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Sample records for aligned double-walled carbon

  1. Double-walled carbon nanotube processing.

    PubMed

    Moore, Katherine E; Tune, Daniel D; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-05-27

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been the focus of intense research, and the body of literature continues to grow exponentially, despite more than two decades having passed since the first reports. As well as extensive studies of the fundamental properties, this has seen SWCNTs used in a plethora of applications as far ranging as microelectronics, energy storage, solar cells, and sensors, to cancer treatment, drug delivery, and neuronal interfaces. On the other hand, the properties and applications of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) have remained relatively under-explored. This is despite DWCNTs not only sharing many of the same unique characteristics of their single-walled counterparts, but also possessing an additional suite of potentially advantageous properties arising due to the presence of the second wall and the often complex inter-wall interactions that arise. For example, it is envisaged that the outer wall can be selectively functionalized whilst still leaving the inner wall in its pristine state and available for signal transduction. A similar situation arises in DWCNT field effect transistors (FETs), where the outer wall can provide a convenient degree of chemical shielding of the inner wall from the external environment, allowing the excellent transconductance properties of the pristine nanotubes to be more fully exploited. Additionally, DWCNTs should also offer unique opportunities to further the fundamental understanding of the inter-wall interactions within and between carbon nanotubes. However, the realization of these goals has so far been limited by the same challenge experienced by the SWCNT field until recent years, namely, the inherent heterogeneity of raw, as-produced DWCNT material. As such, there is now an emerging field of research regarding DWCNT processing that focuses on the preparation of material of defined length, diameter and electronic type, and which is rapidly building upon the experience gained by the broader

  2. Double-walled carbon nanocones: stability and electronic structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brito, Elias; Freitas, Aliliane; Silva, Thiago; Guerra, Thiago; Azevedo, Sergio

    2015-06-01

    We have applied first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to investigate the stability and electronic properties of double-walled carbon nanocones, 60°60°, 120°120° and 60°120° with different rotation angles between the walls. We have shown that the most favorable double-walled nanocone studied here is that of angles of 60°60°, with rotation angle of 36° and distance between apexes of 4.22 Å. We have found that, the interaction between the walls of rotated double-walled nanocones introduce geometric distortion in gap states, such as in Fermi level. These results should have consequences on the field emission properties of double-walled carbon nanocones. Additionally, we also investigated the spin polarization of such structures, and we have found unpaired electrons, which induces a total spin from 1 and 1/2 for 60°60° and 60°120° double cones, respectively.

  3. Double-walled carbon nanotubes: Challenges and opportunities

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, C; Brozena, Alexandra H.; Wang, YuHuang

    2011-01-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes are coaxial nanostructures composed of exactly two single-walled carbon nanotubes, one nested in another. This unique structure offers advantages and opportunities for extending our knowledge and application of the carbon nanomaterials family. This review seeks to comprehensively discuss the synthesis, purification and characterization methods of this novel class of carbon nanomaterials. An emphasis is placed on the double wall physics that contributes to these structures’ complex inter-wall coupling of electronic and optical properties. The debate over the inner-tube photoluminescence provides an interesting illustration of the rich photophysics and challenges associated with the myriad combinations of the inner and outerwall chiralities. Outerwall selective covalent chemistry will be discussed as a potential solution to the unattractive tradeoff between solubility and functionality that has limited some applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes. Finally, we will review the many different uses of double-walled carbon nanotubes and provide an overview of several promising research directions in this new and emerging field.

  4. Telescopic hot double wall carbon nanotube for nanolithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popescu, Adrian; Woods, Lilia

    2010-03-01

    Two main challenges in improving the use of an atomic force microscope tip for nanolithography have been identified for all types of methods for surface modification. One challenge is achieving high spatial resolutions, which is directly related to the sharpness of the tip; the other one is the accurate control of the tip-surface distance, which affects the quality of the surface modification. A telescopic hot double wall carbon nanotube for nanolithography that improves the spatial resolution and successfully solves the problem of maintaining a constant tip-surface distance is proposed. The system consists of a finite length outer tube attached to an atomic force microscope cantilever, while the inner tube with length larger than the outer one is free. By studying the heat transfer in the double wall carbon nanotube/surface, it is found that the size of the thermal spot on the surface is mainly determined by the inner tube diameter indicating that high spatial resolution can be achieved if small diameter nanotubes are used. The interaction forces in the system are of van der Waals type and we show that the inner tube is located always at the same energetically favorable distance from the surface. Since the inner tube can move telescopically along the double wall carbon nanotube axis, the tip/surface distance is maintained constant due to the van der Waals interaction, which in turn eliminates the need of an active feedback loop.

  5. Do inner shells of double-walled carbon nanotubes fluoresce?

    PubMed

    Tsyboulski, Dmitri A; Hou, Ye; Fakhri, Nikta; Ghosh, Saunab; Zhang, Ru; Bachilo, Sergei M; Pasquali, Matteo; Chen, Liwei; Liu, Jie; Weisman, R Bruce

    2009-09-01

    The reported fluorescence from inner shells of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) is an intriguing and potentially useful property. A combination of bulk and single-molecule methods was used to study the spectroscopy, chemical quenching, mechanical rigidity, abundance, density, and TEM images of the near-IR emitters in DWCNT samples. DWCNT inner shell fluorescence is found to be weaker than SWCNT fluorescence by a factor of at least 10,000. Observable near-IR emission from DWCNT samples is attributed to SWCNT impurities. PMID:19653638

  6. Pull out instability in double walled carbon nanocones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Arindam; Gupta, Shakti S.; Verma, Deepti

    Here, we present a molecular mechanics (MM) based study to show sharp changes in the variation of potential energy and wall morphology in double walled carbon nanocones (DWCNCs), when the constituent cones are pulled away from each other. In the MM simulations, bonded and non-bonded interactions among carbon atoms are prescribed using MM3 potential. The process of pulling out is simulated by constraining the base atoms of an inner cone and incrementally moving the tip atoms of the outer cone in the coaxial direction. In the relaxed state DWCNCs, the wall to wall normal distance between the cones is found to be 3.4Å, consistent with that obtained in two-layered graphene sheets. For each incremental step of separation, the minimum energy configuration of the entire system is obtained and the associated potential energy recorded. The instability leads to loss of concentricity of the cross-sections of cones in the sense that the wall of the outer cone deforms, making a single-sided cam-lobe type structure. DWCNCs of two different apex angles show the pull-out instability at almost the same separation distance.

  7. Design of double-walled carbon nanotubes for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, V.; Heister, E.; Costa, S.; Tîlmaciu, C.; Flahaut, E.; Soula, B.; Coley, H. M.; McFadden, J.; Silva, S. R. P.

    2012-09-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) prepared by catalytic chemical vapour deposition were functionalized in such a way that they were optimally designed as a nano-vector for the delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA), which is of great interest for biomedical research and drug development. DWNTs were initially oxidized and coated with a polypeptide (Poly(Lys:Phe)), which was then conjugated to thiol-modified siRNA using a heterobifunctional cross-linker. The obtained oxDWNT-siRNA was characterized by Raman spectroscopy inside and outside a biological environment (mammalian cells). Uptake of the custom-designed nanotubes was not associated with detectable biochemical perturbations in cultured cells, but transfection of cells with DWNTs loaded with siRNA targeting the green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene, serving as a model system, as well as with therapeutic siRNA targeting the survivin gene, led to a significant gene silencing effect, and in the latter case a resulting apoptotic effect in cancer cells.

  8. Extraordinary improvement of the graphitic structure of continuous carbon nanofibers templated with double wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Papkov, Dimitry; Beese, Allison M; Goponenko, Alexander; Zou, Yan; Naraghi, Mohammad; Espinosa, Horacio D; Saha, Biswajit; Schatz, George C; Moravsky, Alexander; Loutfy, Raouf; Nguyen, Sonbinh T; Dzenis, Yuris

    2013-01-22

    Carbon nanotubes are being widely studied as a reinforcing element in high-performance composites and fibers at high volume fractions. However, problems with nanotube processing, alignment, and non-optimal stress transfer between the nanotubes and surrounding matrix have so far prevented full utilization of their superb mechanical properties in composites. Here, we present an alternative use of carbon nanotubes, at a very small concentration, as a templating agent for the formation of graphitic structure in fibers. Continuous carbon nanofibers (CNF) were manufactured by electrospinning from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) with 1.2% of double wall nanotubes (DWNT). Nanofibers were oxidized and carbonized at temperatures from 600 °C to 1850 °C. Structural analyses revealed significant improvements in graphitic structure and crystal orientation in the templated CNFs, with the largest improvements observed at lower carbonization temperatures. In situ pull-out experiments showed good interfacial bonding between the DWNT bundles and the surrounding templated carbon matrix. Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of templated carbonization confirmed oriented graphitic growth and provided insight into mechanisms of carbonization initiation. The obtained results indicate that global templating of the graphitic structure in fine CNFs can be achieved at very small concentrations of well-dispersed DWNTs. The outcomes reveal a simple and inexpensive route to manufacture continuous CNFs with improved structure and properties for a variety of mechanical and functional applications. The demonstrated improvement of graphitic order at low carbonization temperatures in the absence of stretch shows potential as a promising new manufacturing technology for next generation carbon fibers. PMID:23249440

  9. Energetic comparison of double-walled carbon nanotube systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lair, Shalayna Lee

    Controlled fabrication of specific size and type nanotubes would lay the foundation for production of many novel carbon nanotube (CNT) devices. It is well known that changes in the structure of CNTs result in dramatic variations in their material properties and because many devices take advantage of this structure-property paradigm, successful fabrication of these devices depends directly on the ability to control the structure of CNTs. While many researchers have concentrated on varying production parameters, manufacturing methods or focusing on purification methods to control structure, it may be more productive to understand the basic energetics of nucleation and growth of CNTs. The objective of this research is to systematically study and classify electronic energy trends in double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) through ab initio simulations. Understanding if there is a preferred structural motif for DWCNTs and also clarifying which nucleation and growth paths are favored by nanotubes will elucidate if controlled fabrication can be achieved. Previous work by the author has shown how the energetics of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) behave as the length and circumference of the tube changes. The SWCNT work will be used in combination with computational simulations of DWCNTs to obtain a detailed description of the electronic energies for these nanotubes. A variety of configurations will be examined in order to help understand the growth behavior of DWCNTs, and different combinations of type, length and circumference will be studied to establish criteria for high stability systems. In order to confirm the validity of the results a variety of different models and quantum mechanical basis sets will be used to evaluate the energies and comparisons of accuracy and computational time will be made. Finally, this project not only encompasses understanding the electronic energies of DWCNTs but the theoretical methodology developed in this research will be used

  10. Double-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized using carbon black as the dot carbon source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Gang; Li, Feng; Ren, Wen-Cai; Cong, Hongtao; Liu, Chang; Qing Lu, Gao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2006-07-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were synthesized used carbon black as the dot carbon source by a semi-continuous hydrogen arc discharge process. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations revealed that most of the tubes were DWNTs with outer and inner diameters in the range of 2.67-4 nm and 1.96-3.21 nm, respectively. Most of the DWNTs were in a bundle form of about 10-30 nm in diameter with high purity (about 70%) from thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), resonant laser Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and TEM characterizations. It was found that carbon black as the dot carbon source could be easy controlled to synthesize one type of nanotube. A simple process combining oxidation and acid treatment to purify the DWNT bundles was used without damaging the bundles. The structure of carbon black, as the key element for influencing purity, bundle formation and purification of DWNTs, is discussed.

  11. Sharp burnout failure observed in high current-carrying double-walled carbon nanotube fibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Li; Toth, Geza; Wei, Jinquan; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Wei; Ci, Lijie; Vajtai, Robert; Endo, Morinobu; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2012-01-13

    We report on the current-carrying capability and the high-current-induced thermal burnout failure modes of 5-20 μm diameter double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers made by an improved dry-spinning method. It is found that the electrical conductivity and maximum current-carrying capability for these DWNT fibers can reach up to 5.9 × 10(5) S m(-1) and over 1 × 10(5) A cm(-2) in air. In comparison, we observed that standard carbon fiber tended to be oxidized and burnt out into cheese-like morphology when the maximum current was reached, while DWNT fiber showed a much slower breakdown behavior due to the gradual burnout in individual nanotubes. The electron microscopy observations further confirmed that the failure process of DWNT fibers occurs at localized positions, and while the individual nanotubes burn they also get aligned due to local high temperature and electrostatic field. In addition a finite element model was constructed to gain better understanding of the failure behavior of DWNT fibers. PMID:22156276

  12. Sharp burnout failure observed in high current-carrying double-walled carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Li; Toth, Geza; Wei, Jinquan; Liu, Zheng; Gao, Wei; Ci, Lijie; Vajtai, Robert; Endo, Morinobu; Ajayan, Pulickel M.

    2012-01-01

    We report on the current-carrying capability and the high-current-induced thermal burnout failure modes of 5-20 µm diameter double-walled carbon nanotube (DWNT) fibers made by an improved dry-spinning method. It is found that the electrical conductivity and maximum current-carrying capability for these DWNT fibers can reach up to 5.9 × 105 S m - 1 and over 1 × 105 A cm - 2 in air. In comparison, we observed that standard carbon fiber tended to be oxidized and burnt out into cheese-like morphology when the maximum current was reached, while DWNT fiber showed a much slower breakdown behavior due to the gradual burnout in individual nanotubes. The electron microscopy observations further confirmed that the failure process of DWNT fibers occurs at localized positions, and while the individual nanotubes burn they also get aligned due to local high temperature and electrostatic field. In addition a finite element model was constructed to gain better understanding of the failure behavior of DWNT fibers.

  13. Double-walled carbon nanotube array for CO2 and SO2 adsorption.

    PubMed

    Rahimi, Mahshid; Babu, Deepu J; Singh, Jayant K; Yang, Yong-Biao; Schneider, Jörg J; Müller-Plathe, Florian

    2015-09-28

    Grand-canonical Monte Carlo simulations and adsorption experiments are combined to find the optimized carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays for gas adsorption at low pressures and 303 K. Bundles of 3D aligned double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) with inner diameter of 8 nm and different intertube distances were made experimentally. The experimental results show that decreasing intertube distance leads to a significant enhancement in carbon-dioxide (CO2) adsorption capacity at 1 bar. The molecular simulation study on CO2 adsorption onto bundles of 3D aligned DWCNT with inner diameters of 1, 3, and 8 nm and intertube distance of 0-15 nm shows that the intertube distance plays a more important role than the CNT diameter. The simulation results show that decreasing the intertube distance up to 1 nm increases the excess adsorption generally in all the studied systems at pressures 0 < p < 14 bars (the increase can be up to ∼40% depending on the system and pressure). This is in agreement with the experimental result. Further reduction in intertube distance leads to a decrease in the excess adsorption in the pressure range 9 < p < 14 bars. However, at lower pressure, 0 < p < 9 bars, intertube distance of 0.5 nm is found to have the highest excess adsorption. This result is indifferent to tube diameter. Furthermore, molecular simulations are conducted to obtain the optimal parameters, for the DWCNT bundle, for SO2 adsorption, which are similar to those observed for CO2 in the pressure range 0 < p < 3 bars. PMID:26429026

  14. Outerwall-selectively oxidized, water soluble double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brozena, Alexandra H.; Moskovits, Martin; Shao, Beiyue; Deng, Shunliu; Liao, Hongwei; Gaskell, Karen L.; Wang, YuHuang

    2010-02-23

    The outer walls of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) were selectively oxidized using a combination of oleum and nitric acid. Intercalation of oleum between bundled DWNTs enabled a homogeneous reaction by equally exposing all outer wall surfaces to the oxidants. At optimized reaction conditions, this double-wall chemistry enabled high water solubility through carboxylic acid functional groups introduced to the outer wall, while leaving the inner tube intact, as shown by Raman scattering and high resolution TEM. These outer wall selectively oxidized DWNTs retained electrical conductivity up to 65% better than thin films of similarly functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes, which can be attributed to enhanced electrical percolation via the nonoxidized inner tubes.

  15. Interwall Friction and Sliding Behavior of Centimeters Long Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rufan; Ning, Zhiyuan; Xu, Ziwei; Zhang, Yingying; Xie, Huanhuan; Ding, Feng; Chen, Qing; Zhang, Qiang; Qian, Weizhong; Cui, Yi; Wei, Fei

    2016-02-10

    Here, we studied the interwall friction and sliding behaviors of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs). The interwall friction shows a linear dependence on the pullout velocity of the inner wall. The axial curvature in DWCNTs causes the significant increase of the interwall friction. The axial curvature also affects the sliding behavior of the inner wall. Compared with the axial curvature, the opening ends of DWCNTs play tiny roles in their interwall friction. PMID:26784439

  16. Crystal orbital study on the double walls made of nanotubes encapsulated inside zigzag carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Xin; Qiao, Weiye; Li, Yuliang; Huang, Yuanhe

    2015-01-15

    The structure stabilities and electronic properties are investigated by using ab initio self-consistent-field crystal orbital method based on density functional theory for the one-dimensional (1D) double-wall nanotubes made of n-gon SiO{sub 2} nanotubes encapsulated inside zigzag carbon nanotubes. It is found that formation of the combined systems is energetically favorable when the distance between the two constituents is around the Van der Waals scope. The obtained band structures show that all the combined systems are semiconductors with nonzero energy gaps. The frontier energy bands (the highest occupied band and the lowest unoccupied band) of double-wall nanotubes are mainly derived from the corresponding carbon nanotubes. The mobilities of charge carriers are calculated to be within the range of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for the hybrid double-wall nanotubes. Young’s moduli are also calculated for the combined systems. For the comparison, geometrical and electronic properties of n-gon SiO{sub 2} nanotubes are also calculated and discussed. - Graphical abstract: Structures and band structures of the optimum 1D Double walls nanotubes. The optimized structures are 3-gon SiO2@(15,0), 5-gon SiO2@(17,0), 6-gon SiO2@(18,0) and 7-gon SiO2@(19,0). - Highlights: • The structure and electronic properties of the 1D n-gon SiO{sub 2}@(m,0)s are studied using SCF-CO method. • The encapsulation of 1D n-gon SiO{sub 2} tubes inside zigzag carbon nanotubes can be energetically favorable. • The 1D n-gon SiO{sub 2}@(m,0)s are all semiconductors. • The mobility of charge carriers and Young’s moduli are calculated.

  17. Band structure and optical transitions in semiconducting double-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makaev, D. V.; D'Yachkov, P. N.

    2006-11-01

    The electronic structure of semiconducting double-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is calculated using the linearized augmented cylindrical wave method. The consideration is performed in the framework of the local density functional theory and the muffin-tin (MT) approximation for the one-electron Hamiltonian. The electronic spectrum of a double-wall CNT is determined by the free motion of electrons in the interatomic space of the two cylindrical layers, scattering by the MT spheres, and tunneling through the classically impenetrable region. Calculated results for double-wall CNTs of the ( n, 0)@( n', 0) zigzag type indicate that the shift of the band-gap width depends on whether n and n' are divided by 3 with a remainder of 1 or 2. It is found that, regardless of the type of the inner tube, the energy gap E g of the outer tube decreases by 0.15-0.22 eV if the tube belongs to the sequence n = 2 (mod 3). For the outer tubes of the sequence n = 1 (mod 3), the shifts of the band gap Δ E g are always negative -0.15 ≤ Δ E g ≤ -0.05 eV. In both cases, the shifts Δ E g weakly oscillate rather than decrease in going to tubes of a larger diameter d. For the inner tubes, the changes in the band gap Δ E g are more sensitive to the diameter. At 10 ≤ n ≤ 16, the shifts Δ E g are positive and the maximum value of Δ E g equals 0.39 and 0.32 for the sequences n = 2 (mod 3) and n = 1 (mod 3), respectively. In going to the inner tubes of a larger diameter, Δ E g rapidly drops and then oscillates in the range from -0.05 to 0.06 eV. The calculated results indicate that the shifts of the optical band gaps in core and shell tubes upon the formation of double-wall CNTs are significant, which must hinder the identification of double-wall CNTs by optical methods. On the other hand, the obtained results open up possibilities for a more detailed classification of double-wall nanotubes.

  18. Scale effect on wave propagation of double-walled carbon nanotubes with initial axial loading.

    PubMed

    Heireche, H; Tounsi, A; Benzair, A

    2008-05-01

    This paper studies the vibrational characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) with initial stress using a nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model. Both the effect of initial stress and the effect of small length scale are discussed in detail. The effect of van der Waals forces is incorporated in the formulation. The corresponding resonant vibrational characteristics are presented in detail; they are shown to be very different from those predicted by classical elasticity theory when nonlocal effects are significant. The influence of initial stress in carbon nanotubes on their flexural vibration modes is dependent on the tension or compression form of the initial stress. The investigation of the effects of initial stress on transverse wave propagation in carbon nanotubes may be used as a useful reference for the application and the design of nanoelectronic and nanodrive devices, nano-oscillators, and nanosensors, in which carbon nanotubes act as basic elements. PMID:21825699

  19. Thermodynamic Complexing of Monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) Intercalates with Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mykhailenko, O. V.; Prylutskyy, Yu I.; Komarov, I. V.; Strungar, A. V.

    2016-03-01

    By employing the methods of molecular mechanics, semi-empirical quantum-chemical PM3 and Monte-Carlo, the positioning of monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) molecules in double-walled (5,5)@(10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNT) depending on their concentration and temperature has been studied. The molecules have been found out to form stable bonds with CNT walls, with a tendency between intercalate stability and the CNT structure. The temperature growth (over ~500 K) causes gradual bond ruining followed by extrusion of interwall intercalate. Further temperature increase up to 600-700 K is characterised with intercalate external surface desorption, stabilising the whole system and keeping the interwall intercalate only. The CNT's UV-spectrum (5,5)@(10,10) depending on the intercalate concentration and association constant of the "double-walled CNT-intercalate" system have been calculated. A combination of unique optical, electrical and magnetic behaviour of cyclopentadienyl complexes with their ability to form high-stable intercalate with CNT opens a prospect of their applying in nanotechnology.

  20. Thermodynamic Complexing of Monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) Intercalates with Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Мykhailenko, О V; Prylutskyy, Yu I; Кomarov, І V; Strungar, А V

    2016-12-01

    By employing the methods of molecular mechanics, semi-empirical quantum-chemical РМ3 and Monte-Carlo, the positioning of monocyclopentadienylferrum (II) molecules in double-walled (5,5)@(10,10) carbon nanotubes (CNT) depending on their concentration and temperature has been studied. The molecules have been found out to form stable bonds with CNT walls, with a tendency between intercalate stability and the CNT structure. The temperature growth (over ~500 K) causes gradual bond ruining followed by extrusion of interwall intercalate. Further temperature increase up to 600-700 K is characterised with intercalate external surface desorption, stabilising the whole system and keeping the interwall intercalate only. The CNT's UV-spectrum (5,5)@(10,10) depending on the intercalate concentration and association constant of the "double-walled CNT-intercalate" system have been calculated. A combination of unique optical, electrical and magnetic behaviour of cyclopentadienyl complexes with their ability to form high-stable intercalate with CNT opens a prospect of their applying in nanotechnology. PMID:26951128

  1. Chirality-dependent transport in double-walled carbon nanotube assemblies: the role of inner tubes.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Kazunori; Komiyama, Keita; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Shimamoto, Daisuke; Tojo, Tomohiro; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Hayashi, Takuya; Endo, Morinobu; Oshida, Kyoichi; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-09-27

    A fundamental understanding of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes is vital when fabricating high-performance polymeric composites as well as transparent conductive films. Herein, the chirality-dependent transport mechanisms in peapod- and chemical vapor deposition-grown double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) films are discussed by identifying the chiralities of the inner and the outer tubes using fast Fourier transform image processing, as well as optical studies (e.g., Raman, UV, and photoluminescence spectroscopies). The observed conduction mechanisms are strongly dependent on the total fraction of the metallic inner and outer tubes within the DWNT samples. Furthermore, the contribution of the inner tubes to the electronic transport properties of DWNT films is confirmed by photochemically deactivating the outer tubes in both types of DWNT samples. PMID:21838288

  2. Low temperature magnetic phase transition and interlayer coupling in double-wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Diamantopoulou, A.; Glenis, S.; Likodimos, V.; Guskos, N.

    2014-08-28

    The magnetic properties of double wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were investigated using electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. An asymmetric resonance line of low intensity was identified and analyzed by the superimposition of a narrow and a broad metallic lineshape, attributed to the distinct contributions of defect spins located on the inner and outer DWCNTs shells. The spin susceptibilities of both ESR components revealed a ferromagnetic phase transition at low temperatures (T < 10 K) with small variation in the corresponding Curie-Weiss temperatures, approaching closely that of metallic single wall carbon nanotubes. Interlayer coupling between the DWCNT layers is suggested to effectively reduce the difference between the transition temperatures for the inner and outer shells and enhance spin-spin interactions between defect spins via the RKKY-type interaction of localized spins with conduction electrons.

  3. Specific features of low-frequency vibrational dynamics and low-temperature heat capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, M. V.; Roshal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A continuous model has been constructed for low-frequency dynamics of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The formation of the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum of a double-walled nanotube from phonon spectra of its constituent single-walled nanotubes has been considered in the framework of the proposed approach. The influence of the environment on the phonon spectrum of a single double-walled carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A combined method has been proposed for estimating the coefficients of the van der Waals interaction between the walls of the nanotube from the spectroscopic data and the known values of the elastic moduli of graphite. The low-temperature specific heat has been calculated for doublewalled carbon nanotubes, which in the field of applicability of the model ( T < 35 K) is substantially less than the sum of specific heats of two individual single-walled nanotubes forming it.

  4. SYNTHESIS AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CARBON AEROGEL NANOCOMPOSITES CONTAINING DOUBLE-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES

    SciTech Connect

    Worsley, M A; Satcher, J H; Baumann, T F

    2008-03-11

    Carbon aerogels (CAs) are novel mesoporous materials with applications such as electrode materials for super capacitors and rechargeable batteries, adsorbents and advanced catalyst supports. To expand the potential application for these unique materials, recent efforts have focused on the design of CA composites with the goal of modifying the structure, conductivity or catalytic activity of the aerogel. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) possess a number of intrinsic properties that make them promising materials in the design of composite materials. In addition, the large aspect ratios (100-1000) of CNTs means that small additions (less than 1 vol%) of CNTs can produce a composite with novel properties. Therefore, the homogeneous incorporation of CNTs into a CA matrix provides a viable route to new carbon-based composites with enhanced thermal, electrical and mechanical properties. One of the main challenges in preparing CNT composites is achieving a good uniform dispersion of nanotubes throughout the matrix. CAs are typically prepared through the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol with formaldehyde in aqueous solution to produce organic gels that are supercritically dried and subsequently pyrolyzed in an inert atmosphere. Therefore, a significant issue in fabricating CA-CNT composites is dispersing the CNTs in the aqueous reaction media. Previous work in the design of CACNT composites have addressed this issue by using organic solvents in the sol-gel reaction to facilitate dispersion of the CNTs. To our knowledge, no data has been published involving the preparation of CA composites containing CNTs dispersed in aqueous media. In this report, we describe a new method for the synthesis of monolithic CA-CNT composites that involves the sol-gel polymerization of resorcinol and formaldehyde in an aqueous solution containing a surfactant-stabilized dispersion of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT). One of the advantages of this approach is that it allows one to uniformly

  5. Vertical single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes grown from modified porous anodic alumina templates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maschmann, Matthew R.; Franklin, Aaron D.; Amama, Placidus B.; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Stach, Eric A.; Sands, Timothy D.; Fisher, Timothy S.

    2006-08-01

    Vertical single-walled and double-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT and DWNT) arrays have been grown using a catalyst embedded within the pore walls of a porous anodic alumina (PAA) template. The initial film structure consisted of a SiOx adhesion layer, a Ti layer, a bottom Al layer, a Fe layer, and a top Al layer deposited on a Si wafer. The Al and Fe layers were subsequently anodized to create a vertically oriented pore structure through the film stack. CNTs were synthesized from the catalyst layer by plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD). The resulting structure is expected to form the basis for development of vertically oriented CNT-based electronics and sensors.

  6. Molecular Dynamics Study of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Nano-Mechanical Manipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimoto, Yoshihisa; Mori, Hideki; Mikami, Tomohito; Akita, Seiji; Nakayama, Yoshikazu; Higashi, Kenji; Hirai, Yoshihiko

    2005-04-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) are expected to be useful as elements in nano-mechanical systems such as nanobearings and nanosliders. A molecular dynamics simulation is carried out to estimate the relative motion between the inner and outer tubes. The force required to pull the inner tube out of the outer tube is evaluated quantitatively by pulling the inner tube under a constant velocity for DWNTs with various inter-tube spacings and chiralities. When the inner tube is pulled under smaller constant force, the inner tube vibrates inside the outer tube without being pulled out, and an energetics is applied to explain the critical force and vibrational amplitude. The constant force induces not only vibration along the tube axis but also rotation around the tube axis, which indicates the possibility of creating a slider crank mechanism using a DWNT.

  7. Non uniform shrinkages of double-walled carbon nanotube as induced by electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Xianfang Li, Lunxiong; Gong, Huimin; Yang, Lan; Sun, Chenghua

    2014-09-01

    Electron beam-induced nanoinstabilities of pristine double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) of two different configurations, one fixed at both ends and another fixed at only one end, were in-situ investigated in transmission electron microscope at room temperature. It was observed that the DWCNT fixed at both ends shrank in its diameter uniformly. Meanwhile, the DWCNT fixed at only one end intriguingly shrank preferentially from its free cap end along its axial direction whereas its diameter shrinkage was offset. A mechanism of “diffusion” along with “evaporation” at room temperature which is driven by the nanocurvature of the DWCNTs, and the athermal activation induced by the electron beam was proposed to elucidate the observed phenomena. The effect of the interlayer interaction of the DWCNTs was also discussed.

  8. Mechanical coupled vibrations in an individual double-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutahir, Mourad; Rahmani, Abdelhai; Chadli, Hassan; Rahmani, Abdelali

    2016-05-01

    In this paper we calculate the Raman spectra of different double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) by using the spectral moments method. Using a convenient Lennard-Jones expression of the van der Waals intermolecular interaction between the inner and outer tubes, the optimized structures of DWCNT are derived. We found that the C-C bond length in DWCNT is depending on the metallic (M) or semiconducting (Sc) character of the inner and outer nanotubes. We show that the radial breathing-like modes (RBLM) of DWCNT are characterized by concerted inner and outer wall motions. Comparison with Raman spectra measurements is given. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  9. Preparation of large-area double-walled carbon nanotube films and application as film heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zi Ping; Wang, Jian Nong

    2009-11-01

    Large-area (larger than 30×30 cm 2) double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) films are prepared and application as a heating element for film heaters is demonstrated. A high heating efficiency is observed. Measurements indicate that the use of the DWCNT film heater would save energy consumption up to 20-30% when compared with a commercial film-like metal-based heater. Morphological analysis reveals that the special surface structure, appropriate electric and high thermal conductivities of the film formed by the network of entangled nanotube bundles may lead to the high heating performance. Considering large-area, shape flexibility, negligible weight and easy manipulation, the film exhibits promising potential applications as a film heater for thermal control in aircrafts, medical equipment, home appliances and other industrial fields at low temperature (below 400 °C).

  10. Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Wide-Band, Ultrafast Pulse Generation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate wide-band ultrafast optical pulse generation at 1, 1.5, and 2 μm using a single-polymer composite saturable absorber based on double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNTs). The freestanding optical quality polymer composite is prepared from nanotubes dispersed in water with poly(vinyl alcohol) as the host matrix. The composite is then integrated into ytterbium-, erbium-, and thulium-doped fiber laser cavities. Using this single DWNT–polymer composite, we achieve 4.85 ps, 532 fs, and 1.6 ps mode-locked pulses at 1066, 1559, and 1883 nm, respectively, highlighting the potential of DWNTs for wide-band ultrafast photonics. PMID:24735347

  11. Prediction of radial breathing-like modes of double-walled carbon nanotubes with arbitrary chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Fazelzadeh, S. Ahmad

    2014-10-01

    The radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with arbitrary chirality are investigated by a simple analytical model. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through van der Waals (vdW) forces between two adjacent tubes. Lennard-Jones potential and a molecular mechanics model are used to calculate the vdW forces and to predict the mechanical properties, respectively. The validity of these theoretical results is confirmed through the comparison of the experimental results. Finally, a new approach is proposed to determine the diameters and the chiral indices of the inner and outer tubes of the DWCNTs with high precision.

  12. Intershell Interaction in a Double Wall Carbon Nanotube with Determined Chiral Indices under a Torsional Strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Letian; Cui, Taoran; Washburn, Sean; Qin, Lu-Chang

    2011-03-01

    We have used a double wall carbon nanotube to build a torsional pendulum. The nanotube worked as a torsional bearing for a metal block. An external electric field was used to rotate the metal block to cause a fully elastic torsional deformation on the nanotube. Nano-beam electron diffraction patterns were taken before and while the nanotube was twisted. By analysis of the shift of the diffraction patterns, we were able to determine the nanotube chiral indices and measure the inner-shell torisonal responses to the torsional stress applied on the outer-shell. The inter-shell interactions and nanotube shear modulus were also calculated and discussed in connection to the theoretical estimations.

  13. Growth of single and double walled carbon nanotubes over Co/V/MgO catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    You, Yujing; Qu, Meizhen; Zhou, Gumin; Lin, Haoqiang

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} Co/V/MgO has remarkable catalytic activity on the growth of SWCNTs and DWCNTs. {yields} The diameter of CNTs can be controlled by adjusting molar ratio of Co-V to MgO. {yields} The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} is critical to the synthesis of thin CNTs. -- Abstract: High quality single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were synthesized on Co/V/MgO catalysts by catalytic decomposition of CH{sub 4} in H{sub 2}. Raman spectroscopy data revealed that the diameters of as-prepared SWCNTs are 1.28 and 0.73 nm. The diameter value of DWCNTs from Raman analysis also showed a narrow diameter distribution. Using field emission transmission electron microscopy (TEM), it was found that the diameter of carbon nanotubes can be controlled mainly by adjusting the molar ratio of Co-V versus the MgO support. The structure properties of catalysts were examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The formation of C{sub 7}V{sub 8} may play an important role in preserving carbon in the catalyst particle and favoring the dissociation balance of CH{sub 4}.

  14. Nonlinear dynamics of bi-layered graphene sheet, double-walled carbon nanotube and nanotube bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gajbhiye, Sachin O.; Singh, S. P.

    2016-05-01

    Due to strong van der Waals (vdW) interactions, the graphene sheets and nanotubes stick to each other and form clusters of these corresponding nanostructures, viz. bi-layered graphene sheet (BLGS), double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) and nanotube bundle (NB) or ropes. This research work is concerned with the study of nonlinear dynamics of BLGS, DWCNT and NB due to nonlinear interlayer vdW forces using multiscale atomistic finite element method. The energy between two adjacent carbon atoms is represented by the multibody interatomic Tersoff-Brenner potential, whereas the nonlinear interlayer vdW forces are represented by Lennard-Jones 6-12 potential function. The equivalent nonlinear material model of carbon-carbon bond is used to model it based on its force-deflection relation. Newmark's algorithm is used to solve the nonlinear matrix equation governing the motion of the BLGS, DWCNT and NB. An impulse and harmonic excitations are used to excite these nanostructures under cantilevered, bridged and clamped boundary conditions. The frequency responses of these nanostructures are computed, and the dominant resonant frequencies are identified. Along with the forced vibration of these structures, the eigenvalue extraction problem of armchair and zigzag NB is also considered. The natural frequencies and corresponding mode shapes are extracted for the different length and boundary conditions of the nanotube bundle.

  15. Influence of atomic vacancies on the dynamic characteristics of nanoresonators based on double walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Ajay M.; Joshi, Anand Y.

    2015-06-01

    The dynamic analysis of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with different boundary conditions has been performed using atomistic finite element method. The double walled carbon nanotube is modeled considering it as a space frame structure similar to a three dimensional beam. The elastic properties of beam element are calculated by considering mechanical characteristics of covalent bonds between the carbon atoms in the hexagonal lattice. Spring elements are used to describe the interlayer interactions between the inner and outer tubes caused due to the van der Waals forces. The mass of each beam element is assumed as point mass at nodes coinciding with carbon atoms at inner and outer wall of DWCNT. It has been reported that atomic vacancies are formed during the manufacturing process in DWCNT which tend to migrate leading to a change in the mechanical characteristics of the same. Simulations have been carried out to visualize the behavior of such defective DWCNTs subjected to different boundary conditions and when used as mass sensing devices. The variation of such atomic vacancies in outer wall of Zigzag and Armchair DWCNT is performed along the length and the change in response is noted. Moreover, as CNTs have been used as mass sensors extensively, the present approach is focused to explore the use of zigzag and armchair DWCNT as sensing device with a mono-atomic vacancy in it. The results clearly state that the dynamic characteristics are greatly influenced by defects like vacancies in it. A higher frequency shift is observed when the vacancy is located away from the fixed end for both Armchair as well as zigzag type of CNTs. A higher frequency shift is reported for armchair CNT for a mass of 10-22 g which remains constant for 10-21 g and then decreases gradually. Comparison with the other experimental and theoretical studies exhibits good association which suggests that defective DWCNTs can further be explored for mass sensing. This investigation is helpful

  16. Structures and characterizations of bundles of collapsed double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, X H; Wang, R; Liu, L B; Kang, M; Wen, Y Y; Hou, F; Feng, J M; Li, Y L

    2012-12-21

    The performance of carbon nanotube fibers (CNTFs) significantly depends on the packing styles of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. Revealing the structures and characterizations of CNT bundles is contributive to understanding the structures, properties and even the formation of CNTFs during chemical vapor deposition (CVD) processing. In this paper, bundles consisting of collapsed double-walled carbon nanotubes (CDWNT) in continuous CNTFs fabricated from CVD processing were characterized and analyzed by transmission electronic microscopy (TEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). TEM observations show that the continuous CNTFs are composed of CDWNT-bundle units. CDWNT-bundle units of 10-20 nm in thickness contain near numbers of collapsed tubes. The degree of collapse of the CDWNTs varies with their location in the bundle and their own diameter. CDWNT-bundle units pack side by side or face to face, assembling into super-bundles with diameters of 200-300 nm. XRD patterns show that three novel and strong peaks appear at 10°-15°, 21.3° and 23.7°, respectively, corresponding to CDWNT two side pores (10°-15°) and CDWNT layers (21.3° and 23.7°), which indicates the collapsed tube structures in CNTFs are common characterizations. Finally, a collapse mechanism is discussed from the observation and analysis. PMID:23196759

  17. Thermal transport in double-wall carbon nanotubes using heat pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Liang; Kumar, Satish

    2011-10-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are outstanding materials for diverse applications such as electrodes, interconnects, or thermal management. Deep understanding of the underlying thermal transport mechanism in MWCNTs is crucial to engineer their thermal properties for a specific application. This paper investigates the interfacial thermal interaction in double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) using molecular dynamics simulation and compares the transport in DWCNT with that in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The present study is based on the application of intense heat pulse in the middle of the CNTs and analysis of wavelike responses of energy propagation as well as the kinetic energy corresponding to the velocity components in the radial, tangential, and longitudinal directions of CNTs. The analysis shows that the leading wave packets corresponding to the tangential and longitudinal components propagate ballistically along the tube, while the radial components show diffusive behavior with slow propagation speed. However, the radial components can efficiently transfer energy between tubes of DWCNTs while the fast moving longitudinal components and tangential components are weak in the interfacial energy transfer. An appropriate understanding of the energy exchange between different layers of tubes will pave the path of the future design of MWCNT based pellets and composites.

  18. Determination of the inner diameter of a double-walled carbon nanotube from its Raman spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basirjafari, Sedigheh; Esmaielzadeh Khadem, Siamak; Malekfar, Rasoul

    2013-02-01

    In this paper, an exact formula is obtained for the inner diameter of double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) as a function of its higher radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency, using the symbolic package of maple software. Its outer diameter is obtained from the inner diameter formula by considering the constant interlayer spacing between two tubes of DWCNT. For this purpose, DWCNT is considered as double concentric elastic thin cylindrical shells, which are coupled through the van der Waals (vdW) forces between two tubes. Lennard-Jones potential is used to calculate the vdW forces between tubes. The advantage of this analytical approach is that in the double concentric elastic shell model all degrees of freedom in the vibrational analysis of DWCNTs are considered. To demonstrate the accuracy of this work, the relationship between RBM frequency of a single-walled carbon nanotube and its radius is deduced from the DWCNT formula that is well consistent with other publications. To illustrate the application of this approach, the diameters of DWCNTs are obtained from their known RBM frequencies which show an excellent agreement with the available experimental results. Also, the influence of changing the geometrical and mechanical parameters of a DWCNT on its RBM frequencies has been investigated.

  19. Molecular-Dynamic Investigation of Buckling of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes under Uniaxial Compression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jian-Ming; Wang, Yun-Che; Chang, Jee-Gong; Su, Ming-Horng; Hwang, Chi-Chuan

    2008-04-01

    This paper studies the buckling phenomena and mechanical behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via molecular dynamics simulations. The Tersoff interatomic C-C potential is adopted. Using a dimensionless parameter, slenderness ratio (SR, the ratio of length to diameter), we investigate the mechanical behavior of long and short nanotubes under compression through their buckling modes, total strain energy and strain energy density, as well as post-buckling. The curvatures of strain energy provide a means to measure the Young’s modulus of the nanotubes. Moreover, jumps in either the strain energy or strain energy density indicate identical mechanical buckling strains, and are studied in relation to buckling modes. In our simulations, a transition time is observed for short nanotubes to reach stable vase-like buckling mode, indicating a time-dependent property of nanotubes. Furthermore, nanotubes with small SR can bear higher compressive load after their first buckling. In addition, nanotubes with same chirality exhibit roughly the same elastic modulus, regardless of their lengths, when applied compressive strains are less than 5% strain. However, long nanotubes show smaller buckling strength. Effects of temperature at 300 K on buckling strength for SWNT are also discussed in connection to our present study at 1 K.

  20. A nano universal joint made from curved double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Kun; Cai, Haifang; Shi, Jiao; Qin, Qing H.

    2015-06-15

    A nano universal joint is constructed from curved double-wall carbon nanotubes with a short outer tube as stator and a long inner tube as a rotor. When one end of the rotor is driven (by a rotary motor) to rotate, the same rotational speed but with different rotational direction will be induced at the other end of the rotor. This mechanism makes the joint useful for designing a flexible nanodevice with an adjustable output rotational signal. The motion transmission effect of the universal joint is analyzed using a molecular dynamics simulation approach. In particular, the effects of three factors are investigated. The first factor is the curvature of the stator, which produces a different rotational direction of the rotor at the output end. The second is the bonding conditions of carbon atoms on the adjacent tube ends of the motor and the rotor, sp{sup 1} or sp{sup 2} atoms, which create different attraction between the motor and the rotor. The third is the rotational speed of the motor, which can be considered as the input signal of the universal joint. It is noted that the rotor's rotational speed is usually the same as that of the motor when the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends of the motor and the rotor are sp{sup 1} carbon atoms. When they become the new sp{sup 2} atoms, the rotor experiences a jump in rotational speed from a lower value to that of the motor. The mechanism of drops in potential of the motor is revealed. If the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are sp{sup 2} atoms, the rotor rotates more slowly than the motor, whereas the rotational speed is stable when driven by a higher speed motor.

  1. A nano universal joint made from curved double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Kun; Cai, Haifang; Shi, Jiao; Qin, Qing H.

    2015-06-01

    A nano universal joint is constructed from curved double-wall carbon nanotubes with a short outer tube as stator and a long inner tube as a rotor. When one end of the rotor is driven (by a rotary motor) to rotate, the same rotational speed but with different rotational direction will be induced at the other end of the rotor. This mechanism makes the joint useful for designing a flexible nanodevice with an adjustable output rotational signal. The motion transmission effect of the universal joint is analyzed using a molecular dynamics simulation approach. In particular, the effects of three factors are investigated. The first factor is the curvature of the stator, which produces a different rotational direction of the rotor at the output end. The second is the bonding conditions of carbon atoms on the adjacent tube ends of the motor and the rotor, sp1 or sp2 atoms, which create different attraction between the motor and the rotor. The third is the rotational speed of the motor, which can be considered as the input signal of the universal joint. It is noted that the rotor's rotational speed is usually the same as that of the motor when the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends of the motor and the rotor are sp1 carbon atoms. When they become the new sp2 atoms, the rotor experiences a jump in rotational speed from a lower value to that of the motor. The mechanism of drops in potential of the motor is revealed. If the carbon atoms on the adjacent ends are sp2 atoms, the rotor rotates more slowly than the motor, whereas the rotational speed is stable when driven by a higher speed motor.

  2. Strain effects on the performance of zero-Schottky-barrier double-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Md. Abdul; Khosru, Quazi D. M.

    2010-08-01

    Schrodinger's equation is solved using recursive Green's function algorithm self-consistently with Poisson's equation to study the transport physics of uniaxial and torsional strained double-walled (DW) carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) and to analyze their performance. The characteristics and performance of proposed DW CNTFET are compared with existing single-walled (SW) CNTFET. The strain has great impact on the I-V characteristics of both SW and DW CNT devices. Tensile and torsional strains improve greatly the off-state current and on/off current ratio of both devices. Compressive strain improves on-state current, but this improvement is comparatively small. The effect of strain on off-state current, on-state current, and on/off current ratio is higher in SW CNTFET. The inverse subthreshold slope of DW CNTFET is better than SW CNTFET. But the variation in inverse subthreshold slope with strain is smaller in DW CNTFET. Unlike SW CNTFET the on-state transconductance of DW CNTFET improves with tensile and torsional strains, and degrades with compressive strain. The on-state cut-off frequency of DW CNTFET also shows opposite behavior to SW CNTFET with strain following on-state transconductance. Concrete Physical description is provided to explain all above changes with strain.

  3. Self-excited oscillation of rotating double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Yin, Hang; Qin, Qing H; Li, Yan

    2014-05-14

    The oscillatory behavior of a double-walled carbon nanotubes with a rotating inner tube is investigated using molecular dynamics simulation. In the simulation, one end of the outer tube is assumed to be fixed and the other is free. Without any prepullout of the rotating inner tube, it is interesting to observe that self-excited oscillation can be triggered by nonequilibrium attraction of the ends of two tubes. The oscillation amplitude increases until it reaches its maximum with decrease of the rotating speed of the inner tube. The oscillation of a bitube is sensitive to the gap between two walls. Numerical results also indicate that the zigzag/zigzag commensurate model with a larger gap of >0.335 nm can act as a terahertz oscillator, and the armchair/zigzag incommensurate model plays the role of a high amplitude oscillator with the frequency of 1 GHz. An oblique chiral model with a smaller gap of <0.335 nm is unsuitable for the oscillator because of the steep damping of oscillation. PMID:24742354

  4. Force distribution for double-walled carbon nanotubes and gigahertz oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baowan, Duangkamon; Hill, James M.

    2007-09-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have led to the creation of many nano-scale devices and carbon nanotubes are representative materials to construct these devices. Double-walled carbon nanotubes with the inner tube oscillating can be used as gigahertz oscillators and form the basis of possible nano-electronic devices that might be instrumental in the micro-computer industry which are predominantly based on electron transport phenomena. There are many experiments and molecular dynamical simulations which show that a wave is generated on the outer cylinder as a result of the oscillation of the inner carbon nanotube and that the frequency of this wave is also in the gigahertz range. As a preliminary to analyze and model such devices, it is necessary to estimate accurately the resultant force distribution due to the inter-atomic interactions. Here we determine some new analytical expressions for the van der Waals force using the Lennard Jones potential for general lengths of the inner and outer tubes. These expressions are utilized together with Newton’s second law to determine the motion of an oscillating inner tube, assuming that any frictional effects may be neglected. An idealized and much simplified representation of the Lennard Jones force is used to determine a simple formula for the oscillation frequency resulting from an initial extrusion of the inner tube. This simple formula is entirely consistent with the existing known behavior of the frequency and predicts a maximum oscillation frequency occurring when the extrusion length is (L 2 L 1)/2 where L 1 and L 2 are the respective half-lengths of the inner and outer tubes (L 1 < L 2).

  5. Comment on 'Vibration analysis of fluid-conveying double-walled carbon nanotubes based on nonlocal elastic theory'.

    PubMed

    Tounsi, Abdeloauhed; Heireche, Houari; Benzair, Abdelnour; Mechab, Ismail

    2009-11-01

    Most recently, Lee and Chang (2009 J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21 115302) combined nonlocal theory and Euler-Bernoulli beam theory in the study of the vibration of the fluid-conveying double-walled carbon nanotube. In this recent published work, the importance of using nonlocal stress tensors consistently has been overlooked, and some ensuring relations were still presented based on the local stress components. Therefore, the governing equations and applied forces obtained in this manner are either inconsistent or incomplete. In this comment, the consistent governing equations for modelling free transverse vibration of the fluid-conveying double-walled carbon nanotube using the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model are derived. PMID:21832479

  6. Oscillators based on double-walled armchair@zigzag carbon nanotubes containing inner tubes with different helical rises.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yong-Hui; Jiang, Wu-Gui; Qin, Qing H

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach is presented to improve the oscillatory behavior of oscillators based on double-walled carbon nanotubes containing rotating inner tubes applied with different helical rises. The influence of the helical rise on the oscillatory amplitude, frequency, and stability of inner tubes with different helical rises in armchair@zigzag bitubes is investigated using the molecular dynamics method. Our simulated results show that the oscillatory behavior is very sensitive to the applied helical rise. The inner tube with h = 10 Å has the most ideal hexagon after the energy minimization and NVT process in the armchair@zigzag bitubes, superior even to the inner tube without a helical rise, and thus it exhibits better oscillatory behavior compared with other modes. Therefore, we can apply an appropriate helical rise on the inner tube to produce a stable and smooth oscillator based on double-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:26855175

  7. Electronic transport properties of inner and outer shells in near ohmic-contacted double-walled carbon nanotube transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yuchun; Zhou, Liyan; Zhao, Shangqian; Wang, Wenlong; Liang, Wenjie; Wang, Enge

    2014-06-14

    We investigate electronic transport properties of field-effect transistors based on double-walled carbon nanotubes, of which inner shells are metallic and outer shells are semiconducting. When both shells are turned on, electron-phonon scattering is found to be the dominant phenomenon. On the other hand, when outer semiconducting shells are turned off, a zero-bias anomaly emerges in the dependence of differential conductance on the bias voltage, which is characterized according to the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid model describing tunneling into one-dimensional materials. We attribute these behaviors to different contact conditions for outer and inner shells of the double-walled carbon nanotubes. A simple model combining Luttinger liquid model for inner metallic shells and electron-phonon scattering in outer semiconducting shells is given here to explain our transport data at different temperatures.

  8. Experimental-computational study of shear interactions within double-walled carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Filleter, Tobin; Yockel, Scott; Naraghi, Mohammad; Paci, Jeffrey T; Compton, Owen C; Mayes, Maricris L; Nguyen, Sonbinh T; Schatz, George C; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2012-02-01

    The mechanical behavior of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based fibers and nanocomposites depends intimately on the shear interactions between adjacent tubes. We have applied an experimental-computational approach to investigate the shear interactions between adjacent CNTs within individual double-walled nanotube (DWNT) bundles. The force required to pull out an inner bundle of DWNTs from an outer shell of DWNTs was measured using in situ scanning electron microscopy methods. The normalized force per CNT-CNT interaction (1.7 ± 1.0 nN) was found to be considerably higher than molecular mechanics (MM)-based predictions for bare CNTs (0.3 nN). This MM result is similar to the force that results from exposure of newly formed CNT surfaces, indicating that the observed pullout force arises from factors beyond what arise from potential energy effects associated with bare CNTs. Through further theoretical considerations we show that the experimentally measured pullout force may include small contributions from carbonyl functional groups terminating the free ends of the CNTs, corrugation of the CNT-CNT interactions, and polygonization of the nanotubes due to their mutual interactions. In addition, surface functional groups, such as hydroxyl groups, that may exist between the nanotubes are found to play an unimportant role. All of these potential energy effects account for less than half of the ~1.7 nN force. However, partially pulled-out inner bundles are found not to pull back into the outer shell after the outer shell is broken, suggesting that dissipation is responsible for more than half of the pullout force. The sum of force contributions from potential energy and dissipation effects are found to agree with the experimental pullout force within the experimental error. PMID:22214436

  9. Linear augmented cylindrical wave method for calculating the electronic structure of double-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Yachkov, P. N.; Makaev, D. V.

    2006-10-01

    Electronic structure of double-wall carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) consisting of two concentric graphene cylinders with extremely strong covalent bonding of atoms within the individual graphitic sheets, but very weak van der Waals type interaction between them is calculated in the terms of the linear augmented cylindrical wave (LACW) method. A one-electron potential is used and the approximations are made in the sense of muffin-tin (MT) potentials and local density functional theory only. The atoms of DWNT are considered to be enclosed between cylinder-shaped potential barriers. In this approach, the electronic spectrum of the DWNTs is governed by the free movement of electron in the interatomic space of two cylindrical layers, by electron scattering on the MT spheres, and by electron tunneling between the layers. We have calculated the complete band structures and densities of states in the Fermi level region of the purely semiconducting zigzag DWNTs (n,0)@(n',0) ( 10⩽n⩽23 and 19⩽n'⩽32 ) with interlayer distance 3.2Å⩽Δd⩽3.7Å . Analogously data are obtained for metallic armchair (n,n)@(n',n') nanotubes ( n=5 or 4 and n'=10 or 9). According to the LACW calculations, the interwall coupling results in a distinctly stronger perturbation of the band structure of inner tube as compared to that of the outer one. In the case of semiconducting DWNTs, the minimum gap E11 between the singularities of the conduction and valence bands of the shell tubules decreases from 0.15to0.22eV or increases from 0.7to0.15eV , if dividing n' by three leaves a remainder of 1 or 2, respectively. In both cases, the ΔE11 shifts of the gap do not decay, but slightly oscillate as one goes to the tubules with larger diameters d . For inner tubules, the ΔE11 shift depends strongly on the d . For nmod3=2 series with 10⩽n⩽16 , the shifts ΔE11 are positive, the maximum values of ΔE11 being equal to 0.39 and 0.32eV , respectively. As one goes to the inner tubules with larger diameters

  10. Ultrafast exciton energy transfer between nanoscale coaxial cylinders: intertube transfer and luminescence quenching in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Takeshi; Asada, Yuki; Hikosaka, Naoki; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Shinohara, Hisanori; Nakamura, Arao

    2011-07-26

    We study exciton energy transfer in double-walled carbon nanotubes using femtosecond time-resolved luminescence measurements. From direct correspondence between decay of the innertube luminescence and the rise behavior in outertube luminescence, it is found that the time constant of exciton energy transfer from the inner to the outer semiconducting tubes is ∼150 fs. This ultrafast transfer indicates that the relative intensity of steady-state luminescence from the innertubes is ∼700 times weaker than that from single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:21682277

  11. Analytical solutions to the free vibration of a double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a bacterium at its tip

    SciTech Connect

    Storch, Joel A.; Elishakoff, Isaac

    2013-11-07

    We calculate the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a cantilevered double-walled carbon nanotube carrying a rigid body—representative of a bacterium or virus—at the tip of the outer nanotube. By idealizing the nanotubes as Bernoulli-Euler beams, we are able to obtain exact expressions for both the mode shapes and characteristic frequency equation. Separate analyses are performed for the special case of a concentrated tip mass and the more complicated situation where the tip body also exhibits inertia and mass center offset from the beam tip.

  12. Integrated ternary artificial nacre via synergistic toughening of reduced graphene oxide/double-walled carbon nanotubes/poly(vinyl alcohol)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Shanshan; Wu, Mengxi; Jiang, Lei; Cheng, Qunfeng

    2016-07-01

    The synergistic toughening effect of building blocks and interface interaction exists in natural materials, such as nacre. Herein, inspired by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibrillar chitin and two-dimensional (2D) calcium carbonate platelets of natural nacre, we have fabricated integrated strong and tough ternary bio-inspired nanocomposites (artificial nacre) successfully via the synergistic effect of 2D reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanosheets and 1D double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) and hydrogen bonding cross-linking with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix. Moreover, the crack mechanics model with crack deflection by 2D rGO nanosheets and crack bridging by 1D DWNTs and PVA chains induces resultant artificial nacre exhibiting excellent fatigue-resistance performance. These outstanding characteristics enable the ternary bioinspired nanocomposites have many promising potential applications, for instance, aerospace, flexible electronics devices and so forth. This synergistic toughening strategy also provides an effective way to assemble robust graphene-based nanocomposites.

  13. Effects of reducing temperatures on the hydrogen storage capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes with Pd loading.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Qu; Wu, Huimin; Wexler, David; Liu, Huakun

    2014-06-01

    The effects of different temperatures on the hydrogen sorption characteristics of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) with palladium loading have been investigated. When we use different temperatures, the particle sizes and specific surface areas of the samples are different, which affects the hydrogen storage capacity of the DWCNTs. In this work, the amount of hydrogen storage capacity was determined (by AMC Gas Reactor Controller) to be 1.70, 1.85, 2.00, and 1.93 wt% for pristine DWCNTS and for 2%Pd/DWCNTs-300 degrees C, 2%Pd/DWCNTs-400 degrees C, and 2%Pd/DWCNTs-500 degrees C, respectively. We found that the hydrogen storage capacity can be enhanced by loading with 2% Pd nanoparticles and selecting a suitable temperature. Furthermore, the sorption can be attributed to the chemical reaction between atomic hydrogen and the dangling bonds of the DWCNTs. PMID:24738450

  14. Dual-wavelength synchronous mode-locked Yb:LSO laser using a double-walled carbon nanotube saturable absorber.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chao; Hou, Wei; Yang, Jimin; Liu, Jie; Zheng, Lihe; Su, Liangbi; Xu, Jun; Wang, Yonggang

    2016-05-01

    A dual-wavelength, passively mode-locked Yb:LSO laser was demonstrated using a double-walled carbon nanotube as a saturable absorber. The maximum average output power of the laser was 1.34 W at the incident pump power of 9.94 W. The two central wavelengths were 1057 and 1058 nm. The corresponding pulse duration of the autocorrelation interference pattern was about 15 ps, while the beat pulse repetition rate was 0.17 THz and the width of one beat pulse about 2 ps. When the incident pump power was above 10.25 W, a multiwavelength mode-locked oscillation phenomenon was observed. After employing a pair of SF10 prisms, a 1058.7 nm single-wavelength mode-locked laser was obtained with a pulse width of 7 ps. PMID:27140382

  15. Isochronal annealing study of X-ray induced defects in single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Yuki; Itoh, Chihiro; Kisoda, Kenji

    2013-09-21

    X-ray induced defects in single-walled (SWCNTs) and double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) were characterized by Raman scattering spectroscopy. Frenkel defects, interstitial-vacancy pairs, were revealed to form in both SWCNTs and DWCNTs after X-ray irradiation because these defects were entirely healed by thermal annealing. In order to clarify the structure of the X-ray induced defect in SWCNT and DWCNT, isochronal-annealing experiments were performed on the irradiated samples and the activation energy for defect healing was estimated. The intensity of D band (defect induced band) on Raman spectra was used as a measure of the density of X-ray induced defects. The experimental results were in good agreement with the simulated values using second order reaction model, which indicated that the defect healing was determined by the migration energy of interstitials on the carbon layer. We also found that the activation energy for defect healing of SWCNT and DWCNT were around 0.5 eV and 0.32 eV, respectively. The X-ray induced defects in SWCNTs were more stable than those in DWCNTs. Compared these estimated activation energies to previous theoretical reports, we concluded that bridge and/or dumbbell interstitials are formed in both SWCNT and DWCNT by X-ray irradiation.

  16. Synthesis of double-wall nanoscrolls intercalated with polyfluorinated cationic surfactant into layered niobate and their magnetic alignment.

    PubMed

    Nabetani, Yu; Uchikoshi, Akino; Miyajima, Souki; Hassan, Syed Zahid; Ramakrishnan, Vivek; Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yamato, Masafumi; Inoue, Haruo

    2016-04-28

    The orientation of nanomaterials with an anisotropic nature such as nanoscrolls is very important for realizing their efficient and sophisticated functions in devices, including nanostructured electrodes in artificial photosynthetic cells. In this study, we successfully synthesized a nanoscroll by intercalation of a cationic polyfluorinated surfactant into the interlayer spaces of layered niobate and successfully controlled its orientation by applying an external magnetic field in water. The exfoliated niobate nanosheets were efficiently rolled-up to form nanoscrolls, which have a fine layered structure (d020 = 3.64 nm), by mixing with heptafluorobutanoylaminoethylhexadecyldimethylammonium bromide (C3F-S) in water, whereas the corresponding hydrocarbon analogue (C3H-S) did not form nanoscrolls. The synthetic yield for the purified and isolated nanoscrolls from the nanosheets was estimated to be 62% by weight. It was confirmed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) that most of the niobate nanosheets (98%) were converted to nanoscrolls. An external magnetic field was applied to the nanoscrolls to force them to align. After the magnetic treatment, the orientation of the nanoscrolls was investigated by small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The non-uniform ring distribution of the SAXS patterns indicates that the nanoscrolls dispersed in water were aligned well on applying the magnetic field. The long axis of the nanoscroll was oriented in the direction of the applied field and long nanoscrolls were aligned more efficiently. When the intercalated C3F-S molecules were removed from the nanoscrolls by treating with an acid, the resultant nanoscrolls did not exhibit magnetic alignment, strongly suggesting that C3F-S plays an important role in the orientation control of the nanoscrolls by the magnetic field. PMID:27074750

  17. Selective and Scalable Chemical Removal of Thin Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from their Mixtures with Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Komínková, Zuzana; Valeš, Václav; Kalbáč, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) are materials in high demand due to their superior properties. However, it is very challenging to prepare DWCNTs samples of high purity. In particular, the removal of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) contaminants is a major problem. Here, a procedure for a selective removal of thin-diameter SWCNTs from their mixtures with DWCNTs by lithium vapor treatment is investigated. The results are evaluated by Raman spectroscopy and in situ Raman spectroelectrochemistry. It is shown that the amount of SWCNTs was reduced by about 35 % after lithium vapor treatment of the studied SWCNTs-DWCNTs mixture. PMID:26358882

  18. Bright Photoluminescence from the Inner Tubes of Peapod-Derived Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Dresselhaus, M; Terrones Maldonado, Mauricio; Endo, M; Kim, Y A; Hayashi, T; Muramatsu, H; Shimamoto, Daisuke

    2009-01-01

    Corrugated carbon nanotubes containing a number of defective carbon rings can be synthesized from the coalescence of C60 encapsulated in SWNTs (peapods). In this letter we show that contrary to common wisdom, the presence of non-hexagonal rings can actually induce metallic behavior. To demonstrate this, we used a combination of photoluminescence studies, Raman spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and first-principle quantum calculations. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these metallic corrugated inner tubes can be converted into semiconducting tubes by high-temperature thermal treatment in argon. This finding demonstrates for the first time the versatility of the electronic properties for the coalesced structures and provides a novel way to tailor them by thermal processing.

  19. Fabrication of double-walled carbon nanotube film/Cu2O nanoparticle film/TiO2 nanotube array heterojunctions for photosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mingjie; Xu, Jia; Wei, Jinquan; Sun, Jia-Lin; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Jia-Lin

    2012-06-01

    A structure for visible photosensors based on double-walled carbon nanotube (DWCNT) film/Cu2O nanoparticle (NP) film/TiO2 nanotube array (TNA) heterojunctions has been fabricated. Cu2O nanoparticles reduce dark current and enhance photoresponse of the heterojunctions. Consequently, the optoelectric performance is significantly enhanced compared to that of the heterojunctions without Cu2O nanoparticles. The photocurrent-to-dark current ratio reaches ˜1 × 104 under illumination at 405 nm and ˜3 × 104 under illumination at 532 nm, which is two orders of magnitude higher than the results of double-walled carbon nanotube film/TiO2 nanotube array heterojunctions under the same illumination density. Moreover, the response speed of the heterojunctions is greatly improved.

  20. Sudden stoppage of rotor in a thermally driven rotary motor made from double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cai, K; Yu, J Z; Yin, H; Qin, Q H

    2015-03-01

    In a thermally driven rotary motor made from double-walled carbon nanotubes, the rotor (inner tube) can be actuated to rotate within the stator (outer tube) when the environmental temperature is high enough. A sudden stoppage of the rotor can occur when the inner tube has been actuated to rotate at a stable high speed. To find the mechanisms of such sudden stoppages, eight motor models with the same rotor but different stators are built and simulated in the canonical NVT ensembles. Numerical results demonstrate that the sudden stoppage of the rotor occurs when the difference between radii is near 0.34 nm at a high environmental temperature. A smaller difference between radii does not imply easier activation of the sudden rotor stoppage. During rotation, the positions and electron density distribution of atoms at the ends of the motor show that a sp(1) bonded atom on the rotor is attracted by the sp(1) atom with the biggest deviation of radial position on the stator, after which they become two sp(2) atoms. The strong bond interaction between the two atoms leads to the loss of rotational speed of the rotor within 1 ps. Hence, the sudden stoppage is attributed to two factors: the deviation of radial position of atoms at the stator's ends and the drastic thermal vibration of atoms on the rotor in rotation. For a stable motor, sudden stoppage could be avoided by reducing deviation of the radial position of atoms at the stator's ends. A nanobrake can be, thus, achieved by adjusting a sp1 atom at the ends of stator to stop the rotation of rotor quickly. PMID:25676848

  1. Horizontal carbon nanotube alignment.

    PubMed

    Cole, Matthew T; Cientanni, Vito; Milne, William I

    2016-09-21

    The production of horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes offers a rapid means of realizing a myriad of self-assembled near-atom-scale technologies - from novel photonic crystals to nanoscale transistors. The ability to reproducibly align anisotropic nanostructures has huge technological value. Here we review the present state-of-the-art in horizontal carbon nanotube alignment. For both in and ex situ approaches, we quantitatively assess the reported linear packing densities alongside the degree of alignment possible for each of these core methodologies. PMID:27546174

  2. Study of collective radial breathing-like modes in double-walled carbon nanotubes: combination of continuous two-dimensional membrane theory and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levshov, Dmitry I.; Avramenko, Marina V.; Than, Xuan-Tinh; Michel, Thierry; Arenal, Raul; Paillet, Matthieu; Rybkovskiy, Dmitry V.; Osadchy, Alexander V.; Rochal, Sergei B.; Yuzyuk, Yuri I.; Sauvajol, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Radial breathing modes (RBMs) are widely used for the atomic structure characterization and index assignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) from resonant Raman spectroscopy. However, for double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs), the use of conventional ωRBM(d) formulas is complicated due to the van der Waals interaction between the layers, which strongly affects the frequencies of radial modes and leads to new collective vibrations. This paper presents an alternative way to theoretically study the collective radial breathing-like modes (RBLMs) of DWNTs and to account for interlayer interaction, namely the continuous two-dimensional membrane theory. We obtain an analytical ωRBLM(do,di) relation, being the equivalent of the conventional ωRBM(d) expressions, established for SWNTs. We compare our theoretical predictions with Raman data, measured on individual index-identified suspended DWNTs, and find a good agreement between experiment and theory. Moreover, we show that the interlayer coupling in individual DWNTs strongly depends on the interlayer distance, which is manifested in the frequency shifts of the RBLMs with respect to the RBMs of the individual inner and outer tubes. In terms of characterization, this means that the combination of Raman spectroscopy data and predictions of continuous membrane theory may give additional criteria for the index identification of DWNTs, namely the interlayer distance.

  3. Purification, separation and extraction of inner tubes from double-walled carbon nanotubes by tailoring density gradient ultracentrifugation using optical probes

    PubMed Central

    Rohringer, Philip; Shi, Lei; Liu, Xianjie; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Pichler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We studied the effect of varying sonication and centrifugation parameters on double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNT) by measuring optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) of the samples. We found that by using a low sonication intensity before applying density gradient ultracentrifugation (DGU), only inner tube species with a diameter ⩽0.8 nm can be identified in absorption measurements. This is in stark contrast to the result after sonicating at higher intensities, where also bigger inner tubes can be found. Furthermore, by comparing PL properties of samples centrifugated either with or without a gradient medium, we found that applying DGU greatly enhances the PL intensity, whereas centrifugation at even higher speeds but without a gradient medium results in lower intensities. This can be explained by extraction of inner tubes from their host outer tubes in a two-stage process: the different shearing forces from the sonication treatments result in some DWCNT to be opened, whereas others stay uncut. A subsequent application of DGU leads to the extraction of the inner tubes or not if the host nanotube stayed uncut or no gradient medium was used. This work shows a pathway to avoid this phenomenon to unravel the intrinsic PL from inner tubes of DWCNT. PMID:25843961

  4. Analysis of alignment effect on carbon nanotube layer in nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Preeti; Upadhyay, S. H.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, effect of various alignments of double walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) in composite is evaluated for axial, lateral and through plane properties. Layers of DWCNTs are incorporated in the matrix. Four models with different layer combinations are analysed using 3D representative volume element. The highest value of axial modulus is observed for composite in which DWCNTs are aligned in direction of loading. Enhancement in lateral stiffness is observed for the models in which layers are aligned in plane perpendicular direction. Through plane stiffness is improved in vertically aligned DWCNT composite. It is observed that both axial and lateral moduli of composite behave non-linearly with respect to DWCNT volume fraction. This is because of the effect of agglomeration, due to the higher content of DWCNT in the composite. The proposed simulation is based on the experimentally adopted alignment of carbon nanotubes. DWCNT based composites with specific properties along various directions can be designed by controlling the volume fractions and alignment of the DWCNT sheets.

  5. A compact multi-wavelength optoacoustic system based on high-power diode lasers for characterization of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; de Varona, Omar; Escudero, Pedro; Carpintero del Barrio, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela Rivera, Horacio

    2015-06-01

    During the last decade, Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), or Optoacoustic Tomography (OAT), has evolved as a novel imaging technique based on the generation of ultrasound waves with laser light. OAI may become a valid alternative to techniques currently used for the detection of diseases at their early stages. It has been shown that OAI combines the high contrast of optical imaging techniques with high spatial resolution of ultrasound systems in deep tissues. In this way, the use of nontoxic biodegradable contrast agents that mark the presence of diseases in near-infrared (NIR) wavelengths range (0.75-1.4 um) has been considered. The presence of carcinomas and harmful microorganisms can be revealed by means of the fluorescence effect exhibited by biopolymer nanoparticles. A different approach is to use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which are a contrast agent in NIR range due to their absorption characteristics in the range between 800 to 1200 nm. We report a multi-wavelength (870 and 905 nm) laser diode-based optoacoustic (OA) system generating ultrasound signals from a double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) solution arranged inside a tissue-like phantom, mimicking the scattering of a biological soft tissue. Optoacoustic signals obtained with DWCNTs inclusions within a tissue-like phantom are compared with the case of ink-filled inclusions, with the aim to assess their absorption. These measurements are done at both 870 and 905 nm, by using high power laser diodes as light sources. The results show that the absorption is relatively high when the inclusion is filled with ink and appreciable with DWCNTs.

  6. International amphibian micronucleus standardized procedure (ISO 21427-1) for in vivo evaluation of double-walled carbon nanotubes toxicity and genotoxicity in water.

    PubMed

    Mouchet, Florence; Landois, Perine; Datsyuk, Vitaliy; Puech, Pascal; Pinelli, Eric; Flahaut, Emmanuel; Gauthier, Laury

    2011-04-01

    Considering the important production of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), it is likely that some of them will contaminate the environment during each step of their life cycle. Nevertheless, there is little known about their potential ecotoxicity. Consequently, the impact of CNTs on the environment must be taken into consideration. This work evaluates the potential impact of well characterized double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) in the amphibian larvae Xenopus laevis under normalized laboratory conditions according to the International Standard micronucleus assay ISO 21427-1:2006 for 12 days of half-static exposure to 0.1-1-10 and 50 mg L(-1) of DWNTs in water. Two different endpoints were carried out: (i) toxicity (mortality and growth of larvae) and (ii) genotoxicity (induction of micronucleated erythrocytes). Moreover, intestine of larvae were analyzed using Raman spectroscopy. The DWNTs synthetized by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) were used as produce (experiment I) and the addition of Gum Arabic (GA) was investigated to improve the stability of the aqueous suspensions (experiment II). The results show growth inhibition in larvae exposed to 10 and 50 mg L(-1) of DWNTs with or without GA. No genotoxicity was evidenced in erythrocytes of larvae exposed to DWNTs, except to 1 mg L(-1) of DWNTs with GA suggesting its potential effect in association with DWNTs at the first nonacutely toxic concentration. The Raman analysis confirmed the presence of DWNTs into the lumen of intestine but not in intestinal tissues and cells, nor in the circulating blood of exposed larvae. PMID:20014232

  7. Single- and double-walled carbon nanotube based saturable absorbers for passive mode-locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Kuang-Nan; Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-04-01

    The passive mode-locking of an erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with a medium gain is demonstrated and compared by using three different types of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) doped in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films. Nano-scale clay is used to disperse the CNTs doped in the PVA polymer aqueous solution to serve as a fast saturable absorber to initiate passive mode-locking. The three types of CNT based saturable absorbers, namely single-walled (SW), double-walled (DW) and multi-walled (MW), are characterized by Raman scattering and optical absorption spectroscopy. The SW-CNTs with a diameter of 1.26 nm have two absorption peaks located around 1550 ± 70 and 860 ± 50 nm. In contrast, the DW-CNTs with a diameter of 1.33 nm reveal two absorption peaks located at 1580 ± 40 and 920 ± 50 nm. By using the SW-CNT based saturable absorber, the passively mode-locked EDFL exhibits a pulsewidth of 1.28 ps and a spectral linewidth of 1.99 nm. Due to the increased linear absorption of the DW-CNT based saturable absorber, the intra-cavity net gain of the EDFL is significantly attenuated to deliver an incompletely mode-locked pulsewidth of 6.8 ps and a spectral linewidth of 0.62 nm. No distinct pulse-train is produced by using the MW-CNT film as the saturable absorber, which is attributed to the significant insertion loss of the EDFL induced by the large linear absorption of the MW-CNT film.

  8. Growth of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films: Single- versus Multi-walled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sanju; Wang, Yunyu

    2005-03-01

    Vertically aligned high density small diameter carbon nanotube films were deposited by microwave CVD technique. The iron catalyst was prepared by E-beam evaporation on thermally grown silicon dioxide n-type Si(100) substrates. Experiments show that by continuous reduction in the thickness of Fe (˜ 3-5), smaller diameter carbon nanotube can be achieved. Scanning electron and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy show that the diameter of carbon nanotubes ranged ˜ 1 - 5 nm and the films are comprised of both the single- and double-wall carbon nanotubes. Visible Raman spectroscopy was used to further verify the diameter of nanotubes. A thick iron film (80 nm) was also used to grow nanotubes for comparison. The results show that the catalyst islands become greater than hundred nanometers with increasing thickness and induce multi-wall and bamboo-like microstructures. While for thinner layer of iron films smaller sizes of catalyst particles/droplets produce hollow concentric tubes without bamboo structure and with less number of walls (single-wall and double-wall carbon nanotubes). The base growth was the most appropriate model to describe the growth mechanism for our films. The electron field emission properties such as field electron emission microscopy (FEEM) in conjunction with the temperature dependence (T-FEEM) were measured to investigate the emission site density and their intensity variation. These findings in terms of the role of adsorption will be briefly discussed.

  9. Grafted-double walled carbon nanotubes as electrochemical platforms for immobilization of antibodies using a metallic-complex chelating polymer: Application to the determination of adiponectin cytokine in serum.

    PubMed

    Ojeda, Irene; Barrejón, Myriam; Arellano, Luis M; González-Cortés, Araceli; Yáñez-Sedeño, Paloma; Langa, Fernando; Pingarrón, José M

    2015-12-15

    An electrochemical immunosensor for adiponectin (APN) using screen printed carbon electrodes (SPCEs) modified with functionalized double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as platforms for immobilization of the specific antibodies is reported. DWCNTs were functionalized by treatment with 4-aminobenzoic acid (HOOC-Phe) in the presence of isoamylnitrite resulting in the formation of 4-carboxyphenyl-DWCNTs. The oriented binding of specific antibodies toward adiponectin was accomplished by using the metallic-complex chelating polymer Mix&Go™. The HOOC-Phe-DWCNTs-modified SPCEs were characterized by cyclic voltammetry and compared with HOOC-Phe-SWCNTs/SPCE. The different variables affecting the performance of the developed immunosensor were optimized. Under the selected conditions, a calibration plot for APN was constructed showing a range of linearity extending between 0.05 and 10.0 μg/mL which is adequate for the determination of the cytokine in real samples. A detection limit of 14.5 ng/mL was achieved. The so prepared immunosensor exhibited a good reproducibility for the APN measurements, excellent storage stability and selectivity, and a much shorter assay time than the available ELISA kits. The usefulness of the immunosensor for the analysis of real samples was demonstrated by analyzing human serum from female or male healthy patients. PMID:26093125

  10. Improvement of signal-to-noise ratio of optoacoustic signals from double-walled carbon nanotubes by using an array of dual-wavelength high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leggio, Luca; de Varona, Omar E.; Escudero, Pedro; Carpintero del Barrio, Guillermo; Osiński, Marek; Lamela Rivera, Horacio

    2015-07-01

    Optoacoustic (OA) imaging is a rising biomedical technique that has attracted much interest over the last 15 years. This technique permits to visualize the internal soft tissues in depth by using short laser pulses, able to generate ultrasonic signals in a large frequency range. It combines the high contrast of optical imaging with the high resolution of ultrasound systems. The OA signals detected from the whole surface of the body serve to reconstruct in detail the image of the internal tissues, where the absorbed optical energy distribution outlines the regions of interest. In fact, the use of contrast agents could improve the detection of growing anomalies in soft tissues, such as carcinomas. This work proposes the use of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) as a potential nontoxic biodegradable contrast agent applicable in OA to reveal the presence of malignant in-depth tissues in near infrared (NIR) wavelength range (0.75-1.4 μm), where the biological tissues are fairly transparent to optical radiation. A dual-wavelength (870 and 905 nm) OA system is presented, based on arrays of high power diode lasers (HPDLs) that generate ultrasound signals from a DWCNT solution embedded within a biological phantom. The OA signals generated by DWCNTs are compared with those obtained using black ink, considered to be a very good absorber at these wavelengths. The experiments prove that DWCNTs are a potential contrast agent for optoacoustic spectroscopy (OAS).

  11. Double-wall tubing for oil recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Back, L. H.; Carroll, W. F.; Jaffee, L. D.; Stimpson, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    Insulated double-wall tubing designed for steam injection oil recovery makes process more economical and allows deeper extension of wells. Higher quality wet steam is delivered through tubing to oil deposits with significant reductions in heat loss to surrounding rock allowing greater exploitation of previously unworkable reservoirs.

  12. Purification process for vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V.; Delziet, Lance; Matthews, Kristopher; Chen, Bin; Meyyappan, M.

    2003-01-01

    Individual, free-standing, vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes or nanofibers are ideal for sensor and electrode applications. Our plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition techniques for producing free-standing and vertically aligned carbon nanofibers use catalyst particles at the tip of the fiber. Here we present a simple purification process for the removal of iron catalyst particles at the tip of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers derived by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The first step involves thermal oxidation in air, at temperatures of 200-400 degrees C, resulting in the physical swelling of the iron particles from the formation of iron oxide. Subsequently, the complete removal of the iron oxide particles is achieved with diluted acid (12% HCl). The purification process appears to be very efficient at removing all of the iron catalyst particles. Electron microscopy images and Raman spectroscopy data indicate that the purification process does not damage the graphitic structure of the nanotubes.

  13. The excitonic effects in single and double-walled boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shudong; Li, Yunhai; Wang, Jinlan; Yip, Joanne

    2014-06-28

    The electronic structures and excitonic optical properties of single- and double-walled armchair boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) [e.g., (5,5) and (10,10), and (5,5)@(10,10)] are investigated within many-body Green's function and Bethe-Salpeter equation formalism. The first absorption peak of the double-walled nanotube has almost no shift compared with the single-walled (5,5) tube due to the strong optical transition in the double-walled tube that occurs within the inner (5,5) one. Dark and semi-dark excitonic states are detected in the lower energy region, stemming from the charge transfer between inner and outer tubes in the double-walled structure. Most interestingly, the charge transfer makes the electron and the hole reside in different tubes. Moreover, the excited electrons in the double-walled BNNT are able to transfer from the outer tube to the inner one, opposite to that which has been observed in double-walled carbon nanotubes.

  14. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Patry, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carrier liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to the CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  15. Controlled Deposition and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A carbon nanotube (CNT) attraction material is deposited on a substrate in the gap region between two electrodes on the . substrate. An electric potential is applied to the two electrodes. The CNT attraction material is wetted with a solution defined by a carver liquid having carbon nanotubes (CNTs) suspended therein. A portion of the CNTs align with the electric field and adhere to The CNT attraction material. The carrier liquid and any CNTs not adhered to the CNT attraction material are then removed.

  16. Making Macroscopic Assemblies of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Richard E.; Colbert, Daniel T.; Smith, Ken A.; Walters, Deron A.; Casavant, Michael J.; Qin, Xiaochuan; Yakobson, Boris; Hauge, Robert H.; Saini, Rajesh Kumar; Chiung, Wan-Ting; Huffman, Charles B.

    2005-01-01

    A method of aligning and assembling single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate macroscopic structures has been invented. The method entails suspending SWNTs in a fluid, orienting the SWNTs by use of a magnetic and/or electric field, and then removing the aligned SWNTs from suspension in such a way as to assemble them while maintaining the alignment. SWNTs are essentially tubular extensions of fullerene molecules. It is desirable to assemble aligned SWNTs into macroscopic structures because the common alignment of the SWNTs in such a structure makes it possible to exploit, on a macroscopic scale, the unique mechanical, chemical, and electrical properties that individual oriented SWNTs exhibit at the molecular level. Because of their small size and high electrical conductivity, carbon nanotubes, and especially SWNTs, are useful for making electrical connectors in integrated circuits. Carbon nanotubes can be used as antennas at optical frequencies, and as probes in scanning tunneling microscopes, atomic-force microscopes, and the like. Carbon nanotubes can be used with or instead of carbon black in tires. Carbon nanotubes are useful as supports for catalysts. Ropes of SWNTs are metallic and, as such, are potentially useful in some applications in which electrical conductors are needed - for example, they could be used as additives in formulating electrically conductive paints. Finally, macroscopic assemblies of aligned SWNTs can serve as templates for the growth of more and larger structures of the same type. The great variety of tubular fullerene molecules and of the structures that could be formed by assembling them in various ways precludes a complete description of the present method within the limits of this article. It must suffice to present a typical example of the use of one of many possible variants of the method to form a membrane comprising SWNTs aligned substantially parallel to each other in the membrane plane. The apparatus used in this variant

  17. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  18. Method for limiting heat flux in double-wall tubes

    DOEpatents

    Hwang, Jaw-Yeu

    1982-01-01

    A method of limiting the heat flux in a portion of double-wall tubes including heat treating the tubes so that the walls separate when subjected to high heat flux and supplying an inert gas mixture to the gap at the interface of the double-wall tubes.

  19. Structural Properties and Stability of Double Walled Armchair Silicon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Haoliang; Ray, Asok

    2012-02-01

    A systematic study of armchair double-walled Si nanotubes (DWNT) (n,n)@(m,m) (3 <= n <= 6 ; 7 <= m <= 12) using the finite cluster approximation is presented. The geometries of the tubes have been spin optimized with an all electron 3-21G* basis set and the B3LYP functional. The study indicates that the stabilities of the double-walled Si nanotubes are of the same order as those of single-walled Si nanotubes suggesting the possibilities of experimental synthesis of both single-walled and double-walled Si nanotubes. The binding energy per atom or the cohesive energy of the double-walled nanotubes depends not only on the number of atoms but also on the coupling of the constituent single-walled nanotubes. Some nanotubes with small interlayer separations do not hold the coaxial cylindrical structure after optimization. The NTS (n, n)@(n+3, n+3) are found to have large formation energies and binding energies per atom. For example, (3,3)@(6,6), (4,4)@(7,7), (5,5)@(8,8), and (6,6)@(9,9) all have large binding energies per atom, around 3.7eV/atom. All double-walled Si nanotubes are found to be semiconductors. However, the band gap, in general, is observed to decrease from single walled nanotubes to double walled nanotubes.

  20. Aligned carbon nanotube sheet piezoresistive strain sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ang; Bogdanovich, Alexander E.; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a unique set of properties that may be useful in the production of next generation structural health monitoring composites. This research introduces a novel CNT based material system for strain and damage sensing applications. An aligned sheet of interconnected CNTs was drawn from a chemical vapor deposition grown CNT array and then bonded to the surface of glass fiber/epoxy composite coupons. Various types of mechanical tests were conducted, accompanied by real-time electrical data acquisition, in order to evaluate the electro-mechanical behavior of the developed sensing material. Specimens were loaded in the longitudinal and transverse CNT sheet orientations to investigate the anisotropy of the piezoresistive effect. The CNT sheets exhibited good sensing stability, linearity, sensitivity and repeatability within a practical strain range; which are crucial sensor features for health monitoring. It was also demonstrated that the CNT orientation in the sheet had a dramatic effect on the sensitivity, thus validating the usefulness of this sensing material for directional strain/damage monitoring. Finally, pre-straining of the CNT sheet sensors was conducted to further enhance the linearity of electro-mechanical response and long-term stability of the sensors during cyclic loading.

  1. Double wall vacuum tubing and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Stahl, Charles R.; Gibson, Michael A.; Knudsen, Christian W.

    1989-01-01

    An evacuated double wall tubing is shown together with a method for the manufacture of such tubing which includes providing a first pipe of predetermined larger diameter and a second pipe having an O.D. substantially smaller than the I.D. of the first pipe. An evacuation opening is then in the first pipe. The second pipe is inserted inside the first pipe with an annular space therebetween. The pipes are welded together at one end. A stretching tool is secured to the other end of the second pipe after welding. The second pipe is then prestressed mechanically with the stretching tool an amount sufficient to prevent substantial buckling of the second pipe under normal operating conditions of the double wall pipe. The other ends of the first pipe and the prestressed second pipe are welded together, preferably by explosion welding, without the introduction of mechanical spacers between the pipes. The annulus between the pipes is evacuated through the evacuation opening, and the evacuation opening is finally sealed. The first pipe is preferably of steel and the second pipe is preferably of titanium. The pipes may be of a size and wall thickness sufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing or may be of a size and wall thickness insufficient for the double wall pipe to be structurally load bearing, and the double wall pipe positioned with a sliding fit inside a third pipe of a load-bearing size.

  2. Nanoelectrode Arrays Based on Low Site Density Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Tu; Lin, Yuehe ); Ren, Zhifeng N.

    2003-01-29

    Nanoelectrode arrays (NEAs) were fabricated from the low site density aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNTs were grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on Ni nanoparticles made by the electrochemical deposition.

  3. Heat exchanger with leak detecting double wall tubes

    DOEpatents

    Bieberbach, George; Bongaards, Donald J.; Lohmeier, Alfred; Duke, James M.

    1981-01-01

    A straight shell and tube heat exchanger utilizing double wall tubes and three tubesheets to ensure separation of the primary and secondary fluid and reliable leak detection of a leak in either the primary or the secondary fluids to further ensure that there is no mixing of the two fluids.

  4. Active sound attenuation across a double wall structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Shepherd, Kevin P.

    1991-01-01

    The possibility of achieving significant local and global sound attenuation across a flat double wall is demonstrated. It is also shown that sound can be prevented from entering the interior of a cabinlike environment. The approach used is unlike established active noise control techniques.

  5. Aligning carbon fibers in micro-extruded composite ink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Chaitanya G.

    Direct write processes include a wide range of additive manufacturing techniques with the ability to fabricate structures directly onto planar and non-planar surfaces. Most additive manufacturing techniques use unreinforced polymers to produce parts. By adding carbon fiber as a reinforcing material, properties such as mechanical strength, electrical conductivity, and thermal conductivity can be enhanced. Carbon fibers can be long and continuous, or short and discontinuous. The strength of carbon fiber composite parts is greatly increased when the fibers are preferentially aligned. This research focuses on increasing the strength of additively manufactured parts reinforced using discontinuous carbon fibers that have been aligned during the micro extrusion process. A design of experiments (DOE) approach was used to identify significant process parameters affecting fiber alignment. Factors such as the length of carbon fibers, nozzle diameter, fiber loading fraction, air pressure, translational speed and standoff distance were considered. A two dimensional Fast Fourier Transform (2D FFT) was used to quantify the degree of fiber alignment in the extruded composite inks. ImageJ software supported by an oval profile plugin was used with micrographs of printed samples to obtain the carbon fiber alignment values. The optimal value for the factors was derived by identifying the significant main and interaction effects. Based on the results of the DOE, tensile test samples were printed with fibers aligned parallel and perpendicular to the tensile axis. A standard test method for tensile properties of plastic revealed that the extruded parts with fibers aligned along the tensile axis were better in tensile strength and modulus.

  6. Improved Synthesis of Aligned Carbon Nanotube Arrays for Optical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paudel, Trilochan; Gao, Yantao; Lan, Yucheng; Macmohan, Gregs; Kempa, Krzysztof; Naughton, Michael; Ren, Zhifeng

    2009-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown on the high temperature glass (Aluminosilicate, Corning 1737) substrates with improved characteristics compared to previous attempts. The glass substrates were first coated with a buffer layer of either Chromium or Titanium, thick enough to facilitate CNT growth, but thin enough as to be largely transparent. On the top of the buffer layer, a monolayer of polystyrene spheres was deposited with close compaction, and then a Nickel catalyst film was evaporated. The polystyrene spheres were then removed to obtain honeycomb Ni patterns. On top of the Ni patterns, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were grown by the direct current plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (dc PECVD). These aligned carbon nanotubes, which can range in height from 0.5 to 10 microns, and in diameter from 50 to 350 nm, can then be coated with various dielectrics to function as components in optical waveguides, including solar cells.

  7. Structural and electronic properties of boron-doped double-walled silicon carbide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behzad, Somayeh; Moradian, Rostam; Chegel, Raad

    2010-12-01

    The effects of boron doping on the structural and electronic properties of (6,0)@(14,0) double-walled silicon carbide nanotube (DWSiCNT) are investigated by using spin-polarized density functional theory. It is found that boron atom could be more easily doped in the inner tube. Our calculations indicate that a Si site is favorable for B under C-rich condition and a C site is favorable under Si-rich condition. Additionally, B-substitution at either single carbon or silicon atom site in DWSiCNT could induce spontaneous magnetization.

  8. Magnetic alignment of nickel-coated carbon fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Chuncheng; State Key Laboratory of Electrical Insulation and Power Equipment, Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, 710049 ; Li, Xiaojiao; Wang, Guizhen

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Carbon nanofibers were subjected to a two-step pretreatment, sensitization and activation. Carbon nanofibers were encapsulated by a uniform layer of nickel nanoparticles. The prepared composites are ferromagnetic and with a small value of coercivity. Upon such functionalization, the carbon nanofibers can be aligned in a relatively small external magnetic field. Highlights: {center_dot} A simple microwave-assisted procedure for the magnetic composite. {center_dot} Dense layer of nickel on pretreated carbon nanofibers. {center_dot} Ferromagnetic properties and low coercivity. {center_dot} A long-chain aligned structure under magnetic field. -- Abstract: Magnetic composites of nickel-coated carbon nanofibers have been successfully fabricated by employing a simple microwave-assisted procedure. The scanning electron microscopy images show that a complete and uniform nickel coating with mean size of 25 nm could be deposited on carbon fibers. Magnetization curves demonstrate that the prepared composites are ferromagnetic and that the coercivity is 96 Oe. The magnetic carbon nanofibers can be aligned as a long-chain structure in an external magnetic field.

  9. Study of noise reduction characteristics of double-wall panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navaneethan, R.; Quayle, B.; Stevenson, S.; Graham, M.

    1983-01-01

    The noise reduction characteristics of general aviation type, flat, double-wall structures were investigated. The experimental study was carried out on 20-by-20 inch panels with an exposed area of 18 by 18 inches. A frequency range from 20 to 5000 Hz was covered. The experimental results, in general, follow the expected trends. At low frequencies the double-wall structures are no better than the single-wall structures. However, for depths normally used in the general aviation industry, the double-wall panels are very attractive. The graphite-spoxy skin panels have higher noise reduction at very low frequencies ( 100 Hz) than the Kevlar skin panels. But the aluminum panels have higher noise reduction in the high frequency region, due to their greater mass. Use of fiberglass insulation is not effective in the low frequency region, and at times it is even negative. But the insulation is effective in the high-frequency region. The theoretical model for predicting the transmission loss of these multilayered panels is also discussed.

  10. Fabrication of Dense Horizontally Aligned Arrays of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes from Vertically Aligned Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gang; Wang, Xueshen; Li, Qunqing; Xie, Jing; Zhu, Zhendong; Zou, Yuan; Liu, Junku; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2011-01-01

    The as-grown vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) arrays are transferred from the original silicon substrate to a poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate, which acts as a stamp. Thin SWNT films can be applied from the stamp to the target substrate and subsequently treated by an ultrasonic process to reduce their thickness to 6.6 nm. The transferred SWNT thin film retains the advantageous super-alignment and high-density properties of the vertical SWNT arrays. The linear density, transmittance, and square resistance of the thin film are as high as 15 tubes per micrometer, 99% at 550 nm, and 16 kΩ, respectively.

  11. Increased Alignment in Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance D. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an array of two or more carbon nanotube (CNT) structures on a coated substrate surface, the structures having substantially the same orientation with respect to a substrate surface. A single electrode, having an associated voltage source with a selected voltage, is connected to a substrate surface after the substrate is coated and before growth of the CNT structures, for a selected voltage application time interval. The CNT structures are then grown on a coated substrate surface with the desired orientation. Optionally, the electrode can be disconnected before the CNT structures are grown.

  12. Nanodrawing of Aligned Single Carbon Nanotubes with a Nanopen.

    PubMed

    Yeshua, Talia; Lehmann, Christian; Hübner, Uwe; Azoubel, Suzanna; Magdassi, Shlomo; Campbell, Eleanor E B; Reich, Stephanie; Lewis, Aaron

    2016-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are considered pivotal components for molecular electronics. Techniques for SWCNT lithography today lack simplicity, flexibility, and speed of direct, oriented deposition at specific target locations. In this paper SWCNTs are directly drawn and placed with chemical identification and demonstrated orientation using fountain pen nanolithography (FPN) under ambient conditions. Placement across specific electrical contacts with such alignment is demonstrated and characterized. The fundamental basis of the drawing process with alignment has potential applications for other related systems such as inorganic nanotubes, polymers, and biological molecules. PMID:26789406

  13. Growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on carbon microfibers by dc plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L H.; AuBuchon, J F.; Chen, I C.; Daraio, C; Ye, X R.; Gapin, A; Jin, Sungho; Wang, Chong M.

    2006-01-16

    It is shown that unidirectionally aligned carbon nanotubes can be grown on electrically conductive network of carbon microfibers via control of buffer layer material and applied electric field during dc plasma chemical vapor deposition growth. Ni catalyst deposition on carbon microfiber produces relatively poorly aligned nanotubes with significantly varying diameters and lengths obtained. The insertion of Ti 5 nm thick underlayer between Ni catalyst layer and C microfiber substrate significantly alters the morphology of nanotubes, resulting in much better aligned, finer diameter, and longer array of nanotubes. This beneficial effect is attributed to the reduced reaction between Ni and carbon paper, as well as prevention of plasma etching of carbon paper by inserting a Ti buffer layer. Such a unidirectionally aligned nanotube structure on an open-pore conductive substrate structure may conveniently be utilized as a high-surface-area base electrodes for fuel cells, batteries, and other electrochemical and catalytic reactions.

  14. Leak Air in a Double-Wall Chimney System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Hebenstreit, Babette; Pointner, Christian

    2013-02-01

    Operating biomass stoves in modern buildings with tight shells often requires a room-independent air supply. One possibility to arrange this supply is to use a double-wall chimney with fresh air entering through the annular gap. For this setup, a mathematical model has been developed and checked with experimental data. It turned out that for commercially available chimneys, leakage is not negligible and inclusion of leak air in the calculation is crucial for reproduction of the experimental data. Even with inclusion of this effect, discrepancies remain which call for further investigations and a refinement of the model.

  15. LDRD final report : chromophore-functionalized aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    SciTech Connect

    Vance, Andrew L.; Yang, Chu-Yeu Peter; Krafcik, Karen Lee

    2011-09-01

    The goal of this project was to expand upon previously demonstrated single carbon nanotube devices by preparing a more practical, multi-single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) device. As a late-start, proof-of-concept project, the work focused on the fabrication and testing of chromophore-functionalized aligned SWNT field effect transistors (SWNT-FET). Such devices have not yet been demonstrated. The advantages of fabricating aligned SWNT devices include increased device cross-section to improve sensitivity to light, elimination of increased electrical resistance at nanotube junctions in random mat devices, and the ability to model device responses. The project did not achieve the goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays, but a new SWNT growth capability was established that will benefit future projects. Although the ultimate goal of fabricating and testing chromophore-modified SWNT arrays was not achieved, the work did lead to a new carbon nanotube growth capability at Sandia/CA. The synthesis of dense arrays of horizontally aligned SWNTs is a developing area of research with significant potential for new discoveries. In particular, the ability to prepare arrays of carbon nanotubes of specific electronic types (metallic or semiconducting) could yield new classes of nanoscale devices.

  16. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; Stano, Kelly L; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D

    2015-10-28

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm(-3), the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures. PMID:26419855

  17. Aligned carbon nanotubes: from controlled synthesis to electronic applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Wang, Chuan; Liu, Jia; Che, Yuchi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-10-21

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) possess superior geometrical, electronic, chemical, thermal, and mechanical properties and are very attractive for applications in electronic devices and circuits. To make this a reality, the nanotube orientation, density, diameter, electronic property, and even chirality should be well controlled. This Feature article focuses on recent achievements researchers have made on the controlled growth of horizontally aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays on substrates and their electronic applications. Principles and strategies to control the morphology, structure, and properties of SWNTs are reviewed in detail. Furthermore, electrical properties of field-effect transistors fabricated on both individual SWNTs and aligned SWNT arrays are discussed. State-of-the-art electronic devices and circuits based on aligned SWNTs and SWNT arrays are also highlighted. PMID:23969970

  18. Magnetic Fractionation and Alignment of Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Yodh, A. G.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We study mechanisms of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) alignment in a magnetic field. Through magnetic fractionation, we create SWNT suspensions with varying quantities of magnetic catalyst particles. The degree of tube alignment in magnetic fields up to 9 Tesla is quantified using polarized optical absorbance anisotropy. Continuous measurements of the nematic order parameter of these suspensions in variable magnetic fields provides a way to identify the origin of magnetic torques giving rise to nanotube alignment. Initial data suggests a transition from catalyst-driven to nanotube-anisotropy driven orientation as the catalyst fraction is reduced. We relate these results to observations of nanotube aggregation. This work has been supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  19. Alignment and Load Transfer in Carbon Nanotube and Dicyclopentadiene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Severino, Joseph Vincent

    Individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are the strongest materials available but their macroscopic assemblies are weak. This work establishes a new thermosetting dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and CNT composite that increases the strength of CNT assemblies. These high volume fraction and void free structures constitute advanced materials that could one day replace traditional composite systems. To further the understanding of physical interactions between polymer and CNTs, a novel "capstan" load transfer mechanism is also introduced. Self-supporting assemblies of interconnected carbon nanotubes were stretched, twisted and compressed to fashion composites by the infusion and polymerization of low viscosity DCPD based monomeric resins. The properties of the CNTs, polymer and composite were characterized with thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA), dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and Raman spectroscopy. The microstructure was analyzed by wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Sheets were drawn at 15 m/min from a growth furnace to impart alignment then stretched to further modify alignment. The mechanical properties were determined in five orientations with respect to the growth direction. The strength was nearly three times higher along this growth direction than it was perpendicular, and modulus was nearly six times higher. Transverse stretching achieved 1.5 times the elongation but alignment was inferior due to CNT kinking that prevented alignment and consolidation. Composites yarns and sheets were investigated for the mechanical properties, microstructure and load transfer. The DCPD resin was found to wet the CNTs and lubricated deformation. This reduced loads during processing, and curing solidified the aligned and consolidated structure. The stretched and twisted composite yarns increased the failure stress 51%. In aligned composite sheet, the failure stress increased 200%. The increased stresses

  20. Growth of horizontally aligned dense carbon nanotubes from trench sidewalls.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jingyu; Miao, Jianmin; Xu, Ting; Yan, Bin; Yu, Ting; Shen, Zexiang

    2011-07-01

    Horizontally aligned, dense carbon nanotubes (HADCNTs) in the form of CNT cantilevers/bridges were grown from selected trench sidewalls in silicon substrate by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The as-grown CNT cantilevers/bridges are packed with multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with a linear density of about 10 CNTs µm(-1). The excellent horizontal alignment of these CNTs is mainly ascribed to the van der Waals interactions within the dense CNT bundles. What is more, the Raman intensity ratio I(G)/I(D) shows a gradual increase from the CNT roots to tips, indicating a defect gradient along CNTs generated during their growth. These results will inspire further efforts to explore the fundamentals and applications of HADCNTs. PMID:21586807

  1. Growth and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes using PECVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Suman; Li, Wenzhi

    2010-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been grown by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD). The density of the CNTs is controlled by the density of the nickel catalyst nanoparticles on silicon (Si) surface. Photolithography and nanosphere lithography have been employed to form a catalyst nanoparticle pattern on Si to grow periodic array of CNTS with controllable size and distribution. The electron emission properties of the CNT array have also been investigated.

  2. Copper-encapsulated vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Stano, Kelly L; Chapla, Rachel; Carroll, Murphy; Nowak, Joshua; McCord, Marian; Bradford, Philip D

    2013-11-13

    A new procedure is described for the fabrication of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) that are decorated, and even completely encapsulated, by a dense network of copper nanoparticles. The process involves the conformal deposition of pyrolytic carbon (Py-C) to stabilize the aligned carbon-nanotube structure during processing. The stabilized arrays are mildly functionalized using oxygen plasma treatment to improve wettability, and they are then infiltrated with an aqueous, supersaturated Cu salt solution. Once dried, the salt forms a stabilizing crystal network throughout the array. After calcination and H2 reduction, Cu nanoparticles are left decorating the CNT surfaces. Studies were carried out to determine the optimal processing parameters to maximize Cu content in the composite. These included the duration of Py-C deposition and system process pressure as well as the implementation of subsequent and multiple Cu salt solution infiltrations. The optimized procedure yielded a nanoscale hybrid material where the anisotropic alignment from the VACNT array was preserved, and the mass of the stabilized arrays was increased by over 24-fold because of the addition of Cu. The procedure has been adapted for other Cu salts and can also be used for other metal salts altogether, including Ni, Co, Fe, and Ag. The resulting composite is ideally suited for application in thermal management devices because of its low density, mechanical integrity, and potentially high thermal conductivity. Additionally, further processing of the material via pressing and sintering can yield consolidated, dense bulk composites. PMID:24143862

  3. Highly aligned carbon nanotube arrays fabricated by bias sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Nobuyuki; Honda, Shin-ichi; Tsuji, Keita; Lee, Kuei-Yi; Ikuno, Takashi; Fujimoto, Keiichi; Ohkura, Shigeharu; Katayama, Mitsuhiro; Oura, Kenjiro; Hirao, Takashi

    2003-05-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have been successfully grown on Si substrates by dc bias sputtering. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observations revealed that the resultant arrays consisted of dense CNTs with diameters of 40-60 nm and lengths of 300-400 nm. The CNTs were found to have a bamboo-like structure at the end of which metallic nanoparticle was formed, indicating tip growth mechanism. The energy enhancement of carbon particles is a key factor for synthesis of CNTs using dc bias sputtering system.

  4. Ultralight anisotropic foams from layered aligned carbon nanotube sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faraji, Shaghayegh; L. Stano, Kelly; Yildiz, Ozkan; Li, Ang; Zhu, Yuntian; Bradford, Philip D.

    2015-10-01

    In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than bulk graphite. Microscopy revealed that PyC coated the junctions among CNTs, and also increased CNT surface roughness. These changes in the morphology explain the transition from inelastic behavior to foam-like recovery of the layered CNT sheet structure. Mechanical and thermal properties of the foams were tuned for different applications through variation of PyC deposition duration while dynamic mechanical analysis showed no change in mechanical properties over a large temperature range. Observation of a large and linear electrical resistance change during compression of the aligned CNT/carbon (ACNT/C) foams makes strain/pressure sensors a relevant application. The foams have high oil absorption capacities, up to 275 times their own weight, which suggests they may be useful in water treatment and oil spill cleanup. Finally, the ACNT/C foam's high porosity, surface area and stability allow for demonstration of the foams as catalyst support structures.In this work, we present large scale, ultralight aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) structures which have densities an order of magnitude lower than CNT arrays, have tunable properties and exhibit resiliency after compression. By stacking aligned sheets of carbon nanotubes and then infiltrating with a pyrolytic carbon (PyC), resilient foam-like materials were produced that exhibited complete recovery from 90% compressive strain. With density as low as 3.8 mg cm-3, the foam structure is over 500 times less dense than

  5. Broadband laser polarization control with aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, He; Fu, Bo; Li, Diao; Tian, Ying; Chen, Ya; Mattila, Marco; Yong, Zhenzhong; Li, Ru; Hassanien, Abdou; Yang, Changxi; Tittonen, Ilkka; Ren, Zhaoyu; Bai, Jintao; Li, Qingwen; Kauppinen, Esko I; Lipsanen, Harri; Sun, Zhipei

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a simple approach to fabricate an aligned carbon nanotube (ACNT) device for broadband polarization control in fiber laser systems. The ACNT device was fabricated by pulling from as-fabricated vertically-aligned carbon nanotube arrays. Their anisotropic properties are confirmed with various microscopy techniques. The device was then integrated into fiber laser systems (at two technologically important wavelengths of 1 and 1.5 μm) for polarization control. We obtained a linearly-polarized light output with the maximum extinction ratio of ∼12 dB. The output polarization direction could be fully controlled by the ACNT alignment direction in both lasers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that the ACNT device is applied to polarization control in laser systems. Our results exhibit that the ACNT device is a simple, low-cost, and broadband polarizer to control laser polarization dynamics, for various photonic applications (such as material processing, polarization diversity detection in communications etc.), where linear polarization control is necessary. PMID:26060940

  6. Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofiber based Biosensor Platform for Glucose Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Al Mamun, Khandaker A.; Tulip, Fahmida S.; MacArthur, Kimberly; McFarlane, Nicole; Islam, Syed K.; Hensley, Dale

    2014-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) have recently become an important tool for biosensor design. Carbon nanofibers (CNF) have excellent conductive and structural properties with many irregularities and defect sites in addition to exposed carboxyl groups throughout their surfaces. These properties allow a better immobilization matrix compared to carbon nanotubes and offer better resolution when compared with the FET-based biosensors. VACNFs can be deterministically grown on silicon substrates allowing optimization of the structures for various biosensor applications. Two VACNF electrode architectures have been employed in this study and a comparison of their performances has been made in terms of sensitivity, sensing limitations, dynamic range, and response time. The usage of VACNF platform as a glucose sensor has been verified in this study by selecting an optimum architecture based on the VACNF forest density. Read More: http://www.worldscientific.com/doi/abs/10.1142/S0129156414500062

  7. Terahertz Science and Technology of Macroscopically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kono, Junichiro

    One of the outstanding challenges in nanotechnology is how to assemble individual nano-objects into macroscopic architectures while preserving their extraordinary properties. For example, the one-dimensional character of electrons in individual carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic transport, optical, and magnetic phenomena, but their macroscopic manifestations have been limited. Here, we describe methods for preparing macroscopic films, sheets, and fibers of highly aligned carbon nanotubes and their applications to basic and applied terahertz studies. Sufficiently thick films act as ideal terahertz polarizers, and appropriately doped films operate as polarization-sensitive, flexible, powerless, and ultra-broadband detectors. Together with recently developed chirality enrichment methods, these developments will ultimately allow us to study dynamic conductivities of interacting one-dimensional electrons in macroscopic single crystals of single-chirality single-wall carbon nanotubes.

  8. Ferrimagnetic behaviors in a double-wall cubic metal nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Ji-Yan; Zou, Cheng-Long; Jiang, Wei; Li, Xiao-Xi

    2015-05-01

    A double-wall cubic metal nanotube consists of the ferromagnetic spin-1 inner shell and spin-3/2 surface shell. It is of the ferrimagnetic exchange coupling between two shells. Considering the single-ion anisotropy and transverse field exist together, the magnetization, the initial susceptibility, the internal energy and the specific heat have been investigated by using the effective-field theory with correlations. Some interesting phenomena have been found in the thermal variations of the system. Magnetization appears two or three compensation points in certain parameters. It is an unconventional ferrimagnetic behavior in the nanotube. The shapes of total magnetization and the initial susceptibility are great influenced by the surface exchange coupling, surface single-ion anisotropy and surface transverse field. Some results of nanotube may have potential applications in different research fields, such as electronics, optics, mechanics, and even biomedicine and molecular devices.

  9. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube

    DOEpatents

    Cook, Kenneth V.; Cunningham, Jr., Robert A.; Murrin, Horace T.

    1983-01-01

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  10. Ultrasonic probe for inspecting double-wall tube. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Murrin, H.T.

    1981-05-29

    An ultrasonic probe for inspecting the interface between the walls of a double-wall tube comprises a cylindrical body member having two cavities axially spaced apart thereon. The probe is placed in the tube and ultrasonic energy is transmitted from a transducer in its body member to a reflector in one of its cavities and thence into the inner wall of the tube. A second transducer in the probe body member communicates with the second cavity through a collimation passage in the body member, and the amount of ultrasonic energy reflected from the interface between the walls of the tube to a second reflector through the collimation passage to the second transducer depends upon the characteristics of said interface.

  11. Study of noise transmission through double wall aircraft windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaicaitis, R.

    1983-01-01

    Analytical and experimental procedures were used to predict the noise transmitted through double wall windows into the cabin of a twin-engine G/A aircraft. The analytical model was applied to optimize cabin noise through parametric variation of the structural and acoustic parameters. The parametric study includes mass addition, increase in plexiglass thickness, decrease in window size, increase in window cavity depth, depressurization of the space between the two window plates, replacement of the air cavity with a transparent viscoelastic material, change in stiffness of the plexiglass material, and different absorptive materials for the interior walls of the cabin. It was found that increasing the exterior plexiglass thickness and/or decreasing the total window size could achieve the proper amount of noise reduction for this aircraft. The total added weight to the aircraft is then about 25 lbs.

  12. Structural anisotropy of magnetically aligned single wall carbon nanotube films

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B. W.; Benes, Z.; Luzzi, D. E.; Fischer, J. E.; Walters, D. A.; Casavant, M. J.; Schmidt, J.; Smalley, R. E.

    2000-07-31

    Thick films of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes and ropes have been produced by filtration/deposition from suspension in strong magnetic fields. We measured mosaic distributions of rope orientations in the film plane, for samples of different thicknesses. For an {approx}1 {mu}m film the full width at half maximum (FWHM) derived from electron diffraction is 25 degree sign -28 degree sign . The FWHM of a thicker film ({approx}7 {mu}m) measured by x-ray diffraction is slightly broader, 35{+-}3 degree sign . Aligned films are denser than ordinary filter-deposited ones, and much denser than as-grown material. Optimization of the process is expected to yield smaller FWHMs and higher densities. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Microwave conductance of aligned multiwall carbon nanotube textile sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brian L.; Bykova, Julia S.; Howard, Austin R.; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lee, Mark

    2014-12-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) sheets are a class of nanomaterial-based multifunctional textile with potentially useful microwave properties. To understand better the microwave electrodynamics, complex AC conductance measurements from 0.01 to 50 GHz were made on sheets of highly aligned MWNTs with the alignment texture both parallel and perpendicular to the microwave electric field polarization. In both orientations, the AC conductance is modeled to first order by a parallel frequency-independent conductance and capacitance with no inductive contribution. This is consistent with low-frequency diffusive Drude AC conduction up to 50 GHz, in contrast to the "universal disorder" AC conduction reported in many types of single-wall nanotube materials.

  14. Relationship between substrate morphology and growth of aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartsch, Karl; Leistikow, Annette; Graff, Andreas; Leonhardt, Albrecht

    2002-10-01

    Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) were deposited by bias enhanced microwave chemical vapor deposition on oxidized silicon substrates coated with thin Co layers. The obtained tubes were characterized with respect to the structure and catalyst particle size. No significant difference in size between the particles on the substrate after a plasma treatment and the particles included in the tubes after the deposition process was observed. Two structure types (tubular and bamboo-like) were detected and reasons for their formation are discussed.

  15. Compression behaviour of thick vertically aligned carbon nanotube blocks.

    PubMed

    Pavese, Matteo; Musso, Simone; Pugno, Nicola M

    2010-07-01

    Blocks of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes were prepared by thermal chemical vapor deposition starting from camphor and ferrocene precursors. The blocks, having a thickness of approximately 2 mm and composed of nanotubes with diameter ranging between 30 and 80 nm, were submitted to compression tests. The results were analyzed accordingly with a simple model consisting in a parallel array of nanotubes under compression and bending suffering microscopic instability and compaction. The model mostly fits the experimental stress-strain curves, with a small deviation attributed to dissipative phenomena, such as frictional forces and nanotube wall breakage. PMID:21128406

  16. Gas sensing with gold-decorated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mudimela, Prasantha R; Scardamaglia, Mattia; González-León, Oriol; Reckinger, Nicolas; Snyders, Rony; Llobet, Eduard; Colomer, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Summary Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes of different lengths (150, 300, 500 µm) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and decorated with gold nanoparticles were investigated as gas sensitive materials for detecting nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at room temperature. Gold nanoparticles of about 6 nm in diameter were sputtered on the top surface of the carbon nanotube forests to enhance the sensitivity to the pollutant gas. We showed that the sensing response to nitrogen dioxide depends on the nanotube length. The optimum was found to be 300 µm for getting the higher response. When the background humidity level was changed from dry to 50% relative humidity, an increase in the response to NO2 was observed for all the sensors, regardless of the nanotube length. PMID:24991529

  17. Gas sensing with gold-decorated vertically aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Mudimela, Prasantha R; Scardamaglia, Mattia; González-León, Oriol; Reckinger, Nicolas; Snyders, Rony; Llobet, Eduard; Bittencourt, Carla; Colomer, Jean-François

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes of different lengths (150, 300, 500 µm) synthesized by thermal chemical vapor deposition and decorated with gold nanoparticles were investigated as gas sensitive materials for detecting nitrogen dioxide (NO2) at room temperature. Gold nanoparticles of about 6 nm in diameter were sputtered on the top surface of the carbon nanotube forests to enhance the sensitivity to the pollutant gas. We showed that the sensing response to nitrogen dioxide depends on the nanotube length. The optimum was found to be 300 µm for getting the higher response. When the background humidity level was changed from dry to 50% relative humidity, an increase in the response to NO2 was observed for all the sensors, regardless of the nanotube length. PMID:24991529

  18. Growing Aligned Carbon Nanotubes for Interconnections in ICs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun; Ye, Qi; Cassell, Alan; Ng, Hou Tee; Stevens, Ramsey; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-01-01

    A process for growing multiwalled carbon nanotubes anchored at specified locations and aligned along specified directions has been invented. Typically, one would grow a number of the nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to a silicon integrated-circuit (IC) substrate, starting from (and anchored on) patterned catalytic spots on the substrate. Such arrays of perpendicular carbon nanotubes could be used as electrical interconnections between levels of multilevel ICs. The process (see Figure 1) begins with the formation of a layer, a few hundred nanometers thick, of a compatible electrically insulating material (e.g., SiO(x) or Si(y)N(z) on the silicon substrate. A patterned film of a suitable electrical conductor (Al, Mo, Cr, Ti, Ta, Pt, Ir, or doped Si), having a thickness between 1 nm and 2 m, is deposited on the insulating layer to form the IC conductor pattern. Next, a catalytic material (usually, Ni, Fe, or Co) is deposited to a thickness between 1 and 30 nm on the spots from which it is desired to grow carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Unlike the matted and tangled carbon nanotubes grown by thermal CVD, the carbon nanotubes grown by PECVD are perpendicular and freestanding because an electric field perpendicular to the substrate is used in PECVD. Next, the free space between the carbon nanotubes is filled with SiO2 by means of CVD from tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS), thereby forming an array of carbon nanotubes embedded in SiO2. Chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is then performed to remove excess SiO2 and form a flat-top surface in which the outer ends of the carbon nanotubes are exposed. Optionally, depending on the application, metal lines to connect selected ends of carbon nanotubes may be deposited on the top surface. The top part of Figure 2 is a scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of carbon nanotubes grown, as described above, on catalytic spots of about 100 nm diameter patterned by

  19. Transfer of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers to polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) while maintaining their alignment and impalefection functionality.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Ryan C; Railsback, Justin G; Anderson, Bryan D; Sarac, Mehmet F; McKnight, Timothy E; Tracy, Joseph B; Melechko, Anatoli V

    2013-02-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are synthesized on Al 3003 alloy substrates by direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Chemically synthesized Ni nanoparticles were used as the catalyst for growth. The Si-containing coating (SiN(x)) typically created when VACNFs are grown on silicon was produced by adding Si microparticles prior to growth. The fiber arrays were transferred to PDMS by spin coating a layer on the grown substrates, curing the PDMS, and etching away the Al in KOH. The fiber arrays contain many fibers over 15 μm (long enough to protrude from the PDMS film and penetrate cell membranes) and SiN(x) coatings as observed by SEM, EDX, and fluorescence microscopy. The free-standing array in PDMS was loaded with pVENUS-C1 plasmid and human brain microcapillary endothelial (HBMEC) cells and was successfully impalefected. PMID:23281833

  20. Growth of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahzad, M. I.; Giorcelli, M.; Perrone, D.; Virga, A.; Shahzad, N.; Jagdale, P.; Cocuzza, M.; Tagliaferro, A.

    2013-06-01

    Capability of patterning carbon nanotubes (CNTs) growth is of tantamount importance for a number of applications ranging from thermal to electronic. This article reports on the columnar growth of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) on patterned Silicon (Si) surface. We have developed procedures based on negative as well as positive masking approaches which allows the growth of predetermined MWCNTs patterns. We describe in detail the process steps leading to Si surface patterning. As quoted above, patterns are exploited to grow VA-MWCNTs. We have focused in particular on the growth of CNT pillars by chemical vapor despoition (CVD) technique at 850°C with camphor and ferrocene as carbon precursors and catalyst respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) is employed at low magnification to verify the correct patterning, and at high magnification to examine the surface morphology of CNTs pillars. The pillars are up to 2 mm high, their height being tailored through the deposition time. The diameter of each MWCNT is in the range 30-70 nm and the length is up to few hundred micrometers. The small CNT pillars produced, have several electrical and thermal applications. For instance they can be very useful for heat transfer systems as the lower thermal conductivity of fluids can be improved by the inclusion of nanotubes thanks to their peculiar 1-dimensional heat transfer characteristics.

  1. Growth of well-aligned carbon nanotubes with different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tingkai; Ji, Xianglin; Liu, Hongzhen; Yao, Pengyang; Liu, Wujian; Xiong, Chuanyin; Li, Tianxin; Wang, Chen

    2015-12-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with different shapes, namely coiled CNTs (CCNTs), V-shape CNTs (VCNTs) and ribbon-like CNTs (RCNTs), were prepared by floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition (FC-CVD) using triethylsilane and ferrocene as catalyst precursors and xylene as carbon source. The products were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometer. The experimental results indicated that triethylsilane limited the catalyst effectivity in the formation of the novel shapes. When the mole ratio of ferrocene and triethylsilane reached 10:1, the array morphology was maintained and several shapes appeared. It inferred that the catalyst particles were formed by two phases, namely Fe-C-Si solid solution and cementite Fe3C. The different absorption and desorption rates of carbon atoms between this two phases as well as the catalyst morphology change during the growth consequently lead to the formation of CCNTs and RCNTs. As for the VCNTs, it concluded that the partial inactivation of catalysts lead to two separated growth areas of CNTs which formed this CNTs. A mechanism is proposed to explain the relationships between the adding of triethylsilane and the formation of the novel structure.

  2. Fabrication and characterization of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard; Akin, Cevat; Purri, Matt; Shan, Jerry; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    Membranes having vertically-aligned carbon-nanotube (VACNT) pores offer promise as highly efficient and permeable membranes for use as breathable thin films, or in filtration and separation applications, among others. However, current membrane-fabrication techniques utilizing chemical-vapor-deposition-grown VACNT arrays are costly and difficult to scale up. We have developed a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT membranes. Nanotubes are dispersed in a liquid polymer, and aligned and electrodeposited with the aid of an electric field prior to crosslinking the polymer to create VACNT membranes. We experimentally examine the electrodeposition process, focusing on parameters including the electric field, composition of the solution, and CNT functionalization that can affect the nanotube number density in the resulting membrane. We characterize the CNT pore size and number density and investigate the transport properties of the membrane. Size-exclusion tests are used to check for defects and infer the pore size of the VACNT membranes. Dry-gas membrane permeability is measured with a pressurized nitrogen-flow system, while moisture-vapor-transfer rate is measured with the ASTM-E96 upright-cup test. We discuss the measured transport properties of the solution-based, electric-field-fabricated VACNT membranes in reference to their application as breathable thin films. We would like to acknowledge DTRA for their funding and support of our research.

  3. Self aligned hysteresis free carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlafman, M.; Tabachnik, T.; Shtempluk, O.; Razin, A.; Kochetkov, V.; Yaish, Y. E.

    2016-04-01

    Hysteresis phenomenon in the transfer characteristics of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNT FET) is being considered as the main obstacle for successful realization of electronic devices based on CNTs. In this study, we prepare four kinds of CNTFETs and explore their hysteretic behavior. Two kinds of devices comprise on-surface CNTs (type I) and suspended CNTs (type II) with thin insulating layer underneath and a single global gate which modulates the CNT conductance. The third and fourth types (types III and IV) consist of suspended CNT over a metallic local gate underneath, where for type IV the local gate was patterned self aligned with the source and drain electrodes. The first two types of devices, i.e., type I and II, exhibit substantial hysteresis which increases with scanning range and sweeping time. Under high vacuum conditions and moderate electric fields ( |E |>4 ×106 V /cm ), the hysteresis for on-surface devices cannot be eliminated, as opposed to suspended devices. Interestingly, type IV devices exhibit no hysteresis at all at ambient conditions, and from the different roles which the global and local gates play for the four types of devices, we could learn about the hysteresis mechanism of this system. We believe that these self aligned hysteresis free FETs will enable the realization of different electronic devices and sensors based on CNTs.

  4. Microwave conductance properties of aligned multiwall carbon nanotube textile sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Brian L.; Martinez, Patricia; Zakhidov, Anvar A.; Shaner, Eric A.; Lee, Mark

    2015-07-01

    Understanding the conductance properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) textile sheets in the microwave regime is essential for their potential use in high-speed and high-frequency applications. To expand current knowledge, complex high-frequency conductance measurements from 0.01 to 50 GHz and across temperatures from 4.2 K to 300 K and magnetic fields up to 2 T were made on textile sheets of highly aligned MWNTs with strand alignment oriented both parallel and perpendicular to the microwave electric field polarization. Sheets were drawn from 329 and 520 μm high MWNT forests that resulted in different DC resistance anisotropy. For all samples, the microwave conductance can be modeled approximately by a shunt capacitance in parallel with a frequency-independent conductance, but with no inductive contribution. This is consistent with diffusive Drude conduction as the primary transport mechanism up to 50 GHz. Further, it is found that the microwave conductance is essentially independent of both temperature and magnetic field.

  5. Ionization Gas Sensor using Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes Array

    SciTech Connect

    Kermany, A. R.; Mohamed, N. M.; Singh, B. S. M.

    2011-05-25

    The challenge with current conventional gas sensors which are operating using semiconducting oxides is their size. After the introduction of nanotechnology and in order to reduce the dimension and consequently the power consumption and cost, new materials such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are being introduced. From previous works and characterization results, it was proven that the CNTs based gas sensor has better sensitivity, selectivity and faster response time in compared with semiconducting oxides based gas sensors. As in this work, a fabrication and successful testing of an ionization-based gas sensor using aligned Multiwalled CNTs (MWCNTs) as sensing element is discussed, in which MWCNTs array and Al film are used as anode and cathode plates respectively with electrode separation ranging from 80 {mu}m to 140 {mu}m. Aligned MWCNTs array was incorporated into a sensor configuration in the gas chamber for testing of gases such as argon, air, and mixed gas of 2%H{sub 2} in air. Obtained results show that among the three gases, argon has the lowest breakdown voltage whilst air has the highest value and the breakdown voltage was found to decrease as the electrode spacing was reduced from 140 {mu}m to 80 {mu}m for all three gases.

  6. Structural magnetic loss of vertical aligned carbon fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Wen; Xiao, Peng; Luo, Heng

    2013-06-01

    The electromagnetic spectroscopy of vertical aligned carbon fibres (VACF) reinforced epoxy resin has been performed in the frequency range from 8.2 to 12.4 GHz. The composite was prepared by conventional epoxy polymerization. The results indicate VACF could possess magnetic loss and the structural magnetic properties could be tailored by adjusting the forest structure. The corresponding mechanism of the structural magnetic properties is proposed by the Faradays' law of induction. The structural magnetism is further confirmed by measuring VACF reinforced Al2O3 composites in 1073 K environment. The measurement agrees well with the trend predicted by the parallel fibres model. These results represent a crucial step towards high temperature microwave absorber design and open a new avenue for realizing magnetic losses in the dielectric material.

  7. Freestanding Aligned Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes for Supercapacitor Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, João Vitor Silva; Corat, Evaldo José; May, Paul William; Cardoso, Lays Dias Ribeiro; Lelis, Pedro Almeida; Zanin, Hudson

    2016-08-01

    We report on the synthesis and electrochemical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) for supercapacitor devices. Freestanding vertically-aligned MWCNTs and MWCNT powder were grown concomitantly in a one-step chemical vapour deposition process. Samples were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopies and Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopies. At similar film thicknesses and surface areas, the freestanding MWCNT electrodes showed higher electrochemical capacitance and gravimetric specific energy and power than the randomly-packed nanoparticle-based electrodes. This suggests that more ordered electrode film architectures facilitate faster electron and ion transport during the charge-discharge processes. Energy storage and supply or supercapacitor devices made from these materials could bridge the gap between rechargeable batteries and conventional high-power electrostatic capacitors.

  8. Aligned Carbon Nanotube Thin Films from Liquid Crystal Polyelectrolyte Inks.

    PubMed

    Tune, Daniel D; Blanch, Adam J; Shearer, Cameron J; Moore, Katherine E; Pfohl, Moritz; Shapter, Joseph G; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2015-11-25

    Single walled carbon nanotube thin films are fabricated by solution shearing from high concentration sodium nanotubide polyelectrolyte inks. The solutions are produced by simple stirring of the nanotubes with elemental sodium in dimethylacetamide, and the nanotubes are thus not subject to any sonication-induced damage. At such elevated concentrations (∼4 mg mL(-1)), the solutions exist in the liquid crystal phase and during deposition this order is transferred to the films, which are well aligned in the direction of shear with a 2D nematic order parameter of ∼0.7 determined by polarized absorption measurements. Compared to similarly formed films made from superacids, the polyelectrolyte films contain smaller bundles and a much narrower distribution of bundle diameters. After p-doping with an organic oxidizer, the films exhibit a very high DC electrical to optical conductivity ratio of σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 35, corresponding to a calculated DC conductivity of over 7000 S cm(-1). When very thin (T550 ∼ 96%), smooth (RMS roughness, R(q) ∼ 2.2 nm), and highly aligned films made via this new route are used as the front electrodes of carbon nanotube-silicon solar cells, the power conversion efficiency is almost an order of magnitude greater than that obtained when using the much rougher (R(q) ∼ 20-30 nm) and less conductive (peak σ(DC)/σ(OP) ∼ 2.5) films formed by common vacuum filtration of the same starting material, and having the same transmittance. PMID:26511159

  9. Synthesis and electron emission properties of aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neupane, Suman

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have become one of the most interesting allotropes of carbon due to their intriguing mechanical, electrical, thermal and optical properties. The synthesis and electron emission properties of CNT arrays have been investigated in this work. Vertically aligned CNTs of different densities were synthesized on copper substrate with catalyst dots patterned by nanosphere lithography. The CNTs synthesized with catalyst dots patterned by spheres of 500 nm diameter exhibited the best electron emission properties with the lowest turn-on/threshold electric fields and the highest field enhancement factor. Furthermore, CNTs were treated with NH3 plasma for various durations and the optimum enhancement was obtained for a plasma treatment of 1.0 min. CNT point emitters were also synthesized on a flat-tip or a sharp-tip to understand the effect of emitter geometry on the electron emission. The experimental results show that electron emission can be enhanced by decreasing the screening effect of the electric field by neighboring CNTs. In another part of the dissertation, vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on stainless steel (SS) substrates with and without chemical etching or catalyst deposition. The density and length of CNTs were determined by synthesis time. For a prolonged growth time, the catalyst activity terminated and the plasma started etching CNTs destructively. CNTs with uniform diameter and length were synthesized on SS substrates subjected to chemical etching for a period of 40 minutes before the growth. The direct contact of CNTs with stainless steel allowed for the better field emission performance of CNTs synthesized on pristine SS as compared to the CNTs synthesized on Ni/Cr coated SS. Finally, fabrication of large arrays of free-standing vertically aligned CNT/SnO2 core-shell structures was explored by using a simple wet-chemical route. The structure of the SnO2 nanoparticles was studied by X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy

  10. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  11. Third Harmonic Generation from Aligned Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Darius T., Jr.

    Optical properties of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been extensively studied during the last decade, and much basic knowledge has been accumulated on how light emission, scattering, and absorption occur in the realm of linear optics. However, their nonlinear optical properties remain largely unexplored. Here, we have observed strong third harmonic generation from highly aligned SWCNTs with intense mid-infrared radiation. Through power dependent experiments, we have determined the absolute value of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility, chi(3), of our SWCNT film to be 6.92 x 10--12 esu, which is three orders of magnitude larger than that of the fused silica reference sample we used. Furthermore, through polarization-dependent third harmonic generation experiments, all the nonzero tensor elements of chi(3) have also been extracted. The contribution of the weaker tensor elements to the overall chi (3) signal has been calculated to be approximately 1/6 of that of the dominant c3z zzz component. These results open up new possibilities for application of carbon nanotubes in optoelectronics.

  12. Dielectrophoresis in particle confinement: Aligned carbon particles in polymer matrix below percolation threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaapila, M.; Høyer, H.; Helgesen, G.

    2014-09-01

    We review preparation and properties of confined, aligned string-like particle assemblies formed by dielectrophoresis under alternating electric fields. Particular attention is placed on carbon particles aligned in the oligomer matrix. In these systems the particle fraction is low, below the isotropic percolation threshold. The matrix is polymerized after alignment, which locks the aligned strings in place. Application examples are discussed including particle separation, conductivity enhancement and piezoresistive sensors.

  13. Measurement of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube Array Compression Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Changhong

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the form of vertically aligned arrays or films has been of interest due to the super-compressible response and the ability to be used as electrical and thermal contacts. CNT arrays have shown the remarkable ability to react as foam-like structures and exhibit localized, coordinated buckling within specific regions. An understanding of the buckling region evolution and the resulting effects on the bulk CNT array response are important, unanswered fundamental questions necessary for the future application of CNT arrays. Here, we report on the low-cycle compression of bulk vertically aligned CNT arrays to observe initiation and growth of the buckling as a function of compressive strain and the contacting substrate material. A critical strain of ˜5.5% is found above which the buckling region length increased and below which remained at or below the applied strain. The results are corroborated with nanoindentation on the surfaces, which indicate a stiffening of the near surface by 9.4%-16.5% with increasing applied strain. Also, contact counterfaces with different stiffness, lithium niobate and a polymer gel, were compared, which resulted in changes of ˜32% in total array height after cyclic compression. Raman spectroscopy on CNT arrays before and after compressive deformation was performed observing repeatable vibrational shifts in the strained regions. Also, to observe the applicability of CNT arrays as contact sensors, electrical resistance change during compression was measured and found to increase by 4 times in the parallel versus vertical direction. Observation and results of the buckling region nature and relationship with applied strain and contacting substrates are important for applying the nanotube arrays to energy absorbing cushions, tunable dampers, thermal contacts, contact sensing, chemical sensing, or in sliding contact.

  14. High performance transistors via aligned polyfluorene-sorted carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Gerald J.; Joo, Yongho; Singha Roy, Susmit; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2014-02-24

    We evaluate the performance of exceptionally electronic-type sorted, semiconducting, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) in field effect transistors (FETs). High on-conductance and high on/off conductance modulation are simultaneously achieved at channel lengths which are both shorter and longer than individual s-SWCNTs. The s-SWCNTs are isolated from heterogeneous mixtures using a polyfluorene-derivative as a selective agent and aligned on substrates via dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly at densities of ∼50 s-SWCNTs μm{sup −1}. At a channel length of 9 μm the s-SWCNTs percolate to span the FET channel, and the on/off ratio and charge transport mobility are 2.2 × 10{sup 7} and 46 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. At a channel length of 400 nm, a large fraction of the s-SWCNTs directly span the channel, and the on-conductance per width is 61 μS μm{sup −1} and the on/off ratio is 4 × 10{sup 5}. These results are considerably better than previous solution-processed FETs, which have suffered from poor on/off ratio due to spurious metallic nanotubes that bridge the channel. 4071 individual and small bundles of s-SWCNTs are tested in 400 nm channel length FETs, and all show semiconducting behavior, demonstrating the high fidelity of polyfluorenes as selective agents and the promise of assembling s-SWCNTs from solution to create high performance semiconductor electronic devices.

  15. DC Plasma Synthesis of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers for Biointerfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearce, Ryan Christopher

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) are a class of materials whose nanoscale dimensions and physical properties makes them uniquely suitable as functional elements in many applications for biodetection and biointerfacing on a cellular level. Control of VACNF synthesis by catalytic plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) presents many challenges in integration into devices and structures designed for biointerfacing, such as transparent or flexible substrates. This dissertation addresses ways to overcome many of these issues in addition to deepening the fundamental understanding of nano-synthesis in catalytic PECVD. First, a survey of the field of VACNF synthesis and biointerfacing is presented, identifying the present challenges and greatest experimental applications. It is followed by experimental observations that elucidate the underlying mechanism to fiber alignment during synthesis, a critical step for deterministic control of fiber growth. Using a grid of electrodes patterned by photolithography on an insulating substrate, it was found that the alignment of the fibers is controlled by the anisotropic etching provided by ions during dc-PECVD synthesis. The VACNFs that have been utilized for many cellular interfacing experiments have unique mechanical and fluorescent properties due to a SiNx coating. The mechanism for SiNx deposition to VACNF sidewalls during synthesis is explored in addition to a detailed study of the optical properties of the coating. To explain the optical properties of this coating it is proposed that the source of photoluminescence for the SiNx coated VACNFs is quantum confinement effects due to the presence of silicon nanoclusters embedded in a Si3N4 matrix. These luminescent fibers have proven useful as registry markers in cell impalefection studies. To realize VACNF arrays used as an inflatable angioplasty balloon with embedded fibers to deliver drugs across the blood-brain barrier, a method for transferring fibers to

  16. Impact of carbon nanotube length on electron transport in aligned carbon nanotube networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jeonyoon; Stein, Itai Y.; Devoe, Mackenzie E.; Lewis, Diana J.; Lachman, Noa; Buschhorn, Samuel T.; Wardle, Brian L.; Kessler, Seth S.

    2015-02-02

    Here, we quantify the electron transport properties of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) networks as a function of the CNT length, where the electrical conductivities may be tuned by up to 10× with anisotropies exceeding 40%. Testing at elevated temperatures demonstrates that the aligned CNT networks have a negative temperature coefficient of resistance, and application of the fluctuation induced tunneling model leads to an activation energy of ≈14 meV for electron tunneling at the CNT-CNT junctions. Since the tunneling activation energy is shown to be independent of both CNT length and orientation, the variation in electron transport is attributed to the number of CNT-CNT junctions an electron must tunnel through during its percolated path, which is proportional to the morphology of the aligned CNT network.

  17. Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Using an Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Wiklinson, John; Banda, Sumanth; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Sauti, Godfrey; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2005-01-01

    While high shear alignment has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)-polymer composites, it is difficult to control and often results in degradation of the electrical and dielectric properties of the composite. Here, we report a novel method to actively align SWNTs in a polymer matrix, which allows for control over the degree of alignment of SWNTs without the side effects of shear alignment. In this process, SWNTs are aligned via field-induced dipolar interactions among the nanotubes under an AC electric field in a liquid matrix followed by immobilization by photopolymerization while maintaining the electric field. Alignment of SWNTs was controlled as a function of magnitude, frequency, and application time of the applied electric field. The degree of SWNT alignment was assessed using optical microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy and the morphology of the aligned nanocomposites was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The structure of the field induced aligned SWNTs is intrinsically different from that of shear aligned SWNTs. In the present work, SWNTs are not only aligned along the field, but also migrate laterally to form thick, aligned SWNT percolative columns between the electrodes. The actively aligned SWNTs amplify the electrical and dielectric properties in addition to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. All of these properties of the aligned nanocomposites exhibited anisotropic characteristics, which were controllable by tuning the applied field conditions.

  18. Modelling clustering of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Schaber, Clemens F; Filippov, Alexander E; Heinlein, Thorsten; Schneider, Jörg J; Gorb, Stanislav N

    2015-08-01

    Previous research demonstrated that arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) exhibit strong frictional properties. Experiments indicated a strong decrease of the friction coefficient from the first to the second sliding cycle in repetitive measurements on the same VACNT spot, but stable values in consecutive cycles. VACNTs form clusters under shear applied during friction tests, and self-organization stabilizes the mechanical properties of the arrays. With increasing load in the range between 300 µN and 4 mN applied normally to the array surface during friction tests the size of the clusters increases, while the coefficient of friction decreases. To better understand the experimentally obtained results, we formulated and numerically studied a minimalistic model, which reproduces the main features of the system with a minimum of adjustable parameters. We calculate the van der Waals forces between the spherical friction probe and bunches of the arrays using the well-known Morse potential function to predict the number of clusters, their size, instantaneous and mean friction forces and the behaviour of the VACNTs during consecutive sliding cycles and at different normal loads. The data obtained by the model calculations coincide very well with the experimental data and can help in adapting VACNT arrays for biomimetic applications. PMID:26464787

  19. Visible Aligned Carbon Nanotube-MoS2 Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Rui; Hong, Tu; Wang, Tianjiao; Ali, Ahmad Iffat; Chani, Devpaul Singh; Xu, Yaqiong

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have gained great interest due to their excellent electrical, mechanical and thermal properties. Recent progress in two-dimensional (2D) materials has opened up new horizons in the realm of physics and engineering that could lead to the revolution of future electronics and optoelectronics. Various hybrid structures have been developed for different applications. Here we report a facile method to synthesize ultrathin 2D hybrids between horizontally-aligned SWNT and monolayer molybdenum sulfide (MoS2) through chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These hybrid structures can be imaged under an optical microscope; and their Raman mapping indicates that MoS2 flakes are partially grown on top of SWNTs. Moreover, strong photocurrent signals have been observed in SWNT-MoS2 hybrids through scanning photocurrent measurements. These fundamental studies may provide a new way to fabricate 2D hybrids for future electronics and optoelectronics. Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235, USA.

  20. One-step catalytic growth of carbon nanofiber arrays vertically aligned on carbon substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xun; State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 ; Xu, Zheng

    2012-06-15

    Highlights: ► Acetylene as carbon resource and copper foil as catalyst. ► Three carbon nanostructures are synthesized by modulating feeding gas compositions. ► NH{sub 3} is a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays. -- Abstract: Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber (VA-CNF) arrays on carbon substrate have been synthesized via one-step chemical vapor deposition process on copper foil, by using acetylene as carbon resource. Three types of carbon nanostructures, viz. bare carbon films, CNFs and VA-CNFs grown on carbon substrate, could be selectively synthesized by only modulating the concentration of C{sub 2}H{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} in the feeding gases. It was found that NH{sub 3} was a key factor in the growth of VA-CNF arrays, which could increase the diffusion capability of copper atoms in carbon materials, therefore promote forming larger spherical Cu NPs catalysts for the growth of VA-CNFs. Furthermore, a growth mechanism in different feeding gas compositions was proposed.

  1. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains. PMID:26552843

  2. Extremely High Thermal Conductivity of Aligned Carbon Nanotube-Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Quanwen; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei; Deng, Chengcheng; Yang, Nuo

    2015-11-01

    The ultra-low thermal conductivity of bulk polymers may be enhanced by combining them with high thermal conductivity materials such as carbon nanotubes. Different from random doping, we find that the aligned carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites has a high thermal conductivity by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The analyses indicate that the aligned composite not only take advantage of the high thermal conduction of carbon nanotubes, but enhance thermal conduction of polyethylene chains.

  3. Growth of long and aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes on carbon and metal substrates.

    PubMed

    Delmas, M; Pinault, M; Patel, S; Porterat, D; Reynaud, C; Mayne-L'Hermite, M

    2012-03-16

    Well aligned, long and dense multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) can be grown on both carbon fibres and any metal substrates compatible with the CNT synthesis temperature. The injection-CVD process developed involves two stages, including fibre pretreatment by depositing a SiO(2)-based sub-layer from an organometallic precursor followed by CNT growth from toluene/ferrocene precursor mixture. Carbon substrates, as well as metals, can easily be treated with this process, which takes place in the same reactor and does not need any handling in between the two stages. The aligned CNT carpets obtained are similar to the ones grown on reference quartz substrates. The CNT growth rate is fairly high (ca. 30 μm min(-1)) and it is possible to control CNT length by varying the CNT synthesis duration. The thickness of the SiO(2)-based sub-layer can be varied and is shown to have an influence on the CNT growth. This layer is assumed to play a diffusion barrier layer role between the substrate and the iron based catalyst nanoparticles producing CNT. The CNT anchorage to the carbon fibres has been checked and good overall adhesion proved, which is in favour of a good transfer of electrical charge and heat between the nanotubes and fibre. PMID:22362164

  4. Significantly improving electromagnetic performance of nanopaper and its shape-memory nanocomposite by aligned carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Gou, Jan

    2012-04-01

    A new nanopaper that exhibits exciting electrical and electromagnetic performances is fabricated by incorporating magnetically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) with carbon nanofibers (CNFs). Electromagnetic CNTs were blended with and aligned into the nanopaper using a magnetic field, to significantly improve the electrical and electromagnetic performances of nanopaper and its enabled shape-memory polymer (SMP) composite. The morphology and structure of the aligned CNT arrays in nanopaper were characterized with scanning electronic microscopy (SEM). A continuous and compact network of CNFs and aligned CNTs indicated that the nanopaper could have highly conductive properties. Furthermore, the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency of the SMP composites with different weight content of aligned CNT arrays was characterized. Finally, the aligned CNT arrays in nanopapers were employed to achieve the electrical actuation and accelerate the recovery speed of SMP composites.

  5. Superemission in vertically-aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    Presently we used two samples of vertically aligned single-wall carbon nanotubes (VA SWCNTs) with parallelepiped geometry, sized 0.02 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm and 0.2 cm × 0.2 cm × 1.0 cm. We report absorption and emission properties of the VA SWCNTs, including strong anisotropy in both their absorption and emission spectra. We found that the emission spectra extend from the middle-IR range to the near-IR range, with such extended spectra being reported for the first time. Pumping the VA SWCNTs in the direction normal to their axis, superemission (SE) was observed in the direction along their axis. The SE band maximum is located at 7206 ± 0.4 cm-1. The energy and the power density of the superemission were estimated, along with the diffraction-limited divergence. At the pumping energy of 3 mJ/pulse, the SE energy measured by the detector was 0.74 mJ/pulse, corresponding to the total SE energy of 1.48 mJ/pulse, with the energy density of 18.5 mJ cm-2/pulse and the SE power density of 1.2 × 105 W cm-2/pulse. We report that a bundle of VA SWCNTs is an emitter with a relatively small divergence, not exceeding 3.9 × 10-3 rad. We developed a theoretical approach to explain such absorption and emission spectra. The developed theory is based on the earlier proposed SSH theory, which we extended to include the exchange interactions between the closest SWCNT neighbors. The developed theoretical ideas were implemented in a homemade FORTRAN code. This code was successfully used to calculate and reproduce the experimental spectra and to determine the SWCNT species that originate the respective absorption bands, with acceptable agreement between theory and experiment.

  6. Structure and Characterization of Vertically Aligned Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Bundles

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Márquez, Francisco; López, Vicente; Morant, Carmen; Roque-Malherbe, Rolando; Domingo, Concepción; Elizalde, Eduardo; Zamora, Félix

    2010-01-01

    Arrmore » ays of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotube bundles, SWCNTs, have been synthesized by simple alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition process, carried out at 800°C. The formed SWCNTs are organized in small groups perpendicularly aligned and attached to the substrate. These small bundles show a constant diameter of ca. 30 nm and are formed by the adhesion of no more than twenty individual SWCNTs perfectly aligned along their length.« less

  7. Numerical Comparison of Active Acoustic and Structural Noise Control in a Stiffened Double Wall Cylinder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    1996-01-01

    The active acoustic and structural noise control characteristics of a double wall cylinder with and without ring stiffeners were numerically evaluated. An exterior monopole was assumed to acoustically excite the outside of the double wall cylinder at an acoustic cavity resonance frequency. Structural modal vibration properties of the inner and outer shells were analyzed by post-processing the results from a finite element analysis. A boundary element approach was used to calculate the acoustic cavity response and the coupled structural-acoustic interaction. In the frequency region of interest, below 500 Hz, all structural resonant modes were found to be acoustically slow and the nonresonant modal response to be dominant. Active sound transmission control was achieved by control forces applied to the inner or outer shell, or acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shell. A least mean square technique was used to minimize the interior sound pressures at the nodes of a data recovery mesh. Results showed that single acoustic control monopoles placed just outside the inner or outer shells resulted in better sound transmission control than six distributed point forces applied to either one of the shells. Adding stiffeners to the double wall structure constrained the modal vibrations of the shells, making the double wall stiffer with associated higher modal frequencies. Active noise control obtained for the stiffened double wall configurations was less than for the unstiffened cylinder. In all cases, the acoustic control monopoles controlled the sound transmission into the interior better than the structural control forces.

  8. Controlled growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhaoli

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a fascinating material with extraordinary electrical thermal and mechanical properties. Growing vertically aligned CNT (VACNT) arrays on metal substrates is an important step in bringing CNT into practical applications such as thermal interface materials (TIMs) and microelectrodes. However, the growth process is challenging due to the difficulties in preventing catalyst diffusion and controlling catalyst dewetting on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity. In this work, the catalyst diffusion mechanism and catalyst dewetting theory were studied for the controlled growth of VACNTs on metal substrates. The diffusion time of the catalyst, the diffusion coefficients for the catalyst in the substrate materials and the number density of catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting are identified as the key parameters, based on which three strategies are developed. Firstly, a fast-heating catalyst pretreatment strategy was used, aiming at preserving the amount of catalyst prior to CNT growth by reducing the catalyst diffusion time. The catalyst lifetime is extended from half an hour to one hour on a patterned Al thin film and a VACNT height of 106 mum, about twenty fold of that reported in the literature, was attained. Secondly, a diffusion barrier layer strategy is employed for a reduction of catalyst diffusion into the substrate materials. Enhancement of VACNT growth on Cu substrates was achieved by adopting a conformal Al2O 3 diffusion barrier layer fabricated by a specially designed atomic layer deposition (ALD) system. Lastly, a novel catalyst glancing angle deposition (GLAD) strategy is performed to manipulate the morphology of a relatively thick catalyst on metal substrates with physical surface heterogeneity, aiming to obtain uniform and dense catalyst nanoparticles after dewetting in the pretreatment process for enhanced VACNT growth. We are able to control the VACNT growth conditions on metal substrates in terms of their

  9. Periodically striped films produced from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Sun, Yinghui; Liu, Peng; Wang, Jiaping; Li, Qunqing; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2009-08-19

    We report a novel way to draw films from super-aligned carbon nanotube arrays at large drawing angles. The obtained super-aligned carbon nanotube films have a periodically striped configuration with alternating thinner and thicker film sections, and the width of the stripes is equal to the height of the original arrays. Compared with ordinary uniform films, the striped films provide a better platform for understanding the mechanism of spinning films from arrays because carbon nanotube junctions are easily observed and identified at the boundary of the stripes. Further studies show that the carbon nanotube junctions are bottleneck positions for thermal conduction and mechanical strength of the film, but do not limit its electrical conduction. These films can be utilized as striped and high-degree polarized light emission sources. Our results will be valuable for new applications and future large-scale production of tunable super-aligned carbon nanotube films. PMID:19636102

  10. Effects of hydrogen adsorption on the properties of double wall BN and (BN)xCy nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitas, A.; Azevedo, S.; Kaschny, J. R.

    2016-01-01

    In the present contribution, we apply first-principles calculations, based on the density functional theory, to study the effects of hydrogen adsorption on the structural and electronic properties of boron nitride and hybrid carbon-boron nitride double wall nanotubes. The results demonstrate that the hydrogen decoration induces significant structural deformation and an appreciable reduction in the gap energy. When the number of hydrogen atoms introduced on the outer wall is increased, desorption of hydrogen pairs are observed. The calculations indicate that each adsorbed hydrogen atom induces a structural deformation with an energetic cost of about 68 meV/atom. It is also found that the introduction of hydrogen atoms can be applied as an efficient tool for tuning the electronic properties of such structures.

  11. Noble Metal Decoration and Alignment of Carbon Nanotubes in Carboxymethyl Cellulose

    EPA Science Inventory

    A facile microwave (MW) method is described that accomplishes alignment and decoration of noble metals on carbon nanotubes wrapped with carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) such as single-wall (SWNT), multi-wall (MWNT) and Buckminsterfullerene (C-60) were well ...

  12. Secondary nanotube growth on aligned carbon nanofibre arrays for superior field emission.

    PubMed

    Watts, Paul C P; Lyth, Stephen M; Henley, Simon J; Silva, S Ravi P

    2008-04-01

    We report substantial improvement of the field emission properties from aligned carbon nanotubes grown on aligned carbon nanofibres by a two-stage plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) process. The threshold field decreased from 15.0 to 3.6 V/microm after the secondary growth. The field enhancement factor increased from 240 to 1480. This technique allows for superior emission of electrons for carbon nanotube/nanofibre arrays grown directly on highly doped silicon for direct integration in large area displays. PMID:18572626

  13. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Simpson, John T; Hendricks, Troy R

    2013-06-11

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  14. Array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes and method of producing the array

    DOEpatents

    Ivanov, Ilia N.; Simpson, John T.; Hendricks, Troy R.

    2012-06-19

    An array of aligned and dispersed carbon nanotubes includes an elongate drawn body including a plurality of channels extending therethrough from a first end to a second end of the body, where the channels have a number density of at least about 100,000 channels/mm.sup.2 over a transverse cross-section of the body. A plurality of carbon nanotubes are disposed in each channel, and the carbon nanotubes are sufficiently dispersed and aligned along a length of the channels for the array to comprise an average resistivity per channel of about 9700 .OMEGA.m or less.

  15. Scanning tunneling microscopy of aligned coaxial nanowires of polyaniline passivated carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanien, A.; Gao, M.; Tokumoto, M.; Dai, L.

    2001-11-01

    Various methods are used to grow carbon nanotubes aiming to optimize their structural properties. Among them CVD method proved to be very successful in growing well-aligned carbon nanotubes arrays, which offers great possibilities for applications. Here we present room temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) investigations of well-aligned, polyaniline passivated, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT). STM topographic images show nanotubes are partially covered with the conducting polymer. On atomically resolved scale we observed array of caps with round shape that are separated by polyaniline. Differences in the electronic properties between nanotubes and the polymer suggest that this method could be used to synthesize large scale of nanodevices.

  16. Synthesis of Large Arrays of Well-Aligned Carbon Nanotubes on Glass

    SciTech Connect

    Bush, P. Siegal, M.P.; Huang, Z.P.; Provencio, P.N.; Ren, Z.F.; Wang, J.H.; Xu, J.W.

    1998-11-10

    Free-standing aligned carbon nanotubes have previously been grown above 7000C on mesoporous silica embedded with iron nanoparticles. Here, carbon nanotubes aligned over areas up to several square centimeters were grown on nickel-coated glass below 666oC by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition. Acetylene (C2H2) gas was used as the carbon source and ammonia (NH3) gas was used as a catalyst and dilution gas. Nanotubes with controllable diameters from 20 to 400 nanometers and lengths from 0.1 to 50 micrometers were obtained. Using this method, large panels of aligned carbon nanotubes can be made under conditions that are suitable for device fabrication.

  17. The electrostatic properties of Fiber-Reinforced-Plastics double wall underground storage gasoline tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yipeng; Liu, Quanzhen; Meng, He; Sun, Lifu; Zhang, Yunpeng

    2013-03-01

    At present Fiber Reinforced Plastics (FRP) double wall underground storage gasoline tanks are wildly used. An FRP product with a resistance of more than 1011 Ω is a static non-conductor, so it is difficult for the static electricity in the FRP product to decay into the earth. In this paper an experimental system was built to simulate an automobile gasoline filling station. Some electrostatic parameters of the gasoline, including volume charge density, were tested when gasoline was unloaded into a FRP double wall underground storage tank. Measurements were taken to make sure the volume charge density in the oil-outlet was similar to the volume charge density in the tank. In most cases the volume charge density of the gasoline was more than 22.7 μC m-3, which is likely to cause electrostatic discharge in FRP double wall underground storage gasoline tanks. On the other hand, it would be hard to ignite the vapor by electrostatic discharge since the vapor pressure in the tanks is over the explosion limit. But when the tank is repaired or re-used, the operators must pay attention to the static electricity and some measurements should be taken to avoid electrostatic accident. Besides the relaxation time of charge in the FRP double wall gasoline storage tanks should be longer.

  18. Double Wall Framing Technique An Example of High Performance, Sustainable Building Envelope Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Kosny, Dr. Jan; Asiz, Andi; Shrestha, Som S; Biswas, Kaushik; Nitin, Shukla

    2015-01-01

    Double wall technologies utilizing wood framing have been well-known and used in North American buildings for decades. Most of double wall designs use only natural materials such as wood products, gypsum, and cellulose fiber insulation, being one of few building envelope technologies achieving high thermal performance without use of plastic foams or fiberglass. Today, after several material and structural design modifications, these technologies are considered as highly thermally efficient, sustainable option for new constructions and sometimes, for retrofit projects. Following earlier analysis performed for U.S. Department of Energy by Fraunhofer CSE, this paper discusses different ways to build double walls and to optimize their thermal performance to minimize the space conditioning energy consumption. Description of structural configuration alternatives and thermal performance analysis are presented as well. Laboratory tests to evaluate thermal properties of used insulation and whole wall system thermal performance are also discussed in this paper. Finally, the thermal loads generated in field conditions by double walls are discussed utilizing results from a joined project performed by Zero Energy Building Research Alliance and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), which made possible evaluation of the market viability of low-energy homes built in the Tennessee Valley. Experimental data recorded in two of the test houses built during this field study is presented in this work.

  19. Energy transmission through a double-wall curved stiffened panel using Green's theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subha; Bhattacharya, Partha

    2015-04-01

    It is a common practice in aerospace and automobile industries to use double wall panels as fuselage skins or in window panels to improve acoustic insulation. However, the scientific community is yet to develop a reliable prediction method for a suitable vibro-acoustic model for sound transmission through a curved double-wall panel. In this quest, the present work tries to delve into the modeling of energy transmission through a double-wall curved panel. Subsequently the radiation of sound power into the free field from the curved panel in the low to mid frequency range is also studied. In the developed model to simulate a stiffened aircraft fuselage configuration, the outer wall is provided with longitudinal stiffeners. A modal expansion theory based on Green's theorem is implemented to model the energy transmission through an acoustically coupled double-wall curved panel. An elemental radiator approach is implemented to calculate the radiated energy from the curved surface in to the free field. The developed model is first validated with various numerical models available. It has been observed in the present study that the radius of curvature of the surface has a prominent effect on the behavior of radiated sound power into the free field. Effect of the thickness of the air gap between the two curved surfaces on the sound power radiation has also been noted.

  20. Preparation and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid composite fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Yuxia; Yuan, Jie; Qiu, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Aligned functionalized multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polylactic acid (MWNTs-PCL/PLA) composite fibers were successfully prepared by electrospinning processing. The MWNTs bonded with the polycaprolactone chains exhibited excellent uniform dispersion in PLA solution by comparing with the acid-functionalized MWNTs and amino-functionalized MWNTs. Optical microscopy was used to study the aligned degree of the fibers and to investigate the influences of the electrodes distance on the alignment and structure of the fibers, and results showed that the best quality of aligned fibers with dense structure and high aligned degree were obtained at an electrodes distance of 3 cm. Moreover, the MWNTs embedded inside the MWNTs-PCL/PLA fibers displayed well orientation along the axes of the fibers, which was demonstrated by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  1. A facile method to align carbon nanotubes on polymeric membrane substrate

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhou, Zhijun; Dong, Hang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huanlin; Hou, Lian

    2013-01-01

    The alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is the fundamental requirement to ensure their excellent functions but seems to be desolated in recent years. A facile method, hot-press combined with peel-off (HPPO), is introduced here, through which CNT can be successfully vertically aligned on the polymeric membrane substrate. Shear force and mechanical stretch are proposed to be the main forces to align the tubes perpendicular to the substrate surface during the peel-off process. The alignment of CNT keeps its orientation in a thin hybrid membrane by dip-coating cellulose acetate dope solution. It is expected that the stable alignment of CNT by HPPO would contribute to the realization of its potential applications. PMID:24326297

  2. A facile method to align carbon nanotubes on polymeric membrane substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Haiyang; Zhou, Zhijun; Dong, Hang; Zhang, Lin; Chen, Huanlin; Hou, Lian

    2013-12-01

    The alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNT) is the fundamental requirement to ensure their excellent functions but seems to be desolated in recent years. A facile method, hot-press combined with peel-off (HPPO), is introduced here, through which CNT can be successfully vertically aligned on the polymeric membrane substrate. Shear force and mechanical stretch are proposed to be the main forces to align the tubes perpendicular to the substrate surface during the peel-off process. The alignment of CNT keeps its orientation in a thin hybrid membrane by dip-coating cellulose acetate dope solution. It is expected that the stable alignment of CNT by HPPO would contribute to the realization of its potential applications.

  3. Ultrafast laser orthogonal alignment and patterning of carbon nanotube-polymer composite films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Ryan D.; Abere, Michael J.; Zhang, Huanan; Sun, Haiping; Torralva, Ben; Mansfield, John F.; Kotov, Nicholas A.; Yalisove, Steven M.

    2012-11-01

    Dual orthogonal alignment of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within the plane and perpendicular to a substrate is essential for many applications but difficult to obtain. Here, we demonstrate that it is possible using a combination of layer-by-layer deposition and ultrafast laser irradiation. Single-wall CNT-polymer composites preferentially aligned within the plane are irradiated with ultrafast laser pulses. After irradiation with distinct fluences at ambient conditions, morphology is seen where CNTs are formed into bundled CNTs with some orthogonal alignment. A model is presented to account for thermal expansion of the polymer and the formation of CNT bundles.

  4. Deposition of aligned bamboo-like carbon nanotubes via microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Zhou, O.; Stoner, B. R.

    2000-11-01

    Aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes have been grown on silicon substrates by microwave plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition using methane/ammonia mixtures. Scanning electron microscopy shows that the nanotubes are well aligned with high aspect ratio and growth direction normal to the substrate. Transmission electron microscopy reveals that the majority phase has a bamboo-like structure. Data are also presented showing process variable effects on the size and microstructure of the aligned nanotubes, giving insight into possible nucleation and growth mechanisms for the process.

  5. Imaging of alignment and structural changes of carbon disulfide molecules using ultrafast electron diffraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Beck, Joshua; Uiterwaal, Cornelis J; Centurion, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Imaging the structure of molecules in transient-excited states remains a challenge due to the extreme requirements for spatial and temporal resolution. Ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules provides atomic resolution and allows for the retrieval of structural information without the need to rely on theoretical models. Here we use ultrafast electron diffraction from aligned molecules and femtosecond laser mass spectrometry to investigate the dynamics in carbon disulfide following the interaction with an intense femtosecond laser pulse. We observe that the degree of alignment reaches an upper limit at laser intensities below the ionization threshold, and find evidence of structural deformation, dissociation and ionization at higher laser intensities. PMID:26337631

  6. Morphology of fibroblasts grown on substrates formed by dielectrophoretically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Felix L.-Y.; Zak, Gene; Waldman, Stephen D.

    2007-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotube templates formed on the surfaces of planar interdigitated microelectrode arrays by means of AC electric field-guided assembly are being explored as potential substrates for tissue engineering. The objective of the present study is to examine whether surface patterns of aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes can have an effect on cell growth, morphology, and alignment. Bovine fibroblasts grown on aligned carbon nanotubes for a period of 2 weeks were found to have raised bodies and pronounced cell extensions for anchoring themselves to the substrate similar to that of the cells found in native tissues. On the other hand, cells grown on various control surfaces had a flat, circular morphology. The cell cultures were visualized by means of SEM imaging and the resulting morphologies were statistically analyzed and compared. PMID:19002836

  7. Vertically aligned carbon nanotube emitter on metal foil for medical X-ray imaging.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Je Hwang; Kim, Wan Sun; Lee, Seung Ho; Eom, Young Ju; Park, Hun Kuk; Park, Kyu Chang

    2013-10-01

    A simple method is proposed for growing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on metal foil using the triode direct current plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The carbon nanotube (CNT) electron emitter was fabricated using fewer process steps with an acid treated metal substrate. The CNT emitter was used for X-ray generation, and the X-ray image of mouse's joint was obtained with an anode current of 0.5 mA at an anode bias of 60 kV. The simple fabrication of a well-aligned CNT with a protection layer on metal foil, and its X-ray application, were studied. PMID:24245201

  8. Molecular monolayers for attaching electroactive molecules to vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landis, Elizabeth C.

    Integrating molecular monolayers with nanoscale carbon materials is attractive for a variety of applications including electroanalysis, sensing, and electrocatalysis due to the high stability and high surface area of nanoscale carbon. Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers are particularly interesting because their molecular structure indicates that they may have relatively reactive surfaces compared to other types of nanoscale carbon. This work explores the use of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers as a platform for electrocatalysis. We determined the morphology and binding locations of molecular layers on the nanofiber surface, then describe two methods for covalently binding electroactive molecules to the surface. The electron transfer process through the molecular layers was studied with emphasis on understanding the effects of the molecular linkage between the electroactive molecule and the surface and understanding the role of solvent and electrolyte in the electron transfer process. We determined that the electron transfer mechanism through monolayers on vertically aligned carbon nanofibers is controlled by the morphology of the molecular layers on the surface. Several potential catalysts were attached to the surface to evaluate the carbon nanofibers as scaffolds for electrocatalytic reactions.

  9. Plasma effects in aligned carbon nanoflake growth by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B. B.; Zheng, K.; Cheng, Q. J.; Ostrikov, K.

    2015-01-01

    Carbon nanofilms are directly grown on silicon substrates by plasma-enhanced hot filament chemical vapor deposition in methane environment. It is shown that the nanofilms are composed of aligned carbon nanoflakes by extensive investigation of experimental results of field emission scanning electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. In comparison with the graphene-like films grown without plasmas, the carbon nanoflakes grow in an alignment mode and the growth rate of the films is increased. The effects of the plasma on the growth of the carbon nanofilms are studied. The plasma plays three main effects of (1) promoting the separation of the carbon nanoflakes from the silicon substrate, (2) accelerating the motion of hydrocarbon radicals, and (3) enhancing the deposition of hydrocarbon ions onto the substrate surface. Due to these plasma-specific effects, the carbon nanofilms can be formed from the aligned carbon nanoflakes with a high rate. These results advance our knowledge on the synthesis, properties and applications of graphene-based materials.

  10. Effect of Alignment on Transport Properties of Carbon Nanotube/Metallic Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Namkung, Min; Smits, Jan; Williams, Phillip; Harvey, Robert

    2003-01-01

    Ballistic and spin coherent transport in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are predicted to enable high sensitivity single-nanotube devices for strain and magnetic field sensing. Based upon these phenomena, electron beam lithography procedures have been developed to study the transport properties of purified HiPCO single walled carbon nanotubes for development into sensory materials for nondestructive evaluation. Purified nanotubes are dispersed in solvent suspension and then deposited on the device substrate before metallic contacts are defined and deposited through electron beam lithography. This procedure produces randomly dispersed ropes, typically 2 - 20 nm in diameter, of single walled carbon nanotubes. Transport and scanning probe microscopy studies have shown a good correlation between the junction resistance and tube density, alignment, and contact quality. In order to improve transport properties of the junctions a technique has been developed to align and concentrate nanotubes at specific locations on the substrate surface. Lithographic techniques are used to define local areas where high frequency electric fields are to be concentrated. Application of the fields while the substrate is exposed to nanotube-containing solution results in nanotube arrays aligned with the electric field lines. A second electron beam lithography layer is then used to deposit metallic contacts across the aligned tubes. Experimental measurements are presented showing the increased tube alignment and improvement in the transport properties of the junctions.

  11. Six Thousand Electrochemical Cycles of Double-Walled Silicon Nanotube Anodes for Lithium Ion Batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, H

    2011-08-18

    Despite remarkable progress, lithium ion batteries still need higher energy density and better cycle life for consumer electronics, electric drive vehicles and large-scale renewable energy storage applications. Silicon has recently been explored as a promising anode material for high energy batteries; however, attaining long cycle life remains a significant challenge due to materials pulverization during cycling and an unstable solid-electrolyte interphase. Here, we report double-walled silicon nanotube electrodes that can cycle over 6000 times while retaining more than 85% of the initial capacity. This excellent performance is due to the unique double-walled structure in which the outer silicon oxide wall confines the inner silicon wall to expand only inward during lithiation, resulting in a stable solid-electrolyte interphase. This structural concept is general and could be extended to other battery materials that undergo large volume changes.

  12. Alignment and structural control of nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes by utilizing precursor concentration effect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Weina; Chen, Xiaohua; Chen, Xian; Liu, Zheng; Zeng, Ying; Hu, Aiping; Xiong, Yina; Li, Zhe; Tang, Qunli

    2014-11-28

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (NCNTs) were prepared using a simple ultrasonic spray pyrolysis method. The precursor concentration effect was examined to effectively control alignment, open tip and diameter of the NCNTs by changing xylene/cyclohexylamine ratio. The structure and morphology of the resultant NCNTs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The degree of alignment and the diameter of the NCNTs increased as the xylene/cyclohexylamine precursor mixture was changed from 0 to 35% cyclohexylamine. This precursor composition also caused a large number of open-ended nanotubes to form with graphite layers inside the cavities of the NCNTs. However, further increase cyclohexylamine content in the precursor reduced the degree of alignment and diameter of the NCNTs. We demonstrate control over the NCNT alignment and diameter, along with the formation of open-ended nanotube tips, and propose a growth mechanism to understand how these properties are interlinked. PMID:25369800

  13. The role of leak air in a double-wall chimney

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenegger, Klaus; Hebenstreit, Babette; Pointner, Christian; Schmidl, Christoph; Höftberger, Ernst

    2015-06-01

    In modern buildings with tight shells, often room-independent air supply is required for proper operation of biomass stoves. One possibility to arrange this supply is to use a double-wall chimney with flue gas leaving through the pipe and fresh air entering through the annular gap. A one-dimensional quasi-static model based on balance equations has been developed and compared with experimental data. Inclusion of leak air is crucial for reproduction of the experimental results.

  14. Vertically aligned carbon nanofiber nanoelectrode arrays: electrochemical etching and electrode reusability

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Rakesh K.; Meyyappan, M.; Koehne, Jessica E.

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers in the form of nanoelectrode arrays were grown on nine individual electrodes, arranged in a 3 × 3 array geometry, in a 2.5 cm2 chip. Electrochemical etching of the carbon nanofibers was employed for electrode activation and enhancing the electrode kinetics. Here, we report the effects of electrochemical etching on the fiber height and electrochemical properties. Electrode regeneration by amide hydrolysis and electrochemical etching is also investigated for electrode reusability. PMID:25089188

  15. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films

    PubMed Central

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2013-01-01

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies––from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems––whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  16. Zipping, entanglement, and the elastic modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Panzer, Matthew A; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W; Cai, Wei; Goodson, Kenneth E

    2013-12-17

    Reliably routing heat to and from conversion materials is a daunting challenge for a variety of innovative energy technologies--from thermal solar to automotive waste heat recovery systems--whose efficiencies degrade due to massive thermomechanical stresses at interfaces. This problem may soon be addressed by adhesives based on vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, which promise the revolutionary combination of high through-plane thermal conductivity and vanishing in-plane mechanical stiffness. Here, we report the data for the in-plane modulus of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube films using a microfabricated resonator method. Molecular simulations and electron microscopy identify the nanoscale mechanisms responsible for this property. The zipping and unzipping of adjacent nanotubes and the degree of alignment and entanglement are shown to govern the spatially varying local modulus, thereby providing the route to engineered materials with outstanding combinations of mechanical and thermal properties. PMID:24309375

  17. Polarization-selective alignment of a carbon nanotube film by using femtosecond laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. B.; Byeon, C. C.; Park, D. J.; Jeong, M. S.

    2016-01-01

    We report on a considerable alignment of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in randomly oriented bundles, by using a simple drop-and-dry method and irradiation with high-intensity femtosecond laser pulses. A remarkable third-harmonic generation was observed after irradiation with the laser pulses, whereas a narrow-band white-light continuum was generated in the as-prepared films. This observation, combined with scanning electron microscopy images, confirmed the high degree of alignment of the SWCNTs. In contrast to the pulsed irradiation of carbon soot, the powerdependent laser irradiation of a highly-purified SWCNT film show polarization-dependent ablation of individual nanotubes caused by polarization-dependent absorption. Raman spectroscopy results confirmed the presence of fractured nanotubes caused by the ablation processes. Polarizationresolved absorption spectroscopy results revealed that the aligned SWCNT film had potential usage in optical polarizers.

  18. Three-dimensional micropatterns of well-aligned carbon nanotubes produced by photolithography.

    PubMed

    Chen, Q; Dai, L

    2001-03-01

    Three-dimensional micropatterns of well-aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared on photolithographically prepatterned substrates by pyrolysis of iron(II) phthalocyanine (FePc) under an Ar/H2 atmosphere at 800-1100 degrees C. The photopatterning was achieved by photolithographic cross-linking of a chemically amplified photoresist layer spin-cast on a quartz plate or a silicon wafer, coupled with solution development. Owing to an appropriate surface characteristic, the patterned photoresist layer was found in this case to support aligned carbon nanotube growth by pyrolysis of FePc, as were the photoresist-free substrate surfaces. The difference in chemical nature between the surface areas covered and uncovered by the photoresist film, however, caused a region-specific growth of the nanotubes with different tubular lengths and packing densities, leading to the formation of three-dimensional aligned nanotube patterns suitable for various device applications. PMID:12914030

  19. Growth Mechanisms of Vertically-aligned Carbon, Boron Nitride, and Zinc Oxide Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Yap, Yoke Khin

    2009-07-07

    Nanotubes are one-dimensional nanomaterials with all atoms located near the surface. This article provides a brief review on the possible growth mechanisms of a series of inorganic nanotubes, in particular, vertically-aligned (VA) carbon nanotubes (CNTs), boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), and ZnO nanotubes (ZnO NTs).

  20. Fabrication Of Double Wall Tube By U-O Press Forming And Pulsed Gas Tungsten Arc-welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasuga, Yukio; Kawamori, Shigehiro; Kuroda, Kiyoshi; Okai, Toshihiko

    2011-01-01

    Double walled tubes were trially fabricated by press-forming and arc-welding, as difficulty in fabrication was anticipated in the case of roll-forming. U-O press-formed double walled sheets are TIG arc- welded. For determination of welding conditions, overlapped flat sheets were employed and butt-welded including pulsed arc-welding. Pulse from 1 to 100Hz is effective to obtain penetrated weld bead. With this, the double walled tube could be arc-welded, which could not be achieved by conventional TIG arc-welding.

  1. Vibro-acoustic modelling of aircraft double-walls with structural links using Statistical Energy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolina, Bruno L.

    The prediction of aircraft interior noise involves the vibroacoustic modelling of the fuselage with noise control treatments. This structure is composed of a stiffened metallic or composite panel, lined with a thermal and acoustic insulation layer (glass wool), and structurally connected via vibration isolators to a commercial lining panel (trim). The goal of this work aims at tailoring the noise control treatments taking design constraints such as weight and space optimization into account. For this purpose, a representative aircraft double-wall is modelled using the Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) method. Laboratory excitations such as diffuse acoustic field and point force are addressed and trends are derived for applications under in-flight conditions, considering turbulent boundary layer excitation. The effect of the porous layer compression is firstly addressed. In aeronautical applications, compression can result from the installation of equipment and cables. It is studied analytically and experimentally, using a single panel and a fibrous uniformly compressed over 100% of its surface. When compression increases, a degradation of the transmission loss up to 5 dB for a 50% compression of the porous thickness is observed mainly in the mid-frequency range (around 800 Hz). However, for realistic cases, the effect should be reduced since the compression rate is lower and compression occurs locally. Then the transmission through structural connections between panels is addressed using a four-pole approach that links the force-velocity pair at each side of the connection. The modelling integrates experimental dynamic stiffness of isolators, derived using an adapted test rig. The structural transmission is then experimentally validated and included in the double-wall SEA model as an equivalent coupling loss factor (CLF) between panels. The tested structures being flat, only axial transmission is addressed. Finally, the dominant sound transmission paths are

  2. Broadband extraordinary terahertz transmission through super-aligned carbon nanotubes film.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yue; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Duan, Guangwu; Zhang, Xin

    2016-07-11

    We experimentally demonstrate the extraordinary transmission of THz waves through super-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) films with one-dimensional arrays of sub-wavelength rectangular gratings in the broad frequency range from 0.2 to 2.5 THz. To achieve this, two kinds of MWCNT films (1 μm and 3 μm in thickness) were fabricated by drawing from a sidewall of super-aligned nanotube arrays synthesized by low pressure chemical vapor deposition. The measured complex refraction index of the film exhibits highly anisotropic transmission of THz waves through the MWCNTs. The anisotropy depends not only on the polarization direction of the THz waves but also on the orientation of the MWCNT gratings. We found that the resonantly extraordinary THz transmission originated from the surface plasmon polaritons supported by periodically patterned carbon nanotube gratings. Our experimental results may provide important insights for emerging THz plasmonic devices based on carbon nanotubes. PMID:27410845

  3. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-03-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices.

  4. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication.

    PubMed

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices. PMID:24642903

  5. Macroscopic Ensembles of Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in Bubble Imprints Studied by Polarized Raman Microscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ushiba, Shota; Hoyt, Jordan; Masui, Kyoko; Kono, Junichiro; Kawata, Satoshi; Shoji, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    We study the alignment of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) in bubble imprints through polarized Raman microscopy. A hemispherical bubble containing SWCNTs is pressed against a glass substrate, resulting in an imprint of the bubble membrane with a coffee ring on the substrate. We find that macroscopic ensembles of aligned SWCNTs are obtained in the imprints, in which there are three patterns of orientations: (i) azimuthal alignment on the coffee ring, (ii) radial alignment at the edge of the membrane, and (iii) random orientation at the center of the membrane. We also find that the alignment of SWCNTs in the imprintsmore » can be manipulated by spinning bubbles. The orientation of SWCNTs on the coffee ring is directed radially, which is orthogonal to the case of unspun bubbles. This approach enables one to align SWCNTs in large quantities and in a short time, potentially opening up a wide range of CNT-based electronic and optical applications.« less

  6. Hybrid hydrogels containing vertically aligned carbon nanotubes with anisotropic electrical conductivity for muscle myofiber fabrication

    PubMed Central

    Ahadian, Samad; Ramón-Azcón, Javier; Estili, Mehdi; Liang, Xiaobin; Ostrovidov, Serge; Shiku, Hitoshi; Ramalingam, Murugan; Nakajima, Ken; Sakka, Yoshio; Bae, Hojae; Matsue, Tomokazu; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Biological scaffolds with tunable electrical and mechanical properties are of great interest in many different fields, such as regenerative medicine, biorobotics, and biosensing. In this study, dielectrophoresis (DEP) was used to vertically align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within methacrylated gelatin (GelMA) hydrogels in a robust, simple, and rapid manner. GelMA-aligned CNT hydrogels showed anisotropic electrical conductivity and superior mechanical properties compared with pristine GelMA hydrogels and GelMA hydrogels containing randomly distributed CNTs. Skeletal muscle cells grown on vertically aligned CNTs in GelMA hydrogels yielded a higher number of functional myofibers than cells that were cultured on hydrogels with randomly distributed CNTs and horizontally aligned CNTs, as confirmed by the expression of myogenic genes and proteins. In addition, the myogenic gene and protein expression increased more profoundly after applying electrical stimulation along the direction of the aligned CNTs due to the anisotropic conductivity of the hybrid GelMA-vertically aligned CNT hydrogels. We believe that platform could attract great attention in other biomedical applications, such as biosensing, bioelectronics, and creating functional biomedical devices. PMID:24642903

  7. Stack growth of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes using floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saheed, Mohamed Shuaib Mohamed; Mohamed, Norani Muti

    2015-04-01

    The Letter reports another approach to grow vertically aligned millimeter length multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapor deposition technique. In this stack growth, the first grown MWCNT layer is observe to have been lift-off from the substrate surface by the newly grown underneath layer as a result of the diffusion of iron catalyst and carbon source through the first layer. The first grown layer acts as a permeable membrane allowing the catalyst vapor and carbon to reach the bottom layer and the top surface of the substrate, resulting in the growth of another layer of MWCNT underneath it.

  8. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Liu, Gang; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Lau, Chun Ning; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu, Jianlin

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO2) ridges created by the growth of HfO2 thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO2 film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO2 area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO2 ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  9. Torsion-sensing material from aligned carbon nanotubes wound onto a rod demonstrating wide dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeo; Yamamoto, Yuki; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Sekiguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Kobashi, Kazufumi; Futaba, Don N; Hata, Kenji

    2013-04-23

    A rational torsion sensing material was fabricated by wrapping aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) thin films onto the surface of a rod with a predetermined and fixed wrapping angle without destroying the internal network of the SWCNTs within the film. When applied as a torsion sensor, torsion could be measured up to 400 rad/meter, that is, more than 4 times higher than conventional optical fiber torsion sensors, by monitoring increases in resistance due to fracturing of the aligned SWCNT thin films. PMID:23464614

  10. Enhanced water vapor separation by temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotube membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Wonjae; Yun, Jongju; Khan, Fakhre Alam; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-08-01

    Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of magnitude higher than the Knudsen prediction regardless of membrane temperature. The water vapor separation performance of hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene membranes could also be significantly enhanced at low temperatures. This work combines the membrane-based separation technology with temperature control to enhance water vapor separation performance.Here we present a new strategy of selectively rejecting water vapor while allowing fast transport of dry gases using temperature-controlled aligned-multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWNTs). The mechanism is based on the water vapor condensation at the entry region of nanotubes followed by removing aggregated water droplets at the tip of the superhydrophobic aligned-MWNTs. The first condensation step could be dramatically enhanced by decreasing the nanotube temperature. The permeate-side relative humidity was as low as ~17% and the helium-water vapor separation factor was as high as 4.62 when a helium-water vapor mixture with a relative humidity of 100% was supplied to the aligned-MWNTs. The flow through the interstitial space of the aligned-MWNTs allowed the permeability of single dry gases an order of

  11. Understanding high-yield catalyst-free growth of horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes nucleated by activated C60 species.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Grimm, Daniel; Popov, Alexey; Makharza, Sami; Knupfer, Martin; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-12-21

    Our understanding of the catalyst-free growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition is limited. Toward improving our knowledge base, we conducted systematic investigations into the initial preparation of C(60) fullerenes as nucleation precursors for single-wall and even double-wall carbon nanotube fabrication. The role of the dispersing media is shown to be crucial and is related to the initial fullerene cluster size. Oxygen-based groups, in particular, epoxy groups, are shown to be vital prior to actual growth. Moreover, the presence of oxygen groups during the growth phase is necessary for tube development. We also demonstrate the possibility of fabricating the tubes in crossbar configurations with bespoke crossing angles in a single synthesis step, unlike other routes which require at least two synthesis steps. The systematic studies significantly advance our understanding of the growth mechanisms involved in all-carbon catalyst-free growth of single- and double-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:23186015

  12. Mechanics of capillary forming of aligned carbon nanotube assemblies.

    PubMed

    Tawfick, Sameh; Zhao, Zhouzhou; Maschmann, Matthew; Brieland-Shoultz, Anna; De Volder, Michael; Baur, Jeffery W; Lu, Wei; Hart, A John

    2013-04-30

    Elastocapillary self-assembly is emerging as a versatile technique to manufacture three-dimensional (3D) microstructures and complex surface textures from arrangements of micro- and nanoscale filaments. Understanding the mechanics of capillary self-assembly is essential to engineering of properties such as shape-directed actuation, anisotropic wetting and adhesion, and mechanical energy transfer and dissipation. We study elastocapillary self-assembly (herein called "capillary forming") of carbon nanotube (CNT) microstructures, combining in situ optical imaging, micromechanical testing, and finite element modeling. By imaging, we identify sequential stages of liquid infiltration, evaporation, and solid shrinkage, whose kinetics relate to the size and shape of the CNT microstructure. We couple these observations with measurements of the orthotropic elastic moduli of CNT forests to understand how the dynamic of shrinkage of the vapor-liquid interface is coupled to the compression of the forest. We compare the kinetics of shrinkage to the rate of evporation from liquid droplets having the same size and geometry. Moreover, we show that the amount of shrinkage during evaporation is governed by the ability of the CNTs to slip against one another, which can be manipulated by the deposition of thin conformal coatings on the CNTs by atomic layer deposition (ALD). This insight is confirmed by finite element modeling of pairs of CNTs as corrugated beams in contact and highlights the coupled role of elasticity and friction in shrinkage and stability of nanoporous solids. Overall, this study shows that nanoscale porosity can be tailored via the filament density and adhesion at contact points, which is important to the development of lightweight multifunctional materials. PMID:23537107

  13. Preparation, characterization, and in vitro release studies of insulin-loaded double-walled poly(lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres.

    PubMed

    Ansary, Rezaul H; Rahman, Mokhlesur M; Awang, Mohamed B; Katas, Haliza; Hadi, Hazrina; Doolaanea, Abd Almonen

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to fabricate insulin-loaded double-walled and single-polymer poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres using a fast degrading glucose core, hydroxyl-terminated poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (Glu-PLGA), and a moderate degrading carboxyl-terminated PLGA polymers. A modified water-in-oil-in-oil-in-water (w/o/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation technique was employed to prepare double-walled microspheres, whereas single-polymer microspheres were fabricated by a conventional water-in-oil-in-water (w/o/w) emulsion solvent evaporation method. The effect of fabrication techniques and polymer characteristics on microspheres size, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro release, and insulin stability was evaluated. The prepared double-walled microspheres were essentially non-porous, smooth surfaced, and spherical in shape, whereas single-polymer microspheres were highly porous. Double-walled microspheres exhibited a significantly reduced initial burst followed by sustained and almost complete release of insulin compared to single-polymer microspheres. Initial burst release was further suppressed from double-walled microspheres when the mass ratio of the component polymers was increased. In conclusion, double-walled microspheres made of Glu-PLGA and PLGA can be a potential delivery system of therapeutic insulin. PMID:26817478

  14. Giant piezoresistivity in aligned carbon nanotube nanocomposite: account for nanotube structural distortion at crossed tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Gong, S; Zhu, Z H

    2015-01-28

    High piezoresistivity is critical for multifunctional carbon nanotube polymer composites with sensing capability. By developing a new percolation network model, this work reveals theoretically that a giant piezoresistivity in the composites can be potentially achieved by controlled nanotube alignment resulting from field based alignment techniques. The tube-tube and/or tube-matrix interaction in conjunction with the aligned carbon nanotube networks are fully considered in the newly proposed model. The structural distortion of nanotubes is determined self-consistently by minimizing the pseudo-potential energy at crossed-tube junctions based on the Lennard-Jones potential and simulation of coarse grain molecular dynamics. The tunneling transport through crossed-tube junctions is calculated by the Landauer-Büttiker formula with empirical fitting by first-principle calculation. The simulation results also reveal that the piezoresistivity can be further improved by using low carbon nanotube loadings near the percolation threshold, carbon nanotubes with a small aspect ratio, high intrinsic conductivity and polymers with a small Poisson's ratio. This giant piezoresistive effect offers a tremendously promising future, which needs further thorough exploration. PMID:25492244

  15. Vertical alignment of single-walled carbon nanotube films formed by electrophoretic deposition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Kyoung; Lee, Haiwon; Tanaka, Hirofumi; Weiss, Paul S

    2008-11-18

    Films of chemically shortened and functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been formed on a gold electrode by electrophoretic deposition. Applying ultrasonic energy resulted in dramatic changes of the film morphology; the deposited SWNT bundles reassembled and oriented normal to the electrode. Oriented SWNT bundles with high density (more than 250 bundles/microm (2)) not only presented narrow size distributions, but uniformly spread on the electrode. We discuss the mechanism of SWNT orientation by analyzing the variation in the film morphology with ultrasonication time. In addition, we suggest that the 3D displays of AFM images can lead to misjudgment of nanotube alignment. The method for aligning SWNTs normal to the electrode may be competitive with chemical vapor deposition or screen printing, the predominant methods by which vertically aligned SWNT films have been fabricated to date. PMID:18925761

  16. A polarized infrared thermal detector made from super-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yang; Liu, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Li, Tianyi; Jiang, Zhe; Shi, Junpeng; Liu, Liang; Li, QunQing; Zhao, Yonggang; Feng, Zhenghe; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2011-01-14

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films, easily drawn from super-aligned CNT arrays with a large area and a good compatibility with semiconductor technology, have been used as light sensitive materials for infrared (IR) detection. A bolometric CNT detector made from one layer of super-aligned CNT film shows a 15.4% resistance change under 10 mW mm(-2) of IR illumination and a fast characteristic response time of 4.4 ms due to its ultra-small heat capacity per unit area in vacuum at room temperature. Besides the power intensity detection, the anisotropic property of the super-aligned CNT films makes them ideal materials to detect the polarization of IR light simultaneously, which provides great potential in infrared imaging polarimetry. Theoretical analyses have been carried out to investigate the influences of CNT film properties on the responsivity and response time of the detector. PMID:21135478

  17. CVD-grown horizontally aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes: synthesis routes and growth mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Imad; Bachmatiuk, Alicja; Warner, Jamie H; Büchner, Bernd; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Rümmeli, Mark H

    2012-07-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have attractive electrical and physical properties, which make them very promising for use in various applications. For some applications however, in particular those involving electronics, SWCNTs need to be synthesized with a high degree of control with respect to yield, length, alignment, diameter, and chirality. With this in mind, a great deal of effort is being directed to the precision control of vertically and horizontally aligned nanotubes. In this review the focus is on the latter, horizontally aligned tubes grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). The reader is provided with an in-depth review of the established vapor deposition orientation techniques. Detailed discussions on the characterization routes, growth parameters, and growth mechanisms are also provided. PMID:22619167

  18. Electrokinetics of scalable, electric-field-assisted fabrication of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard J.; Akin, Cevat; Giraldo, Gabriel; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco; Shan, Jerry W.

    2015-06-01

    Composite thin films incorporating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) offer promise for a variety of applications where the vertical alignment of the CNTs is critical to meet performance requirements, e.g., highly permeable membranes, thermal interfaces, dry adhesives, and films with anisotropic electrical conductivity. However, current VACNT fabrication techniques are complex and difficult to scale up. Here, we describe a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT composites. Multiwall-carbon nanotubes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, aligned with an alternating-current (AC) electric field, and electrophoretically concentrated to one side of the thin film with a direct-current (DC) component to the electric field. This approach enables the fabrication of highly concentrated, individually aligned nanotube composites from suspensions of very dilute ( ϕ = 4 × 10 - 4 ) volume fraction. We experimentally investigate the basic electrokinetics of nanotube alignment under AC electric fields, and show that simple models can adequately predict the rate and degree of nanotube alignment using classical expressions for the induced dipole moment, hydrodynamic drag, and the effects of Brownian motion. The composite AC + DC field also introduces complex fluid motion associated with AC electro-osmosis and the electrochemistry of the fluid/electrode interface. We experimentally probe the electric-field parameters behind these electrokinetic phenomena, and demonstrate, with suitable choices of processing parameters, the ability to scalably produce large-area composites containing VACNTs at number densities up to 1010 nanotubes/cm2. This VACNT number density exceeds that of previous electric-field-fabricated composites by an order of magnitude, and the surface-area coverage of the 40 nm VACNTs is comparable to that of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown arrays of smaller-diameter nanotubes.

  19. Testing of and model development for double-walled thermal tubular

    SciTech Connect

    Satchwell, R.M.; Johnson, L.A. Jr.

    1992-08-01

    Insulated tubular products have become essential for use in steam injection projects. In a steam injection project, steam is created at the surface by either steam boilers or generators. During this process, steam travels from a boiler through surface lines to the wellhead, down the wellbore to the sandface, and into the reservoir. For some projects to be an economic success, cost must be reduced and oil recoveries must be increased by reducing heat losses in the wellbore. With reduced heats losses, steam generation costs are lowered and higher quality steam can be injected into the formation. To address this need, work under this project consisted of the design and construction of a thermal flow loop, testing a double-walled tubular product that was manufactured by Inter-Mountain Pipe Company, and the development and verification of a thermal hydraulic numerical simulator for steam injection. Four different experimental configurations of the double-walled pipe were tested. These configurations included: (1) bare pipe case, (2) bare pipe case with an applied annular vacuum, (3) insulated annular pipe case, and (4) insulated annular pipe case with an applied annular vacuum. Both the pipe body and coupling were tested with each configuration. The results of the experimental tests showed that the Inter-Mountain Pipe Company double-walled pipe body achieved a 98 percent reduction in heat loss when insulation was applied to the annular portion of the pipe. The application of insulation to the annular portion of the coupling reduced the heat losses by only 6 percent. In tests that specified the use of a vacuum in the annular portion of the pipe, leaks were detected and the vacuum could not be held.

  20. Synthesis and characterization of vertically aligned carbon nanotube forest for solid state fiber spinning.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Seong Woo; Hwang, Jae Won; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2012-07-01

    Continuous carbon nanotubes (CNT) fibers were directly spun from a vertically aligned CNT forest grown by a plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) process. The correlation of the CNT structure with Fe catalyst coarsening, reaction time, and the CNTs bundling phenomenon was investigated. We controlled the diameters and walls of the CNTs and minimized the amorphous carbon deposition on the CNTs for favorable bundling and spinning of the CNT fibers. The CNT fibers were fabricated with an as-grown vertically aligned CNT forest by a PECVD process using nanocatalyst an Al2O3 buffer layer, followed by a dry spinning process. Well-aligned CNT fibers were successfully manufactured using a dry spinning process and a surface tension-based densification process by ethanol. The mechanical properties were characterized for the CNT fibers spun from different lengths of a vertically aligned CNT forest. Highly oriented CNT fibers from the dry spinning process were characterized with high strength, high modulus, and high electrical as well as thermal conductivities for possible application as ultralight, highly strong structural materials. Examples of structural materials include space elevator cables, artificial muscle, and armor material, while multifunctional materials include E-textile, touch panels, biosensors, and super capacitors. PMID:22966627

  1. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M; Hároz, Erik H; Doorn, Stephen K; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Adams, W Wade; Hauge, Robert H; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm(2)) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 10(6) nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm(2). The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios. PMID:27043199

  2. Wafer-scale monodomain films of spontaneously aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiaowei; Gao, Weilu; Xie, Lijuan; Li, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Lei, Sidong; Robinson, John M.; Hároz, Erik H.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Wang, Weipeng; Vajtai, Robert; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Adams, W. Wade; Hauge, Robert H.; Kono, Junichiro

    2016-07-01

    The one-dimensional character of electrons, phonons and excitons in individual single-walled carbon nanotubes leads to extremely anisotropic electronic, thermal and optical properties. However, despite significant efforts to develop ways to produce large-scale architectures of aligned nanotubes, macroscopic manifestations of such properties remain limited. Here, we show that large (>cm2) monodomain films of aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes can be prepared using slow vacuum filtration. The produced films are globally aligned within ±1.5° (a nematic order parameter of ∼1) and are highly packed, containing 1 × 106 nanotubes in a cross-sectional area of 1 μm2. The method works for nanotubes synthesized by various methods, and film thickness is controllable from a few nanometres to ∼100 nm. We use the approach to create ideal polarizers in the terahertz frequency range and, by combining the method with recently developed sorting techniques, highly aligned and chirality-enriched nanotube thin-film devices. Semiconductor-enriched devices exhibit polarized light emission and polarization-dependent photocurrent, as well as anisotropic conductivities and transistor action with high on/off ratios.

  3. Mechanical properties of aligned carbon nanotube architectures: origin from 3D morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Itai Y.; Wardle, Brian L.

    The scale-dependent properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) continue to motivate their study for next-generation material architectures. While recent work has shown that aligned CNT arrays can be made on the cm-scale, such systems exhibit properties that are orders of magnitude below those predicted by existing theories. This deviation mainly stems from the rudimentary assumptions made about the CNT morphology: CNTs are either devoid of local curvature (i.e. waviness) or have waviness that is easy to model, e.g. using helices and sine waves. Here, we use a simulation framework comprised of 105 CNTs with realistic 3D stochastic morphologies to elucidate the role morphology plays in the orders of magnitude over-prediction of the effective stiffness of aligned CNT structures. Application to aligned CNT polymer and carbon matrix nanocomposites reveals that the elimination of the torsion deformation mechanism, which dominates the effective compliance of CNT arrays, through CNT interactions with the matrix is responsible for the stiffness enhancement in CNT nanocomposites. This works paves the way to more accurate property prediction of CNT nanocomposites, and further work to predict the transport properties of aligned CNT architectures is planned.

  4. Molecular dynamics investigation into the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Ajori, S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the oscillatory behavior of double-walled boron-nitride nanotubes is investigated based on the molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The MD simulations are performed using the Lennard-Jones and Tersoff-like potential functions. The influences of friction between the walls of inner and outer tubes, flexibility, velocity and outer length-to-inner length ratio on the frequency of oscillations are studied. The results show that the flexibility increases the frequency during the simulation. Furthermore, it is observed that by increasing the initial velocity, the frequency decreases.

  5. A simple method of producing aligned carbon nanotubes from an unconventional precursor Camphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Mukul; Ando, Yoshinori

    2003-06-01

    Vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes of diameter 20-40 nm and length ˜200 μm were grown on quartz substrate by pyrolyzing camphor with ferrocene catalyst at 900 °C in argon atmosphere at ambient pressure. Catalyst requirement with camphor was found to be low by a factor of 10 as compared to available reports of aligned nanotubes from conventional precursors. Because of the low catalyst requirement with camphor, as-grown nanotubes are least contaminated with metal particles, whereas the oxygen atom present in camphor helps in oxidizing amorphous carbon in-situ, eliminating the need of post-deposition purification. Good graphitization of the tube layers was observed by TEM, whereas high purity was confirmed by EDX analysis. The estimated yield of as-grown nanotubes is ˜90%.

  6. A black body absorber from vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kohei; Ishii, Juntaro; Kishida, Hideo; Hayamizu, Yuhei; Yasuda, Satoshi; Futaba, Don N.; Yumura, Motoo; Hata, Kenji

    2009-01-01

    Among all known materials, we found that a forest of vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes behaves most similarly to a black body, a theoretical material that absorbs all incident light. A requirement for an object to behave as a black body is to perfectly absorb light of all wavelengths. This important feature has not been observed for real materials because materials intrinsically have specific absorption bands because of their structure and composition. We found a material that can absorb light almost perfectly across a very wide spectral range (0.2–200 μm). We attribute this black body behavior to stem from the sparseness and imperfect alignment of the vertical single-walled carbon nanotubes. PMID:19339498

  7. Preferential syntheses of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes for direct use in FETs.

    PubMed

    Qu, Liangti; Du, Feng; Dai, Liming

    2008-09-01

    We have combined fast heating with plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) for preferential growth of semiconducting vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (VA-SWNTs). Raman spectroscopic estimation indicated a high yield of up to 96% semiconducting SWNTs in the VA-SWNT array. The as-synthesized semiconducting SWNTs can be used directly for fabricating FET devices without the need for any postsynthesis purification or separation. PMID:18665651

  8. Low temperature growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes by thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Cheol Jin; Son, Kwon Hee; Park, Jeunghee; Yoo, Jae Eun; Huh, Yoon; Lee, Jeong Yong

    2001-04-01

    Vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are grown on Fe-deposited silicon oxide substrate at 550°C by thermal chemical vapor deposition of C 2H 2 gas. We employed two-stage heating technique that the reactants heated at 850°C in the first zone flow into the second zone maintained at 550°C for CNT growth. The CNTs have bamboo structure, closed tip, and defective graphite sheets.

  9. RAPID COMMUNICATION: Aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube-reinforced composites: processing and mechanical characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thostenson, Erik T.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    2002-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been the subject of considerable attention because of their exceptional physical and mechanical properties. These properties observed at the nanoscale have motivated researchers to utilize carbon nanotubes as reinforcement in composite materials. In this research, a micro-scale twin-screw extruder was used to achieve dispersion of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in a polystyrene matrix. Highly aligned nanocomposite films were produced by extruding the polymer melt through a rectangular die and drawing the film prior to cooling. Randomly oriented nanocomposites were produced by achieving dispersion first with the twin-screw extruder followed by pressing a film using a hydraulic press. The tensile behaviour of the aligned and random nanocomposite films with 5 wt.{%} loading of nanotubes were characterized. Addition of nanotubes increased the tensile modulus, yield strength and ultimate strengths of the polymer films, and the improvement in elastic modulus with the aligned nanotube composite is five times greater than the improvement for the randomly oriented composite.

  10. Microwave and Millimeter Wave Properties of Vertically-Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haddadi, K.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Hivin, Q.; Ducournau, G.; Teo, E.; Coquet, P.; Tay, B. K.; Lepilliet, S.; Avramovic, V.; Chazelas, J.; Decoster, D.

    2016-05-01

    We present the experimental determination of the complex permittivity of vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) films grown on quartz substrates in the microwave regime from 10 MHz up to 67 GHz, with the electrical field perpendicular to the main axis of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), based on coplanar waveguide transmission line approach together with the measurement of the microwave impedance of top metalized vertically—aligned SWCNTs grown on conductive silicon substrates up to 26 GHz. From coplanar waveguide measurements, we obtain a real part of the permittivity almost equal to unity, which is interpreted in terms of low carbon atom density (3 × 1019 at/cm3) associated with a very low imaginary part of permittivity (<10-3) in the frequency range considered due to a very small perpendicular conductivity. The microwave impedance of a vertically aligned CNTs bundle equivalent to a low resistance reveals a good conductivity (3 S/cm) parallel to the CNTs axis. From these two kinds of data, we experimentally demonstrate the tensor nature of the vertically grown CNTs bundles.

  11. Aligned carbon nanotube with electro-catalytic activity for oxygen reduction reaction

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing; Wang, Xiaoping

    2010-08-03

    A catalyst for an electro-chemical oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) of a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes having a catalytically active transition metal incorporated longitudinally in said nanotubes. A method of making an electro-chemical catalyst for an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) having a bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes, where a substrate is in a first reaction zone, and a combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into the first reaction zone which is maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is then introduced to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes over the substrate with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

  12. Label-free electronic detection of bio-toxins using aligned carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Palaniappan, Al; Goh, W H; Fam, D W H; Rajaseger, G; Chan, C E Z; Hanson, B J; Moochhala, S M; Mhaisalkar, S G; Liedberg, B

    2013-05-15

    A facile route for sensitive label-free detection of bio-toxins using aligned single walled carbon nanotubes is described. This approach involves patterning of a catalyst on the surface of a quartz substrate using a sub-100 μm stripe-patterned polydimethylsiloxane stamp for aligned carbon nanotube generation followed by fabrication of field effect transistor (FET). Atomic force microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy are employed to characterize the synthesized nanotubes. Unlike previous reports, the adopted approach enables direct electronic detection of bio-toxins with sensitivities comparable to ELISA. As a proof of concept, the fabricated FET responds to nM concentration levels (with a LOD of ∼2 nM) of epsilon toxin produced by Clostridium perfringens and a prominent food toxin. This facile approach could be customized to detect other classes of toxins and biomarkers upon appropriate functionalization of the aligned carbon nanotubes. Finally, we demonstrate the use of the FET-platform for detection of toxin in more complex matrices such as orange juice. PMID:23298625

  13. Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers for interfacing with live systems

    SciTech Connect

    Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Desikan, Ramya; McKnight, Timothy E; Klein, Kate L; Rack, P. D.

    2009-01-01

    The ability to synthesize carbon nanofibers with a high degree of control over their geometry, location, and structure via catalytic plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition has expanded the possibility of new applications. The nanoscale dimensions and high aspect ratio of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs), along with favorable physical and chemical characteristics, has provided a nanostructured material with properties that are well-suited for interfacing with live cells and tissues. This review surveys the aspects of synthesis, integration, and functionalization of VACNFs, followed by examples of how VACNFs have been used to interface with live systems for a variety of advanced nanoscale biological applications.

  14. Aerosynthesis: Growths of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanofibers with Air DC Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kodumagulla, A; Varanasi, V; Pearce, Ryan; Wu, W-C; Hensley, Dale K; Tracy, Joseph B; McKnight, Timothy E; Melechko, Anatoli

    2014-01-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNF) have been synthesized in a mixture of acetone and air using catalytic DC plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Typically, ammonia or hydrogen is used as etchant gas in the mixture to remove carbon that otherwise passivates the catalyst surface and impedes growth. Our demonstration of using air as the etchant gas opens up a possibility that ion etching could be sufficient to maintain the catalytic activity state during synthesis. It also demonstrates the path toward growing VACNFs in open atmosphere.

  15. Cu-Ni composition gradient for the catalytic synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Kate L; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich; Rack, Philip D; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Meyer III, Harry M; Simpson, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The influence of catalyst alloy composition on the growth of vertically aligned carbon nanofibers was studied using Cu-Ni thin films. Metals were co-sputtered onto a substrate to form a thin film alloy with a wide compositional gradient, as determined by Auger analysis. Carbon nanofibers were then grown from the gradient catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The alloy composition produced substantial differences in the resulting nanofibers, which varied from branched structures at 81%Ni-19%Cu to high aspect ratio nanocones at 80%Cu-20%Ni. Electron microscopy and spectroscopy techniques also revealed segregation of the initial alloy catalyst particles at certain concentrations.

  16. Crystallographic growth and alignment of carbon nanotubes on few-layer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arash, Aram; Hunley, Patrick D.; Nasseri, Mohsen; Boland, Mathias J.; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Hudak, Bethany M.; Guiton, Beth S.; Strachan, Douglas R.

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid carbon nanotube and graphene structures are emerging as an exciting material system built from a common sp2 carbon backbone. Such hybrid systems have promise for use in improving the performance of energy storage and high-speed electronic applications. Towards the attainment of such hybrid materials, the catalytic growth and crystallographic alignment of these integrated structures are investigated along with the atomic-scale features of their interfaces. The catalytic activity of nanoparticles to form carbon nanotubes on the surface of few-layer graphene is tuned through precise feedstock application. Through careful materials synthesis, the interfaces of these hybrid carbon nanotube - graphene systems are investigated through ultra-high resolution electron microscopy.

  17. Quantum dot decorated aligned carbon nanotube bundles for a performance enhanced photoswitch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Hansen, Reinack; Joshi, Hrishikesh; Kutty, R. Govindan; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Lianxi; Yang, Jinglei; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-01

    Photoactive materials that are triggered by the irradiation of light to generate an electrical response provide an ecofriendly platform to afford efficient power sources and switches. A chemical assembly of well-known elements with aligned carbon nanotube bundles is reported here, which was employed to form an efficient photo-induced charge transfer device. The primary elements of this device are ultra-long multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles, polyaniline (PANI) thin film coating, and CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Highly ordered and horizontally aligned MWCNT bundles were coated with PANI to enhance charge transfer properties of active QDs in this platform. The obtained device (CdSe-MWCNT@PANI) constructed on a silicon base exhibits highly efficient power conversion capabilities owing to the aligned MWCNT bundle assisted enhanced charge transport pathways generated within the device. The device also shows a short circuit current density (Jsc) of 9.81 mA cm-2 and an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.46 V. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the device is 5.41%, and the current response is quite stable, highly responsive, and reproducible.Photoactive materials that are triggered by the irradiation of light to generate an electrical response provide an ecofriendly platform to afford efficient power sources and switches. A chemical assembly of well-known elements with aligned carbon nanotube bundles is reported here, which was employed to form an efficient photo-induced charge transfer device. The primary elements of this device are ultra-long multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles, polyaniline (PANI) thin film coating, and CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Highly ordered and horizontally aligned MWCNT bundles were coated with PANI to enhance charge transfer properties of active QDs in this platform. The obtained device (CdSe-MWCNT@PANI) constructed on a silicon base exhibits highly efficient power conversion capabilities owing to the aligned MWCNT bundle assisted

  18. Reverse capillary flow of condensed water through aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yun, Jongju; Jeon, Wonjae; Alam Khan, Fakhre; Lee, Jinkee; Baik, Seunghyun

    2015-06-01

    Molecular transport through nanopores has recently received considerable attention as a result of advances in nanofabrication and nanomaterial synthesis technologies. Surprisingly, water transport investigations through carbon nanochannels resulted in two contradicting observations: extremely fast transport or rejection of water molecules. In this paper, we elucidate the mechanism of impeded water vapor transport through the interstitial space of aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (aligned-MWCNTs)—capillary condensation, agglomeration, reverse capillary flow, and removal by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the nanotubes. The origin of separation comes from the water’s phase change from gas to liquid, followed by reverse capillary flow. First, the saturation water vapor pressure is decreased in a confined space, which is favorable for the phase change of incoming water vapor into liquid drops. Once continuous water meniscus is formed between the nanotubes by the adsoprtion and agglomeration of water molecules, a high reverse Laplace pressure is induced in the mushroom-shaped liquid meniscus at the entry region of the aligned-MWCNTs. The reverse Laplace pressure can be significantly enhanced by decreasing the pore size. Finally, the droplets pushed backward by the reverse Laplace pressure can be removed by superhydrophobicity at the tip of the aligned-MWCNTs. The analytical analysis was also supported by experiments carried out using 4 mm-long aligned-MWCNTs with different intertube distances. The water rejection rate and the separation factor increased as the intertube distance decreased, resulting in 90% and 10, respectively, at an intertube distance of 4 nm. This mechanism and nanotube membrane may be useful for energy-efficient water vapor separation and dehumidification.

  19. Steel-stiffened filament-wound double-wall fiberglass composite underground storage tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaempen, C.E.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes how a double wall filament wound glass fiber reinforced plastic underground storage tank (UST) can be stiffened by a non-removable steel frame mandrel that remains within the tank. A specific design is exhibited to show how a nonmetallic filament-wound UST can be made to have sufficient stiffness to resist, with negligible deflection, a hundred ton load of water and backfill while the tank bottom is unsupported for 66% of its width and as much as 80% of its length. The steel-stiffened double wall UST described in this paper consists of two independent concentric nonmetallic composite pressure vessels, separated by an annular space that has a bottom sump that can be monitored to provide warning of a leaking tank. This paper summarizes the extensive physical and chemical resistance tests conducted by Underwriters Laboratories, Inc. to qualify the nonmetallic underground storage tank at meeting the performance requirements outlined in Class 16 of the UL Standard for safety Subject 1316, which is believed to be the highest standard ever developed for the safe long term underground storage of flammable liquids. Some details relating to the cost and performance characteristics of the steel-stiffened nonmetallic composite tank are presented.

  20. Controlled growth of aligned carbon nanotube using pulsed glow barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Tomohiro; Kimura, Yoshihito; Okazaki, Ken

    2002-10-01

    We first achieved a catalytic growth of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) using atmospheric pressure pulsed glow barrier discharge combined with DC bias (1000 V). Aligned CNT can grow with the directional electric field, and this is a big challenge in barrier discharges since dielectric barrier does not allow DC bias and forces to use AC voltage to maintain stable plasma conditions. To overcome this, we developed a power source generating Gaussian-shape pulses at 20 kpps with 4% duty, and DC bias was applied to the GND electrode where Ni-, Fe-coated substrate existed. With positive pulse, i.e. substrate was the cathode, random growth of CNT was observed at about 10^9 cm-2. Growth rate significantly reduced when applied negative pulse; Negative glow formation near substrate is essential for sufficient supply of radical species to the catalyst. If -DC was biased, aligned CNT with 20 nm was synthesized because negative bias enhanced negative glow formation. Interestingly, 2 to 3 CNTs stuck each other with +DC bias, resulting in 50-70 nm and non-aligned CNT. Atmospheric pressure glow barrier discharges can be highly controlled and be a potential alternative to vacuum plasmas for CVD, micro-scale, nano-scale fabrication.

  1. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Trihalide Perovskite Interface - Oral Presentation

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-25

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene-2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  2. Dipole Alignment at the Carbon Nanotube and Methyl Ammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Interface

    SciTech Connect

    Przepioski, Joshua

    2015-08-28

    This work correlates resonant peaks from first principles calculation on ammonia (NH3) Nitrogen 1s x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) within the methyl ammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3), and proposes a curve to determine the alignment of the methyl ammonium dipole if there exists angular dependence. The Nitrogen 1s XAS was performed at varying incident angles on the perovskite with and without a carbon nanotube (CNT) interface produced from an ultrasonic spray deposition. We investigated the peak contribution from PbI2 and the poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene- 2,7-diyl) with bipyridine (PFO-BPy) wrapped around the CNT, and used normalization techniques to better identify the dipole alignment. There was angular dependence on samples containing the CNT interface suggesting an existing dipole alignment, but there was no angular dependence on the perovskite samples alone; however, more normalization techniques and experimental work must be performed in order to ensure its validity and to better describe its alignment, and possible controlling factors.

  3. Electrodeposition of Various Au Nanostructures on Aligned Carbon Nanotubes as Highly Sensitive Nanoelectrode Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fayazfar, H.; Afshar, A.; Dolati, A.

    2015-05-01

    An efficient method has been developed to synthesize well-aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on a conductive Ta substrate by chemical vapor deposition. Free-standing MWCNTs arrays were functionalized through electrochemical oxidation with the formation of hydroxyl and carboxyl functional groups. Facile template-free electrochemical routes were then developed for the shape-selective synthesis of less-common Au nanostructures, including flower, sphere, dendrite, rod, sheet, and cabbage onto the aligned MWCNTs at room temperature. Especially, among all the synthesis methods for Au nanocrystals, this is the first report using electrochemical technique to synthesize wide variety shapes of gold nanostructures (GNs) onto the aligned MWCNTs. The morphology of electrodeposited Au nanostructures was controlled by adjustment of the deposition time and potential, the number of potential cycles, the kind of deposition bath, and electrodeposition method. Transmission electron microscopy and field-emission scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize the products. Cyclic voltammograms showed that the MWCNT/Ta electrodes modified with GNs have higher sensitivity compared to the unmodified electrodes in the presence of Fe2+/Fe3+ redox couple. These kinds of aligned-CNT/Au nanostructure hybrid materials introduced by these efficient and simple electrochemical methods could lead to the development of a new generation device for ultrasensitive catalytic and biological application.

  4. Nonhomogeneous morphology and the elastic modulus of aligned carbon nanotube films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Yoonjin; Gao, Yuan; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, Brian L.; Xiang, Rong; Maruyama, Shigeo; Kenny, Thomas W.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2015-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays offer the potential to develop nanostructured materials that leverage their outstanding physical properties. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs), also named CNT forests, CNT arrays, or CNT turfs, can provide high heat conductivity and sufficient mechanical compliance to accommodate thermal expansion mismatch for use as thermal interface materials (TIMs). This paper reports measurements of the in-plane moduli of vertically aligned, single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) films. The mechanical response of these films is related to the nonhomogeneous morphology of the grown nanotubes, such as entangled nanotubes of a top crust layer, aligned CNTs in the middle region, and CNTs in the bottom layer. To investigate how the entanglements govern the overall mechanical moduli of CNT films, we remove the crust layer consisting of CNT entanglements by etching the CNT films from the top. A microfabricated cantilever technique shows that crust removal reduces the resulting moduli of the etched SWCNT films by as much as 40%, whereas the moduli of the etched MWCNT films do not change significantly, suggesting a minimal crust effect on the film modulus for thick MWCNT films (>90 μm). This improved understanding will allow us to engineer the mechanical moduli of CNT films for TIMs or packaging applications.

  5. Quantum dot decorated aligned carbon nanotube bundles for a performance enhanced photoswitch.

    PubMed

    Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Hansen, Reinack; Joshi, Hrishikesh; Kutty, R Govindan; Liu, Zheng; Zheng, Lianxi; Yang, Jinglei; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-04-28

    Photoactive materials that are triggered by the irradiation of light to generate an electrical response provide an ecofriendly platform to afford efficient power sources and switches. A chemical assembly of well-known elements with aligned carbon nanotube bundles is reported here, which was employed to form an efficient photo-induced charge transfer device. The primary elements of this device are ultra-long multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundles, polyaniline (PANI) thin film coating, and CdSe quantum dots (QDs). Highly ordered and horizontally aligned MWCNT bundles were coated with PANI to enhance charge transfer properties of active QDs in this platform. The obtained device (CdSe-MWCNT@PANI) constructed on a silicon base exhibits highly efficient power conversion capabilities owing to the aligned MWCNT bundle assisted enhanced charge transport pathways generated within the device. The device also shows a short circuit current density (Jsc) of 9.81 mA cm(-2) and an open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.46 V. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the device is 5.41%, and the current response is quite stable, highly responsive, and reproducible. PMID:26695727

  6. Rainbow channeling of protons in very short carbon nanotubes with aligned Stone-Wales defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ćosić, M.; Petrović, S.; Bellucci, S.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper proton channeling through armchair single-walled-carbon-nanotubes (SWCNTs) with aligned Stone-Wales defects has been investigated. The energy of the proton beam was 1 GeV, while the lengths of the SWCNTs have been varied from 200 nm up to 1000 nm. The linear density of aligned defects has been varied in the whole range, from minimally up to maximally possible values. Here are presented results of a detailed morphological analysis concerning: the formation, evolution and interaction of the nanotube rainbows. The potential of the SWCNT has been constructed from Molère's expression of the Thomas-Fermi's proton-carbon interaction-energy, using the approximation of the continuous atomic string. Trajectories of the channeled protons were obtained by solving the corresponding classical equations of motions. Distributions of the transmitted protons were obtained by the Monte-Carlo simulation. The shape of angular distributions has been explained in the framework of the theory of nanotube rainbows. The aim of this study is also to investigate the applicability of the proton rainbow channeling for the characterization of nanotubes with aligned Stone-Wales defects.

  7. Double-Wall Nanotubes and Graphene Nanoplatelets for Hybrid Conductive Adhesives with Enhanced Thermal and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Messina, Elena; Leone, Nancy; Foti, Antonino; Di Marco, Gaetano; Riccucci, Cristina; Di Carlo, Gabriella; Di Maggio, Francesco; Cassata, Antonio; Gargano, Leonardo; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Fazio, Barbara; Maragò, Onofrio Maria; Robba, Benedetto; Vasi, Cirino; Ingo, Gabriel Maria; Gucciardi, Pietro Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Improving the electrical and thermal properties of conductive adhesives is essential for the fabrication of compact microelectronic and optoelectronic power devices. Here we report on the addition of a commercially available conductive resin with double-wall carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets that yields simultaneously improved thermal and electrical conductivity. Using isopropanol as a common solvent for the debundling of nanotubes, exfoliation of graphene, and dispersion of the carbon nanostructures in the epoxy resin, we obtain a nanostructured conducting adhesive with thermal conductivity of ∼12 W/mK and resistivity down to 30 μΩ cm at very small loadings (1% w/w for nanotubes and 0.01% w/w for graphene). The low filler content allows one to keep almost unchanged the glass-transition temperature, the viscosity, and the curing parameters. Die shear measurements show that the nanostructured resins fulfill the MIL-STD-883 requirements when bonding gold-metalized SMD components, even after repeated thermal cycling. The same procedure has been validated on a high-conductivity resin characterized by a higher viscosity, on which we have doubled the thermal conductivity and quadrupled the electrical conductivity. Graphene yields better performances with respect to nanotubes in terms of conductivity and filler quantity needed to improve the resin. We have finally applied the nanostructured resins to bond GaN-based high-electron-mobility transistors in power-amplifier circuits. We observe a decrease of the GaN peak and average temperatures of, respectively, ∼30 °C and ∼10 °C, with respect to the pristine resin. The obtained results are important for the fabrication of advanced packaging materials in power electronic and microwave applications and fit the technological roadmap for CNTs, graphene, and hybrid systems. PMID:27538099

  8. Facile Synthesis of Highly Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Polymer Precursors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Han, Catherine Y.; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Wang, H. Hau; Lin, Xiao-Min; Trasobares, Susana; Cook, Russell E.

    2009-01-01

    We report a facile one-step approach which involves no flammable gas, no catalyst, and no in situ polymerization for the preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotube array. A polymer precursor is placed on top of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane containing regular nanopore arrays, and slow heating under Ar flow allows the molten polymer to wet the template through adhesive force. The polymer spread into the nanopores of the template to form polymer nanotubes. Upon carbonization the resulting multi-walled carbon nanotubes duplicate the nanopores morphology precisely. The process is demonstrated for 230, 50, and 20 nm pore membranes. The synthesized carbonmore » nanotubes are characterized with scanning/transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, and resistive measurements. Convenient functionalization of the nanotubes with this method is demonstrated through premixing CoPt nanoparticles in the polymer precursors.« less

  9. Self-embedded nanocrystalline chromium carbides on well-aligned carbon nanotips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, C. L.; Hsu, J. H.; Chen, C. F.

    2003-06-01

    Well-aligned carbon nanotips embedded with nanocrystalline chromium carbide were directly grown on a substrate by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition. These nanomaterials grew up to about 1 μm long and 60 nm in diameter, yielding a high aspect ratio. In comparison between carbon nanotubes with hollow structure, transmission electron microscopy images show its solid body, which is made of graphite along with nanocrystalline chromium carbide on the tip. These nanomaterials perform well in field emission applications with a turn-on field of 1.38 V/μm and 565 μA/cm2 at 2.2 V/μm. Our result confirms the possibility of the self-embedded nanocrystalline materials on the top of carbon nanotips.

  10. Visible and near-infrared radiative properties of vertically aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, X J; Flicker, J D; Lee, B J; Ready, W J; Zhang, Z M

    2009-05-27

    This work investigates the reflection and scattering from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes, fabricated on silicon substrate using thermally enhanced chemical vapor deposition with both tip-growth and base-growth mechanisms. The directional-hemispherical reflectance in the visible and near-infrared wavelengths was measured with an integrating sphere. The polarization-dependent bidirectional reflectance distribution function was characterized with a laser scatterometer at the wavelength of 635 nm. The effective medium theory was used to elucidate the mechanism of high absorptance (greater than 0.97 in the spectral region from 400 to 1800 nm) of the multi-walled carbon nanotube samples. It is observed that scattering by impurities on the top of the nanotubes, by the nanotube tips, and by defects and misalignment can significantly increase the reflectance and introduce retroreflection. This study may facilitate application of carbon nanotubes in pyroelectric detectors as well as thermophotovoltaic emitters and absorbers. PMID:19423943

  11. Tunneling phenomena in aligned multi-walled carbon nanotube sheets: conductivity and Raman correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Corro, E.; Castillo-Martínez, E.; Taravillo, M.; Baonza, V. G.

    2014-12-01

    We performed simultaneous Raman spectroscopy and electrical conductivity measurements on self-standing aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes sheets at varying inter-tube distances. A sapphire anvil cell is used here to modulate the inter-tube distance and promote the subsequent electronic tunneling phenomena. We observe a singular correlation between the intensity of the so called defect bands of carbon materials and their conductivity. This indicates that the conditions of the resonant processes that originate these bands are modified by the tunneling phenomena. Such an issue has never been reported before and has potential technological applications. Additionally, the provided AFM images evidence the debundling of the carbon nanotubes that had been described to occur after small compression.

  12. Periodic alignment of Si quantum dots on hafnium oxide coated single wall carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Olmedo, Mario; Martinez-Morales, Alfredo A.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Liu Jianlin; Liu Gang; Lau, C.N.; Yengel, Emre; Ozkan, Cengiz S.

    2009-03-23

    We demonstrate a bottom up approach for the aligned epitaxial growth of Si quantum dots (QDs) on one-dimensional (1D) hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) ridges created by the growth of HfO{sub 2} thin film on single wall carbon nanotubes. This growth process creates a high strain 1D ridge on the HfO{sub 2} film, which favors the formation of Si seeds over the surrounding flat HfO{sub 2} area. Periodic alignment of Si QDs on the 1D HfO{sub 2} ridge was observed, which can be controlled by varying different growth conditions, such as growth temperature, growth time, and disilane flow rate.

  13. Charge trapping in aligned single-walled carbon nanotube arrays induced by ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Esqueda, Ivan S.; Cress, Cory D.; Che, Yuchi; Cao, Yu; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-02-07

    The effects of near-interfacial trapping induced by ionizing radiation exposure of aligned single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) arrays are investigated via measurements of gate hysteresis in the transfer characteristics of aligned SWCNT field-effect transistors. Gate hysteresis is attributed to charge injection (i.e., trapping) from the SWCNTs into radiation-induced traps in regions near the SWCNT/dielectric interface. Self-consistent calculations of surface-potential, carrier density, and trapped charge are used to describe hysteresis as a function of ionizing radiation exposure. Hysteresis width (h) and its dependence on gate sweep range are investigated analytically. The effects of non-uniform trap energy distributions on the relationship between hysteresis, gate sweep range, and total ionizing dose are demonstrated with simulations and verified experimentally.

  14. Ultra-high density aligned Carbon-nanotube with controled nano-morphology for supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghaffari, Mehdi; Zhao, Ran; Liu, Yang; Zhou, Yue; Cheng, Jiping; Guzman de Villoria, Roberto; Wardle, B. L.; Zhang, Q. M.

    2012-02-01

    Recent advances in fabricating controlled-morphology vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs) with ultrahigh volume fractioncreate unique opportunities for developing unconventional supercapacitors with ultra-high energy density, power density, and long charge/discharge cycle life.Continuous paths through inter-VA-CNT channels allow fast ion transport, and high electrical conduction of the aligned CNTs in the composite electrodes lead to fast discharge speed. We investigate the charge-discharge characteristics of VA-CNTs with >20 vol% of CNT and ionic liquids as electrolytes. By employing both the electric and electromechanical spectroscopes, as well as nanostructured materials characterization, the ion transport and storage behaviors in porous electrodes are studied. The results suggest pathways for optimizing the electrode morphology in supercapacitorsusing ultra-high volume fraction VA-CNTs to further enhance performance.

  15. Aligned carbon nanotube array stiffness from stochastic three-dimensional morphology.

    PubMed

    Stein, Itai Y; Lewis, Diana J; Wardle, Brian L

    2015-12-14

    The landmark theoretical properties of low dimensional materials have driven more than a decade of research on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and related nanostructures. While studies on isolated CNTs report behavior that aligns closely with theoretical predictions, studies on cm-scale aligned CNT arrays (>10(10) CNTs) oftentimes report properties that are orders of magnitude below those predicted by theory. Using simulated arrays comprised of up to 10(5) CNTs with realistic stochastic morphologies, we show that the CNT waviness, quantified via the waviness ratio (w), is responsible for more than three orders of magnitude reduction in the effective CNT stiffness. Also, by including information on the volume fraction scaling of the CNT waviness, the simulation shows that the observed non-linear enhancement of the array stiffness as a function of the CNT close packing originates from the shear and torsion deformation mechanisms that are governed by the low shear modulus (∼1 GPa) of the CNTs. PMID:26553970

  16. Electron-shading effect on the horizontal aligned growth of carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Chai Yang; Xiao Zhiyong; Chan, Philip C. H.

    2009-01-26

    Based on the well-accepted electron-shading theory during plasma processing, we designed microstructures to control the local built-in electric-field on the substrate surface. The distortion magnitude of the electric-field is largest near the sidewalls of the microstructures, creating a horizontal electric-field in this region. We showed that the horizontally aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were grown by making use of this built-in electric-field during the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition process, with a tactical choice of geometries and materials of the microstructures on the substrate. This technique opens up a way to selectively and controllably grow horizontally aligned CNTs on the substrate surface.

  17. Clothing polymer fibers with well-aligned and high-aspect ratio carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Gengzhi; Zheng, Lianxi; An, Jia; Pan, Yongzheng; Zhou, Jinyuan; Zhan, Zhaoyao; Pang, John H. L.; Chua, Chee Kai; Leong, Kah Fai; Li, Lin

    2013-03-01

    It is believed that the crucial step towards preparation of electrical conductive polymer-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites is dispersing CNTs with a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio in a well-aligned manner. However, this process is extremely challenging when dealing with long and entangled CNTs. Here in this study, a new approach is demonstrated to fabricate conductive polymer-CNT composite fibers without involving any dispersion process. Well-aligned CNT films were firstly drawn from CNT arrays, and then directly coated on polycaprolactone fibers to form polymer-CNT composite fibers. The conductivity of these composite fibers can be as high as 285 S m-1 with only 2.5 wt% CNT loading, and reach 1549 S m-1 when CNT loading is 13.4 wt%. As-prepared composite fibers also exhibit 82% retention of conductivity at a strain of 7%, and have improved mechanical properties.It is believed that the crucial step towards preparation of electrical conductive polymer-carbon nanotube (CNT) composites is dispersing CNTs with a high length-to-diameter aspect ratio in a well-aligned manner. However, this process is extremely challenging when dealing with long and entangled CNTs. Here in this study, a new approach is demonstrated to fabricate conductive polymer-CNT composite fibers without involving any dispersion process. Well-aligned CNT films were firstly drawn from CNT arrays, and then directly coated on polycaprolactone fibers to form polymer-CNT composite fibers. The conductivity of these composite fibers can be as high as 285 S m-1 with only 2.5 wt% CNT loading, and reach 1549 S m-1 when CNT loading is 13.4 wt%. As-prepared composite fibers also exhibit 82% retention of conductivity at a strain of 7%, and have improved mechanical properties. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34208e

  18. Fabrication of Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotube or Zinc Oxide Nanorod Arrays for Optical Diffraction Gratings.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong; Kim, Sun Il; Cho, Seong-Ho; Hwang, Sungwoo; Lee, Young Hee; Hur, Jaehyun

    2015-11-01

    We report on new fabrication methods for a transparent, hierarchical, and patterned electrode comprised of either carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorods. Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes or zinc oxide nanorod arrays were fabricated by either chemical vapor deposition or hydrothermal growth, in combination with photolithography. A transparent conductive graphene layer or zinc oxide seed layer was employed as the transparent electrode. On the patterned surface defined using photoresist, the vertically grown carbon nanotubes or zinc oxides could produce a concentrated electric field under applied DC voltage. This periodic electric field was used to align liquid crystal molecules in localized areas within the optical cell, effectively modulating the refractive index. Depending on the material and morphology of these patterned electrodes, the diffraction efficiency presented different behavior. From this study, we established the relationship between the hierarchical structure of the different electrodes and their efficiency for modulating the refractive index. We believe that this study will pave a new path for future optoelectronic applications. PMID:26726580

  19. On the rate dependence of mechanical properties of aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Y. C.; Zhang, Q.; Dai, L.; Baur, J.

    2015-08-01

    Aligned carbon nanotube arrays are a new form of carbon nanomaterials that have received great interest due to their superior structure and properties. The present work comprehensively examines the rate-dependent mechanical deformation of the vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VA-CNTs) by the use of indentation tests. The small-displacement, elastic property of the VA-CNTs was measured by a spherical indenter. The effective indentation strain rate was varied by adjusting the indenter unloading rate. The instantaneous modulus of the VA-CNTs has been calculated and is found to increase linearly with indentation strain rate. The large-displacement, plastic property of the VA-CNTs was measured by a cylindrical, flat-ended indenter. At large indentation depths, the stress-strain curve of the VA-CNTs reveals distinct plastic deformation. The indentation strain rate was varied by directly changing the indenter velocity. The yield strength ( σ y) of the VA-CNTs also increases linearly with respect to indentation strain rate.

  20. Fabrication of Single, Vertically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes in 3D Nanoscale Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Anupama B.; Megerian, Krikor G.; Von Allmen, Paul A.; Baron, Richard L.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) and high-throughput manufacturing techniques for integrating single, aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) into novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been developed. First, the PECVD growth technique ensures excellent alignment of the tubes, since the tubes align in the direction of the electric field in the plasma as they are growing. Second, the tubes generated with this technique are all metallic, so their chirality is predetermined, which is important for electronic applications. Third, a wafer-scale manufacturing process was developed that is high-throughput and low-cost, and yet enables the integration of just single, aligned tubes with nanoscale 3D architectures with unprecedented placement accuracy and does not rely on e-beam lithography. Such techniques should lend themselves to the integration of PECVD grown tubes for applications ranging from interconnects, nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS), sensors, bioprobes, or other 3D electronic devices. Chemically amplified polyhydroxystyrene-resin-based deep UV resists were used in conjunction with excimer laser-based (lambda = 248 nm) step-and-repeat lithography to form Ni catalyst dots = 300 nm in diameter that nucleated single, vertically aligned tubes with high yield using dc PECVD growth. This is the first time such chemically amplified resists have been used, resulting in the nucleation of single, vertically aligned tubes. In addition, novel 3D nanoscale architectures have been created using topdown techniques that integrate single, vertically aligned tubes. These were enabled by implementing techniques that use deep-UV chemically amplified resists for small-feature-size resolution; optical lithography units that allow unprecedented control over layer-to-layer registration; and ICP (inductively coupled plasma) etching techniques that result in near-vertical, high-aspect-ratio, 3D nanoscale architectures, in conjunction with the use of materials that are

  1. Development of a model for flaming combustion of double-wall corrugated cardboard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinnon, Mark B.

    Corrugated cardboard is used extensively in a storage capacity in warehouses and frequently acts as the primary fuel for accidental fires that begin in storage facilities. A one-dimensional numerical pyrolysis model for double-wall corrugated cardboard was developed using the Thermakin modeling environment to describe the burning rate of corrugated cardboard. The model parameters corresponding to the thermal properties of the corrugated cardboard layers were determined through analysis of data collected in cone calorimeter tests conducted with incident heat fluxes in the range 20--80 kW/m 2. An apparent pyrolysis reaction mechanism and thermodynamic properties for the material were obtained using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The fully-parameterized bench-scale model predicted burning rate profiles that were in agreement with the experimental data for the entire range of incident heat fluxes, with more consistent predictions at higher heat fluxes.

  2. Spin Brazil-nut effect and its reverse in a rotating double-walled drum.

    PubMed

    Huang, Decai; Lu, Ming; Sen, Surajit; Sun, Min; Feng, Yaodong; Yang, Anna

    2013-04-01

    The segregation of binary mixtures in a filled rotating double-walled drum is explored by simulations. Based on the characteristics of self-gravity and the centrifugal force, we argue that both percolation and buoyancy effects dominate the segregation process. The simulational results show that up to long enough times the segregation state is controlled by the rotational speed, the particle radius and density. At low rotational speeds, the smaller and heavier particles tend to accumulate towards the inner drum wall and the bigger and lighter ones towards the outer drum wall, while the segregation pattern reverses completely at higher rotational speeds. Two typical phase diagrams in the space of the density and radius ratio of bigger particles to smaller particles further confirm the predictions. PMID:23605570

  3. Fabrication of double-walled section models of the ITER vacuum vessel

    SciTech Connect

    Koizumi, K.; Kanamori, N.; Nakahira, M.; Itoh, Y.; Horie, M.; Tada, E.; Shimamoto, S.

    1995-12-31

    Trial fabrication of double-walled section models has been performed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) for the construction of ITER vacuum vessel. By employing TIG (Tungsten-arc Inert Gas) welding and EB (Electron Beam) welding, for each model, two full-scaled section models of 7.5 {degree} toroidal sector in the curved section at the bottom of vacuum vessel have been successfully fabricated with the final dimensional error of within {+-}5 mm to the nominal values. The sufficient technical database on the candidate fabrication procedures, welding distortion and dimensional stability of full-scaled models have been obtained through the fabrications. This paper describes the design and fabrication procedures of both full-scaled section models and the major results obtained through the fabrication.

  4. High-yield growth of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a continuously moving substrate.

    PubMed

    Guzmán de Villoria, R; Figueredo, S L; Hart, A J; Steiner, S A; Slocum, A H; Wardle, B L

    2009-10-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays are grown on a moving substrate, demonstrating continuous growth of nanoscale materials with long-range order. A cold-wall chamber with an oscillating moving platform is used to locally heat a silicon growth substrate coated with an Fe/Al2O3 catalyst film for CNT growth via chemical vapor deposition. The reactant gases are introduced over the substrate through a directed nozzle to attain high-yield CNT growth. Aligned multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays (or 'forests') with heights of approximately 1 mm are achieved at substrate speeds up to 2.4 mm s(-1). Arrays grown on moving substrates at different velocities are studied in order to identify potential physical limitations of repeatable and fast growth on a continuous basis. No significant differences are noted between static and moving growth as characterized by scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, although overall growth height is marginally reduced at the highest substrate velocity. CNT arrays produced on moving substrates are also found to be comparable to those produced through well-characterized batch processes consistent with a base-growth mechanism. Growth parameters required for the moving furnace are found to differ only slightly from those used in a comparable batch process; thermal uniformity appears to be the critical parameter for achieving large-area uniform array growth. If the continuous-growth technology is combined with a reaction zone isolation scheme common in other types of processing (e.g., in the manufacture of carbon fibers), large-scale dense and aligned CNT arrays may be efficiently grown and harvested for numerous applications including providing interlayers for advanced composite reinforcement and improved electrical and thermal transport. PMID:19752503

  5. Hydrophobic vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on Corning glass for self cleaning applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Ian Y. Y.; Oei, Shu Pei

    2010-09-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes were prepared by Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) on inexpensive Corning glass substrates using different under layers. The samples were functionalised by a simple 1H,1H-2H,2H perfluorodecyl-trichlorosilane (FDTS) and hexane mixture. The surface roughness of the CNTs and protective FDTS coating provides an ideal hydrophobic surface of around 141°. Auger spectroscopy analysis was performed to confirm fluorination of the sample. It was also found titanium provides a suitable under layer support for Ni catalyst due to the wetability of the two elements.

  6. Effects of ligand monolayers on catalytic nickel nanoparticles for synthesizing vertically aligned carbon nanofibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sarac, Mehmet; Robert, Wilson; Johnsont-Peck, Aaron; Wang, Junwei; Pearce, Ryan; Klein, Kate; Melechko, Anatoli; Tracy, Joseph

    2011-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanofibers (VACNFs) were synthesized using ligand-stabilized Ni nanoparticle (NP) catalysts and plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition. Using chemically synthesized Ni NPs enables facile preparation of VACNF arrays with monodisperse diameters below the size limit of thin film lithography. During pregrowth heating, the ligands catalytically convert into graphitic shells that prevent the catalyst NPs from agglomerating and coalescing, resulting in a monodisperse VACNF size distribution. In comparison, significant agglomeration occurs when the ligands are removed before VACNF growth, giving a broad distribution of VACNF sizes. The ligand shells are also promising for patterning the NPs and synthesizing complex VACNF arrays.

  7. Conducting polymer composite film incorporated with aligned carbon nanotubes for transparent, flexible and efficient supercapacitor

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Huijuan; Li, Li; Ren, Jing; Cai, Zhenbo; Qiu, Longbin; Yang, Zhibin; Peng, Huisheng

    2013-01-01

    Polyaniline composite films incorporated with aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are synthesized through an easy electrodeposition process. These robust and electrically conductive films are found to function as effective electrodes to fabricate transparent and flexible supercapacitors with a maximum specific capacitance of 233 F/g at a current density of 1 A/g. It is 36 times of bare MWCNT sheet, 23 times of pure polyaniline and 3 times of randomly dispersed MWCNT/polyaniline film under the same conditions. The novel supercapacitors also show a high cyclic stability. PMID:23443325

  8. Synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on a large area using thermal chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. J.; Son, K. H.; Lee, T. J.; Lyu, S. C.; Yoo, J. E.

    2001-10-01

    Vertically well-aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were homogeneously grown on iron deposited silicon oxide substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene. The CNTs have an uniform length of 100 μm and a diameter in the range from 100 to 200 nm. The CNTs reveal closed tip and very clean surface without any carbonaceous particles. The CNTs have no encapsulated iron particles at the closed tip and a bamboo structure in which the curvature of compartment layers is directed to the tip.

  9. Monolayer formation of human osteoblastic cells on vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Anderson O; Antunes, Erica F; Palma, Mariana Bs; Pacheco-Soares, Cristina; Trava-Airoldi, Vladimir J; Corat, Evaldo J

    2010-04-01

    Monolayer formation of SaOS-2 (human osteoblast-like cells) was observed on VACNT (vertically aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes) scaffolds without purification or functionalization. The VACNT were produced by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition on titanium surfaces with nickel or iron as catalyst. Cell viability and morphology studies were evaluated by LDH (lactate dehydrogenase) release assay and SEM (scanning electron microscopy), respectively. The non-toxicity and the flat spreading with monolayer formation of the SaOs-2 on VACNT scaffolds surface indicate that they can be used for biomedical applications. PMID:19947917

  10. Thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays: Growth conditions and tube inhomogeneity

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Matthew L.; Pham, Quang N.; Saltonstall, Christopher B.; Norris, Pamela M.

    2014-10-13

    The thermal conductivity of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays (VACNTAs) grown on silicon dioxide substrates via chemical vapor deposition is measured using a 3ω technique. For each sample, the VACNTA layer and substrate are pressed to a heating line at varying pressures to extract the sample's thermophysical properties. The nanotubes' structure is observed via transmission electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The presence of hydrogen and water vapor in the fabrication process is tuned to observe the effect on measured thermal properties. The presence of iron catalyst particles within the individual nanotubes prevents the array from achieving the overall thermal conductivity anticipated based on reported measurements of individual nanotubes and the packing density.