespan?

    PubMed

    Sanz, Alberto

    2016-08-01

    Testing the predictions of the Mitochondrial Free Radical Theory of Ageing (MFRTA) has provided a deep understanding of the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitochondria in the aging process. However those data, which support MFRTA are in the majority correlative (e.g. increasing oxidative damage with age). In contrast the majority of direct experimental data contradict MFRTA (e.g. changes in ROS levels do not alter longevity as expected). Unfortunately, in the past, ROS measurements have mainly been performed using isolated mitochondria, a method which is prone to experimental artifacts and does not reflect the complexity of the in vivo process. New technology to study different ROS (e.g. superoxide or hydrogen peroxide) in vivo is now available; these new methods combined with state-of-the-art genetic engineering technology will allow a deeper interrogation of, where, when and how free radicals affect aging and pathological processes. In fact data that combine these new approaches, indicate that boosting mitochondrial ROS in lower animals is a way to extend both healthy and maximum lifespan. In this review, I discuss the latest literature focused on the role of mitochondrial ROS in aging, and how these new discoveries are helping to better understand the role of mitochondria in health and disease. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997500

  13. A moral dilemma.

    PubMed

    Arruda, R

    1994-09-01

    During the end of the 1980s, all AIDS prevention campaigns in Brazil mentioning condoms were automatically vetoed by the Catholic Church. The Church's influence upon the government, however, has decreased over the years such that government pamphlets now carry specific, graphic instructions on how to use condoms. This realistic approach to prevention taken by the government has been implemented even though the Church still refuses to endorse condom use and avoids mentioning them in the context of AIDS prevention. Even though the Catholic Church tries to deny that people, young and old alike, have sex solely for pleasure outside of the confines of heterosexual, marital relationships, it must increasingly face reality even within its own ranks. Even though only one priest has thus far openly declared his HIV status, at least 25 of the 1410 priests in Sao Paolo are thought to have died of AIDS in the last five years, while a senior source in the Church believes that more than 40 priests out of a total 14,000 could be seriously ill; no one knows how many are asymptomatically HIV-seropositive. It is clear that HIV cases identified and suspected thus far among the clergy were the result of sexual activity. In this context, the Church has become less verbally opposed to AIDS prevention campaigns, provides care for the sick without moral condemnation, and tends to support its HIV-seropositive priests. PMID:12287968

  14. Ballistic penetration test results for Ductal and ultra-high performance concrete samples.

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhart, William Dodd; Thornhill, Tom Finley, III

    2010-03-01

    This document provides detailed test results of ballistic impact experiments performed on several types of high performance concrete. These tests were performed at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research Facility using a 50 caliber powder gun to study penetration resistance of concrete samples. This document provides test results for ballistic impact experiments performed on two types of concrete samples, (1) Ductal{reg_sign} concrete is a fiber reinforced high performance concrete patented by Lafarge Group and (2) ultra-high performance concrete (UHPC) produced in-house by DoD. These tests were performed as part of a research demonstration project overseen by USACE and ERDC, at the Sandia National Laboratories Shock Thermodynamic Applied Research (STAR) facility. Ballistic penetration tests were performed on a single stage research powder gun of 50 caliber bore using a full metal jacket M33 ball projectile with a nominal velocity of 914 m/s (3000 ft/s). Testing was observed by Beverly DiPaolo from ERDC-GSL. In all, 31 tests were performed to achieve the test objectives which were: (1) recovery of concrete test specimens for post mortem analysis and characterization at outside labs, (2) measurement of projectile impact velocity and post-penetration residual velocity from electronic and radiographic techniques and, (3) high-speed photography of the projectile prior to impact, impact and exit of the rear surface of the concrete construct, and (4) summarize the results.

  15. Probing of protein localization and shuttling in mitochondrial microcompartments by FLIM with sub-diffraction resolution.

    PubMed

    Söhnel, Anna-Carina; Kohl, Wladislaw; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Rieger, Bettina; Busch, Karin B

    2016-08-01

    The cell is metabolically highly compartmentalized. Especially, mitochondria host many vital reactions in their different microcompartments. However, due to their small size, these microcompartments are not accessible by conventional microscopy. Here, we demonstrate that time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) fluorescence lifetime-imaging microscopy (FLIM) classifies not only mitochondria, but different microcompartments inside mitochondria. Sensor proteins in the matrix had a different lifetime than probes at membrane proteins. Localization in the outer and inner mitochondrial membrane could be distinguished by significant differences in the lifetime. The method was sensitive enough to monitor shifts in protein location within mitochondrial microcompartments. Macromolecular crowding induced by changes in the protein content significantly affected the lifetime, while oxidizing conditions or physiological pH changes had only marginal effects. We suggest that FLIM is a versatile and completive method to monitor spatiotemporal events in mitochondria. The sensitivity in the time domain allows for gaining substantial information about sub-mitochondrial localization overcoming diffraction limitation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27016377

  16. Narrativity and enaction: the social nature of literary narrative understanding

    PubMed Central

    Popova, Yanna B.

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes an understanding of literary narrative as a form of social cognition and situates the study of such narratives in relation to the new comprehensive approach to human cognition, enaction. The particular form of enactive cognition that narrative understanding is proposed to depend on is that of participatory sense-making, as developed in the work of Di Paolo and De Jaegher. Currently there is no consensus as to what makes a good literary narrative, how it is understood, and why it plays such an irreplaceable role in human experience. The proposal thus identifies a gap in the existing research on narrative by describing narrative as a form of intersubjective process of sense-making between two agents, a teller and a reader. It argues that making sense of narrative literature is an interactional process of co-constructing a story-world with a narrator. Such an understanding of narrative makes a decisive break with both text-centered approaches that have dominated both structuralist and early cognitivist study of narrative, as well as pragmatic communicative ones that view narrative as a form of linguistic implicature. The interactive experience that narrative affords and necessitates at the same time, I argue, serves to highlight the active yet cooperative and communal nature of human sociality, expressed in the many forms than human beings interact in, including literary ones. PMID:25202286

  17. Prefazione al terzo volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The symposium dedicated to Gerbert on 12.52012 was held at the Vallicelliana Library, in the Borromini hall. The title was Gerberto and Borromini, in order to evidence the link between Gerbert (938 ca. - 1003) and the Ticinese architect who saved his tumb, during the restauration of the Cathedral of Rome St. John in Laterano in 1648. It is possibile that from his residence in the Lateran Gerbert could observe the stars with his tubes, which are presented by C. Sigismondi in this volume. During his trips to Italy, alone and following the archbishop Adalbero of Reims Gerbert could have passed in the Chiusa Valley and influence with his astronomical knowledges the builders of the Sacra of S. Michele, this is the subject of Laura C. Paladino study. Abbo of Fleury is contemporary to Gerbert and he had the same vast interests. He studied in England and they are presented together in the paper of Paolo Rossi. Veronica Regoli shows the link between Gerbert, Dante and Jerusalem.

  18. The Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera: New chronological data of several eruptions of the Copper-Middle Bronze Age period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passariello, Isabella; Lubritto, Carmine; D'Onofrio, Antonio; Guan, Yongjing; Terrasi, Filippo

    2010-04-01

    Radiocarbon dating of short-lived sample materials is a useful tool applied to date deposits of volcanic eruptions. Several archaeological sites discovered and excavated in Campania witnessed important volcanic eruptions, which occurred in the Copper and Middle Bronze Ages. These eruptions come from the Somma-Vesuvius complex and the Phlaegrean Fields caldera. At least four Plinian eruptions have been identified in the eruptive history of Somma-Vesuvius, interspersed by interplinian events, called protohistoric, which occurred between Avellino and Pompeii. At S. Paolo Belsito a stratigraphic sequence below Avellino and above the first two protohistoric events after Avellino were highlighted; while Nola (Naples) gives new information on the chronology of Avellino. Sites like Caivano and Gricignano D'Aversa, involved by the Agnano 3, Paleoastroni 2 and Agnano Monte Spina eruptions were highlighted and investigated. In this work, we want to clarify the chronology of some eruptions by comparing our results with previous data. Charcoal, bone and seed samples were collected, treated and measured at the CIRCE laboratory in Caserta.

  19. New Constraints on Archean-Paleoproterozoic Carbonate Chemistry and pCO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blättler, C. L.; Higgins, J. A.

    2015-12-01

    Very few constraints exist on Archean and Proterozoic seawater chemistry, leaving huge uncertainties on the boundary conditions for the evolution of life and a habitable environment. Ancient carbonate chemistry, which is intimately related to oceanic pH and atmospheric pCO2, remains particularly uncertain, despite its importance for understanding environments and temperatures on early Earth. Using a new application of high-precision calcium isotope measurements, we present data from the Tumbiana Formation (2.7 Ga, Western Australia), the Campbellrand Platform (2.6 Ga, South Africa) and the Pethei Group (1.9 Ga, Northwest Territories, Canada) that allow us to place constraints on carbonate chemistry both before and after the Great Oxidation Event. By analogy with calcium isotope behavior in sulfate minerals (Blättler and Higgins, 2014) and Mono Lake (Nielsen and DePaolo, 2013), we infer a lower limit on the ratio of calcium ions to carbonate alkalinity during deposition of these three sedimentary sequences. These data rule out the soda ocean hypothesis (Kempe and Degens, 1985) and make further predictions about the role of CO2 in solving the faint young Sun problem.

  20. Quark Matter 2011 (QM11) Quark Matter 2011 (QM11)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-12-01

    International Advisory Committee Antinori, FedericoPaic, Guy Braun-Munzinger, PeterPajares, Carlos Cifarelli, LuisaPeitzmann, Thomas Erazmus, BarbaraRedlich, Krzysztof Eskola, KariRiccati, Lodovico Gaardhøje, Jens JørgenRoland, Gunther Gale, CharlesRoy, Christelle Gelis, FrancoisSchukraft, Jürgen Giubellino, PaoloSinha, Bikash Greiner, CarstenSrivastava, Dinesh Gyulassy, MiklosStachel, Johanna Harris, JohnSteinberg, Peter Hatsuda, TetsuoStroth, Joachim Heinz, UlrichSugitate, Toru Jacak, BarbaraTserruya, Itzhak Karsch, FrithjofVelkovska, Julia Kharzeev, DimaWang, Enke Kodama, TakeshiWang, Xin, Nian Lévai, PéterWessels, Johannes Manko, VladislavXu, Nu Müller, BerndtZajc, William Ollitrault, Jean-Yves Organizing Committee Arleo, FrancoisDupieux, Pascal Bastid, NicoleFurget, Christophe Bourgeois, Marie-LaureGranier de Cassagnac, Raphael Bregant, MarcoGuernane, Rachid Carminati, FedericoHervet, Carnita Castillo, JavierKuhn, Christian Cheynis, BrigitteOlivier, Nathalie Conesa, DelValle, Zaida Connor, MichelleRenshall, Lucy Crochet, PhilippeSuire, Christophe Delagrange, HuguesTihinen, Ulla Program Committee Schutz, Yves (Chair)Baldisseri, Alberto Wiedemann, Urs (co-Chair)Safarik, Karel Aurenche, Patrick

  1. Glutamine transport. From energy supply to sensing and beyond.

    PubMed

    Scalise, Mariafrancesca; Pochini, Lorena; Galluccio, Michele; Indiveri, Cesare

    2016-08-01

    Glutamine is the most abundant amino acid in plasma and is actively involved in many biosynthetic and regulatory processes. It can be synthesized endogenously but becomes "conditionally essential" in physiological or pathological conditions of high proliferation rate. To accomplish its functions glutamine has to be absorbed and distributed in the whole body. This job is efficiently carried out by a network of membrane transporters that differ in transport mechanisms and energetics, belonging to families SLC1, 6, 7, 38, and possibly, 25. Some of the transporters are involved in glutamine traffic across different membranes for metabolic purposes; others are involved in specific signaling functions through mTOR. Structure/function relationships and regulatory aspects of glutamine transporters are still at infancy. In the while, insights in involvement of these transporters in cell redox control, cancer metabolism and drug interactions are arising, stimulating basic research to uncover molecular mechanisms of transport and regulation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26951943

  2. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis and its role in the respiratory chain structure.

    PubMed

    Alcázar-Fabra, María; Navas, Plácido; Brea-Calvo, Gloria

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ) is a unique electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which is synthesized on-site by a nuclear encoded multiprotein complex. CoQ receives electrons from different redox pathways, mainly NADH and FADH2 from tricarboxylic acid pathway, dihydroorotate dehydrogenase, electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase that support key aspects of the metabolism. Here we explore some lines of evidence supporting the idea of the interaction of CoQ with the respiratory chain complexes, contributing to their superassembly, including respirasome, and its role in reactive oxygen species production in the mitochondrial inner membrane. We also review the current knowledge about the involvement of mitochondrial genome defects and electron transfer flavoprotein dehydrogenase mutations in the induction of secondary CoQ deficiency. This mechanism would imply specific interactions coupling CoQ itself or the CoQ-biosynthetic apparatus with the respiratory chain components. These interactions would regulate mitochondrial CoQ steady-state levels and function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26970214

  3. ["Fabulous things". Drug narratives about coca and cocaine in the 19th century].

    PubMed

    Wahrig, Bettina

    2009-12-01

    This contribution focuses on the history of Coca leaves and Cocaine in the second half of 19th century Europe. Even though, to date, no direct link has been established between the activities of the Milano physician Paolo Mantegazza, and the Göttingen chemist Friedrich Wöhler, it is not a mere coincidence that both published their findings in the same year, namely, 1859. Mantegazza authored the first treatise claiming that Coca had psychoactive qualities and touted its broad therapeutic faculties; he claimed that it should be introduced into European pharmacotherapy. In Wöhler's laboratory, cocaine was isolated from leaves by his pupil Alfred Niemann; later, Wilhelm Lossen refined and corrected Niemann's results. Narratives about medicinal drugs often streamline history into a story that starts with multiple meanings and impure matters and ends with well-defined substances, directed at clear-cut diseases and symptoms. In the case of Coca, however, the pure substance triggered no such process well into the 1880s, whereas the leaves continued to circulate as an exotic, pluripotent drug whose effects where miraculous and yet difficult to establish. PMID:20481059

  4. Early Solar System Alkali Fractionation Events Recorded by K-Ca Isotopes in the Yamato-74442 LL-Chondritic Breccia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tatsunori, T.; Misawa, K.; Okano, O.; Shih, C.-Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2015-01-01

    Radiogenic ingrowth of Ca-40 due to decay of K-40 occurred early in the solar system history causing the Ca-40 abundance to vary within different early-former reservoirs. Marshall and DePaolo ] demonstrated that the K-40/Ca-40 decay system could be a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [3,4] determined 40K/40Ca ages of lunar granitic rock fragments and discussed the chemical characteristics of their source materials. Recently, Yokoyama et al. [5] showed the application of the K-40/Ca-40 chronometer for high K/Ca materials in ordinary chondrites (OCs). High-precision calcium isotopic data are needed to constrain mixing processes among early solar system materials and the time of planetesimal formation. To better constrain the solar system calcium isotopic compositions among astromaterials, we have determined the calcium isotopic compositions of OCs and an angrite. We further estimated a source K/Ca ratio for alkali-rich fragments in a chondritic breccia using the estimated solar system initial Ca-40/Ca-44.

  5. DRP1-dependent apoptotic mitochondrial fission occurs independently of BAX, BAK and APAF1 to amplify cell death by BID and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Oettinghaus, Björn; D'Alonzo, Donato; Barbieri, Elisa; Restelli, Lisa Michelle; Savoia, Claudia; Licci, Maria; Tolnay, Markus; Frank, Stephan; Scorrano, Luca

    2016-08-01

    During apoptosis mitochondria undergo cristae remodeling and fragmentation, but how the latter relates to outer membrane permeabilization and downstream caspase activation is unclear. Here we show that the mitochondrial fission protein Dynamin Related Protein (Drp) 1 participates in cytochrome c release by selected intrinsic death stimuli. While Bax, Bak double deficient (DKO) and Apaf1(-/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) were less susceptible to apoptosis by Bcl-2 family member BID, H(2)O(2), staurosporine and thapsigargin, Drp1(-/-) MEFs were protected only from BID and H(2)O(2). Resistance to cell death of Drp1(-/-) and DKO MEFs correlated with blunted cytochrome c release, whereas mitochondrial fragmentation occurred in all cell lines in response to all tested stimuli, indicating that other mechanisms accounted for the reduced cytochrome c release. Indeed, cristae remodeling was reduced in Drp1(-/-) cells, potentially explaining their resistance to apoptosis. Our results indicate that caspase-independent mitochondrial fission and Drp1-dependent cristae remodeling amplify apoptosis. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997499

  6. Bioenergetic relevance of hydrogen sulfide and the interplay between gasotransmitters at human cystathionine β-synthase.

    PubMed

    Vicente, João B; Malagrinò, Francesca; Arese, Marzia; Forte, Elena; Sarti, Paolo; Giuffrè, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Merely considered as a toxic gas in the past, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is currently viewed as the third 'gasotransmitter' in addition to nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO), playing a key signalling role in human (patho)physiology. H2S can either act as a substrate or, similarly to CO and NO, an inhibitor of mitochondrial respiration, in the latter case by targeting cytochrome c oxidase (CcOX). The impact of H(2)S on mitochondrial energy metabolism crucially depends on the bioavailability of this gaseous molecule and its interplay with the other two gasotransmitters. The H(2)S-producing human enzyme cystathionine β-synthase (CBS), sustaining cellular bioenergetics in colorectal cancer cells, plays a role in the interplay between gasotransmitters. The enzyme was indeed recently shown to be negatively modulated by physiological concentrations of CO and NO, particularly in the presence of its allosteric activator S-adenosyl-l-methionine (AdoMet). These newly discovered regulatory mechanisms are herein reviewed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27039165

  7. What do we not know about mitochondrial potassium channels?

    PubMed

    Laskowski, Michał; Augustynek, Bartłomiej; Kulawiak, Bogusz; Koprowski, Piotr; Bednarczyk, Piotr; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa; Szewczyk, Adam

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we summarize our knowledge about mitochondrial potassium channels, with a special focus on unanswered questions in this field. The following potassium channels have been well described in the inner mitochondrial membrane: ATP-regulated potassium channel, Ca(2+)-activated potassium channel, the voltage-gated Kv1.3 potassium channel, and the two-pore domain TASK-3 potassium channel. The primary functional roles of these channels include regulation of mitochondrial respiration and the alteration of membrane potential. Additionally, they modulate the mitochondrial matrix volume and the synthesis of reactive oxygen species by mitochondria. Mitochondrial potassium channels are believed to contribute to cytoprotection and cell death. In this paper, we discuss fundamental issues concerning mitochondrial potassium channels: their molecular identity, channel pharmacology and functional properties. Attention will be given to the current problems present in our understanding of the nature of mitochondrial potassium channels. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26951942

  8. The role of the K-channel and the active-site tyrosine in the catalytic mechanism of cytochrome c oxidase.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vivek; Wikström, Mårten

    2016-08-01

    The active site of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) comprises an oxygen-binding heme, a nearby copper ion (CuB), and a tyrosine residue that is covalently linked to one of the histidine ligands of CuB. Two proton-conducting pathways are observed in CcO, namely the D- and the K-channels, which are used to transfer protons either to the active site of oxygen reduction (substrate protons) or for pumping. Proton transfer through the D-channel is very fast, and its role in efficient transfer of both substrate and pumped protons is well established. However, it has not been fully clear why a separate K-channel is required, apparently for the supply of substrate protons only. In this work, we have analysed the available experimental and computational data, based on which we provide new perspectives on the role of the K-channel. Our analysis suggests that proton transfer in the K-channel may be gated by the protonation state of the active-site tyrosine (Tyr244) and that the neutral radical form of this residue has a more general role in the CcO mechanism than thought previously. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26898520

  9. Surgical treatment of painful lesions of the inferior alveolar nerve.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Allevi, Fabiana; Lozza, Alessandro

    2015-10-01

    Nerve-related complications are being reported with increasing frequency following oral and dental surgery, and typically involve the inferior alveolar nerve (IAN). We assess herein the etiology of neuropathic pain related to IAN injuries, and describe the various surgical treatment techniques available. Between 2007 and 2013, 19 patients were referred to the Maxillofacial Surgery Department of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) with pain in the area supplied by the IAN, which developed following endodontic treatment, oral surgery and maxillofacial surgery. All patients underwent IAN surgery by several different microsurgical procedures. Most of the patients affected by pain before surgery experienced complete or partial amelioration of symptoms. All patients receiving sural nerve grafts were pain-free 12 months after surgery. In five patients the operation was unsuccessful. In 78.94% of cases, a significant increase in nerve function was observed. Pain following IAN surgical damage may be addressed by microsurgery; nerve substitution with a sural nerve interpositional graft appears to represent the most efficacious procedure. Scar releasing, nerve decompression and nerve substitution using vein grafts are less effective. Removal of endodontic material extravasated into the mandibular canal is mandatory and effective in patients experiencing severe pain. Surgery should be performed within 12 months postoperatively, ideally during the first few weeks after symptoms onset. PMID:26315275

  10. Women with TSC: Relationship between Clinical, Lung Function and Radiological Features in a Genotyped Population Investigated for Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    PubMed Central

    Imeri, Gianluca; Palumbo, Giuseppina; La Briola, Francesca; Tresoldi, Silvia; Volpi, Angela; Gualandri, Lorenzo; Ghelma, Filippo; Alfano, Rosa Maria; Montanari, Emanuele; Gorio, Alfredo; Lesma, Elena; Peron, Angela; Canevini, Maria Paola; Centanni, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The advent of pharmacological therapies for lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) has made early diagnosis important in women with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), although the lifelong cumulative radiation exposure caused by chest computer tomography (CT) should not be underestimated. We retrospectively investigated, in a cohort of TSC outpatients of San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy) 1) the role of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) for LAM diagnosis, 2) the association between LAM and other features of TSC (e.g. demography, extrapulmonary manifestations, genetic mutations, etc.), and 3) the characteristics of patients with multifocal micronodular pneumocyte hyperplasia (MMPH). Eighty-six women underwent chest CT scan; pulmonary involvement was found in 66 patients (77%; 49% LAM with or without MMPH, and 28% MMPH alone). LAM patients were older, with a higher rate of pneumothorax, presented more frequently with renal and hepatic angiomyolipomas, and tended to have a TSC2 mutation profile. PFTs, assessed in 64% of women unaffected by cognitive impairments, revealed a lower lung diffusion capacity in LAM patients. In multivariate analysis, age, but not PFTs, resulted independently associated with LAM diagnosis. Patients with MMPH alone did not show specific clinical, functional or genetic features. A mild respiratory impairment was most common in LAM-TSC patients: In conclusions, PFTs, even if indicated to assess impairment in lung function, are feasible in a limited number of patients, and are not significantly useful for LAM diagnosis in women with TSC. PMID:27171001

  11. Physiology of intracellular potassium channels: A unifying role as mediators of counterion fluxes?

    PubMed

    Checchetto, Vanessa; Teardo, Enrico; Carraretto, Luca; Leanza, Luigi; Szabo, Ildiko

    2016-08-01

    Plasma membrane potassium channels importantly contribute to maintain ion homeostasis across the cell membrane. The view is emerging that also those residing in intracellular membranes play pivotal roles for the coordination of correct cell function. In this review we critically discuss our current understanding of the nature and physiological tasks of potassium channels in organelle membranes in both animal and plant cells, with a special emphasis on their function in the regulation of photosynthesis and mitochondrial respiration. In addition, the emerging role of potassium channels in the nuclear membranes in regulating transcription will be discussed. The possible functions of endoplasmic reticulum-, lysosome- and plant vacuolar membrane-located channels are also referred to. Altogether, experimental evidence obtained with distinct channels in different membrane systems points to a possible unifying function of most intracellular potassium channels in counterbalancing the movement of other ions including protons and calcium and modulating membrane potential, thereby fine-tuning crucial cellular processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-7, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26970213

  12. The multitude of iron-sulfur clusters in respiratory complex I.

    PubMed

    Gnandt, Emmanuel; Dörner, Katerina; Strampraad, Marc F J; de Vries, Simon; Friedrich, Thorsten

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory complex I couples the electron transfer from NADH to ubiquinone with the translocation of protons across the membrane. Complex I contains one non-covalently bound flavin mononucleotide and, depending on the species, up to ten iron-sulfur (Fe/S) clusters as cofactors. The reason for the presence of the multitude of Fe/S clusters in complex I remained enigmatic for a long time. The question was partly answered by investigations on the evolution of the complex revealing the stepwise construction of the electron transfer domain from several modules. Extension of the ancestral to the modern electron input domain was associated with the acquisition of several Fe/S-proteins. The X-ray structure of the complex showed that the NADH oxidation-site is connected with the quinone-reduction site by a chain of seven Fe/S-clusters. Fast enzyme kinetics revealed that this chain of Fe/S-clusters is used to regulate electron-tunneling rates within the complex. A possible function of the off-pathway cluster N1a is discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26944855

  13. Retrograde signaling: Organelles go networking.

    PubMed

    Kleine, Tatjana; Leister, Dario

    2016-08-01

    The term retrograde signaling refers to the fact that chloroplasts and mitochondria utilize specific signaling molecules to convey information on their developmental and physiological states to the nucleus and modulate the expression of nuclear genes accordingly. Signals emanating from plastids have been associated with two main networks: 'Biogenic control' is active during early stages of chloroplast development, while 'operational' control functions in response to environmental fluctuations. Early work focused on the former and its major players, the GUN proteins. However, our view of retrograde signaling has since been extended and revised. Elements of several 'operational' signaling circuits have come to light, including metabolites, signaling cascades in the cytosol and transcription factors. Here, we review recent advances in the identification and characterization of retrograde signaling components. We place particular emphasis on the strategies employed to define signaling components, spanning the entire spectrum of genetic screens, metabolite profiling and bioinformatics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26997501

  14. How much urban population matters? Exploring the drivers of carbon emissions in 84 cities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero Lankao, P.

    2010-12-01

    Just as urban centers register different levels and paths of development, cities do not contribute at the same level to global warming. Carbon emissions per capita in cities from high-income countries such as Texas and the District of Columbia are 19-20 fold as high compared with those in Sao Paolo, Delhi and Kolkata. Yet, other wealthy cities such as Stockholm and Barcelona also have low levels of emissions per capita. This presentation will draw on results from a quantitative research effort covering 84 cities to show that population dynamics are not the only determinant of urban emissions. Many different factors account for the diverse levels and sources of urban carbon emissions: (a) differences both in their national/regional energy systems and in how energy generation, transportation and other emitters operate; (b) levels of economic development and affluence as measured by gross domestic product (GDP) per capita; (c) technology and technological innovations and acquisition; (d) climatic situation, altitude and location in relation to energy sources; (e) demographic structure and dynamics of a city; (f) urban function and city’s economic base; (g) urban form (spatial structure) and related to this, the lay out and structure of a city’s transportation system; and (h) the wider institutional setting of the city.

  15. On the structural possibility of pore-forming mitochondrial FoF1 ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Gerle, Christoph

    2016-08-01

    The mitochondrial permeability transition is an inner mitochondrial membrane event involving the opening of the permeability transition pore concomitant with a sudden efflux of matrix solutes and breakdown of membrane potential. The mitochondrial F(o)F(1) ATP synthase has been proposed as the molecular identity of the permeability transition pore. The likeliness of potential pore-forming sites in the mitochondrial F(o)F(1) ATP synthase is discussed and a new model, the death finger model, is described. In this model, movement of a p-side density that connects the lipid-plug of the c-ring with the distal membrane bending Fo domain allows reversible opening of the c-ring and structural cross-talk with OSCP and the catalytic (αβ)(3) hexamer. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26968896

  16. [Evaluation of the treatment with levodropropizine of respiratory diseases in children].

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, A; Zuccotti, G V; Vignati, B; Pogliani, L; Sala, M; Riva, E

    1989-01-01

    Sometimes, antitussives can be a valid adjuvant to respiratory tract infections treatment. Although not always needed, this therapeutic support can be extremely useful in selected cases, and when patient is resident and monitored. In this line, the efficacy of a new peripheral antitussive, levodropropizine (Dompé farmaceutici, Milan), has been evaluated in 70 children inpatients of the Pediatric Department at san Paolo Hospital - Milan University - from September 1987 to May 1988. Thirty one male and 29 female children, aged 4 years and 6 months +/- 3 years and 5 months, suffering from various respiratory tract diseases were included in the study. Underlying diseases were represented by 21 acute bronchitis, 20 asthmatic attacks, 18 bronchopneumonia, 11 tracheitis, 6 acute episodes of chronic bronchitis, 2 hypoglottis laryngitis, 1 pertussis, 1 spontaneous pneumothorax. All parents gave their oral informed consent. The basic treatments were antibiotics in 44 patients associated or not with beta 2 agonists (31), theophylline (15), corticosteroids via aerosol (9) or parenterally (3), immunomodulators (2). Treatment with levodropropizine in the oral drops formulation at 2 mg pro kg a day was continued for 5 days and withdrawn according to the clinical evolution. Cough was registered by means of appropriate record forms given to the parents as well as with 120' tape recording whenever possible, i.e. 60 minutes before and 60 minutes after drug administration, on day one and 2. At treatment end, parents and investigator gave an antitussive efficacy judgement. Tolerability was evaluated as per clinical evolution and laboratory parameters. PMID:2631057

  17. Role of cysteines in mammalian VDAC isoforms' function.

    PubMed

    De Pinto, Vito; Reina, Simona; Gupta, Ankit; Messina, Angela; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-08-01

    In this mini-review, we analyze the influence of cysteines in the structure and activity of mitochondrial outer membrane mammalian VDAC isoforms. The three VDAC isoforms show conserved sequences, similar structures and the same gene organization. The meaning of three proteins encoded in different chromosomes must thus be searched for subtle differences at the amino acid level. Among others, cysteine content is noticeable. In humans, VDAC1 has 2, VDAC2 has 9 and VDAC3 has 6 cysteines. Recent works have shown that, at variance from VDAC1, VDAC2 and VDAC3 exhibit cysteines predicted to protrude towards the intermembrane space, making them a preferred target for oxidation by ROS. Mass spectrometry in VDAC3 revealed that a disulfide bridge can be formed and other cysteine oxidations are also detectable. Both VDAC2 and VDAC3 cysteines were mutagenized to highlight their role in vitro and in complementation assays in Δporin1 yeast. Chemico-physical techniques revealed an important function of cysteines in the structural stabilization of the pore. In conclusion, the works available on VDAC cysteines support the notion that the three proteins are paralogs with a similar pore-function and slightly different, but important, ancillary biological functions. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26947058

  18. Optimising the weighting of the water retention index using sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, William; Vandecasteele, Ine

    2015-04-01

    A robust composite indicator was developed to assess the capacity of the landscape to regulate and retain water passing through it at Pan-European scale. The "Water Retention Index" (WRI) takes into account the role of interception by vegetation, the water-holding capacity of the soil, and the relative capacity of the bedrock to allow percolation of water, as well as the influence of soil sealing and slope gradient. A delicate issue in composite indicators is however the relative weighting of each variable used in the indicator - strong correlations and skewness are known to cause unequal influence of the input variables, even though the weighting coefficients are equal (Paruolo et al, 2013). To understand the effects of the weightings in the WRI, penalised splines were used to calculate the first order sensitivity index of each variable used in the construction of the WRI, allowing the true influence of each input to be determined. Furthermore, the weighting coefficients were optimised using an iterative nonlinear algorithm to find the coefficients which resulted in the most equal influence of each input to the indicator. In principle, this approach can be used to improve the weighting of many different kinds of composite indicator, the results of which are often used as the basis for important policy decisions at the European level. Paruolo, Paolo, Michaela Saisana, and Andrea Saltelli. "Ratings and rankings: voodoo or science?." Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series A (Statistics in Society) 176.3 (2013): 609-634.

  19. El Salvador.

    PubMed

    1993-02-01

    Background notes on El Salvador capsulizes specific statistical and descriptive information on geography, demography, government. and economic conditions. The man text describes the people, their history and the nature of the peace process, principal government officials, political conditions, human rights, the state of the economy, foreign relations, and relations with the US. In 1992, the estimated population was about 5 million of which 89% are mestizo (Spanish-Indian), 10% Indian, and 1% Caucasian. 58% live in rural areas. It is largely Roman Catholic. Literacy is about 65% among adults. 6 years of education are compulsory. 40% are engaged in agriculture, 27% in services, and 16% in industry. The gross domestic product was $5.1 billion; per capita income was $1160. El Salvador's history has been marked by frequent revolutions. Almost every present since 1932 has been a military officer. In the more recent past (1969-80), Honduras and El Salvador fought over borders; a peace treaty was signed in 1980, but it was not until 1992 that the land in dispute was awarded by the International Court of Justice to Honduras. During the 1970, efforts by Duarte were made toward democratic reform, but fraud and corruption contributed to the rise of armed guerrilla warfare as a means to bring about change. There were rightist and leftists groups accelerating violence; event he Salvadoran armed forces engaged in lawlessness. The judicial system failed. Nicaragua after 1979 supplied arms and munitions to 5 guerrilla groups. Duarte returned to power and his junta initiated land reform and nationalized banks and marketing of coffee and sugar. The elections in 1982 led to the transfer of power to Alvaro Magana. The new constitution in 1983 appeased some, but land reforms still did not satisfy guerrillas. Duarte was elected again in 1984 and Alfredo Christiani in 1989 in a peaceful transfer of power. In 1991 and 1992 peace accords were signed with the guerrillas. During this 12-year

  20. Ensino e divulgação de astronomia no Planetário de Campinas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, R. P.

    2003-08-01

    Projeto desenvolvido em 1981 por professores da Unicamp, sob a coordenação do Prof. Dr. Carlos Alfredo Argüello propunha a instalação de um Planetário em Campinas. Convênio firmado em 1982 entre a Unicamp, a Prefeitura de Campinas, a Funcamp e a Academia de Ciências do Estado de São Paulo, possibilitou a aquisição de um planetário Zeiss ZKP2, através do MEC, e em 28 de outubro de 1987 foi inaugurado o Planetário de Campinas. Desde então várias atividades de ensino e divulgação da Astronomia foram desenvolvidas regularmente. A verificação dos registros das atividades realizadas mostra um alto índice de atendimento, considerada a capacidade das instalações (sala de projeção para 60 pessoas, auditório com 45 poltronas e hall de exposições). As atividades dirigidas ao público, estudantes e professores, atenderam cerca de 400.000 participantes nos quase 16 anos de sua existência. Além de sessões públicas e escolares, com duração de 1 hora, são oferecidas às escolas vários outros tipos de atividades, com duração de 2,5 horas. Abordam diversos temas e são dirigidas a diferentes níveis de escolaridade. Cursos para o público e para professores, palestras, exposições e eventos especiais completam o quadro de atividades regulares. Mesmo enfrentando quase sempre dificuldades financeiras e administrativas verifica-se que o Planetário de Campinas realizou um trabalho quantitativamente e qualitativamente satisfatório, prestando bom serviços à comunidade de Campinas e de outras cidades de São Paulo e outros Estados. Isso é também atestado pela grande procura de reservas para suas atividades.

  1. Iron cycling in the Amazon River Basin: the isotopic perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poitrasson, Franck; Vieira, Lucieth; Mulholland, Daniel; Seyler, Patrick; Sondag, Francis; Allard, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    With the global climate change and increasing anthropic pressure on nature, it is important to find new indicators of the response of complex systems like the Amazon River Basin. In particular, new tracers like iron isotopes may tell us much on processes such as the chemical exchanges between rivers, soils and the biosphere. Pioneering studies revealed that for some river waters, large δ57Fe fractionations are observed between the suspended and dissolved load (Bergquist and Boyle, 2006), and isotopic variations were also recognized on the suspended matter along the hydrological cycle (Ingri et al., 2006). On land, soil studies from various locations have shown that δ57Fe signatures depend mostly on the weathering regime (Fantle and DePaolo, 2004; Emmanuel et al., 2005; Wiederhold et al., 2007; Poitrasson et al., 2008). It thus seems that Fe isotopes could become an interesting new tracer of the exchanges between soils, rivers and the biosphere. We therefore conducted Fe isotope surveys through multidisciplinary field missions on rivers from the Amazon Basin. It was confirmed that acidic, organic-rich black waters show strong Fe isotope fractionation between particulate and dissolved loads. Furthermore, this isotopic fractionation varies along the hydrological cycle, like previously uncovered in boreal waters suspended matter. In contrast, unfiltered waters show very little variation with time. It was also found that Fe isotopes remain a conservative tracer even in the case of massive iron loss during the mixing of chemically contrasted waters such as the Negro and Solimões tributaries of the Amazon River. Given that >95% of the Fe from the Amazon River is carried as detrital materials, our results lead to the conclusion that the Fe isotope signature delivered to the Atlantic Ocean is undistinguishable from the continental crust value, in contrast to previous inferences. The results indicate that Fe isotopes in rivers represent a promising indicator of the

  2. Media event at ESOC: closest encounter between ESA's comet chaser Rosetta and Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-02-01

    , Gerhard Schwehm, Head of Solar System Science Operations Division & Rosetta Mission Manager 03:10 - Introductory comments on approach ; Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division and Rosetta Flight Operations Director Comments on eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo, Rosetta Spacecraft Operations Manager Comments on closest approach/eclipse, Andrea Accomazzo & Paolo Ferri 03:15 - Closest approach to Mars, eclipse starts 03:17 - Ground stations, Manfred Lugert, Head of Ground Facilities Operations Division 03:28 - Occultation ends - signal back 03:30 - Imagery from Rosetta and Mars Express , Uwe Keller, Mas-Planck Institute 03:40 - Comments on eclipse end and telemetry acquisition, Andrea Accomazzo, 03:52 - Conclusions, Manfred Warhaut, Head of Mission Operations Department 04 :00 - End of event

  3. The Mg isotopic composition of marine pore fluids from ODP Site 807A (Ontong Java Plateau): Implications for the Cenozoic Mg chemistry of the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantle, M. S.; Teng, F.

    2011-12-01

    carbonates exchange Mg with pore fluids over long time scales, as has been suggested previously [1-2], then the use of Mg isotopes as a paleo-proxy in marine carbonates is complicated. In addition, there is considerable structure in the pore fluid δ26Mg values as a function of depth. Neither the pore fluid isotopic data nor the Mg concentration data fit a simple concave up diffusion profile with depth. Therefore, we hypothesize that there is a component of the pore fluid Mg isotope geochemistry that reflects variations in the Mg isotopic composition of seawater over time, similar to previous attempts at reconstructing seawater Mg concentrations [1]. We use numerical models to simulate deposition, recrystallization, and diffusion over million-year time scales in order to determine seawater δ26Mg over time, constraining recrystallization rates based on previous work [1-2]. References [1] Fantle and DePaolo (2006) GCA, 70, 3883-3904 [2] Fantle and DePaolo (2007), GCA, 71, 2524-2546 [3] Higgins and Schrag (2010), GCA, 74, 5039-5053

  4. Thermal forces on planetary ring particles: application to the main system of Saturn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokrouhlický, D.; Nesvorný, D.; Dones, L.; Bottke, W. F.

    2007-08-01

    of Saturn's rings as derived from the ballistic transport theory. We propose that, in addition to collisional coagulation, radiation forces may efficiently remove centimetre-sized particles and thus help explain the observed paucity of these particles in Saturn's rings. A population of particles with spin axes aligned with normal to the disk plane, if it exists, would experience a net outward drift provided their rotation rate is larger than their orbital frequency. This work is dedicated to late Paolo Farinella (1953-2000) who was prompting one of us (D.V.) to analyse orbital effects of thermal forces on ring particles back in 1998. Flooded with many other ideas, Paolo never came to analyse this problem in detail. Appendices are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  5. Dissecting the peripheral stalk of the mitochondrial ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Vega-deLuna, Félix; Sánchez-Vásquez, Lorenzo; Colina-Tenorio, Lilia; Remacle, Claire; Cardol, Pierre; Miranda-Astudillo, Héctor; González-Halphen, Diego

    2016-08-01

    The algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Polytomella sp., a green and a colorless member of the chlorophycean lineage respectively, exhibit a highly-stable dimeric mitochondrial F1Fo-ATP synthase (complex V), with a molecular mass of 1600 kDa. Polytomella, lacking both chloroplasts and a cell wall, has greatly facilitated the purification of the algal ATP-synthase. Each monomer of the enzyme has 17 polypeptides, eight of which are the conserved, main functional components, and nine polypeptides (Asa1 to Asa9) unique to chlorophycean algae. These atypical subunits form the two robust peripheral stalks observed in the highly-stable dimer of the algal ATP synthase in several electron-microscopy studies. The topological disposition of the components of the enzyme has been addressed with cross-linking experiments in the isolated complex; generation of subcomplexes by limited dissociation of complex V; detection of subunit-subunit interactions using recombinant subunits; in vitro reconstitution of subcomplexes; silencing of the expression of Asa subunits; and modeling of the overall structural features of the complex by EM image reconstruction. Here, we report that the amphipathic polymer Amphipol A8-35 partially dissociates the enzyme, giving rise to two discrete dimeric subcomplexes, whose compositions were characterized. An updated model for the topological disposition of the 17 polypeptides that constitute the algal enzyme is suggested. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26873638

  6. K-Ca Dating of Alkali-Rich Fragments in the Y-74442 and Bhola LL-Chondritic Breccias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yokoyama, T; Misawa, K.; Okano, O; Shih, C. -Y.; Nyquist, L. E.; Simon, J. I.; Tappa, M. J.; Yoneda, S.

    2013-01-01

    Alkali-rich igneous fragments in the brecciated LL-chondrites, Krahenberg (LL5) [1], Bhola (LL3-6) [2], Siena (LL5) [3] and Yamato (Y)-74442 (LL4) [4-6], show characteristic fractionation patterns of alkali and alkaline elements [7]. The alkali-rich fragments in Krahenberg, Bhola and Y-74442 are very similar in mineralogy and petrography, suggesting that they could have come from related precursor materials [6]. Recently we reported Rb-Sr isotopic systematics of alkali-rich igneous rock fragments in Y-74442: nine fragments from Y-74442 yield the Rb-Sr age of 4429 plus or minus 54 Ma (2 sigma) for lambda(Rb-87) = 0.01402 Ga(exp -1) [8] with the initial ratio of Sr-87/Sr-86 = 0.7144 plus or minus 0.0094 (2 sigma) [9]. The Rb-Sr age of the alkali-rich fragments of Y-74442 is younger than the primary Rb-Sr age of 4541 plus or minus 14 Ma for LL-chondrite whole-rock samples [10], implying that they formed after accumulation of LL-chondrite parental bodies, although enrichment may have happened earlier. Marshall and DePaolo [11,12] demonstrated that the K-40 - Ca-40 decay system could be an important chronometer as well as a useful radiogenic tracer for studies of terrestrial rocks. Shih et al. [13,14] and more recently Simon et al. [15] determined K-Ca ages of lunar granitic rocks, and showed the application of the K-Ca chronometer for K-rich planetary materials. Since alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias are highly enriched in K, we can expect enhancements of radiogenic Ca-40. Here, we report preliminary results of K-Ca isotopic systematics of alkali-rich fragments in the LL-chondritic breccias, Y-74442 and Bhola.

  7. Isotretinoin Exposure and Risk of Celiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Rashtak, Shadi; Khaleghi, Shahryar; Marietta, Eric V.; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Larson, Joseph J.; Lahr, Brian D.; Murray, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) is a metabolite of vitamin A and has anti-inflammatory and immunoregulatory effects; however, a recent publication by DePaolo et al. demonstrated that in the presence of IL-15, retinoic acid can act as an adjuvant and promote inflammation against dietary proteins. Objective To evaluate the risk of overt and latent celiac disease (CD) among users of isotretinoin. Material and Methods Medical records of patients from 1995 to 2011 who had a mention of isotretinoin in their records (N = 8393) were searched for CD diagnosis using ICD-09CM codes. Isotretinoin exposure was compared across overt CD patients and their age- and gender-matched controls from the same pool. To evaluate the risk of latent CD with isotretinoin exposure, patients were overlapped with a community-based list of patients with waste serum samples that were tested for CD serology, excluding those with overt CD (2006–2011). Isotretinoin exposure was defined as the use of isotretinoin prior to CD diagnosis or serology. Results Of 8393 patients, 25 had a confirmed CD diagnosis. Compared to matched controls (N = 75), isotretinoin exposure was not significantly different between overt CD patients versus controls (36% versus 39%, respectively; P = 0.712). Likewise, latent CD defined as positive serology was not statistically different between isotretinoin exposed (N = 506) versus non-exposed (N = 571) groups (1.8% versus 1.4%, respectively; P = 0.474). Conclusions There was no association between isotretinoin use and risk of either overt or latent CD. PMID:26287738

  8. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    SciTech Connect

    Drell, Persis; Armstrong, Neal; Carter, Emily; DePaolo, Don; Gunnoe, Brent

    2011-05-25

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several “grand challenges” and use-inspired “basic research needs” recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to

  9. New genes and pathomechanisms in mitochondrial disorders unraveled by NGS technologies.

    PubMed

    Legati, Andrea; Reyes, Aurelio; Nasca, Alessia; Invernizzi, Federica; Lamantea, Eleonora; Tiranti, Valeria; Garavaglia, Barbara; Lamperti, Costanza; Ardissone, Anna; Moroni, Isabella; Robinson, Alan; Ghezzi, Daniele; Zeviani, Massimo

    2016-08-01

    Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) technologies are revolutionizing the diagnostic screening for rare disease entities, including primary mitochondrial disorders, particularly those caused by nuclear gene defects. NGS approaches are able to identify the causative gene defects in small families and even single individuals, unsuitable for investigation by traditional linkage analysis. These technologies are contributing to fill the gap between mitochondrial disease cases defined on the basis of clinical, neuroimaging and biochemical readouts, which still outnumber by approximately 50% the cases for which a molecular-genetic diagnosis is attained. We have been using a combined, two-step strategy, based on targeted genes panel as a first NGS screening, followed by whole exome sequencing (WES) in still unsolved cases, to analyze a large cohort of subjects, that failed to show mutations in mtDNA and in ad hoc sets of specific nuclear genes, sequenced by the Sanger's method. Not only this approach has allowed us to reach molecular diagnosis in a significant fraction (20%) of these difficult cases, but it has also revealed unexpected and conceptually new findings. These include the possibility of marked variable penetrance of recessive mutations, the identification of large-scale DNA rearrangements, which explain spuriously heterozygous cases, and the association of mutations in known genes with unusual, previously unreported clinical phenotypes. Importantly, WES on selected cases has unraveled the presence of pathogenic mutations in genes encoding non-mitochondrial proteins (e.g. the transcription factor E4F1), an observation that further expands the intricate genetics of mitochondrial disease and suggests a new area of investigation in mitochondrial medicine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26968897

  10. Prefazione al quarto volume di GERBERTVS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    The fourth volume of GERBERTVS contains the acts of the symposia held in Rome, at the Odeion hall of Lettere faculty in Sapienza University on December 7, 2012 Gerbert Homo Novus and on March 13, 2013 on the pre and post humanistic figures. Laura C. Paladino presents the didactical activity of Gerbert as from Richer of Reims who completed his Historia Francorum in 998, before the election of Gerbert to the pontifical soil. Among these activities there is the teaching of astronomy and mathematics and the abacus, to which a special article of Jorge Nuno Silva is dedicated. The abacus increased dramatically the rapidity of the computations and some algoritms thaught by Gerbert and reported by his former student Bernelinus is very reliably invented by Gerbert himself, as Silva demostrates in his paper. Giancarlo Pani presents the relation between Galileo and Kepler, at the end of the humanistic period, showing interesting insights on the rather asymmetrical exchange of information between the two greater astronomer of 1600. Veronica Regoli presents the Cosmos of Dante, the ideal structure of the Divine Comedy. Patrick Demouy presents the new biography of Flavio G. Nuvolone where the great novelty is the noble origin of Gerbert from Carlat family, but before the marriage of his (presumed) father. His birth is shifted back to 938 with technical demostrations. Paolo Zanna compares the magisterium of Gerbert-Sylvester II and that one of John Paul II and pope Francesco. Finally C. Sigismondi presents the work and the activities of Pawel Max Maksym (1983-2013) who founded the Observatory &"Pope Sylvester II" in the town of Bukowiec, near Lodz, Poland.

  11. “Media, politics and science policy: MS and evidence from the CCSVI Trenches”

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In 2009, Dr. Paolo Zamboni proposed chronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiency (CCSVI) as a possible cause of multiple sclerosis (MS). Although his theory and the associated treatment (“liberation therapy”) received little more than passing interest in the international scientific and medical communities, his ideas became the source of tremendous public and political tension in Canada. The story moved rapidly from mainstream media to social networking sites. CCSVI and liberation therapy swiftly garnered support among patients and triggered remarkable and relentless advocacy efforts. Policy makers have responded in a variety of ways to the public’s call for action. Discussion We present three different perspectives on this evolving story, that of a health journalist who played a key role in the media coverage of this issue, that of a health law and policy scholar who has closely observed the unfolding public policy developments across the country, and that of a medical ethicist who sits on an expert panel convened by the MS Society of Canada and the Canadian Institutes of Health Research to assess the evidence as it emerges. Summary This story raises important questions about resource allocation and priority setting in scientific research and science policy. The growing power of social media represents a new level of citizen engagement and advocacy, and emphasizes the importance of open debate about the basis on which such policy choices are made. It also highlights the different ways evidence may be understood, valued and utilized by various stakeholders and further emphasizes calls to improve science communication so as to support balanced and informed decision-making. PMID:23402260

  12. Carbon in Underland (A "Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research" contest entry from the 2011 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum

    ScienceCinema

    DePaolo, Donald J. (Director, Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2); NCGC Staff

    2011-11-02

    'Carbon in Underland' was submitted by the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2 (NCGC) to the 'Life at the Frontiers of Energy Research' video contest at the 2011 Science for Our Nation's Energy Future: Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) Summit and Forum. Twenty-six EFRCs created short videos to highlight their mission and their work. This video was selected as one of five winners by a distinguished panel of judges for its 'entertaining animation and engaging explanations of carbon sequestration'. NCGC, an EFRC directed by Donald J. DePaolo at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a partnership of scientists from seven institutions: LBNL (lead) Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, University of California, Davis, Ohio State University, and Washington University in St. Louis. The Office of Basic Energy Sciences in the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science established the 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) in 2009. These collaboratively-organized centers conduct fundamental research focused on 'grand challenges' and use-inspired 'basic research needs' recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The overall purpose is to accelerate scientific progress toward meeting the nation's critical energy challenges. The mission of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO{sub 2} is 'to use new investigative tools, combined with experiments and computer simulations, to build a fundamental understanding of molecular-to-pore-scale processes in fluid-rock systems, and to demonstrate the ability to control critical aspects of flow, transport, and mineralization in porous rock media as applied to geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Research topics are: bio-inspired, CO{sub 2} (store), greenhouse gas, and interfacial characterization.

  13. PREFACE: International Seminar on Strong and Electromagnetic Interactions in High Energy Collisions 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardina, Giorgio; Sandorfi, Andrew; Pedroni, Paolo

    2013-03-01

    The International Seminar 'Strong and Electromagnetic Interaction in High Energy Collisions' was held in the Conference Hall 'Ettore Majorana' of the Department of Physics in Messina, Italy on October 12, 2012. The Seminar was organized by the University of Messina and 'Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo', with the aim of presenting and discussing the results of the current experiments and also new plans involving research at INFN-LNF (Italy), JLAB (USA), LHC-CERN, ELSA (Bonn), MAMI (Mainz). The main purpose of this Seminar was to deal with aspects of electromagnetic and strong forces by meson photoproduction and the electron-positron collider, and to search for dark energy. The recent results on hadron contributions to the muon anomalous magnetic moment and kaon interferometry at the DAFNE facility were also discussed. Editors: Giorgio Giardina (University of Messina), Andrew M Sandorfi (Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, USA), Paolo Pedroni (INFN 'Sezione di Pavia') Organizing Committee: Chairman: G Giardina (Messina - Italy) Co-Chairman: A M Sandorfi (Newport News, USA) Co-Chairman: P Pedroni (Pavia - Italy) Scientific Secretary: G Mandaglio (University of Messina - Italy) Organizing Institutions: University of Messina Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina) Topics: Meson photoproduction and baryon resonances Muon anomaly (g-2) Recent results in experiments at the Large Hadron Collider Kaon interferometry Local Organizing Committee: F Curciarello, V De Leo, G Fazio, G Giardina, G Mandaglio, M Romaniuk Sponsored by: University of Messina, Fondazione Bonino-Pulejo (Messina), INFN Sezione di Catania Web-Site: http://newcleo.unime.it/IntSem2012

  14. Energy Frontier Research Centers: A View from Senior EFRC Representatives (2011 EFRC Summit, panel session)

    ScienceCinema

    Drell, Persis (SLAC); Armstrong, Neal (University of Arizona); Carter, Emily (Princeton University); DePaolo, Don (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory); Gunnoe, Brent (University of Virginia)

    2012-03-16

    A distinguished panel of scientists from the EFRC community provide their perspective on the importance of EFRCs for addressing critical energy needs at the 2011 EFRC Summit. Persis Drell, Director at SLAC, served as moderator. Panel members are Neal Armstrong (Director of the Center for Interface Science: Solar Electric Materials, led by the University of Arizona), Emily Carter (Co-Director of the Combustion EFRC, led by Princeton University. She is also Team Leader of the Heterogeneous Functional Materials Center, led by the University of South Caroline), Don DePaolo (Director of the Center for Nanoscale Control of Geologic CO2, led by LBNL), and Brent Gunnoe (Director of the Center for Catalytic Hydrocarbon Functionalization, led by the University of Virginia). The 2011 EFRC Summit and Forum brought together the EFRC community and science and policy leaders from universities, national laboratories, industry and government to discuss "Science for our Nation's Energy Future." In August 2009, the Office of Science established 46 Energy Frontier Research Centers. The EFRCs are collaborative research efforts intended to accelerate high-risk, high-reward fundamental research, the scientific basis for transformative energy technologies of the future. These Centers involve universities, national laboratories, nonprofit organizations, and for-profit firms, singly or in partnerships, selected by scientific peer review. They are funded at $2 to $5 million per year for a total planned DOE commitment of $777 million over the initial five-year award period, pending Congressional appropriations. These integrated, multi-investigator Centers are conducting fundamental research focusing on one or more of several ?grand challenges? and use-inspired ?basic research needs? recently identified in major strategic planning efforts by the scientific community. The purpose of the EFRCs is to integrate the talents and expertise of leading scientists in a setting designed to accelerate

  15. Report Of The Cospar WG On "Future Of Space Astronomy"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubertini, Pietro; Space Astronomy*, Cospar WG on Future of

    2011-09-01

    The COSPAR President on April 20, 2010 appointed the "Future of Space Astronomy” Working Group under the aegis of Commission E, with the aim to analyze the difficult situation of space astronomy over the next two decades and recommend ways to improve the prospects. Having assessed the scientific needs and the current plans of the main space agencies worldwide, the WG has identified some major concerns about the lack of a secured future for Space Astronomy. In fact, astronomers today have access to an impressive set of space missions and ground-based observatories that gives them nearly continuous coverage of the electromagnetic spectrum from the gamma-ray to the radio regions. But the picture becomes concerning and critical in the next 10 - 15 years, when current space astronomy missions will have ended and new missions will be much less numerous. Astronomy is a difficult observational science requiring continuous and simultaneous access to the full electromagnetic spectrum to explore our complex Universe and to pursue answers to fundamental scientific questions. The history of space astronomy, especially the past three decades, has demonstrated clearly the importance and benefits of access to the gamma-ray, X-ray, UV-optical, near IR and far-IR spectrum from space. So far the only planned observatory class missions, proposed to NASA-ESA-JAXA are JWST (2018), WFIRST/EUCLID (2018-2020), Athena (ex IXO, 2022) and LISA. The latter two under re-scope in an ESA alone scenario with a cost <1B€. We will present the main WG outcome with a number of recommendations and, finally, suggest a road map for the next decades. *WG membership: Pietro Ubertini (Chair), Italy, Neil Gehrels (Co-Chair), USA, Ian Corbett (IAU liason), UK, Paolo De Bernardis, Italy, Marcos Machado, Argentina, Matt Griffin, UK, Michael Hauser, USA, Ravinder K. Manchanda, India, Nobuyuki Kawai, Japan, Shuang-Nan Zhang, China, Mikhail Pavlinsky, Russia

  16. Isaac Newton: Eighteenth-century Perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, A. Rupert

    1999-05-01

    This new product of the ever-flourishing Newton industry seems a bit far-fetched at first sight: who but a few specialists would be interested in the historiography of Newton biography in the eighteenth century? On closer inspection, this book by one of the most important Newton scholars of our day turns out to be of interest to a wider audience as well. It contains several biographical sketches of Newton, written in the decades after his death. The two most important ones are the Eloge by the French mathematician Bernard de Fontenelle and the Italian scholar Paolo Frisi's Elogio. The latter piece was hitherto unavailable in English translation. Both articles are well-written, interesting and sometimes even entertaining. They give us new insights into the way Newton was revered throughout Europe and how not even the slightest blemish on his personality or work could be tolerated. An example is the way in which Newton's famous controversy with Leibniz is treated: Newton is without hesitation presented as the wronged party. Hall has provided very useful historical introductions to the memoirs as well as footnotes where needed. Among the other articles discussed is a well-known memoir by John Conduitt, who was married to Newton's niece. This memoir, substantial parts of which are included in this volume, has been a major source of personal information for Newton biographers up to this day. In a concluding chapter, Hall gives a very interesting overview of the later history of Newton biography, in which he describes the gradual change from adoration to a more critical approach in Newton's various biographers. In short, this is a very useful addition to the existing biographical literature on Newton. A J Kox

  17. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.D.; Unruh, D.M.; Gilbert, M.C.

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 +/- 165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 +/- 2. A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 +/- 29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogenous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

  18. Constraining the timescales of sediment transport in lowland regions using U-series isotopes and morphometric analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ashley; Dosseto, Anthony; Chivas, Allan; May, Jan-Hendrik

    2014-05-01

    approaches of geochronology and geomorphometrics. [1] DePaolo et al. (2006), Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 248, 394-410. [2] Willenbring et al. (2013), Geology 41, 343.

  19. Glutamate excitotoxicity and Ca2+-regulation of respiration: Role of the Ca2+ activated mitochondrial transporters (CaMCs).

    PubMed

    Rueda, Carlos B; Llorente-Folch, Irene; Traba, Javier; Amigo, Ignacio; Gonzalez-Sanchez, Paloma; Contreras, Laura; Juaristi, Inés; Martinez-Valero, Paula; Pardo, Beatriz; Del Arco, Araceli; Satrustegui, Jorgina

    2016-08-01

    +/- mice. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060251

  20. High throughput gene complementation screening permits identification of a mammalian mitochondrial protein synthesis (ρ(-)) mutant.

    PubMed

    Potluri, Prasanth; Procaccio, Vincent; Scheffler, Immo E; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    To identify nuclear DNA (nDNA) oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) gene mutations using cultured cells, we have developed a complementation system based on retroviral transduction with a full length cDNA expression library and selection for OXHOS function by growth in galactose. We have used this system to transduce the Chinese hamster V79-G7 OXPHOS mutant cell line with a defect in mitochondrial protein synthesis. The complemented cells were found to have acquired the cDNA for the bS6m polypeptide of the small subunit of the mitochondrial ribosome. bS6m is a 14 kDa polypeptide located on the outside of the mitochondrial 28S ribosomal subunit and interacts with the rRNA. The V79-G7 mutant protein was found to harbor a methionine to threonine missense mutation at codon 13. The hamster bS6m null mutant could also be complemented by its orthologs from either mouse or human. bS6m protein tagged at its C-terminus by HA, His or GFP localized to the mitochondrion and was fully functional. Through site-directed mutagenesis we identified the probable RNA interacting residues of the bS6m peptide and tested the functional significance of mammalian specific C-terminal region. The N-terminus of the bS6m polypeptide functionally corresponds to that of the prokaryotic small ribosomal subunit, but deletion of C-terminal residues along with the zinc ion coordinating cysteine had no functional effect. Since mitochondrial diseases can result from hundreds to thousands of different nDNA gene mutations, this one step viral complementation cloning may facilitate the molecular diagnosis of a range of nDNA mitochondrial disease mutations. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26946086

  1. Deficiency in the mouse mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator isoform 2 gene is associated with cardiac noncompaction.

    PubMed

    Kokoszka, Jason E; Waymire, Katrina G; Flierl, Adrian; Sweeney, Katelyn M; Angelin, Alessia; MacGregor, Grant R; Wallace, Douglas C

    2016-08-01

    The mouse fetal and adult hearts express two adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) isoform genes. The predominant isoform is the heart-muscle-brain ANT-isoform gene 1 (Ant1) while the other is the systemic Ant2 gene. Genetic inactivation of the Ant1 gene does not impair fetal development but results in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in postnatal mice. Using a knockin X-linked Ant2 allele in which exons 3 and 4 are flanked by loxP sites combined in males with a protamine 1 promoter driven Cre recombinase we created females heterozygous for a null Ant2 allele. Crossing the heterozygous females with the Ant2(fl), PrmCre(+) males resulted in male and female ANT2-null embryos. These fetuses proved to be embryonic lethal by day E14.5 in association with cardiac developmental failure, immature cardiomyocytes having swollen mitochondria, cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation, and cardiac failure due to hypertrabeculation/noncompaction. ANTs have two main functions, mitochondrial-cytosol ATP/ADP exchange and modulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). Previous studies imply that ANT2 biases the mtPTP toward closed while ANT1 biases the mtPTP toward open. It has been reported that immature cardiomyocytes have a constitutively opened mtPTP, the closure of which signals the maturation of cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesize that the developmental toxicity of the Ant2 null mutation may be the result of biasing the cardiomyocyte mtPTP to remain open thus impairing cardiomyocyte maturation and resulting in cardiomyocyte hyperproliferation and failure of trabecular maturation. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27048932

  2. Workflow in Clinical Trial Sites & Its Association with Near Miss Events for Data Quality: Ethnographic, Workflow & Systems Simulation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo de Carvalho, Elias Cesar; Batilana, Adelia Portero; Claudino, Wederson; Lima Reis, Luiz Fernando; Schmerling, Rafael A.; Shah, Jatin; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    Background With the exponential expansion of clinical trials conducted in (Brazil, Russia, India, and China) and VISTA (Vietnam, Indonesia, South Africa, Turkey, and Argentina) countries, corresponding gains in cost and enrolment efficiency quickly outpace the consonant metrics in traditional countries in North America and European Union. However, questions still remain regarding the quality of data being collected in these countries. We used ethnographic, mapping and computer simulation studies to identify/address areas of threat to near miss events for data quality in two cancer trial sites in Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Two sites in Sao Paolo and Rio Janeiro were evaluated using ethnographic observations of workflow during subject enrolment and data collection. Emerging themes related to threats to near miss events for data quality were derived from observations. They were then transformed into workflows using UML-AD and modeled using System Dynamics. 139 tasks were observed and mapped through the ethnographic study. The UML-AD detected four major activities in the workflow evaluation of potential research subjects prior to signature of informed consent, visit to obtain subject́s informed consent, regular data collection sessions following study protocol and closure of study protocol for a given project. Field observations pointed to three major emerging themes: (a) lack of standardized process for data registration at source document, (b) multiplicity of data repositories and (c) scarcity of decision support systems at the point of research intervention. Simulation with policy model demonstrates a reduction of the rework problem. Conclusions/Significance Patterns of threats to data quality at the two sites were similar to the threats reported in the literature for American sites. The clinical trial site managers need to reorganize staff workflow by using information technology more efficiently, establish new standard procedures and manage

  3. Breast tomography with synchrotron radiation: preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Silvia; Longo, Renata; Dreossi, Diego; Montanari, Francesco; Olivo, Alessandro; Arfelli, Fulvia; Bergamaschi, Anna; Poropat, Paolo; Rigon, Luigi; Zanconati, Fabrizio; Dalla Palma, Ludovico; Castelli, Edoardo

    2004-05-01

    A system for in vivo breast imaging with monochromatic x-rays has been designed and built at the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste (Italy) and will be operational in 2004. The system design involves the possibility of performing both planar mammography and breast tomography. In the present work, the first results obtained with a test set-up for breast tomography are shown and discussed. Tomographic images of in vitro breasts were acquired using monochromatic x-ray beams in the energy range 20-28 keV and a linear array silicon pixel detector. Tomograms were reconstructed using standard filtered backprojection algorithms; the effect of different filters was evaluated. The attenuation coefficients of fibroglandular and adipose tissue were measured, and a quantitative comparison of images acquired at different energies was performed by calculating the differential signal-to-noise ratio of fibroglandular details in adipose tissue. All images required a dose comparable to the dose delivered in clinical, conventional mammography and showed a high resolution of the breast structures without the overlapping effects that limit the visibility of the structures in 2D mammography. A quantitative evaluation of the images proves that the image quality at a given dose increases in the considered energy range and for the considered breast sizes. This work is dedicated to the memory of Paolo Poropat, who died tragically on June 8th, 2002. He was a brilliant experimental scientist and gave relevant contributions to the fields of high energy physics and medical physics. He had a very rich and versatile personality, a brilliant character, a big vitality. We will never forget him, his love of life, the passion and the enthusiasm he put into everything he did.

  4. One step beyond a ribosome: The ancient anaerobic core.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Filipa L; Nelson-Sathi, Shijulal; Martin, William F

    2016-08-01

    Life arose in a world without oxygen and the first organisms were anaerobes. Here we investigate the gene repertoire of the prokaryote common ancestor, estimating which genes it contained and to which lineages of modern prokaryotes it was most similar in terms of gene content. Using a phylogenetic approach we found that among trees for all 8779 protein families shared between 134 archaea and 1847 bacterial genomes, only 1045 have sequences from at least two bacterial and two archaeal groups and retain the ancestral archaeal-bacterial split. Among those, the genes shared by anaerobes were identified as candidate genes for the prokaryote common ancestor, which lived in anaerobic environments. We find that these anaerobic prokaryote common ancestor genes are today most frequently distributed among methanogens and clostridia, strict anaerobes that live from low free energy changes near the thermodynamic limit of life. The anaerobic families encompass genes for bifunctional acetyl-CoA-synthase/CO-dehydrogenase, heterodisulfide reductase subunits C and A, ferredoxins, and several subunits of the Mrp-antiporter/hydrogenase family, in addition to numerous S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) dependent methyltransferases. The data indicate a major role for methyl groups in the metabolism of the prokaryote common ancestor. The data furthermore indicate that the prokaryote ancestor possessed a rotor stator ATP synthase, but lacked cytochromes and quinones as well as identifiable redox-dependent ion pumping complexes. The prokaryote ancestor did possess, however, an Mrp-type H(+)/Na(+) antiporter complex, capable of transducing geochemical pH gradients into biologically more stable Na(+)-gradients. The findings implicate a hydrothermal, autotrophic, and methyl-dependent origin of life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27150504

  5. Evolution of granitoids in the Catalina metamorphic core complex, southeastern Arizona: U-Pb, Nd, and Hf isotopic constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornash, Katherine F.; Patchett, P. Jonathan; Gehrels, George E.; Spencer, Jon E.

    2013-06-01

    The Santa Catalina Mountains, SE Arizona, was one of the first metamorphic core complexes to be described. Despite its status as a type example, relatively little is known about precise ages and origins of the intrusive rocks that make up most of the crystalline core. U-Pb and Hf isotopic data by laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry from zircons and Nd isotopic results from whole rocks were obtained for 12 granitoids ranging from 1,440 to 26 Ma. Results confirm that the 1.44-Ga Oracle Granite extends through the Catalina Range as variably mylonitic granite and banded gneiss. Laramide intrusions (67-73 Ma) display initial ɛNd values -5 to -8 and ɛHf from -7.5 to -9. Magmatic ages for the prominent white granite sills of the Wilderness suite are 46-57 Ma, in agreement with Terrien (2012), and these granites have initial ɛNd values -8 to -10 and ɛHf from -7 to -14. Lastly, the undeformed Catalina Granite has an age of 26 Ma, with an initial ɛNd and ɛHf of -6 and -8, respectively. Our Nd results agree with limited results from Farmer and DePaolo (89:10141-10160, 1984). Although the Catalina Granite seems to have a significant juvenile component based on Nd and Hf, most of the Laramide and Wilderness intrusions contain Nd and Hf compositions lying close to the evolution of 1.44-Ga Oracle Granites, a fact that is confirmed by the U-Pb data, which show both 1.7- and 1.4-Ga zircon cores in these samples, with 1.4 Ga as the dominant core age. In order to become the dominant source of most of the 72-45-Ma magmas, the Oracle pluton must not only extend across the whole Catalina region, but also have abundant deep-seated equivalents to provide magma sources.

  6. Uranium-series Comminution Ages of Pleistocene Sediments: Effects of Sample Pretreatment Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, V. E.; Depaolo, D. J.; Christensen, J. N.

    2008-12-01

    The uranium-series comminution age method has great potential for dating a wide variety of clastic Quaternary sediments and for providing information about sediment transport and storage times in different environments. This method, applicable to silt- and clay-sized particles, is based on the time-dependent decrease in the 234U/238U ratio due to alpha recoil loss of the 234U daughter from a grain (DePaolo et al. 2006). In order to apply the method to sediments and soils, which are chemically complex, heterogeneous assemblages of multiple phases, the detrital component must be isolated. This requires the removal of phases that can potentially host uranium with a different isotopic composition than the detrital component, including: the adsorbed (exchangeable) fraction, authigenic carbonates, Fe-Mn oxides, and organic compounds. We apply several procedures for removing these non-detrital phases, which mainly involve leaching (as well as ashing in some cases), to a suite of sediments with different bulk compositions, ages, and from a range of depositional settings (including alluvial fan, pluvial lake, and subglacial settings). The efficacy of each method is evaluated to determine which procedures are most effective at removing the non-detrital components while causing minimal damage to the clasts. This evaluation is based on measurements of the (234U/238U) activity ratio, the primary piece of information needed to obtain a sediment's comminution age. Additional measurements include x-ray diffraction for the host mineralogy, and scanning electron microscopy to observe any changes in surface textures. Initial results suggest that a sequential leaching procedure modified from Tessier et al. (1979) is a good choice for pretreating samples in order to obtain its comminution age.

  7. Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin dam-hydraulic system, travel time and temperature modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devkota, Bishnu; Imberger, Jörg

    2012-12-01

    SummaryTiete River System in the State of Sao Paolo, Brazil is characterized by complex hydraulics and operational problems due to series of dams and point and diffuse inflows along the river. A one dimension Lagrangian river model was developed and applied to the 313 km reach of the Upper and Middle Tiete River Basin from the Penha Dam to the head water of Bara Bonita Reservoir, a stretch of river that includes six small to medium size dams (3.4-22 m high) including the Pirapora Reservoir and 26 inflows into the river (11 tributaries, 9 diffuse source areas, and discharges of 4 cities stormwater and 2 wastewater treatment plants. The conservative tracer transport and temperature model that accounts for the short and long wave radiation and heat transfers at the free surface was included and solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The time variable catchment input to the model was the simulated output of the external hydrological model called Runoff Load Model which results were provided by CETESB. The numerical treatment of series of dams and spillway (that included uncontrolled overflow spillway, gate-controlled ogee spillway; and underflow gates and tunnels) and parameterisation of hydraulic jumps are described. Special attention was focused on the high spatial and temporal variation of flows in Tiete River Basin, a result of the large variation in catchment inflows and channel geometry due to dams and reservoirs along the river. Predicted and measured spatial and seasonal variation of flow and temperature profiles along the river show good agreement. The simulated travel time of conservative tracer is compared against the CETESB's 1982 and 1984 field study data in a 254 km reach of the Middle Tiete River that again shows good agreement. Being Lagrangian in construction, this new model is computationally efficient making it an ideal tool for long term simulation for water resource planning, management and operation decision making in a large and complex river

  8. [Medicine and enlightenment in New Spain].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    1998-01-01

    Fundamental ideas of the cultural movement of Enlightenment were drawn up and encouraged in England by John Locke and introduced into continental Europe by Voltaire. The essence of this movement was defined by I. Kant in 1784. These new ideas were projected into the field of medicine initially with the systematization of anatomical studies by Winslow, Vicq d' Azyr and Sénac in France, by S. Th. Sömmerring and von Haller in Germany, and by Paolo Mascagni and other anatomists in Italy. This movement settled in Spain toward the middle of the XVIII century, due to Father Feijóo and his pupils such as Piquer and Casal. In New Spain, which maintained cultural and scientific relationship with the Old World, the leaders of the movement were José Antonio Alzate in the field of biology and José Ignacio Bartolache in that of medicine. These were the founders of the first scientific journals: the "Diario Literario" (Literary Journal) by Alzate (1768) and the "Mercurio Volante" (Flying Mercury) by Bartolache (1772). Latter this physician had to face the great epidemic outbreak of smallpox in 1779. Due to that, he attributed great importance to the psychological aspect of the problem and supported the variolization proceeding introduced into Mexico by Doctor Henri Morel. Moreover, two scientific expeditions, which reached New Spain at the end of the XVIII century, allowed to systematize the study of the American vegetables and to acknowledge the usefulness of botany and chemistry as auxiliary sciences of medicine. PMID:9780494

  9. The Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgi, F.

    2013-12-01

    An ensemble of regional climate model (RCM) projections was produced with the RegCM4 modeling system as a first contribution to the CORDEX framework by the RegCM modeling community, the Phase I CORDEX RegCM hyper-MAtrix (CREMA) experiment. A total of 34 regional projections were completed covering the period 1970-2100 over five different CORDEX domains, Africa, Central America, South America, South Asia and the Mediterranean. The projections use different combinations of three driving GCMs (HadGEM, MPI and GFDL), two greenhouse gas concentration pathways (RCP4.5 and RCP8.5) and different land surface and convection schemes, which allows a first exploration of different sources of uncertainty. The paper will describe the CREMA phase I experiment and discuss some basic results from a first analysis of these runs, with emphasis on extreme events (including tropical storms), variability and regional circulations of relevance for the different domains (e.g. the monsoon). The CREMA Phase I experiment was completed as a collaboration between the Abdus Salam ICTP and the U. San Paolo, CICESE, and the Indian Institute of Technology, and the results from this first analysis are being published in a special issue of Climatic Change. The data from these projections is freely available following the CORDEX data policy for eventual further analysis and use in impact assessment studies. We plan to incrementally populate the CREMA ensemble with further simulations employing more driving GCMs and model configurations and to compare our resultswith other models participating to the CORDEX effort.

  10. Astronomy in the Age of Leonardo.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welther, B. L.

    1997-12-01

    In the 1450s, when Leonardo da Vinci was born, horoscopes were still based primarily on the 13th-century tables developed in the court of Alfonso el Sabio of Spain. By the 15th century European astronomers were computing revised forms of the tables. In Italy, for example, Giovanni Bianchini of Ferrara completed his Tabulae astronomicae in the 1440s. It was finally published posthumously in Venice in 1495. By the 1480s Domenico Maria Novara, a professor of astronomy in Bologna, was publishing annual prognostications of eclipses, conjunctions, and other celestial phenomena. Against this background of traditional astronomy in Italy, two Florentines recorded observations of the sun and moon, comets, and meteorology. Paolo dal Pozzi Toscanelli flourished in the first half of the 15th century and Leonardo da Vinci in the last half. Their observations of celestial phenomena were not primarily for astronomical purposes; they were spinoffs of other pursuits such as medicine, astrology, optics, engineering, and studies of light and shadow. As a physician and cartographer, Toscanelli practiced astrology, studied omens, observed comets and plotted their paths on homemade maps. He also was associated with the construction of a gnomon at the top of the Duomo to observe the summer solstice. It was this project that may have brought him into contact with the young artisan, Leonardo da Vinci. As a painter, Leonardo's approach to science and engineering was to observe, sketch and analyze. His interest in light and shadow led him to notice how the earth, moon and planets all reflect sunlight. His extant manuscripts have geometric sketches for eclipses and for the phenomenon known as "old moon in new moon's arms." Unfortunately, because neither Toscanelli nor Leonardo published their observations, they made no impact on the history of astronomical thought or observation. Their contemporaries did not know or write about their work. Astronomers in the 16th century did not know about

  11. Coenzyme Q biosynthesis in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Acosta, Manuel Jesús; Vazquez Fonseca, Luis; Desbats, Maria Andrea; Cerqua, Cristina; Zordan, Roberta; Trevisson, Eva; Salviati, Leonardo

    2016-08-01

    Coenzyme Q (CoQ, or ubiquinone) is a remarkable lipid that plays an essential role in mitochondria as an electron shuttle between complexes I and II of the respiratory chain, and complex III. It is also a cofactor of other dehydrogenases, a modulator of the permeability transition pore and an essential antioxidant. CoQ is synthesized in mitochondria by a set of at least 12 proteins that form a multiprotein complex. The exact composition of this complex is still unclear. Most of the genes involved in CoQ biosynthesis (COQ genes) have been studied in yeast and have mammalian orthologues. Some of them encode enzymes involved in the modification of the quinone ring of CoQ, but for others the precise function is unknown. Two genes appear to have a regulatory role: COQ8 (and its human counterparts ADCK3 and ADCK4) encodes a putative kinase, while PTC7 encodes a phosphatase required for the activation of Coq7. Mutations in human COQ genes cause primary CoQ(10) deficiency, a clinically heterogeneous mitochondrial disorder with onset from birth to the seventh decade, and with clinical manifestation ranging from fatal multisystem disorders, to isolated encephalopathy or nephropathy. The pathogenesis of CoQ(10) deficiency involves deficient ATP production and excessive ROS formation, but possibly other aspects of CoQ(10) function are implicated. CoQ(10) deficiency is unique among mitochondrial disorders since an effective treatment is available. Many patients respond to oral CoQ(10) supplementation. Nevertheless, treatment is still problematic because of the low bioavailability of the compound, and novel pharmacological approaches are currently being investigated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27060254

  12. Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic study of the Glen Mountains layered complex: Initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambert, David D.; Unruh, D. M.; Gilbert, M. Charles

    1988-01-01

    Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotopic data for rocks and minerals of the Glen Mountains layered complex (GMLC), a midcontinent mafic layered intrusion in the Wichita Mountains of southwestern Oklahoma, constrain the time of initiation of rifting within the southern Oklahoma aulacogen and provide information on the chemistry of the early Paleozoic mantle. Four whole-rock samples define a Rb-Sr isochron corresponding to a maximum crystallization age of 577 ±165 Ma and an initial Sr isotopic composition of 0.70359 ±2. These whole-rock analyses do not define a Sm-Nd isochron; rather, they display a significant range in initial Nd isotopic composition (ɛNd = 3.63-5.35). A three-point Sm-Nd mineral-whole-rock (internal) isochron for an anorthositic gabbro provides a crystallization age of 528 ±29 Ma. These data suggest that the GMLC was emplaced into the southern Oklahoma aulacogen during the initial phase of rifting along the southern margin of the North American craton in the early Paleozoic. This Sm-Nd internal isochron age is within analytical uncertainty of U-Pb zircon ages for granites and rhyolites from the Wichita Mountains; therefore, mafic and felsic magmatism may have been contemporaneous within the rift during the early stages of development. Hybrid rocks and composite dikes in the Wichita Mountains provide field evidence for contemporaneous mafic and felsic magmas. Initial Sr and Nd isotopic data suggest that magmas parental to the GMLC were derived from a depleted mantle source. However, Nd isotopic data for the GMLC plot distinctly below data for the depleted mantle source cited by DePaolo and thus suggest that the parental magmas of the GMLC were either contaminated by Proterozoic crust of the southern midcontinent or were derived from a heterogeneous mantle source region that had variable initial Nd isotopic compositions.

  13. Pb and Sr isotopic constraints on lithospheric magma sources during Mesozoic continental margin arc initiation, southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Barth, A.P. . Dept. of Geology); Tosdal, R.M.; Wooden, J.L. )

    1993-04-01

    Initiation of the Mesozoic Cordilleran arc in the southwestern US is marked by plutonism from about 241--213 Ma, exposed in the Granite Mountains in the southwestern Mojave Desert, through the Transverse Ranges to the Colorado River trough in southeastern California and southwestern Arizona. Plutons range in composition from diorite to granite, but quartz monzonite and monzodiorite predominate. Plutons intruded 1,700 to 1,100 Ma rocks of the Mojave crustal province [as defined isotopically by Wooden and Miller (1990) and Bennett and DePaolo (1987)], and episomal plutons locally intruded its deformed cratonal/miogeoclinal cover. Plutons emplaced during arc initiation overlap isotopically with local Proterozoic basement rocks, but typically have less radiogenic [sup 207]Pb/[sup 204]Pb, [sup 208]Pb/[sup 204]Pb and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr than adjacent, more voluminous Middle-Late Jurassic and Late Cretaceous arc plutons. Among early arc plutons, an inter-suite trend toward more radiogenic Pb and [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr at similar silica contents reflects regional basement isotopic variability. Generally high Sr contents, low Rb/Sr and limited REE data suggest this inter-suite variations records heterogeneity in eclogite/garnet amphibolite facies mafic lithospheric magma sources, corresponding to mafic lower crust and/or upper mantle formed during 1,700 Ma orogenesis or rift-related magmatism at 1,100 Ma. Intra-suite trends toward less radiogenic Pb at constant or more radiogenic Sr reflect involvement of a U and Th depleted, silicic intracrustal contaminant. Distinctive magma sources and limited crustal interaction during emplacement probably reflects the relatively cool thermal structure of the nascent Cordilleran continental margin arc.

  14. Cardiovascular disease risk factor profiles in children with celiac disease on gluten-free diets

    PubMed Central

    Norsa, Lorenzo; Shamir, Raanan; Zevit, Noam; Verduci, Elvira; Hartman, Corina; Ghisleni, Diana; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To describe the cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors in a population of children with celiac disease (CD) on a gluten-free diet (GFD). METHODS: This cross-sectional multicenter study was performed at Schneider Children’s Medical Center of Israel (Petach Tiqva, Israel), and San Paolo Hospital (Milan, Italy). We enrolled 114 CD children in serologic remission, who were on a GFD for at least one year. At enrollment, anthropometric measurements, blood lipids and glucose were assessed, and compared to values at diagnosis. The homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance was calculated as a measure of insulin resistance. RESULTS: Three or more concomitant CVD risk factors [body mass index, waist circumference, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, triglycerides, blood pressure and insulin resistance] were identified in 14% of CD subjects on a GFD. The most common CVD risk factors were high fasting triglycerides (34.8%), elevated blood pressure (29.4%), and high concentrations of calculated LDL cholesterol (24.1%). On a GFD, four children (3.5%) had insulin resistance. Fasting insulin and HOMA-IR were significantly higher in the Italian cohort compared to the Israeli cohort (P < 0.001). Children on a GFD had an increased prevalence of borderline LDL cholesterol (24%) when compared to values (10%) at diagnosis (P = 0.090). Trends towards increases in overweight (from 8.8% to 11.5%) and obesity (from 5.3% to 8.8%) were seen on a GFD. CONCLUSION: This report of insulin resistance and CVD risk factors in celiac children highlights the importance of CVD screening, and the need for dietary counseling targeting CVD prevention. PMID:24039358

  15. The Project Serapis: High Resolution Seismic Imagingof The Campi Flegrei Caldera Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zollo, A.; Virieux, J.; Capuano, P.; Chiarabba, C.; de Franco, R.; Makris, J.; Michelini, A.; Musacchio, G.; Serapis Group

    expected NE-SW and SE-NW structural trends and it has been designed to get 2D/3D images of the crustal structure at a regional scale. A denser 2D network of 35 OBSs has been deployed in the bay of Pozzuoli aimed at detecting and modeling reflected/converted waves from 1 the possible shallow to deep discontinuities beneath the Campi Flegrei caldera. The main target of this particular receiver lay-out is the detailed imaging of the magma chamber top, expected at 4-5 km depth, according to temperature measurements in wells and sparse seismic observations. About 5000 shots have been performed dur- ing the SERAPIS experiment, at an average spatial spacing of 125 m, for a total ship travel path of 620 km. All of the seismic lines have been re-sampled at least twice, using a staggered configuration, which results in a smaller source spacing (less than 65m). In the gulf of Pozzuoli the source array had a geometry of a 5x5 km grid, slightly shifted south with respect to the OBS array. Seismic signals produced by air- guns have been well detected up to 50-60 km distance and the whole Campi Flegrei, Ischia and Procida on-land networks have recorded high quality seismograms pro- duced by the gridded source array in the bay of Pozzuoli. Due to the extended and very dense source and receiver arrays used for SERAPIS, this campaign can provide an innovative contribution to the accurate reconstruction of the Campi Flegrei caldera structure and to the definition of its feeding system at depth. *SERAPIS group: Auger Emmanuel, Bernard Marie-Lise, Bobbio Antonella, Bonagura Mariateresa, Cantore Luciana, Convertito Vincenzo, D'Auria Luca, De Matteis Raffaella, Emolo Anto- nio, Festa Gaetano, Gasparini Paolo, Giberti Grazia, Herrero Andre, Improta Luigi, Lancieri Maria Flora, Nielsen Stefan, Nisii Vincenzo, Russo Guido, Satriano Clau- dio, Simini Mariella, Vassallo Maurizio, Bruno Pier Paolo, Buonocunto Ciro, Capello Marco, Del Pezzo Edoardo, Galluzzo Danilo, Gaudiosi Germana, Giuliana Alessio

  16. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  17. The ATPase Inhibitory Factor 1 (IF1): A master regulator of energy metabolism and of cell survival.

    PubMed

    García-Bermúdez, Javier; Cuezva, José M

    2016-08-01

    entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26876430

  18. The Increasing Challenge of Multidrug-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Giuffrè, Mario; Geraci, Daniela M.; Bonura, Celestino; Saporito, Laura; Graziano, Giorgio; Insinga, Vincenzo; Aleo, Aurora; Vecchio, Davide; Mammina, Caterina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Colonization and infection by multidrug-resistant gram-negative bacilli (MDR GNB) in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) are increasingly reported. We conducted a 5-year prospective cohort surveillance study in a tertiary NICU of the hospital “Paolo Giaccone,” Palermo, Italy. Our objectives were to describe incidence and trends of MDR GNB colonization and the characteristics of the most prevalent organisms and to identify the risk factors for colonization. Demographic, clinical, and microbiological data were prospectively collected. Active surveillance cultures (ASCs) were obtained weekly. Clusters of colonization by extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were analyzed by conventional and molecular epidemiological tools. During the study period, 1152 infants were enrolled in the study. Prevalences of colonization by MDR GNB, ESBL-producing GNB and multiple species/genera averaged, respectively, 28.8%, 11.7%, and 3.7%. Prevalence and incidence density of colonization by MDR GNB and ESBL-producing GNB showed an upward trend through the surveillance period. Rates of ESBL-producing E coli and K pneumoniae colonization showed wide fluctuations peaking over the last 2 years. The only independent variables associated with colonization by MDR GNB and ESBL-producing organisms and multiple colonization were, respectively, the days of NICU stay (odds ratio [OR] 1.041), the days of exposure to ampicillin–sulbactam (OR 1.040), and the days of formula feeding (OR 1.031). Most clusters of E coli and K pneumoniae colonization were associated with different lineages. Ten out of 12 clusters had an outborn infant as their index case. Our study confirms that MDR GNB are an increasing challenge to NICUs. The universal once-a-week approach allowed us to understand the epidemiology of MDR GNB, to timely detect new clones and institute contact precautions, and to assess risk factors. Collection of these data can be an

  19. A Combined He and Os Isotopic Study of the HSDP-2 Core from Mauna Kea, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ireland, T. J.; Walker, R. J.; Depaolo, D. J.; Kurz, M. D.

    2004-12-01

    Combined osmium and helium isotope systematics of hotspot lavas have the potential to reveal information about the deep Earth. A high 3He/4He ratio may represent an undegassed reservoir, generally associated with the lower mantle. There are two Os isotopes that can be studied to help to further elucidate the problem. The decay of 187Re to 187Os is the more frequently cited system; however, in terms of lower mantle processes, the decay of 190Pt to 186Os may be extremely useful. Both of these Os isotopes are enriched in the core relative to chondritic values. In a previous study, Brandon et al. (1999) examined several Hawaiian volcanoes for both He and Os isotopes. A correlation was noted between the 3He/4He, 187Os/188Os and 186Os/188Os ratios. In terms of 3He/4He and 187Os/188Os space, the three commonly cited Hawaiian end-members (Kea, Koolau and Loihi members) were clearly defined. A strong positive correlation was also observed for 186Os/188Os versus 3He/4He. These correlations were interpreted as a possible signature of core-mantle interaction. There were some limitations to previous studies. Only 2-3 samples from each volcano were studied, with these samples generally being subaerially erupted. The He data utilized were often not for the same samples for which the Os data were collected (volcano averages for He were used on some samples). With the introduction of data from the Hawaiian Scientific Drilling Project (HSDP-2), which drilled 2.84 km into the Mauna Kea volcanics (DePaolo et al., 2000), an extensive history of a single volcano can be observed (from the early submarine stages to the later subaerial rocks). In the current study a detailed Os isotopic analysis of several samples that span a large depth range of the HSDP-2 core, in conjunction with previously collected He isotopic data (Kurz et al., 2004), was conducted. The samples define a relatively narrow range of slightly suprachondritic 187Os/188Os ratios (0.12865-0.13056), despite having a large

  20. Impacts and Ophiolites: A Way to Recognize Large Terrestrial Impact Basins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olds, E. P.

    2015-12-01

    That Chicxulub Crater is located on ~35 km thick continental crust is apparently inconsistent with oceanic crustal/upper mantle geochemical signatures detected globally in the KT boundary impact layer [1-5 and unpublished Cr isotope data from the Yin lab at UC Davis] since introduction of the Alvarez hypothesis [6]. Apparent excavation and ejection of mafic/ultramafic target rock by the KT boundary impact might imply an additional KT impact site involving oceanic lithosphere. We speculate: 1) The Greater Antilles island chain ophiolite belt marks the rim of a ~700 km diameter impact basin, deformed and dismembered from an originally circular form by at least 50 million years of left lateral shear on the North American-Caribbean transform plate boundary; 2) Other ophiolite segments may similarly mark rims of large impact basins deformed to greater or lesser extent by, and serving as strain markers for, relative plate motions over geologic time; 3) The Greater Antilles/Chicxulub and Sulu Sea Basin/Spratly Island cases may constitute doublet craters of similar size ratio and separation distance; 4) Plate boundaries may be formed or modified by such impacts. Problems include: 1) The KT fireball layer should be tens of cm thick rather than a few mm thick [8-9]; 2) Impact basins of this size/scale are not expected in the Phanerozoic/Proterozoic [10]; References: [1] DePaolo D. J. et al. 1983. EPSL 64:356-373. [2] Hildebrand A. R. and Boynton W. V. 1988, LPI Contributions 673:78-79. [3] Hildebrand A. R. and Boynton W. V.. 1990. Science 248:843-847. [4] Montanari A. et al. 1983. Geology 11:668. [5] Bohor B. F. et al. 1989. Meteoritics 24:253. [6] Alvarez L. W. et al. 1980 Science 208:1095-1108. [7][8] Grieve R.A.F. and Cintala M.J. 1992 Meteoritics 27: 526-538. [9] Pierazzo E. et al. 1997 Icarus 127/2:408-423. [10] Ivanov B.A. et al. 2002 Asteroids III 89-101

  1. Short timescale photometric and polarimetric behavior of two BL Lacertae type objects

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Covino, S.; Baglio, M. C.; Foschini, L.; Sandrinelli, A.; Tavecchio, F.; Treves, A.; Zhang, H.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bonnoli, G.; Böttcher, M.; et al

    2015-06-05

    Context. Blazars are astrophysical sources whose emission is dominated by non-thermal processes, typically interpreted as synchrotron and inverse Compton emission. Although the general picture is rather robust and consistent with observations, many aspects are still unexplored. Aims. Polarimetric monitoring can offer a wealth of information about the physical processes in blazars. Models with largely different physical ingredients can often provide almost indistinguishable predictions for the total flux, but usually are characterized by markedly different polarization properties. We explore, with a pilot study, the possibility to derive structural information about the emitting regions of blazars by means of a joint analysismore » of rapid variability of the total and polarized flux at optical wavelengths. Methods. Short timescale (from tens of seconds to a couple of minutes) optical linear polarimetry and photometry for two blazars, BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, was carried out with the PAOLO polarimeter at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Several hours of almost continuous observations were obtained for both sources. Results. Our intense monitoring allowed us to draw strongly different scenarios for BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, with the former characterized by intense variability on time-scales from hours to a few minutes and the latter practically constant in total flux. Essentially the same behavior is observed for the polarized flux and the position angle. The variability time-scales turned out to be as short as a few minutes, although involving only a few percent variation of the flux. The polarization variability time-scale is generally consistent with the total flux variability. Total and polarized flux appear to be essentially uncorrelated. However, even during our relatively short monitoring, different regimes can be singled out. Conclusions. No simple scenario is able to satisfactorily model the very rich phenomenology exhibited in our data. As

  2. Tracing the secular evolution of the UCC using the iron isotope composition of ancient glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Rudnick, R. L.; Hazen, R. M.; Shahar, A.

    2015-12-01

    in the ocean (e.g., biological activity) instead of abiotic redox reactions on the continent. References: 1.Martin (1990) Paleoceanography. 2.Fantle and DePaolo (2004) EPSL. 3. Gaschnig et al. (2014) EPSL. 4. Dauphas et al. (2009) EPSL.

  3. Tracing the secular evolution of the UCC using the iron isotope composition of ancient glacial diamictites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X. M.; Gaschnig, R. M.; Rudnick, R. L.; Hazen, R. M.; Shahar, A.

    2014-12-01

    in the ocean (e.g., biological activity) instead of abiotic redox reactions on the continent. References: 1.Martin (1990) Paleoceanography. 2.Fantle and DePaolo (2004) EPSL. 3. Gaschnig et al. (2014) EPSL. 4. Dauphas et al. (2009) EPSL.

  4. Convective Mixing in Porosity Waves during Melt Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, J.; Hesse, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    Models of trace element partitioning during non-reactive, one-dimensional melt migration predict the decoupling of tracers with different partition coefficients (e.g. La and Sm)(Navon & Stolper 1987, DePaolo 1996 Liang 2008). Such decoupling is often not observed in igneous products at the surface. We propose a numeric melt migration model derived from first principles to aid our understanding of mixing during melt migration in the mantle. We assert that circulation within a porosity wave could provide an explanation for this disparity. Buoyancy drives regions of elevated melt fraction through the overlying mantle as porosity waves (Richter & McKenzie 1984, Spiegelman 1993). Within those waves we expect porous flow to lead to the transport and mixing of distinct peridotite-derived lithologies (Kelemen 1997). A consequence of this mixing includes partitioning of trace elements in the partially molten, mixing lithologies. We begin our numeric experiment by imposing a partially molten region in a nearly impermeable background. As the partially molten region rises, the buoyant melt races to the front of the porosity wave. Once the melt reaches the edge of the porosity wave, it encounters an extreme drop in permeability. Though the melt within the porosity wave may move faster than the wave itself, the permeable region confines the melt. Since the melt cannot outrun the porosity wave, it would pool at the edge of the impermeable region. However, the porosity wave continues to rise around the melt. This causes the melt to appear to double back into the more permeable region within the porosity wave. After "turning back", the buoyant melt hugs the low permeability wall of the porosity wave as it continues to migrate. Near the bottom of the porosity wave the melt changes direction and begins to move upward again. The porosity wave and melt create a convective mixing cell. Modeled circulation of melt within the porosity wave could explain why the linear decoupling of trace

  5. Numerical modeling of forceful pluton emplacement and associated deformation at different crustal levels - instantaneous, continuous or episodic intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Nabelek, P. I.

    2015-12-01

    ) in upper parts of the pluton. By examing the chamber overpressure generated by injection of magma (Jellinek and DePaolo, 2003) and the overpressure related to magma buoyancy (Karlstrom et al, 2010), eruption during high-frequency magma input may be promoted by the magma buoyancy while an eruption during low-frequency input may be caused by injection of a large magma batch.

  6. Out of the Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2006-08-01

    Foreword Freeman J. Dyson; Introduction Nina Byers; 1. Hertha Aryton 1854-1923 Joan Mason; 2. Margaret Maltby 1860-1944 Peggy Kidwell; 3. Agnes Pockels 1862-1935 Gary A. Williams; 4. Marie Curie 1867-1934 A. Pais; 5. Henrietta Leavitt 1868-1921 Jean L. Turner; 6. Harriet Brooks 1876-1933 C. W. Wong; 7. Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Ruth Lewin Sime; 8. Emmy Noether 1882-1935 Nina Byers; 9. Inge Lehmann 1888-1993 Bruce A. Bolt; 10. Marietta Blau 1894-1970 Leopold Halpern and Maurice M. Shapiro; 11. Hertha Sponer 1895-1968 Helmut Rechenberg; 12. Irene Joliot-Curie 1897-1956 Hélène Langevin-Joliot and Pierre Radvanyi; 13. Katherine Burr Blodgett 1898-1979 Gary A. Williams; 14. Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin 1900-1979 Vera C. Rubin; 15. Mary Cartwright 1900-1998 Freeman J. Dyson; 16. Bertha Jeffreys 1903-1999 Ruth M. Williams; 17. Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale1903-1971 Judith Milledge; 18. Maria Goeppert Mayer 1906-1972 Steven A. Moszkowski; 19. Helen Megaw 1907-2002 A. Michael Glazer and Christine Kelsey; 20. Yvette Cauchois 1908-1999 Christiane Bonnelle; 21. Marguerite Perey 1909-1975 Jean-Pierre Adloff and George B. Kauffman; 22. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1910-1994 Jenny P. Glusker; 23. Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber 1911-1998 Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; 24. Chien Shiung Wu 1912-1997 Noemie Bencze-Koller; 25. Margaret E. Burbidge 1919 Virginia Trimble; 26. Phyllis Freier 1921-1992 Cecil J. Waddington; 27. Rosalyn S. Yalow 1921 M. S. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 28. Esther Conwell 1922 Lewis Rothberg; 29. Cecile Dewitt-Morette 1922 Bryce DeWitt; 30. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat 1923 James W. York Jr.; 31. Vera Rubin 1928 Robert J. Rubin; 32. Mildred S. Dresselhaus 1930 G. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 33. Myriam Sarachik 1933 Jonathan R. Friedman; 34. Juliet Lee-Franzini 1933 Paolo Franzini; 35. Helen T. Edwards 1936 John Peoples; 36. Mary K. Gaillard 1939 Andreszej Buras; 37. Renata Kallosh 1943 Andrei Linde and Michael Gutperle; 38. Jocelyn Bell Burnell 1943 Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Gary A

  7. Out of the Shadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Nina; Williams, Gary

    2010-12-01

    Foreword Freeman J. Dyson; Introduction Nina Byers; 1. Hertha Aryton 1854-1923 Joan Mason; 2. Margaret Maltby 1860-1944 Peggy Kidwell; 3. Agnes Pockels 1862-1935 Gary A. Williams; 4. Marie Curie 1867-1934 A. Pais; 5. Henrietta Leavitt 1868-1921 Jean L. Turner; 6. Harriet Brooks 1876-1933 C. W. Wong; 7. Lise Meitner 1878-1968 Ruth Lewin Sime; 8. Emmy Noether 1882-1935 Nina Byers; 9. Inge Lehmann 1888-1993 Bruce A. Bolt; 10. Marietta Blau 1894-1970 Leopold Halpern and Maurice M. Shapiro; 11. Hertha Sponer 1895-1968 Helmut Rechenberg; 12. Irene Joliot-Curie 1897-1956 Hélène Langevin-Joliot and Pierre Radvanyi; 13. Katherine Burr Blodgett 1898-1979 Gary A. Williams; 14. Cecilia Payne Gaposchkin 1900-1979 Vera C. Rubin; 15. Mary Cartwright 1900-1998 Freeman J. Dyson; 16. Bertha Jeffreys 1903-1999 Ruth M. Williams; 17. Kathleen Yardley Lonsdale1903-1971 Judith Milledge; 18. Maria Goeppert Mayer 1906-1972 Steven A. Moszkowski; 19. Helen Megaw 1907-2002 A. Michael Glazer and Christine Kelsey; 20. Yvette Cauchois 1908-1999 Christiane Bonnelle; 21. Marguerite Perey 1909-1975 Jean-Pierre Adloff and George B. Kauffman; 22. Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin 1910-1994 Jenny P. Glusker; 23. Gertrude Scharff Goldhaber 1911-1998 Alfred Scharff Goldhaber; 24. Chien Shiung Wu 1912-1997 Noemie Bencze-Koller; 25. Margaret E. Burbidge 1919 Virginia Trimble; 26. Phyllis Freier 1921-1992 Cecil J. Waddington; 27. Rosalyn S. Yalow 1921 M. S. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 28. Esther Conwell 1922 Lewis Rothberg; 29. Cecile Dewitt-Morette 1922 Bryce DeWitt; 30. Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat 1923 James W. York Jr.; 31. Vera Rubin 1928 Robert J. Rubin; 32. Mildred S. Dresselhaus 1930 G. Dresselhaus and F. A. Stahl; 33. Myriam Sarachik 1933 Jonathan R. Friedman; 34. Juliet Lee-Franzini 1933 Paolo Franzini; 35. Helen T. Edwards 1936 John Peoples; 36. Mary K. Gaillard 1939 Andreszej Buras; 37. Renata Kallosh 1943 Andrei Linde and Michael Gutperle; 38. Jocelyn Bell Burnell 1943 Ferdinand V. Coroniti and Gary A

  8. PREFACE: 32nd UIT (Italian Union of Thermo-fluid-dynamics) Heat Transfer Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    volume would like to sincerely thank the authors for presenting their works at the conference and in this special issue. Special thanks are also due to the Scientific Committee, to all the reviewers, and to all the authors for their accurate revision process of each paper for this special issue. Special thanks go to the Organizing Committee, chaired by Prof. Paolo Di Marco. Walter Grassi (Chairman of the Scientific Committee), Alessandro Franco, Nicola Forgione, Daniele Testi - Editors of the Special Issue

  9. Short timescale photometric and polarimetric behavior of two BL Lacertae type objects

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, S.; Baglio, M. C.; Foschini, L.; Sandrinelli, A.; Tavecchio, F.; Treves, A.; Zhang, H.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Bonnoli, G.; Böttcher, M.; Cecconi, M.; D’Ammando, F.; di Fabrizio, L.; Giarrusso, M.; Leone, F.; Lindfors, E.; Lorenzi, V.; Molinari, E.; Prandini, E.; Raiteri, C. M.

    2015-06-05

    Context. Blazars are astrophysical sources whose emission is dominated by non-thermal processes, typically interpreted as synchrotron and inverse Compton emission. Although the general picture is rather robust and consistent with observations, many aspects are still unexplored. Aims. Polarimetric monitoring can offer a wealth of information about the physical processes in blazars. Models with largely different physical ingredients can often provide almost indistinguishable predictions for the total flux, but usually are characterized by markedly different polarization properties. We explore, with a pilot study, the possibility to derive structural information about the emitting regions of blazars by means of a joint analysis of rapid variability of the total and polarized flux at optical wavelengths. Methods. Short timescale (from tens of seconds to a couple of minutes) optical linear polarimetry and photometry for two blazars, BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, was carried out with the PAOLO polarimeter at the 3.6 m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo. Several hours of almost continuous observations were obtained for both sources. Results. Our intense monitoring allowed us to draw strongly different scenarios for BL Lacertae and PKS 1424+240, with the former characterized by intense variability on time-scales from hours to a few minutes and the latter practically constant in total flux. Essentially the same behavior is observed for the polarized flux and the position angle. The variability time-scales turned out to be as short as a few minutes, although involving only a few percent variation of the flux. The polarization variability time-scale is generally consistent with the total flux variability. Total and polarized flux appear to be essentially uncorrelated. However, even during our relatively short monitoring, different regimes can be singled out. Conclusions. No simple scenario is able to satisfactorily model the very rich phenomenology exhibited in our data. As a

  10. Geodiversity and geohazards of the Susa Valley (W-Alps, Italy): combining scientific research and new technologies for enhanced knowledge and proactive management of geoheritage in mountain regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardino, Marco; Bacenetti, Marco; Perotti, Luigi; Giordano, Enrico; Ghiraldi, Luca; Palomba, Mauro

    2013-04-01

    Mountain regions have a range of geological and geomorphological features that make them very attractive for tourism activities. As a consequence, increased human "pressure" causes impacts on geoheritage sites and higher geomorphological risks. These effects are magnified by active geomorphic processes characterizing mountains areas, highly sensitive to climate change. In term of "human sensitivity", several sociological surveys have shown that "perceived risk", not "real risk", influences people's behavior towards natural hazards. The same approach can be applied to geodiversity and geoheritage. Based on these assumptions, we considered the possible strategic roles played by diffusion of scientific research and application of new technologies: 1) to enhance awareness, either of geodiversity or environmental dynamics and 2) to improve knowledge, both on geoheritage management and natural risk reduction. Within the activities of the "ProGEO-Piemonte Project" (Progetti d'Ateneo 2011, cofunded by Universita? degli Studi di Torino and Compagnia di San Paolo Bank Foundation), we performed a systematic review of geodiversity and natural hazards information in the Piemonte Region (NW-Italy). Then we focused our attention on the Susa Valley, an area of the Western Alps where the geoheritage is affected by very active morphodynamics, as well as by a growing tourism, after the 2006 winter Olympics. The Susa Valley became one of the 9 strategic geothematic areas have been selected to represent the geodiversity of the Piemonte region, each characterized by high potential for enhancement of public understanding of science, and recreation activities supported by local communities. Then we contributed to the awareness-raising communication strategy of the "RiskNat project" (Interreg Alcotra 2007-2013, Action A.4.3) by synthesizing geoscience knowledge on the Susa Valley and information on slope instabilities and models/prevention measures/warning systems. Visual representations

  11. Is increasing industrialization affecting remote ecosystem health in the South Americas? Insights from ocean surface water measurements of As, Sb and Pb from a GEOTRACES transect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Dominik; Salaun, Pascal; Van den Berg, Stan; Bi, Zaoshun

    2014-05-01

    Continued industrial development of the South Americas with increasing atmospheric emission of toxic trace metals has lead to a growing concern about possible effects on pristine ecosystem health. Concentration measurements of trace metals in ocean surface waters in the North Atlantic have successfully revealed the global extent of atmospheric pollution in the Northern Hemisphere during economical growth in the USA and Europe, suggesting a similar approach can be applied to the Southern Hemisphere. To this end, we determined concentrations of lead (Pb), antimony (Sb) and arsenic (As) using voltammetry in surface water samples of the South Atlantic Ocean collected during the third leg of the GEOTRACES West Atlantic Cruise. These elements are volatile and therefore most likely suitable tracer elements of industrial emissions from South America. The samples were not filtered and the solutions were acidified and UV digested. Total concentrations of Pb were detected. Detected As levels correspond to the sum of inorganic species (AsIII + AsV) plus the mono methyl arsenic acid (MMA) while the dimethyl arsenic acid (DMA) is not detected in such conditions. For Sb, detected levels correspond at least to the sum of inorganic fractions (SbIII + SbV). The measured concentrations for Pb varied from 6 to 23 pM. Concentrations were highest at -35° latitude and lowest at -40° and -50° latitude. We found a decreasing trend from about -35° latitude southwards. The average concentrations of As was 20 nM and of Sb 1.2 nM. Arsenic showed a more significant north to south trend than Sb. Arsenic concentration was highest at -23 ° latitude (21 nM) and the lowest at -43 ° latitude (17.7 nM). Antimony concentration was highest at -31 ° latitude (1.5 nM) and lowest at -35 ° latitude (1.0 nM). Our preliminary data suggests that the major industrial centres in Brazil (i.e., Sao Paolo, Rio de Janeiro) and Argentina (i.e., Buenos Aires) affect atmospheric metal fluxes to remote

  12. An overview on the history of pedology and soil mapping in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calzolari, C.

    2012-04-01

    In Italy, the word pedology (pedologia) was introduced in a text book as synonym of soil science for the first time in 1904 by Vinassa de Regny. In the literature, the term cohabitates with the words agrology (agrologia), agro-geology (agro-geologia), agricultural geognostic (geognostica agraria), geopedology (geo-pedologia) used in different historical moments by differently rooted soil scientists. When early pedologists started with systematic studies of soils, their characteristics and geography, they were strongly influenced by their cultural background, mainly geology and agro-chemistry. Along the time, the soil concept evolved, as did the concept of pedology, and this is somehow witnessed by the use of different Italian words with reference to soil: suolo, terreno, terra. Differently from agro-chemists, early pedologists based the soil study on the field description of soil profile. This was firstly based on the vertical differentiation between humus rich layers and "inactive" layers and later on, as long as the discipline evolved, on the presence of genetic horizons. The first complete soil map of Italy is dated 1928. Its Author, the geologist De Angelis d'Ossat, was the president of the organising committee of the 1924 International Soil Conference of Rome, where the International Society of Soil Science was founded. The map was based on the geological map of Italy, drafted in scale 1:1,000,000 after the creation of the Kingdom of Italy in 1861. The internal disputes within the Geological Society, together with the scarce interest of most of geologists for soil, did not facilitate the birth of a central soil survey. Soil mapping was mainly conducted by universities and research institutes, and we had to wait until 1953 for a new soil map (scale 1:3,125,000) at national level to be realised by Paolo Principi, based on literature data. In 1966 a new 1:1,000,000 soil map of Italy was eventually published by a national committee, led by Fiorenzo Mancini. This

  13. Technial Programme Committee

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-06-01

    Chairpersons Dr Dinesh Sathyamoorthy, Science & Technology Research Institute for Defence (STRIDE), Ministry of Defence, Malaysia Associate Professor Sr Dr Abdul Rashid Mohamed Shariff, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Dr Ahmad Fikri Abdullah, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Dr Farrah Melissa Muharram, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Members Professor Dr Li Jing, Beijing Normal University, China Professor Dr Iyyanki Muralikrishna, Administrative Staff College of India (ASCI), India Professor Dr Alias Abdul Rahman, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Professor Dr Ismat Mohamed El Hassan, King Saud University, Saudi Arabia Professor Dr George Miliaresis, Open University of Cyprus, Cyprus Professor Dr Christine Pohl, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Professor Dr Mahender Kotha, Goa University, India Associate Professor Dr Paolo Gamba, University of Pavia, Italy Associate Professor Dr Behara Seshadri Daya Sagar, Indian Statistical Institute (ISI), India Associate Professor Sr Ranjit Singh, Infrastructure University Kuala Lumpur (IUKL), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Abdul Nasir Matori, Universiti Teknologi Petronas (UTP), Malaysia Associate Dr Lucian Dragut, West University of Timişoara, Romania Associate Professor Dr Saied Pirasteh, Islamic Azad University, Iran Associate Professor Dr Peter Yuen, Cranfield University, United Kingdom Associate Professor Dr Lim Hwee San, Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Wayan Suparta, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Tuong Thuy Vu, The University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus, Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Maged Mahmoud Marghany, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Rami Al-Ruzouq, University of Sharjah, UAE Associate Professor Dr Biswajeet Pradhan, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia Associate Professor Dr Helmi Zulhaidi Mohd Shafri, Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM), Malaysia

  14. Toward an integrated quasi-operational air quality analysis and prediction system for South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshyaripour, Gholam Ali; Brasseur, Guy; Petersen, Katinka; Bouarar, Idiir; Andrade, Maria de Fatima

    2015-04-01

    Recent industrialization and urbanization in South America (SA) have notably exacerbated the air pollution with adverse impacts on human health and socio-economic systems. Consequently, there is a strong demand for developing ever-better assessment mechanisms to monitor the air quality at different temporal and spatial scales and minimize its damages. Based on previous achievements (e.g., MACC project in Europe and PANDA project in East Asia) we aim to design and implement an integrated system to monitor, analyze and forecast the air quality in SA along with its impacts upon public health and agriculture. An initiative will be established to combine observations (both satellite and in-situ) with advanced numerical models in order to provide a robust scientific basis for short- and long-term decision-making concerning air quality issues in SA countries. The main objectives of the project are defined as 3E: Enhancement of the air quality monitoring system through coupling models and observations, Elaboration of comprehensive indicators and assessment tools to support policy-making, Establishment of efficient information-exchange platforms to facilitate communication among scientists, authorities, stockholders and the public. Here we present the results of the initial stage, where a coarse resolution (50×50 km) set up of Weather Research and Forecast model with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) is used to simulate the air quality in SA considering anthropogenic, biomass-burning (based on MACCity, FINN inventories, respectively) and biogenic emissions (using MEGAN model). According to the availability of the observation data for Metropolitan Area of São Paulo, August 2012 is selected as the simulation period. Nested domains with higher resolution (15×15 km) are also embedded within the parent domain over the megacities (Sao Paolo and Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and Buenos Aires in Argentina), which account for the major anthropogenic emission sources located along coastal regions

  15. Reducing VDAC1 expression induces a non-apoptotic role for pro-apoptotic proteins in cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Arif, Tasleem; Krelin, Yakov; Shoshan-Barmatz, Varda

    2016-08-01

    , July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27080741

  16. The electrochemical transmission in I-Band segments of the mitochondrial reticulum.

    PubMed

    Patel, Keval D; Glancy, Brian; Balaban, Robert S

    2016-08-01

    propose that the abundant cation-proton antiporter in skeletal muscle mitochondria operates in opposite directions in the IBS and PS to permit local recycling of H(+) at each site driven by cooperative gradients in H(+) and Na(+)/K(+) which favor H(+) entry in the PS and H(+) efflux in the IBS. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016,' edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26921810

  17. Calcium isotope (δ 44/40Ca) fractionation along hydrothermal pathways, Logatchev field (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 14°45'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini, Marghaleray; Eisenhauer, Anton; Böhm, Florian; Fietzke, Jan; Bach, Wolfgang; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Rosner, Martin; Bock, Barbara; Lackschewitz, Klas S.; Hauff, Folkmar

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 14°45'N to constrain the calcium isotope hydrothermal flux into the ocean. During the transformation of seawater to a hydrothermal solution, the Ca concentration of pristine seawater ([Ca] SW) increases from about 10 mM to about 32 mM in the hydrothermal fluid endmember ([Ca] HydEnd) and thereby adopts a δ 44/40Ca HydEnd of -0.95 ± 0.07‰ relative to seawater (SW) and a 87Sr/ 86Sr isotope ratio of 0.7034(4). We demonstrate that δ 44/40Ca HydEnd is higher than that of the bedrock at the Logatchev field. From mass balance calculations, we deduce a δ 44/40Ca of -1.17 ± 0.04‰ (SW) for the host-rocks in the reaction zone and -1.45 ± 0.05‰ (SW) for the isotopic composition of the entire hydrothermal cell of the Logatchev field. The values are isotopically lighter than the currently assumed δ 44/40Ca for Bulk Earth of -0.92 ± 0.18‰ (SW) [Skulan J., DePaolo D. J. and Owens T. L. (1997) Biological control of calcium isotopic abundances in the global calcium cycle. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta61,(12) 2505-2510] and challenge previous assumptions of no Ca isotope fractionation between hydrothermal fluid and the oceanic crust [Zhu P. and Macdougall J. D. (1998) Calcium isotopes in the marine environment and the oceanic calcium cycle. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta62,(10) 1691-1698; Schmitt A. -D., Chabeaux F. and Stille P. (2003) The calcium riverine and hydrothermal isotopic fluxes and the oceanic calcium mass balance. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 6731, 1-16]. Here we propose that Ca isotope fractionation along the fluid flow pathway of the Logatchev field occurs during the precipitation of anhydrite. Two anhydrite samples from the Logatchev Hydrothermal Field show an average fractionation of about Δ 44/40Ca = -0.5‰ relative to their assumed parental solutions. Ca isotope ratios in aragonites from carbonate veins from ODP drill cores indicate aragonite precipitation directly from seawater at low

  18. Regulation of V-ATPase assembly and function of V-ATPases in tumor cell invasiveness.

    PubMed

    McGuire, Christina; Cotter, Kristina; Stransky, Laura; Forgac, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:26906430

  19. Highlights of Astronomy, Vol. 15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbett, Ian

    2010-11-01

    Preface; Part I. Gruber Cosmology Prize Lecture; Part II. Invited Discourses; Part III. Joint Discussions: 1. Dark matter in early-type galaxies Léon V. E. Koopmans and Tommaso Treu; 2. Diffuse light in galaxy clusters Magda Arnaboldi and Ortwin Gerhard; 3. Neutron stars - timing in extreme environments Tomaso Belloni, Mariano Méndez and Chengmin Zhang; 4. Progress in understanding the physics of Ap and related stars Margarida Cunha; 5. Modelling the Milky Way in the age of Gaia Annie C. Robin; 6. Time and astronomy Pascale Defraigne; 7. Astrophysical outflows and associated accretion phenomena Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex C. Raga; 8. Hot interstellar matter in elliptical galaxies Dong-Woo Kim and Silvia Pellegrini; 9. Are the fundamental constants varying with time? Paolo Molaro and Elisabeth Vangioni; 10. 3D views on cool stellar atmospheres - theory meets observation K. N. Nagendra, P. Bonifacio and H. G. Ludwig; 11. New advances in helio- and astero-seismology; 12. The first galaxies - theoretical predictions and observational clues; 13. Eta Carinae in the context of the most massive stars Theodore R. Gull and Augusto Damineli; 14. The ISM of galaxies in the far-infrared and sub-millimetre; 15. Magnetic fields in diffuse media Elisabete M. de Gouveia Dal Pino and Alex Lazarian; 16. IHY global campaign - whole heliosphere interval; Part IV. Special Sessions: SpS 1. IR and sub-mm spectroscopy - a new tool for studying stellar evolution Glenn Wahlgren, Hans Käufl and Florian Kerber; SpS 2. The international year of astronomy Pedro Russo, Catherine Cesarsky and Lars Lindberg Christensen; SpS 3. Astronomy in Antarctica in 2009 Michael G. Burton; SpS 4. Astronomy education between past and future J. P. De Greve; SpS 5. Accelerating the rate of astronomical discovery Ray P. Norris; SpS 6. Planetary systems as potential sites for life Régis Courtin, Alan Boss and Michel Mayor; SpS 7. Young stars, brown dwarfs, and protoplanetary disks Jane Gregorio

  20. PREFACE: 12th High-Tech Plasma Processes Conference (HTPP-12)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gleizes, Alain; Ghedini, Emanuele; Gherardi, Matteo; Sanibondi, Paolo; Dilecce, Giorgio

    2012-12-01

    organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of HTPP-12. The Editors of the HTPP 12 Proceedings Professor Alain Gleizes (head of the ISC) Dr Emanuele Ghedini Dr Matteo Gherardi Dr Paolo Sanibondi Dr Giorgio Dilecce Bologna, 30 October 2012

  1. Continuing education. Closing the performance gap.

    PubMed

    Petit, P

    1994-01-01

    Research Foundation provides health learning materials and newsletters. Other community development approaches have been developed by Paolo Friere, David Werner, and Bill Bower, but, whatever the approach, there is always a gap between plans and program activity. Simple measures such as using ward or supervisory meetings to provide information to health workers are possible. PMID:12222414

  2. Intensities of drilling predation of molluscan assemblages in intertidal and subtidal soft substrates in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handler, Sabine M.; Albano, Paolo G.; Bentlage, Rudolf; Drummond, Hannah; García-Ramos, Diego A.; Zuschin, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Intensities of drilling predation of molluscan assemblages in intertidal and subtidal soft substrates in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf Sabine Maria Handler1, Paolo G. Albano1, Rudolf Bentlage2, Hannah Drummond2, D.A. García-Ramos1, Martin Zuschin1 1 Department of Paleontology, University of Vienna, Austria 2 St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York 13617, USA Trace fossils left by predators in the skeleton of their prey are arguably one of the most powerful sources of direct data on predator-prey interactions available in the fossil record. Drill holes, especially those attributed to naticid and muricid gastropods, are unambiguous marks of predation and allow discriminating between successful and unsuccessful predation attempts (complete and incomplete holes, respectively). Latitude and water depth influence drilling frequency. We inspected death assemblages of an intertidal flat and of two subtidal (water depth between 6 and 20 m) sandy sites in the Persian (Arabian) Gulf, off the coast of the United Arab Emirates, to determine the patterns of predation on shelled molluscs along the depth gradient. The study is based on ~7,000 and ~60,000 shells from the intertidal and subtidal, respectively. Drilling Frequency (DF, the number of drilled individuals), Incomplete Drilling Frequency (IDF, number of incomplete drill holes), and Prey Effectiveness (ratio between the number of incomplete drill holes and the total number of drilling attempts) were used as metrics of drilling intensity. We observed major differences between the intertidal and subtidal study areas. Drilling frequencies were generally remarkably low and intertidal flats showed a much lower drilling frequency than the subtidal (1.4% and 6.7%, respectively). In the subtidal, we observed significant differences of drilling intensity among bivalve species and between the two sites. However, predation metrics did not correlate with environmental factors such as substrate type and depth, nor with species life

  3. Coseismic ground deformations related to the 2009 L’Aquila seismic sequence (Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montone, P.; Working Group, E.

    2009-12-01

    and to many individual throws observed along the long-term Paganica fault, raise questions on the maximum expected Magnitude and the seismic hazard estimate of this area. Thus, although the 2009 L’Aquila earthquake and associated faulting caused major damage and loss of life, it does not fully characterize the seismic hazard associated to this area. Emergeo working group: Giuliana Alessio, Laura Alfonsi, Carlo Alberto Brunori, Francesca R. Cinti, Riccardo Civico, Luigi Cucci, Paolo Marco De Martini, Sofia Mariano, Maria Teresa Mariucci, Paola Montone, Rosa Nappi, Daniela Pantosti, Antonio Patera, Simona Pierdominici and Stefano Pucci.

  4. The U-series comminution approach: where to from here

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Handley, Heather; Turner, Simon; Afonso, Juan; Turner, Michael; Hesse, Paul

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying the rates of landscape evolution in response to climate change is inhibited by the difficulty of dating the formation of continental detrital sediments. The 'comminution age' dating model of DePaolo et al. (2006) hypothesises that the measured disequilibria between U-series nuclides (234U and 238U) in fine-grained continental (detrital) sediments can be used to calculate the time elapsed since mechanical weathering of a grain to the threshold size ( 50 µm). The comminution age includes the time that a particle has been mobilised in transport, held in temporary storage (e.g., soils and floodplains) and the time elapsed since final deposition to present day. Therefore, if the deposition age of sediment can be constrained independently, for example via optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating, the residence time of sediment (e.g., a palaeochannel deposit) can be determined. Despite the significant potential of this approach, there is still much work to be done before meaningful absolute comminution ages can be obtained. The calculated recoil loss factor and comminution age are highly dependent on the method of recoil loss factor determination used and the inherent assumptions. We present new and recently published uranium isotope data for aeolian sediment deposits, leached and unleached palaeochannel sediments and bedrock samples from Australia to exemplify areas of current uncertainty in the comminution age approach. In addition to the information gained from natural samples, Monte Carlo simulations have been conducted for a synthetic sediment sample to determine the individual and combined comminution age uncertainties associated to each input variable. Using a reasonable associated uncertainty for each input factor and including variations in the source rock and measured (234U/238U) ratios, the total combined uncertainty on comminution age in our simulation (for two methods of recoil loss factor estimation: weighted geometric and surface area

  5. ESA Press Event: See Mars Express before its departure to the Red Planet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-08-01

    There will be ten participants: four ESA astronauts (Pedro Duque, Leopold Eyharts, Paolo Nespoli and Thomas Reiter), four Japanese astronauts from NASDA (Takao Doi, Koichi Wakata, Satoshi Furukawa and Aikihido Hoshide) and two NASA astronauts (Nicole Passonno Stott and Stephanie D. Wilson). The main objective of this training session is to prepare the astronauts for the tasks they will have to perform when the Japanese experiment module (JEM) and ESA's Columbus laboratory are docked with the core of the International Space Station over the years ahead. After completing their training and certification, the astronauts will be assigned to long-duration missions to the ISS. The advanced training at the EAC will focus on the Columbus systems and the Automated Transfer Vehicle (ATV). It will consist of 24 classroom lectures on the Columbus and ATV systems and 4 on payloads, and 2 sessions in the Columbus Trainer. Instructors are being provided by Astrium for the Columbus systems and Alenia Spazio for the ATV, with ESA/EAC staff as mentors for the Columbus payloads. The astronauts are scheduled to visit Astrium in Bremen on 30 August to get acquainted with the flight unit of the Columbus laboratory module currently undergoing integration. This group of astronauts started their advanced training in April 2001 at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC), Houston, where they attended a first course on the US segment of the International Space Station. This was followed by training on the JEM system at NASDA's Tsukuba Space Center, Japan, in December 2001 - January 2002 and additional training at the JSC in May 2002. At the beginning of next year the group will be returning to Tsukuba for training on Japanese payloads. Hands-on sessions on Columbus Payload Training Models are scheduled for the second half of 2003, again at ESA's European Astronaut Centre. On Thursday 5 September, between 16:30 and 18:30 hrs, the astronauts and other ESA specialists will be available for interviews

  6. Sm-Nd isotopic study of Precambrian/Cambrian sedimentary provenance in the Great Basin and implications for the tectonic evolution of the western US

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, G.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Nd isotopic compositions and Sm-Nd model ages were determined for 14 Precambrian to Cambrian clastic miogeoclinal and 2 Lower Paleozoic eugeoclinal metasedimentary rocks in the Great Basin to determine the sediment source regions and constrain the tectonic evolution of the western margin of the continental US Upper Precambrian (McCoy Creek Group-MCG) and Lower Cambrian miogeoclinal sandstones and shales have homogeneous 147SM/144Nd values (.110 to .119) but show a regional variation in measured element of/sub Nd/, from values of -18 and -26 (T/sub DM/=1.9 and 2.5Ga) in the Pilot and Ruby Ranges in N. Nevada, to values clustering at -11 and -18 (T/sub DM/=1.3 and 1.9Ga) in the Deep Creek and Schell Creek Ranges in the east-central Great Basin. The isotopic variations in the MCG correspond spatially to changes in the element of/sub ND/(0) and T/sub DM/ Precambrian basement adjacent to the miogeocline, suggesting that the MCG were derived from these crustal terranes and were deposited close to the paleocontinental margin of the western US. An element of/sub Nd/(0)=22.14 (T/sub DM/=2.1 Ga) for deeper water miogeoclinal sediment in the southern Great Basin (Wyman Fm-White Mountains, California) requires a source either in nearby T/sub DM/=2.2Ga crust in the S. Sierra Nevada (Bennett and DePaolo, 1984), or in T/sub DM/>2.0Ga crustal terranes to the north, with the sediment having been transported southward via Precambrian longshore currents. Feldspathic sandstone of the Cambrian Harmony Formation in north-central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-25.22 (T/sub DM/=2.4Ga), consistent with a northerly source in Archean crust of present-day Idaho, while Ordovician shale of the Vinini Fm. in central Nevada has element of/sub Nd/(0)=-17.6, identical to values for the MCG exposed directly to the east.

  7. Carbon and Nitrogen Cycling in Urban Landscapes: Global, Regional Dynamics and Case Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svirejeva-Hopkins, A.; Nardoto, G. B.; Schellnhuber, H.

    2008-12-01

    The urban population has been growing rapidly in the last decades and is predicted to continue its exponential trend, especially in the developing countries, which would create additional pressure on the environment by overpopulated unsustainable cities and will continue to substantially change the main Biogeochemical cycles. Such disturbances in the main driving cycle of the Biosphere (global carbon cycle) and the nitrogen cycle, induced by sprawling urban human activities, lead to global, regional and local environmental problems, i.e. global warming, photochemical smog, stratospheric ozone depletion, soil acidification, nitrate pollution of surface and ground water, coastal ecosystem disturbances. Since urban areas are expected to continue their rapid expansion in the 21st century, accompanied by growing energy production, increased food demand, expanding transportation and industrialization it becomes more and more important to be able to describe and forecast the dynamics of biogeochemical functioning of these landscapes (which have altered characteristics compared to the natural ecosystems). Moreover, from the environmental policy perspective, a high density of people makes cities focal points of vulnerability to global environmental change. The model based on the forecasting the dynamics of urban area growth, allows us to forecast the dynamics of Carbon and Nitrogen on the urban territories at different scales. However, nitrogen cycle is very complex and is closely interlinked with the other major biogeochemical cycles, such as oxygen and water. The system of water supply and liquid waste carried by water out of the system 'city' is investigated. In order to better understand the mechanisms of cycling, we consider the case studies, when we investigated the detailed fluxes of Carbon and Nitrogen in Sao Paolo (Brazil) and Paris (France). When we know the yearly amounts of carbon and nitrogen, produced by a city, we should be capable of coming up with what

  8. Mitochondrial disease-related mutations at the cytochrome b-iron-sulfur protein (ISP) interface: Molecular effects on the large-scale motion of ISP and superoxide generation studied in Rhodobacter capsulatus cytochrome bc1.

    PubMed

    Ekiert, Robert; Borek, Arkadiusz; Kuleta, Patryk; Czernek, Justyna; Osyczka, Artur

    2016-08-01

    . This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'EBEC 2016: 19th European Bioenergetics Conference, Riva del Garda, Italy, July 2-6, 2016', edited by Prof. Paolo Bernardi. PMID:27032290

  9. Osmium isotope evidence for Early to Middle Proterozoic mantle lithosphere stabilization and concomitant production of juvenile crust in Dish Hill, CA peridotite xenoliths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armytage, Rosalind M. G.; Brandon, Alan D.; Peslier, Anne H.; Lapen, Thomas J.

    2014-07-01

    The 187Os/188Os compositions in peridotite samples from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) can be used to constrain the timing of melt extraction and potentially test the link between large-scale mantle melting and juvenile crust production. The SCLM has often experienced a complex history such that some lithophile elements such as REEs (rare earth elements) in these rocks typically record overprinting during metasomatism. New 187Os/188Os, major and trace element compositional data were obtained on sixteen Dish Hill peridotite xenoliths (California, USA) and are used to examine these issues. The samples show strong correlations between 187Os/188Os and indicators of melt depletion such as Lu abundance in clinopyroxene, modal abundance of clinopyroxene, bulk rock Al2O3 and the Cr# (Cr/(Cr + Al) in spinel. These relationships indicate that metasomatism did not compromise the 187Os/188Os systematics. The data appear to form two melt depletion trends consistent with Re depletion model ages (TRD) obtained from the two Al2O3 versus 187Os/188Os trends are 2.1 ± 0.5 Ga and 1.3 ± 0.3 Ga (±95% conf.). It has been suggested that the SCLM under Dish Hill may be fragments of oceanic lithosphere emplaced as the result of Farallon plate subduction during the Late Cretaceous (Luffi et al., 2009). However, the strong melt depletion trends, major element compositions and Re-depletion ages are not consistent with the interpretation of this suite of xenoliths having an oceanic lithospheric origin. Rather, the 2.1 Ga age coincides with Nd model ages of 2-2.3 Ga (Bennett and DePaolo, 1987; Rämö and Calzia, 1998) for the overlying Mojavia crustal province. The 1.3 Ga age is consistent with large-scale A-type magmatism in the nearby region at this time that is purported to be the result of mantle plume melting processes. Therefore, data from this study point to the SCLM under Dish Hill being formed by two ancient mantle-melting events, which could be the result of

  10. The evolution of anatomical illustration and wax modelling in Italy from the 16th to early 19th centuries

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Alessandro; Conti, Gabriele; Solinas, Paola; Loy, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Although the contribution to anatomical illustration by Vesalius and his followers has received much attention, less credit has been given to Veslingius and particularly Fabricius. By 1600, Fabricius had amassed more than 300 paintings that together made the Tabulae Pictae, a great atlas of anatomy that was highly admired by his contemporaries. Many of his new observations were incorporated into subsequent books, including those by Casserius, Spighelius, Harvey and Veslingius. Also of importance were the Tabulae by Eustachius (1552), which, although only published in 1714, greatly influenced anatomical wax modelling. In 1742, Pope Benedict XIV established a Museum of Anatomy in Bologna, entrusting to Ercole Lelli the creation of several anatomical preparations in wax. Felice Fontana realised that the production of a large number of models by the casting method would make cadaveric specimens superfluous for anatomical teaching and in 1771 he asked the Grand Duke to fund a wax-modelling workshop in Florence as part of the Natural History Museum, later known as La Specola. Fontana engaged Giuseppe Ferrini as his first modeller and then the 19-year-old Clemente Susini who, by his death in 1814, had superintended the production of, or personally made, more than 2000 models. In 1780, the Austrian Emperor Joseph II visited La Specola and ordered a great number of models for his Josephinum museum; these were made by Fontana with the help of Clemente Susini and supervised by the anatomist Paolo Mascagni. It is, however, in Cagliari that some of Susini’s greatest waxes are to be found. These were made when he was free of Fontana’s influence and were based on dissections made by Francesco Antonio Boi (University of Cagliari). Their distinctive anatomical features include the emphasis given to nerves and the absence of lymphatics in the brain, a mistake made on earlier waxes. The refined technical perfection of the anatomical details demonstrates the closeness of the

  11. The Kea- and Loa- trends and magma genesis in the Hawaiian mantle plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Z.; Ingle, S.; Takahashi, E.; Hirano, N.; Hirata, T.; Tatsumi, Y.

    2005-12-01

    The Hawaiian-Emperor volcanic island and seamount chain has been created by a hot mantle plume located beneath the Pacific lithosphere. The shield volcanoes of the Hawaiian islands are distributed in two curvilinear parallel trends, termed _eKea_Eand _eLoa_E(Jackson et al., 1972). Lavas from these two trends are commonly believed to have different geochemical characteristics (Tatsumoto, 1978; Frey et al., 1994; Hauri, 1996; Lassiter et al., 1996; Abouchami et al., 2005). The Kea- and Loa- geochemical trends within the Hawaiian shield volcanoes have been interpreted to reflect melting above a compositionally concentrically zoned (Hauri, 1996; Lassiter et al., 1996; Kurz et al., 1996; DePaolo et al., 2001) or compositionally left-right asymmetrically zoned mantle plume (Abouchami et al., 2005). In order to evaluate the homogeneity of the mantle plume source sampled by the Kea- and Loa- trends, we analyzed major and trace element compositions of olivine-hosted melt inclusions from Hawaiian shield lavas, using EPMA and Laser ICP-MS. We selected lava samples form submarine Hana Ridge, Haleakala volcano (Kea trend) and submarine exposures of the Makapuu stage, Koolau volcano (Loa trend), respectively. We found both Kea- and Loa-like major and trace element compositions from olivine-hosted melt inclusions in individual, shield-stage Hawaiian volcanoes, even within single rock samples. We infer from these data that although one mantle source component may dominate a single lava flow, the two (or more) mantle source components are consistently represented to some extent in all lavas, regardless of the specific geographic location of the volcano. On the basis of whole rock geochemical characteristics (Ren et al., J. pet., 2004; 2005) combined with the melt inclusion data (Ren et al., 2005, Nature), we propose a Hawaiian mantle plume characterized by more random heterogeneity than would be present in a simple compositionally zoned mantle plume. The geochemical differences in

  12. Ca-Mg-Sr-Nd Isotopes in Granitic Rocks of the Lhasa Terrane, Southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, B. T.; Simon, J. I.; Depaolo, D. J.; Christensen, J. N.; Harrison, T. M.

    2010-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) and Calcium (Ca) isotopes are fractionated by aqueous precipitation and incongruent silicate weathering, resulting in sedimentary reservoirs with characteristic isotopic compositions. Limestones and dolomites are isotopically light in both elements, whereas shales/pelites can have heavy Mg and light Ca. The isotopic character of these reservoirs may persist through anatexis (Shen, et al., PNAS 106(49), 2009). Mg and Ca isotopes could therefore be used to gain new insights into the sources of granitic magmas and hence the mechanisms by which the continental crust forms and evolves. Radiogenic 40Ca gives additional information about the K/Ca ratios of magma sources, and Sr and Nd isotopes provide complementary age and lithology information. To evaluate the potential of Ca and Mg isotopes for studying granite petrogenesis we made measurements on a suite of granitic intrusive rocks of Jurassic to Miocene age in southern Tibet that exhibit large variations in Nd (ɛNd = +5 to -12) and Sr isotopes (87Sr/86Sr = 0.704 to 0.722). Our samples represent a transect northward from the Indus-Yalu Suture (IS), west of Lhasa. Rocks close to the IS have mantle-like Nd and Sr isotopic compositions, whereas those farther to the north have low ɛNd and higher 87Sr/86Sr, and include Mesozoic, Paleogene and Neogene peraluminous (2-mica) granites (DePaolo, et al., Goldschmidt, 2008; Kapp, et al., JGR 110, 2005; Hou et al., EPSL 220, 2004). Radiogenic 40Ca is detectable in peraluminous (2-mica) granites and correlates with high 87Sr/86Sr, but does not correlate with Nd isotopes, indicating that 2-mica granite magmas come from both low-K and high-K sources. Stable isotopes of both Ca and Mg show substantial variation. Relative to bulk silicate Earth (BSE, which we define as δ=0 for discussion) δ44Ca values vary from 0 to -0.7, and δ26Mg varies from -0.3 to +0.6. Thus to first order Ca is light and Mg is heavy relative to BSE. For samples with mantle-like Nd and Sr, δ44Ca

  13. Polarimetric and spectroscopic optical observations of the ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baglio, M. C.; Mainetti, D.; D'Avanzo, P.; Campana, S.; Covino, S.; Russell, D. M.; Shahbaz, T.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We present a polarimetric and spectroscopic study of the persistent ultra-compact X-ray binary 4U 0614+091 aimed at searching for the emission of a relativistic particle jet and at unveiling the orbital period Porb of the system. Methods: We obtained r-band polarimetric observations with the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) equipped with the PAOLO polarimeter and with the Nordic Optical Telescope (NOT) equipped with the ALFOSC instrument, covering ~2 h and ~0.5 h observations, respectively. We carried out low resolution spectroscopy of the system using the ESO Very Large Telescope equipped with FORS1 for ~1.5 h (16 spectra covering the range 4300-8000 Å). Results: The polarimetric analysis performed starting from the TNG dataset revealed a polarisation degree in the r-band of 3% ± 1%. From the NOT dataset, due to the lower signal-to-noise ratio, we could obtain only a 3σ upper limit of 3.4%. From the joining of a spectroscopic and photometric analysis, through the study of the equivalent width variations of the CII 7240 Å line and the r-band light curve, we could find a hint of a ~45 min periodicity. Conclusions: A polarisation degree P of ~3% in the r-band is consistent with the emission of a relativistic particle jet, which is supposed to emit intrinsically linearly polarised synchrotron radiation. Since no variations of P with time have been detected, and the accretion disc of the system does not contain ionised hydrogen, scattering by free electrons in the accretion disc has been rejected. The period of ~45 min obtained through the analysis of the system light curve and of the equivalent width variations of the selected spectral line is probably linked to the presence of a hot spot or a superhump in the accretion disc, and lead to an orbital period ≳1 h for the binary system. Based on observations made with the Italian Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG) operated on the island of La Palma by the Fundación Galileo Galilei of the INAF (Istituto

  14. Applying the seismic interferometry method to vertical seismic profile data using tunnel excavation noise as source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurado, Maria Jose; Teixido, Teresa; Martin, Elena; Segarra, Miguel; Segura, Carlos

    2013-04-01

    response and the reflection response for a 1D multilayer structure, and next 3D approach (Wapenaar 2004). As a result of this seismic interferometry experiment the 3D reflectivity model (frequencies and resolution ranges) was obtained. We proved also that the seismic interferometry approach can be applied in asynchronous seismic auscultation. The reflections detected in the virtual seismic sections are in agreement with the geological features encountered during the excavation of the tunnel and also with the petrophysical properties and parameters measured in previous geophysical borehole logging. References Claerbout J.F., 1968. Synthesis of a layered medium from its acoustic transmision response. Geophysics, 33, 264-269 Flavio Poletto, Piero Corubolo and Paolo Comeli.2010. Drill-bit seismic interferometry whith and whitout pilot signals. Geophysical Prospecting, 2010, 58, 257-265. Wapenaar, K., J. Thorbecke, and D. Draganov, 2004, Relations between reflection and transmission responses of three-dimensional inhomogeneous media: Geophysical Journal International, 156, 179-194.

  15. Experimental determination of equilibrium magnesium isotope fractionation between spinel, forsterite, and magnesite by the three-isotope method at 700 °C and 1 GPa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macris, C. A.; Young, E. D.; Manning, C. E.; Schauble, E. A.

    2011-12-01

    Sp-Fo = 1.01% at this temperature (Schauble, 2010). Our findings also agree with spinel-forsterite fractionation measured in mantle xenoliths after correction for temperature (Young et al. 2010). These preliminary data allow the calculation of an experimentally-determined equation for the temperature dependence of 26Mg/24Mg fractionation between spinel and olivine: ΔSp-Fo = 0.96 × 106/T2. This result is the first high-T experimental demonstration of Mg isotope fractionation and is entirely consistent with expectations. However, despite this agreement for forsterite and spinel, the fractionations between silicate/oxide and carbonate differ from previous predictions based on theory and from expectations from natural carbonate data (Young and Galy, 2004). One possibility for this discrepancy is that natural carbonates reflect kinetic rather than equilibrium Mg isotope fractionation (DePaolo, 2011).

  16. The influence of solution stoichiometry on surface-controlled Ca isotope fractionation during Ca carbonate precipitation from Mono Lake, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, L. C.; Depaolo, D. J.

    2010-12-01

    much higher Ca2+:CO32- activity ratios. We attribute this similarity to the constant detachment frequency of Ca2+ from the mineral surface. Based on a model developed by DePaolo (2010), detachment frequency controls the dependence of isotope fractionation on growth rate, while excess ion attachment relative to detachment controls the rate itself. The frequency of ion attachment depends on ion activity and solution stoichiometry, whereas detachment frequency is solely defined by the solubility product and ion attachment rate constants (Zhang & Nancollas, J. Colloid Interface Sci., 1998). Thus, the Ca detachment flux from CaCO3 surfaces and the rate dependence of Δ44/40Cas-f should be independent of solution stoichiometry, consistent with our findings in the Mono Lake system.

  17. Elucidating the controls on the Mg isotopic composition of marine pore fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanda, P.; Fantle, M.

    2013-12-01

    influence of carbonate recrystallization, diffusion, and the upper and lower boundary conditions. The numerical model is also used to investigate specific hypotheses regarding the influence of a depth-variable fractionation factor, and variable growth histories of the sedimentary column (the latter is suggested by the differences in δ26Mg trends at depth). Preliminary model results suggest that diffusive communication with an isotopically distinct lower boundary does not explain the features of the δ26Mg data, but that a depth variable fractionation factor during sediment-fluid exchange can. Ultimately, the objective of understanding the controls on pore fluid δ26Mg is twofold: (1) to provide accurate constraints on the leverage to alter isotopic composition during diagenesis, and (2) to evaluate the extent to which secular changes in seawater influence, or can be deconvolved, from pore fluid δ26Mg. References: [1] Higgins and Schrag, 2012. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett., 357-358, 386-396 [2] Fantle and DePaolo, 2006. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta. 70, 3883-3904

  18. The Incredible, Embryological Egg: Calcium and Strontium Isotopes Recapitulate Ontogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, G. W.; Skulan, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Embryological development reflects evolutionary history. Understanding the processes of fetal growth is important for curing human birth defects and predicting damage to ecosystems from environmental insults. Tracing enzymatic and hormonal gradients during development, and correlating them to genetic cues dominate modern embryology. Previous work done tracing the mass transfer of elements has generally been limited to isotope spikes in vitro. Natural mass-dependent Ca and Sr isotopic ratios and radiogenic Sr isotopes have the potential to reveal both source and biochemical mechanism information about processes in vivo, but have not previously been extensively explored. The process when a hen lays a fertilized egg that becomes a chick includes formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate (bone) and calcium carbonate (shell). Skulan and DePaolo (1999) showed that chickens have 2% δ44/42Ca between a hen's bones and an egg white; this span represents more than 80% of the entire range of natural Ca isotope variation and illustrates there is significant variation to investigate. A striking feature of archosaurian development that also occurs in many mammals, including humans, is mass transfer of calcium from mother to embryo. The yolk of the domestic hen matures over 7-9 days, but the albumen, shell membranes and shell form in less than 20 hours. Domestic laying hens are at the physiological limit of egg production and selective breeding is no longer an effective method of increasing egg production. 60-75% of the shell's ~1.5 g of calcium comes from dietary sources, while 25-40% comes from the hen's medullary bone. Medullary bone is spicules formed in the marrow of long bones, and is a store of dietary calcium rapidly available for eggshell secretion. During in ovo development, the embryo's skeleton is formed from calcium in the yolk and by bulk dissolution of the eggshell's inner aspect via carbonic anhydrase in a process that has an effect on bone density similar to

  19. New mapping of Radlandi basin and detailed analysis of its inner plains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minelli, Francesco; Giorgetti, Carolina; Mondini, Alessandro; Pauselli, Cristina; Mancinelli, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    NEW MAPPING OF RADITLADI BASIN AND DETAILED ANALYSIS OF ITS INNER PLAINS. Francesco Minelli 1, Carolina Giorgetti 1, Alessandro C. Mondini 2, Cristina Pauselli 1, Paolo Mancinelli1. 1 Gruppo di Geologia Strutturale e Geofisica (GSG), Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra, Università degli Studi di Perugia, 06123, Perugia, Italy . Email: minelli91@yahoo.it. 2 CNR IRPI Perugia, 06123, Perugia. Introduction: The Raditladi basin is a large peak-ring impact crater discovered during the MESSENGER (MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging) first flyby of Mercury in January 2008 [1]. The Raditladi basin is relatively young [2], and the study of the internal structures give an indication of the processes that acted recently in Mercury's geological history. Geological mapping: We first present the geological mapping of Raditladi crater. In the map we defined different sub-units on the base of previous studies [4][5] and surface morphology and reflectance. Through a GIS software we associated a polygonal layer to each sub-unit, this allowed to distinguish nine different layers. Due to the similarities with the Rachmaninoff basin, to define sub-units mapped on Raditladi, we adopted Rachmaninoff crater's units definitions made by Marchi et al. (2011) [4]. Structures analysis : We also mapped secondary structures consisting in concentric troughs arranged in a circular pattern. We defined two different kinds of troughs: (i) structures characterized by a distinct flat floor and interpretable as grabens, and (ii) structures with linear and curvilinear segments [5]. Inner plain deposit: The analysis of the topography made possible the estimation of the deposit's thickness. The measurement of the thickness is possible thanks to the presence of two small craters, crater A and crater, located in Raditladi's Inner plain. Observing the morphology of the two small craters' rim and hummocky central floor, we distinguished two different units: the shallower consists in

  20. Detecting Slow Deformation Signals Preceding Dynamic Failure: A New Strategy For The Mitigation Of Natural Hazards (SAFER)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinciguerra, Sergio; Colombero, Chiara; Comina, Cesare; Ferrero, Anna Maria; Mandrone, Giuseppe; Umili, Gessica; Fiaschi, Andrea; Saccorotti, Gilberto

    2015-04-01

    Rock slope monitoring is a major aim in territorial risk assessment and mitigation. The high velocity that usually characterizes the failure phase of rock instabilities makes the traditional instruments based on slope deformation measurements not applicable for early warning systems. The use of "site specific" microseismic monitoring systems, with particular reference to potential destabilizing factors, such as rainfalls and temperature changes, can allow to detect pre-failure signals in unstable sectors within the rock mass and to predict the possible acceleration to the failure. We deployed a microseismic monitoring system in October 2013 developed by the University of Turin/Compagnia San Paolo and consisting of a network of 4 triaxial 4.5 Hz seismometers connected to a 12 channel data logger on an unstable patch of the Madonna del Sasso, Italian Western Alps. The initial characterization based on geomechanical and geophysical tests allowed to understand the instability mechanism and to design a 'large aperture' configuration which encompasses the entire unstable rock and can monitor subtle changes of the mechanical properties of the medium. Stability analysis showed that the stability of the slope is due to rock bridges. A continuous recording at 250 Hz sampling frequency (switched in March 2014 to 1 kHz for improving the first arrival time picking and obtain wider frequency content information) and a trigger recording based on a STA/LTA (Short Time Average over Long Time Average) detection algorithm have been used. More than 2000 events with different waveforms, duration and frequency content have been recorded between November 2013 and March 2014. By inspecting the acquired events we identified the key parameters for a reliable distinction among the nature of each signal, i.e. the signal shape in terms of amplitude, duration, kurtosis and the frequency content in terms of range of maximum frequency content, frequency distribution in spectrograms. Four main

  1. Overview of balloon-borne aerosol measurements with the aerosol counter LOAC, with focus on the ChArMEx 2013 campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulac, François; Renard, Jean-Baptiste

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of 250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles: the first one, at 12°, is used to determine the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of 0.2-100 mm; the second angle, at 60°, is used to discriminate between different types of particles dominating different size classes. The sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with measurements from other sensors at the surface are shown. We shall give a quick review of balloon-borne experiences since 2011 with LOAC under all kinds of balloons including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric, and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLBP) from CNES. Observation domains include the atmospheric surface layer, the boundary layer, the free troposphere and the lower stratosphere up to more than 35 km in altitude. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Results from the various campaigns will be illustrated including the study of fog events, urban aerosols, Saharan dust transport over France, stratospheric soot... Emphasis will be put on the ChArMEx campaign (the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment) performed in summer 2013 in the Mediterranean basin: 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France) in late July and early August. Most of the flights were coupled with ozone concentration measurements (see presentation by F. Gheusi et al.). LOAC balloons were especially, but not

  2. PREFACE: International Conference on Computing in High Energy and Nuclear Physics (CHEP'09)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruntorad, Jan; Lokajicek, Milos

    2010-11-01

    Physics Milos Lokajicek (co-chair), Institute of Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Prague Vojtech Petracek, Czech Technical University in Prague, Faculty of Nuclear Sciences and Physical Engineering and especially the Programme Committee for their careful choice of conference contributions and their enormous work with organization of 340 post conference proceedings paper review Ludek Matyska (chair), CESNET Online Computing Volker Gülzow, DESY Jiri Masik, University of Manchester/on leave from Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Event Processing Elizabeth Sexton-Kennedy, FNAL Tomas Davidek, Charles University, Prague Software Components, Tools and Databases Paolo Calafiura, LBNL Julius Hrivnac, LAL Track 4 Hardware and Computing Fabrics Takashi Sasaki, KEK Jiri Chudoba, Institute of Physics AS CR, Prague Grid Middleware and Networking Technologies Francesco Giacomini, CERN Ales Krenek, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Distributed Processing and Analysis Latchezar Betev, CERN Simon Lin, ASGC, Taipei Dagmar Adamova, Nuclear Physics Institute AS CR, Prague Collaborative Tools Eva Hladka, Masaryk University, Brno/CESNET Thank you to all who made CHEP'09 a success. Jan Gruntorad and Milos Lokajicek CHEP'09 Conference Chairs Prague, March 2010 The PDF and HTML files contain a list of all CHEP'09 contributions.

  3. Rosetta spacecraft meets asteroid Steins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-08-01

    Steins is Rosetta’s first nominal scientific target. The spacecraft will rendezvous with the asteroid in the course of its first incursion into the asteroid belt located between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter, while on its way to comet 67/P Churyumov-Gerasimenko. The study of asteroids is extremely important as they represent a sample of Solar System material at different stages of evolution - key to understanding the origin of our own planet and of our planetary neighbourhood. The closest approach to Steins is due to take place on 5 September at 20:58 CEST (Central European Summer Time), from a distance of 800 km, during which the spacecraft will not be communicating with Earth. First ground contact with the spacecraft and announcement of successful fly-by will take place at 22:23 CEST. The first data and images collected by Rosetta will be sent to Earth throughout the night of 5 to 6 September and will undergo preliminary processing in the morning of 6 September. The first images will be made available for broadcasters via a special satellite feed on Saturday 6 September (details will be given on http://television.esa.int). To register for the events, please use the attached form. The press conference on 6 September will also be streamed on the ESA web: at http://www.esa.int/rosetta. Rosetta Steins Fly-By Doors open to the media 5 September 2008, 18:00, Building K ESA-ESOC Robert-Bosch Strasse 5, 64293 Darmstadt, Germany 18:00 - Doors open 18:00 - 19:00 Interview opportunities 19:00 - 20:15 Buffet dinner 20:15 - 20:30 The Steins Fly-By, Introduction by Paolo Ferri, Head of Solar and Planetary Missions Division (Mission Operations Dept.), ESA The crucial role of Flight Dynamics, by Trevor Morley, Rosetta Flight Dynamics Team, ESA 20:30 - 21:00 Live from Rosetta’s control room (loss of telemetry signal at 20:47) 22:23 - First telemetry on ground: signal of successful fly-by 23:00 - End of event Rosetta Steins Fly-By Press Conference 6 September 2008, 12

  4. ``Petrograph'': a New Software for the Analysis and Presentation of Geochemical Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrelli, M.

    2003-04-01

    square root. The principal geochemical parameters and indexes which can be determined are: CIPW norm, Larsen Index, Solidification Index, Total Iron and Fe/Mg Ratio; weight per cent values can be converted in molar values and REE parameters can be calculated. Large number of geochemical models can be calculated and plotted: Batch Melting (modal and not), Fractional Melting, Continuous Melting, Zone Refining, Fractional Crystallization, Equilibrium Crystallization, in Situ Crystallization, Mixing, O'Hara's RFT and RFT(A), DePaolo's AFC. The models are performed using trace elements and, when possible, isotopes. "Petrograph" graphical interface has been specifically designed to be user friendly and to allow even users with little knowledge of computer techniques to manage and plot geochemical data. Thanks to its intuitive interface "Petrograph" can be utilised for research purposes as well as for teaching and training activity.

  5. The buoyancy of large siliceous magma chambers is sufficient to initiate supereruptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malfait, W.; Sanchez-Valle, C.; Seifert, R.; Petitgirard, S.; Perrillat, J.; Ota, T.; Nakamura, E.; Lerch, P.; Mezouar, M.

    2012-12-01

    magma chambers for a range of conditions/configurations indicates that magma buoyancy provides a significant background overpressure that in many cases may suffice to initiate an eruption. Thus, although magma recharge and mush rejuvenation, volatile saturation or tectonic stress may be important triggers for specific eruptive episodes, the initiation of a supereruption does not a priori require such a trigger. [1] Mason, B.G., D.M. Pyle, and C. Oppenheimer, Bulletin of Volcanology, 2004. 66: p. 735-748. [2] Self, S. and S. Blake, Elements, 2008. 4(1): p. 41. [3] Sparks, S., et al., in Report of a Geological Society of Landon Working Group, T. Nield, Editor. 2005: London. [4] Jellinek, A.M. and D.J. DePaolo, Bulletin of Volcanology, 2003. 65: p. 363-381. [5] Knoche, R., S.L. Webb, and D.B. Dingwell, Canadian Mineralogist, 1992. 30: p. 561-569. [6] Ochs, F.A. and R.A. Lange, Science, 1999. 283: p. 1314.

  6. Roadway management plan based on rockfall modelling calibration and validation. Application along the Ma-10 road in Mallorca (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Rosa Maria; Garcia, Inmaculada; Reichenbach, Paola; Herrera, Gerardo; Sarro, Roberto; Rius, Joan; Aguilo, Raul

    2016-04-01

    taking into account, not only the success, but also the mistakes. We have further validated the calibrated parameters along the Ma-road using the 63 rockfall recorded during the past 18 years along the road. 81.5% of the rockfalls are well represented by STONE modelling. Results have been exploited by the Road Maintenance Service of Mallorca for the design of the following road management plan: (1) Phase 1. Short-term. Design a specific plan for the road- sections where rockfalls were registered and modelling results were obtained. A large investment will be expended for implementation of retention and protection measures. (2) Phase 2. Medium-term. Design a specific plan for the road- sections where rockfalls were registered but no modelling results were obtained. For these cases, new studies at local scale are necessary as well as the application of other modelling software which include higher resolution input data. (3) Phase 3. Long-term. Design a specific plan for the road- sections where no rockfalls were registered but modelling results were obtained. These are potential rockfall areas and local and specific ground studies are necessaries. References Mateos RM (2006) Los movimientos de ladera en la Serra de Tramuntana (Mallorca). Caracterización geomecánica y análisis de peligrosidad. PhD. Servicio de Publicaciones de la Universidad Complutense de Madrid. Madrid, 299 p. Mateos RM, García-Moreno I, Herrera G, Mulas J (2013) Damage caused by recent mass-movements in Majorca (Spain), a region with a high risk due to tourism.Landslide Science and Practice.Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti and KyojiSassa (Editors). Volume 7: Social and Economic Impact and Policies. 105-113. Guzzetti F, Crosta G, Detti R, Agliardi F (2002) STONE: A computer program for the three-dimensional simulation of rock-falls. Computers Geosciences. Vol. 28:1079-1093.

  7. EDITORIAL: Focus on Dark Matter and Particle Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aprile, Elena; Profumo, Stefano

    2009-10-01

    Doetinchem, H Gast, T Kirn and S Schael Axion searches with helioscopes and astrophysical signatures for axion(-like) particles K Zioutas, M Tsagri, Y Semertzidis, T Papaevangelou, T Dafni and V Anastassopoulos The indirect search for dark matter with IceCube Francis Halzen and Dan Hooper DIRECT DARK MATTER SEARCHES:EXPERIMENTS Gaseous dark matter detectors G Sciolla and C J Martoff Search for dark matter with CRESST Rafael F Lang and Wolfgang Seidel DIRECT AND INDIRECT PARTICLE DARK MATTER SEARCHES:THEORY Dark matter annihilation around intermediate mass black holes: an update Gianfranco Bertone, Mattia Fornasa, Marco Taoso and Andrew R Zentner Update on the direct detection of dark matter in MSSM models with non-universal Higgs masses John Ellis, Keith A Olive and Pearl Sandick Dark stars: a new study of the first stars in the Universe Katherine Freese, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo and Douglas Spolyar Determining the mass of dark matter particles with direct detection experiments Chung-Lin Shan The detection of subsolar mass dark matter halos Savvas M Koushiappas Neutrino coherent scattering rates at direct dark matter detectors Louis E Strigari Gamma rays from dark matter annihilation in the central region of the Galaxy Pasquale Dario Serpico and Dan Hooper DARK MATTER MODELS The dark matter interpretation of the 511 keV line Céline Boehm Axions as dark matter particles Leanne D Duffy and Karl van Bibber Sterile neutrinos Alexander Kusenko Dark matter candidates Lars Bergström Minimal dark matter: model and results Marco Cirelli and Alessandro Strumia Shedding light on the dark sector with direct WIMP production Partha Konar, Kyoungchul Kong, Konstantin T Matchev and Maxim Perelstein Axinos as dark matter particles Laura Covi and Jihn E Kim

  8. Variability of DTM-derived, morphometric parameters versus cell size. An example of application in Calabria (Southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rago, Valeria; Caloiero, Paola; Pellegrino, Annamaria Daniela; Iovine, Giulio G. R.; Terranova, Oreste G.; Pascale, Stefania

    2016-04-01

    , G. Gullà, G. Iovine, O. Petrucci, P. Salvador Sanchis, M. Sorriso-Valvo, O. Terranova, D. Torri, V. Bagarello, C. Di Stefano, V. Ferro, G. Buttafuoco, G. Callegari, P. Porto, B. Betrò, A. Bodini, C. Brambilla (2010) - Relazione Finale Contratto Lotto 2 Pericolosità legata ai fenomeni di intensa erosione idrica areale e lineare- POR Calabria 2000-2006, Azione. 1.4c. Rapporto per Autorità di Bacino Regione Calabria. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2014) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (southern Calabria, Italy) with considerations on the role of causal factors. Natural Hazards, 73(1), pp.111-136. In: G. Iovine & D. Cohen (Eds.), Advanced methods in landslide modelling. Iovine G., Greco R., Gariano S.L., Iaquinta P., Pellegrino A.D., Terranova O.G. (2013) - Shallow-landslide susceptibility in the Costa Viola mountain ridge (Italia). In: Landslide Science and Practice, Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti, Kyoji Sassa (Editors), Volume 3: Spatial Analysis and Modelling, pp.81-87. Proc. Second World Landslide Forum, 3-7 October 2011, Rome.

  9. Prefazione al volume 9 di Gerbertus in Transitu Mercurii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2016-05-01

    The papers published in this volume deal with historical and contemporary themes of physics and astronomy, always with the focus in didactics, as in the style of Gerbert of Aurillac, "rogatus a pluribus" (required by several students to write down the basics of new sciences). 1. Christopher Columbus in the voyage to America of 1492 discovered the deviation of the Magnetic North from the Celestial North; his measurements could have been done with the technology available to Gerbert, here we present the astronomical aspects of them. 2. On the meridian line of Santa Maria degli Angeli (1702) we repeated the experiences of Cassini in characterizing the refraction of the atmosphere by the difference between observed and calculated positions of the center of the Sun: 3. The collection of astronomical instruments in the Vatican Museums gives the opportunity to present the role of Astronomy in Catholic Church, starting from the calculation of Easter, present in the Chair of Hyppolitus. 4. The Eucharistic Miracle in Lanciano is dated VIII century AD, and the recognition of 1574 found the miracle of weights, where the five drops weigthed like one only. A discussion on that result is made on the light of sensibility of the scales of that time, which does not depart from the one of Gerbert's time. 5. The climate of X century allowed crossing the Alps: Luigi Mariani presents parallel evidences. 6. A list of 44 questions aswered by Paolo Rossi on modern physics/astrophysics is presented as a wish list of the level of culture of a secondary student. Three decades ago these topics were achievable only to University students: now are part of the public opinion, and a new framework has to be set by the teachers. 7. The dynamics of a micro-probe sent to alpha Centauri in 20 years is studied numerically. 8. The azimut of the Pyramid Cestia and 9. the height of the Vatican obelisk are studied exploiting solar ephemerides 10. The phases of pollen production of Cypress for 2016 are

  10. Low-metallicity Star Formation (IAU S255)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2009-01-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  11. Low-Metallicity Star Formation: From the First Stars to Dwarf Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Leslie K.; Madden, Suzanne C.; Schneider, Raffaella

    2008-12-01

    Preface; SOC and LOC; Participants; Life at the conference; Conference photo; Session I. Population III and Metal-Free Star Formation: 1. Open questions in the study of population III star formation S. C. O. Glover, P. C. Clark, T. H. Greif, J. L. Johnson, V. Bromm, R. S. Klessen and A. Stacy; 2. Protostar formation in the early universe Naoki Yoshida; 3. Population III.1 stars: formation, feedback and evolution of the IMF Jonathan C. Tan; 4. The formation of the first galaxies and the transition to low-mass star formation T. H. Greif, D. R. G. Schleicher, J. L. Johnson, A.-K. Jappsen, R. S. Klessen, P. C. Clark, S. C. O. Glover, A. Stacy and V. Bromm; 5. Low-metallicity star formation: the characteristic mass and upper mass limit Kazuyuki Omukai; 6. Dark stars: dark matter in the first stars leads to a new phase of stellar evolution Katherine Freese, Douglas Spolyar, Anthony Aguirre, Peter Bodenheimer, Paolo Gondolo, J. A. Sellwood and Naoki Yoshida; 7. Effects of dark matter annihilation on the first stars F. Iocco, A. Bressan, E. Ripamonti, R. Schneider, A. Ferrara and P. Marigo; 8. Searching for Pop III stars and galaxies at high redshift Daniel Schaerer; 9. The search for population III stars Sperello di Serego Alighieri, Jaron Kurk, Benedetta Ciardi, Andrea Cimatti, Emanuele Daddi and Andrea Ferrara; 10. Observational search for population III stars in high-redshift galaxies Tohru Nagao; Session II. Metal Enrichment, Chemical Evolution, and Feedback: 11. Cosmic metal enrichment Andrea Ferrara; 12. Insights into the origin of the galaxy mass-metallicity relation Henry Lee, Eric F. Bell and Rachel S. Somerville; 13. LSD and AMAZE: the mass-metallicity relation at z > 3 F. Mannucci and R. Maiolino; 14. Three modes of metal-enriched star formation at high redshift Britton D. Smith, Matthew J. Turk, Steinn Sigurdsson, Brian W. O'Shea and Michael L. Norman; 15. Primordial supernovae and the assembly of the first galaxies Daniel Whalen, Bob Van Veelen, Brian W. O

  12. Seasonal rockfall risk assessment along transportation network: a sample from Mallorca (Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Rosa Maria; Garcia, Inmaculada; Reichenbach, Paola; Herrera, Gerardo; Rius, Joan; Aguilo, Raul; Roldan, Francisco J.

    2014-05-01

    section of the road. For the risk analysis, four scenarios depending on the seasonal people exposition have been taken into account, considering the autumn as the season with the highest risk. This methodology can be applied to highly touristy areas such Mallorca, where the safety of the population and its visitors must be the priority of all concerned. References : Guzzetti, F., Crosta G., Detti, R. Agliardi, F., 2002: STONE: A computer program for the three-dimensional simulation of rock-falls. Computers Geosciences 28 (2002) 1079-1093. Mateos, R.M., García-Moreno, I., Azañón, J.M., 2012. Freeze-thaw cycles and rainfall as triggering factors of mass movements in a warm Mediterranean region: the case of the Tramuntana Range (Majorca, Spain). Landslides (2012), 9: 417-432. Mateos, R.M., García- Moreno, I., Herrera, G., Mulas, J., 2013b. Damage caused by recent mass-movements in Majorca (Spain), a region with a high risk due to tourism. Landslide Science and Practice. Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti and Kyoji Sassa (Editors). Volume 7: Social and Economic Impact and Policies. 105-113.

  13. Evidence of partial melting in xenoliths from the Wooley Creek batholith, Klamath Mountains, California: implications for assimilation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coint, N.; Barnes, C. G.; Yoshinobu, A. S.; Barnes, M. A.

    2010-12-01

    Host rocks assimilation has been described as a process allowing mafic magma to evolve toward more felsic compositions as well as a way to explain isotopic variations observed in igneous rock suites. Assimilation modalities were first modeled as assimilation coupled with fractional crystallization (De Paolo, 1981. EPSL, v.53, 189-202), assuming that assimilation of host rocks or xenoliths was instantaneous and left no residue. Spera and Bohrson (2001. J.Pet., v.42, 999-1018) introduced the concept of EC-AFC (Energy-Conserved Assimilation- Fractional Crystallization). In this model, assimilation is due to mixing of partial melts from host rocks into the magma, and energy required for partial melting is taken into account numerically. Partial melting of the contaminant need not be complete; therefore, evidence of partial melting of host rocks and xenoliths should be observed in the field. The Wooley Creek batholith, situated in the Klamath Mountains in northern California, was emplaced between 159 and 156 My ago (Coint et al, 2009. Eos Trans. AGU, v.90-52, 1777). Xenoliths have been observed along the contacts and several km inside the pluton. Xenolith sizes vary from ~100 meters long to the centimeter scale. Xenoliths further than 3 km from the contact tend to be refractory (quartz-rich or calc-silicate) and small (<40 cm). Metasedimentary and metavolcanic protoliths can be identified. In metavolcanic rocks, the texture is granoblastic with the mineral assemblage two pyroxenes + plagioclase ± biotite ± hornblende ± quartz. Compositional layering is preserved in some of the metasedimentary xenoliths, creating variations of texture and mineral assemblages within single xenoliths from two pyroxene + plagioclase ± quartz ± hornblende ± biotite ± rutile granofels to plagioclase, sillimanite, cordierite, muscovite, quartz, biotite ± orthoclase ± rutile ± kyanite schists. Calc-silicate rocks are scant. Evidence of partial melting is widespread in xenoliths both

  14. The Sun: the Earth light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrilli, Francesco; Giovannelli, Luca; Del Moro, Dario; Piazzesi, Roberto; Catena, Liu` Maria; Amicucci, Giordano; Vittorio, Nicola

    2015-04-01

    Education and the National Program for the diffusion of Scientific Degrees (Progetto Lauree Scientifiche or PLS). In the last years has been mainly aimed to underline the connections between Astronomy, Astrophysics and the new materials involved in the astronomical techniques. The Sun has always been used in the course as a key element since the final product was the production of a self-constructed solar telescope able to be used to monitor the solar activity through Wolf's number estimation. In the third edition the project has been extended to other three Universities on the Italian territory: University of l'Aquila, University of Camerino and University of Calabria. Over the years more than 80 students and 50 teachers where directly involved and more than 50 different high schools on all the national territory, reaching thousands of their students in the final dissemination part of the program. 25 telescopes are currently in use in high school institutes all-over Italy. A book describing the project has been published by Springer in 2013 (STUDENTI-RICERCATORI per cinque giorni "Stage a Tor Vergata" Editors: Liù M. Catena, Francesco Berrilli, Ivan Davoli, Paolo Prosposito, ISBN: 978-88-470-5271-0 (Online) ), the link to the book describing the project and reporting student interviews is at: http://link.springer.com/book

  15. Noise in Nonlinear Dynamical Systems 3 Volume Paperback Set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Frank; McClintock, P. V. E.

    2011-11-01

    Volume 1: List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume one; 1. Noise-activated escape from metastable states: an historical view Rolf Landauer; 2. Some Markov methods in the theory of stochastic processes in non-linear dynamical systems R. L. Stratonovich; 3. Langevin equations with coloured noise J. M. Sancho and M. San Miguel; 4. First passage time problems for non-Markovian processes Katja Lindenberg, Bruce J. West and Jaume Masoliver; 5. The projection approach to the Fokker-Planck equation: applications to phenomenological stochastic equations with coloured noises Paolo Grigolini; 6. Methods for solving Fokker-Planck equations with applications to bistable and periodic potentials H. Risken and H. D. Vollmer; 7. Macroscopic potentials, bifurcations and noise in dissipative systems Robert Graham; 8. Transition phenomena in multidimensional systems - models of evolution W. Ebeling and L. Schimansky-Geier; 9. Coloured noise in continuous dynamical systems: a functional calculus approach Peter Hanggi; Appendix. On the statistical treatment of dynamical systems L. Pontryagin, A. Andronov and A. Vitt; Index. Volume 2: List of contributors; Preface; Introduction to volume two; 1. Stochastic processes in quantum mechanical settings Ronald F. Fox; 2. Self-diffusion in non-Markovian condensed-matter systems Toyonori Munakata; 3. Escape from the underdamped potential well M. Buttiker; 4. Effect of noise on discrete dynamical systems with multiple attractors Edgar Knobloch and Jeffrey B. Weiss; 5. Discrete dynamics perturbed by weak noise Peter Talkner and Peter Hanggi; 6. Bifurcation behaviour under modulated control parameters M. Lucke; 7. Period doubling bifurcations: what good are they? Kurt Wiesenfeld; 8. Noise-induced transitions Werner Horsthemke and Rene Lefever; 9. Mechanisms for noise-induced transitions in chemical systems Raymond Kapral and Edward Celarier; 10. State selection dynamics in symmetry-breaking transitions Dilip K. Kondepudi; 11. Noise in a

  16. Symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr in outburst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizabeth O. Waagen

    2012-09-01

    The symbiotic variable V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst, according to observations reported to the AAVSO and confirmed by spectroscopy by Ulisse Munari et al. Prompted by an observation and comment from John Bortle (Stormville, NY) (16 June 2012, visual magnitude 12.2) about a possible outburst, Steven O'Connor (St. George's, Bermuda) obtained an observation (10 August 2012, 11.44V) that confirmed V4018 Sgr was bright. His subsequent BVRI observations in September and visual observations by Bortle and Andrew Pearce (Nedlands, Western Australia) show the system brightening and at V magnitude 11.07 as of 2012 Sep. 17.091 UT. Ulisse Munari (INAF Astr. Obs. Padua, Italy) and colleagues Paolo Valisa and Sergio Dallaporta (ANS Collaboration), after being informed by the AAVSO of the bright state of V4018 Sgr, carried out spectroscopy. Munari writes: "A low resolution, absolutely fluxed 4000-8650 Ang spectrum of V4018 Sgr was obtained on Sept 13.90 UT with the 0.6m telescope ! of the Schiaparelli Observatory in Varese (Italy). It shows the spectrum of the M giant overwhelmed by a blue continuum up to 6000 Ang, and all high ionization emission lines typical of quiescence are gone, leaving only hydrogen Balmer and weak HeI lines in emission. The spectrum looks like a template one for a symbiotic star in outburst. CCD photometry was obtained on Sept 13.79 UT and provides V=11.027 ± 0.002, B-V=+0.621 ± 0.003. The B-V color is appreciably bluer and the V magnitude much brighter than typical in quiescence (on average V=13.3, B-V=+1.09; Henden and Munari 2008, Baltic Astronomy 17, 293), and support the idea V4018 Sgr is undergoing an outburst." According to Munari, the last bright outburst of V4018 Sgr was underway in June 1990. Observations in the AAVSO International Database from Albert Jones (Nelson, New Zealand) beginning in May 1992 show the variable at visual magnitude 11.0, with fluctuations between 10.5 and 11.9 through October 1995. Numerous ! other observers

  17. Introduction and Committees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angelova, Maia; Zakrzewski, Wojciech; Hussin, Véronique; Piette, Bernard

    2011-03-01

    This volume contains contributions to the XXVIIIth International Colloquium on Group-Theoretical Methods in Physics, the GROUP 28 conference, which took place in Newcastle upon Tyne from 26-30 July 2010. All plenary and contributed papers have undergone an independent review; as a result of this review and the decisions of the Editorial Board most but not all of the contributions were accepted. The volume is organised as follows: it starts with notes in memory of Marcos Moshinsky, followed by contributions related to the Wigner Medal and Hermann Weyl prize. Then the invited talks at the plenary sessions and the public lecture are published followed by contributions in the parallel and poster sessions in alphabetical order. The Editors:Maia Angelova, Wojciech Zakrzewski, Véronique Hussin and Bernard Piette International Advisory Committee Michael BaakeUniversity of Bielefeld, Germany Gerald DunneUniversity of Connecticut, USA J F (Frank) GomesUNESP, Sao Paolo, Brazil Peter HanggiUniversity of Augsburg, Germany Jeffrey C LagariasUniversity of Michigan, USA Michael MackeyMcGill University, Canada Nicholas MantonCambridge University, UK Alexei MorozovITEP, Moscow, Russia Valery RubakovINR, Moscow, Russia Barry SandersUniversity of Calgary, Canada Allan SolomonOpen University, Milton Keynes, UK Christoph SchweigertUniversity of Hamburg, Germany Standing Committee Twareque AliConcordia University, Canada Luis BoyaSalamanca University, Spain Enrico CeleghiniFirenze University, Italy Vladimir DobrevBulgarian Academy of Sciences, Bulgaria Heinz-Dietrich DoebnerHonorary Member, Clausthal University, Germany Jean-Pierre GazeauChairman, Paris Diderot University, France Mo-Lin GeNankai University. China Gerald GoldinRutgers University, USA Francesco IachelloYale University, USA Joris Van der JeugtGhent University, Belgium Richard KernerPierre et Marie Curie University, France Piotr KielanowskiCINVESTAV, Mexico Alan KosteleckyIndiana University, USA Mariano del Olmo

  18. Missing Black Holes Driven Out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-05-01

    difficult task to find them. Because of the obscuring effect of dust, they cannot be found through standard (i.e. in the visible) methods of quasar selection. The only way to hope to drive them out of their bushes is to detect them through their hard X-rays which are able to penetrate through the torus. But this requires that astronomers can analyse and cross-correlate in a very efficient way the observations from several space- and ground-based observatories, which together span the entire range of wavelengths. Type-2 quasars can indeed be identified as the only objects appearing very red and at the same time emitting strongly in X-rays. Virtual Observatories ESO PR Photo 17/04 ESO PR Photo 17/04 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 415 pix - 57k] [Normal - JPEG: 800 x 829 pix - 764k] [FullRes - JPEG: 1702 x 1764 pix - 2.0M] Caption: ESO PR Photo 17/04 shows the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) visualisation interface; it interface is based on Centre de Donneés Astronomiques de Strasbourg's Aladin. AVO devises new methods for accessing and describing data in a way that allows images, spectra and information from different sources to work together seamlessly. This is where Virtual Observatories can play a decisive role. Major breakthroughs in telescope, detector, and computer technology now allow astronomical surveys to produce massive amounts of images, spectra, and catalogues. These datasets cover the sky at all wavelengths from gamma- and X-rays, optical, infrared, to radio waves. Virtual Observatories are an international, community-based initiative, to allow global electronic access to available astronomical data in a seamless and transparent way. The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory project (AVO) ([1]) is the effort in Virtual Observatories of the European astronomical community. Funded jointly by the European Commission and six participating European organisations, it is led by the European Southern Observatory (ESO). The AVO science team headed by Paolo Padovani (ST

  19. Asteroids IV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Patrick; DeMeo, Francesca E.; Bottke, William F.

    easy and pleasant as possible for the editors, authors, and referees. They also thank Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his strong support and advice during this process, as well as the staff at the University of Arizona Press. Finally, editor Patrick Michel would like to thank his wife Delphine, who married him on June 14, 2013, almost at the birth of the book process. He is grateful that she was willing to put up with him as he spent many of his nights and weekends working on the book. Thanks to her support, their trajectories are as bounded as a perfectly stable asteroid binary system, and this was probably the best way to experience from the start what her life would be like with a researcher! Co-editor Bottke would also like to thank his wife Veronica and his children Kristina-Marie, Laura, and Julie, who make up his own favorite asteroid family. Since Asteroids III, the size distribution of the family members has been steadily changing, and who knows how many tiny new members it will contain by Asteroids V! Co-editor DeMeo would like to thank her husband Alfredo for his support and encouragement throughout the process of creating this book. They met at the beginning of her career in research, becoming an asteroid pair and now continuing on the same orbit in life.

  20. Adaptation response surfaces from an ensemble of wheat projections under climate change in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Ferrise, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    preliminary ARSs show some adaptation options allow recover up to ca. 2000 kg/ha. Compared to the historical yields recorded at Lleida province (2550 kg/ha in 1981-2010) our results indicate that adaptation is feasible and may help to reduce detrimental effects of CC. Our analysis evaluates if the explored adaptations fulfill the biophysical requirements to become a practical adaptive solution. This study exemplifies how adaptation options and their impacts can be analyzed, evaluated and communicated in a context of high regional uncertainty for current and future conditions and for short to long-term perspective. This work was funded by MACSUR project within FACCE-JPI. References Abeledo, L.G., R. Savin and G.A. Slafer (2008). European Journal of Agronomy 28:541-550. Cartelle, J., A. Pedró, R. Savin, G.A. Slafer (2006) European Journal of Agronomy 25:365-371. Pirttioja, N., T. Carter, S. Fronzek, M. Bindi, H. Hoffmann, T. Palosuo, M. Ruiz-Ramos, F. Tao, M. Acutis, S. Asseng, P. Baranowski, B. Basso, P. Bodin, S. Buis, D. Cammarano, P. Deligios, M.-F. Destain, B. Dumont, R. Ewert, R. Ferrise, L. François, T. Gaiser, P. Hlavinka, I. Jacquemin, K.C. Kersebaum, C. Kollas, J. Krzyszczak, I.J. Lorite, J. Minet, M.I. Minguez, M. Montesino, M. Moriondo, C. Müller, C. Nendel, I. Öztürk, A. Perego, A. Rodríguez, A.C. Ruane, F. Ruget, M. Sanna, M.A. Semenov, C. Slawinski, P. Stratonovitch, I. Supit, K. Waha, E. Wang, L. Wu, Z. Zhao, and R.P. Rötter, 2015: A crop model ensemble analysis of temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect using impact response surfaces. Clim. Res., 65, 87-105, doi:10.3354/cr01322. IRS2 TEAM: Alfredo Rodríguez(1), Ignacio J. Lorite(3), Fulu Tao(4), Nina Pirttioja(5), Stefan Fronzek(5), Taru Palosuo(4), Timothy R. Carter(5), Marco Bindi(2), Jukka G Höhn(4), Kurt Christian Kersebaum(6), Miroslav Trnka(7,8), Holger Hoffmann(9), Piotr Baranowski(10), Samuel Buis(11), Davide Cammarano(12), Yi Chen(13,4), Paola Deligios

  1. PREFACE: XIV Mexican School on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashir, Adnan; Contreras, Guillermo; Raya, Alfredo; Tejeda-Yeomans, Maria Elena

    2011-03-01

    de Física de Altas Energías. At a personal level, we are very grateful to Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo (President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías), Dr Pedro Mata Vázquez (Director of COECyT), Dr Ricardo Becerril Bárcenas (Director of the Institute of Physics and Mathematics, UMSNH), Dr Rigoberto Vera Mendoza (Director of the Faculty of Science, UMSNH) and Dr José Napoleón Guzmán Ávila (Coordinator of Scientific Research, UMSNH) for their invaluable support in all organizational matters, which enabled the school to become a reality. We gratefully acknowledge the help of our colleagues in the organizing committee: Alexis Aguilar, Alejandro Ayala, Wolfgang Bietenholz, Alberto Güijosa, Gabriela Murguía, Sarira Sahu (UNAM), Eduard de la Cruz Burelo, Abdel Pérez-Lorenzana (CINVESTAV), Elena Cáceres (UCOL), David Delepine (UG), Mariana Kirchbach (UASLP), Ildefonso León (UAS), Juan Carlos Arteaga-Velázquez (for his impeccable work in managing the web page of the school) and Víctor Villanueva (UMSNH). Most of them contributed to the extra work involved in refereeing the contributions submitted for this publication. Many thanks also go to all the student volunteers for the efficiency and dedication with which they carried out their duties. At the registration desk, we relied on the hard work of Xiomara Gutiérrez, Enif Gutiérrez (UMSNH) and Mara Diaz Pancardo. Several post docs and PhD students provided invaluable support in all organizational matters: Adolfo Huet, Cliffor Compeán, Rocío Bermúdez, Saúl Sánchez, Anabel Trejo, Iraís Rubalcava, Khépani Raya, José Juan González, Saúl Hernández Ortiz (UMSNH), Alfredo Galaviz, and Alan Aganza (USON). Their help in carrying out the organization of the school was essential and without their collaboration, this school would not have been the same. We also acknowledge the help of the administrative secretary Maria Esperanza Jaramillo of IFM (UMSNH). We would like to take this opportunity to thank

  2. Adaptation response surfaces from an ensemble of wheat projections under climate change in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Ramos, Margarita; Ferrise, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    preliminary ARSs show some adaptation options allow recover up to ca. 2000 kg/ha. Compared to the historical yields recorded at Lleida province (2550 kg/ha in 1981-2010) our results indicate that adaptation is feasible and may help to reduce detrimental effects of CC. Our analysis evaluates if the explored adaptations fulfill the biophysical requirements to become a practical adaptive solution. This study exemplifies how adaptation options and their impacts can be analyzed, evaluated and communicated in a context of high regional uncertainty for current and future conditions and for short to long-term perspective. This work was funded by MACSUR project within FACCE-JPI. References Abeledo, L.G., R. Savin and G.A. Slafer (2008). European Journal of Agronomy 28:541-550. Cartelle, J., A. Pedró, R. Savin, G.A. Slafer (2006) European Journal of Agronomy 25:365-371. Pirttioja, N., T. Carter, S. Fronzek, M. Bindi, H. Hoffmann, T. Palosuo, M. Ruiz-Ramos, F. Tao, M. Acutis, S. Asseng, P. Baranowski, B. Basso, P. Bodin, S. Buis, D. Cammarano, P. Deligios, M.-F. Destain, B. Dumont, R. Ewert, R. Ferrise, L. François, T. Gaiser, P. Hlavinka, I. Jacquemin, K.C. Kersebaum, C. Kollas, J. Krzyszczak, I.J. Lorite, J. Minet, M.I. Minguez, M. Montesino, M. Moriondo, C. Müller, C. Nendel, I. Öztürk, A. Perego, A. Rodríguez, A.C. Ruane, F. Ruget, M. Sanna, M.A. Semenov, C. Slawinski, P. Stratonovitch, I. Supit, K. Waha, E. Wang, L. Wu, Z. Zhao, and R.P. Rötter, 2015: A crop model ensemble analysis of temperature and precipitation effects on wheat yield across a European transect using impact response surfaces. Clim. Res., 65, 87-105, doi:10.3354/cr01322. IRS2 TEAM: Alfredo Rodríguez(1), Ignacio J. Lorite(3), Fulu Tao(4), Nina Pirttioja(5), Stefan Fronzek(5), Taru Palosuo(4), Timothy R. Carter(5), Marco Bindi(2), Jukka G Höhn(4), Kurt Christian Kersebaum(6), Miroslav Trnka(7,8), Holger Hoffmann(9), Piotr Baranowski(10), Samuel Buis(11), Davide Cammarano(12), Yi Chen(13,4), Paola Deligios

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-08-01

    GonzalezBUAP, FCFM Lorenzo Díaz CruzBUAP Facultad de Ciencias Físico Matemáticas Luis Rey Díaz BarrónDivisión de Ciencias e Ingenierías Luis UrenaUniversidad de Guanajuato Magda LolaDept. of Physics, University of Patras, Greece Mahmoud WahbaEgyptian Center for Theoretical Physics, MTI Marcus S CohenNew Mexico State University Mario A Acero OrtegaICN - UNAM Mario E GomezUniversidad de Huelva Mark PipeUniversity of Sheffield Mauro NapsucialeDCI-UG Mirco CannoniUniversidad de Huelva Mónica Felipa Ramírez PalaciosUniversidad de Guadalajara Murli Manohar VermaLucknow university, India Nassim BozorgniaUCLA Octavio Obregón Octavio ValenzuelaIA-UNAM Oleg KamaevUniversity of Minnesota Osamu SetoHokkai-Gakuen University Pedro F González DíazIFF, CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid, Spain Qaisar ShafiBartol Research Inst. and Delaware U. Raul Hennings-YeomansLos Alamos National Laboratory René Ángeles MartínezDepartamento de Fisica, del DCI de la Universidad de Guanajuato Reyna XoxocotziBUAP, FCFM Rishi Kumar TiwariGovt. Model Science College, Rewa (MP) INDIA Roberto A SussmanICN-UNAM Selim Gómez ÁvilaDCI-UG Sugai KenichiSaitama University Susana Valdez AlvaradoDCI-UG TVladimir - 2K CollaborationColorado State University Tonatiuh MatosCINVESTAV Valeriy DvoeglazovUniversidad de Zacatecas Vannia Gonzalez MaciasDCI-UG Vladimir Avila-ReeseInstituto de Astronomia, UNAM Wolfgang BietenholzINC, UNAM (Mexico) Yamanaka MasatoKyoto Sangyo University Yann MambriniLPT Orsay Yu-Feng ZhouInstitute of Theotretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, PR China Aaron HigueraDCI-UG Azarael Yebra PérezDCI-UG César Hernández AguayoDCI-UG Jaime Chagoya AlvarezDCI-UG Jonathan Rashid Rosique CampuzanoDCI-UG José Alfredo Soto ÁlvarezDCI-UG Juan Carlos De Haro SantosDCI-UG Luis Eduardo Medina MedranoDCI-UG Maria Fatima Rubio EspinozaDCI-UG Paulo Alberto Rodriguez HerreraDCI-UG Roberto Oziel Gutierrez CotaDCI-UG Rocha Moran Maria PaulinaDCI-UG Xareni Sanchez MonroyDCI-UG

  4. PREFACE: Introduction to the proceedings of Dynamics Days South America 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macau, Elbert E. N.; Pereira, Tiago; Prado, Antonio F. B. A.; Turci, Luiz F. R.; Winter, Othon C.

    2011-03-01

    number of attendees ever. Finally, we would like to express our gratitude to all the participants for their presentations, discussions, and remarkable interactions with one another. The tireless work undertaken by all the members of the International Advisory Committee and the Organizing Committee must also be recognized. We also wish to express our deep appreciation for the Scientific Societies and Research Support Agencies which supported the conference and provided all the resources which were necessary to make this idea of a South American Dynamics Days come true. Elbert E N Macau, Tiago Pereira, Antonio F B A Prado, Luiz F R Turci, and Othon C WinterEditors Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph Conference photograph International Advisory Committee Adilson E MotterNorthwestern UniversityEvanston - IL - USA Alfredo OzorioCentro Brasileiro de Pesquisas FísicasRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Celso Grebogi (Chair)University of AberdeenAberdeen - UK Ed OttUniversity of MarylandCollege Park - MD - USA Epaminondas Rosa JrIllinois State UniversityNormal - IL - USA Hans Ingo WeberPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Holger KantzMax Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex SystemsDresden - Germany Jason Gallas (Co-chair)Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do SulPorto Alegre - RS - Brazil José Roberto Rios LeiteUniv. Federal de PernanbucoRecife - PE - Brazil Jürgen KurthsPotsdam Institute for climate Impact ResearchHumboldt University, Berlin - Germany Kenneth ShowalterWest Virginia UniversityMorgantown - WV - USA Lou PecoraNaval Research LabWashington - DC - USA Luis Antonio AguirreUniversidade Federal de Minas GeraisBelo Horizonte - MG - Brazil Marcelo VianaIMPA - Instituto Nacional de Matemática Pura e AplicadaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Miguel A F SanjuánUniversidad Rey Juan CarlosMadrid - Spain Paulo Roberto de Souza MendesPontifícia Universidade CatólicaRio de Janeiro - RJ - Brazil Roland KorbeleUniversidade de

  5. a Passage to the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1995-11-01

    a concluding Press Conference , during which the outcome of this unique event will be summarized by the participants and the organisers: Monday, November 20, 1995, 15:30 pm, at the ESO Headquarters, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching, Germany List of National First-Prize Winners Belgium: Mr. Freddy Allemeersch (Teacher), Mr. Pieter De Ceuninck, Mr. Jeroen Staelens (Onze-Lieve-Vrouwecollege, Brugge) Denmark: Mr. Joern C. Olsen, Mr. Henrik Struckmann, Mr. Uffe A. Hansen, Mr. Mogens Winther (Teacher) (Soenderborg Amtsgymnasium) Finland: Mr. Reima Eresmaa, Ms. Laura Elina Nykyri, Ms. Reetamaija Janhonen (Cygnaeues-Lukeo, Jyvaeskylae and Jyvaeskylaen Lyseon Lukeo) France: Mr. Rene Cavaroz (Teacher), Mr. Vincent Hardy, Mr. Antoine Lesuffleur (Lycee Chartier, Bayeux) Germany: Ms. Dorothee Barth, Mr. Walter Czech (Teacher), Mr. Uwe Kranz, Ms. Karin Wieland (Immanuel-Kant-Gymnasium, Leinfelden-Echterdingen, Baden-Wuerttemberg) Greece: Ms. Agni Ioannidi, Ms. Elena Katifori, Mr. Vassilis Samiotis, Mr. Vassillos Tzotzes (Teacher) (Second Varvakelo Experimental Lyceum, Athens) Ireland: Mr. Declan Maccuarta (Teacher), Mr. Colm Mcloughlin (St. Peter's College, Wexford, Co. Wexford) Italy: Mr. Pasquale Ciarletta, Ms. Francesca D'elia, Ms. Ada Fortugna (Teacher), Mr. Alfredo Pudano (Liceo Scientifico `Leonardo da Vinci', Reggio Calabria) The Netherlands: Mr. Alex De Beer, Mr. Klaas Huijbregts, Mr. Ruud Nellen (Norbertuscollege, Rosendaal) Spain: Mr. Aritz Atela Aio, Mr. Julen Sarasola Manich (Teacher), Mr. Jon Huertas Rodriquez (Txorierri Batxilergoko Institua, Derio Bizkaia) Sweden: Mr. Rahman Amanullah, Mr. Kjell L. Bonander (Teacher), Mr. Tomas Oppelstrup, Ms. Christin Wiedemann (Saltsjoebadens Samskola, Saltsjoebaden) United Kingdom: Mr. Michael Ching, Dr. Richard Field (Teacher) (Oundle School, Peterborough) National Committees Further information about the national contests may be obtained from the National Committees: Belgium: Dr. C. Sterken, Vrije Universiteit

  6. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2011-09-01

    KhodelVictorKurchatov Institute, Moscowvak@wuphys.wustl.edu KimuraMasaakiHokkaido University, Sapporomasaaki@nucl.sci.hokudai.ac.jp LacroixDenisGANIL, Caenlacroix@ganil.fr LiangHaozhaoPeking University, Beijinghzliang@pku.edu.cn MargueronJérômeIPN Orsayjerome.margueron@ipno.in2p3.fr MassotElisabethIPN Orsaymassot@ipno.in2p3.fr MengJiePeking University, Beijingmengj@pku.edu.cn MillerTomaszWarsaw University of Technologymillert@student.mini.pw.edu.pl MoghrabiKassemIPN Orsaymoghrabi@ipno.in2p3.fr NapolitaniPaoloIPN Orsaynapolita@ipno.in2p3.fr NeffThomasGSI Darmstadtt.neff@gsi.de NguyenVan GiaiIPN Orsaynguyen@ipno.in2p3.fr OtsukaTakaharuUniversity of Tokyootsuka@phys.s.u-tokyo.ac.jp PilletNathalie-MarieCEA-DAM, Arpajonnathalie.pillet@cea.fr QiChongKTH Stockholmchongq@kth.se RamananSunethraICTP Triestesramanan@ictp.it RingPeterTU Munichring@ph.tum.de Rios HuguetArnauUniversity of Surreya.rios@surrey.ac.uk RivetMarie-FranceIPN Orsayrivet@ipno.in2p3.fr RobledoLuisUniversidad Autonoma de Madridluis.robledo@uam.es Roca MazaXavierINFN Milanoxavier.roca.maza@mi.infn.it RöpkeGerdRostock Universitygerd.roepke@uni-rostock.de RowleyNeilIPN Orsayrowley@ipno.in2p3.fr SagawaHiroyukiUniversity of Aizusagawa@u-aizu.ac.jp SandulescuNicolaeIFIN-HH, Bucharestsandulescu@theory.nipne.ro SchuckPeterIPN Orsayschuck@ipno.in2p3.fr SedrakianArmenGoethe Universität Frankfurtsedrakian@th.physik.uni-frankfurt.de SeveryukhinAlexeyJINR Dubnasever@theor.jinr.ru SogoTakaakiIPN Orsaysogo@ipno.in2p3.fr SomàVittorioCEA Saclayvittorio.soma@cea.fr StrinatiGiancarloUniversità di Camerinogiancarlo.strinati@gmail.com SuharaTadahiroKyoto Universitysuhara@ruby.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp SukhoruchkinSergeiPetersburg Nuclear Physics Institutesergeis@pnpi.spb.ru SuzukiToruTokyo Metropolitan Universitysuzukitr@tmu.ac.jp SuzukiToshioNihon University, Tokyosuzuki@chs.nihon-u.ac.jp TarpanovDimitarINRNE, Sofiadimitert@yahoo.co.uk Tohsaki-SuzukiAkihiroOsaka Universitytohsaki@rcnp.osaka-u.ac.jp TypelStefanGSI Darmstadts

  7. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  8. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  9. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France

  10. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  11. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  12. 1992 WAMET/EUROMET Joint Expedition to Search for Meteorites in the Nullarbor Region, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bevan, A.

    1992-07-01

    The Nullarbor Region is a limestone desert in the south of Australia. It forms part of the larger Eucla Basin, which straddles the border between South Australia and Western Australia. The portion of the Eucla Basin lying in Westem Australia covers an area of about 104,000 km^2 (Bevan and Binns, 1989) and meteorites have been recovered from this region since 1971, new material being deposited at the Western Australia Museum. Between 21/3/92 and 6/4/92 a joint expedition between the Western Australia Museum and EUROMET recovered approximately 440 specimens of meteorites (total mass 13206 g) and 297 tektites. The expedition, whose members were Claude Perron (Paris), Christian Koeberl (Vienna), Georg Delisle (BGR Hannover), Gian- Paolo Sighinolfi (Modena), and Andrew Morse (OU) for Euromet, together with Wayne Smith (Australian Army) and Tom Smith (Perth Astronomical Observatory), was led by Dr Alex Bevan of the Western Australia Museum. Searching was carried out on foot with the participants spread out in a line with a 10-m spacing, walking along a compass bearing for approximately 10 km and back each day. Eight collecting regions were used, with a stop of about 2 days at each camp. Half of the searching was done near known strewn fields in order that the team become practised. Thus the expedition collected material at the following known sites. Camel Donga, Eucrite: The initial recovery was made in 1984 (Cleverly et al., 1986). The strewn field is about 8 km by 2-3 km at coordinates 30 degrees 19'S, 126 degrees 37'E. This expedition recovered 65 stones weighing a total of 2456 g, plus one stone of 4.8 g that was clearly chondritic in hand specimen. Mulga (north), H6: The initial recovery was made in 1964 (McCall, 1968). The strewn field is 8 km by 2 km at coordinates 30 degrees 11'S, 126 degrees 22'E and on this expedition 5 stones were recovered with a weight of 548 g. Also 110 stones (total mass 1535 g) that are certainly not H6 were found within a 100-m radius of

  13. The Serra de Tramuntana World Heritage Site (Mallorca, Spain). Landslide activity valuation by means of Persistent Scatterers Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mateos, Rosa Maria; Bianchini, Silvia; Herrera, Gerardo; Garcia, Inmaculada; Sanabria, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    < ‑5mm/yr) and seven of them with a potential to produce moderate damage (VSLOPE < ‑10mm/yr). One of the largest landslides in the range is the Bàlitx landslide (50 million m3 in volume), located on the steep coastal side (Mateos et al., 2013b). Within the landslide body, Roman cistern and old terrace walls have been identified. Numerous geomorphological features identified in its displaced mass (cracks, shallow slides and rockfalls) reveal that the landslide has not yet reached a state of equilibrium. Additionally, field observations determine that the northeastern sector of Bàlitx shows major activity signs. DInSAR results reveal that the rate of movement for the Bàlitx landslide is extremely low (- 5mm /yr on average) that could be interpreted as the residual displacement of the deep-seated rockslide. A major activity has also been detected in the northeastern sector of Bàlitx with the PSI technique, where velocities rates are slightly over -5 mm/yr. The outcomes of this work reveal the usefulness of landslide activity maps for environmental planning activities in cultural heritage sites. References: Bianchini S, Herrera G, Mateos RM, Notti D, García-Moreno I, Mora O, Moretti S (2013). Landslide Activity Maps Generation by means of Persistent Scattered Interferometry. Remote Sensing 5:6198-6222. Mateos R.M., García-Moreno I., Herrera G., Mulas J (2013) a. Damage caused by recent mass-movements in Majorca (Spain), a region with a high risk due to tourism. Landslide Science and Practice. Claudio Margottini, Paolo Canuti and Kyoji Sassa (Editors). Volume 7: Social and Economic Impact and Policies. 105-113. Mateos RM, Rodríguez-Peces M, Azañón JM, Rodríguez-Fernández FJ, Roldán FJ, García-Moreno I, Gelabert B, García-Mayordomo J (2013)b. El deslizamiento de Bàlitx (Mallorca) y su posible origen sísmico. Procesos activos desde el Pleistoceno superior. Boletín Geológico y Minero, 124 (1): 41-61

  14. Crisis of isotope geodynamics: Sm-Nd aspect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pushkarev, Y. D.; Nikitina, L. P.

    2009-04-01

    Isotope geochemistry for many years contributes to improve our understanding of the Earth's interiors. There are a lot of models of the crust-mantle system evolution based on the isotope data. Indeed, identification of various types of the mantle material on the basis of isotope composition of its magmatic derivatives has opened perspective to fill geophysical models with the geochemical content. Study of the mantle material composition, changing in time and in space, with the same approach originated a new branch of geology, which was named chemical geodynamics or isotope geodynamics. Opportunities of the new approach have been unambiguously admitted more than 30 years ago after DePaolo & D.Wasserburg pioneer works, dedicated to development of Sm-Nd isotope systematics. This systematics became the most considerable component in the basement of isotope geodynamics as a whole. Since then nobody ever discussed the constrains of this siystematics. At the same time there are many contradictions in it. There are numerous mantle xenoliths depleted in main elements (Pearson et al., 2003), for which the whole variation curve normalized to chondrite is plotted below chondrite level. Paradox of the situation is that this mantle material has REE pattern which displays a continuous decrease of their concentration from La to Lu. Accordingly, Sm/Nd ratio in such material is lower than in chondrites. Through some time this material will be able to generate melts with ENd<0, which is considered to be the characteristic of the enriched mantle. At the same time, the material producing such melts in terms of the total REE concentration and the main elements concentration is high depleted. Another example, which demonstrates the independent variations of the main elements concentration, of the total REE contents, of Sm/Nd ratio and of Nd isotope composition in a source of the mantle magmatic derivatives, is connected with tholeiites of the middle ocean ridges and ocean islands

  15. Something going on in Milan: a review of the 4th International PhD Student Cancer Conference.

    PubMed

    Segré, C

    2010-01-01

    Maria Sarra Ferraris), due to the high scientific level of the abstracts submitted. In the end, 26 top students were chosen to give a 15-min oral presentation in one of eight sessions: Development & Differentiation, Cell Migration, Immunology & Cancer, Modelling & Large Scale approaches, Genome Instability, Signal Transduction, Cancer Genetics & Drug Resistance, Stem Cells in Biology and Cancer.The scientific programme was further enriched by two scientific special sessions, held by Professor Pier Paolo di Fiore and Dr Giuseppe Testa, Principal Investigators at the IFOM-IEO-Campus and by a bioethical round table on human embryonic stem cell research moderated by Silvia Camporesi, a senior PhD student in the SEMM PhD Programme 'Foundation of Life Science and their Bioethical Consequences'.ON TOP OF EVERYTHING, WE HAD THE PLEASURE OF INVITING, AS KEYNOTE SPEAKERS, TWO LEADING EUROPEAN SCIENTISTS IN THE FIELDS OF CANCER INVASION AND BIOLOGY OF STEM CELLS, RESPECTIVELY: Dr Peter Friedl from The Nijmegen Centre for Molecular Life (The Netherlands) and Professor Andreas Trumpp from The Heidelberg Institute for Stem Cell Technology and Experimental Medicine (Heidelberg).All the student talks have distinguished themselves for the impressive quality of the science; an encouraging evidence of the high profile level of research carried out in Europe. It would be beyond the purposes of this report to summarise all 26 talks, which touched many different and specific topics. For further information, the Conference Abstract book with all the scientific content is available on the conference Web site (http://www.semm.it/events_researchPast.php). In what follows, the special sessions and the keynote lectures will be discussed in detail. PMID:22276043

  16. LHC Nobel Symposium Proceedings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekelöf, Tord

    2013-12-01

    referees of these Proceedings and to the staff at Uppsala University, in particular my Administrative Assistant for the Symposium, Marja Fahlander, at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences, at the Nobel Foundation and at the Institute of Physics Publishing Company for Physica Scripta for realizing this enlightening Symposium at its proceedings. The Nobel Symposium was financed by the Nobel Foundation. Tord Ekelöf Chair of the LHC Nobel Symposium Local Organizing Committee and LHC Nobel Guest Editor for the Symposium Proceedings Members of the Local Organizing Committee of the LHC Nobel Symposium Tord Ekelöf (Uppsala University, Chair) Kerstin Jon-And (Stockholms University) Bengt Lund-Jensen (Royal Institute of Technology) Anders Oskarsson (Lunds University) Torsten Åkesson (Lund University) Barbro Åsman (Swedish Royal Academy of Sciences) Members of the International Advisory Committee of the LHC Nobel Symposium Pierluigi Campana (INFN Frascati) Fabiola Gianotti (CERN) Paolo Giubellino (INFN-Torino) Joe Incandela (UC Santa Barbara) Young-Kee Kim (FNAL) Michelangelo Mangano (CERN) Lisa Randall (Harvard University)

  17. Original sounding and drifting balloon-borne measurements in the western Mediterranean with the aerosol counter/sizer LOAC during summer ChArMEx campaigns, with a focus on desert dust events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renard, Jean-Baptiste; Dulac, François; Vignelles, Damien; Jeannot, Matthieu; Verdier, Nicolas; Chazette, Patrick; Crenn, Vincent; Sciare, Jean; Totems, Julien; Durand, Pierre; Barret, Brice; Jambert, Corinne; Mallet, Marc; Menut, Laurent; Mailler, Sylvain; Basart, Sara; Baldasano, José Maria

    2015-04-01

    LOAC (Light Optical Aerosol Counter) is a new small optical particle counter/sizer of ~250 grams designed to fly under all kinds of balloons. The measurements are conducted at two scattering angles (12° and 60°), allowing the determination of the aerosol particle concentrations in 19 size classes within a diameter range of ~0.2-100 µm and some identification of the nature of particles dominating different size classes. Following laboratory calibration, the sensor particularly discriminates wet or liquid particles, mineral dust, soot carbon particles and salts. Comparisons with other in situ sensors at the surface and with remote sensing measurements on the vertical were performed to give confidence in measurements. The instrument has been operated at the surface, under all kinds of balloons up to more than 35 km in altitude, including tethered, sounding, open stratospheric and new boundary-layer pressurized drifting balloons (BLPB) from CNES, and was tested on board a small UAV. Operations encompass a variety of environments including the Arctic (Reykjavik, Island, and Kiruna, Sweden), Brazil (Sao Paolo), the western Mediterranean Basin, southwestern France, peri-urban (Ile de France) and urban areas (Paris and Vienna). Presented results are focused on the LOAC balloon-borne measurements performed in the western Mediterranean basin during MISTRALS/ChArMEx campaigns (Mediterranean Integrated Studies aT Regional And Local Scales/the Chemistry-Aerosol Mediterranean Experiment; http://www.mistrals-hjome.org; http://charmex.lsce.ipsl.fr), with a focus on African dust events. Two test flights with a first version of LOAC under sounding balloons were first successfully performed in late June 2012 near Marseille during an intense dust event. In 2013, 19 LOAC flights have been performed under meteorological balloons and 12 under low altitude drifting balloons, most of them from Minorca Island (Spain) in June and early July and others from Levant Island (south of France

  18. Evidence for Ultra-Energetic Particles in Jet from Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-06-01

    shoot out from the black hole at close to the speed of light and then release their energy as radiation as far out as they are seen, the particles have to be accelerated locally, where they produce their emission. Both teams also used data from the third of NASA's Great Observatories, the Hubble Space Telescope, and the radio telescopes of the Very Large Array (VLA). The three space telescopes and the VLA "see" emission of different wavelengths from celestial objects, and the combined data was essential to reveal the new comprehensive perspective on the jets. "The new observations show that the flow structure of this jet is more complicated than had been assumed previously," Jester explains. "That the present evidence favors the synchrotron model deepens the mystery of how jets produce the ultra-energetic particles that radiate at X-ray wavelengths." "Our results call for a radical rethink of the physics of relativistic jets that black holes drive," said Uchiyama. "But, we now have a crucial new clue to solving one of the major mysteries in high-energy astrophysics." Other authors on the papers include Jeffrey Van Duyne and Paolo Coppi at Yale; C.C. Cheung at Stanford University; Rita Sambruna at NASA/GSFC, Greenbelt, MD; Tadayuki Takahashi at ISAS/JAXA, Japan; Laura Maraschi and Fabrizio Tavecchio at the Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Milan; Dan Harris from the SAO; Herman Marshall at MIT; and Klaus Meisenheimer at Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg. Grant and contract funding from NASA supported the research. Additional images and background material are available at: http://www.astro.soton.ac.uk/~jester/3C273.html and http://www.astro.isas.jaxa.jp/~uchiyama/Site2/Spitzer_3C273.html

  19. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    epitaxial In2O3 thin films grown on Y-stabilised ZrO2(111) K H L Zhang, V K Lazarov, T D Veal, F E Oropeza, C F McConville, R G Egdell and A Walsh Hydrogenated cation vacancies in semiconducting oxidesJ B Varley, H Peelaers, A Janotti and C G Van de Walle Reactive force field simulation of proton diffusion in BaZrO3 using an empirical valence bond approachPaolo Raiteri, Julian D Gale and Giovanni Bussi Conductivity in transparent oxide semiconductorsP D C King and T D Veal A theoretical study of a ZnO graphene analogue: adsorption on Ag(111) and hydrogen transportIlker Demiroglu, Daniele Stradi, Francesc Illas and Stefan T Bromley The interplay between dopants and oxygen vacancies in the magnetism of V-doped TiO2 Ricardo Grau-Crespo and Udo Schwingenschlögl Electron and hole stability in GaN and ZnOAron Walsh, C Richard A Catlow, Martina Miskufova and Alexey A Sokol Holes bound as small polarons to acceptor defects in oxide materials: why are their thermal ionization energies so high?O F Schirmer

  20. PREFACE: Fourteenth International Symposium on Laser-Aided Plasma Diagnostics (LAPD14)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicotti, L.; Pasqualotto, R.

    2010-04-01

    . Döbele (1993 - 1999) K. Muraoka (1999 - 2003) A. J. H. Donné (2003 - ) LOCAL ORGANIZERS: Leonardo Giudicotti, Consorzio RFX and Padova University (Chairman) Roberto Pasqualotto, Consorzio RFX Margherita Basso, Consorzio RFX Santolo De Benedictis, Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and Plasmas, CNR Paolo Innocente, Consorzio RFX Alberto Alfier, Consorzio RFX Enrico Scek Osman, Consorzio RFX PREVIOUS LAPD MEETINGS 1983- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1985- Oxford, U.K.: D. Evans (Organizer) 1987- Lake Arrowhead, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 1989- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1991- Bad Honnef, Germany: F. Döbele (Organizer) 1993- Bar Harbor, USA: P. Woskov (Organizer) 1995- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 1997- Doorwerth, Netherlands: A. J. H. Donné (Organizer) 1999- Lake Tahoe, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 2001- Fukuoka, Japan: K. Muraoka (Organizer) 2003- Les Houches, France: N. Sadeghi (Organizer) 2005- Snowbird, USA: N. C. Luhmann, Jr. (Organizer) 2007- Takayama, Japan: K. Kawahata (Organizer) 2009- Castelbrando, Italy: L. Giudicotti (Organizer)

  1. Seeing through the Dark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-03-01

    Astronomers have measured the distribution of mass inside a dark filament in a molecular cloud with an amazing level of detail and to great depth. The measurement is based on a new method that looks at the scattered near-infrared light or 'cloudshine' and was made with ESO's New Technology Telescope. Associated with the forthcoming VISTA telescope, this new technique will allow astronomers to better understand the cradles of newborn stars. ESO PR Photo 05a/08 ESO PR Photo 06/08 A Dark Filament in Scattered Light The vast expanses between stars are permeated with giant complexes of cold gas and dust opaque to visible light. Yet these are the future nurseries of stars to be. "One would like to have a detailed knowledge of the interiors of these dark clouds to better understand where and when new stars will appear," says Mika Juvela, lead author of the paper in which these results are reported. Because the dust in these clouds blocks the visible light, the distribution of matter within interstellar clouds can be examined only indirectly. One method is based on measurements of the light from stars that are located behind the cloud [1] . "This method, albeit quite useful, is limited by the fact that the level of details one can obtain depends on the distribution of background stars," says co-author Paolo Padoan. In 2006, astronomers Padoan, Juvela, and colleague Veli-Matti Pelkonen, proposed that maps of scattered light could be used as another tracer of the cloud's inner structure, a method that should yield more advantages. The idea is to estimate the amount of dust located along the line of sight by measuring the intensity of the scattered light. Dark clouds are feebly illuminated by nearby stars. This light is scattered by the dust contained in the clouds, an effect dubbed 'cloudshine' by Harvard astronomers Alyssa Goodman and Jonathan Foster. This effect is well known to sky lovers, as they create in visible light wonderful pieces of art called 'reflection nebulae

  2. Editorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrijevic, M. S.; Popovic, L. C.

    . Orlov Paolo Paolicchi Paul Paquet Genadij I. Pinigin Sylvie Sahal-Brechot Dan Selaru N. D. Simonenko Eduardo Simonneau A. Shul'ga Magdalena Stavinschi Cristina Stoica T. I. Suchkova Emil Tatomir Svetlana A. Tolchelnikova-Muri V. I. Turenkov Margarita Yu. Volyanskaya A. Yu. Yacenko Vincento Zappala G. Zhen-Nian We are grateful to these authors for having chosen our journal, thereby conferring on the Serbian Astronomical Journal an international standing. This is also a suitable opportunity to thank the numerous referees who contributed to our Journal being better. During this period the referees officially registered (a number of them, mainly belonging to the editorial boards, remain unregistered) have been (in Brackets is the number of papers they reviewed): Trajko Angelov (11) Jelisaveta Arsenijevic (4) Olga Atanackovic-Vukmanovic (4) Milutin Blagojevic (1) Markyan S. Chubey (1) B. Ciric (2) Miodrag Dacic (2) Milan S. Dimitrijevic (43) Gojko Djurasevic (1) B. Djuric (1) Dragutin Djurovic (5) Stevica Djurovic (3) Petar Grujic (5) Slobodan Jankov (1) Zoran Knezevic (7) Nikola Konjevic (6) Vladimir Krsljanin (2) Aleksandar Kubicela (12) Mike Kuzmanoski (10) Jaroslav Labat (1) Jovan Lazovic (1) Ilija Lukacevic (5) Jovan Malisic (1) Milan Mijatov (1) Jelena Milogradov-Turin (2) Vladeta Milovanovic (6) Ljubisa Mitic (22) Radovan Mrkic (1) Ranko Muzijevic (4) Slobodan Ninkovic (30) Dragomir Olevic (3) Nada Pejovic (1) Georgije Popovic (18) Luka C. Popovic (12) Sofija Sadzakov (28) Jovan Simovljevic (7) Nicholas Spyrou (1) Bozidar Stanic (1) Miroljub Starcevic (1) S. Starcevic (1) Magdalena Stavinschi (1) Dragoljub Stefanovic (1) Dusan Saletic (9) Stevo Segan (1) Branislav Sevarlic (16) Djordje Teleki (10) Istvan Vince (42) Mirjana Vukicevic-Karabin (1) Vincento Zappala (1) Danilo Zulevic (2) In our register, in which M.S.D. began entering the submitted articles from January 1st, 1984, up to now, 455 of them are inscribed. A part of them has been published in Publications of

  3. The Quiet Explosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-07-01

    A European-led team of astronomers are providing hints that a recent supernova may not be as normal as initially thought. Instead, the star that exploded is now understood to have collapsed into a black hole, producing a weak jet, typical of much more violent events, the so-called gamma-ray bursts. The object, SN 2008D, is thus probably among the weakest explosions that produce very fast moving jets. This discovery represents a crucial milestone in the understanding of the most violent phenomena observed in the Universe. Black Hole ESO PR Photo 23a/08 A Galaxy and two Supernovae These striking results, partly based on observations with ESO's Very Large Telescope, will appear tomorrow in Science Express, the online version of Science. Stars that were at birth more massive than about 8 times the mass of our Sun end their relatively short life in a cosmic, cataclysmic firework lighting up the Universe. The outcome is the formation of the densest objects that exist, neutron stars and black holes. When exploding, some of the most massive stars emit a short cry of agony, in the form of a burst of very energetic light, X- or gamma-rays. In the early afternoon (in Europe) of 9 January 2008, the NASA/STFC/ASI Swift telescope discovered serendipitously a 5-minute long burst of X-rays coming from within the spiral galaxy NGC 2770, located 90 million light-years away towards the Lynx constellation. The Swift satellite was studying a supernova that had exploded the previous year in the same galaxy, but the burst of X-rays came from another location, and was soon shown to arise from a different supernova, named SN 2008D. Researchers at the Italian National Institute for Astrophysics (INAF), the Max-Planck Institute for Astrophysics (MPA), ESO, and at various other institutions have observed the supernova at great length. The team is led by Paolo Mazzali of INAF's Padova Observatory and MPA. "What made this event very interesting," says Mazzali, "is that the X-ray signal was very

  4. PREFACE: Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases Physics and biology of neurodegenerative diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastore, Annalisa

    2012-06-01

    -imaging and quantification of human substantia nigra using synchrotron radiation based x-ray fluorescence—in relation to Parkinson's diseaseMagdalena Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, Anna Krygowska-Wajs and Dariusz Adamek Explaining the length threshold of polyglutamine aggregationPaolo De Los Rios, Marc Hafner and Annalisa Pastore The role of iron in neurodegeneration—Mössbauer spectroscopy, electron microscopy, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and neuroimaging studiesJolanta Galazka-Friedman, Erika R Bauminger, Karol Szlachta and Andrzej Friedman Crowding versus molecular seeding: NMR studies of protein aggregation in hen egg whiteD Sanfelice, M Adrover, G Martorell, A Pastore and P A Temussi

  5. Long-lasting but Dim Brethren of Cosmic Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-08-01

    astronomers with a large data set to document this new class of events. The group led by Elena Pian indeed confirmed that the event was tied to a supernova called SN 2006aj a few days later. Remarkable details about the chemical composition of the star debris continue to be analysed. The newly discovered supernova is dimmer than hypernovae associated with normal long gamma-ray bursts by about a factor of two, but it is still a factor of 2-3 more luminous than regular core-collapse supernovae. All together, these facts point to a substantial diversity between supernovae associated with GRBs and supernovae associated with X-ray flashes. This diversity may be related to the masses of the exploding stars. Whereas gamma-ray bursts probably mark the birth of a black hole, X-ray flashes appear to signal the type of star explosion that leaves behind a neutron star. Based on the VLT data, a team led by Paolo Mazzali of the Max Planck Institute for Astrophysics in Garching, Germany, postulate that the 18 February event might have led to a highly magnetic type of neutron star called a magnetar. Mazzali and his team find indeed that the star that exploded had an initial mass of 'only' 20 times the mass of the Sun. This is smaller, by about a factor two at least, than those estimated for the typical GRB-supernovae. "The properties of GRB 060218 suggest the existence of a population of events less luminous than 'classical' GRBs, but possibly much more numerous", said Mazzali. "Indeed, these events may be the most abundant form of X- or gamma-ray bursts in the Universe, but instrumental limits allow us to detect them only locally." The astronomers find that the number of such events could be about 100 times more numerous than typical gamma-ray bursts.

  6. Detailed chronology of a giant Pleistocene rock-avalanche sequence in the hyperarid southern Peru revealed by jointly applied 10Be and 3He cosmic ray exposure dating : The Study case of the Cerro Caquilluco landslide complex.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swann, Zerathe; Laurence, Audin; Carlos, Benavente; Régis, Braucher; Pierre-Henri, Blard; Didier, Bourlès; Julien, Carcaillet; Fabrizio, Delgado; Pascal, Lacroix; Valderrama Patricio, Murillo; Aster Team

    2015-04-01

    suggesting sequential failures, this object appeared as a good target to bring additional knowledge on the previously exposed issues. Our goal was to use TCN and to sample a maximum of individual lobes to be able to discuss: (i) the time of recurrence of successive extreme events, (ii) the respective roles of past climate variations versus earthquake forcing on the landslide trigger, and (iii) the impact of these mass remobilizations on local erosion rates compared to fluvial erosion rates and tectonic uplift rates (both known in this region). On average, three samples were extracted from individual meter-scale boulders sampled on seven different lobes of debris (~20 samples). Due to the lack of quartz in that volcanic lithology, 10Be was extracted from feldspaths for all samples. Half were additionally processed for 3He measurements on pyroxene, allowing to reduce the uncertainty on the derived exposure ages and to solve the production equation for both time and erosion variables. The obtained ages show a perfect consistency with the pattern of erosion, geomorphic surfaces and relative position of each lobes (i.e. younger from the toe to the top). These results highlight sequential failures staggered at the Pleistocene timescale, with some surprising time of recurrence ranging from 30 to 100 ka that may correspond to the main last climate variations in that region. Crosta, G.B., Hermanns, R.L., Frattini, P., Valbuzzi, E., Valagussa, A., 2014a. Large slope instabilities in Northern Chile: Inventory, Characterisation and Possible Triggers. In: Proceedings of the 3rd world landslide Forum, 2-6 June 2014, Bejing, p 6. DOI: 10.1007/978/-3-319-04996-0_28. Crosta, G.B., Paolo, F., Elena, V., Hermanns, R.L., 2014b. The Cerro Caquilluco-Cerrillos Negros Giant Rock Avalanches (Tacna, Peru). IAEG - Torino 2014, N°159. McPhillips, D., Bierman, P.R., Rood, D.H., 2014. Millennial-scale record of landslides in the Andes consistent with earthquake trigger. Nature Geoscience, DOI: 10

  7. PREFACE: Water Interfaces in Physics Chemistry and Biology: a multi-disciplinary approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellissent-Funel, Marie-Claire; Dore, John

    2009-07-01

    meeting as well as five extended abstracts. 1. Initial Filling Mechanism of Predominant Water Adsorption on Hydrophobic Slit-Shaped Carbon Nanopores Tomonori Ohba and Katsumi Kaneko 2. Computer simulation study of water/hydrocarbon interfaces: effects of hydrocarbon branching on interfacial properties Janamejaya Chowdhary and Branka M Ladanyi 3. Thermodynamics of supercooled water in solutions D Corradini, P Gallo and M Rovere 4. Transferability of polarizable models for ion-water electrostatic interaction Marco Masia 5. Quantum chemical study of water impact on the calcium hydroxyapatite V D Khavryuchenko, O V Khavryuchenko, V V Lisnyak 6. Neutron Scattering Studies of Dynamic Crossover Phenomena in a Coupled System of Biopolymer and Its Hydration Water Sow-Hsin Chen, F Mallamace, X Q Chu, C Kim, M Lagi, A Faraone, E Fratini, P Baglioni 7. Looking for the best experimental conditions to detail the protein solvation shell in a binary aqueous solvent via Small Angle Scattering Maria Grazia Ortore, Raffaele Sinibaldi, Francesco Spinozzi, Andrea Carbini, Flavio Carsughi and Paolo Mariani 8. Influence of the water molecules near surface of viral protein on virus activation process S O Shepelenko, A S Salnikov, S V Rak, E P Goncharova and A B Ryzhikov 9. Optical Kerr effect measurements on supercooled water: the experimental perspectives P. Bartolini, A Taschin, R Eramo, R Righini and R Torre 10. Structural studies of water confined in a confined hydrophobic environment J C Dore, M-C Bellissent-Funel, A Burian, H P Castricum, J Jelassi, K Kaneko, T Ohba, H Tanaka and J B W Webber 11. Dynamic transition and glassy behaviour in hydrated proteins F Mezei, M Russina, G Chen, H Frauenfelder, P W Fenimore, P Falus and B Farago 12. Relation between frequency and H bond length in heavy water: Towards the understanding of the unusual properties of H bond dynamics in nanoporous media S Pommeret, R Musat, J-P Renault, J-C Leicknam and S Bratos 13. Quantum confinement of hydrogen in ice

  8. COASTALT Project's contribution to the development and dissemination of coastal altimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipollini, P.; Benveniste, J.

    2012-04-01

    , Machiel Bos, Valborg Byfield, Marco Caparrini, Peter Challenor, Paolo Cipolli

  9. Velocity and Vorticity Fields of a Turbulent Plume under different experimental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matulka, A. M.; Gonzalez-Nieto, P. L.; Redondo, J. M.; Tarquis, A. M.

    2012-04-01

    flows and turbulent structure. The main aim of the research in particular is to investigate mixing processes and their efficiency for different turbulent plumes, jets and their scale to scale reactions with dominant coherent structures such as vortices. The interesting way to analyse fith multifractal [8,9] techniques the evolution of contours comparing scalar, velocity and vorticity interfaces to visualize in different parameter and phase spaces that give us an idea on local mixing influenced by velocity, vorticity and helicity for different Atwood numbers in time. [1]Csanady, G. T.: Turbulent diffusion in the environment. Reidel, 248 pp., 1973. [2] DePaolo, D. J. and Stolper, E. M.: Models of Hawaiian volcano growth and plume structure: Implications of results from the Hawaii Scientific Drilling Project. J. of Geophysical Research, 101, B5, 11643-11654, 1996. [3] Fackrell, J. E. and Robins, A. G.: Concentration fluctuations and fluxes in plumes from a point source in a turbulent boundary layer. Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 117, 1-26, 1982. [4] List, E. J.: Turbulent jets and plumes. Ann. Rev. Fluid Mech., 14, 189-212, 1982. [5] López González-Nieto, P.: La mezcla turbulenta por convección gravitatoria: modelización experimental y aplicación a situaciones atmosféricas. PhD Thesis, Servicio de Publicaciones UCM, 2004. [6] López González-Nieto, P., Cano, J. L. and Redondo, J. M.: An experimental model of mixing processes generated by an array of top-heavy turbulent plumes. Il Nuovo Cimento, 31C (5-6), 679-698, 2008. [7] Matulka, A., The Turbulent Structure in Environmental Flows: Effects of Stratification and Rotation, 2010. PhD. Thesis UPC, Barcelona [8] Redondo J.M., R. Castilla, A. Carillo, A. Matulka and A. Babiano; Taxonomy of 2D-3D Decaying Non-Homogeneous . Topical Problems of Fluid Mechanics, Prague (ISBN 978- 80-87012-19-2), 2009. [9] Vila T., S. Layzet, C. Vassilicos and J.M. Redondo; Multi-Fractal Analysis of Turbulent wakes, intermittency and mixing

  10. UVES Analyses the Universe: A First Portfolio of Most Promising Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-04-01

    formation rate at this early stage of the evolution of the galaxy. Notes [1] 1 billion = 1,000 million. [2] These figures indicate the percentage of the photons from a celestial object entering the UVES spectrograph slit that are effectively registered by the detectors. For comparison, astronomical spectrographs constructed in the early 1990's only reached efficiencies of the order of 5% and 10% in these wavebands, respectively. The very effective performance of UVES thus signifies another important gain (in addition to that caused by the large mirror of KUEYEN), allowing comparatively fainter objects to be observed, or shorter integration times in the case of brighter objects. [3] The "spectral resolution" indicates the amount of spectral detail that is registered. The number is calculated as the wavelength of observation, divided by the smallest wavelength difference at which two spectral lines can still be resolved. A resolution of 115,000 at the wavelength of H-alpha, a prominent hydrogen emission line at 656.2 nm in the red spectral region, thus corresponds to the possibility of recording individual spectral features that are only 0.006 nm apart (or a velocity difference of about 0.26 km/sec). [4] The UVES Instrument Science Team was constituted at the end of 1992 and is composed by Bengt Gustafsson (Uppsala Observatory, Sweden), Herman Hensberge (Royal Observatory, Bruxelles, Belgium), Paolo Molaro (Trieste Astronomical Observatory, Italy) and Poul Erik Nissen (Chairman, Aarhus University, Denmark). The team members followed the development of the instrument from the early design phase to its installation at Paranal, providing timely advice on all science-related matters. Antoinette Songaila (Hawaii, USA) and Francesco Bertola (Padova, Italy) also contributed to the first evaluation of the data. A. The Beryllium Abundance in Extremely Metal-Poor Stars Together with lithium (Li) and boron (B), beryllium (Be) belongs to a small group of elements (the "light elements

  11. Into the Epoch of Galaxy Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-02-01

    distant, evolved galaxies and also about the existence of associations of distant galaxies. A first clear example is the concentration of galaxies that appear uniformly yellow in PR Photo 06b/00 , apparently tracing a group of galaxies that was already assembled when the Universe was only 6 billion years old. A confirmation of the distance of a few of these galaxies has already been obtained by means of spectral observations in the framework of an ESO Large Programme , entitled "A Stringent Test on the Formation of Early Type and Massive Galaxies" and carried out by another group of astronomers [2]. A further clear example of a concentration of distant galaxies is seen in the upper right part of PR Photo 06b/00 . The very red colours of several galaxies in this sky area indicate that they are even more distant, "evolved" galaxies, already present when the Universe was only 1/3 of the current age. Notes [1] The European team consists of Emanuele Giallongo (Principal Investigator), Adriano Fontana , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (all at Rome Observatory), Stephane Arnouts and Sandro D'Odorico (European Southern Observatory, Garching), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). The data analysis was performed at the Milan ( P. Saracco ) and Rome ( A. Fontana , F. Poli ) Observatories. [2] This programme is conducted Andrea Cimatti (Principal Investigator) and Emanuele Daddi (both at Arcetri Observatory), Tom Broadhurst , Sandro D'Odorico , Roberto Gilmozzi and Alvio Renzini (European Southern Observatory), Stefano Cristiani (ST European Coordinating Facility, Garching), Adriano Fontana , Emanuele Giallongo , Nicola Menci and Francesco Poli (Rome Observatory), Marco Mignoli , Lucia Pozzetti and Giovanni Zamorani (Bologna Observatory) and Paolo Saracco (Milan Observatory). Technical note : The K-band image ( PR Photo 06a/00 ) is the result of 510 min of integration time with ISAAC at VLT ANTU. The 3-sigma magnitude

  12. PREFACE: Particles and Fields: Classical and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Clemente-Gallardo, J.; Marmo, G.

    2007-07-01

    BERETTA, Gian Paolo: Università di Brescia, Italy BHAMATHI, Gopalakrishnan: University of Texas at Austin, USA BOYA, Luis Joaquín: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain CARIÑENA, José F.: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain CELEGHINI, Enrico: Università di Firenze & INFN, Italy CHRUSCINSKI, Dariusz: Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland CIRILO-LOMBARDO, Diego: Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics (JINR-Dubna), Russia CLEMENTE-GALLARDO, Jesus: BIFI-Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain DE LUCAS, Javier: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain FALCETO, Fernando: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain GINOCCHIO, Joseph: Los Alamos National Laboratory, USA GORINI, Vittorio: Universitá' dell' Insubria, Como, Italy INDURAIN, Javier: Universidad de Zaragoza, Spain KLAUDER, John: University of Florida, USA KOSSAKOWSKI, Andrzej: Nicolaus Copernicus University, Torun, Poland MARMO, Giuseppe: Università di Napoli Federico II, Italy MORANDI, Giuseppe: Universitá di Bologna-Italy MUKUNDA, Narasimhaiengar: Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India MUÑOZ-CASTAÑEDA, Jose M.: University of Zaragoza, Spain NAIR, RANJIT: Centre for Philosophy & Foundations of Science, New Delhi, India NILSSON, Jan S: University of Gothenburg, Sweden OKUBO, Susumu: University of Rochester, USA PASCAZIO, Saverio: Universitá di Bari, Italy RIVERA HERNÁNDEZ, Rayito: Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France RODRIGUEZ, Cesar: University of Texas - Austin, USA SCOLARICI, Giuseppe: Universitá del Salento, Lecce, Italy SEGUI, Antonio

  13. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    Mechanical feedback in the high-frequency limit R El Boubsi, O Usmani and Ya M Blanter Back-action evasion and squeezing of a mechanical resonator using a cavity detector A A Clerk, F Marquardt and K Jacobs Simultaneous cooling and entanglement of mechanical modes of a micromirror in an optical cavity Claudiu Genes, David Vitali and Paolo Tombesi Dispersive optomechanics: a membrane inside a cavity A M Jayich, J C Sankey, B M Zwickl, C Yang, J D Thompson, S M Girvin, A A Clerk, F Marquardt and J G E Harris Cavity-assisted backaction cooling of mechanical resonators I Wilson-Rae, N Nooshi, J Dobrindt, T J Kippenberg and W Zwerger Cavity cooling of a nanomechanical resonator by light scattering I Favero and K Karrai Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: II. Implementation M P Blencowe and A D Armour Probing the quantum coherence of a nanomechanical resonator using a superconducting qubit: I. Echo scheme A D Armour and M P Blencowe Nanoelectromechanics of suspended carbon nanotubes A K Hüttel, M Poot, B Witkamp and H S J van der Zant Prospects for cooling nanomechanical motion by coupling to a superconducting microwave resonator J D Teufel, C A Regal and K W Lehnert

  14. PREFACE: Rutherford Centennial Conference on Nuclear Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeman, Sean

    2012-09-01

    Dobacewski (Warsaw, Poland) G Dracoulis (ANU, Australia) S J Freedman (LBL, USA) M Hass (Weizmann Institute, Israel) M Huyse (Leuven, Belgium) P Jones (Birmingham, UK) D Khao (Hanoi, Vietnam) R Krücken (Munich, Germany) K Langanke (Darmstadt, Germany) C Lister (Argonne, USA) G A Miller (University of Washington, USA) D Morrissey (MSU, USA) T Motobayashi (RIKEN, Japan) S Nagamiya (J-PARC, Japan) W Nazarewicz (ORNL, USA) S Mullins (iThemba, South Africa) T Nakamura (Tokyo, Japan) P Roussel Chomaz (GANIL, France) R Ribas (Sao Paolo, Brazil) M Vanderhaeghen (Mainz, Germany) U Wiedner (Uppsala, Sweden) F Xu (Peking University, China) Q Zhao (IHEP, Bejing) W Zajc (Columbia, USA)

  15. PREFACE: Dynamics of low-dimensional systems Dynamics of low-dimensional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernasconi, M.; Miret-Artés, S.; Toennies, J. P.

    2012-03-01

    Chulkov Surface phonons on Pb(111) I Yu Sklyadneva, R Heid, K-P Bohnen, P M Echenique and E V Chulkov Using evidence from nanocavities to assess the vibrational properties of external surfaces G F Cerofolini, F Corni, S Frabboni, G Ottaviani, E Romano, R Tonini and D Narducci Magnetic properties and relaxation dynamics of a frustrated Ni7 molecular nanomagnet E Garlatti, S Carretta, M Affronte, E C Sañudo, G Amoretti and P Santini A theoretical study of rotational and translational diffusion dynamics of molecules with a six-fold point symmetry adsorbed on a hexagonal lattice by neutron scattering I Calvo-Almazán, S Miret-Artés and P Fouquet Vibrational dynamics and surface structure of Bi(111) from helium atom scattering measurements M Mayrhofer-Reinhartshuber, A Tamtögl, P Kraus, K H Rieder and W E Ernst Double and triple ionization of silver clusters by electron impactAvik Halder, Anthony Liang, Chunrong Yin and Vitaly V Kresin Scattering of O2 from a graphite surface W W Hayes, Junepyo Oh, Takahiro Kondo, Keitaro Arakawa, Yoshihiko Saito, Junji Nakamura and J R Manson Zero-phonon lines of systems with different dimensions and unconventional vibronic interactions V Hizhnyakov A kinetic Monte Carlo approach to investigate antibiotic translocation through bacterial porins Matteo Ceccarelli, Attilio V Vargiu and Paolo Ruggerone Quantum Zeno and anti-Zeno effects in surface diffusion of interacting adsorbates H C Peñate-Rodrìguez, R Martìnez-Casado, G Rojas-Lorenzo, A S Sanz and S Miret-Artés Weakly bound finite systems: (4He)N-Rb2(3Σu), clustering structures from a quantum Monte Carlo approach D López-Durán, R Rodrìguez-Cantano, T González-Lezana, G Delgado-Barrio, P Villarreal, E Yurtsever and F A Gianturco Multiphonon atom-surface scattering from corrugated surfaces: derivation of the inelastic scattering spectrum for diffraction statesBranko Gumhalter Probing the non-pairwise interactions between CO molecules moving on a Cu(111) surfacePepijn R Kole, Holly

  16. PREFACE: IARD 2012: 8th Biennial Conference on Classical and Quantum Relativistic Dynamics of Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwitz, L. P.; Land, Martin C.; Gill, Tepper; Lusanna, Luca; Salucci, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    ) Luca Lusanna (National Institute for Nuclear Physics, INFN) Benoit Famaey (Observatoire Astronomique de Strasbourg, CNRS) The organizers express their gratitude to the Galileo Galilei Institute for Theoretical Physics for its support and the use of its excellent facilities, and to INFN for its generous support. Finally, we thank the participants who contributed through their lectures, personal discussions, and these papers, to the advancement of the subject and our understanding. For the Editors and Organizing Committee, L P Horwitz (Tel-Aviv University, Bar Ilan University), Editor-in-Chief Luca Lusanna (INFN), Chairman of the Local Organizing committee Tepper Gill (Howard University), IARD Treasurer Martin Land (Hadassah College), IARD President Paolo Salucci (SISSA)

  17. Preface: Introductory Remarks: Linear Scaling Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowler, D. R.; Fattebert, J.-L.; Gillan, M. J.; Haynes, P. D.; Skylaris, C.-K.

    2008-07-01

    Haynes, Chris-Kriton Skylaris, Arash Mostofi and Mike Payne A miscellaneous overview of SIESTA algorithms Jose M Soler Wavelets as a basis set for electronic structure calculations and electrostatic problems Stefan Goedecker Wavelets as a basis set for linear scaling electronic structure calculationsMark Rayson O(N) Krylov subspace method for large-scale ab initio electronic structure calculations Taisuke Ozaki Linear scaling calculations with the divide-and-conquer approach and with non-orthogonal localized orbitals Weitao Yang Toward efficient wavefunction based linear scaling energy minimization Valery Weber Accurate O(N) first-principles DFT calculations using finite differences and confined orbitals Jean-Luc Fattebert Linear-scaling methods in dynamics simulations or beyond DFT and ground state properties An O(N) time-domain algorithm for TDDFT Guan Hua Chen Local correlation theory and electronic delocalization Joseph Subotnik Ab initio molecular dynamics with linear scaling: foundations and applications Eiji Tsuchida Towards a linear scaling Car-Parrinello-like approach to Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics Thomas Kühne, Michele Ceriotti, Matthias Krack and Michele Parrinello Partial linear scaling for quantum Monte Carlo calculations on condensed matter Mike Gillan Exact embedding of local defects in crystals using maximally localized Wannier functions Eric Cancès Faster GW calculations in larger model structures using ultralocalized nonorthogonal Wannier functions Paolo Umari Other approaches for linear-scaling, including methods formetals Partition-of-unity finite element method for large, accurate electronic-structure calculations of metals John E Pask and Natarajan Sukumar Semiclassical approach to density functional theory Kieron Burke Ab initio transport calculations in defected carbon nanotubes using O(N) techniques Blanca Biel, F J Garcia-Vidal, A Rubio and F Flores Large-scale calculations with the tight-binding (screened) KKR method Rudolf Zeller

  18. The Dark Side of Nature: the Crime was Almost Perfect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-12-01

    Astrofisico di Arcetri, Italy), Guido Chincarini (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera & Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Italy), Nino Panagia (Space Telescope Science Institute, USA), Gianpiero Tagliaferri, Dino Fugazza, Sergio Campana, Stefano Covino, and Paolo D'Avanzo (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Italy), Daniele Malesani (SISSA/ISAS, Italy and Dark Cosmology Centre, Copenhagen), Vincenzo Testa, L. Angelo Antonelli, Silvia Piranomonte, and Luigi Stella (INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vanessa Mangano (INAF/IASF Palermo, Italy), Kevin Hurley (University of California, Berkeley, USA), I. Felix Mirabel (ESO), and Leonardo J. Pellizza (Instituto de Astronomia y Fisica del Espacio). The Danish-led team is composed of Johan P. U. Fynbo, Darach Watson, Christina C. Thöne, Tamara M. Davis, Jens Hjorth, José Mará Castro Cerón, Brian L. Jensen, Maximilian D. Stritzinger, and Dong Xu (Dark Cosmology Centre, University of Copenhagen, Denmark), Jesper Sollerman (Dark Cosmology Centre and Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, Sweden), Uffe G. Jørgensen, Tobias C. Hinse, and Kristian G. Woller (Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen), Joshua S. Bloom, Daniel Kocevski, Daniel Perley (Department of Astronomy, University of California at Berkeley, USA), Páll Jakobsson (Centre for Astrophysics Research, University of Hertfordshire, UK), John F. Graham and Andrew S. Fruchter (Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, USA), David Bersier (Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, UK), Lisa Kewley (University of Hawaii, Institute of Astronomy, USA), Arnaud Cassan and Marta Zub (Astronomisches Rechen-Institut, Zentrum für Astronomie der Universität Heidelberg, Germany), Suzanne Foley (School of Physics, University College Dublin, Ireland), Javier Gorosabel (Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, Granada, Spain), Keith D. Horne (SUPA Physics/Astronomy, University of St Andrews, Scotland, UK), Sylvio

  19. PREFACE: Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations Liquid-solid interfaces: structure and dynamics from spectroscopy and simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre; Sulpizi, Marialore

    2012-03-01

    Ishiyama, Hideaki Takahashi and Akihiro Morita A theoretical study of the sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy of the carbon tetrachloride/water interface Anthony J Green, Angela Perry, Preston B Moore and Brian Space Salt effects on water/hydrophobic liquid interfaces: a molecular dynamics study Chao Zhang and Paolo Carloni Density functional theory-based simulations of sum frequency generation spectra involving methyl stretching vibrations: effect of the molecular model on the deduced molecular orientation and comparison with an analytical approach F Cecchet, D Lis, Y Caudano, A A Mani, A Peremans, B Champagne and J Guthmuller Towards modelling the vibrational signatures of functionalized surfaces: carboxylic acids on H-Si(111) surfaces Conrard Giresse Tetsassi Feugmo, Benoît Champagne, Yves Caudano, Francesca Cecchet, Yves J Chabal and Vincent Liégeois

  20. Faintest Methane Brown Dwarf Discovered with the NTT and VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1999-08-01

    objects? Since only a few have been identified so far, any statistics must be quite uncertain. Until now, the best estimates have been of the order of 1 per 3,500 cubic light-years (0.01/pc 3 ). A surprising aspect of this discovery is that NTTDF J1205-0744 was found within a sky area of only 2.3 x 2.3 arcmin 2 , specially selected to be as "empty" as possible in order to facilitate studies of distant galaxies. Based on the above density estimate, the chance of finding such an object should only have been about 1%. Based on model predictions, the chance would have been even smaller than this. Searches like the one described here, based on the combination of optical and infrared data, therefore appear particularly effective at detecting such objects. It is now of high interest to test if this first discovery was just extremely lucky, or if the space density of these extreme objects is in fact much higher than expected. More information A research article about these new results ( Discovery of a faint Field Methane Brown Dwarf from ES0 NTT and VLT observations), will appear in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics . Note [1] The team consists of Jean Gabriel Cuby, Alan Moorwood, Sandro D'Odorico, Chris Lidman, Fernando Comeron, Jason Spyromilio (ESO) and Paolo Saracco (Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, Merate, Milan, Italy). [2] A more nearby, hotter brown dwarf, KELU-1 , was found at La Silla in 1997 at a distance of 33 light-years, cf. ESO Press Release 07/97. How to obtain ESO Press Information ESO Press Information is made available on the World-Wide Web (URL: http://www.eso.org../ ). ESO Press Photos may be reproduced, if credit is given to the European Southern Observatory.

  1. UVES Investigates the Environment of a Very Remote Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-03-01

    present time. More information The results described in this Press Release are presented in a research paper "The Lyman-alpha forest of a Lyman-Break Galaxy: VLT Spectra of MS 1512-cB58 at z = 2.724" by Sandra Savaglio, Nino Panagia and Paolo Padovani, appearing in the research journal "Astrophysical Journal" this month. Notes [1]: The team consists of Sandra Savaglio (Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, USA, and Rome Observatory, Italy), Nino Panagia and Paolo Padovani (both European Space Agency and Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore) [2]: The measured redshift of MS 1512-cB58 is z = 2.724. In astronomy, the redshift denotes the fraction by which the lines in the spectrum of an object are shifted towards longer wavelengths. The observed redshift of a distant cloud or galaxy gives a direct estimate of the apparent recession velocity as caused by the universal expansion. Since the expansion rate increases with distance, the velocity is itself a function (the Hubble relation) of the distance to the object. The distances indicated in the text are based on an age of the Universe of 15 billion years. At the indicated redshift, the Lyman-alpha line of atomic hydrogen (rest wavelength 121.6 nm) is observed at 452.8 nm, i.e. in the blue spectral region. The Lyman-alpha absorption lines from intergalactic clouds along the line-of-sight (and at lower redshifts) are observed at shorter wavelengths. The lower limit of the UVES spectrum of MS 1512-cB58 (415 nm) corresponds to a Lyman-alpha redshift of 2.41, i.e. a distance of about 7.5 billion light-years. [3]: The importance of the Lyman-alpha line in absorption is that it is exquisitely sensitive to the presence of neutral hydrogen which only constitutes a small fraction of the total amount of hydrogen in the intergalactic medium (about 1/10,000). Still, the observed Ly-alpha forest is extremely rich. What we see is most likely the "tip of the iceberg" only and hydrogen in the intergalactic medium at high redshift is

  2. PREFACE: XVth International Conference on Calorimetry in High Energy Physics (CALOR2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Nural

    2012-12-01

    /Saclay Irfu/SPP FRANCAVILLA, Paolo IFAE Barcelona GATAULLIN, Marat California Institute of Technology GATTO, Corrado INFN-Napoli GAUDIO, Gabriella INFN-Pavia GERMANI, Stefano INFN-Perugia Goldenzweig, Pablo University of Rochester GRAF, Norman SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory GROOM, Don Lawrence Berkeley Lab GUARDINCERRI, Elena Los Alamos National Laboratory HAUPTMAN, John Iowa State University HENRIQUES, Ana CERN HUANG, Jin Los Alamos National Laboratory HU, Tao IHEP-Beijing, CAS JIANG, Xiaodong Los Alamos National Laboratory JUI, Charles University of Utah KAPUSTINSKY, Jon Los Alamos National Laboratory KIBILKO, Mark SE Technical Sales, Inc. KIRSCHENMANN, Henning University of Hamburg KISTENEV, Edouard Brookhaven National Laboratory KLIMEK, Pawel Stockholm Universitet KROEGER, Robert University of Mississippi LECOQ, Paul CERN LEE, Sehwook Texas Tech University LEE, Sung-Won Texas Tech University LIVAN, Michele Pavia University LUTZ, Benjamin DESY MAGILL, Stephen Argonne National Laboratory MATHIS, Mark College of William and Mary MATTHEWS, John University of Utah MENKE, Sven Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik MOULSON, Matthew INFN-Frascati NAGEL, Martin Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik NAKAMURA, Isamu KEK NEMECEK, Stanislav FZU AVCR Praha NESSI-TEDALDI, Francesca ETH Zurich NOVOTNY, Rainer 2nd Physics Institute, University Giessen OREGLIA, Mark University of Chicago PERLOFF, Alexx Texas A&M University PETYT, David Rutherford Appleton Laboratory RAHMAT, Rahmat University of Mississippi RAMILLI, Marco Hamburg Universitaet ROSIER LEES, Sylvie LAPP- IN2P3-CNRS RUTHERFOORD, John University of Arizona SAKUMA, Tai Texas A&M University SANTIAGO CERQUEIRA, Augusto Federal University of Juiz de Fora SARRA, Ivano INFN-Frascati SEIDEL, Sally University of New Mexico SEIFERT, Frank TU Dresden, Germany SHAMIM, Mansoora University of Oregon SIMON, Frank Max-Planck-Institute for Physics STAFFAN, Paul Wiener Plein and Baus, Corp Dr. STAROVOITOV, Pavel DESY TABARELLI DE FATIS, Tommaso

  3. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2008-11-01

    Davide CassaniLaboratoire de Physique Théorique, École Normale Supérieure, Paris Alejandra CastroUniversity of Michigan Claudio Caviezel Max-Planck-Institut für Physik, München Alessio Celi Universitat de Barcelona Anna Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Università di Torino Athanasios ChatzistavrakidisNational Technical University of Athens Wissam ChemissanyCentre for Theoretical Physics, University of Groningen Eugen-Mihaita CioroianuUniversity of Craiova Andres CollinucciTechnische Universität Wien Paul CookUniversità di Roma, Tor Vergata Lorenzo CornalbaUniversità di Milano-Bicocca Aldo CotroneKatholieke Universiteit Leuven Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Riccardo D'AuriaPolitecnico di Torino Gianguido Dall'AgataUniversity of Padova Jose A de AzcarragaUniversidad de Valencia Jan de BoerInstituut voor Theoretische Fysica, Universiteit van Amsterdam Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Marius de LeeuwUtrecht University Frederik De RooVrije Universiteit, Brussel Jan De Rydt Katholieke Universiteit Leuven and CERN, Geneva Bernard de WitInstitute for Theoretical Physics, Utrecht University Stephane DetournayIstituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia Niels Bohr Institute, København Eugen DiaconuUniversity of Craiova Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Nick DoreyUniversity of Cambridge Hajar Ebrahim NajafabadiIPM, Tehran Federico Elmetti Università di Milano Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Francesco Fiamberti Università di Milano Davide Forcella SISSA, Trieste and CERN, Geneva Valentina Forini Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Marialuisa Frau Università di Torino Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule (ETH), Zürich Diego Gallego SISSA/ISAS, Trieste Maria Pilar Garcia del

  4. List of Participants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-11-01

    Ceresole Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare and Università di Torino Kang Sin Choi University of Bonn Michele Cirafici University of Patras Andres Collinucci Katholieke Universiteit Leuven Aldo Cotrone Universitat de Barcelona Ben Craps Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Stefano Cremonesi SISSA, Trieste Gianguido Dall'Agata Padova University Sanjit Das Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur Forcella Davide SISSA, Trieste Jose A de Azcarraga Valencia University and Instituto de Fìsica Corpuscular (CSIC-UVEG), Valencia Sophie de BuylInstitut des Hautes Études Scientifiques, Bures-sur-Yvette Jean-Pierre Derendinger Université de Neuchâtel Stephane Detournay Università Degli Studi di Milano Paolo Di Vecchia NORDITA, København Oscar Dias Universitat de Barcelona Vladimir Dobrev Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia Joel Ekstrand Department of Theoretical Physics, Uppsala University Federico Elmetti Università di Milano I Diaconu Eugen University of Craiova Oleg Evnin Vrije Universiteit, Brussel Bo Feng Imperial College, London Livia Ferro Università di Torino Pau Figueras Universitat de Barcelona Raphael Flauger University of Texas at Austin Valentina Forini Università di Perugia Angelos Fotopoulos Università di Torino Denis Frank Université de Neuchâtel Lisa Freyhult Albert-Einstein-Institut, Golm Carlos Fuertes Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Matthias Gaberdiel Eidgenössische Technische Hochschule, Zürich Maria Pilar Garcia del Moral Università di Torino Daniel Gerber Instituto de Física Teórica, Madrid Valentina Giangreco Marotta Puletti Uppsala University Joaquim Gomis Universitat de Barcelona Gianluca Grignani Università di Perugia Luca Griguolo Università di Parma Umut Gursoy École Polytechnique, Palaiseau and École Normale Supérieure, Paris Michael Haack Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, München Troels Harmark Niels Bohr Institute, København Alexander Haupt Imperial College, London Michal

  5. Ashes from the Elder Brethren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-03-01

    based is now in press in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. It is also available on the web as astro-ph/0012457. Notes [1]: 1 billion = 1,000 million. [2]: The team members in the ESO Large Program 165-L0263 devoted to the analysis of globular cluster dwarf stars, described in this Press Release, are: Raffaele Gratton (PI), Eugenio Carretta , Riccardo Claudi , Silvano Desidera , Sara Lucatello (Osservatorio Astronomico di Padova, Italy), Gisella Clementini , Angela Bragaglia (Osservatorio Astronomico di Bologna, Italy), Paolo Molaro , Piercarlo Bonifacio , Miriam Centurion (Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, Italy), Francesca D' Antona (Osservatorio Astronomico di Roma, Italy), Vittorio Castellani (Universita' di Pisa, Italy), Alessandro Chieffi (CNR-IAS, Italy), Oscar Straniero (Osservatorio di Teramo, Italy), Luca Pasquini , Patrick Francois (ESO), Francois Spite , Monique Spite (Observatoire de Meudon, France), Chris Sneden (University of Texas at Austin, USA), Frank Grundahl (University of Aarhus, Denmark). [3]: While it is apparent that some mass is transferred from the Planetary Nebulae to the stars, the details of this process are not clear. It may have happened before the stars here observed were formed, or later. In the latter case, the accretion may have occurred only during a particular evolutionary phase, some 100 million years after the cluster formed, i.e. about 11 to 15 billion years ago, and in very dense environments. Moreover, the accretion rate will depend on the relative velocities: only stars that move slowly with respect to the interstellar medium has a good chance of accreting matter. This may also be (part of) an explanation of the observed, large differences from star to star. [4]: A photo of a large planetary nebula is available as PR Photo 38a/98 and information about VLT observations of white dwarf stars in globular clusters are described in PR 20/99. Technical information about the photo PR Photo 06a/01 The image has been

  6. Biodiversity and global health—hubris, humility and the unknown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Carolyn

    2012-03-01

    Amazonia/Yungas are better protected, in terms of biodiversity and environmental damage, than other conservation units such as national or regional reserves [23, 24]. Yet deforestation, resource extraction and climate change threaten all parts of the Amazonia/Yungas [19, 25-28], and indigenous communities, amongst the most marginalized peoples in Latin America [29], are experiencing increasing threats to their territories, and their health and well-being [20]. Figures 1-3 show different aspects of the Andean Yungas and high mountain ecosystems of Argentina. The ecosystems are highly biodiverse. We are only beginning to understand the extent of their importance for human well-being, and these incredible forests are at risk from deforestation, mining and climate change. Figure 1 Figure 1. Rio Cochuna in Tucumán, Argentina, part of the vital and extensive river system of the Andean Yungas, home to amazing and underexplored biodiversity. By Carolyn Stephens. Figure 2 Figure 2. Argiope argentata—widespread and striking, this spider can eat twice her weight in insects and her venom is thought to have medicinal properties. By Carolyn Stephens. Figure 3 Figure 3. Humming birds may not seem to have a direct ecosystem service, but they, along with many insect species, are important pollinators of plants and trees which themselves may be directly important for human health. By Alfredo Gutierrez. It is notable that, recognizing their vital role in ecosystem understanding protection, indigenous peoples and local communities now play an important part in global policy processes, including the United Nations Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) [30]. In 2011, the IUCN met with indigenous representatives and conservation organizations to discuss conservation priorities in the context of indigenous rights. IUCN agreed to review the implementation of resolutions related to indigenous peoples taken at the 4th World

  7. How Old is the Universe?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2001-02-01

    , for the immediate future, the accuracy of this age determination does not really depend on the VLT spectrum. For the time being, the real problems are the present uncertainties in the available laboratory data for uranium by means of which the measured line strengths are converted into element abundances. In addition, the nuclear-physics calculations of the initial isotope production ratios introduce errors that are larger than those of the spectral observation. Thus, improved measurements of those physical data are necessary in order to read more accurately the cosmic clock in CS 31082-001 from the existing observational data. The relevant laboratory measurements are now underway at the CEA, Saclay, France, and the University of Lund, Sweden. In the meantime, the team is trying to find other stars like CS 31082-001 . There may not be many, but if the uranium line can be seen and measured in more spectra, it will also become possible to judge whether those very old stars, as surmised, are all of about the same age, i.e. that of our Milky Way galaxy. More information The research described in this Press Release is reported in a research article ("Measurement of stellar age from uranium decay"), that appears in the international research journal Nature on Thursday, February 8, 2001. Notes [1]: 1 billion = 1,000 million. [2]: The team members are: Roger Cayrel (P.I.), Francois Spite and Monique Spite (all Observatoire de Paris, France), Vanessa Hill and Francesca Primas (ESO), Johannes Andersen and Birgitta Nordström (Copenhagen and Lund Observatories, Denmark and Sweden), Timothy C. Beers (Michigan State Univ., USA), Piercarlo Bonifacio and Paolo Molaro (Trieste, Italy), Bertrand Plez (Montpellier, France), and Beatriz Barbuy (Univ. of Sao Paulo, Brazil). [3]: Isotopes of a natural element contain different numbers of neutrons in the nuclei, in addition to a certain number of protons that characterize that particular element. Some isotopes are "radioactive", i.e. with

  8. Macromolecular crowding: chemistry and physics meet biology (Ascona, Switzerland, 10-14 June 2012)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foffi, G.; Pastore, A.; Piazza, F.; Temussi, P. A.

    2013-08-01

    exhaustive chronological account of the major milestones. It is clear that the concept of excluded volume as a key factor remains central to the concept of molecular crowding. As a consequence, simple descriptive paradigms borrowed essentially from colloid physics may still provide useful tools to understand the subtle effects of crowding and confinement in living matter. The contiguity between crowding, colloids and soft matter further emerged as an important concept in the course of the conference in several theoretical lectures and a few experimental ones. Dave Thirumalai, from the University of Maryland (USA), one of the most active theoreticians in the field of theoretical biophysics, outlined scaling theories, concepts from colloid literature and different simulation techniques to describe scenarios for crowding-induced changes in the structure and dynamics of proteins and RNA. In particular, he showed the importance of the shape of crowding particles in affecting folding oligomerization of amyloidogenic peptides. Johannes Schöneberg, from IMPRS, Mathematics Institute (Germany), illustrated ReaDDy , a newly developed particle-based simulation software tool for reaction-diffusion dynamics, developed in the group of Frank Noe at EMPRS. He showed that ReaDDy makes it possible to bridge the gap between soft matter and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on the one hand and particle-based stochastic reaction-diffusion simulations on the other. We asked Johannes to organize a tutorial session to lead interested participants into the package and 'get their hands wet' under the guidance of the developers. The tutorial session was indeed successful and the broad possibilities offered by the simulation toolkit appeared to be clear to the participants. Paolo De Los Rios, from the Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL, Switzerland), examined the complexity of the effects caused by crowding conditions from the point of view of statistical physics. Starting from a