Science.gov

Sample records for alix binding requirements

  1. Structural Basis for Viral Late-Domain Binding to Alix

    SciTech Connect

    Lee,S.; Joshi, A.; Nagashima, K.; Freed, E.; Hurley, J.

    2007-01-01

    The modular protein Alix is a central node in endosomal-lysosomal trafficking and the budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1. The Gag p6 protein of HIV-1 contains a LYPx{sub n}LxxL motif that is required for Alix-mediated budding and binds a region of Alix spanning residues 360-702. The structure of this fragment of Alix has the shape of the letter 'V' and is termed the V domain. The V domain has a topologically complex arrangement of 11 {alpha}-helices, with connecting loops that cross three times between the two arms of the V. The conserved residue Phe676 is at the center of a large hydrophobic pocket and is crucial for binding to a peptide model of HIV-1 p6. Overexpression of the V domain inhibits HIV-1 release from cells. This inhibition of release is reversed by mutations that block binding of the Alix V domain to p6.

  2. Viral infection controlled by a calcium-dependent lipid-binding module in ALIX.

    PubMed

    Bissig, Christin; Lenoir, Marc; Velluz, Marie-Claire; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael; Gruenberg, Jean

    2013-05-28

    ALIX plays a role in nucleocapsid release during viral infection, as does lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). However, the mechanism remains unclear. Here we report that LBPA is recognized within an exposed site in ALIX Bro1 domain predicted by MODA, an algorithm for discovering membrane-docking areas in proteins. LBPA interactions revealed a strict requirement for a structural calcium tightly bound near the lipid interaction site. Unlike other calcium- and phospholipid-binding proteins, the all-helical triangle-shaped fold of the Bro1 domain confers selectivity for LBPA via a pair of hydrophobic residues in a flexible loop, which undergoes a conformational change upon membrane association. Both LBPA and calcium binding are necessary for endosome association and virus infection, as are ALIX ESCRT binding and dimerization capacity. We conclude that LBPA recruits ALIX onto late endosomes via the calcium-bound Bro1 domain, triggering a conformational change in ALIX to mediate the delivery of viral nucleocapsids to the cytosol during infection. PMID:23664863

  3. Arabidopsis ALIX is required for the endosomal localization of the deubiquitinating enzyme AMSH3.

    PubMed

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Goodman, Kaija; Cuyas, Laura; Anzenberger, Franziska; Alkofer, Angela; Paz-Ares, Javier; Braun, Pascal; Rubio, Vicente; Otegui, Marisa S; Isono, Erika

    2015-10-01

    Ubiquitination is a signal for various cellular processes, including for endocytic degradation of plasma membrane cargos. Ubiquitinating as well as deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) can regulate these processes by modifying the ubiquitination status of target protein. Although accumulating evidence points to the important regulatory role of DUBs, the molecular basis of their regulation is still not well understood. Associated molecule with the SH3 domain of signal transduction adaptor molecule (STAM) (AMSH) is a conserved metalloprotease DUB in eukaryotes. AMSH proteins interact with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) and are implicated in intracellular trafficking. To investigate how the function of AMSH is regulated at the cellular level, we carried out an interaction screen for the Arabidopsis AMSH proteins and identified the Arabidopsis homolog of apoptosis-linked gene-2 interacting protein X (ALIX) as a protein interacting with AMSH3 in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of alix knockout mutants in Arabidopsis showed that ALIX is essential for plant growth and development and that ALIX is important for the biogenesis of the vacuole and multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Cell biological analysis revealed that ALIX and AMSH3 colocalize on late endosomes. Although ALIX did not stimulate AMSH3 activity in vitro, in the absence of ALIX, AMSH3 localization on endosomes was abolished. Taken together, our data indicate that ALIX could function as an important regulator for AMSH3 function at the late endosomes. PMID:26324913

  4. Arabidopsis ALIX is required for the endosomal localization of the deubiquitinating enzyme AMSH3

    PubMed Central

    Kalinowska, Kamila; Nagel, Marie-Kristin; Goodman, Kaija; Cuyas, Laura; Anzenberger, Franziska; Alkofer, Angela; Paz-Ares, Javier; Braun, Pascal; Rubio, Vicente; Otegui, Marisa S.; Isono, Erika

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a signal for various cellular processes, including for endocytic degradation of plasma membrane cargos. Ubiquitinating as well as deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) can regulate these processes by modifying the ubiquitination status of target protein. Although accumulating evidence points to the important regulatory role of DUBs, the molecular basis of their regulation is still not well understood. Associated molecule with the SH3 domain of signal transduction adaptor molecule (STAM) (AMSH) is a conserved metalloprotease DUB in eukaryotes. AMSH proteins interact with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) and are implicated in intracellular trafficking. To investigate how the function of AMSH is regulated at the cellular level, we carried out an interaction screen for the Arabidopsis AMSH proteins and identified the Arabidopsis homolog of apoptosis-linked gene-2 interacting protein X (ALIX) as a protein interacting with AMSH3 in vitro and in vivo. Analysis of alix knockout mutants in Arabidopsis showed that ALIX is essential for plant growth and development and that ALIX is important for the biogenesis of the vacuole and multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Cell biological analysis revealed that ALIX and AMSH3 colocalize on late endosomes. Although ALIX did not stimulate AMSH3 activity in vitro, in the absence of ALIX, AMSH3 localization on endosomes was abolished. Taken together, our data indicate that ALIX could function as an important regulator for AMSH3 function at the late endosomes. PMID:26324913

  5. ALG-2 activates the MVB sorting function of ALIX through relieving its intramolecular interaction

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sheng; Zhou, Xi; Corvera, Joe; Gallick, Gary E; Lin, Sue-Hwa; Kuang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    The modular adaptor protein ALIX is critically involved in endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRT)-mediated multivesicular body (MVB) sorting of activated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); however, ALIX contains a default intramolecular interaction that renders ALIX unable to perform this ESCRT function. The ALIX partner protein ALG-2 is a calcium-binding protein that belongs to the calmodulin superfamily. Prompted by a defined biological function of calmodulin, we determined the role of ALG-2 in regulating ALIX involvement in MVB sorting of activated EGFR. Our results show that calcium-dependent ALG-2 interaction with ALIX completely relieves the intramolecular interaction of ALIX and promotes CHMP4-dependent ALIX association with the membrane. EGFR activation induces increased ALG-2 interaction with ALIX, and this increased interaction is responsible for increased ALIX association with the membrane. Functionally, inhibition of ALIX activation by ALG-2 inhibits MVB sorting of activated EGFR as effectively as inhibition of ALIX interaction with CHMP4 does; however, inhibition of ALIX activation by ALG-2 does not affect cytokinetic abscission or equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) budding. These findings indicate that calcium-dependent ALG-2 interaction with ALIX is specifically responsible for generating functional ALIX that supports MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors.

  6. Structure-based in silico identification of ubiquitin-binding domains provides insights into the ALIX-V:ubiquitin complex and retrovirus budding

    PubMed Central

    Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Attali, Ilan; Estrin, Michael; Kuo, Lillian S; Farkash, Efrat; Jerabek-Willemsen, Moran; Blutraich, Noa; Artzi, Shay; Peri, Aviyah; Freed, Eric O; Wolfson, Haim J; Prag, Gali

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitylation signal promotes trafficking of endogenous and retroviral transmembrane proteins. The signal is decoded by a large set of ubiquitin (Ub) receptors that tether Ub-binding domains (UBDs) to the trafficking machinery. We developed a structure-based procedure to scan the protein data bank for hidden UBDs. The screen retrieved many of the known UBDs. Intriguingly, new potential UBDs were identified, including the ALIX-V domain. Pull-down, cross-linking and E3-independent ubiquitylation assays biochemically corroborated the in silico findings. Guided by the output model, we designed mutations at the postulated ALIX-V:Ub interface. Biophysical affinity measurements using microscale-thermophoresis of wild-type and mutant proteins revealed some of the interacting residues of the complex. ALIX-V binds mono-Ub with a Kd of 119 μM. We show that ALIX-V oligomerizes with a Hill coefficient of 5.4 and IC50 of 27.6 μM and that mono-Ub induces ALIX-V oligomerization. Moreover, we show that ALIX-V preferentially binds K63 di-Ub compared with mono-Ub and K48 di-Ub. Finally, an in vivo functionality assay demonstrates the significance of ALIX-V:Ub interaction in equine infectious anaemia virus budding. These results not only validate the new procedure, but also demonstrate that ALIX-V directly interacts with Ub in vivo and that this interaction can influence retroviral budding. PMID:23361315

  7. The α-arrestin ARRDC3 mediates ALIX ubiquitination and G protein–coupled receptor lysosomal sorting

    PubMed Central

    Dores, Michael R.; Lin, Huilan; J. Grimsey, Neil; Mendez, Francisco; Trejo, JoAnn

    2015-01-01

    The sorting of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) to lysosomes is critical for proper signaling and cellular responses. We previously showed that the adaptor protein ALIX regulates lysosomal degradation of protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1), a GPCR for thrombin, independent of ubiquitin-binding ESCRTs and receptor ubiquitination. However, the mechanisms that regulate ALIX function during PAR1 lysosomal sorting are not known. Here we show that the mammalian α-arrestin arrestin domain–containing protein-3 (ARRDC3) regulates ALIX function in GPCR sorting via ubiquitination. ARRDC3 colocalizes with ALIX and is required for PAR1 sorting at late endosomes and degradation. Depletion of ARRDC3 by small interfering RNA disrupts ALIX interaction with activated PAR1 and the CHMP4B ESCRT-III subunit, suggesting that ARRDC3 regulates ALIX activity. We found that ARRDC3 is required for ALIX ubiquitination induced by activation of PAR1. A screen of nine mammalian NEDD4-family E3 ubiquitin ligases revealed a critical role for WWP2. WWP2 interacts with ARRDC3 and not ALIX. Depletion of WWP2 inhibited ALIX ubiquitination and blocked ALIX interaction with activated PAR1 and CHMP4B. These findings demonstrate a new role for the α-arrestin ARRDC3 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 in regulation of ALIX ubiquitination and lysosomal sorting of GPCRs. PMID:26490116

  8. DdAlix, an Alix/AIP1 homolog in Dictyostelium discoideum, is required for multicellular development under low Ca2+ conditions.

    PubMed

    Ohkouchi, Susumu; El-Halawany, Medhat S; Aruga, Fumika; Shibata, Hideki; Hitomi, Kiyotaka; Maki, Masatoshi

    2004-08-01

    Apoptosis-linked gene 2 (ALG-2) interacting protein X (Alix), also called AIP1, is a widely conserved protein in eukaryotes. Alix and its homologs are involved in various phenomena such as apoptosis, regulation of cell adhesion, protein sorting, adaptation to stress conditions, and budding of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To investigate the role of Alix in development, we identified an Alix homolog in the cellular slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum and disrupted the gene by homologous recombination. The growth of DdAlix deletion mutant (alx-) cells was significantly impaired in the presence of 5 mM Li+. On an agar plate, alx- cells underwent normal development and formed fruiting bodies indistinguishable from those formed by wild-type cells. However, alx- cells could not form fruiting bodies in the presence of 5 mM Li+. Similar results were obtained when cells were developed in the presence of 3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester (TMB-8), which is an antagonist of intracellular Ca2+ store. Furthermore, when the extracellular free Ca2+ was reduced to 10 nM, the ability of alx- cells, but not that of wild-type cells, to form fruiting bodies was impaired. The results indicate that DdAlix is essential for development under low Ca2+ conditions and suggest that DdAlix is involved in Ca2+ signaling during development. PMID:15276209

  9. Alix differs from ESCRT proteins in the control of autophagy

    SciTech Connect

    Petiot, Anne; Strappazzon, Flavie; Chatellard-Causse, Christine; Blot, Beatrice; Torch, Sakina; Jean-Marc Verna; Sadoul, Remy

    2008-10-10

    Alix/AIP1 is a cytosolic protein that regulates cell death through mechanisms that remain unclear. Alix binds to two protein members of the so-called Endosomal Sorting Complex Required for Transport (ESCRT), which facilitates membrane fission events during multivesicular endosome formation, enveloped virus budding and cytokinesis. Alix itself has been suggested to participate in these cellular events and is thus often considered to function in the ESCRT pathway. ESCRT proteins were recently implicated in autophagy, a process involved in bulk degradation of cytoplasmic constituents in lysosomes, which can also participate in cell death. In this study, we shown that, unlike ESCRT proteins, Alix is not involved in autophagy. These results strongly suggest that the capacity of several mutants of Alix to block both caspase-dependent and independent cell death does not relate to their capacity to modulate autophagy. Furthermore, they reinforce the conclusion of other studies demonstrating that the role of Alix is different from that of classical ESCRT proteins.

  10. Role of Alix in miRNA packaging during extracellular vesicle biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    IAVELLO, ALESSANDRA; FRECH, VALESKA S.L.; GAI, CHIARA; DEREGIBUS, MARIA CHIARA; QUESENBERRY, PETER J.; CAMUSSI, GIOVANNI

    2016-01-01

    Evidence indicates that Alix, an accessory protein of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT), is involved in the biogenesis of extracellular vesicles (EVs). EVs contain selected patterns of microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs); however, little is known about the mechanisms of miRNA enrichment in EVs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether Alix is involved in the packaging of miRNAs within EVs released by human liver stem-like cells (HLSCs). EVs released from HLSCs were enriched with miRNAs and expressed Alix and several RNA-binding proteins, including Argonaute 2 (Ago2), a member of the Argonaute family known to be involved in the transport and the processing of miRNAs. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments revealed an association between Alix and Ago2. The results from RT-qPCR indicated that in the Alix/Ago2 immunoprecipitates, miRNAs were detectable. EVs were instrumental in transferring selected miRNAs from HLSCs to human endothelial cells absent in the latter cells. Alix knockdown did not influence the number of EVs released by HLSCs, but it significantly decreased miRNA expression levels in the EVs and consequently their transfer to the endothelium. Our findings indicate that Alix binds to Ago2 and miRNAs, suggesting that it plays a key role in miRNA enrichment during EV biogenesis. These results may represent a novel function of Alix, demonstrating its involvement in the EV-mediated transfer of miRNAs. PMID:26935291

  11. Structural And Functional Studies of ALIX Interactions With YPXnL Late Domains of HIV-1 And EIAV

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Q.; Fisher, R.D.; Chung, H.-Y.; Myszka, D.G.; Sundquist, W.I.; Hill, C.P.

    2009-05-28

    Retrovirus budding requires short peptide motifs (late domains) located within the viral Gag protein that function by recruiting cellular factors. The YPX{sub n}L late domains of HIV and other lentiviruses recruit the protein ALIX (also known as AIP1), which also functions in vesicle formation at the multivesicular body and in the abscission stage of cytokinesis. Here, we report the crystal structures of ALIX in complex with the YPX{sub n}L late domains from HIV-1 and EIAV. The two distinct late domains bind at the same site on the ALIX V domain but adopt different conformations that allow them to make equivalent contacts. Binding studies and functional assays verified the importance of key interface residues and revealed that binding affinities are tuned by context-dependent effects. These results reveal how YPX{sub n}L late domains recruit ALIX to facilitate virus budding and how ALIX can bind YPX{sub n}L sequences with both n = 1 and n = 3.

  12. Structural and Biochemical Studies of ALIX/AlP1 and Its Role in Retrovirus Budding

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher,R.; Chung, H.; Zhai, Q.; Robinson, H.; Sundquist, W.; Hill, C.

    2007-01-01

    ALIX/AIP1 functions in enveloped virus budding, endosomal protein sorting, and many other cellular processes. Retroviruses, including HIV-1, SIV, and EIAV, bind and recruit ALIX through YPXnL late-domain motifs (X = any residue; n = 1-3). Crystal structures reveal that human ALIX is composed of an N-terminal Bro1 domain and a central domain that is composed of two extended three-helix bundles that form elongated arms that fold back into a 'V.'. The structures also reveal conformational flexibility in the arms that suggests that the V domain may act as a flexible hinge in response to ligand binding. YPXnL late domains bind in a conserved hydrophobic pocket on the second arm near the apex of the V, whereas CHMP4/ESCRT-III proteins bind a conserved hydrophobic patch on the Bro1 domain, and both interactions are required for virus budding. ALIX therefore serves as a flexible, extended scaffold that connects retroviral Gag proteins to ESCRT-III and other cellular-budding machinery.

  13. Unraveling the pivotal role of ALIX in MVB sorting and silencing of activated EGFR

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Sheng; Zhou, Xi; Zhang, Wei; Gallick, Gary E.; Kuang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    ESCRT-III mediated membrane invagination and scission is a critical step in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors and generally thought to be required for degradation of these receptors in lysosomes. The adaptor protein ALIX is critically involved in multiple ESCRT-III-mediated membrane remodeling processes in mammalian cells. However, ALIX knockdown does not inhibit degradation of activated EGFR in mammalian cell lines, leading to a widely held notion that ALIX is not critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells. In this study, we demonstrate that despite its non-essential roles in degradation of activated EGFR, ALIX plays a critical role in MVB sorting and silencing of activated EGFR. EGF stimulation of mammalian cell lines induces ALIX interaction with ubiquitinated EGFR through the ALIX V domain and increases ALIX association with membrane-bound CHMP4 through the ALIX Bro1 domain. Under both continuous and pulse-chase EGF stimulation conditions, inhibition of ALIX interaction with membrane-bound CHMP4, inhibition of ALIX dimerization through the V domain or ALIX knockdown dramatically inhibits MVB sorting of activated EGFR and promotes sustained activation of ERK1/2. Under the continuous EGF stimulation conditions, these cell treatments also retard degradation of activated EGFR. These findings indicate that ALIX is critically involved in MVB sorting of ubiquitinated membrane receptors in mammalian cells. PMID:25510652

  14. ALG-2 interacting protein-X (Alix) is essential for clathrin-independent endocytosis and signaling

    PubMed Central

    Mercier, Vincent; Laporte, Marine H.; Destaing, Olivier; Blot, Béatrice; Blouin, Cédric M.; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Chatellard, Christine; Saoudi, Yasmina; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Lamaze, Christophe; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Petiot, Anne; Sadoul, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and the biological functions of clathrin independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely elusive. Alix (ALG-2 interacting protein X), has been assigned roles in membrane deformation and fission both in endosomes and at the plasma membrane. Using Alix ko cells, we show for the first time that Alix regulates fluid phase endocytosis and internalization of cargoes entering cells via CIE, but has no apparent effect on clathrin mediated endocytosis or downstream endosomal trafficking. We show that Alix acts with endophilin-A to promote CIE of cholera toxin and to regulate cell migration. We also found that Alix is required for fast endocytosis and downstream signaling of the interleukin-2 receptor giving a first indication that CIE is necessary for activation of at least some surface receptors. In addition to characterizing a new function for Alix, our results highlight Alix ko cells as a unique tool to unravel the biological consequences of CIE. PMID:27244115

  15. ALG-2 interacting protein-X (Alix) is essential for clathrin-independent endocytosis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Mercier, Vincent; Laporte, Marine H; Destaing, Olivier; Blot, Béatrice; Blouin, Cédric M; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Chatellard, Christine; Saoudi, Yasmina; Albiges-Rizo, Corinne; Lamaze, Christophe; Fraboulet, Sandrine; Petiot, Anne; Sadoul, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms and the biological functions of clathrin independent endocytosis (CIE) remain largely elusive. Alix (ALG-2 interacting protein X), has been assigned roles in membrane deformation and fission both in endosomes and at the plasma membrane. Using Alix ko cells, we show for the first time that Alix regulates fluid phase endocytosis and internalization of cargoes entering cells via CIE, but has no apparent effect on clathrin mediated endocytosis or downstream endosomal trafficking. We show that Alix acts with endophilin-A to promote CIE of cholera toxin and to regulate cell migration. We also found that Alix is required for fast endocytosis and downstream signaling of the interleukin-2 receptor giving a first indication that CIE is necessary for activation of at least some surface receptors. In addition to characterizing a new function for Alix, our results highlight Alix ko cells as a unique tool to unravel the biological consequences of CIE. PMID:27244115

  16. The ESCRT-Associated Protein Alix Recruits the Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1 To Facilitate HIV-1 Release through the LYPXnL L Domain Motif▿

    PubMed Central

    Sette, Paola; Jadwin, Joshua A.; Dussupt, Vincent; Bello, Nana F.; Bouamr, Fadila

    2010-01-01

    The p6 region of HIV-1 Gag contains two late (L) domains, PTAP and LYPXnL, that bind Tsg101 and Alix, respectively. Interactions with these two cellular proteins recruit members of the host's fission machinery (ESCRT) to facilitate HIV-1 release. Other retroviruses gain access to the host ESCRT components by utilizing a PPXY-type L domain that interacts with cellular Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligases. Despite the absence of a PPXY motif in HIV-1 Gag, interaction with the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-2 was recently shown to stimulate HIV-1 release. We show here that another Nedd4-like ubiquitin ligase, Nedd4-1, corrected release defects resulting from the disruption of PTAP (PTAP−), suggesting that HIV-1 Gag also recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate virus release. Notably, Nedd4-1 remediation of HIV-1 PTAP− budding defects is independent of cellular Tsg101, implying that Nedd4-1's function in HIV-1 release does not involve ESCRT-I components and is therefore distinct from that of Nedd4-2. Consistent with this finding, deletion of the p6 region decreased Nedd4-1-Gag interaction, and disruption of the LYPXnL motif eliminated Nedd4-1-mediated restoration of HIV-1 PTAP−. This result indicated that both Nedd4-1 interaction with Gag and function in virus release occur through the Alix-binding LYPXnL motif. Mutations of basic residues located in the NC domain of Gag that are critical for Alix's facilitation of HIV-1 release, also disrupted release mediated by Nedd4-1, further confirming a Nedd4-1-Alix functional interdependence. In fact we found that Nedd4-1 binds Alix in both immunoprecipitation and yeast-two-hybrid assays. In addition, Nedd4-1 requires its catalytic activity to promote virus release. Remarkably, RNAi knockdown of cellular Nedd4-1 eliminated Alix ubiquitination in the cell and impeded its ability to function in HIV-1 release. Together our data support a model in which Alix recruits Nedd4-1 to facilitate HIV-1 release mediated through the LYPXnL/Alix budding pathway

  17. ESCRT-III-Associated Protein ALIX Mediates High-Affinity Phosphate Transporter Trafficking to Maintain Phosphate Homeostasis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-López, Ximena; Cuyas, Laura; Marín, Elena; Irigoyen, María Luisa; Gil, Erica; Puga, María Isabel; Bligny, Richard; Nussaume, Laurent; Geldner, Niko; Paz-Ares, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Prior to the release of their cargoes into the vacuolar lumen, sorting endosomes mature into multivesicular bodies (MVBs) through the action of ENDOSOMAL COMPLEX REQUIRED FOR TRANSPORT (ESCRT) protein complexes. MVB-mediated sorting of high-affinity phosphate transporters (PHT1) to the vacuole limits their plasma membrane levels under phosphate-sufficient conditions, a process that allows plants to maintain phosphate homeostasis. Here, we describe ALIX, a cytosolic protein that associates with MVB by interacting with ESCRT-III subunit SNF7 and mediates PHT1;1 trafficking to the vacuole in Arabidopsis thaliana. We show that the partial loss-of-function mutant alix-1 displays reduced vacuolar degradation of PHT1;1. ALIX derivatives containing the alix-1 mutation showed reduced interaction with SNF7, providing a simple molecular explanation for impaired cargo trafficking in alix-1 mutants. In fact, the alix-1 mutation also hampered vacuolar sorting of the brassinosteroid receptor BRI1. We also show that alix-1 displays altered vacuole morphogenesis, implying a new role for ALIX proteins in vacuolar biogenesis, likely acting as part of ESCRT-III complexes. In line with a presumed broad target spectrum, the alix-1 mutation is pleiotropic, leading to reduced plant growth and late flowering, with stronger alix mutations being lethal, indicating that ALIX participates in diverse processes in plants essential for their life. PMID:26342016

  18. ALIX Regulates the Ubiquitin-Independent Lysosomal Sorting of the P2Y1 Purinergic Receptor via a YPX3L Motif

    PubMed Central

    Dores, Michael R.; Grimsey, Neil J.; Mendez, Francisco; Trejo, JoAnn

    2016-01-01

    Endocytic sorting and lysosomal degradation are integral to the regulation of G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) function. Upon ligand binding, classical GPCRs are activated, internalized and recycled or sorted to lysosomes for degradation, a process that requires receptor ubiquitination. However, recent studies have demonstrated that numerous GPCRs are sorted to lysosomes independent of receptor ubiquitination. Here, we describe an ubiquitin-independent lysosomal sorting pathway for the purinergic GPCR P2Y1. After activation, P2Y1 sorts to lysosomes for degradation independent of direct ubiquitination that is mediated by a YPX3L motif within the second intracellular loop that serves as a binding site for the adaptor protein ALIX. Depletion of ALIX or site-directed mutation of the YPX3L motif inhibits P2Y1 sorting into the lumen of multivesicular endosomes/lysosomes and degradation. These findings confirm the function of YPX3L motifs as lysosomal targeting sequences for GPCRs and demonstrate that ALIX mediates the ubiquitin-independent degradation of certain GPCRs. PMID:27301021

  19. ALIX and ESCRT-III Coordinately Control Cytokinetic Abscission during Germline Stem Cell Division In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Eikenes, Åsmund H.; Malerød, Lene; Christensen, Anette Lie; Steen, Chloé B.; Mathieu, Juliette; Nezis, Ioannis P.; Liestøl, Knut; Huynh, Jean-René; Stenmark, Harald; Haglund, Kaisa

    2015-01-01

    Abscission is the final step of cytokinesis that involves the cleavage of the intercellular bridge connecting the two daughter cells. Recent studies have given novel insight into the spatiotemporal regulation and molecular mechanisms controlling abscission in cultured yeast and human cells. The mechanisms of abscission in living metazoan tissues are however not well understood. Here we show that ALIX and the ESCRT-III component Shrub are required for completion of abscission during Drosophila female germline stem cell (fGSC) division. Loss of ALIX or Shrub function in fGSCs leads to delayed abscission and the consequent formation of stem cysts in which chains of daughter cells remain interconnected to the fGSC via midbody rings and fusome. We demonstrate that ALIX and Shrub interact and that they co-localize at midbody rings and midbodies during cytokinetic abscission in fGSCs. Mechanistically, we show that the direct interaction between ALIX and Shrub is required to ensure cytokinesis completion with normal kinetics in fGSCs. We conclude that ALIX and ESCRT-III coordinately control abscission in Drosophila fGSCs and that their complex formation is required for accurate abscission timing in GSCs in vivo. PMID:25635693

  20. The Phe105 Loop of Alix Bro1 Domain Plays a Key Role in HIV-1 Release

    SciTech Connect

    Sette, Paola; Mu, Ruiling; Dussupt, Vincent; Jiang, Jiansheng; Snyder, Greg; Smith, Patrick; Xiao, Tsan Sam; Bouamr, Fadila

    2011-12-07

    Alix and cellular paralogs HD-PTP and Brox contain N-terminal Bro1 domains that bind ESCRT-III CHMP4. In contrast to HD-PTP and Brox, expression of the Bro1 domain of Alix alleviates HIV-1 release defects that result from interrupted access to ESCRT. In an attempt to elucidate this functional discrepancy, we solved the crystal structures of the Bro1 domains of HD-PTP and Brox. They revealed typical 'boomerang' folds they share with the Bro1 Alix domain. However, they each contain unique structural features that may be relevant to their specific function(s). In particular, phenylalanine residue in position 105 (Phe105) of Alix belongs to a long loop that is unique to its Bro1 domain. Concurrently, mutation of Phe105 and surrounding residues at the tip of the loop compromise the function of Alix in HIV-1 budding without affecting its interactions with Gag or CHMP4. These studies identify a new functional determinant in the Bro1 domain of Alix.

  1. Structural recognition mechanisms between human Src homology domain 3 (SH3) and ALG-2-interacting protein X (Alix).

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaoli; Betzi, Stephane; Lugari, Adrien; Opi, Sandrine; Restouin, Audrey; Parrot, Isabelle; Martinez, Jean; Zimmermann, Pascale; Lecine, Patrick; Huang, Mingdong; Arold, Stefan T; Collette, Yves; Morelli, Xavier

    2012-06-21

    The functions of Src family kinases are tightly regulated through Src homology (SH) domain-mediated protein-protein interactions. We previously reported the biophysical characteristics of the apoptosis-linked gene 2-interacting protein X (Alix) in complex with the haemopoietic cell kinase (Hck) SH3 domain. In the current study, we have combined ITC, NMR, SAXS and molecular modeling to determine a 3D model of the complex. We demonstrate that Hck SH3 recognizes an extended linear proline-rich region of Alix. This particular binding mode enables Hck SH3 to sense a specific non-canonical residue situated in the SH3 RT-loop of the kinase. The resulting model helps clarify the mechanistic insights of Alix-Hck interaction. PMID:22641034

  2. Alix regulates cortical actin and the spatial distribution of endosomes.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alicia; Bache, Kristi G; Brech, Andreas; Stenmark, Harald

    2005-06-15

    Alix/AIP1 is a proline-rich protein that has been implicated in apoptosis, endocytic membrane trafficking and viral budding. To further elucidate the functions of Alix, we used RNA interference to specifically suppress its expression. Depletion of Alix caused a striking redistribution of early endosomes from a peripheral to a perinuclear location. The redistribution of endosomes did not affect transferrin recycling or degradation of endocytosed epidermal growth factor receptors, although the uptake of transferrin was mildly reduced when Alix was downregulated. Quantitative immunoelectron microscopy showed that multivesicular endosomes of Alix-depleted cells contained normal amounts of CD63, whereas their levels of lysobisphosphatidic acid were reduced. Alix depletion also caused an accumulation of unusual actin structures that contained clathrin and cortactin, a protein that couples membrane dynamics to the cortical actin cytoskeleton. Our results suggest that Alix functions in the actin-dependent intracellular positioning of endosomes, but that it is not essential for endocytic recycling or for trafficking of membrane proteins between early and late endosomes in non-polarised cells. PMID:15914539

  3. Galectin-3 regulates intracellular trafficking of epidermal growth factor receptor through Alix and promotes keratinocyte migration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Hsu, Daniel K.; Chen, Huan-Yuan; Yang, Ri-Yao; Carraway, Kermit L.; Isseroff, Roslyn R.; Liu, Fu-Tong

    2012-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mediated signaling pathways are important in a variety of cellular processes, including cell migration and wound re-epithelialization. Intracellular trafficking of EGFR is critical for maintaining EGFR surface expression. Galectin-3, a member of an animal lectin family, has been implicated in a number of physiological and pathological processes. Through studies of galectin-3-deficient mice and cells isolated from these mice, we demonstrated that absence of galectin-3 impairs keratinocyte migration and skin wound re-epithelialization. We have linked this pro-migratory function to a crucial role of cytosolic galectin-3 in controlling intracellular trafficking and cell surface expression of EGFR after EGF stimulation. Without galectin-3, the surface levels of EGFR are dramatically reduced and the receptor accumulates diffusely in the cytoplasm. This is associated with reduced rates of both endocytosis and recycling of the receptor. We have provided evidence that this novel function of galectin-3 may be mediated through interaction with its binding partner Alix, which is a protein component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery. Our results suggest that galectin-3 is potentially a critical regulator of a number of important cellular responses through its intracellular control of trafficking of cell surface receptors. PMID:22785133

  4. ATG12-ATG3 Interacts with Alix to Promote Basal Autophagic Flux and Late Endosome Function

    PubMed Central

    Murrow, Lyndsay; Malhotra, Ritu; Debnath, Jayanta

    2015-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like molecule ATG12 is required for the early steps of autophagy. Recently, we identified ATG3, the E2-like enzyme required for LC3 lipidation during autophagy, as an ATG12 conjugation target. Here, we demonstrate that cells lacking ATG12-ATG3 have impaired basal autophagic flux, accumulation of perinuclear late endosomes, and impaired endolysosomal trafficking. Furthermore, we identify an interaction between ATG12-ATG3 and the ESCRT-associated protein Alix (also known as PDCD6IP) and demonstrate that ATG12-ATG3 controls multiple Alix-dependent processes including late endosome distribution, exosome biogenesis, and viral budding. Lastly, similar to ATG12-ATG3, Alix is functionally required for efficient basal, but not starvation-induced, autophagy. Overall, these results identify a link between the core autophagy and ESCRT machineries and uncover a role for ATG12-ATG3 in late endosome function that is distinct from the canonical role of either ATG in autophagosome formation. PMID:25686249

  5. Structure of the Bro1 Domain Protein BROX and Functional Analyses of the ALIX Bro1 Domain in HIV-1 Budding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Q.; Robinson H.; Landesman M. B.; Sundquist W. I.; Hill C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC{sup Gag} protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements. We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  6. The role of Alix in the proliferation of human glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chengjin; Ban, Na; Dai, Shirong; Zhang, Xiubing; Zhang, Li; Xu, Peng; Chen, Wenjuan; Sun, Jie; Bao, Zhen; Chang, Hao; Wang, Donglin; Ren, Jianbing

    2016-06-01

    Apoptosis-linked-gene-2-interacting protein 1 (Alix) is involved in the endosome-lysosome system in the cytoplasm. The normal function of Alix may be altered by ALG-2 toward a destructive role during active cell death. Alix also may play a role in regulation of cell proliferation. However, the role of Alix in human glioma has not been elucidated yet. This study intended to clarify the relationship between Alix and glioma pathologic grades and its role in the proliferation of glioma cells. Our findings showed that Alix protein concentrations were significantly elevated in high-grade glioma tissue compared with low-grade glioma (P < .0001). Immunohistochemical study revealed that Alix was overexpressed in 75 resected glioma tissues and may forecast poor survival. Alix expression was increased in resting serum-stimulated glioma cells. Additionally, we reduced Alix expression in U251MG cells and then found that cell viability was decreased significantly when p21 expression increased. Colony formation assay and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that reduced Alix expression may lead to growth inhibition and cell cycle arrest. In summary, our findings suggest that Alix plays an important role in the proliferation of glioma cells and may be a novel therapeutic target. PMID:26980041

  7. Exosomes in colorectal carcinoma formation: ALIX under the magnifying glass.

    PubMed

    Valcz, Gábor; Galamb, Orsolya; Krenács, Tibor; Spisák, Sándor; Kalmár, Alexandra; Patai, Árpád V; Wichmann, Barna; Dede, Kristóf; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2016-08-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles that have important roles in transporting a great variety of bioactive molecules between epithelial compartment and their microenvironment during tumor formation including colorectal adenoma-carcinoma sequence. We tested the mRNA expression of the top 25 exosome-related markers based on ExoCharta database in healthy (n=49), adenoma (n=49) and colorectal carcinoma (n=49) patients using Affymetrix HGU133 Plus2.0 microarrays. Most related genes showed significantly elevated expression including PGK1, PKM, ANXA5, ENO1, HSP90AB1 and MSN during adenoma-carcinoma sequence. Surprisingly, the expression of ALIX (ALG 2-interacting protein X), involved in multivesicular body (MVB) and exosome formation, was significantly reduced in normal vs adenoma (P=5.02 × 10(-13)) and in normal vs colorectal carcinoma comparisons (P=1.51 × 10(-10)). ALIX also showed significant reduction (P<0.05) at the in situ protein level in the epithelial compartment of adenoma (n=35) and colorectal carcinoma (n=37) patients compared with 27 healthy individuals. Furthermore, significantly reduced ALIX protein levels were accompanied by their gradual transition from diffuse cytoplasmic expression to granular signals, which fell into the 0.6-2 μm diameter size range of MVBs. These ALIX-positive particles were seen in the tumor nests, including tumor-stroma border, which suggest their exosome function. MVB-like structures were also detected in tumor microenvironment including α-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells, budding off cancer cells in the tumor front as well as in cancer cells entrapped within lymphoid vessels. In conclusion, we determined the top aberrantly expressed exosome-associated markers and revealed the transition of diffuse ALIX protein signals into a MVB-like pattern during adenoma-carcinoma sequence. These tumor-associated particles seen both in the carcinoma and the surrounding microenvironment can potentially mediate epithelial

  8. Interleukin-13 promotes expression of Alix to compromise renal tubular epithelial barrier function.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chen; Sun, Guangdong; Yang, Jie; Sun, Qianmei; Tong, Zhaohui

    2015-05-01

    The epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in a number of kidney diseases. The mechanism is unclear. Alix is a protein involving in protein degradation in epithelial cells. This study aims to investigate that interleukin (IL)-13 inhibits Alix to compromise the kidney epithelial barrier function. In this study, the murine collecting duct cell line (M-1) was cultured in Transwell inserts to investigate the significance of Alix in compromising the epithelial barrier functions. T cell (Teff cells) proliferation assay was employed to assess the antigenicity of ovalbumin (OVA) that was transported across the M-1 monolayer barrier. The results showed that M-1 cells express Alix. Exposure to interleukin (IL)-13 markedly decreased the expression of Alix in M-1 cells, which compromised the M-1 monolayer barrier functions by showing the increases in the permeability to OVA. Over-expression of Alix abolished the IL-13-induced M-1 monolayer barrier dysfunction. Knockdown of Alix significantly increased M-1 monolayer permeability. The OVA collected from the Transwell basal chambers induced the OVA-specific T cell proliferation. We conclude that IL-13 compromises M-1 epithelial barrier functions via inhibiting Alix expression. PMID:25597757

  9. ALIX Rescues Budding of a Double PTAP/PPEY L-Domain Deletion Mutant of Ebola VP40: A Role for ALIX in Ebola Virus Egress.

    PubMed

    Han, Ziying; Madara, Jonathan J; Liu, Yuliang; Liu, Wenbo; Ruthel, Gordon; Freedman, Bruce D; Harty, Ronald N

    2015-10-01

    Ebola (EBOV) is an enveloped, negative-sense RNA virus belonging to the family Filoviridae that causes hemorrhagic fever syndromes with high-mortality rates. To date, there are no licensed vaccines or therapeutics to control EBOV infection and prevent transmission. Consequently, the need to better understand the mechanisms that regulate virus transmission is critical to developing countermeasures. The EBOV VP40 matrix protein plays a central role in late stages of virion assembly and egress, and independent expression of VP40 leads to the production of virus-like particles (VLPs) by a mechanism that accurately mimics budding of live virus. VP40 late (L) budding domains mediate efficient virus-cell separation by recruiting host ESCRT and ESCRT-associated proteins to complete the membrane fission process. L-domains consist of core consensus amino acid motifs including PPxY, P(T/S)AP, and YPx(n)L/I, and EBOV VP40 contains overlapping PPxY and PTAP motifs whose interactions with Nedd4 and Tsg101, respectively, have been characterized extensively. Here, we present data demonstrating for the first time that EBOV VP40 possesses a third L-domain YPx(n)L/I consensus motif that interacts with the ESCRT-III protein Alix. We show that the YPx(n)L/I motif mapping to amino acids 18-26 of EBOV VP40 interacts with the Alix Bro1-V fragment, and that siRNA knockdown of endogenous Alix expression inhibits EBOV VP40 VLP egress. Furthermore, overexpression of Alix Bro1-V rescues VLP production of the budding deficient EBOV VP40 double PTAP/PPEY L-domain deletion mutant to wild-type levels. Together, these findings demonstrate that EBOV VP40 recruits host Alix via a YPx(n)L/I motif that can function as an alternative L-domain to promote virus egress. PMID:25786915

  10. Paraptosis: mediation by MAP kinases and inhibition by AIP-1/Alix.

    PubMed

    Sperandio, S; Poksay, K; de Belle, I; Lafuente, M J; Liu, B; Nasir, J; Bredesen, D E

    2004-10-01

    Programmed cell death (pcd) may take the form of apoptotic or nonapoptotic pcd. Whereas cysteine aspartyl-specific proteases (caspases) mediate apoptosis, the mediators of nonapoptotic cell death programs are much less well characterized. Here, we report that paraptosis, an alternative, nonapoptotic cell death program that may be induced by the insulin-like growth factor I receptor (among other inducers), is mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and inhibited by AIP-1/Alix. The inhibition by AIP-1/Alix is specific for paraptosis since apoptosis was not inhibited. Caspases were not activated in this paradigm, nor were caspase inhibitors effective in blocking cell death. However, insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGFIR)-induced paraptosis was inhibited by MEK-2-specific inhibitors and by antisense oligonucleotides directed against c-jun N-terminal kinase-1 (JNK-1). These results suggest that IGFIR-induced paraptosis is mediated by MAPKs, and inhibited by AIP-1/Alix. PMID:15195070

  11. Role of LBPA and Alix in multivesicular liposome formation and endosome organization.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hirotami; Chevallier, Julien; Mayran, Nathalie; Le Blanc, Isabelle; Ferguson, Charles; Fauré, Julien; Blanc, Nathalie Sartori; Matile, Stefan; Dubochet, Jacques; Sadoul, Rémy; Parton, Robert G; Vilbois, Francis; Gruenberg, Jean

    2004-01-23

    What are the components that control the assembly of subcellular organelles in eukaryotic cells? Although membranes can clearly be distorted by cytosolic factors, very little is known about the intrinsic mechanisms that control the biogenesis, shape, and organization of organellar membranes. Here, we found that the unconventional phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) could induce the formation of multivesicular liposomes that resembled the multivesicular endosomes that exist where this lipid is found in vivo. This process depended on the same pH gradient that exists across endosome membranes in vivo and was selectively controlled by Alix. In turn, Alix regulated the organization of LBPA-containing endosomes in vivo. PMID:14739459

  12. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin–tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin–tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical–basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  13. Alix-mediated assembly of the actomyosin-tight junction polarity complex preserves epithelial polarity and epithelial barrier.

    PubMed

    Campos, Yvan; Qiu, Xiaohui; Gomero, Elida; Wakefield, Randall; Horner, Linda; Brutkowski, Wojciech; Han, Young-Goo; Solecki, David; Frase, Sharon; Bongiovanni, Antonella; d'Azzo, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of epithelial cell polarity and epithelial barrier relies on the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton and proper positioning/assembly of intercellular junctions. However, how these processes are regulated is poorly understood. Here we reveal a key role for the multifunctional protein Alix in both processes. In a knockout mouse model of Alix, we identified overt structural changes in the epithelium of the choroid plexus and in the ependyma, such as asymmetrical cell shape and size, misplacement and abnormal beating of cilia, blebbing of the microvilli. These defects culminate in excessive cell extrusion, enlargement of the lateral ventricles and hydrocephalus. Mechanistically, we find that by interacting with F-actin, the Par complex and ZO-1, Alix ensures the formation and maintenance of the apically restricted actomyosin-tight junction complex. We propose that in this capacity Alix plays a role in the establishment of apical-basal polarity and in the maintenance of the epithelial barrier. PMID:27336173

  14. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Berger, Allan L; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-01-11

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [alpha-(32)P]8-N(3)-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  15. Normal gating of CFTR requires ATP binding to both nucleotide-binding domains and hydrolysis at the second nucleotide-binding domain

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Allan L.; Ikuma, Mutsuhiro; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ATP interacts with the two nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of CFTR to control gating. However, it is unclear whether gating involves ATP binding alone, or also involves hydrolysis at each NBD. We introduced phenylalanine residues into nonconserved positions of each NBD Walker A motif to sterically prevent ATP binding. These mutations blocked [α-32P]8-N3-ATP labeling of the mutated NBD and reduced channel opening rate without changing burst duration. Introducing cysteine residues at these positions and modifying with N-ethylmaleimide produced the same gating behavior. These results indicate that normal gating requires ATP binding to both NBDs, but ATP interaction with one NBD is sufficient to support some activity. We also studied mutations of the conserved Walker A lysine residues (K464A and K1250A) that prevent hydrolysis. By combining substitutions that block ATP binding with Walker A lysine mutations, we could differentiate the role of ATP binding vs. hydrolysis at each NBD. The K1250A mutation prolonged burst duration; however, blocking ATP binding prevented the long bursts. These data indicate that ATP binding to NBD2 allowed channel opening and that closing was delayed in the absence of hydrolysis. The corresponding NBD1 mutations showed relatively little effect of preventing ATP hydrolysis but a large inhibition of blocking ATP binding. These data suggest that ATP binding to NBD1 is required for normal activity but that hydrolysis has little effect. Our results suggest that both NBDs contribute to channel gating, NBD1 binds ATP but supports little hydrolysis, and ATP binding and hydrolysis at NBD2 are key for normal gating. PMID:15623556

  16. Binding of Cryptococcus neoformans by human cultured macrophages. Requirements for multiple complement receptors and actin.

    PubMed Central

    Levitz, S M; Tabuni, A

    1991-01-01

    We studied the receptors on human cultured macrophages (MO-M phi) responsible for binding encapsulated and isogenic mutant acapsular strains of Cryptococcus neoformans, and whether such binding leads to a phagocytic event. Both strains required opsonization with complement components in normal human serum in order for binding to occur. Binding of the acapsular, but not the encapsulated, strain led to phagocytosis. MAb directed against any of the three defined complement receptors (CR) on MO-M phi (CR1, CR3, and CR4) profoundly inhibited binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated (and to a lesser extent acapsular) organisms to MO-M phi. Immunofluorescence studies demonstrated migration of CR to the area of the cryptococcal binding site. Trypsin and elastase inhibited binding of encapsulated and, to a lesser extent, acapsular yeasts to MO-M phi. Binding of encapsulated C. neoformans was profoundly inhibited by incubation in the cold or by inhibitors of receptor capping and actin microfilaments. Thus, multiple CR appear to contribute to binding of serum-opsonized encapsulated C. neoformans by MO-M phi. Binding is an energy-dependent process that requires conformational changes in actin yet does not lead to phagocytosis of the organism. In contrast, energy is not required for binding of acapsular yeasts by MO-M phi and binding triggers phagocytosis. Images PMID:1991837

  17. RXR function requires binding to an endogenous terpenoid ligand

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The issue of whether the nuclear receptor RXR must bind to an endogenous, nanomolar affinity ligand in order to perform its natural function is still unsettled (1). On the basis of our previous studies establishing that the Drosophilamelanogaster ortholog of the retinoid X receptor ("ultraspiracle,"...

  18. Glucagon and adenylate cyclase: binding studies and requirements for activation.

    PubMed

    Levey, G S; Fletcher, M A; Klein, I

    1975-01-01

    Solubilization of myocardial adenylate cyclase abolished responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, two of the hormones which activate the membrane-bound enzyme. Adenylate cyclase freed of detergent by DEAE-cellulose chromatography continues to remain unresponsive to hormone stimulation. However, adding purified bovine brain phospholipids--phosphotidylserine and monophosphatidylinositol--restored responsiveness to glucagon and catecholamines, respectively. 125-i-glucagon binding appeared to be independent of phospholipid, since equal binding was observed in the presence or absence of detergent and in the presence or absence of phospholipids. Chromatography of the solubilized preparation on Sephadex G-100 WAS CHARACTERIZED BY 125-I-glucagon binding and fluoride-stimulatable adenylate cyclase activity appearing in the fractions consistent with the void volume, suggesting a molecular weight greater than 100,000 for the receptor-adenylate cyclase complex. Prior incubation of the binding peak with 125-I-glucagon and rechromatography of the bound glucagon on Sephadex G-100 shifted its elution to a later fraction consistent with a smaller-molecular-weight peak. The molecular weight of this material was 24,000 to 28,000, as determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The latter findings are consistent with a dissociable receptor site for glucagon on myocardial adenylate cyclase. PMID:165684

  19. Association of Alix with late endosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid is important for dengue virus infection in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Pattanakitsakul, Sa-nga; Poungsawai, Jesdaporn; Kanlaya, Rattiyaporn; Sinchaikul, Supachok; Chen, Shui-Tein; Thongboonkerd, Visith

    2010-09-01

    The most severe form of dengue virus (DENV) infection is dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome (DHF/DSS), which is accompanied by increased vascular permeability indicating that endothelial cells are the targets of DENV infection. However, molecular mechanisms underlying DENV replication in endothelial cells remained poorly understood. We therefore examined changes in subcellular proteomes of different cellular compartments (including cytosolic, membrane/organelle, nucleus, and cytoskeleton) of human endothelial (EA.hy926) cells upon DENV2 infection using a 2-DE-based proteomics approach followed by Q-TOF MS and MS/MS. A total of 35 altered proteins were identified in these subcellular locales, including an increase in the level of Alix (apoptosis-linked gene-2-interacting protein X) in the cytosolic fraction of DENV2-infected cells compared to mock control cells. Double immunofluorescence staining revealed colocalization of Alix with late endosomal lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA). This complex has been proposed to be involved in the export of DENV proteins from late endosomes to the cytoplasm. Subsequent functional study revealed that pretreatment with an anti-LBPA antibody prior to DENV challenge significantly reduced the level of viral envelope protein synthesis and DENV replication. Our data indicate that Alix plays a pivotal role in the early phase of DENV replication, particularly when it arrives at the late endosome stage. Blocking this step may lead to a novel therapeutic approach to reducing the level of DENV replication in vivo. PMID:20669987

  20. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  1. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W; Caldecott, Keith W

    2015-08-18

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  2. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S

    2016-07-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA-DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  3. Dynamic binding of replication protein a is required for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ran; Subramanyam, Shyamal; Elcock, Adrian H.; Spies, Maria; Wold, Marc S.

    2016-01-01

    Replication protein A (RPA), the major eukaryotic single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) binding protein, is essential for replication, repair and recombination. High-affinity ssDNA-binding by RPA depends on two DNA binding domains in the large subunit of RPA. Mutation of the evolutionarily conserved aromatic residues in these two domains results in a separation-of-function phenotype: aromatic residue mutants support DNA replication but are defective in DNA repair. We used biochemical and single-molecule analyses, and Brownian Dynamics simulations to determine the molecular basis of this phenotype. Our studies demonstrated that RPA binds to ssDNA in at least two modes characterized by different dissociation kinetics. We also showed that the aromatic residues contribute to the formation of the longer-lived state, are required for stable binding to short ssDNA regions and are needed for RPA melting of partially duplex DNA structures. We conclude that stable binding and/or the melting of secondary DNA structures by RPA is required for DNA repair, including RAD51 mediated DNA strand exchange, but is dispensable for DNA replication. It is likely that the binding modes are in equilibrium and reflect dynamics in the RPA–DNA complex. This suggests that dynamic binding of RPA to DNA is necessary for different cellular functions. PMID:27131385

  4. The intracellular bacterium Rhodococcus equi requires Mac-1 to bind to mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hondalus, M K; Diamond, M S; Rosenthal, L A; Springer, T A; Mosser, D M

    1993-01-01

    Rhodococcus equi is a facultative intracellular bacterium of macrophages that causes disease in immunocompromised individuals, particularly those with AIDS. In this report, we demonstrate that R. equi binding to mammalian cells requires complement and is mediated primarily by the leukocyte complement receptor, Mac-1. Bacteria bind to macrophages poorly unless exogenous complement is added to the incubation medium. The addition of fresh nonimmune serum, which contains no detectable antibodies to R. equi, greatly enhances bacterial binding to macrophages, whereas heat inactivation of this serum or immunological depletion of C3 from the serum reduces binding to levels only slightly higher than those of binding under serum-free conditions. Human serum depleted of C2 or C4 is fully opsonic, indicating that complement activation and fixation occur by the alternative pathway. The serum-dependent binding of rhodococci to macrophages is mediated primarily by the macrophage complement receptor type 3, Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18). Bacteria do not bind to fibroblastoid or epithelial cells that lack this receptor. Most of the bacterial binding to macrophages is inhibited by a monoclonal antibody to Mac-1 but is unaffected by a monoclonal antibody to complement receptor type 1. Furthermore, opsonized, but not unopsonized, bacteria bind to purified Mac-1 immobilized on plastic. In addition, in the presence of opsonic complement, rhodococci bind efficiently to fibroblastoid cells transfected with cloned Mac-1 but relatively poorly to cells transfected with the complement receptor type 1. Hence, R. equi fixes complement by activating the alternative complement pathway, and this fixation is a requirement for bacterial adhesion and invasion. Furthermore, complement fixation defines rhodococcal host cell tropism, since R. equi binds specifically and exclusively to cells expressing Mac-1. Images PMID:8514396

  5. Sequence requirement for specific interaction of an enhancer binding protein (EBP1) with DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Clark, L; Hay, R T

    1989-01-01

    Short DNA sequence motifs have been identified in viral and cellular enhancers which represent the binding sites for a variety of trans- acting factors. One such HeLa cell factor, EBP1, has been purified and shown to bind to sequences in the SV40 enhancer. The PRDII element in the human beta-interferon gene regulatory element (IRE) shows strong sequence similarity to the EBP1 binding site in the SV40 enhancer. We demonstrate here that EBP1 binds to its sites in the SV40 enhancer and IRE in a similar manner, making base specific contacts over one complete turn of the DNA double helix. Mutational analysis of the EBP1 sites in the IRE and SV40 enhancer has identified the DNA sequence requirements necessary for specific EBP1/DNA complex formation. In addition, 34 DNA sequences related to the EBP1 binding site were analysed for their ability to bind EBP1. Sequences constituting high affinity binding sites possess the sequence 5'-GG(N)6CC-3'. Single base pair changes in the region between the conserved Gs and Cs can generally be tolerated although it is clear that these intervening bases contribute to binding affinity. Mutations in the recognition site which could lead to gross structural changes in the DNA abolish EBP1 binding. Images PMID:2536920

  6. The chair of mental and brain diseases: Charcot's pupils--Benjamin Ball, Alix Joffroy and Gilbert Ballet.

    PubMed

    Tiberghien, Denis

    2011-01-01

    Benjamin Ball (1833-1893), Alix Joffroy (1844-1908) and Gilbert Ballet (1853-1916) were three pupils of the great Charcot (1825-1893). They were successive holders of the chair for mental illness and encephalon at its creation in 1877 until the First World War: Benjamin Ball from 1877 to 1893, Alix Joffroy from 1893 to 1908, and Gilbert Ballet from 1908 to 1916. After describing the context surrounding the creation of this chair and the choice of its representative and successors, we will examine their neurological work on the brain derived from a method influenced by a current of thought careful to list the symptoms of the disease and to look for the anatomical causes in the brain. The renowned 19th century French neurologist Jean-Martin Charcot was a huge influence. With their acquired experience and progress in the fields of morphology and histology and cerebral cortex functioning, they greatly contributed to the evolution of neurological, clinical anatomical and psychological-physiological findings--thus allowing certain pathologies to be considered as organic diseases rather than neurotic symptoms--while all the time recognizing the importance of the cortical cell in mental illness. PMID:20938145

  7. ATP binding by NLRP7 is required for inflammasome activation in response to bacterial lipopeptides.

    PubMed

    Radian, Alexander D; Khare, Sonal; Chu, Lan H; Dorfleutner, Andrea; Stehlik, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligimerization domain (NOD)-like receptors (NLRs) are pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) involved in innate immune responses. NLRs encode a central nucleotide-binding domain (NBD) consisting of the NAIP, CIITA, HET-E and TP1 (NACHT) domain and the NACHT associated domain (NAD), which facilitates receptor oligomerization and downstream inflammasome signaling. The NBD contains highly conserved regions, known as Walker motifs, that are required for nucleotide binding and hydrolysis. The NLR containing a PYRIN domain (PYD) 7 (NLRP7) has been recently shown to assemble an ASC and caspase-1-containing high molecular weight inflammasome complex in response to microbial acylated lipopeptides and Staphylococcus aureus infection. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for NLRP7 inflammasome activation is still elusive. Here we demonstrate that the NBD of NLRP7 is an ATP binding domain and has ATPase activity. We further show that an intact nucleotide-binding Walker A motif is required for NBD-mediated nucleotide binding and hydrolysis, oligomerization, and NLRP7 inflammasome formation and activity. Accordingly, THP-1 cells expressing a mutated Walker A motif display defective NLRP7 inflammasome activation, interleukin (IL)-1β release and pyroptosis in response to acylated lipopeptides and S. aureus infection. Taken together, our results provide novel insights into the mechanism of NLRP7 inflammasome assembly. PMID:26143398

  8. Structural and energetic requirements for a second binding site at the dimeric β-lactoglobulin interface.

    PubMed

    Bello, Martiniano

    2016-09-01

    Through experimental and theoretical approaches, it has been shown that bovine β-lactoglobulin (βlg) uses its hydrophobic cavity or calyx as the primary binding site for hydrophobic molecules, whereas the existence of a second ligand binding site at the dimeric interface has only been structurally identified for vitamin D3 (VD3). This binding exists even in the thermally denatured state, suggesting the prevalence of this secondary site. Although crystallographic experiments have suggested that VD3 can bind to both monomeric and dimeric states without significant structural differences, theoretical and experimental reports have proposed some structural requirements. Thus, in this study, based on known experimental data, the dynamic interaction of VD3 with the monomeric or dimeric forms of βlg was investigated through a protocol combining blind docking and 2 microsecond molecular dynamics simulations coupled with binding free energy and per-residue binding free energy decomposition analyses using the Molecular Mechanics Generalized Born Surface Area approach. Binding free energy calculations allowed us to estimate the energetic differences of coupling VD3 at the calyx and the dimeric interface for the monomeric or dimeric state, revealing that the dimeric structure is required to form a stable complex with VD3 at the dimeric interface. This also has an important impact on the dimerization process, whereas although the monomeric state also forms a stable complex with VD3 at the dimeric interface, the incorporation of the entropy component contributed to producing a marginally favorable binding free energy. Finally, the per-residue decomposition analysis provided energetic information about the most relevant residues in stabilizing the different systems. PMID:26375627

  9. IsdB-dependent Hemoglobin Binding Is Required for Acquisition of Heme by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pishchany, Gleb; Sheldon, Jessica R.; Dickson, Claire F.; Alam, Md Tauqeer; Read, Timothy D.; Gell, David A.; Heinrichs, David E.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen responsible for tremendous morbidity and mortality. As with most bacteria, S. aureus requires iron to cause disease, and it can acquire iron from host hemoglobin. The current model for staphylococcal hemoglobin-iron acquisition proposes that S. aureus binds hemoglobin through the surface-exposed hemoglobin receptor IsdB. IsdB removes heme from bound hemoglobin and transfers this cofactor to other proteins of the Isd system, which import and degrade heme to release iron in the cytoplasm. Here we demonstrate that the individual components of the Isd system are required for growth on low nanomolar concentrations of hemoglobin as a sole source of iron. An in-depth study of hemoglobin binding by IsdB revealed key residues that are required for hemoglobin binding. Further, we show that these residues are necessary for heme extraction from hemoglobin and growth on hemoglobin as a sole iron source. These processes are found to contribute to the pathogenicity of S. aureus in a murine model of infection. Together these results build on the model for Isd-mediated hemoglobin binding and heme-iron acquisition during the pathogenesis of S. aureus infection. PMID:24338348

  10. LMO2 Oncoprotein Stability in T-Cell Leukemia Requires Direct LDB1 Binding

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Justin H.; Alford, Catherine E.; McDonald, W. Hayes

    2015-01-01

    LMO2 is a component of multisubunit DNA-binding transcription factor complexes that regulate gene expression in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development. Enforced expression of LMO2 causes leukemia by inducing hematopoietic stem cell-like features in T-cell progenitor cells, but the biochemical mechanisms of LMO2 function have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we systematically dissected the LMO2/LDB1-binding interface to investigate the role of this interaction in T-cell leukemia. Alanine scanning mutagenesis of the LIM interaction domain of LDB1 revealed a discrete motif, R320LITR, required for LMO2 binding. Most strikingly, coexpression of full-length, wild-type LDB1 increased LMO2 steady-state abundance, whereas coexpression of mutant proteins deficient in LMO2 binding compromised LMO2 stability. These mutant LDB1 proteins also exerted dominant negative effects on growth and transcription in diverse leukemic cell lines. Mass spectrometric analysis of LDB1 binding partners in leukemic lines supports the notion that LMO2/LDB1 function in leukemia occurs in the context of multisubunit complexes, which also protect the LMO2 oncoprotein from degradation. Collectively, these data suggest that the assembly of LMO2 into complexes, via direct LDB1 interaction, is a potential molecular target that could be exploited in LMO2-driven leukemias resistant to existing chemotherapy regimens. PMID:26598604

  11. Data on docking and dynamics simulation of Entamoeba histolytica EhADH (an ALIX protein) and lysobisphosphatidic acid

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos-Castro, Silvia; Montaño, Sarita; Orozco, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan agent responsible for human amoebiasis. Trophozoites are highly phagocytic cells and the lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) is involved in endocytosis. LBPA interacts with EhADH protein (an ALIX family member) also participating in phagocytosis, as it is referred in the research article Identification of the phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid in the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica: an active molecule in endocytosis (Castellanos-Castro et al., 2016) [1]. To unveil the interaction site between EhADH and LBPA, here we performed molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking. Molecular modeling and docking predictions revealed that EhADH interacts with LBPA through the Bro1 domain, located at the N-terminus of the protein and through the adherence domain at the C-terminus. In silico mutation abolished these interactions, supporting the data obtained in molecular dynamic and docking in silico assays. PMID:27014730

  12. Data on docking and dynamics simulation of Entamoeba histolytica EhADH (an ALIX protein) and lysobisphosphatidic acid.

    PubMed

    Castellanos-Castro, Silvia; Montaño, Sarita; Orozco, Esther

    2016-06-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the protozoan agent responsible for human amoebiasis. Trophozoites are highly phagocytic cells and the lysobisphosphatidic acid (LBPA) is involved in endocytosis. LBPA interacts with EhADH protein (an ALIX family member) also participating in phagocytosis, as it is referred in the research article Identification of the phospholipid lysobisphosphatidic acid in the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica: an active molecule in endocytosis (Castellanos-Castro et al., 2016) [1]. To unveil the interaction site between EhADH and LBPA, here we performed molecular modeling, dynamics simulation and docking. Molecular modeling and docking predictions revealed that EhADH interacts with LBPA through the Bro1 domain, located at the N-terminus of the protein and through the adherence domain at the C-terminus. In silico mutation abolished these interactions, supporting the data obtained in molecular dynamic and docking in silico assays. PMID:27014730

  13. Supervillin binding to myosin II and synergism with anillin are required for cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Tara C.; Fridy, Peter C.; Li, Yinyin; Basil, Shruti; Arjun, Sneha; Friesen, Ryan M.; Leszyk, John; Chait, Brian T.; Rout, Michael P.; Luna, Elizabeth J.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokinesis, the process by which cytoplasm is apportioned between dividing daughter cells, requires coordination of myosin II function, membrane trafficking, and central spindle organization. Most known regulators act during late cytokinesis; a few, including the myosin II–binding proteins anillin and supervillin, act earlier. Anillin's role in scaffolding the membrane cortex with the central spindle is well established, but the mechanism of supervillin action is relatively uncharacterized. We show here that two regions within supervillin affect cell division: residues 831–1281, which bind central spindle proteins, and residues 1–170, which bind the myosin II heavy chain (MHC) and the long form of myosin light-chain kinase. MHC binding is required to rescue supervillin deficiency, and mutagenesis of this site creates a dominant-negative phenotype. Supervillin concentrates activated and total myosin II at the furrow, and simultaneous knockdown of supervillin and anillin additively increases cell division failure. Knockdown of either protein causes mislocalization of the other, and endogenous anillin increases upon supervillin knockdown. Proteomic identification of interaction partners recovered using a high-affinity green fluorescent protein nanobody suggests that supervillin and anillin regulate the myosin II and actin cortical cytoskeletons through separate pathways. We conclude that supervillin and anillin play complementary roles during vertebrate cytokinesis. PMID:24088567

  14. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (ePAB) phosphorylation is required for Xenopus oocyte maturation.

    PubMed

    Friend, Kyle; Brook, Matthew; Bezirci, F Betül; Sheets, Michael D; Gray, Nicola K; Seli, Emre

    2012-07-01

    Oocyte maturation and early embryonic development require the cytoplasmic polyadenylation and concomitant translational activation of stored maternal mRNAs. ePAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein, also known as ePABP and PABPc1-like] is a multifunctional post-transcriptional regulator that binds to poly(A) tails. In the present study we find that ePAB is a dynamically modified phosphoprotein in Xenopus laevis oocytes and show by mutation that phosphorylation at a four residue cluster is required for oocyte maturation. We further demonstrate that these phosphorylations are critical for cytoplasmic polyadenylation, but not for ePAB's inherent ability to promote translation. Our results provide the first insight into the role of post-translational modifications in regulating PABP protein activity in vivo. PMID:22497250

  15. Mitotic activation of the kinase Aurora-A requires its binding partner Bora.

    PubMed

    Hutterer, Andrea; Berdnik, Daniela; Wirtz-Peitz, Frederik; Zigman, Mihaela; Schleiffer, Alexander; Knoblich, Juergen A

    2006-08-01

    The protein kinase Aurora-A is required for centrosome maturation, spindle assembly, and asymmetric protein localization during mitosis. Here, we describe the identification of Bora, a conserved protein that is required for the activation of Aurora-A at the onset of mitosis. In the Drosophila peripheral nervous system, bora mutants have defects during asymmetric cell division identical to those observed in aurora-A. Furthermore, overexpression of bora can rescue defects caused by mutations in aurora-A. Bora is conserved in vertebrates, and both Drosophila and human Bora can bind to Aurora-A and activate the kinase in vitro. In interphase cells, Bora is a nuclear protein, but upon entry into mitosis, Bora is excluded from the nucleus and translocates into the cytoplasm in a Cdc2-dependent manner. We propose a model in which activation of Cdc2 initiates the release of Bora into the cytoplasm where it can bind and activate Aurora-A. PMID:16890155

  16. Wiz binds active promoters and CTCF-binding sites and is required for normal behaviour in the mouse

    PubMed Central

    Isbel, Luke; Prokopuk, Lexie; Wu, Haoyu; Daxinger, Lucia; Oey, Harald; Spurling, Alex; Lawther, Adam J; Hale, Matthew W; Whitelaw, Emma

    2016-01-01

    We previously identified Wiz in a mouse screen for epigenetic modifiers. Due to its known association with G9a/GLP, Wiz is generally considered a transcriptional repressor. Here, we provide evidence that it may also function as a transcriptional activator. Wiz levels are high in the brain, but its function and direct targets are unknown. ChIP-seq was performed in adult cerebellum and Wiz peaks were found at promoters and transcription factor CTCF binding sites. RNA-seq in Wiz mutant mice identified genes differentially regulated in adult cerebellum and embryonic brain. In embryonic brain most decreased in expression and included clustered protocadherin genes. These also decreased in adult cerebellum and showed strong Wiz ChIP-seq enrichment. Because a precise pattern of protocadherin gene expression is required for neuronal development, behavioural tests were carried out on mutant mice, revealing an anxiety-like phenotype. This is the first evidence of a role for Wiz in neural function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15082.001 PMID:27410475

  17. The RNA-binding protein Musashi is required intrinsically to maintain stem cell identity.

    PubMed

    Siddall, Nicole A; McLaughlin, Eileen A; Marriner, Neisha L; Hime, Gary R

    2006-05-30

    A key goal of regenerative medicine is an understanding of the genetic factors that define the properties of stem cells. However, stem cell research in mammalian tissue has been hampered by a paucity of stem cell-specific markers. Although increasing evidence suggests that members of the Musashi (Msi) family of RNA-binding proteins play important functions in progenitor cells, it remains unclear whether there is a stem cell-autonomous requirement for Msi because of an inability to distinguish stem cells from early-lineage cells in mammalian tissues. Here, using the Drosophila testis as a model system for the study of stem cell regulation, we show specific evidence for a cell-autonomous requirement for Msi family proteins in regulating stem cell differentiation, leading to the identification of an RNA-binding protein required for spermatogonial stem cell maintenance. We found that loss of Msi function disrupts the balance between germ-line stem cell renewal and differentiation, resulting in the premature differentiation of germ-line stem cells. Moreover, we found that, although Msi is expressed in both somatic and germ cells, Msi function is required intrinsically in stem cells for maintenance of stem cell identity. We also discovered a requirement for Msi function in male meiosis, revealing that Msi has distinct roles at different stages of germ cell differentiation. We describe the complementary expression patterns of the murine Msi paralogues Msi1 and Msi2 during spermatogenesis, which support the idea of distinct, evolutionarily conserved roles of Msi. PMID:16717192

  18. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-02-18

    The RpoS/σ(S) sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σ(S)-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σ(S) has been proposed to result largely from competition between σ(S) and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σ(S) binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σ(S) protein proficient for Eσ(S) complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σ(S) requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σ(S) are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by Eσ(S). PMID:25578965

  19. Repressor activity of the RpoS/σS-dependent RNA polymerase requires DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lévi-Meyrueis, Corinne; Monteil, Véronique; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnès; Kolb, Annie; Monot, Marc; Dupuy, Bruno; Duarte, Sara Serradas; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Beraud, Mélanie; Norel, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    The RpoS/σS sigma subunit of RNA polymerase (RNAP) activates transcription of stationary phase genes in many Gram-negative bacteria and controls adaptive functions, including stress resistance, biofilm formation and virulence. In this study, we address an important but poorly understood aspect of σS-dependent control, that of a repressor. Negative regulation by σS has been proposed to result largely from competition between σS and other σ factors for binding to a limited amount of core RNAP (E). To assess whether σS binding to E alone results in significant downregulation of gene expression by other σ factors, we characterized an rpoS mutant of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium producing a σS protein proficient for EσS complex formation but deficient in promoter DNA binding. Genome expression profiling and physiological assays revealed that this mutant was defective for negative regulation, indicating that gene repression by σS requires its binding to DNA. Although the mechanisms of repression by σS are likely specific to individual genes and environmental conditions, the study of transcription downregulation of the succinate dehydrogenase operon suggests that σ competition at the promoter DNA level plays an important role in gene repression by EσS. PMID:25578965

  20. The Cre-Binding Protein Dcreb-a Is Required for Drosophila Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Rose, R. E.; Gallaher, N. M.; Andrew, D. J.; Goodman, R. H.; Smolik, S. M.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously described the cloning of a cyclic AMP response-element (CRE)-binding protein, dCREB-A, in Drosophila melanogaster that is similar to the mammalian CRE-binding protein CREB. dCREB-A is a member of the bZIP family of transcription factors, shows specific binding to the (CRE), and can activate transcription in cell culture. In this report, we describe the gene structure for dCREB-A, protein expression patterns throughout development and the necessary role for this gene in embryogenesis. The 4.5-kb transcript is encoded in six exons that are distributed over 21 kb of DNA. There are seven start sites and no TATA consensus sequences upstream. The dCREB-A protein is expressed in the nuclei of the embryonic salivary gland, proventriculus and stomadeum. Late in embryogenesis, tracheal cell nuclei and specific nuclei within the segments show staining with anti-dCREB-A antibodies. In adult female ovaries, dCREB-A is expressed in the stage 9 through stage 11 follicle cell nuclei. Null mutations of the dCREB-A gene give rise to animals that no longer express dCREB-A protein and die late in embryogenesis before or at hatching. The absolute requirement of dCREB-A for embryogenesis demonstrates a nonredundant function for a CRE-binding protein that will be useful in studying the role of specific signal transduction cascades in development. PMID:9178009

  1. Purification of a cellular, double-stranded DNA-binding protein required for initiation of adenovirus DNA replication by using a rapid filter-binding assay.

    PubMed Central

    Diffley, J F; Stillman, B

    1986-01-01

    A rapid and quantitative nitrocellulose filter-binding assay is described for the detection of nuclear factor I, a HeLa cell sequence-specific DNA-binding protein required for the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. In this assay, the abundant nonspecific DNA-binding activity present in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts was greatly reduced by preincubation of these extracts with a homopolymeric competitor DNA. Subsequently, specific DNA-binding activity was detected as the preferential retention of a labeled 48-base-pair DNA fragment containing a functional nuclear factor I binding site compared with a control DNA fragment to which nuclear factor I did not bind specifically. This specific DNA-binding activity was shown to be both quantitative and time dependent. Furthermore, the conditions of this assay allowed footprinting of nuclear factor I in unfractionated HeLa nuclear extracts and quantitative detection of the protein during purification. Using unfrozen HeLa cells and reagents known to limit endogenous proteolysis, nuclear factor I was purified to near homogeneity from HeLa nuclear extracts by a combination of standard chromatography and specific DNA affinity chromatography. Over a 400-fold purification of nuclear factor I, on the basis of the specific activity of both sequence-specific DNA binding and complementation of adenovirus DNA replication in vitro, was affected by this purification. The most highly purified fraction was greatly enriched for a polypeptide of 160 kilodaltons on silver-stained sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gels. Furthermore, this protein cosedimented with specific DNA-binding activity on glycerol gradients. That this fraction indeed contained nuclear factor I was demonstrated by both DNase I footprinting and its function in the initiation of adenovirus DNA replication. Finally, the stoichiometry of specific DNA binding by nuclear factor I is shown to be most consistent with 2 mol of the 160-kilodalton polypeptide

  2. Normocyte-binding protein required for human erythrocyte invasion by the zoonotic malaria parasite Plasmodium knowlesi.

    PubMed

    Moon, Robert W; Sharaf, Hazem; Hastings, Claire H; Ho, Yung Shwen; Nair, Mridul B; Rchiad, Zineb; Knuepfer, Ellen; Ramaprasad, Abhinay; Mohring, Franziska; Amir, Amirah; Yusuf, Noor A; Hall, Joanna; Almond, Neil; Lau, Yee Ling; Pain, Arnab; Blackman, Michael J; Holder, Anthony A

    2016-06-28

    The dominant cause of malaria in Malaysia is now Plasmodium knowlesi, a zoonotic parasite of cynomolgus macaque monkeys found throughout South East Asia. Comparative genomic analysis of parasites adapted to in vitro growth in either cynomolgus or human RBCs identified a genomic deletion that includes the gene encoding normocyte-binding protein Xa (NBPXa) in parasites growing in cynomolgus RBCs but not in human RBCs. Experimental deletion of the NBPXa gene in parasites adapted to growth in human RBCs (which retain the ability to grow in cynomolgus RBCs) restricted them to cynomolgus RBCs, demonstrating that this gene is selectively required for parasite multiplication and growth in human RBCs. NBPXa-null parasites could bind to human RBCs, but invasion of these cells was severely impaired. Therefore, NBPXa is identified as a key mediator of P. knowlesi human infection and may be a target for vaccine development against this emerging pathogen. PMID:27303038

  3. JunB is required for endothelial cell morphogenesis by regulating core-binding factor β

    PubMed Central

    Licht, Alexander H.; Pein, Oliver T.; Florin, Lore; Hartenstein, Bettina; Reuter, Hendrik; Arnold, Bernd; Lichter, Peter; Angel, Peter; Schorpp-Kistner, Marina

    2006-01-01

    The molecular mechanism triggering the organization of endothelial cells (ECs) in multicellular tubules is mechanistically still poorly understood. We demonstrate that cell-autonomous endothelial functions of the AP-1 subunit JunB are required for proper endothelial morphogenesis both in vivo in mouse embryos with endothelial-specific ablation of JunB and in in vitro angiogenesis models. By cDNA microarray analysis, we identified core-binding factor β (CBFβ), which together with the Runx proteins forms the heterodimeric core-binding transcription complex CBF, as a novel JunB target gene. In line with our findings, expression of the CBF target MMP-13 was impaired in JunB-deficient ECs. Reintroduction of CBFβ into JunB-deficient ECs rescued the tube formation defect and MMP-13 expression, indicating an important role for CBFβ in EC morphogenesis. PMID:17158955

  4. Binding of transcription factor GabR to DNA requires recognition of DNA shape at a location distinct from its cognate binding site

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zyoud, Walid A.; Hynson, Robert MG.; Ganuelas, Lorraine A.; Coster, Adelle CF.; Duff, Anthony P.; Baker, Matthew AB.; Stewart, Alastair G.; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Ho, Joshua WK.; Gaus, Katharina; Liu, Dali; Lee, Lawrence K.; Böcking, Till

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms for transcription factor recognition of specific DNA base sequences are well characterized and recent studies demonstrate that the shape of these cognate binding sites is also important. Here, we uncover a new mechanism where the transcription factor GabR simultaneously recognizes two cognate binding sites and the shape of a 29 bp DNA sequence that bridges these sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle laser light scattering are consistent with a model where the DNA undergoes a conformational change to bend around GabR during binding. In silico predictions suggest that the bridging DNA sequence is likely to be bendable in one direction and kinetic analysis of mutant DNA sequences with biolayer interferometry, allowed the independent quantification of the relative contribution of DNA base and shape recognition in the GabR–DNA interaction. These indicate that the two cognate binding sites as well as the bendability of the DNA sequence in between these sites are required to form a stable complex. The mechanism of GabR–DNA interaction provides an example where the correct shape of DNA, at a clearly distinct location from the cognate binding site, is required for transcription factor binding and has implications for bioinformatics searches for novel binding sites. PMID:26681693

  5. Binding of transcription factor GabR to DNA requires recognition of DNA shape at a location distinct from its cognate binding site.

    PubMed

    Al-Zyoud, Walid A; Hynson, Robert M G; Ganuelas, Lorraine A; Coster, Adelle C F; Duff, Anthony P; Baker, Matthew A B; Stewart, Alastair G; Giannoulatou, Eleni; Ho, Joshua W K; Gaus, Katharina; Liu, Dali; Lee, Lawrence K; Böcking, Till

    2016-02-18

    Mechanisms for transcription factor recognition of specific DNA base sequences are well characterized and recent studies demonstrate that the shape of these cognate binding sites is also important. Here, we uncover a new mechanism where the transcription factor GabR simultaneously recognizes two cognate binding sites and the shape of a 29 bp DNA sequence that bridges these sites. Small-angle X-ray scattering and multi-angle laser light scattering are consistent with a model where the DNA undergoes a conformational change to bend around GabR during binding. In silico predictions suggest that the bridging DNA sequence is likely to be bendable in one direction and kinetic analysis of mutant DNA sequences with biolayer interferometry, allowed the independent quantification of the relative contribution of DNA base and shape recognition in the GabR-DNA interaction. These indicate that the two cognate binding sites as well as the bendability of the DNA sequence in between these sites are required to form a stable complex. The mechanism of GabR-DNA interaction provides an example where the correct shape of DNA, at a clearly distinct location from the cognate binding site, is required for transcription factor binding and has implications for bioinformatics searches for novel binding sites. PMID:26681693

  6. Mutational definition of binding requirements of an hnRNP-like protein in Arabidopsis using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Leder, Verena; Lummer, Martina; Tegeler, Kathrin; Humpert, Fabian; Lewinski, Martin; Schüttpelz, Mark; Staiger, Dorothee

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • We use FCS to investigate binding site requirements for the hnRNP-like protein AtGRP7. • We identify three nucleotides critical for AtGRP7 binding to its own intron. • Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} abolishes binding altogether. • The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif with different sequence requirement. • The glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. - Abstract: Arabidopsis thaliana glycine-rich RNA binding protein 7 (AtGRP7) is part of a negative feedback loop through which it regulates alternative splicing and steady-state abundance of its pre-mRNA. Here we use fluorescence correlation spectroscopy to investigate the requirements for AtGRP7 binding to its intron using fluorescently-labelled synthetic oligonucleotides. By systematically introducing point mutations we identify three nucleotides that lead to an increased K{sub d} value when mutated and thus are critical for AtGRP7 binding. Simultaneous mutation of all three residues abrogates binding. The paralogue AtGRP8 binds to an overlapping motif but with a different sequence preference, in line with overlapping but not identical functions of this protein pair. Truncation of the glycine-rich domain reduces the binding affinity of AtGRP7, showing for the first time that the glycine-rich stretch of a plant hnRNP-like protein contributes to binding. Mutation of the conserved R{sup 49} that is crucial for AtGRP7 function in pathogen defence and splicing abolishes binding.

  7. New insights into the stereochemical requirements of the bradykinin B1 receptor antagonists binding.

    PubMed

    Lupala, Cecylia S; Gomez-Gutierrez, Patricia; Perez, Juan J

    2016-07-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is a nonapeptide involved in several pathophysiological conditions including among others, septic and haemorrhagic shock, anaphylaxis, arthritis, rhinitis, asthma, inflammatory bowel disease. Accordingly, BK antagonists have long been sought after for therapeutic intervention. Action of BK is mediated through two different G-protein coupled receptors known as B1 and B2. Although there are several B1 antagonists reported in literature, their pharmacological profile is not yet optimal so that new molecules need to be discovered. In the present work we have constructed an atomistic model of the B1 receptor and docked diverse available non-peptide antagonists in order to get a deeper insight into the structure-activity relationships involving binding to this receptor. The model was constructed by homology modeling using the chemokine CXC4 and bovine rhodopsin receptors as template. The model was further refined using molecular dynamics for 600ns with the protein embedded in a POPC bilayer. From the refinement process we obtained an average structure that was used for docking studies using the Glide software. Antagonists selected for the docking studies include Compound 11, Compound 12, Chroman28, SSR240612, NPV-SAA164 and PS020990. The results of the docking study underline the role of specific receptor residues in ligand binding. The results of this study permitted to define a pharmacophore that describes the stereochemical requirements of antagonist binding, and can be used for the discovery of new compounds. PMID:27469392

  8. Binding of cGMP to both allosteric sites of cGMP-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE5) is required for its phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Turko, I V; Francis, S H; Corbin, J D

    1998-01-01

    cGMP-binding phosphodiesterases contain two homologous allosteric cGMP-binding sites (sites a and b) that are arranged in tandem; they constitute a superfamily of mammalian cyclic nucleotide receptors distinct from the cyclic nucleotide-dependent protein kinases/cation channels family. The functional role of each of these two sites in the phosphodiesterases is not known. The cGMP-binding sites of one of these phosphodiesterases, the cGMP-binding cGMP-specific phosphodiesterase (cGB-PDE, PDE5), have been analysed by using site-directed mutagenesis. Mutations that affect cGMP binding to either one or both allosteric sites do not influence cGMP hydrolysis in the catalytic site under the conditions used. However, compared with wild-type enzyme, the D289A, D478A and D289A/D478A mutants, which are defective in cGMP binding to either site a or site b, or both allosteric sites, require much higher cGMP concentrations for the allosteric stimulation of phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. The cGMP effect is on the cGB-PDE rather than on the catalytic subunit of the protein kinase because the latter enzyme does not require cGMP for activity. The D289N mutant, which has higher binding affinity for cGMP than does the wild-type enzyme, is phosphorylated at lower concentrations of cGMP than is the wild-type enzyme. It is concluded that cGMP binding to the allosteric sites of cGB-PDE does not directly affect catalysis, but binding to both of these sites regulates phosphorylation of this enzyme. PMID:9445376

  9. Structural Requirements for Sterol Regulatory Element-binding Protein (SREBP) Cleavage in Fission Yeast*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Rocky; Espenshade, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are central regulators of cellular lipid synthesis and homeostasis. Mammalian SREBPs are proteolytically activated and liberated from the membrane by Golgi Site-1 and Site-2 proteases. Fission yeast SREBPs, Sre1 and Sre2, employ a different mechanism that genetically requires the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase complex for cleavage activation. Here, we established Sre2 as a model to define structural requirements for SREBP cleavage. We showed that Sre2 cleavage does not require the N-terminal basic helix-loop-helix zipper transcription factor domain, thus separating cleavage of Sre2 from its transcription factor function. From a mutagenesis screen of 94 C-terminal residues of Sre2, we isolated 15 residues required for cleavage and further identified a glycine-leucine sequence required for Sre2 cleavage. Importantly, the glycine-leucine sequence is located at a conserved distance before the first transmembrane segment of both Sre1 and Sre2 and cleavage occurs in between this sequence and the membrane. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a broad conservation of this novel glycine-leucine motif in SREBP homologs of ascomycete fungi, including the opportunistic human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus where SREBP is required for virulence. Consistent with this, the sequence was also required for cleavage of the oxygen-responsive transcription factor Sre1 and adaptation to hypoxia, demonstrating functional conservation of this cleavage recognition motif. These cleavage mutants will aid identification of the fungal SREBP protease and facilitate functional dissection of the Dsc E3 ligase required for SREBP activation and fungal pathogenesis. PMID:23729666

  10. Structural Requirements for Bisphosphonate Binding on Hydroxyapatite: NMR Study of Bisphosphonate Partial Esters

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen different bisphosphonates, including four clinically used bisphosphonate acids and their phosphoesters, were studied to evaluate how the bisphosphonate structure affects binding to bone. Bisphosphonates with weak bone affinity, such as clodronate, could not bind to hydroxyapatite after the addition of one ester group. Medronate retained its ability to bind after the addition of one ester group, and hydroxy-bisphosphonates could bind even after the addition of two ester groups. Thus, several bisphosphonate esters are clearly bone binding compounds. The following conclusions about bisphosphonate binding emerge: (1) a hydroxyl group in the geminal carbon takes part in the binding process and increases the bisphosphonate’s ability to bind to bone; (2) the bisphosphonate’s ability to bind decreases when the amount of ester groups increases; and (3) the location of the ester groups affects the bisphosphonate’s binding ability. PMID:25893039

  11. The Association of Myosin IB with Actin Waves in Dictyostelium Requires Both the Plasma Membrane-Binding Site and Actin-Binding Region in the Myosin Tail

    PubMed Central

    Brzeska, Hanna; Pridham, Kevin; Chery, Godefroy; Titus, Margaret A.; Korn, Edward D.

    2014-01-01

    F-actin structures and their distribution are important determinants of the dynamic shapes and functions of eukaryotic cells. Actin waves are F-actin formations that move along the ventral cell membrane driven by actin polymerization. Dictyostelium myosin IB is associated with actin waves but its role in the wave is unknown. Myosin IB is a monomeric, non-filamentous myosin with a globular head that binds to F-actin and has motor activity, and a non-helical tail comprising a basic region, a glycine-proline-glutamine-rich region and an SH3-domain. The basic region binds to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane through a short basic-hydrophobic site and the Gly-Pro-Gln region binds F-actin. In the current work we found that both the basic-hydrophobic site in the basic region and the Gly-Pro-Gln region of the tail are required for the association of myosin IB with actin waves. This is the first evidence that the Gly-Pro-Gln region is required for localization of myosin IB to a specific actin structure in situ. The head is not required for myosin IB association with actin waves but binding of the head to F-actin strengthens the association of myosin IB with waves and stabilizes waves. Neither the SH3-domain nor motor activity is required for association of myosin IB with actin waves. We conclude that myosin IB contributes to anchoring actin waves to the plasma membranes by binding of the basic-hydrophobic site to acidic phospholipids in the plasma membrane and binding of the Gly-Pro-Gln region to F-actin in the wave. PMID:24747353

  12. Functional requirements of AID's higher order structures and their interaction with RNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Samiran; Begum, Nasim A; Hu, Wenjun; Honjo, Tasuku

    2016-03-15

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is essential for the somatic hypermutation (SHM) and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes. Although both the N and C termini of AID have unique functions in DNA cleavage and recombination, respectively, during SHM and CSR, their molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay combined with glycerol gradient fractionation, we revealed that the AID C terminus is required for a stable dimer formation. Furthermore, AID monomers and dimers form complexes with distinct heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs). AID monomers associate with DNA cleavage cofactor hnRNP K whereas AID dimers associate with recombination cofactors hnRNP L, hnRNP U, and Serpine mRNA-binding protein 1. All of these AID/ribonucleoprotein associations are RNA-dependent. We propose that AID's structure-specific cofactor complex formations differentially contribute to its DNA-cleavage and recombination functions. PMID:26929374

  13. Feline Leukemia Virus Infection Requires a Post-Receptor Binding Envelope-Dependent Cellular Component▿

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Naveen; Thickett, Kelly R.; Na, Hong; Leung, Cherry; Tailor, Chetankumar S.

    2011-01-01

    Gammaretrovirus receptors have been suggested to contain the necessary determinants to mediate virus binding and entry. Here, we show that murine NIH 3T3 and baby hamster kidney (BHK) cells overexpressing receptors for subgroup A, B, and C feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) are weakly susceptible (101 to 102 CFU/ml) to FeLV pseudotype viruses containing murine leukemia virus (MLV) core (Gag-Pol) proteins, whereas FeLV receptor-expressing murine Mus dunni tail fibroblast (MDTF) cells are highly susceptible (104 to 106 CFU/ml). However, NIH 3T3 cells expressing the FeLV subgroup B receptor PiT1 are highly susceptible to gibbon ape leukemia virus pseudotype virus, which differs from the FeLV pseudotype viruses only in the envelope protein. FeLV resistance is not caused by a defect in envelope binding, low receptor expression levels, or N-linked glycosylation. Resistance is not alleviated by substitution of the MLV core in the FeLV pseudotype virus with FeLV core proteins. Interestingly, FeLV resistance is alleviated by fusion of receptor-expressing NIH 3T3 and BHK cells with MDTF or human TE671 cells, suggesting the absence of an additional cellular component in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells that is required for FeLV infection. The putative FeLV-specific cellular component is not a secreted factor, as MDTF conditioned medium does not alleviate the block to FeLV infection. Together, our findings suggest that FeLV infection requires an additional envelope-dependent cellular component that is absent in NIH 3T3 and BHK cells but that is present in MDTF and TE671 cells. PMID:21917946

  14. Differences between MyoD DNA binding and activation site requirements revealed by functional random sequence selection.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J; Blackwell, T K; Kedes, L; Weintraub, H

    1996-01-01

    A method has been developed for selecting functional enhancer/promoter sites from random DNA sequences in higher eukaryotic cells. Of sequences that were thus selected for transcriptional activation by the muscle-specific basic helix-loop-helix protein MyoD, only a subset are similar to the preferred in vitro binding consensus, and in the same promoter context an optimal in vitro binding site was inactive. Other sequences with full transcriptional activity instead exhibit sequence preferences that, remarkably, are generally either identical or very similar to those found in naturally occurring muscle-specific promoters. This first systematic examination of the relation between DNA binding and transcriptional activation by basic helix-loop-helix proteins indicates that binding per se is necessary but not sufficient for transcriptional activation by MyoD and implies a requirement for other DNA sequence-dependent interactions or conformations at its binding site. PMID:8668207

  15. Phorbol ester binding to protein kinase C requires a cysteine-rich zinc-finger-like sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Yoshitaka; Fujii, Tomoko; Igarashi, Koichi; Kuno, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Chikako; Kikkawa, Ushio; Nishizuka, Yasutomi )

    1989-07-01

    Protein kinase C normally has a tandem repeat of a characteristic cysteine-rich sequence in C{sub 1}, the conserved region of the regulatory domain. These sequences resemble the DNA-binding zinc finger domain. For the {gamma} subspecies of rat brain protein kinase C, various deletion and point mutants in this domain were constructed, and the mutated proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli by using the T7 expression system. Radioactive phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate binding analysis indicated that a cysteine-rich zinc-finger-like sequence was essential for protein kinase C to bind phorbol ester and that one of the two sequences was sufficient for the phorbol ester binding. Conserved region C{sub 2}, another region in the regulatory domain, was apparently needed for the enzyme to require Ca{sup 2+} for phorbol ester binding activity.

  16. Acyl CoA Binding Proteins are Required for Cuticle Formation and Plant Responses to Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ye; Yu, Keshun; Gao, Qing-ming; Wilson, Ella V.; Navarre, Duroy; Kachroo, Pradeep; Kachroo, Aardra

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) and lipids are well known regulators of plant defense. Our previous studies have shown that components of prokaryotic (plastidal) FA biosynthesis pathway regulate various aspects of plant defense. Here, we investigated the defense related roles of the soluble acyl CoA binding proteins (ACBPs), which are thought to facilitate the intracellular transport of FA/lipids. We show that ACBP3 and 4 are required for maintaining normal lipid levels and that ACBP3 contributes to the lipid flux between the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways. We also show that loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 impair normal development of the cuticle and affect both basal and resistance protein-mediated defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens. Loss of ACBP3, 4, or 6 also inhibits the induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR) due to the plants inability to generate SAR inducing signal(s). Together, these data show that ACBP3, ACBP4, and ACBP6 are required for cuticle development as well as defense against microbial pathogens. PMID:23060893

  17. Self-Association Is Required for Occupation of Adjacent Binding Sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Type III Secretion System Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Anne E.; Schubot, Florian D.

    2014-01-01

    ExsA is a member of the AraC/XylS family of transcriptional regulators and is required for expression of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type III secretion system (T3SS). All P. aeruginosa T3SS promoters contain two adjacent binding sites for monomeric ExsA. The amino-terminal domain of ExsA (NTD) is thought to mediate interactions between the ExsA monomers bound to each site. Threading the NTD onto the AraC backbone revealed an α-helix that likely serves as the primary determinant for dimerization. In this study, we performed alanine scanning mutagenesis of the ExsA α-helix (residues 136 to 152) to identify determinants required for self-association. Residues L137, C139, L140, K141, and L148 exhibited self-association defects and were required for maximal activation by ExsA. Disruption of self-association resulted in decreased binding to T3SS promoters, particularly loss of binding by the second ExsA monomer. Removing the NTD or increasing the space between the ExsA-binding sites restored the ability of the second ExsA monomer to bind the PexsC promoter. This finding indicated that, in the absence of self-association, the NTD prevents binding by a second monomer. Similar findings were seen with the PexoT promoter; however, binding of the second ExsA monomer in the absence of self-association also required the presence of a high-affinity site 2. Based on these data, ExsA self-association is necessary to overcome inhibition by the NTD and to compensate for low-affinity binding sites, thereby allowing for full occupation and activation of ExsA-dependent promoters. Therefore, ExsA self-association is indispensable and provides an attractive target for antivirulence therapies. PMID:25070741

  18. N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding and actin reorganization.

    PubMed

    Garg, Ritu; Riento, Kirsi; Keep, Nicholas; Morris, Jonathan D H; Ridley, Anne J

    2008-04-15

    ROCK-I (Rho-associated kinase 1) is a serine/threonine kinase that can be activated by RhoA and inhibited by RhoE. ROCK-I has an N-terminal kinase domain, a central coiled-coil region and a RhoA-binding domain near the C-terminus. We have previously shown that RhoE binds to the N-terminal 420 amino acids of ROCK-I, which includes the kinase domain as well as N-terminal and C-terminal extensions. In the present study, we show that N-terminus-mediated dimerization of ROCK-I is required for RhoE binding. The central coiled-coil domain can also dimerize ROCK-I in cells, but this is insufficient in the absence of the N-terminus to allow RhoE binding. The kinase activity of ROCK-I(1-420) is required for dimerization and RhoE binding; however, inclusion of part of the coiled-coil domain compensates for lack of kinase activity, allowing RhoE to bind. N-terminus-mediated dimerization is also required for ROCK-I to induce the formation of stellate actin stress fibres in cells. These results indicate that dimerization via the N-terminus is critical for ROCK-I function in cells and for its regulation by RhoE. PMID:18215121

  19. Sequence and structural requirements for high-affinity DNA binding by the WT1 gene product.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagama, H; Heinrich, G; Pelletier, J; Housman, D E

    1995-01-01

    The Wilms' tumor suppressor gene, WT1, encodes a zinc finger polypeptide which plays a key role regulating cell growth and differentiation in the urogenital system. Using the whole-genome PCR approach, we searched murine genomic DNA for high-affinity WT1 binding sites and identified a 10-bp motif 5'GCGTGGGAGT3' which we term WTE). The WTE motif is similar to the consensus binding sequence 5'GCG(G/T)GGGCG3' recognized by EGR-1 and is also suggested to function as a binding site for WT1, setting up a competitive regulatory loop. To evaluate the underlying biochemical basis for such competition, we compared the binding affinities of WT1 and EGR1 for both sequences. WT1 shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for the WTE sequence compared with that of the EGR-1 binding motif. Mutational analysis of the WTE motif revealed a significant contribution to binding affinity by the adenine nucleotide at the eighth position (5'GCGTGGGAGT3') as well as by the 3'-most thymine (5'GCGTGGGAGT3'), whereas mutations in either flanking nucleotides or other nucleotides in the core sequence did not significantly affect the specific binding affinity. Mutations within WT1 zinc fingers II to IV abolished the sequence-specific binding of WT1 to WTE, whereas alterations within the first WT1 zinc finger reduced the binding affinity approximately 10-fold but did not abolish sequence recognition. We have thus identified a WT1 target, which, although similar in sequence to the EGR-1 motif, shows a 20- to 30-fold-higher affinity for WT1. These results suggest that physiological action of WT1 is mediated by binding sites of significantly higher affinity than the 9-bp EGR-1 binding motif. The role of the thymine base in contributing to binding affinity is discussed in the context of recent structural analysis. PMID:7862142

  20. Coxsackievirus A21 binds to decay-accelerating factor but requires intercellular adhesion molecule 1 for cell entry.

    PubMed Central

    Shafren, D R; Dorahy, D J; Ingham, R A; Burns, G F; Barry, R D

    1997-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that many viruses employ multiple receptor molecules in their cell entry mechanisms. The human enterovirus coxsackievirus A21 (CAV21) has been reported to bind to the N-terminal domain of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and undergo limited replication in ICAM-1-expressing murine L cells. In this study, we show that in addition to binding to ICAM-1, CAV21 binds to the first short consensus repeat (SCR) of decay-accelerating factor (DAF). Dual antibody blockade using both anti-ICAM-1 (domain 1) and anti-DAF (SCR1) monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is required to completely abolish binding and replication of high-titered CAV21. However, the binding of CAV21 to DAF, unlike that to ICAM-1, does not initiate a productive cell infection. The capacity of an anti-DAF (SCR3) MAb to block CAV21 infection but not binding, coupled with immunoprecipitation data from chemical cross-linking studies, indicates that DAF and ICAM-1 are closely associated on the cell surface. It is therefore suggested that DAF may function as a low-affinity attachment receptor either enhancing viral presentation or providing a viral sequestration site for subsequent high-affinity binding to ICAM-1. PMID:9151867

  1. Co-operative DNA binding by GAGA transcription factor requires the conserved BTB/POZ domain and reorganizes promoter topology.

    PubMed Central

    Katsani, K R; Hajibagheri, M A; Verrijzer, C P

    1999-01-01

    The POZ domain is a conserved protein-protein interaction motif present in a variety of transcription factors involved in development, chromatin remodelling and human cancers. Here, we study the role of the POZ domain of the GAGA transcription factor in promoter recognition. Natural target promoters for GAGA typically contain multiple GAGA-binding elements. Our results show that the POZ domain mediates strong co-operative binding to multiple sites but inhibits binding to single sites. Protein cross-linking and gel filtration chromatography experiments established that the POZ domain is required for GAGA oligomerization into higher order complexes. Thus, GAGA oligomerization increases binding specificity by selecting only promoters with multiple sites. Electron microscopy revealed that GAGA binds to multiple sites as a large oligomer and induces bending of the promoter DNA. Our results indicate a novel mode of DNA binding by GAGA, in which a large GAGA complex binds multiple GAGA elements that are spread out over a region of a few hundred base pairs. We suggest a model in which the promoter DNA is wrapped around a GAGA multimer in a conformation that may exclude normal nucleosome formation. PMID:9927429

  2. Platelet secretion and hemostasis require syntaxin-binding protein STXBP5

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Shaojing; Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Zhang, Jinchao; Yang, Fanmuyi; Zhang, Guoying; Smyth, Susan S.; Li, Zhenyu; Takai, Yoshimi; Whiteheart, Sidney W.

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have linked genes encoding several soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) regulators to cardiovascular disease risk factors. Because these regulatory proteins may directly affect platelet secretion, we used SNARE-containing complexes to affinity purify potential regulators from human platelet extracts. Syntaxin-binding protein 5 (STXBP5; also known as tomosyn-1) was identified by mass spectrometry, and its expression in isolated platelets was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that STXBP5 interacts with core secretion machinery complexes, such as syntaxin-11/SNAP23 heterodimers, and fractionation studies suggested that STXBP5 also interacts with the platelet cytoskeleton. Platelets from Stxbp5 KO mice had normal expression of other key secretory components; however, stimulation-dependent secretion from each of the 3 granule types was markedly defective. Secretion defects in STXBP5-deficient platelets were confirmed via lumi-aggregometry and FACS analysis for P-selectin and LAMP-1 exposure. Interestingly, STXBP5-deficient platelets had altered granule cargo levels, despite having normal morphology and granule numbers. Consistent with secretion and cargo deficiencies, Stxbp5 KO mice showed dramatic bleeding in the tail transection model and defective hemostasis in the FeCl3-induced carotid injury model. Transplantation experiments indicated that these defects were due to loss of STXBP5 in BM-derived cells. Our data demonstrate that STXBP5 is required for normal arterial hemostasis, due to its contributions to platelet granule cargo packaging and secretion. PMID:25244094

  3. Platelet secretion and hemostasis require syntaxin-binding protein STXBP5.

    PubMed

    Ye, Shaojing; Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Zhang, Jinchao; Yang, Fanmuyi; Zhang, Guoying; Smyth, Susan S; Li, Zhenyu; Takai, Yoshimi; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2014-10-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have linked genes encoding several soluble NSF attachment protein receptor (SNARE) regulators to cardiovascular disease risk factors. Because these regulatory proteins may directly affect platelet secretion, we used SNARE-containing complexes to affinity purify potential regulators from human platelet extracts. Syntaxin-binding protein 5 (STXBP5; also known as tomosyn-1) was identified by mass spectrometry, and its expression in isolated platelets was confirmed by RT-PCR analysis. Coimmunoprecipitation studies showed that STXBP5 interacts with core secretion machinery complexes, such as syntaxin-11/SNAP23 heterodimers, and fractionation studies suggested that STXBP5 also interacts with the platelet cytoskeleton. Platelets from Stxbp5 KO mice had normal expression of other key secretory components; however, stimulation-dependent secretion from each of the 3 granule types was markedly defective. Secretion defects in STXBP5-deficient platelets were confirmed via lumi-aggregometry and FACS analysis for P-selectin and LAMP-1 exposure. Interestingly, STXBP5-deficient platelets had altered granule cargo levels, despite having normal morphology and granule numbers. Consistent with secretion and cargo deficiencies, Stxbp5 KO mice showed dramatic bleeding in the tail transection model and defective hemostasis in the FeCl3-induced carotid injury model. Transplantation experiments indicated that these defects were due to loss of STXBP5 in BM-derived cells. Our data demonstrate that STXBP5 is required for normal arterial hemostasis, due to its contributions to platelet granule cargo packaging and secretion. PMID:25244094

  4. The acyl-CoA binding protein is required for normal epidermal barrier function in mice.

    PubMed

    Bloksgaard, Maria; Bek, Signe; Marcher, Ann-Britt; Neess, Ditte; Brewer, Jonathan; Hannibal-Bach, Hans Kristian; Helledie, Torben; Fenger, Christina; Due, Marianne; Berzina, Zane; Neubert, Reinhard; Chemnitz, John; Finsen, Bente; Clemmensen, Anders; Wilbertz, Johannes; Saxtorph, Henrik; Knudsen, Jens; Bagatolli, Luis; Mandrup, Susanne

    2012-10-01

    The acyl-CoA binding protein (ACBP) is a 10 kDa intracellular protein expressed in all eukaryotic species. Mice with targeted disruption of Acbp (ACBP(-/-) mice) are viable and fertile but present a visible skin and fur phenotype characterized by greasy fur and development of alopecia and scaling with age. Morphology and development of skin and appendages are normal in ACBP(-/-) mice; however, the stratum corneum display altered biophysical properties with reduced proton activity and decreased water content. Mass spectrometry analyses of lipids from epidermis and stratum corneum of ACBP(+/+) and ACBP(-/-) mice showed very similar composition, except for a significant and specific decrease in the very long chain free fatty acids (VLC-FFA) in stratum corneum of ACBP(-/-) mice. This finding indicates that ACBP is critically involved in the processes that lead to production of stratum corneum VLC-FFAs via complex phospholipids in the lamellar bodies. Importantly, we show that ACBP(-/-) mice display a ∼50% increased transepidermal water loss compared with ACBP(+/+) mice. Furthermore, skin and fur sebum monoalkyl diacylglycerol (MADAG) levels are significantly increased, suggesting that ACBP limits MADAG synthesis in sebaceous glands. In summary, our study shows that ACBP is required for production of VLC-FFA for stratum corneum and for maintaining normal epidermal barrier function. PMID:22829653

  5. The Myelin and Lymphocyte Protein MAL Is Required for Binding and Activity of Clostridium perfringens ε-Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Oo, Myat Lin; Anrather, Josef; Schaeren-Wiemers, Nicole; Alonso, Miguel A.; Fischetti, Vincent A.; McClain, Mark S.; Vartanian, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens ε-toxin (ETX) is a potent pore-forming toxin responsible for a central nervous system (CNS) disease in ruminant animals with characteristics of blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction and white matter injury. ETX has been proposed as a potential causative agent for Multiple Sclerosis (MS), a human disease that begins with BBB breakdown and injury to myelin forming cells of the CNS. The receptor for ETX is unknown. Here we show that both binding of ETX to mammalian cells and cytotoxicity requires the tetraspan proteolipid Myelin and Lymphocyte protein (MAL). While native Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells are resistant to ETX, exogenous expression of MAL in CHO cells confers both ETX binding and susceptibility to ETX-mediated cell death. Cells expressing rat MAL are ~100 times more sensitive to ETX than cells expressing similar levels of human MAL. Insertion of the FLAG sequence into the second extracellular loop of MAL abolishes ETX binding and cytotoxicity. ETX is known to bind specifically and with high affinity to intestinal epithelium, renal tubules, brain endothelial cells and myelin. We identify specific binding of ETX to these structures and additionally show binding to retinal microvasculature and the squamous epithelial cells of the sclera in wild-type mice. In contrast, there is a complete absence of ETX binding to tissues from MAL knockout (MAL-/-) mice. Furthermore, MAL-/- mice exhibit complete resistance to ETX at doses in excess of 1000 times the symptomatic dose for wild-type mice. We conclude that MAL is required for both ETX binding and cytotoxicity. PMID:25993478

  6. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysins pneumolysin and streptolysin O require binding to red blood cell glycans for hemolytic activity

    PubMed Central

    Shewell, Lucy K.; Harvey, Richard M.; Higgins, Melanie A.; Day, Christopher J.; Hartley-Tassell, Lauren E.; Chen, Austen Y.; Gillen, Christine M.; James, David B. A.; Alonzo, Francis; Torres, Victor J.; Walker, Mark J.; Paton, Adrienne W.; Paton, James C.; Jennings, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin (CDC) pneumolysin (Ply) is a key virulence factor of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Membrane cholesterol is required for the cytolytic activity of this toxin, but it is not clear whether cholesterol is the only cellular receptor. Analysis of Ply binding to a glycan microarray revealed that Ply has lectin activity and binds glycans, including the Lewis histo-blood group antigens. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that Ply has the highest affinity for the sialyl LewisX (sLeX) structure, with a Kd of 1.88 × 10−5 M. Ply hemolytic activity against human RBCs showed dose-dependent inhibition by sLeX. Flow cytometric analysis and Western blots showed that blocking binding of Ply to the sLeX glycolipid on RBCs prevents deposition of the toxin in the membrane. The lectin domain responsible for sLeX binding is in domain 4 of Ply, which contains candidate carbohydrate-binding sites. Mutagenesis of these predicted carbohydrate-binding residues of Ply resulted in a decrease in hemolytic activity and a reduced affinity for sLeX. This study reveals that this archetypal CDC requires interaction with the sLeX glycolipid cellular receptor as an essential step before membrane insertion. A similar analysis conducted on streptolysin O from Streptococcus pyogenes revealed that this CDC also has glycan-binding properties and that hemolytic activity against RBCs can be blocked with the glycan lacto-N-neotetraose by inhibiting binding to the cell surface. Together, these data support the emerging paradigm shift that pore-forming toxins, including CDCs, have cellular receptors other than cholesterol that define target cell tropism. PMID:25422425

  7. Collagenase-3 binds to a specific receptor and requires the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein for internalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmina, O. Y.; Walling, H. W.; Fiacco, G. J.; Freije, J. M.; Lopez-Otin, C.; Jeffrey, J. J.; Partridge, N. C.

    1999-01-01

    We have previously identified a specific receptor for collagenase-3 that mediates the binding, internalization, and degradation of this ligand in UMR 106-01 rat osteoblastic osteosarcoma cells. In the present study, we show that collagenase-3 binding is calcium-dependent and occurs in a variety of cell types, including osteoblastic and fibroblastic cells. We also present evidence supporting a two-step mechanism of collagenase-3 binding and internalization involving both a specific collagenase-3 receptor and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Ligand blot analysis shows that (125)I-collagenase-3 binds specifically to two proteins ( approximately 170 kDa and approximately 600 kDa) present in UMR 106-01 cells. Western blotting identified the 600-kDa protein as the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein. Our data suggest that the 170-kDa protein is a specific collagenase-3 receptor. Low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-null mouse embryo fibroblasts bind but fail to internalize collagenase-3, whereas UMR 106-01 and wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts bind and internalize collagenase-3. Internalization, but not binding, is inhibited by the 39-kDa receptor-associated protein. We conclude that the internalization of collagenase-3 requires the participation of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein and propose a model in which the cell surface interaction of this ligand requires a sequential contribution from two receptors, with the collagenase-3 receptor acting as a high affinity primary binding site and the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein mediating internalization.

  8. Asp residues of βDELSEED-motif are required for peptide binding in the Escherichia coli ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zulfiqar; Tayou, Junior; Laughlin, Thomas F

    2015-04-01

    This study demonstrates the requirement of Asp-380 and Asp-386 in the βDELSEED-motif of Escherichia coli ATP synthase for peptide binding and inhibition. We studied the inhibition profiles of wild-type and mutant E. coli ATP synthase in presence of c-terminal amide bound melittin and melittin related peptide. Melittin and melittin related peptide inhibited wild-type ATPase almost completely while only partial inhibition was observed in single mutations with replacement of Asp to Ala, Gln, or Arg. Additionally, very little or no inhibition occurred among double mutants βD380A/βD386A, βD380Q/βD386Q, or βD380R/βD386R signifying that removal of one Asp residue allows limited peptide binding. Partial or substantial loss of oxidative phosphorylation among double mutants demonstrates the functional requirement of βD380 and βD386 Asp residues. Moreover, abrogation of wild-type E. coli cell growth and normal growth of mutant cells in presence of peptides provides strong evidence for the requirement of βDELSEED-motif Asp residues for peptide binding. It is concluded that while presence of one Asp residue may allow partial peptide binding, both Asp residues, βD380 and βD386, are essential for proper peptide binding and inhibition of ATP synthase. PMID:25603139

  9. Upstream regulatory regions required to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence in an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J; Wu, F; Gaynor, R

    1987-10-26

    Of the five early adenovirus promoters, the early region 3 (E3) promoter is one of the most strongly induced by the E1A protein. To identify cellular proteins involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, DNase I footprinting using partially purified Hela cell extracts was performed. Four regions of the E3 promoter serve as binding domains for cellular proteins. These regions are found between -156 to -179 (site IV), -83 to -103 (site III), -47 to -67 (site II), and -16 to -37 (site I), relative to the start of transcription. Examination of the DNA sequences in each binding domain suggests that site III likely serves as a binding site for activator protein 1 (AP-1), site II for the cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB), and site I for a TATA binding factor. The factors binding to either site II or III were sufficient to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence (site I). Mutagenesis studies indicated that both sites II and III, in addition to site I, are needed for complete basal and E1A-induced transcription. These results suggest that multiple cellular factors are involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, and that either of two upstream regions are capable of stabilizing factor binding to the TATA sequence. PMID:2959908

  10. Upstream regulatory regions required to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence in an adenovirus early promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J; Wu, F; Gaynor, R

    1987-01-01

    Of the five early adenovirus promoters, the early region 3 (E3) promoter is one of the most strongly induced by the E1A protein. To identify cellular proteins involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, DNase I footprinting using partially purified Hela cell extracts was performed. Four regions of the E3 promoter serve as binding domains for cellular proteins. These regions are found between -156 to -179 (site IV), -83 to -103 (site III), -47 to -67 (site II), and -16 to -37 (site I), relative to the start of transcription. Examination of the DNA sequences in each binding domain suggests that site III likely serves as a binding site for activator protein 1 (AP-1), site II for the cyclic AMP regulatory element binding protein (CREB), and site I for a TATA binding factor. The factors binding to either site II or III were sufficient to stabilize binding to the TATA sequence (site I). Mutagenesis studies indicated that both sites II and III, in addition to site I, are needed for complete basal and E1A-induced transcription. These results suggest that multiple cellular factors are involved in both the basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter, and that either of two upstream regions are capable of stabilizing factor binding to the TATA sequence. Images PMID:2959908

  11. Defining the Stoichiometry of Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate Binding Required to Initiate Ca2+ Release

    PubMed Central

    Alzayady, Kamil J.; Wang, Liwei; Chandrasekhar, Rahul; Wagner, Larry E.; Van Petegem, Filip; Yule, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptors (IP3Rs) are tetrameric intracellular Ca2+-release channels with each subunit containing a binding site for IP3 in the N-terminus. We provide evidence that four IP3 molecules are required to activate the channel under diverse conditions. Comparing the concentration-response relationship for binding and Ca2+ release suggested that IP3Rs are maximally occupied by IP3 before substantial Ca2+ release occurs. We showed that ligand binding–deficient subunits acted in a dominant-negative manner when coexpressed with wild-type monomers in the chicken immune cell line DT40-3KO, which lacks all three genes encoding IP3R subunits, and confirmed the same effect in an IP3R-null human cell line (HEK-3KO) generated by CRISPR/Cas9 technology. Using dimeric and tetrameric concatenated IP3Rs with increasing numbers of binding-deficient subunits, we addressed the obligate ligand stoichiometry. The concatenated IP3Rs with four ligand-binding sites exhibited Ca2+ release and electrophysiological properties of native IP3Rs. However, IP3 failed to activate IP3Rs assembled from concatenated dimers consisting of one binding-competent and one binding-deficient mutant subunit. Similarly, IP3Rs containing two monomers of IP3R2short, an IP3 binding-deficient splice variant, were nonfunctional. Concatenated tetramers containing only three binding competent ligand-binding sites were nonfunctional under a wide range of activating conditions. These data provide definitive evidence that IP3-induced Ca2+ release only occurs when each IP3R monomer within the tetramer is occupied by IP3, thereby ensuring fidelity of Ca2+ release. PMID:27048566

  12. UV cross-linking identifies four polypeptides that require the TATA box to bind to the Drosophila hsp70 promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, D.S.; Dietz, T.J.; Elgin, S.C. )

    1990-08-01

    A protein fraction that requires the TATA sequence to bind to the hsp70 promoter has been partially purified from nuclear extracts of Drosophila embryos. This TATA factor produces a large DNase I footprint that extends from -44 to +35 on the promoter. A mutation that changes TATA to TATG interferes both with the binding of this complex and with the transcription of the hsp70 promoter in vitro, indicating that this interaction is important for transcriptional activity. Using a highly specific protein-DNA cross-linking assay, we have identified four polypeptides that require the TATA sequence to bind to the hsp70 promoter. Polypeptides of 26 and 42 kilodaltons are in intimate contact with the TATA sequence. Polypeptides of 150 and 60 kilodaltons interact within the region from +24 to +47 in a TATA-dependent manner. Both the extended footprint and the polypeptides identified by UV cross-linking indicate that the Drosophila TATA factor is a multicomponent complex.

  13. Circulating IgM Requires Plasma Membrane Disruption to Bind Apoptotic and Non-Apoptotic Nucleated Cells and Erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hesketh, Emily E.; Dransfield, Ian; Kluth, David C.; Hughes, Jeremy

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmunity is associated with defective phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. IgM deficient mice exhibit an autoimmune phenotype consistent with a role for circulating IgM antibodies in apoptotic cell clearance. We have extensively characterised IgM binding to non-apoptotic and apoptotic mouse thymocytes and human Jurkat cells using flow cytometry, confocal imaging and electron microscopy. We demonstrate strong specific IgM binding to a subset of Annexin-V (AnnV)+PI (Propidium Iodide)+ apoptotic cells with disrupted cell membranes. Electron microscopy studies indicated that IgM+AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells exhibited morphologically advanced apoptosis with marked plasma membrane disruption compared to IgM-AnnV+PI+ apoptotic cells, suggesting that access to intracellular epitopes is required for IgM to bind. Strong and comparable binding of IgM to permeabilised non-apoptotic and apoptotic cells suggests that IgM bound epitopes are 'apoptosis independent' such that IgM may bind any cell with profound disruption of cell plasma membrane integrity. In addition, permeabilised erythrocytes exhibited significant IgM binding thus supporting the importance of cell membrane epitopes. These data suggest that IgM may recognize and tag damaged nucleated cells or erythrocytes that exhibit significant cell membrane disruption. The role of IgM in vivo in conditions characterized by severe cell damage such as ischemic injury, sepsis and thrombotic microangiopathies merits further exploration. PMID:26121639

  14. Calcium-Binding Capacity of Centrin2 Is Required for Linear POC5 Assembly but Not for Nucleotide Excision Repair

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Tiago J.; Daly, Owen M.; Conroy, Pauline C.; Tomas, Martin; Wang, Yifan; Lalor, Pierce; Dockery, Peter; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Morrison, Ciaran G.

    2013-01-01

    Centrosomes, the principal microtubule-organising centres in animal cells, contain centrins, small, conserved calcium-binding proteins unique to eukaryotes. Centrin2 binds to xeroderma pigmentosum group C protein (XPC), stabilising it, and its presence slightly increases nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity in vitro. In previous work, we deleted all three centrin isoforms present in chicken DT40 cells and observed delayed repair of UV-induced DNA lesions, but no centrosome abnormalities. Here, we explore how centrin2 controls NER. In the centrin null cells, we expressed centrin2 mutants that cannot bind calcium or that lack sites for phosphorylation by regulatory kinases. Expression of any of these mutants restored the UV sensitivity of centrin null cells to normal as effectively as expression of wild-type centrin. However, calcium-binding-deficient and T118A mutants showed greatly compromised localisation to centrosomes. XPC recruitment to laser-induced UV-like lesions was only slightly slower in centrin-deficient cells than in controls, and levels of XPC and its partner HRAD23B were unaffected by centrin deficiency. Interestingly, we found that overexpression of the centrin interactor POC5 leads to the assembly of linear, centrin-dependent structures that recruit other centrosomal proteins such as PCM-1 and NEDD1. Together, these observations suggest that assembly of centrins into complex structures requires calcium binding capacity, but that such assembly is not required for centrin activity in NER. PMID:23844208

  15. The RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and cancer cell proliferation inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Qing; Yang, Yu; Wu, Chuanfang

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for cell proliferation inhibition. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for apoptosis induction. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for RNA binding. • RNA recognition motif domains of RBM5 are essential for caspase-2 alternative splicing. - Abstract: RBM5 is a known putative tumor suppressor gene that has been shown to function in cell growth inhibition by modulating apoptosis. RBM5 also plays a critical role in alternative splicing as an RNA binding protein. However, it is still unclear which domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and related functional activities. We hypothesized the two putative RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains of RBM5 spanning from amino acids 98–178 and 231–315 are essential for RBM5-mediated cell growth inhibition, apoptosis regulation, and RNA binding. To investigate this hypothesis, we evaluated the activities of the wide-type and mutant RBM5 gene transfer in low-RBM5 expressing A549 cells. We found that, unlike wild-type RBM5 (RBM5-wt), a RBM5 mutant lacking the two RRM domains (RBM5-ΔRRM), is unable to bind RNA, has compromised caspase-2 alternative splicing activity, lacks cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction function in A549 cells. These data provide direct evidence that the two RRM domains of RBM5 are required for RNA binding and the RNA binding activity of RBM5 contributes to its function on apoptosis induction and cell growth inhibition.

  16. Binding and Transcriptional Regulation by 14-3-3 (Bmh) Proteins Requires Residues Outside of the Canonical Motif

    PubMed Central

    Parua, Pabitra K.

    2014-01-01

    Evolutionarily conserved 14-3-3 proteins have important functions as dimers in numerous cellular signaling processes, including regulation of transcription. Yeast 14-3-3 proteins, known as Bmh, inhibit a post-DNA binding step in transcription activation by Adr1, a glucose-regulated transcription factor, by binding to its regulatory domain, residues 226 to 240. The domain was originally defined by regulatory mutations, ADR1c alleles that alter activator-dependent gene expression. Here, we report that ADR1c alleles and other mutations in the regulatory domain impair Bmh binding and abolish Bmh-dependent regulation both directly and indirectly. The indirect effect is caused by mutations that inhibit phosphorylation of Ser230 and thus inhibit Bmh binding, which requires phosphorylated Ser230. However, several mutations inhibit Bmh binding without inhibiting phosphorylation and thus define residues that provide important interaction sites between Adr1 and Bmh. Our proposed model of the Adr1 regulatory domain bound to Bmh suggests that residues Ser238 and Tyr239 could provide cross-dimer contacts to stabilize the complex and that this might explain the failure of a dimerization-deficient Bmh mutant to bind Adr1 and to inhibit its activity. A bioinformatics analysis of Bmh-interacting proteins suggests that residues outside the canonical 14-3-3 motif might be a general property of Bmh target proteins and might help explain the ability of 14-3-3 to distinguish target and nontarget proteins. Bmh binding to the Adr1 regulatory domain, and its failure to bind when mutations are present, explains at a molecular level the transcriptional phenotype of ADR1c mutants. PMID:24142105

  17. Efficient translation of alfamovirus RNAs requires the binding of coat protein dimers to the 3' termini of the viral RNAs.

    PubMed

    Neeleman, Lyda; Linthorst, Huub J M; Bol, John F

    2004-01-01

    The coat protein (CP) of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is required to initiate infection by the viral tripartite RNA genome whereas infection by the tripartite Brome mosaic virus (BMV) genome is independent of CP. AMV CP stimulates translation of AMV RNA in vivo 50- to 100-fold. The 3' untranslated region (UTR) of the AMV subgenomic CP messenger RNA 4 contains at least two CP binding sites. A CP binding site in the 3'-terminal 112 nucleotides of RNA 4 was found to be required for efficient translation of the RNA whereas an upstream binding site was not. Binding of CP to the AMV 3' UTR induces a conformational change of the RNA but this change alone was not sufficient to stimulate translation. CP mutant R17A is unable to bind to the 3' UTR and translation in vivo of RNA 4 encoding this mutant occurs at undetectable levels. Replacement of the 3' UTR of this mutant RNA 4 by the 3' UTR of BMV RNA 4 restored translation of R17A-CP to wild-type levels. Apparently, the BMV 3' UTR stimulates translation independently of CP. AMV CP mutant N199 is defective in the formation of CP dimers and did not stimulate translation of RNA 4 in vivo although the mutant CP did bind to the 3' UTR. The finding that N199-CP does not promote AMV infection corroborates the notion that the requirement of CP in the inoculum reflects its role in translation of the viral RNAs. PMID:14718638

  18. Tumor Suppressor Activity of Profilin Requires a Functional Actin Binding Site

    PubMed Central

    Wittenmayer, Nina; Jandrig, Burkhard; Rothkegel, Martin; Schlüter, Kathrin; Arnold, Wolfgang; Haensch, Wolfgang; Scherneck, Siegfried; Jockusch, Brigitte M.

    2004-01-01

    Profilin 1 (PFN1) is a regulator of the microfilament system and is involved in various signaling pathways. It interacts with many cytoplasmic and nuclear ligands. The importance of PFN1 for human tissue differentiation has been demonstrated by the findings that human cancer cells, expressing conspicuously low PFN1 levels, adopt a nontumorigenic phenotype upon raising their PFN1 level. In the present study, we characterize the ligand binding site crucial for profilin's tumor suppressor activity. Starting with CAL51, a human breast cancer cell line highly tumorigenic in nude mice, we established stable clones that express PFN1 mutants differentially defective in ligand binding. Clones expressing PFN1 mutants with reduced binding to either poly-proline-stretch ligands or phosphatidyl-inositol-4,5-bisphosphate, but with a functional actin binding site, were normal in growth, adhesion, and anchorage dependence, with only a weak tendency to elicit tumors in nude mice, similar to controls expressing wild-type PFN1. In contrast, clones expressing a mutant with severely reduced capacity to bind actin still behaved like the parental CAL51 and were highly tumorigenic. We conclude that the actin binding site on profilin is instrumental for normal differentiation of human epithelia and the tumor suppressor function of PFN1. PMID:14767055

  19. Integrin binding by Borrelia burgdorferi P66 facilitates dissemination but is not required for infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Ristow, Laura C.; Bonde, Mari; Lin, Yi-Pin; Sato, Hiromi; Curtis, Michael; Wesley, Erin; Hahn, Beth L.; Fang, Juan; Wilcox, David A.; Leong, John M.; Bergström, Sven; Coburn, Jenifer

    2015-01-01

    Summary P66, a Borrelia burgdorferi surface protein with porin and integrin-binding activities, is essential for murine infection. The role of P66 integrin-binding activity in B. burgdorferi infection was investigated and found to affect transendothelial migration. The role of integrin binding, specifically, was tested by mutation of two amino acids (D205A,D207A) or deletion of seven amino acids (Del202–208). Neither change affected surface localization or channel-forming activity of P66, but both significantly reduced binding to αvβ3. Integrin-binding deficient B. burgdorferi strains caused disseminated infection in mice at 4 weeks post-subcutaneous inoculation, but bacterial burdens were significantly reduced in some tissues. Following intravenous inoculation, the Del202–208 bacteria were below the limit of detection in all tissues assessed at 2 weeks post-inoculation, but bacterial burdens recovered to wild-type levels at 4 weeks post-inoculation. The delay in tissue colonization correlated with reduced migration of the Del202–208 strains across microvascular endothelial cells, similar to Δp66 bacteria. These results indicate that integrin binding by P66 is important to efficient dissemination of B. burgdorferi, which is critical to its ability to cause disease manifestations in incidental hosts and to its maintenance in the enzootic cycle. PMID:25604835

  20. Distinct Actin and Lipid Binding Sites in Ysc84 Are Required during Early Stages of Yeast Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Urbanek, Agnieszka N.; Allwood, Ellen G.; Smith, Adam P.; Booth, Wesley I.; Ayscough, Kathryn R.

    2015-01-01

    During endocytosis in S. cerevisiae, actin polymerization is proposed to provide the driving force for invagination against the effects of turgor pressure. In previous studies, Ysc84 was demonstrated to bind actin through a conserved N-terminal domain. However, full length Ysc84 could only bind actin when its C-terminal SH3 domain also bound to the yeast WASP homologue Las17. Live cell-imaging has revealed that Ysc84 localizes to endocytic sites after Las17/WASP but before other known actin binding proteins, suggesting it is likely to function at an early stage of membrane invagination. While there are homologues of Ysc84 in other organisms, including its human homologue SH3yl-1, little is known of its mode of interaction with actin or how this interaction affects actin filament dynamics. Here we identify key residues involved both in Ysc84 actin and lipid binding, and demonstrate that its actin binding activity is negatively regulated by PI(4,5)P2. Ysc84 mutants defective in their lipid or actin-binding interaction were characterized in vivo. The abilities of Ysc84 to bind Las17 through its C-terminal SH3 domain, or to actin and lipid through the N-terminal domain were all shown to be essential in order to rescue temperature sensitive growth in a strain requiring YSC84 expression. Live cell imaging in strains with fluorescently tagged endocytic reporter proteins revealed distinct phenotypes for the mutants indicating the importance of these interactions for regulating key stages of endocytosis. PMID:26312755

  1. Poly(A)-binding proteins are required for diverse biological processes in metazoans

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard W.P.; Blee, Tajekesa K.P.; Gray, Nicola K.

    2014-01-01

    PABPs [poly(A)-binding proteins] bind to the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and are conserved in species ranging from yeast to human. The prototypical cytoplasmic member, PABP1, is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein with roles in global and mRNA-specific translation and stability, consistent with a function as a central regulator of mRNA fate in the cytoplasm. More limited insight into the molecular functions of other family members is available. However, the consequences of disrupting PABP function in whole organisms is less clear, particularly in vertebrates, and even more so in mammals. In the present review, we discuss current and emerging knowledge with respect to the functions of PABP family members in whole animal studies which, although incomplete, already underlines their biological importance and highlights the need for further intensive research in this area. PMID:25110030

  2. Poly(A)-binding proteins are required for diverse biological processes in metazoans.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard W P; Blee, Tajekesa K P; Gray, Nicola K

    2014-08-01

    PABPs [poly(A)-binding proteins] bind to the poly(A) tail of eukaryotic mRNAs and are conserved in species ranging from yeast to human. The prototypical cytoplasmic member, PABP1, is a multifunctional RNA-binding protein with roles in global and mRNA-specific translation and stability, consistent with a function as a central regulator of mRNA fate in the cytoplasm. More limited insight into the molecular functions of other family members is available. However, the consequences of disrupting PABP function in whole organisms is less clear, particularly in vertebrates, and even more so in mammals. In the present review, we discuss current and emerging knowledge with respect to the functions of PABP family members in whole animal studies which, although incomplete, already underlines their biological importance and highlights the need for further intensive research in this area. PMID:25110030

  3. Biotin binding to avidin. Oligosaccharide side chain not required for ligand association.

    PubMed Central

    Hiller, Y; Gershoni, J M; Bayer, E A; Wilchek, M

    1987-01-01

    A commercially available, purified preparation of avidin was found to comprise two polypeptide bands (Mr 18,000 and Mr 15,500 respectively). Both bands bound biotin as assessed by biotin overlays of protein blots. The Mr 15,500 polypeptide was found to differ from the Mr 18,000 polypeptide only in its sugar content. When the commercial preparation was applied to a concanavalin A affinity column, the glycosylated forms were retarded as expected, and homotypic nonglycosylated avidin tetramers which failed to bind selectively to the column were collected in the effluent. The biotin-binding properties of the nonglycosylated avidin were equivalent to those obtained for the native (glycosylated) avidin molecule, indicating that the oligosaccharide moiety is not essential for the binding activity. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 5. PMID:3435435

  4. The Phosphatidic Acid Binding Site of the Arabidopsis Trigalactosyldiacylglycerol 4 (TGD4) Protein Required for Lipid Import into Chloroplasts*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Anderson, Nicholas Scott; Benning, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast membrane lipid synthesis relies on the import of glycerolipids from the ER. The TGD (TriGalactosylDiacylglycerol) proteins are required for this lipid transfer process. The TGD1, -2, and -3 proteins form a putative ABC (ATP-binding cassette) transporter transporting ER-derived lipids through the inner envelope membrane of the chloroplast, while TGD4 binds phosphatidic acid (PtdOH) and resides in the outer chloroplast envelope. We identified two sequences in TGD4, amino acids 1–80 and 110–145, which are necessary and sufficient for PtdOH binding. Deletion of both sequences abolished PtdOH binding activity. We also found that TGD4 from 18:3 plants bound specifically and with increased affinity PtdOH. TGD4 did not interact with other proteins and formed a homodimer both in vitro and in vivo. Our results suggest that TGD4 is an integral dimeric β-barrel lipid transfer protein that binds PtdOH with its N terminus and contains dimerization domains at its C terminus. PMID:23297418

  5. Two distinct factors bind to the rabbit uteroglobin TATA-box region and are required for efficient transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Klug, J; Knapp, S; Castro, I; Beato, M

    1994-01-01

    The rabbit uteroglobin gene is expressed in a variety of epithelial cell types like the lung Clara cells and the glandular and luminal epithelial cells of the endometrium. Expression in Clara cells is on a high constitutive level, whereas expression in the rabbit endometrium is under tight hormonal control. One important element of the rabbit uteroglobin gene mediating its efficient transcription in two epithelial cell lines from human endometrium (Ishikawa) and lung (NCI-H441) is its noncanonical TATA box (TACA). Here, we show that two factors (TATA core factor [TCF] and TATA palindrome factor [TPF]) different from the TATA-box binding protein bind to the DNA major groove at two adjacent sites within the uteroglobin TATA-box region and that one of them (TCF) is specifically expressed in cell lines derived from uteroglobin-expressing tissues. The binding sites for TCF and TPF, respectively, are both required for efficient transcription in Ishikawa and NCI-H441 cells. Mutation of the TACA box, which we show is a poor TATA box in functional terms, to a canonical TATA motif does not affect TCF and TPF binding. Therefore, we suggest that the function of the unusual cytosine could be to reduce rabbit uteroglobin expression in cells lacking TCF and that the interaction of TATA-box binding protein with the weak TACA site is facilitated in TCF- and TPF-positive cells. Images PMID:8065353

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP-Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    PubMed Central

    Bilder, Patrick; Sun, Meihao; Lim, Jihyeon; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Basaraba, Randall; So, Melvin; Zhu, Guofeng; Tufariello, JoAnn M.; Izzo, Angelo A.; Orme, Ian M.; Almo, Steve C.; Leyh, Thomas S.; Chan, John

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis universal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-Å-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i) M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii) Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii) Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv) the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection. PMID:19478878

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Universal Stress Protein Rv2623 Regulates Bacillary Growth by ATP Binding: Requirement for Establishing Chronic Persistent Infection

    SciTech Connect

    Drumm, J.; Mi, K; Bilder, P; Sun, M; Lim, J; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, H; Basaraba, R; So, M; Zhu, G; et. al.

    2009-01-01

    Tuberculous latency and reactivation play a significant role in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, yet the mechanisms that regulate these processes remain unclear. The Mycobacterium tuberculosisuniversal stress protein (USP) homolog, rv2623, is among the most highly induced genes when the tubercle bacillus is subjected to hypoxia and nitrosative stress, conditions thought to promote latency. Induction of rv2623 also occurs when M. tuberculosis encounters conditions associated with growth arrest, such as the intracellular milieu of macrophages and in the lungs of mice with chronic tuberculosis. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that Rv2623 regulates tuberculosis latency. We observed that an Rv2623-deficient mutant fails to establish chronic tuberculous infection in guinea pigs and mice, exhibiting a hypervirulence phenotype associated with increased bacterial burden and mortality. Consistent with this in vivo growth-regulatory role, constitutive overexpression of rv2623 attenuates mycobacterial growth in vitro. Biochemical analysis of purified Rv2623 suggested that this mycobacterial USP binds ATP, and the 2.9-A-resolution crystal structure revealed that Rv2623 engages ATP in a novel nucleotide-binding pocket. Structure-guided mutagenesis yielded Rv2623 mutants with reduced ATP-binding capacity. Analysis of mycobacteria overexpressing these mutants revealed that the in vitro growth-inhibitory property of Rv2623 correlates with its ability to bind ATP. Together, the results indicate that i M. tuberculosis Rv2623 regulates mycobacterial growth in vitro and in vivo, and ii Rv2623 is required for the entry of the tubercle bacillus into the chronic phase of infection in the host; in addition, iii Rv2623 binds ATP; and iv the growth-regulatory attribute of this USP is dependent on its ATP-binding activity. We propose that Rv2623 may function as an ATP-dependent signaling intermediate in a pathway that promotes persistent infection.

  8. The C(2)B Ca(2+)-binding motif of synaptotagmin is required for synaptic transmission in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mackler, J M; Drummond, J A; Loewen, C A; Robinson, I M; Reist, N E

    2002-07-18

    Synaptotagmin is a synaptic vesicle protein that is postulated to be the Ca(2+) sensor for fast, evoked neurotransmitter release. Deleting the gene for synaptotagmin (syt(null)) strongly suppresses synaptic transmission in every species examined, showing that synaptotagmin is central in the synaptic vesicle cycle. The cytoplasmic region of synaptotagmin contains two C(2) domains, C(2)A and C(2)B. Five, highly conserved, acidic residues in both the C(2)A and C(2)B domains of synaptotagmin coordinate the binding of Ca(2+) ions, and biochemical studies have characterized several in vitro Ca(2+)-dependent interactions between synaptotagmin and other nerve terminal molecules. But there has been no direct evidence that any of the Ca(2+)-binding sites within synaptotagmin are required in vivo. Here we show that mutating two of the Ca(2+)-binding aspartate residues in the C(2)B domain (D(416,418)N in Drosophila) decreased evoked transmitter release by >95%, and decreased the apparent Ca(2+) affinity of evoked transmitter release. These studies show that the Ca(2+)-binding motif of the C(2)B domain of synaptotagmin is essential for synaptic transmission. PMID:12110842

  9. Structural requirements of tetracycline-Tet repressor interaction: determination of equilibrium binding constants for tetracycline analogs with the Tet repressor.

    PubMed Central

    Degenkolb, J; Takahashi, M; Ellestad, G A; Hillen, W

    1991-01-01

    We used the Tn10-encoded Tet repressor, which has a highly specific binding capacity for tetracycline, to probe contacts between the drug and protein by chemical interference studies of the antibiotic. For that purpose, the equilibrium association constants of modified tetracyclines with the Tet repressor and Mg2+ cations were determined quantitatively. The results confirm the previous notion that Mg2+ probably binds with the oxygens at positions 11 and 12 and is absolutely required for protein-drug recognition. Modifications were introduced at positions seven, six, five, and four of the drug, and anhydrotetracycline was also studied. Substitutions or eliminations of functions at these positions influenced binding to the Tet repressor up to 35-fold. The introduction of an azido function at position seven in 7-azidotetracycline and epimerization of the substituents at position four in 4-epitetracycline lead to a 2- or 25-fold reduction, respectively, of Tet repressor affinity in those compounds. Anhydrotetracycline bound about 35-fold more strongly than tetracycline did, indicating that the oxygen at position 11 may be involved in Tet repressor recognition. This increased binding is in contrast to the lower antibiotic activity of anhydrotetracycline and indicates that the Tet repressor and ribosomes recognize the drug differently. PMID:1929330

  10. N-linked glycosylation of SV2 is required for binding and uptake of botulinum neurotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Yao, Guorui; Zhang, Sicai; Mahrhold, Stefan; Lam, Kwok-Ho; Stern, Daniel; Bagramyan, Karine; Perry, Kay; Kalkum, Markus; Rummel, Andreas; Dong, Min; Jin, Rongsheng

    2016-07-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A1 (BoNT/A1), a licensed drug widely used for medical and cosmetic applications, exerts its action by invading motoneurons. Here we report a 2.0-Å-resolution crystal structure of the BoNT/A1 receptor-binding domain in complex with its neuronal receptor, glycosylated human SV2C. We found that the neuronal tropism of BoNT/A1 requires recognition of both the peptide moiety and an N-linked glycan on SV2. This N-glycan-which is conserved in all SV2 isoforms across vertebrates-is essential for BoNT/A1 binding to neurons and for its potent neurotoxicity. The glycan-binding interface on SV2 is targeted by a human BoNT/A1-neutralizing antibody currently licensed as an antibotulism drug. Our studies reveal a new paradigm of host-pathogen interactions, in which pathogens exploit conserved host post-translational modifications, thereby achieving highly specific receptor binding while also tolerating genetic changes across multiple isoforms of receptors. PMID:27294781

  11. Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the small GTP-binding protein Cdc42p and its activator CDC24.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Z S; Leung, T; Manser, E; Lim, L

    1995-01-01

    Pheromone signalling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by the STE4-STE18 G-protein beta gamma subunits. A possible target for the subunits is Ste20p, whose structural homolog, the serine/threonine kinase PAK, is activated by GTP-binding p21s Cdc42 and Rac1. The putative Cdc42p-binding domain of Ste20p, expressed as a fusion protein, binds human and yeast GTP-binding Cdc42p. Cdc42p is required for alpha-factor-induced activation of FUS1.cdc24ts strains defective for Cdc42p GDP/GTP exchange show no pheromone induction at restrictive temperatures but are partially rescued by overexpression of Cdc42p, which is potentiated by Cdc42p12V mutants. Epistatic analysis indicates that CDC24 and CDC42 lie between STE4 and STE20 in the pathway. The two-hybrid system revealed that Ste4p interacts with Cdc24p. We propose that Cdc42p plays a pivotal role both in polarization of the cytoskeleton and in pheromone signalling. PMID:7565673

  12. The Rho-GTPase binding protein IQGAP2 is required for the glomerular filtration barrier.

    PubMed

    Sugano, Yuya; Lindenmeyer, Maja T; Auberger, Ines; Ziegler, Urs; Segerer, Stephan; Cohen, Clemens D; Neuhauss, Stephan C F; Loffing, Johannes

    2015-11-01

    Podocyte dysfunction impairs the size selectivity of the glomerular filter, leading to proteinuria, hypoalbuminuria, and edema, clinically defined as nephrotic syndrome. Hereditary forms of nephrotic syndrome are linked to mutations in podocyte-specific genes. To identify genes contributing to podocyte dysfunction in acquired nephrotic syndrome, we studied human glomerular gene expression data sets for glomerular-enriched gene transcripts differentially regulated between pretransplant biopsy samples and biopsies from patients with nephrotic syndrome. Candidate genes were screened by in situ hybridization for expression in the zebrafish pronephros, an easy-to-use in vivo assay system to assess podocyte function. One glomerulus-enriched product was the Rho-GTPase binding protein, IQGAP2. Immunohistochemistry found a strong presence of IQGAP2 in normal human and zebrafish podocytes. In zebrafish larvae, morpholino-based knockdown of iqgap2 caused a mild foot process effacement of zebrafish podocytes and a cystic dilation of the urinary space of Bowman's capsule upon onset of urinary filtration. Moreover, the glomerulus of zebrafish morphants showed a glomerular permeability for injected high-molecular-weight dextrans, indicating an impaired size selectivity of the glomerular filter. Thus, IQGAP2 is a Rho-GTPase binding protein, highly abundant in human and zebrafish podocytes, which controls normal podocyte structure and function as evidenced in the zebrafish pronephros. PMID:26154927

  13. Neuroprotection requires the functions of the RNA-binding protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Skliris, A; Papadaki, O; Kafasla, P; Karakasiliotis, I; Hazapis, O; Reczko, M; Grammenoudi, S; Bauer, J; Kontoyiannis, D L

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in the functions of neuronal RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) can contribute to neurodegenerative diseases. However, neurons also express a set of widely distributed RBPs that may have developed specialized functions. Here, we show that the ubiquitous member of the otherwise neuronal Elavl/Hu family of RNA-binding proteins, Elavl1/HuR, has a neuroprotective role. Mice engineered to lack exclusively HuR in the hippocampal neurons of the central nervous system (CNS), maintain physiologic levels of neuronal Elavls and develop a partially diminished seizure response following strong glutamatergic excitation; however, they display an exacerbated neurodegenerative response subsequent to the initial excitotoxic event. This response was phenocopied in hippocampal cells devoid of ionotropic glutamate receptors in which the loss of HuR results in enhanced mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative damage and programmed necrosis solely after glutamate challenge. The molecular dissection of HuR and nElavl mRNA targets revealed the existence of a HuR-restricted posttranscriptional regulon that failed in HuR-deficient neurons and is involved in cellular energetics and oxidation defense. Thus, HuR acts as a specialized controller of oxidative metabolism in neurons to confer protection from neurodegeneration. PMID:25301069

  14. Requirement of aggregation propensity of Alzheimer amyloid peptides for neuronal cell surface binding

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, David A; McLaurin, JoAnne; Chakrabartty, Avijit

    2007-01-01

    Background Aggregation of the amyloid peptides, Aβ40 and Aβ42, is known to be involved in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we investigate the relationship between peptide aggregation and cell surface binding of three forms of Aβ (Aβ40, Aβ42, and an Aβ mutant). Results Using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry with fluorescently labelled Aβ, we demonstrate a correlation between the aggregation propensity of the Alzheimer amyloid peptides and their neuronal cell surface association. We find that the highly aggregation prone Aβ42 associates with the surface of neuronal cells within one hour, while the less aggregation prone Aβ40 associates over 24 hours. We show that a double mutation in Aβ42 that reduces its aggregation propensity also reduces its association with the cell surface. Furthermore, we find that a cell line that is resistant to Aβ cytotoxicity, the non-neuronal human lymphoma cell line U937, does not bind either Aβ40 or Aβ42. Conclusion Taken together, our findings reveal that amyloid peptide aggregation propensity is an essential determinant of neuronal cell surface association. We anticipate that our approach, involving Aβ imaging in live cells, will be highly useful for evaluating the efficacy of therapeutic drugs that prevent toxic Aβ association with neuronal cells. PMID:17475015

  15. FOXO1 is Required for Binding of PR on IRF4, Novel Transcriptional Regulator of Endometrial Stromal Decidualization

    PubMed Central

    Vasquez, Yasmin M.; Mazur, Erik C.; Li, Xilong; Kommagani, Ramakrishna; Jiang, Lichun; Chen, Rui; Lanz, Rainer B.; Kovanci, Ertug; Gibbons, William E.

    2015-01-01

    The forkhead box O1A (FOXO1) is an early-induced target of the protein kinase A pathway during the decidualization of human endometrial stromal cells (HESCs). In this study we identified the cistrome and transcriptome of FOXO1 and its role as a transcriptional regulator of the progesterone receptor (PR). Direct targets of FOXO1 were identified by integrating RNA sequencing with chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing. Gene ontology analysis demonstrated that FOXO1 regulates a subset of genes in decidualization such as those involved in cancer, p53 signaling, focal adhesions, and Wnt signaling. An overlap of the FOXO1 and PR chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing intervals revealed the co-occupancy of FOXO1 in more than 75% of PR binding intervals. Among these intervals were highly enriched motifs for the interferon regulatory factor member 4 (IRF4). IRF4 was determined to be a genomic target of both FOXO1 and PR and also to be differentially regulated in HESCs treated with small interfering RNA targeting FOXO1 or PR prior to decidualization stimulus. Ablation of FOXO1 was found to abolish binding of PR to the shared binding interval downstream of the IRF4 gene. Finally, small interfering RNA-mediated ablation of IRF4 was shown to compromise morphological transformation of decidualized HESCs and to attenuate the expression of the decidual markers IGFBP1, PRL, and WNT4. These results provide the first evidence that FOXO1 is functionally required for the binding of PR to genomic targets. Most notably, FOXO1 and PR are required for the regulation of IRF4, a novel transcriptional regulator of decidualization in HESCs. PMID:25584414

  16. The C. elegans CCAAT-enhancer binding protein gamma is required for surveillance immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Kirthi C.; Dunbar, Tiffany L.; Nargund, Amrita M.; Haynes, Cole M.; Troemel, Emily R.

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens attack host cells by deploying toxins that perturb core host processes. Recent findings from the nematode C. elegans and other metazoans indicate that surveillance or ‘effector-triggered’ pathways monitor functioning of these core processes and mount protective responses when they are perturbed. Despite a growing number of examples of surveillance immunity, the signaling components remain poorly defined. Here we show that CEBP-2, the C. elegans ortholog of mammalian CCAAT-enhancer binding protein gamma, is a key player in surveillance immunity. We show that CEBP-2 acts together with the bZIP transcription factor ZIP-2 in the protective response to translational block by P. aeruginosa Exotoxin A, as well as to perturbations of other processes. CEBP-2 serves to limit pathogen burden, promote survival upon P. aeruginosa infection, and also promote survival upon Exotoxin A exposure. These findings may have broad implications for the mechanisms by which animals sense pathogenic attack and mount protective responses. PMID:26876169

  17. The Actin-Binding Protein α-Adducin Is Required for Maintaining Axon Diameter.

    PubMed

    Leite, Sérgio Carvalho; Sampaio, Paula; Sousa, Vera Filipe; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Joana; Pinto-Costa, Rita; Peters, Luanne Laurel; Brites, Pedro; Sousa, Mónica Mendes

    2016-04-19

    The actin-binding protein adducin was recently identified as a component of the neuronal subcortical cytoskeleton. Here, we analyzed mice lacking adducin to uncover the function of this protein in actin rings. α-adducin knockout mice presented progressive axon enlargement in the spinal cord and optic and sciatic nerves, followed by axon degeneration and loss. Using stimulated emission depletion super-resolution microscopy, we show that a periodic subcortical actin cytoskeleton is assembled in every neuron type inspected including retinal ganglion cells and dorsal root ganglia neurons. In neurons devoid of adducin, the actin ring diameter increased, although the inter-ring periodicity was maintained. In vitro, the actin ring diameter adjusted as axons grew, suggesting the lattice is dynamic. Our data support a model in which adducin activity is not essential for actin ring assembly and periodicity but is necessary to control the diameter of both actin rings and axons and actin filament growth within rings. PMID:27068466

  18. Variable requirements for DNA-binding proteins at polycomb-dependent repressive regions in human HOX clusters.

    PubMed

    Woo, Caroline J; Kharchenko, Peter V; Daheron, Laurence; Park, Peter J; Kingston, Robert E

    2013-08-01

    Polycomb group (PcG)-mediated repression is an evolutionarily conserved process critical for cell fate determination and maintenance of gene expression during embryonic development. However, the mechanisms underlying PcG recruitment in mammals remain unclear since few regulatory sites have been identified. We report two novel prospective PcG-dependent regulatory elements within the human HOXB and HOXC clusters and compare their repressive activities to a previously identified element in the HOXD cluster. These regions recruited the PcG proteins BMI1 and SUZ12 to a reporter construct in mesenchymal stem cells and conferred repression that was dependent upon PcG expression. Furthermore, we examined the potential of two DNA-binding proteins, JARID2 and YY1, to regulate PcG activity at these three elements. JARID2 has differential requirements, whereas YY1 appears to be required for repressive activity at all 3 sites. We conclude that distinct elements of the mammalian HOX clusters can recruit components of the PcG complexes and confer repression, similar to what has been seen in Drosophila. These elements, however, have diverse requirements for binding factors, which, combined with previous data on other loci, speaks to the complexity of PcG targeting in mammals. PMID:23775117

  19. The N-terminus of porcine circovirus type 2 replication protein is required for nuclear localization and ori binding activities

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, W.-L.; Chien, M.-S.; Du, Y.-W.; Wu, P.-C.; Huang Chienjin

    2009-02-20

    Porcine circovirus type 2 possesses a circular, single-stranded DNA genome that requires the replication protein (Rep) for virus replication. To characterize the DNA binding potential and the significant region that confers the nuclear localization of the Rep protein, the defined coding regions of rep gene were cloned and expressed. All of the recombinant proteins except for the N-terminal 110 residues deletion mutant could bind to the double-stranded minimal binding site of replication origin (ori). In addition, the N-terminal deletion mutant lacking 110 residues exhibited mainly cytoplasmic staining in the transfected cells in contrast to the others, which localized dominantly in the nucleus, suggesting that this N-terminal domain is essential for nuclear localization. Furthermore, a series of green fluorescence proteins (GFP) containing potential nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences were tested for their cellular distribution. The ability of the utmost 20 residues of the N-terminal region to target the GFP to the nucleus confirmed its role as a functional NLS.

  20. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding

    PubMed Central

    Boddey, Justin A.; O'Neill, Matthew T.; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G.; Hodder, Anthony N.; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J.; Cowman, Alan F.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  1. Export of malaria proteins requires co-translational processing of the PEXEL motif independent of phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate binding.

    PubMed

    Boddey, Justin A; O'Neill, Matthew T; Lopaticki, Sash; Carvalho, Teresa G; Hodder, Anthony N; Nebl, Thomas; Wawra, Stephan; van West, Pieter; Ebrahimzadeh, Zeinab; Richard, Dave; Flemming, Sven; Spielmann, Tobias; Przyborski, Jude; Babon, Jeff J; Cowman, Alan F

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum exports proteins into erythrocytes using the Plasmodium export element (PEXEL) motif, which is cleaved in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) by plasmepsin V (PMV). A recent study reported that phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate (PI(3)P) concentrated in the ER binds to PEXEL motifs and is required for export independent of PMV, and that PEXEL motifs are functionally interchangeable with RxLR motifs of oomycete effectors. Here we show that the PEXEL does not bind PI(3)P, and that this lipid is not concentrated in the ER. We find that RxLR motifs cannot mediate export in P. falciparum. Parasites expressing a mutated version of KAHRP, with the PEXEL motif repositioned near the signal sequence, prevented PMV cleavage. This mutant possessed the putative PI(3)P-binding residues but is not exported. Reinstatement of PEXEL to its original location restores processing by PMV and export. These results challenge the PI(3)P hypothesis and provide evidence that PEXEL position is conserved for co-translational processing and export. PMID:26832821

  2. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of the Bovine Papillomavirus E1 Helicase Domain Identifies Residues Involved in the Nonspecific DNA Binding Activity Required for Double Trimer Formation ▿

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofei; Schuck, Stephen; Stenlund, Arne

    2010-01-01

    The papillomavirus E1 protein is a multifunctional initiator protein responsible for preparing the viral DNA template for initiation of DNA replication. The E1 protein encodes two DNA binding activities that are required for initiation of DNA replication. A well-characterized sequence-specific DNA binding activity resides in the E1 DBD and is used to tether E1 to the papillomavirus ori. A non-sequence-specific DNA binding activity is also required for formation of the E1 double trimer (DT) complex, which is responsible for the local template melting that precedes loading of the E1 helicase. This DNA binding activity is very poorly understood. We use a structure-based mutagenesis approach to identify residues in the E1 helicase domain that are required for the non-sequence-specific DNA binding and DT formation. We found that three groups of residues are involved in nonspecific DNA binding: the E1 β-hairpin structure containing R505, K506, and H507; a hydrophobic loop containing F464; and a charged loop containing K461 together generate the binding surface involved in nonspecific DNA binding. These residues are well conserved in the T antigens from the polyomaviruses, indicating that the polyomaviruses share this nonspecific DNA binding activity. PMID:20147403

  3. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    PubMed Central

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes. PMID:26679720

  4. VIM1, a methylcytosine-binding protein required for centromeric heterochromatinization

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Hye Ryun; Pontes, Olga; Pikaard, Craig S.; Richards, Eric J.

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in eukaryotes is executed by a complex set of signaling interactions among small RNA species and chromatin marks, including histone modification and DNA methylation. We identified vim1 (VARIANT IN METHYLATION 1), an Arabidopsis mutation causing cytosine hypomethylation and decondensation of centromeres in interphase. VIM1 is a member of a small gene family, encoding proteins containing PHD, RING, and SRA (SET- and RING-associated) domains, which are found together in mammalian proteins implicated in regulation of chromatin modification, transcription, and the cell cycle. VIM1 is an unconventional methylcytosine-binding protein that interacts in vitro with 5mCpG- and 5mCpHpG-modified DNA (via its SRA domain), as well as recombinant histones (H2B, H3, H4, and HTR12) in plant extracts. VIM1 associates with methylated genomic loci in vivo and is enriched in chromocenters. Our findings suggest that VIM1 acts at the DNA methylation–histone interface to maintain centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:17242155

  5. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Zakharova, Natalia I; Emelyanov, Alexander V; Turoverov, Konstantin K; Verkhusha, Vladislav V

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes. PMID:26679720

  6. Investigation of the structure requirement for 5-HT₆ binding affinity of arylsulfonyl derivatives: a computational study.

    PubMed

    Hao, Ming; Li, Yan; Li, Hanqing; Zhang, Shuwei

    2011-01-01

    5-HT(6) receptor has been implicated in a series of diseases including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunctions. 5-HT(6) ligands have been reported to play a significant role in the treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Presently, a large series of 223 5-HT(6) ligands were studied using a combinational method by 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics calculations for further improvement of potency. The optimal 3D models exhibit satisfying statistical results with r(2) (ncv), q(2) values of 0.85 and 0.50 for CoMFA, 0.81 and 0.53 for CoMSIA, respectively. Their predictive powers were validated by external test set, showing r(2) (pred) of 0.71 and 0.76. The contour maps also provide a visual representation of contributions of steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond fields as well as the prospective binding models. In addition, the agreement between 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation proves the rationality of the developed models. These results, we hope, may be helpful in designing novel and potential 5-HT(6) ligands. PMID:21954341

  7. Minimal domain of bacterial phytochrome required for chromophore binding and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rumyantsev, Konstantin A.; Shcherbakova, Daria M.; Zakharova, Natalia I.; Emelyanov, Alexander V.; Turoverov, Konstantin K.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    2015-12-01

    Fluorescent proteins (FP) are used to study various biological processes. Recently, a series of near-infrared (NIR) FPs based on bacterial phytochromes was developed. Finding ways to improve NIR FPs is becoming progressively important. By applying rational design and molecular evolution we have engineered R. palustris bacterial phytochrome into a single-domain NIR FP of 19.6 kDa, termed GAF-FP, which is 2-fold and 1.4-fold smaller than bacterial phytochrome-based NIR FPs and GFP-like proteins, respectively. Engineering of GAF-FP involved a substitution of 15% of its amino acids and a deletion of the knot structure. GAF-FP covalently binds two tetrapyrrole chromophores, biliverdin (BV) and phycocyanobilin (PCB). With the BV chromophore GAF-FP absorbs at 635 nm and fluoresces at 670 nm. With the PCB chromophore GAF-FP becomes blue-shifted and absorbs at 625 nm and fluoresces at 657 nm. The GAF-FP structure has a high tolerance to small peptide insertions. The small size of GAF-FP and its additional absorbance band in the violet range has allowed for designing a chimeric protein with Renilla luciferase. The chimera exhibits efficient non-radiative energy transfer from luciferase to GAF-FP, resulting in NIR bioluminescence. This study opens the way for engineering of small NIR FPs and NIR luciferases from bacterial phytochromes.

  8. Electrostatically induced recruitment of membrane peptides into clusters requires ligand binding at both interfaces.

    PubMed

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Horner, Andreas; Pohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin). Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i) by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility D(PLL) and (ii) by an increased lifetime τ(PLL) of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither D(PLL) nor τ(P) changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:23285199

  9. Electrostatically Induced Recruitment of Membrane Peptides into Clusters Requires Ligand Binding at Both Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Pohl, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Protein recruitment to specific membrane locations may be governed or facilitated by electrostatic attraction, which originates from a multivalent ligand. Here we explored the energetics of a model system in which this simple electrostatic recruitment mechanism failed. That is, basic poly-L-lysine binding to one leaflet of a planar lipid bilayer did not recruit the triply-charged peptide (O-Pyromellitylgramicidin). Clustering was only observed in cases where PLL was bound to both channel ends. Clustering was indicated (i) by the decreased diffusional PLL mobility DPLL and (ii) by an increased lifetime τPLL of the clustered channels. In contrast, if PLL was bound to only one leaflet, neither DPLL nor τP changed. Simple calculations suggest that electrostatic repulsion of the unbound ends prevented neighboring OPg dimers from approaching each other. We believe that a similar mechanism may also operate in cell signaling and that it may e.g. contribute to the controversial results obtained for the ligand driven dimerization of G protein-coupled receptors. PMID:23285199

  10. A flavin-mononucleotide-binding site in Hansenula anomala nicked flavocytochrome b2, requiring the association of two domains.

    PubMed

    Gervais, M; Labeyrie, F; Risler, Y; Vergnes, O

    1980-10-01

    Previous experiments in our laboratory with Saccharomyces cervisiae flavocytochrom b2 indicated that both fragments alpha and beta of the enzyme after cleavage by yeast proteases are required to form the flavin site. More detailed experiments have not been carried out on the nicked Hansenula anomala enzyme obtained by tryptic cleavage. A method has been devised that gives a quantitative separation in 4 M urea of beta, and alpha with its heme still bound. The characteristics of the various species: isolated alpha and beta and mixed alpha + beta were studied in 4 M urea and after elimination of this reagent by dialysis in the presence of FMN and 2-mercaptoethanol. Several methods, including heme spectroscopy, tryptophan fluorescence, sedimentation studies, and titration of bound flavin, were used. The results indicate that isolated alpha and beta have a folded globular structure after renaturation. The flavin binding to the alpha + beta mixture was important (50-100%) with recovery of the flavodehydrogenase activity. In contrast, binding was not detectable (< 0.5%, Kf > 10 mM) for isolated alpha and beta. As far as mononucleotide binding is concerned, such a cooperative requirement for two folding domains has never been reported in other enzymes. The present results are discussed together with others obtained in our laboratory which demonstrate that, as deduced from their sensitivity to trypsin, the structure of S. cerevisiae and H. anomala flavocytochrome b2 protomers is triglobular 'n-x-beta' (n and x combined within alpha). The tetramer assembly, which remains intact as a nicked enzyme (alpha beta)4 after the first trypsin cleavage, is broken down following a second cleavage of the chain into four cytochrome cores (n) and a functional T-flavodehydrogenase entity, a tetramer of the type (x beta)4. PMID:7439181

  11. The VPS33B-binding protein VPS16B is required in megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Denisa; Li, Ling; Christensen, Hilary; Pluthero, Fred G.; Chen, Shao Zun; Puhacz, Michael; Garg, Parvesh M.; Lanka, Kiran K.; Cummings, James J.; Kramer, Helmut; Wasmuth, James D.; Parkinson, John

    2012-01-01

    Patients with platelet α or dense δ-granule defects have bleeding problems. Although several proteins are known to be required for δ-granule development, less is known about α-granule biogenesis. Our previous work showed that the BEACH protein NBEAL2 and the Sec1/Munc18 protein VPS33B are required for α-granule biogenesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, and bioinformatics studies, we identified VPS16B as a VPS33B-binding protein. Immunoblotting confirmed VPS16B expression in various human tissues and cells including megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in megakaryocytic Dami cells. Characterization of platelets from a patient with arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome containing mutations in C14orf133 encoding VPS16B revealed pale-appearing platelets in blood films and electron microscopy revealed a complete absence of α-granules, whereas δ-granules were observed. Soluble and membrane-bound α-granule proteins were reduced or undetectable, suggesting that both releasable and membrane-bound α-granule constituents were absent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Dami cells stably expressing GFP-VPS16B revealed that similar to VPS33B, GFP-VPS16B colocalized with markers of the trans-Golgi network, late endosomes and α-granules. We conclude that VPS16B, similar to its binding partner VPS33B, is essential for megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis. PMID:23002115

  12. The VPS33B-binding protein VPS16B is required in megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Urban, Denisa; Li, Ling; Christensen, Hilary; Pluthero, Fred G; Chen, Shao Zun; Puhacz, Michael; Garg, Parvesh M; Lanka, Kiran K; Cummings, James J; Kramer, Helmut; Wasmuth, James D; Parkinson, John; Kahr, Walter H A

    2012-12-13

    Patients with platelet α or dense δ-granule defects have bleeding problems. Although several proteins are known to be required for δ-granule development, less is known about α-granule biogenesis. Our previous work showed that the BEACH protein NBEAL2 and the Sec1/Munc18 protein VPS33B are required for α-granule biogenesis. Using a yeast two-hybrid screen, mass spectrometry, coimmunoprecipitation, and bioinformatics studies, we identified VPS16B as a VPS33B-binding protein. Immunoblotting confirmed VPS16B expression in various human tissues and cells including megakaryocytes and platelets, and also in megakaryocytic Dami cells. Characterization of platelets from a patient with arthrogryposis, renal dysfunction, and cholestasis (ARC) syndrome containing mutations in C14orf133 encoding VPS16B revealed pale-appearing platelets in blood films and electron microscopy revealed a complete absence of α-granules, whereas δ-granules were observed. Soluble and membrane-bound α-granule proteins were reduced or undetectable, suggesting that both releasable and membrane-bound α-granule constituents were absent. Immunofluorescence microscopy of Dami cells stably expressing GFP-VPS16B revealed that similar to VPS33B, GFP-VPS16B colocalized with markers of the trans-Golgi network, late endosomes and α-granules. We conclude that VPS16B, similar to its binding partner VPS33B, is essential for megakaryocyte and platelet α-granule biogenesis. PMID:23002115

  13. Identification of amino acid sequence motifs in desmocollin, a desmosomal glycoprotein, that are required for plakoglobin binding and plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Troyanovsky, S M; Troyanovsky, R B; Eshkind, L G; Leube, R E; Franke, W W

    1994-11-01

    By transfecting epithelial cells with gene constructs encoding chimeric proteins of the transmembrane part of the gap junction protein connexin 32 in combination with various segments of the cytoplasmic part of the desmosomal cadherin desmocollin 1a, we have determined that a relatively short sequence element is necessary for the formation of desmosome-like plaques and for the specific anchorage of bundles of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs). Deletion of as little as the carboxyl-terminal 37 aa resulted in a lack of IF anchorage and binding of the plaque protein plakoglobin, as shown by immunolocalization and immunoprecipitation experiments. In addition, we show that the sequence requirements for the recruitment of desmoplakin, another desmosomal plaque protein, differ and that a short (10 aa) segment of the desmocollin 1a tail, located close to the plasma membrane, is also required for the binding of plakoglobin, as well as of desmoplakin, and also for IF anchorage. The importance of the carboxyl-terminal domain, homologous in diverse types of cadherins, is emphasized, as it must harbor, in a mutually exclusive pattern, the information for assembly of the IF-anchoring desmosomal plaque in desmocollins and for formation of the alpha-/beta-catenin- and vinculin-containing, actin filament-anchoring plaque in E- and N-cadherin. PMID:7971964

  14. A DNA Binding Protein Is Required for Viral Replication and Transcription in Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bin; Shi, Yanghui; Quan, Yanping; Nie, Zuoming; Zhang, Yaozhou; Yu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    A DNA-binding protein (DBP) [GenBank accession number: M63416] of Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus (BmNPV) has been reported to be a regulatory factor in BmNPV, but its detailed functions remain unknown. In order to study the regulatory mechanism of DBP on viral proliferation, genome replication, and gene transcription, a BmNPV dbp gene knockout virus dbp-ko-Bacmid was generated by the means of Red recombination system. In addition, dbp-repaired virus dbp-re-Bacmid was constructed by the means of the Bac to Bac system. Then, the Bacmids were transfected into BmN cells. The results of this viral titer experiment revealed that the TCID50 of the dbp-ko-Bacmid was 0; however, the dbp-re-Bacmid was similar to the wtBacmid (p>0.05), indicating that the dbp-deficient would lead to failure in the assembly of virus particles. In the next step, Real-Time PCR was used to analyze the transcriptional phases of dbp gene in BmN cells, which had been infected with BmNPV. The results of the latter experiment revealed that the transcript of dbp gene was first detected at 3 h post-infection. Furthermore, the replication level of virus genome and the transcriptional level of virus early, late, and very late genes in BmN cells, which had been transfected with 3 kinds of Bacmids, were analyzed by Real-Time PCR. The demonstrating that the replication level of genome was lower than that of wtBacmid and dbp-re-Bacmid (p<0.01). The transcriptional level of dbp-ko-Bacmid early gene lef-3, ie-1, dnapol, late gene vp39 and very late gene p10 were statistically significantly lower than dbp-re-Bacmid and wtBacmid (p<0.01). The results presented are based on Western blot analysis, which indicated that the lack of dbp gene would lead to low expressions of lef3, vp39, and p10. In conclusion, dbp was not only essential for early viral replication, but also a viral gene that has a significant impact on transcription and expression during all periods of baculovirus life cycle. PMID:27414795

  15. Properties of SEPT9 isoforms and the requirement for GTP binding.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Claire; Church, Stewart W; Nagar, Hans A; Price, John; Hall, Peter A; Russell, S E Hilary

    2004-05-01

    Members of the evolutionarily conserved septin family of genes are emerging as key components of several cellular processes including membrane trafficking, cytokinesis, and cell-cycle control events. SEPT9 has been shown to have a complex genomic architecture, such that up to 15 different isoforms are possible by the shuffling of five alternate amino termini and three alternate carboxy termini. Genomic and transcriptional alterations of SEPT9 have been associated with neoplasia. The present study has used a Sept9-specific antibody to determine the pattern of isoform expression in a range of tumour cell lines. Western blot analysis indicated considerable variation in the relative amounts and isoform content of Sept9. Immunofluorescence studies showed a range of patterns of cytoplasmic localization ranging from mainly particulate to mainly filamentous. Expression constructs were also generated for each amino terminal isoform to investigate the patterns of localization of individual isoforms and the effects on cells of ectopic expression. The present study shows that the epsilon isoform appears filamentous in this overexpression system while the remaining isoforms are particulate and cytoplasmic. Transient transfection of individual constructs into tumour cell lines results in cell-cycle perturbation with a G2/M arrest and dramatic growth suppression, which was greatest in cell lines with the lowest amounts of endogenous Sept9. Similar phenotypic observations were made with GTP-binding mutants of all five N-terminal variants of Sept9. However, dramatic differences were observed in the kinetics of accumulation of wild-type versus mutant septin protein in transfected cells. In conclusion, the present study shows that the expression patterns of Sept9 protein are very varied in a panel of tumour cell lines and the functional studies are consistent with a model of septin function as a component of a molecular scaffold that contributes to diverse cellular functions

  16. Sperm surface protein PH-20 is bifunctional: one activity is a hyaluronidase and a second, distinct activity is required in secondary sperm-zona binding.

    PubMed

    Hunnicutt, G R; Primakoff, P; Myles, D G

    1996-07-01

    In previous studies, we have found that the sperm membrane protein PH-20 acts during two different stages of fertilization. On acrosome-intact sperm, PH-20 has a hyaluronidase activity that is required for sperm penetration through the cumulus cell layer that surrounds the oocyte. On acrosome-reacted sperm, PH-20 has a required function in sperm-zona binding (secondary binding). Because hyaluronic acid (HA) has been detected in the zona pellucida, secondary sperm-zona adhesion could depend on repetitive binding and hydrolysis of HA by PH-20 acting as a hyaluronidase. Alternatively, PH-20 may be bifunctional and have a second, different activity required for secondary binding. To distinguish between these two possibilities, in this study we used reagents that inhibit either PH-20's function in sperm-zona binding or its hyaluronidase activity. We found that an anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 90%) had no effect on hyaluronidase activity. Conversely, apigenin, a hyaluronidase inhibitor, blocked PH-20 hyaluronidase activity 93% without inhibiting sperm-zona binding. Similarly, another anti-PH-20 monoclonal antibody that inhibited hyaluronidase activity 95% only partially inhibited sperm-zona binding (approximately 45%). We also extensively pretreated oocytes with hyaluronidase to remove all accessible HA on or in the zona pellucida and found little or no effect on secondary sperm-zona binding. Our results suggest that PH-20 is bifunctional and has two activities: a hyaluronidase activity and a second, separate activity required for secondary sperm-zona binding. PMID:8793062

  17. Embryonic Poly(A)-Binding Protein (EPAB) Is Required for Granulosa Cell EGF Signaling and Cumulus Expansion in Female Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Cai-Rong; Lowther, Katie M; Lalioti, Maria D; Seli, Emre

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein in Xenopus, mouse, and human oocytes and early embryos before zygotic genome activation. EPAB is required for translational activation of maternally stored mRNAs in the oocyte and Epab(-/-) female mice are infertile due to impaired oocyte maturation, cumulus expansion, and ovulation. The aim of this study was to characterize the mechanism of follicular somatic cell dysfunction in Epab(-/-) mice. Using a coculture system of oocytectomized cumulus oophorus complexes (OOXs) with denuded oocytes, we found that when wild-type OOXs were cocultured with Epab(-/-) oocytes, or when Epab(-/-) OOXs were cocultured with WT oocytes, cumulus expansion failed to occur in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF). This finding suggests that oocytes and cumulus cells (CCs) from Epab(-/-) mice fail to send and receive the necessary signals required for cumulus expansion. The abnormalities in Epab(-/-) CCs are not due to lower expression of the oocyte-derived factors growth differentiation factor 9 or bone morphogenetic protein 15, because Epab(-/-) oocytes express these proteins at comparable levels with WT. Epab(-/-) granulosa cells (GCs) exhibit decreased levels of phosphorylated MEK1/2, ERK1/2, and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase in response to lutenizing hormone and EGF treatment, as well as decreased phosphorylation of the EGF receptor. In conclusion, EPAB, which is oocyte specific, is required for the ability of CCs and GCs to become responsive to LH and EGF signaling. These results emphasize the importance of oocyte-somatic communication for GC and CC function. PMID:26492470

  18. Mapping the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor. Orientation requirements for activation by covalent agonist.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, D A; Cohen, J B

    2000-04-28

    To characterize the structural requirements for ligand orientation compatible with activation of the Torpedo nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR), we used Cys mutagenesis in conjunction with sulfhydryl-reactive reagents to tether primary or quaternary amines at defined positions within the agonist binding site of nAChRs containing mutant alpha- or gamma-subunits expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 4-(N-Maleimido)benzyltrimethylammonium and 2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate acted as irreversible antagonists when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaY198C, or gammaE57C, as well as at alphaN94C (2-aminoethylmethanethiosulfonate only). [2-(Trimethylammonium)-ethyl]-methanethiosulfonate (MTSET), which attaches thiocholine to binding site Cys, also acted as an irreversible antagonist when tethered at alphaY93C, alphaN94C, or gammaE57C. However, MTSET modification of alphaY198C resulted in prolonged activation of the nAChR not reversible by washing but inhibitable by subsequent exposure to non-competitive antagonists. Modification of alphaY198C (or any of the other positions tested) by [(trimethylammonium)methyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted only in irreversible inhibition, while modification of alphaY198C by [3-(trimethylammonium)propyl]methanethiosulfonate resulted in irreversible activation of nAChR, but at lower efficacy than by MTSET. Thus changing the length of the tethering arm by less than 1 A in either direction markedly effects the ability of the covalent trimethylammonium to activate the nAChR, and agonist activation depends on a very selective orientation of the quaternary ammonium within the agonist binding site. PMID:10777557

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) binding to Chk1 at stalled replication forks is required for S-phase checkpoint activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wookee; Bruhn, Christopher; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Li, Fu; Krüger, Anja; Siddeek, Bénazir; Greulich, Karl-Otto; Popp, Oliver; Meisezahl, Chris; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.; Bürkle, Alexander; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2013-12-01

    Damaged replication forks activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), which catalyses poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formation; however, how PARP1 or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in the S-phase checkpoint is unknown. Here we show that PAR, supplied by PARP1, interacts with Chk1 via a novel PAR-binding regulatory (PbR) motif in Chk1, independent of ATR and its activity. iPOND studies reveal that Chk1 associates readily with the unperturbed replication fork and that PAR is required for efficient retention of Chk1 and phosphorylated Chk1 at the fork. A PbR mutation, which disrupts PAR binding, but not the interaction with its partners Claspin or BRCA1, impairs Chk1 and the S-phase checkpoint activation, and mirrors Chk1 knockdown-induced hypersensitivity to fork poisoning. We find that long chains, but not short chains, of PAR stimulate Chk1 kinase activity. Collectively, we disclose a previously unrecognized mechanism of the S-phase checkpoint by PAR metabolism that modulates Chk1 activity at the replication fork.

  20. Structural and mutational analysis of archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase identifies amino acids required for RNA binding and catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Huiqiong; Yoshinari, Shigeo; Ghosh, Raka; Ignatochkina, Anna V.; Gollnick, Paul D.; Murakami, Katsuhiko S.; Ho, C. Kiong

    2016-01-01

    An ATP-dependent RNA ligase from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum (MthRnl) catalyzes intramolecular ligation of single-stranded RNA to form a closed circular RNA via covalent ligase-AMP and RNA-adenylylate intermediate. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of an MthRnl•ATP complex as well as the covalent MthRnl–AMP intermediate. We also performed structure-guided mutational analysis to survey the functions of 36 residues in three component steps of the ligation pathway including ligase-adenylylation (step 1), RNA adenylylation (step 2) and phosphodiester bond synthesis (step 3). Kinetic analysis underscored the importance of motif 1a loop structure in promoting phosphodiester bond synthesis. Alanine substitutions of Thr117 or Arg118 favor the reverse step 2 reaction to deadenylate the 5′-AMP from the RNA-adenylate, thereby inhibiting step 3 reaction. Tyr159, Phe281 and Glu285, which are conserved among archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligases and are situated on the surface of the enzyme, are required for RNA binding. We propose an RNA binding interface of the MthRnl based on the mutational studies and two sulfate ions that co-crystallized at the active site cleft in the MthRnl–AMP complex. PMID:26896806

  1. A small GTP-binding host protein is required for entry of powdery mildew fungus into epidermal cells of barley.

    PubMed

    Schultheiss, Holger; Dechert, Cornelia; Kogel, Karl-Heinz; Hückelhoven, Ralph

    2002-04-01

    Small GTP-binding proteins such as those from the RAC family are cytosolic signal transduction proteins that often are involved in processing of extracellular stimuli. Plant RAC proteins are implicated in regulation of plant cell architecture, secondary wall formation, meristem signaling, and defense against pathogens. We isolated a RacB homolog from barley (Hordeum vulgare) to study its role in resistance to the barley powdery mildew fungus (Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei). RacB was constitutively expressed in the barley epidermis and its expression level was not strongly influenced by inoculation with B. graminis. However, after biolistic bombardment of barley leaf segments with RacB-double-stranded RNA, sequence-specific RNA interference with RacB function inhibited fungal haustorium establishment in a cell-autonomous and genotype-specific manner. Mutants compromised in function of the Mlo wild-type gene and the Ror1 gene (genotype mlo5 ror1) that are moderately susceptible to B. graminis showed no alteration in powdery mildew resistance upon RacB-specific RNA interference. Thus, the phenotype, induced by RacB-specific RNA interference, was apparently dependent on the same processes as mlo5-mediated broad resistance, which is suppressed by ror1. We conclude that an RAC small GTP-binding protein is required for successful fungal haustorium establishment and that this function may be linked to MLO-associated functions. PMID:11950993

  2. LPS-induced NFκB enhanceosome requires TonEBP/NFAT5 without DNA binding.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwan Hee; Sanada, Satoru; An, Seung Min; Ye, Byeong Jin; Lee, Jun Ho; Seo, Young-Kyo; Lee, Changwook; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Küper, Christoph; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Choi, Soo Youn; Kwon, Hyug Moo

    2016-01-01

    NFκB is a central mediator of inflammation. Present inhibitors of NFκB are mostly based on inhibition of essential machinery such as proteasome and protein kinases, or activation of nuclear receptors; as such, they are of limited therapeutic use due to severe toxicity. Here we report an LPS-induced NFκB enhanceosome in which TonEBP is required for the recruitment of p300. Increased expression of TonEBP enhances the NFκB activity and reduced TonEBP expression lowers it. Recombinant TonEBP molecules incapable of recruiting p300 do not stimulate NFκB. Myeloid-specific deletion of TonEBP results in milder inflammation and sepsis. We discover that a natural small molecule cerulenin specifically disrupts the enhanceosome without affecting the activation of NFκB itself. Cerulenin suppresses the pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages and sepsis without detectable toxicity. Thus, the NFκB enhanceosome offers a promising target for useful anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:27118681

  3. LPS-induced NFκB enhanceosome requires TonEBP/NFAT5 without DNA binding

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwan Hee; Sanada, Satoru; An, Seung Min; Ye, Byeong Jin; Lee, Jun Ho; Seo, Young-Kyo; Lee, Changwook; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Küper, Christoph; Neuhofer, Wolfgang; Choi, Soo Youn; Kwon, Hyug Moo

    2016-01-01

    NFκB is a central mediator of inflammation. Present inhibitors of NFκB are mostly based on inhibition of essential machinery such as proteasome and protein kinases, or activation of nuclear receptors; as such, they are of limited therapeutic use due to severe toxicity. Here we report an LPS-induced NFκB enhanceosome in which TonEBP is required for the recruitment of p300. Increased expression of TonEBP enhances the NFκB activity and reduced TonEBP expression lowers it. Recombinant TonEBP molecules incapable of recruiting p300 do not stimulate NFκB. Myeloid-specific deletion of TonEBP results in milder inflammation and sepsis. We discover that a natural small molecule cerulenin specifically disrupts the enhanceosome without affecting the activation of NFκB itself. Cerulenin suppresses the pro-inflammatory activation of macrophages and sepsis without detectable toxicity. Thus, the NFκB enhanceosome offers a promising target for useful anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:27118681

  4. Structure of the Toxoplasma gondii ROP18 Kinase Domain Reveals a Second Ligand Binding Pocket Required for Acute Virulence*

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Daniel; Gold, Daniel A.; Julien, Lindsay; Rosowski, Emily E.; Niedelman, Wendy; Yaffe, Michael B.; Saeij, Jeroen P. J.

    2013-01-01

    At least a third of the human population is infected with the intracellular parasite Toxoplasma gondii, which contributes significantly to the disease burden in immunocompromised and neutropenic hosts and causes serious congenital complications when vertically transmitted to the fetus. Genetic analyses have identified the Toxoplasma ROP18 Ser/Thr protein kinase as a major factor mediating acute virulence in mice. ROP18 is secreted into the host cell during the invasion process, and its catalytic activity is required for the acute virulence phenotype. However, its precise molecular function and regulation are not fully understood. We have determined the crystal structure of the ROP18 kinase domain, which is inconsistent with a previously proposed autoinhibitory mechanism of regulation. Furthermore, a sucrose molecule bound to our structure identifies an additional ligand-binding pocket outside of the active site cleft. Mutational analysis confirms an important role for this pocket in virulence. PMID:24129568

  5. Threshold occupancy and specific cation binding modes in the hammerhead ribozyme active site are required for active conformation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Giambaşu, George M.; Sosa, Carlos P.; Martick, Monika; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between formation of active in-line attack conformations and monovalent (Na+) and divalent (Mg2+) metal ion binding in the hammerhead ribozyme has been explored with molecular dynamics simulations. To stabilize repulsions between negatively charged groups, different requirements of threshold occupancy of metal ions were observed in the reactant and activated precursor states both in the presence or absence of a Mg2+ in the active site. Specific bridging coordination patterns of the ions are correlated with the formation of active in-line attack conformations and can be accommodated in both cases. Furthermore, simulation results suggest that the hammerhead ribozyme folds to form an electronegative recruiting pocket that attracts high local concentrations of positive charge. The present simulations help to reconcile experiments that probe the metal ion sensitivity of hammerhead ribozyme catalysis and support the supposition that Mg2+, in addition to stabilizing active conformations, plays a specific chemical role in catalysis. PMID:19265710

  6. Attention is required for maintenance of feature binding in visual working memory.

    PubMed

    Zokaei, Nahid; Heider, Maike; Husain, Masud

    2014-01-01

    Working memory and attention are intimately connected. However, understanding the relationship between the two is challenging. Currently, there is an important controversy about whether objects in working memory are maintained automatically or require resources that are also deployed for visual or auditory attention. Here we investigated the effects of loading attention resources on precision of visual working memory, specifically on correct maintenance of feature-bound objects, using a dual-task paradigm. Participants were presented with a memory array and were asked to remember either direction of motion of random dot kinematograms of different colour, or orientation of coloured bars. During the maintenance period, they performed a secondary visual or auditory task, with varying levels of load. Following a retention period, they adjusted a coloured probe to match either the motion direction or orientation of stimuli with the same colour in the memory array. This allowed us to examine the effects of an attention-demanding task performed during maintenance on precision of recall on the concurrent working memory task. Systematic increase in attention load during maintenance resulted in a significant decrease in overall working memory performance. Changes in overall performance were specifically accompanied by an increase in feature misbinding errors: erroneous reporting of nontarget motion or orientation. Thus in trials where attention resources were taxed, participants were more likely to respond with nontarget values rather than simply making random responses. Our findings suggest that resources used during attention-demanding visual or auditory tasks also contribute to maintaining feature-bound representations in visual working memory-but not necessarily other aspects of working memory. PMID:24266343

  7. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is required for oocyte maturation and female fertility in mice.

    PubMed

    Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Lalioti, Maria D; Aydiner, Fulya; Sasson, Isaac; Ilbay, Orkan; Sakkas, Denny; Lowther, Katie M; Mehlmann, Lisa M; Seli, Emre

    2012-08-15

    Gene expression during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis up to zygotic genome activation requires translational activation of maternally-derived mRNAs. EPAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein] is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein during this period in Xenopus, mouse and human. In Xenopus oocytes, ePAB stabilizes maternal mRNAs and promotes their translation. To assess the role of EPAB in mammalian reproduction, we generated Epab-knockout mice. Although Epab(-/-) males and Epab(+/-) of both sexes were fertile, Epab(-/-) female mice were infertile, and could not generate embryos or mature oocytes in vivo or in vitro. Epab(-/-) oocytes failed to achieve translational activation of maternally-stored mRNAs upon stimulation of oocyte maturation, including Ccnb1 (cyclin B1) and Dazl (deleted in azoospermia-like) mRNAs. Microinjection of Epab mRNA into Epab(-/-) germinal vesicle stage oocytes did not rescue maturation, suggesting that EPAB is also required for earlier stages of oogenesis. In addition, late antral follicles in the ovaries of Epab(-/-) mice exhibited impaired cumulus expansion, and a 8-fold decrease in ovulation, associated with a significant down-regulation of mRNAs encoding the EGF (epidermal growth factor)-like growth factors Areg (amphiregulin), Ereg (epiregulin) and Btc (betacellulin), and their downstream regulators, Ptgs2 (prostaglandin synthase 2), Has2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and Tnfaip6 (tumour necrosis factor α-induced protein 6). The findings from the present study indicate that EPAB is necessary for oogenesis, folliculogenesis and female fertility in mice. PMID:22621333

  8. Embryonic poly(A)-binding protein (EPAB) is required for oocyte maturation and female fertility in mice

    PubMed Central

    Guzeloglu-Kayisli, Ozlem; Lalioti, Maria D.; Aydiner, Fulya; Sasson, Isaac; Ilbay, Orkan; Sakkas, Denny; Lowther, Katie M.; Mehlmann, Lisa M.; Seli, Emre

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression during oocyte maturation and early embryogenesis up to zygotic genome activation requires translational activation of maternally-derived mRNAs. EPAB [embryonic poly(A)-binding protein] is the predominant poly(A)-binding protein during this period in Xenopus, mouse and human. In Xenopus oocytes, ePAB stabilizes maternal mRNAs and promotes their translation. To assess the role of EPAB in mammalian reproduction, we generated Epab-knockout mice. Although Epab−/− males and Epab+/− of both sexes were fertile, Epab−/− female mice were infertile, and could not generate embryos or mature oocytes in vivo or in vitro. Epab−/− oocytes failed to achieve translational activation of maternally-stored mRNAs upon stimulation of oocyte maturation, including Ccnb1 (cyclin B1) and Dazl (deleted in azoospermia-like) mRNAs. Microinjection of Epab mRNA into Epab−/− germinal vesicle stage oocytes did not rescue maturation, suggesting that EPAB is also required for earlier stages of oogenesis. In addition, late antral follicles in the ovaries of Epab−/− mice exhibited impaired cumulus expansion, and a 8-fold decrease in ovulation, associated with a significant down-regulation of mRNAs encoding the EGF (epidermal growth factor)-like growth factors Areg (amphiregulin), Ereg (epiregulin) and Btc (betacellulin), and their downstream regulators, Ptgs2 (prostaglandin synthase 2), Has2 (hyaluronan synthase 2) and Tnfaip6 (tumour necrosis factor α-induced protein 6). The findings from the present study indicate that EPAB is necessary for oogenesis, folliculogenesis and female fertility in mice. PMID:22621333

  9. Identification of RNA Binding Proteins Associated with Dengue Virus RNA in Infected Cells Reveals Temporally Distinct Host Factor Requirements

    PubMed Central

    Viktorovskaya, Olga V.; Greco, Todd M.; Cristea, Ileana M.; Thompson, Sunnie R.

    2016-01-01

    Background There are currently no vaccines or antivirals available for dengue virus infection, which can cause dengue hemorrhagic fever and death. A better understanding of the host pathogen interaction is required to develop effective therapies to treat DENV. In particular, very little is known about how cellular RNA binding proteins interact with viral RNAs. RNAs within cells are not naked; rather they are coated with proteins that affect localization, stability, translation and (for viruses) replication. Methodology/Principal Findings Seventy-nine novel RNA binding proteins for dengue virus (DENV) were identified by cross-linking proteins to dengue viral RNA during a live infection in human cells. These cellular proteins were specific and distinct from those previously identified for poliovirus, suggesting a specialized role for these factors in DENV amplification. Knockdown of these proteins demonstrated their function as viral host factors, with evidence for some factors acting early, while others late in infection. Their requirement by DENV for efficient amplification is likely specific, since protein knockdown did not impair the cell fitness for viral amplification of an unrelated virus. The protein abundances of these host factors were not significantly altered during DENV infection, suggesting their interaction with DENV RNA was due to specific recruitment mechanisms. However, at the global proteome level, DENV altered the abundances of proteins in particular classes, including transporter proteins, which were down regulated, and proteins in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which were up regulated. Conclusions/Significance The method for identification of host factors described here is robust and broadly applicable to all RNA viruses, providing an avenue to determine the conserved or distinct mechanisms through which diverse viruses manage the viral RNA within cells. This study significantly increases the number of cellular factors known to interact with

  10. STUbL-mediated degradation of the transcription factor MATα2 requires degradation elements that coincide with corepressor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Christopher M.; Hochstrasser, Mark

    2015-01-01

    The yeast transcription factor MATα2 (α2) is a short-lived protein known to be ubiquitylated by two distinct pathways, one involving the ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) Ubc6 and Ubc7 and the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Doa10 and the other operating with the E2 Ubc4 and the heterodimeric E3 Slx5/Slx8. Although Slx5/Slx8 is a small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO)-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL), it does not require SUMO to target α2 but instead directly recognizes α2. Little is known about the α2 determinants required for its Ubc4- and STUbL-mediated degradation or how these determinants substitute for SUMO in recognition by the STUbL pathway. We describe two distinct degradation elements within α2, both of which are necessary for α2 recognition specifically by the Ubc4 pathway. Slx5/Slx8 can directly ubiquitylate a C-terminal fragment of α2, and mutating one of the degradation elements impairs this ubiquitylation. Surprisingly, both degradation elements identified here overlap specific interaction sites for α2 corepressors: the Mcm1 interaction site in the central α2 linker and the Ssn6 (Cyc8) binding site in the α2 homeodomain. We propose that competitive binding to α2 by the ubiquitylation machinery and α2 cofactors is balanced so that α2 can function in transcription repression yet be short lived enough to allow cell-type switching. PMID:26246605

  11. Mutational Dissection of Telomeric DNA Binding Requirements of G4 Resolvase 1 Shows that G4-Structure and Certain 3'-Tail Sequences Are Sufficient for Tight and Complete Binding.

    PubMed

    Smaldino, Philip J; Routh, Eric D; Kim, Jung H; Giri, Banabihari; Creacy, Steven D; Hantgan, Roy R; Akman, Steven A; Vaughn, James P

    2015-01-01

    Ends of human chromosomes consist of the six nucleotide repeat d[pTTAGGG]n known as telomeric DNA, which protects chromosomes. We have previously shown that the DHX36 gene product, G4 Resolvase 1 (G4R1), binds parallel G-quadruplex (G4) DNA with an unusually tight apparent Kd. Recent work associates G4R1 with the telomerase holoenzyme, which may allow it to access telomeric G4-DNA. Here we show that G4R1 can tightly bind telomeric G4-DNA, and in the context of the telomeric sequence, we determine length, sequence, and structural requirements sufficient for tight G4R1 telomeric binding. Specifically, G4R1 binds telomeric DNA in the K+-induced "3+1" G4-topology with an apparent Kd = 10 ± 1.9 pM, a value similar as previously found for binding to unimolecular parallel G4-DNA. G4R1 binds to the Na+-induced "2+2" basket G4-structure formed by the same DNA sequence with an apparent Kd = 71 ± 2.2 pM. While the minimal G4-structure is not sufficient for G4R1 binding, a 5' G4-structure with a 3' unstructured tail containing a guanine flanked by adenine(s) is sufficient for maximal binding. Mutations directed to disrupt G4-structure similarly disrupt G4R1 binding; secondary mutations that restore G4-structure also restore G4R1 binding. We present a model showing that a replication fork disrupting a T-loop could create a 5' quadruplex with an opened 3'tail structure that is recognized by G4R1. PMID:26172836

  12. Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-MAP kinase. Durable type II inhibitors that do not require binding into the canonical ATP hinge region

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Yu Mi; Clare, Michael; Ensinger, Carol L.; Hood, Molly M.; Lord, John W.; Lu, Wei-Ping; Miller, David F.; Patt, William C.; Smith, Bryan D.; Vogeti, Lakshminarayana; Kaufman, Michael D.; Petillo, Peter A.; Wise, Scott C.; Abendroth, Jan; Chun, Lawrence; Clark, Robin; Feese, Michael; Kim, Hidong; Stewart, Lance; Flynn, Daniel L.

    2012-01-20

    Switch control pocket inhibitors of p38-alpha kinase are described. Durable type II inhibitors were designed which bind to arginines (Arg67 or Arg70) that function as key residues for mediating phospho-threonine 180 dependant conformational fluxing of p38-alpha from an inactive type II state to an active type I state. Binding to Arg70 in particular led to potent inhibitors, exemplified by DP-802, which also exhibited high kinase selectivity. Binding to Arg70 obviated the requirement for binding into the ATP Hinge region. X-ray crystallography revealed that DP-802 and analogs induce an enhanced type II conformation upon binding to either the unphosphorylated or the doubly phosphorylated form of p38-alpha kinase.

  13. An amino-terminal domain of Enterococcus faecalis aggregation substance is required for aggregation, bacterial internalization by epithelial cells and binding to lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Waters, Christopher M; Hirt, Helmut; McCormick, John K; Schlievert, Patrick M; Wells, Carol L; Dunny, G M

    2004-05-01

    Aggregation substance (AS), a plasmid-encoded surface protein of Enterococcus faecalis, plays important roles in virulence and antibiotic resistance transfer. Previous studies have suggested that AS-mediated aggregation of enterococcal cells could involve the binding of this protein to cell wall lipoteichoic acid (LTA). Here, a method to purify an undegraded form of Asc10, the AS of the plasmid pCF10, is described. Using this purified protein, direct binding of Asc10 to purified E. faecalis LTA was demonstrated. Equivalent binding of Asc10 to LTA purified from INY3000, an E. faecalis strain that is incapable of aggregation, was also observed. Surprisingly, mutations in a previously identified aggregation domain from amino acids 473 to 683 that abolished aggregation had no effect on LTA binding. In frame deletion analysis of Asc10 was used to identify a second aggregation domain located in the N-terminus of the protein from amino acids 156 to 358. A purified Asc10 mutant protein lacking this domain showed reduced LTA binding, while a purified N-terminal fragment from amino acids 44-331 had high LTA binding. Like the previously described aggregation domain, the newly identified Asc10((156-358)) aggregation domain was also required for efficient internalization of E. faecalis into HT-29 enterocytes. Thus, Asc10 possess two distinct domains required for aggregation and eukaryotic cell internalization: an N-terminal domain that promotes binding to LTA and a second domain located near the middle of the protein. PMID:15130132

  14. CREB Binding Protein (CBP) Activation Is Required for Luteinizing Hormone Beta Expression and Normal Fertility in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ryan S.; Wolfe, Andrew; He, Ling; Radovick, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is dependent on gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GNRH)-stimulated synthesis and secretion of luteinizing hormone (LH) from the pituitary gonadotroph. While the transcriptional coactivator CREB binding protein (CBP) is known to interact with Egr-1, the major mediator of GNRH action on the Lhb gene, the role of CBP in Lhb gene expression has yet to be characterized. We show that in the LβT2 gonadotroph cell line, overexpression of CBP augmented the response to GNRH and that knockdown of CBP eliminated GNRH responsiveness. While GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 increased the interaction with Egr-1 on the Lhb promoter, loss of this phosphorylation site eliminated GNRH-mediated Lhb expression in LβT2 cells. In vivo, loss of CBP phosphorylation at Ser436 rendered female mice subfertile. S436A knock-in mice had disrupted estrous cyclicity and reduced responsiveness to GNRH. Our results show that GNRH-mediated phosphorylation of CBP at Ser436 is required for Egr-1 to activate Lhb expression and is a requirement for normal fertility in female mice. As CBP can be phosphorylated by other factors, such as insulin, our studies suggest that CBP may act as a key regulator of Lhb expression in the gonadotroph by integrating homeostatic information with GNRH signaling. PMID:22508984

  15. Cell surface localization and processing of the ComG proteins, required for DNA binding during transformation of Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y S; Breidt, F; Dubnau, D

    1998-08-01

    The comG operon of Bacillus subtilis encodes seven proteins essential for the binding of transforming DNA to the competent cell surface. We have explored the processing of the ComG proteins and the cellular localization of six of them. All of the proteins were found to be membrane associated. The four proteins with N-terminal sequence motifs typical of type 4 pre-pilins (ComGC, GD, GE and GG) are processed by a pathway that requires the product of comC, also an essential competence gene. The unprocessed forms of ComGC and GD behave like integral membrane proteins. Pre-ComGG differs from pre-ComGC and pre-ComGD, in that it is accessible to proteolysis only from the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and at least a portion of it behaves like a peripheral membrane protein. The mature forms of these proteins are translocated to the outer face of the membrane and are liberated when peptidoglycan is hydrolysed by lysozyme or mutanolysin. ComGG exists in part as a disulphide-cross-linked homodimer in vivo. ComGC was found to possess an intramolecular disulphide bond. The previously identified homodimer form of this protein is not stabilized by disulphide bond formation. ComGF behaves as an integral membrane protein, while ComGA, a putative ATPase, is located on the inner face of the membrane as a peripheral membrane protein. Possible roles of the ComG proteins in DNA binding to the competent cell surface are discussed in the light of these and other results. PMID:9723928

  16. The calmodulin-binding transcription activator CAMTA1 is required for long-term memory formation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M M; Bengtson, C Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-06-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by calcium/calmodulin signaling in the nucleus. Recent studies have drawn attention to a new family of transcriptional regulators, the so-called calmodulin-binding transcription activator (CAMTA) proteins. CAMTAs are expressed at particularly high levels in the mouse and human brain, and we reasoned that, as calmodulin-binding transcription factors, CAMTAs may regulate the formation of long-term memory by coupling synaptic activity and calcium/calmodulin signaling to memory-related transcriptional responses. This hypothesis is supported by genetic studies that reported a correlation between Camta gene polymorphisms or mutations and cognitive capability in humans. Here, we show that acute knockdown of CAMTA1, but not CAMTA2, in the hippocampus of adult mice results in impaired performance in two memory tests, contextual fear conditioning and object-place recognition test. Short-term memory and neuronal morphology were not affected by CAMTA knockdown. Gene expression profiling in the hippocampus of control and CAMTA knockdown mice revealed a number of putative CAMTA1 target genes related to synaptic transmission and neuronal excitability. Patch clamp recordings in organotypic hippocampal slice cultures provided further evidence for CAMTA1-dependent changes in electrophysiological properties. In summary, our study provides experimental evidence that confirms previous human genetic studies and establishes CAMTA1 as a regulator of long-term memory formation. PMID:27194798

  17. RNA binding by the novel helical domain of the influenza virus NS1 protein requires its dimer structure and a small number of specific basic amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W; Riedel, K; Lynch, P; Chien, C Y; Montelione, G T; Krug, R M

    1999-01-01

    The RNA-binding/dimerization domain of the NS1 protein of influenza A virus (73 amino acids in length) exhibits a novel dimeric six-helical fold. It is not known how this domain binds to its specific RNA targets, one of which is double-stranded RNA. To elucidate the mode of RNA binding, we introduced single alanine replacements into the NS1 RNA-binding domain at specific positions in the three-dimensional structure. Our results indicate that the dimer structure is essential for RNA binding, because any alanine replacement that causes disruption of the dimer also leads to the loss of RNA-binding activity. Surprisingly, the arginine side chain at position 38, which is in the second helix of each monomer, is the only amino-acid side chain that is absolutely required only for RNA binding and not for dimerization, indicating that this side chain probably interacts directly with the RNA target. This interaction is primarily electrostatic, because replacement of this arginine with lysine had no effect on RNA binding. A second basic amino acid, the lysine at position 41, which is also in helix 2, makes a strong contribution to the affinity of binding. We conclude that helix 2 and helix 2', which are antiparallel and next to each other in the dimer conformation, constitute the interaction face between the NS1 RNA-binding domain and its RNA targets, and that the arginine side chain at position 38 and possibly the lysine side chain at position 41 in each of these antiparallel helices contact the phosphate backbone of the RNA target. PMID:10024172

  18. Interaction of the TGGCA-binding protein with upstream sequences is required for efficient transcription of mouse mammary tumor virus.

    PubMed Central

    Miksicek, R; Borgmeyer, U; Nowock, J

    1987-01-01

    A high-affinity binding site for the TGGCA-binding protein, also known as nuclear factor I, has previously been shown to reside within the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat. We have introduced mutations into this binding site to test the importance of this ubiquitous nuclear protein in MMTV transcription. Mutations which abolish the binding of the TGGCA protein in vitro are shown to impair strongly glucocorticoid-induced transcription from this promoter in vivo. These data demonstrate that the TGGCA-binding protein is a multifunctional DNA-binding protein, capable of serving a transcriptional role in the case of MMTV, in addition to its known involvement in the replication of adenovirus. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:3038519

  19. The tRNA-binding moiety in GCN2 contains a dimerization domain that interacts with the kinase domain and is required for tRNA binding and kinase activation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hongfang; Dong, Jinsheng; Hu, Cuihua; Francklyn, Christopher S.; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2001-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates translation of GCN4 mRNA in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 is activated by binding of uncharged tRNA to a domain related to histidyl-tRNA synthetase (HisRS). The HisRS-like region contains two dimerization domains (HisRS-N and HisRS-C) required for GCN2 function in vivo but dispensable for dimerization by full-length GCN2. Residues corresponding to amino acids at the dimer interface of Escherichia coli HisRS were required for dimerization of recombinant HisRS-N and for tRNA binding by full-length GCN2, suggesting that HisRS-N dimerization promotes tRNA binding and kinase activation. HisRS-N also interacted with the protein kinase (PK) domain, and a deletion impairing this interaction destroyed GCN2 function without reducing tRNA binding; thus, HisRS-N–PK interaction appears to stimulate PK function. The C-terminal domain of GCN2 (C-term) interacted with the PK domain in a manner disrupted by an activating PK mutation (E803V). These results suggest that the C-term is an autoinhibitory domain, counteracted by tRNA binding. We conclude that multiple domain interactions, positive and negative, mediate the activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11250908

  20. TNPO3 Is Required for HIV-1 Replication after Nuclear Import but prior to Integration and Binds the HIV-1 Core

    PubMed Central

    Valle-Casuso, Jose Carlos; Di Nunzio, Francesca; Yang, Yang; Reszka, Natalia; Lienlaf, Maritza; Arhel, Nathalie; Perez, Patricio; Brass, Abraham L.

    2012-01-01

    TNPO3 is a nuclear importer required for HIV-1 infection. Here, we show that depletion of TNPO3 leads to an HIV-1 block after nuclear import but prior to integration. To investigate the mechanistic requirement of TNPO3 in HIV-1 infection, we tested the binding of TNPO3 to the HIV-1 core and found that TNPO3 binds to the HIV-1 core. Overall, this work suggests that TNPO3 interacts with the incoming HIV-1 core in the cytoplasm to assist a process that is important for HIV-1 infection after nuclear import. PMID:22398280

  1. Phosphorylation of the C-terminal tail of proteasome subunit α7 is required for binding of the proteasome quality control factor Ecm29

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Prashant S.; Suppahia, Anjana; Capalla, Xavier; Ondracek, Alex; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2016-01-01

    The proteasome degrades many short-lived proteins that are labeled with an ubiquitin chain. The identification of phosphorylation sites on the proteasome subunits suggests that degradation of these substrates can also be regulated at the proteasome. In yeast and humans, the unstructured C-terminal region of α7 contains an acidic patch with serine residues that are phosphorylated. Although these were identified more than a decade ago, the molecular implications of α7 phosphorylation have remained unknown. Here, we showed that yeast Ecm29, a protein involved in proteasome quality control, requires the phosphorylated tail of α7 for its association with proteasomes. This is the first example of proteasome phosphorylation dependent binding of a proteasome regulatory factor. Ecm29 is known to inhibit proteasomes and is often found enriched on mutant proteasomes. We showed that the ability of Ecm29 to bind to mutant proteasomes requires the α7 tail binding site, besides a previously characterized Rpt5 binding site. The need for these two binding sites, which are on different proteasome subcomplexes, explains the specificity of Ecm29 for proteasome holoenzymes. We propose that alterations in the relative position of these two sites in different conformations of the proteasome provides Ecm29 the ability to preferentially bind specific proteasome conformations. PMID:27302526

  2. The cleverSuite approach for protein characterization: predictions of structural properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities

    PubMed Central

    Klus, Petr; Bolognesi, Benedetta; Agostini, Federico; Marchese, Domenica; Zanzoni, Andreas; Tartaglia, Gian Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: The recent shift towards high-throughput screening is posing new challenges for the interpretation of experimental results. Here we propose the cleverSuite approach for large-scale characterization of protein groups. Description: The central part of the cleverSuite is the cleverMachine (CM), an algorithm that performs statistics on protein sequences by comparing their physico-chemical propensities. The second element is called cleverClassifier and builds on top of the models generated by the CM to allow classification of new datasets. Results: We applied the cleverSuite to predict secondary structure properties, solubility, chaperone requirements and RNA-binding abilities. Using cross-validation and independent datasets, the cleverSuite reproduces experimental findings with great accuracy and provides models that can be used for future investigations. Availability: The intuitive interface for dataset exploration, analysis and prediction is available at http://s.tartaglialab.com/clever_suite. Contact: gian.tartaglia@crg.es Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24493033

  3. Methyl-CpG-binding domain protein MBD7 is required for active DNA demethylation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunlei; Dong, Xiaomei; Jin, Dan; Zhao, Yusheng; Xie, Shaojun; Li, Xiaojie; He, Xinjian; Lang, Zhaobo; Lai, Jinsheng; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Gong, Zhizhong

    2015-03-01

    Although researchers have established that DNA methylation and active demethylation are dynamically regulated in plant cells, the molecular mechanism for the regulation of active DNA demethylation is not well understood. By using an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) line expressing the Promoter RESPONSIVE TO DEHYDRATION 29A:LUCIFERASE (ProRD29A:LUC) and Promoter cauliflower mosaic virus 35S:NEOMYCIN PHOSPHOTRANSFERASE II (Pro35S:NPTII) transgenes, we isolated an mbd7 (for methyl-CpG-binding domain protein7) mutant. The mbd7 mutation causes an inactivation of the Pro35S:NPTII transgene but does not affect the expression of the ProRD29A:LUC transgene. The silencing of the Pro35S:NPTII reporter gene is associated with DNA hypermethylation of the reporter gene. MBD7 interacts physically with REPRESSOR OF SILENCING5/INCREASED DNA METHYLATION2, a protein in the small heat shock protein family. MBD7 prefers to target the genomic loci with high densities of DNA methylation around chromocenters. The Gypsy-type long terminal repeat retrotransposons mainly distributed around chromocenters are most affected by mbd7 in all transposons. Our results suggest that MBD7 is required for active DNA demethylation and antisilencing of the genomic loci with high densities of DNA methylation in Arabidopsis. PMID:25593350

  4. cAMP response element-binding protein is required for stress but not cocaine-induced reinstatement.

    PubMed

    Kreibich, Arati S; Blendy, Julie A

    2004-07-28

    Reinstatement of previously extinguished conditioned place preference (CPP) is precipitated by stress or drug exposure. Here, we show that acute exposure to forced swim stress (FS), in a context distinct from conditioning, induces reinstatement of cocaine CPP in wild-type mice. This behavior is accompanied by a pattern of phosphorylated cAMP response element-binding protein (pCREB) activation in discrete brain regions that is distinct from the pattern observed after cocaine-induced reinstatement. For example, previous cocaine conditioning increases pCREB levels in the amygdala, and acute exposure to FS, but not to cocaine, further augments these changes. In contrast, previous cocaine conditioning does not alter levels of pCREB in the nucleus accumbens, but acute exposure to FS increases pCREB levels in this region on reinstatement day. Furthermore, to determine whether these alterations of CREB are necessary in FS or cocaine-induced reinstatement, we examined the effect of these stimuli on reinstatement behavior in mice deficient in alpha and Delta isoforms of CREB. The CREB(alphaDelta) mutant mice show deficits in FS-induced reinstatement of conditioned place preference. In contrast, they show robust cocaine-induced reinstatement. This deficit in stress but not drug-induced reinstatement indicates a specific requirement for CREB in stress-induced behavioral responses to drugs of abuse. PMID:15282271

  5. Targeting bacterial membranes: NMR spectroscopy characterization of substrate recognition and binding requirements of D-arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Airoldi, Cristina; Sommaruga, Silvia; Merlo, Silvia; Sperandeo, Paola; Cipolla, Laura; Polissi, Alessandra; Nicotra, Francesco

    2010-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an essential component of the outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria and consists of three elements: lipid A, the core oligosaccharide, and the O-antigen. The inner-core region is highly conserved and contains at least one residue of 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonate (Kdo). Arabinose-5-phosphate isomerase (API) is an aldo-keto isomerase catalyzing the reversible isomerization of D-ribulose-5-phosphate (Ru5P) to D-arabinose-5-phosphate (A5P), the first step of Kdo biosynthesis. By exploiting saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR spectroscopy, the structural requirements necessary for API substrate recognition and binding were identified, with the aim of designing new API inhibitors. In addition, simple experimental conditions for the STD experiments to perform a fast, robust, and efficient screening of small libraries of potential API inhibitors, allowing the identification of new potential leads, were set up. Due to the essential role of API enzymes in LPS biosynthesis and gram-negative bacteria survival, by exploiting these data, a new generation of potent antibacterial drugs could be developed. PMID:20039350

  6. CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α is required for hepatic outgrowth via the p53 pathway in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hao; Wen, Bin; Liu, Xiaohui; Gao, Ce; Yang, Ruimeng; Wang, Luxiang; Chen, Saijuan; Chen, Zhu; de The, Hugues; Zhou, Jun; Zhu, Jun

    2015-01-01

    CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/ebpα) is a transcription factor that plays important roles in the regulation of hepatogenesis, adipogenesis and hematopoiesis. Disruption of the C/EBPα gene in mice leads to disturbed liver architecture and neonatal death due to hypoglycemia. However, the precise stages of liver development affected by C/ebpα loss are poorly studied. Using the zebrafish embryo as a model organism, we show that inactivation of the cebpa gene by TALENs results in a small liver phenotype. Further studies reveal that C/ebpα is distinctively required for hepatic outgrowth but not for hepatoblast specification. Lack of C/ebpα leads to enhanced hepatic cell proliferation and subsequent increased cell apoptosis. Additional loss of p53 can largely rescue the hepatic defect in cebpa mutants, suggesting that C/ebpα plays a role in liver growth regulation via the p53 pathway. Thus, our findings for the first time demonstrate a stage-specific role for C/ebpα during liver organogenesis. PMID:26511037

  7. ATP-binding cassette transporter G26 is required for male fertility and pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Quilichini, Teagen D; Friedmann, Michael C; Samuels, A Lacey; Douglas, Carl J

    2010-10-01

    The highly resistant biopolymer, sporopollenin, gives the outer wall (exine) of spores and pollen grains their unparalleled strength, shielding these structures from terrestrial stresses. Despite a limited understanding of the composition of sporopollenin, it appears that the synthesis of sporopollenin occurs in the tapetum and requires the transport of one or more sporopollenin constituents to the surface of developing microspores. Here, we describe ABCG26, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily, which is required for pollen exine formation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). abcg26 mutants are severely reduced in fertility, with most siliques failing to produce seeds by self-fertilization and mature anthers failing to release pollen. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed an absence of an exine wall on abcg26-1 mutant microspores. Phenotypic abnormalities in pollen wall formation were first apparent in early uninucleate microspores as a lack of exine formation and sporopollenin deposition. Additionally, the highest levels of ABCG26 mRNA were in the tapetum, during early pollen wall formation, sporopollenin biosynthesis, and sporopollenin deposition. Accumulations resembling the trilamellar lipidic coils in the abcg11 and abcg12 mutants defective in cuticular wax export were observed in the anther locules of abcg26 mutants. A yellow fluorescent protein-ABCG26 protein was localized to the endoplasmic reticulum and plasma membrane. Our results show that ABCG26 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development and are consistent with a model by which ABCG26 transports sporopollenin precursors across the tapetum plasma membrane into the locule for polymerization on developing microspore walls. PMID:20732973

  8. Binding Procurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Vaidyanathan, Hari

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the use of the binding procurement process in purchasing Aerospace Flight Battery Systems. NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) requested NASA Aerospace Flight Battery Systems Working Group to develop a set of guideline requirements document for Binding Procurement Contracts.

  9. Sequence Requirements for the Assembly of Simian Virus 40 T Antigen and the T-Antigen Origin Binding Domain on the Viral Core Origin of Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Henry Y.; Barbaro, Brett A.; Joo, Woo S.; Prack, Andrea E.; Sreekumar, K. R.; Bullock, Peter A.

    1999-01-01

    The regions of the simian virus 40 (SV40) core origin that are required for stable assembly of virally encoded T antigen (T-ag) and the T-ag origin binding domain (T-ag-obd131–260) have been determined. Binding of the purified T-ag-obd131–260 is mediated by interactions with the central region of the core origin, site II. In contrast, T-ag binding and hexamer assembly requires a larger region of the core origin that includes both site II and an additional fragment of DNA that may be positioned on either side of site II. These studies indicate that in the context of T-ag, the origin binding domain can engage the pentanucleotides in site II only if a second region of T-ag interacts with one of the flanking sequences. The requirements for T-ag double-hexamer assembly are complex; the nucleotide cofactor present in the reaction modulates the sequence requirements for oligomerization. Nevertheless, these experiments provide additional evidence that only a subset of the SV40 core origin is required for assembly of T-ag double hexamers. PMID:10438844

  10. Heterodimerization of the transcription factors E2F-1 and DP-1 is required for binding to the adenovirus E4 (ORF6/7) protein.

    PubMed Central

    Helin, K; Harlow, E

    1994-01-01

    Adenovirus infection leads to E1A-dependent activation of the transcription factor E2F. E2F has recently been identified in complexes with cellular proteins such as the retinoblastoma protein (pRB) and the two pRB family members p107 and p130. E1A dissociates E2F from these cellular proteins, and another viral protein, E4 (ORF6/7), can bind to E2F. The binding of E4 to E2F induces the formation of a stable DNA-binding complex containing the two proteins, and stimulation of the adenovirus E2 early promoter can occur. Recent studies have shown that E2F is the combined activity of several proteins, and we demonstrate here that heterodimerization of two of these proteins, E2F-1 and DP-1, is required for stable binding to E4. This complex is formed independently of DNA binding and requires the C-terminal 20 amino acids of E4. Furthermore, the binding is dependent on a region of E2F-1 between amino acids 284 and 358. This region of E2F-1 is conserved in E2F-2 and E2F-3, and deletion of this region drastically reduces the transcriptional activity of the molecule without affecting DP-1 binding, suggesting that this region of the E2F transcription factors is involved in regulating their activity. Our experiments also demonstrate that pRB binding to the E2F-1/DP-1 heterodimer prevents the formation of an E2F-1/DP-1/E4 complex. Images PMID:8035503

  11. The heparin binding domain of vitronectin is the region that is required to enhance insulin-like growth factor-I signaling.

    PubMed

    Maile, Laura A; Busby, Walker H; Sitko, Kevin; Capps, Byron E; Sergent, Tiffany; Badley-Clarke, Jane; Ling, Yan; Clemmons, David R

    2006-04-01

    We have shown that vitronectin (Vn) binding to a cysteine loop sequence within the extracellular domain of the beta3-subunit (amino acids 177-184) of alphaVbeta3 is required for the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I signaling. When Vn binding to this sequence is blocked, IGF-I signaling in smooth muscle cells is impaired. Because this binding site is distinct from the site on beta3 to which the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence of extracellular matrix ligands bind (amino acids 107-171), we hypothesized that the region of Vn that binds to the cysteine loop on beta3 is distinct from the region that contains the Arg-Gly-Asp sequence. The results presented in this study demonstrate that this heparin binding domain (HBD) is the region of Vn that binds to the cysteine loop region of beta3 and that this region is sufficient to mediate the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I signaling. We provide evidence that binding of the HBD of Vn to alphaVbeta3 has direct effects on the activation state of beta3 as measured by beta3 phosphorylation. The increase in beta3 phosphorylation associated with exposure of cells to this HBD is associated with enhanced phosphorylation of the adaptor protein Src homology 2 domain-containing transforming protein C and enhanced activation MAPK, a downstream mediator of IGF-I signaling. We conclude that the interaction of the HBD of Vn binding to the cysteine loop sequence of beta3 is necessary and sufficient for the positive effects of Vn on IGF-I-mediated effects in smooth muscle cells. PMID:16322097

  12. Maximal stimulation of meiotic recombination by a yeast transcription factor requires the transcription activation domain and a DNA-binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkpatrick, D T; Fan, Q; Petes, T D

    1999-01-01

    The DNA sequences located upstream of the yeast HIS4 represent a very strong meiotic recombination hotspot. Although the activity of this hotspot requires the transcription activator Rap1p, the level of HIS4 transcription is not directly related to the level of recombination. We find that the recombination-stimulating activity of Rap1p requires the transcription activation domain of the protein. We show that a hybrid protein with the Gal4p DNA-binding domain and the Rap1p activation domain can stimulate recombination in a strain in which Gal4p-binding sites are inserted upstream of HIS4. In addition, we find recombination hotspot activity associated with the Gal4p DNA-binding sites that is independent of known transcription factors. We suggest that yeast cells have two types of recombination hotspots, alpha (transcription factor dependent) and beta (transcription factor independent). PMID:10224246

  13. Transcriptional enhancer activity of hr5 requires dual-palindrome half sites that mediate binding of a dimeric form of the baculovirus transregulator IE1.

    PubMed

    Rodems, S M; Friesen, P D

    1995-09-01

    The hr5 enhancer element stimulates early viral transcription and may function as an origin of DNA replication for Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus (AcMNPV). The smallest functional unit of hr5 is a 28-bp repeat consisting of an imperfect palindrome (28-mer). To identify essential sequences and examine the molecular basis of hr5 activity, the effects of site-directed mutations on transcriptional enhancement by the 28-mer and binding of the AcMNPV transregulator IE1 were investigated. In transfection assays and infections with AcMNPV recombinants, activation of a basal viral promoter required sequences within both halves of the 28-mer. Basal promoter activation also required a critical spacing between these half sites. Mobility shift assays indicated that hr5 probes containing a single 28-mer were bound by in vitro-synthesized IE1. Competition assays using DNA fragments that contained mutated 28-mers demonstrated that both half sites were required for optimal binding of IE1. Similar assays using mutated 28-mer DNAs and nuclear extracts indicated that the relative affinity with which AcMNPV infection-specific proteins bound to the 28-mer was similar to that of in vitro-synthesized IE1. By using a combination of DNA binding and antibody supershift assays, it was demonstrated that IE1 binds to the 28-mer as a dimer. Collectively, these findings support a model in which symmetrical IE1 binding and simultaneous interaction with each half site are required for IE1-mediated transcriptional enhancement by hr5. Thus, sequence-specific binding may be one of the mechanisms by which IE1 directly or indirectly transregulates baculovirus gene expression. PMID:7636981

  14. Probing the ATP-binding site of P1 ParA: partition and repression have different requirements for ATP binding and hydrolysis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Emma; Bouet, Jean-Yves; Funnell, Barbara E.

    2001-01-01

    The ParA family of proteins is involved in partition of a variety of plasmid and bacterial chromosomes. P1 ParA plays two roles in partition: it acts as a repressor of the par operon and has an undefined yet indispensable role in P1 plasmid localization. We constructed seven mutations in three putative ATP-binding motifs of ParA. Three classes of phenotypes resulted, each represented by mutations in more than one motif. Three mutations created ‘super-repressors’, in which repressor activity was much stronger than in wild-type ParA, while the remainder damaged repressor activity. All mutations eliminated partition activities, but two showed a plasmid stability defect that was worse than that of a null mutation. Four mutant ParAs, two super-repressors and two weak repressors, were analyzed biochemically, and all exhibited damaged ATPase activity. The super-repressors bound site-specifically to the par operator sequence, and this activity was strongly stimulated by ATP and ADP. These results support the proposal that ATP binding is essential but hydrolysis is inhibitory for ParA’s repressor activity and suggest that ATP hydrolysis is essential for plasmid localization. PMID:11532954

  15. Cable pili and the 22-kilodalton adhesin are required for Burkholderia cenocepacia binding to and transmigration across the squamous epithelium.

    PubMed

    Urban, Teresa A; Goldberg, Joanna B; Forstner, Janet F; Sajjan, Umadevi S

    2005-09-01

    Burkholderia cenocepacia strains expressing both cable (Cbl) pili and the 22-kDa adhesin bind to cytokeratin 13 (CK13) strongly and invade squamous epithelium efficiently. It has not been established, however, whether the gene encoding the adhesin is located in the cbl operon or what specific contribution the adhesin and Cbl pili lend to binding and transmigration or invasion capacity of B. cenocepacia. By immunoscreening an expression library of B. cenocepacia isolate BC7, we identified a large gene (adhA) that encodes the 22-kDa adhesin. Isogenic mutants lacking expression of either Cbl pili (cblA or cblS mutants) or the adhesin (adhA mutant) were constructed to assess the individual role of Cbl pili and the adhesin in mediating B. cenocepacia binding to and transmigration across squamous epithelium. Relative to the parent strain, mutants of Cbl pili showed reduced binding (50%) to isolated CK13, while the adhesin mutant showed almost no binding (0 to 8%). Mutants lacking either cable pili or the adhesin were compromised in their ability to bind to and transmigrate across the squamous epithelium compared to the wild-type strain, although this deficiency was most pronounced in the adhA mutant. These results indicate that both Cbl pili and the 22-kDa adhesin are necessary for the optimal binding to CK13 and transmigration properties of B. cenocepacia. PMID:16113259

  16. Transcriptional activation requires protection of the TATA-binding protein Tbp1 by the ubiquitin-specific protease Ubp3.

    PubMed

    Chew, Boon Shang; Siew, Wee Leng; Xiao, Benjamin; Lehming, Norbert

    2010-11-01

    Tbp1, the TATA-binding protein, is essential for transcriptional activation, and Gal4 and Gcn4 are unable to fully activate transcription in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae TBP1E86D mutant strain. In the present study we have shown that the Tbp1E186D mutant protein is proteolytically instable, and we have isolated intragenic and extragenic suppressors of the transcription defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. The TBP1R6S mutation stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Furthermore, we found that the overexpression of the de-ubiquitinating enzyme Ubp3 (ubiquitin-specific protease 3) also stabilizes the Tbp1E186D mutant protein and suppresses of the defects of the TBP1E186D mutant strain. Importantly, the deletion of UBP3 and its cofactor BRE5 lead to increased degradation of wild-type Tbp1 protein and to defects in transcriptional activation by Gal4 and Gcn4. Purified GST (glutathione transferase)-Ubp3 reversed Tbp1 ubiquitination, and the deletion of UBP3 lead to the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated species of Tbp1 in a proteaseome-deficient genetic background, demonstrating that Ubp3 reverses ubiquitination of Tbp1 in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that Ubp3 was recruited to the GAL1 and HIS3 promoters upon the induction of the respective gene, indicating that protection of promoter-bound Tbp1 by Ubp3 is required for transcriptional activation. PMID:20738257

  17. The COMATOSE ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter Is Required for Full Fertility in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Footitt, Steven; Dietrich, Daniela; Fait, Aaron; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Holdsworth, Michael J.; Baker, Alison; Theodoulou, Frederica L.

    2007-01-01

    COMATOSE (CTS) encodes a peroxisomal ATP-binding cassette transporter required not only for β-oxidation of storage lipids during germination and establishment, but also for biosynthesis of jasmonic acid and conversion of indole butyric acid to indole acetic acid. cts mutants exhibited reduced fertilization, which was rescued by genetic complementation, but not by exogenous application of jasmonic acid or indole acetic acid. Reduced fertilization was also observed in thiolase (kat2-1) and peroxisomal acyl-Coenzyme A synthetase mutants (lacs6-1,lacs7-1), indicating a general role for β-oxidation in fertility. Genetic analysis revealed reduced male transmission of cts alleles and both cts pollen germination and tube growth in vitro were impaired in the absence of an exogenous carbon source. Aniline blue staining of pollinated pistils demonstrated that pollen tube growth was affected only when both parents bore the cts mutation, indicating that expression of CTS in either male or female tissues was sufficient to support pollen tube growth in vivo. Accordingly, abundant peroxisomes were detected in a range of maternal tissues. Although γ-aminobutyric acid levels were reduced in flowers of cts mutants, they were unchanged in kat2-1, suggesting that alterations in γ-aminobutyric acid catabolism do not contribute to the reduced fertility phenotype through altered pollen tube targeting. Taken together, our data support an important role for β-oxidation in fertility in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and suggest that this pathway could play a role in the mobilization of lipids in both pollen and female tissues. PMID:17468211

  18. The Interferon Consensus Sequence Binding Protein (Icsbp/Irf8) Is Required for Termination of Emergency Granulopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liping; Huang, Weiqi; Hjort, Elizabeth E; Bei, Ling; Platanias, Leonidas C; Eklund, Elizabeth A

    2016-02-19

    Emergency granulopoiesis occurs in response to infectious or inflammatory challenge and is a component of the innate immune response. Some molecular events involved in initiating emergency granulopoiesis are known, but termination of this process is less well defined. In this study, we found that the interferon consensus sequence binding protein (Icsbp/Irf8) was required to terminate emergency granulopoiesis. Icsbp is an interferon regulatory transcription factor with leukemia suppressor activity. Expression of Icsbp is decreased in chronic myeloid leukemia, and Icsbp(-/-) mice exhibit progressive granulocytosis with evolution to blast crisis, similar to the course of human chronic myeloid leukemia. In this study, we found aberrantly sustained granulocyte production in Icsbp(-/-) mice after stimulation of an emergency granulopoiesis response. Icsbp represses transcription of the genes encoding Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (Fap1) and growth arrest-specific 2 (Gas2) and activates genes encoding Fanconi C and F. After stimulation of emergency granulopoiesis, we found increased and sustained expression of Fap1 and Gas2 in bone marrow myeloid progenitor cells from Icsbp(-/-) mice in comparison with the wild type. This was associated with resistance to Fas-induced apoptosis and increased β-catenin activity in these cells. We also found that repeated episodes of emergency granulopoiesis accelerated progression to acute myeloid leukemia in Icsbp(-/-) mice. This was associated with impaired Fanconi C and F expression and increased sensitivity to DNA damage in bone marrow myeloid progenitors. Our results suggest that impaired Icsbp expression enhances leukemogenesis by deregulating processes that normally limit granulocyte expansion during the innate immune response. PMID:26683374

  19. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C

    2016-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression. PMID:26936655

  20. A conserved acidic patch in the Myb domain is required for activation of an endogenous target gene and for chromatin binding

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Emily Ray; Ko, Dennis; Chen, Carolyn; Lipsick, Joseph S

    2008-01-01

    The c-Myb protein is a transcriptional regulator initially identified by homology to the v-Myb oncoprotein, and has since been implicated in human cancer. The most highly conserved portion of the c-Myb protein is the DNA-binding domain which consists of three imperfect repeats. Many other proteins contain one or more Myb-related domains, including a number of proteins that do not bind directly to DNA. We performed a phylogenetic analysis of diverse classes of Myb-related domains and discovered a highly conserved patch of acidic residues common to all Myb-related domains. These acidic residues are positioned in the first of three alpha-helices within each of the three repeats that comprise the c-Myb DNA-binding domain. Interestingly, these conserved acidic residues are present on a surface of the protein which is distinct from that which binds to DNA. Alanine mutagenesis revealed that the acidic patch of the third c-Myb repeat is essential for transcriptional activity, but neither for nuclear localization nor DNA-binding. Instead, these acidic residues are required for efficient chromatin binding and interaction with the histone H4 N-terminal tail. PMID:18840288

  1. Stimulation of translation by human Unr requires cold shock domains 2 and 4, and correlates with poly(A) binding protein interaction

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Swagat; Anderson, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA binding protein Unr, which contains five cold shock domains, has several specific roles in post-transcriptional control of gene expression. It can act as an activator or inhibitor of translation initiation, promote mRNA turnover, or stabilise mRNA. Its role depends on the mRNA and other proteins to which it binds, which includes cytoplasmic poly(A) binding protein 1 (PABP1). Since PABP1 binds to all polyadenylated mRNAs, and is involved in translation initiation by interaction with eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G), we investigated whether Unr has a general role in translational control. We found that Unr strongly stimulates translation in vitro, and mutation of cold shock domains 2 or 4 inhibited its translation activity. The ability of Unr and its mutants to stimulate translation correlated with its ability to bind RNA, and to interact with PABP1. We found that Unr stimulated the binding of PABP1 to mRNA, and that Unr was required for the stable interaction of PABP1 and eIF4G in cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Unr reduced the overall level of cellular translation in cells, as well as that of cap-dependent and IRES-dependent reporters. These data describe a novel role for Unr in regulating cellular gene expression. PMID:26936655

  2. The red clover necrotic mosaic virus capsid protein N-terminal amino acids possess specific RNA binding activity and are required for stable virion assembly.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang-Ho; Sit, Tim L; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Lommel, Steven A

    2013-09-01

    The red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) bipartite RNA genome is packaged into two virion populations containing either RNA-1 and RNA-2 or multiple copies of RNA-2 only. To understand this distinctive packaging scheme, we investigated the RNA-binding properties of the RCNMV capsid protein (CP). Maltose binding protein-CP fusions exhibited the highest binding affinities for RNA probes containing the RNA-2 trans-activator or the 3' non-coding region from RNA-1. Other viral and non-viral RNA probes displayed CP binding but to a much lower degree. Deletion of the highly basic N-terminal 50 residues abolished CP binding to viral RNA transcripts. In planta studies of select CP deletion mutants within this N-terminal region revealed that it was indispensable for stable virion formation and the region spanning CP residues 5-15 is required for systemic movement. Thus, the N-terminal region of the CP is involved in both producing two virion populations due to its RNA binding properties and virion stability. PMID:23747688

  3. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells

    PubMed Central

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Hinnebusch, Alan G.

    2000-01-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the α-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052–2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn– phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn– phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Δ, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  4. Separate domains in GCN1 for binding protein kinase GCN2 and ribosomes are required for GCN2 activation in amino acid-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, E; Hinnebusch, A G

    2000-12-01

    GCN2 stimulates GCN4 translation in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating the alpha-subunit of translation initiation factor 2. GCN2 function in vivo requires the GCN1/GCN20 complex, which binds to the N-terminal domain of GCN2. A C-terminal segment of GCN1 (residues 2052-2428) was found to be necessary and sufficient for binding GCN2 in vivo and in vitro. Overexpression of this fragment in wild-type cells impaired association of GCN2 with native GCN1 and had a dominant Gcn(-) phenotype, dependent on Arg2259 in the GCN1 fragment. Substitution of Arg2259 with Ala in full-length GCN1 abolished complex formation with native GCN2 and destroyed GCN1 regulatory function. Consistently, the Gcn(-) phenotype of gcn1-R2259A, but not that of gcn1Delta, was suppressed by overexpressing GCN2. These findings prove that GCN2 binding to the C-terminal domain of GCN1, dependent on Arg2259, is required for high level GCN2 function in vivo. GCN1 expression conferred sensitivity to paromomycin in a manner dependent on its ribosome binding domain, supporting the idea that GCN1 binds near the ribosomal acceptor site to promote GCN2 activation by uncharged tRNA. PMID:11101534

  5. Characterization of the bacteriophage lambda excisionase (Xis) protein: the C-terminus is required for Xis-integrase cooperativity but not for DNA binding.

    PubMed Central

    Numrych, T E; Gumport, R I; Gardner, J F

    1992-01-01

    We have performed a mutational analysis of the xis gene of bacteriophage lambda. The Xis protein is 72 amino acids in length and required for excisive recombination. Twenty-six mutants of Xis were isolated that were impaired or deficient in lambda excision. Mutant proteins that contained amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal 49 amino acids of Xis were defective in excisive recombination and were unable to bind DNA. In contrast, one mutant protein containing a leucine to proline substitution at position 60 and two truncated proteins containing either the N-terminal 53 or 64 amino acids continued to bind lambda DNA, interact cooperatively with FIS and promote excision. However, these three mutants were unable to bind DNA cooperatively with Int. Cooperativity between wild-type Xis and Int required the presence of FIS, but not the Int core-type binding sites. This study shows that Xis has at least two functional domains and also demonstrates the importance of the cooperativity in DNA binding of FIS, Xis and Int in lambda excision. Images PMID:1396573

  6. Structural requirements for C3d,g/Epstein-Barr virus receptor (CR2/CD21) ligand binding, internalization, and viral infection.

    PubMed

    Carel, J C; Myones, B L; Frazier, B; Holers, V M

    1990-07-25

    The structure of CR2, the human C3d,g/EBV receptor (CR2/CD21) consists of 15 or 16 60-70 amino acid repeats called short consensus repeats (SCRs) followed by a transmembrane and a 34-amino acid intracytoplasmic domain. Functions of CR2 include binding the human complement component C3d,g when it is covalently attached to targets or cross-linked in the fluid phase. In addition, CR2 binds the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and mediates internalization of EBV and subsequent infection of cells. In order to explore functional roles of the repetitive extracytoplasmic SCR structure and the intracytoplasmic domain of CR2, we have created truncated CR2 (rCR2) mutants bearing serial deletions of extracytoplasmic SCRs and also the intracytoplasmic tail. We then stably transfected these rCR2 mutants into two cell lines, murine fibroblast L cells and human erythroleukemic K562 cells. Phenotypic analysis of these expressed mutants revealed that 1) The C3d,g- and EBV-binding sites are found in the two amino-terminal SCRs of CR2, 2) expression of SCRs 3 and 4 is further required for high affinity binding to soluble cross-linked C3d,g, 3) the intracytoplasmic domain of CR2 is not required for binding C3d,g or EBV but is necessary for internalization of cross-linked C3d,g as well as for EBV infection of cells, 4) monoclonal anti-CR2 antibodies with similar activities react with single widely separated epitopes, and 5) no functional roles can yet be clearly assigned to SCRs 5-15, as rCR2 mutants not containing these SCRs show no major differences from wild-type rCR2 in binding or internalizing cross-linked C3d,g or mediating EBV binding and infection. PMID:1695627

  7. trans activation of the simian virus 40 late promoter by large T antigen requires binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1.

    PubMed Central

    Casaz, P; Sundseth, R; Hansen, U

    1991-01-01

    Simian virus 40 (SV40) T antigen stimulates the level of transcription from several RNA polymerase II promoters, including the SV40 late promoter. The mechanism of trans activation appears to be indirect since binding of T antigen to specific DNA sequences is not required. However, specific promoter elements that respond to T antigen have not previously been defined. We identified DNA sequences from the SV40 late promoter whose ability to stimulate transcription is induced by the expression of T antigen. In particular, the Sph I + II motifs of the SV40 enhancer can confer T-antigen inducibility to the normally uninducible herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene promoter when multiple copies of the sequence are inserted 5' of the transcription initiation site and TATA sequence. Binding sites for the cellular transcription factor TEF-1 and octamer binding proteins are contained within the Sph I + II motifs, as well as at other positions in the SV40 promoter. To study the role of individual protein-binding sites in trans activation by T antigen, mutations were constructed in various TEF-1 and octamer protein-binding sites of the SV40 late promoter. These mutations did not significantly affect basal promoter activity. However, mutation of all three TEF-1 sites prevented detectable activation by T antigen. DNase I footprinting of the mutated promoters with purified proteins demonstrated that inducibility by T antigen correlated with binding affinity of TEF-1 for the DNA and not with binding affinity of an octamer binding protein. Images PMID:1658359

  8. An intact sequence-specific DNA-binding domain is required for human cytomegalovirus-mediated sequestration of p53 and may promote in vivo binding to the viral genome during infection

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenke, Kyle; Samuel, Melanie A.; McDowell, Eric T.; Toerne, Melissa A.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A. . E-mail: lfort@uidaho.edu

    2006-04-25

    The p53 protein is stabilized during infection of primary human fibroblasts with human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). However, the p53 in HCMV-infected cells is unable to activate its downstream targets. HCMV accomplishes this inactivation, at least in part, by sequestering p53 into viral replication centers within the cell's nucleus soon after they are established. In order to better understand the interplay between HCMV and p53 and the mechanism of sequestration, we constructed a panel of mutant p53-GFP fusion constructs for use in transfection/infection experiments. These mutants affected several post-translational modification sites and several sites within the central sequence-specific DNA-binding domain of the protein. Two categories of p53 sequestration were observed when the mutant constructs were transfected into primary fibroblasts and then infected at either high or low multiplicity. The first category, including all of the post-translational modification mutants, showed sequestration comparable to a wild-type (wt) control, while the second category, mutants affecting the DNA-binding core, were not specifically sequestered above control GFP levels. This suggested that the DNA-binding ability of the protein was required for sequestration. When the HCMV genome was analyzed for p53 consensus binding sites, 21 matches were found, which localized either to the promoters or the coding regions of viral proteins involved in DNA replication and processing as well as structural proteins. An analysis of in vivo binding to these identified sites via chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed differential binding to several of the sites over the course of infection.

  9. mulet (mlt) encodes a tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog required for spermatid individualization in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, James J.; Aqeel, Nour; Cote, Joy; Estevez, Joshian; Jongoy, Mary; Mangal, Vanie; Tema, Winnie; Rivera, Ashley; Wnukowski, Jerrica; Bencosme, Yolisept

    2012-01-01

    Spermatogenesis in all animal species occurs within a syncytium. Only at the very end of spermatogenesis are individual sperm cells resolved from this syncytium in a process known as individualization. Individualization in Drosophila begins as a membrane-cytoskeletal complex known as the individualization complex (IC) assembles around the sperm heads and proceeds down the flagella, removing cytoplasm from between the sperm tails and shrink-wrapping each spermatid into its own plasma membrane as it travels. The mulet (mlt) mutation results in severely disrupted ICs, indicating that the mlt gene product is required for individualization. Inverse PCR followed by cycle sequencing maps all known P-insertion alleles of mlt to two overlapping genes, CG12214 (the Drosophila tubulin-binding cofactor E-like homolog) and KCNQ (a large voltage-gated potassium channel). However, since the alleles of mlt map to the 5′-UTR of CG12214 and since CG12214 is contained within an intron of KCNQ, it was hypothesized that mlt and CG12214 are allelic. Indeed, CG12214 mutant testes exhibited severely disrupted ICs and were indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, thus further suggesting allelism. To test this hypothesis, alleles of mlt were crossed to CG12214 in order to generate trans-heterozygous males. Testes from all trans-heterozygous combinations revealed severely disrupted ICs and were also indistinguishable from mlt mutant testes, indicating that mlt and CG12214 fail to complement one another and are thus allelic. In addition, complementation testing against null alleles of KCNQ verified that the observed individualization defect is not caused by a disruption of KCNQ. Finally, since a population of spermatid-associated microtubules known to disappear prior to movement of the IC abnormally persists during individualization in CG12214 mutant testes, this work implicates TBCE-like in the removal of these microtubules prior to IC movement. Taken together, these results identify mlt

  10. Engagement of Two Distinct Binding Domains on CCL17 Is Required for Signaling through CCR4 and Establishment of Localized Inflammatory Conditions in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Santulli-Marotto, Sandra; Boakye, Ken; Lacy, Eilyn; Wu, Sheng-Jiun; Luongo, Jennifer; Kavalkovich, Karl; Coelho, Ana; Hogaboam, Cory M.; Ryan, Mary

    2013-01-01

    CCL17 (TARC) function can be completely abolished by mAbs that block either one of two distinct sites required for CCR4 signaling. This chemokine is elevated in sera of asthma patients and is responsible for establishing inflammatory sites through CCR4-mediated recruitment of immune cells. CCL17 shares the GPCR CCR4, with CCL22 (MDC) but these two chemokines differentially affect the immune response. To better understand chemokine mediated effects through CCR4, we have generated chimeric anti-mouse CCL17 surrogate antibodies that inhibit function of this ligand in vitro and in vivo. The affinities of the surrogate antibodies for CCL17 range from 685 pM for B225 to 4.9 nM for B202. One antibody, B202, also exhibits weak binding to CCL22 (KD∼2 µM) and no binding to CCL22 is detectable with the second antibody, B225. In vitro, both antibodies inhibit CCL17-mediated calcium mobilization, β-arrestin recruitment and chemotaxis; B202 can also partially inhibit CCL22-mediated β-arrestin recruitment. Both B202 and B225 antibodies neutralize CCL17 in vivo as demonstrated by reduction of methacholine-induced airway hyperreactivity in the A. fumigatus model of asthma. That both antibodies block CCL17 function but only B202 shows any inhibition of CCL22 function suggests that they bind CCL17 at different sites. Competition binding studies confirm that these two antibodies recognize unique epitopes that are non-overlapping despite the small size of CCL17. Taking into consideration the data from both the functional and binding studies, we propose that effective engagement of CCR4 by CCL17 involves two distinct binding domains and interaction with both is required for signaling. PMID:24339934

  11. Thyroid Hormone Receptor Binds to a Site in the Rat Growth Hormone Promoter Required for Induction by Thyroid Hormone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Ronald J.; Brent, Gregory A.; Warne, Robert L.; Reed Larsen, P.; Moore, David D.

    1987-08-01

    Transcription of the rat growth hormone (rGH) gene in pituitary cells is increased by addition of thyroid hormone (T3). This induction is dependent on the presence of specific sequences just upstream of the rGH promoter. We have partially purified T3 receptor from rat liver and examined its interaction with these rGH sequences. We show here that T3 receptor binds specifically to a site just upstream of the basal rGH promoter. This binding site includes two copies of a 7-base-pair direct repeat, the centers of which are separated by 10 base pairs. Deletions that specifically remove the T3 receptor binding site drastically reduce response to T3 in transient transfection experiments. These results demonstrate that T3 receptor can recognize specific DNA sequences and suggest that it can act directly as a positive transcriptional regulatory factor.

  12. The Adenovirus L4 33-Kilodalton Protein Binds to Intragenic Sequences of the Major Late Promoter Required for Late Phase-Specific Stimulation of Transcription▿

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Humayra; LeRoy, Gary; Bridge, Gemma; Flint, S. J.

    2007-01-01

    The adenovirus late IVa2 protein is required for maximally efficient transcription from the viral major late (ML) promoter, and hence, the synthesis of the majority of viral late proteins. This protein is a sequence-specific DNA-binding protein that also promotes the assembly of progeny virus particles. Previous studies have established that a IVa2 protein dimer (DEF-B) binds specifically to an intragenic ML promoter sequence necessary for late phase-specific stimulation of ML transcription. However, activation of transcription from the ML promoter correlates with binding of at least one additional infected-cell-specific protein, termed DEF-A, to the promoter. Using an assay for the DNA-binding activity of DEF-A, we identified the unknown protein by using conventional purification methods, purification of FLAG-tagged IVa2-protein-containing complexes, and transient synthesis of viral late proteins. The results of these experiments established that the viral L4 33-kDa protein is the only component of DEF-A: the IVa2 and L4 33-kDa proteins are necessary and sufficient for formation of all previously described complexes in the intragenic control region of the ML promoter. Furthermore, the L4 33-kDa protein binds to the promoter with the specificity characteristic of DEF-A and stimulates transcription from the ML promoter in transient-expression assays. PMID:17093188

  13. Prolyl hydroxylation of collagen type I is required for efficient binding to integrin alpha 1 beta 1 and platelet glycoprotein VI but not to alpha 2 beta 1.

    PubMed

    Perret, Stéephanie; Eble, Johannes A; Siljander, Pia R-M; Merle, Christine; Farndale, Richard W; Theisen, Manfred; Ruggiero, Florence

    2003-08-01

    Collagen is a potent adhesive substrate for cells, an event essentially mediated by the integrins alpha 1 beta 1 and alpha 2 beta 1. Collagen fibrils also bind to the integrin alpha 2 beta 1 and the platelet receptor glycoprotein VI to activate and aggregate platelets. The distinct triple helical recognition motifs for these receptors, GXOGER and (GPO)n, respectively, all contain hydroxyproline. Using unhydroxylated collagen I produced in transgenic plants, we investigated the role of hydroxyproline in the receptor-binding properties of collagen. We show that alpha 2 beta 1 but not alpha 1 beta 1 mediates cell adhesion to unhydroxylated collagen. Soluble recombinant alpha 1 beta 1 binding to unhydroxylated collagen is considerably reduced compared with bovine collagens, but binding can be restored by prolyl hydroxylation of recombinant collagen. We also show that platelets use alpha 2 beta 1 to adhere to the unhydroxylated recombinant molecules, but the adhesion is weaker than on fully hydroxylated collagen, and the unhydroxylated collagen fibrils fail to aggregate platelets. Prolyl hydroxylation is thus required for binding of collagen to platelet glycoprotein VI and to cells by alpha 1 beta 1. These observations give new insights into the molecular basis of collagen-receptor interactions and offer new selective applications for the recombinant unhydroxylated collagen I. PMID:12771137

  14. Metal binding to the N-terminal cytoplasmic domain of the PIB ATPase HMA4 is required for metal transport in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Clémentine; Lekeux, Gilles; Ukuwela, Ashwinie A; Xiao, Zhiguang; Charlier, Jean-Benoit; Bosman, Bernard; Carnol, Monique; Motte, Patrick; Damblon, Christian; Galleni, Moreno; Hanikenne, Marc

    2016-03-01

    PIB ATPases are metal cation pumps that transport metals across membranes. These proteins possess N- and C-terminal cytoplasmic extensions that contain Cys- and His-rich high affinity metal binding domains, which may be involved in metal sensing, metal ion selectivity and/or in regulation of the pump activity. The PIB ATPase HMA4 (Heavy Metal ATPase 4) plays a central role in metal homeostasis in Arabidopsis thaliana and has a key function in zinc and cadmium hypertolerance and hyperaccumulation in the extremophile plant species Arabidopsis halleri. Here, we examined the function and structure of the N-terminal cytoplasmic metal-binding domain of HMA4. We mutagenized a conserved CCTSE metal-binding motif in the domain and assessed the impact of the mutations on protein function and localization in planta, on metal-binding properties in vitro and on protein structure by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy. The two Cys residues of the motif are essential for the function, but not for localization, of HMA4 in planta, whereas the Glu residue is important but not essential. These residues also determine zinc coordination and affinity. Zinc binding to the N-terminal domain is thus crucial for HMA4 protein function, whereas it is not required to maintain the protein structure. Altogether, combining in vivo and in vitro approaches in our study provides insights towards the molecular understanding of metal transport and specificity of metal P-type ATPases. PMID:26797794

  15. Multimerization and H3K9me3 Binding Are Required for CDYL1b Heterochromatin Association*

    PubMed Central

    Franz, Henriette; Mosch, Kerstin; Soeroes, Szabolcs; Urlaub, Henning; Fischle, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    Proteins containing defined recognition modules mediate readout and translation of histone modifications. These factors are thought to initiate downstream signaling events regulating chromatin structure and function. We identified CDYL1 as an interaction partner of histone H3 trimethylated on lysine 9 (H3K9me3). CDYL1 belongs to a family of chromodomain factors found in vertebrates. We show that three different splicing variants of CDYL1, a, b, and c, are differentially expressed in various tissues with CDYL1b being the most abundant variant. Although all three splicing variants share a common C-terminal enoyl-CoA hydratase-like domain, only CDYL1b contains a functional chromodomain implicated in H3K9me3 binding. A splicing event introducing an N-terminal extension right at the beginning of the chromodomain of CDYL1a inactivates its chromodomain. CDYL1c does not contain a chromodomain at all. Although CDYL1b displays binding affinity to methyl-lysine residues in different sequence context similar to chromodomains in other chromatin factors, we demonstrate that the CDYL1b chromodomain/H3K9me3 interaction is necessary but not sufficient for association of the factor with heterochromatin. Indeed, multimerization of the protein via the enoyl-CoA hydratase-like domain is essential for H3K9me3 chromatin binding in vitro and heterochromatin localization in vivo. In agreement, overexpression of CDYL1c that can multimerize, but does not interact with H3K9me3 can displace CDYL1b from heterochromatin. Our results imply that multimeric binding to H3K9me3 by CDYL1b homomeric complexes is essential for efficient chromatin targeting. We suggest that similar multivalent binding stably anchors other histone modification binding factors on their target chromatin regions. PMID:19808672

  16. Coupling of vesicle tethering and Rab binding is required for in vivo functionality of the golgin GMAP-210

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Keisuke; Roboti, Peristera; Mironov, Alexander A.; Lowe, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Golgins are extended coiled-coil proteins believed to participate in membrane-tethering events at the Golgi apparatus. However, the importance of golgin-mediated tethering remains poorly defined, and alternative functions for golgins have been proposed. Moreover, although golgins bind to Rab GTPases, the functional significance of Rab binding has yet to be determined. In this study, we show that depletion of the golgin GMAP-210 causes a loss of Golgi cisternae and accumulation of numerous vesicles. GMAP-210 function in vivo is dependent upon its ability to tether membranes, which is mediated exclusively by the amino-terminal ALPS motif. Binding to Rab2 is also important for GMAP-210 function, although it is dispensable for tethering per se. GMAP-210 length is also functionally important in vivo. Together our results indicate a key role for GMAP-210–mediated membrane tethering in maintaining Golgi structure and support a role for Rab2 binding in linking tethering with downstream docking and fusion events at the Golgi apparatus. PMID:25473115

  17. Bid binding to negatively charged phospholipids may not be required for its pro-apoptotic activity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Manara, Anna; Lindsay, Jennefer; Marchioretto, Marta; Astegno, Alessandra; Gilmore, Andrew P.; Esposti, Mauro Degli; Crimi, Massimo

    2010-01-01

    Bid is a ubiquitous pro-apoptotic member of the Bcl-2 family that has been involved in a variety of pathways of cell death. Unique among pro-apoptotic proteins, Bid is activated after cleavage by the apical caspases of the extrinsic pathway; subsequently it moves to mitochondria, where it promotes the release of apoptogenic proteins in concert with other Bcl-2 family proteins like Bak. Diverse factors appear to modulate the pro-apoptotic action of Bid, from its avid binding to mitochondrial lipids (in particular, cardiolipin) to multiple phosphorylations at sites that can modulate its caspase cleavage. This work addresses the question of how the lipid interactions of Bid that are evident in vitro actually impact on its pro-apoptotic action within cells. Using site-directed mutagenesis, we identified mutations that reduced mouse Bid lipid binding in vitro. Mutation of the conserved residue Lys157 specifically decreased the binding to negatively charged lipids related to cardiolipin and additionally affected the rate of caspase cleavage. However, this lipid-binding mutant had no discernable effect on Bid pro-apoptotic function in vivo. The results are interpreted in relation to an underlying interaction of Bid with lysophosphatidylcholine, which is not disrupted in any mutant retaining pro-apoptotic function both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:19463967

  18. PAR-1-Stimulated Factor IXa Binding to a Small Platelet Subpopulation Requires a Pronounced and Sustained Increase of Cytoplasmic Calcium †

    PubMed Central

    London, Fredda S.; Marcinkiewicz, Mariola; Walsh, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    We previously reported that only a subpopulation of PAR-1-stimulated platelets binds coagulation factor IXa, since confirmed by other laboratories. Since calcium changes have been implicated in exposure of procoagulant aminophospholipids, we have now examined calcium fluxes in this subpopulation by measuring fluorescence changes in Fura Red/AM-loaded platelets following PAR-1 stimulation. While fluorescence changes in all platelets indicated calcium release from internal stores and influx of external calcium, a subpopulation of platelets displayed a pronounced increase in calcium transients by 15 seconds and positive factor IXa binding by 2 minutes, with calcium transients sustained for 45 minutes. Pretreatment of platelets with Xestospongin C to inhibit IP3-mediated dense tubule calcium release, and the presence of impermeable calcium channel blockers nifedipine, SKF96365 or LaCl3, inhibited PAR-1-induced development of a subpopulation with pronounced calcium transients, factor IXa binding, and platelet support of FXa generation, suggesting the importance of both release of calcium from internal stores and influx of extracellular calcium. When platelets were stimulated in EDTA for 5 to 20 minutes before addition of calcium, factor IXa binding sites developed on a smaller subpopulation but with unchanged rate indicating sustained opening of calcium channels and continued availability of signaling elements required for binding site exposure. While pretreatment of platelets with 100 μM BAPTA/AM (Kd 160 nM) had minimal effects, 100 μM 5, 5′-dimethylBAPTA/AM (Kd 40 nM) completely inhibited the appearance and function of the platelet subpopulation, indicating the importance of minor increases of cytoplasmic calcium. We conclude that PAR-1-stimulated development of factor IXa binding sites in a subpopulation of platelets is dependent upon release of calcium from internal stores leading to sustained and pronounced calcium transients. PMID:16752917

  19. Binding sites for two novel phosphoproteins, 3AF5 and 3AF3, are required for rbcS-3A expression.

    PubMed Central

    Sarokin, L P; Chua, N H

    1992-01-01

    Previous studies of boxes II (-151 to -138) and III (-125 to -114), binding sites for the nuclear factor GT-1 within the -166 deleted promoter of the ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase-3A (rbcS-3A) gene, suggested that GT-1 might act in concert with an additional protein to confer light-responsive rbcS-3A expression. In this work, S1 analysis of RNA isolated from transgenic tobacco plants carrying mutant rbcS-3A constructs led to the identification of two short sequences located at the 5' and 3' ends of box III that are required for expression. These two sequences serve as binding sites for two novel proteins, 3AF5 and 3AF3. Gel shift studies using tetramerized binding sites for both 3AF5 and 3AF3 showed that complexes with faster mobilities were formed using nuclear extracts prepared from dark-adapted plants compared with those from light-grown tobacco plants. Phosphatase treatment of extracts from light-grown plants resulted in the formation of complexes with faster mobility. Although the binding of 3AF3 to its target site is dependent upon phosphorylation, the binding of 3AF5 does not appear to be affected by its phosphorylation state. These results suggest that the phosphorylated forms of both 3AF5 and 3AF3 are required for -166 rbcS-3A expression but that the mechanisms differ by which phosphorylation regulates the activities of 3AF5 and 3AF3. PMID:1498605

  20. Assembly of Functional Ribonucleoprotein Complexes by AU-rich Element RNA-binding Protein 1 (AUF1) Requires Base-dependent and -independent RNA Contacts*

    PubMed Central

    Zucconi, Beth E.; Wilson, Gerald M.

    2013-01-01

    AU-rich element RNA-binding protein 1 (AUF1) regulates the stability and/or translational efficiency of diverse mRNA targets, including many encoding products controlling the cell cycle, apoptosis, and inflammation by associating with AU-rich elements residing in their 3′-untranslated regions. Previous biochemical studies showed that optimal AUF1 binding requires 33–34 nucleotides with a strong preference for U-rich RNA despite observations that few AUF1-associated cellular mRNAs contain such extended U-rich domains. Using the smallest AUF1 isoform (p37AUF1) as a model, we employed fluorescence anisotropy-based approaches to define thermodynamic parameters describing AUF1 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex formation across a panel of RNA substrates. These data demonstrated that 15 nucleotides of AU-rich sequence were sufficient to nucleate high affinity p37AUF1 RNP complexes within a larger RNA context. In particular, p37AUF1 binding to short AU-rich RNA targets was significantly stabilized by interactions with a 3′-purine residue and largely base-independent but non-ionic contacts 5′ of the AU-rich site. RNP stabilization by the upstream RNA domain was associated with an enhanced negative change in heat capacity consistent with conformational changes in protein and/or RNA components, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assays demonstrated that these contacts were required for p37AUF1 to remodel local RNA structure. Finally, reporter mRNAs containing minimal high affinity p37AUF1 target sequences associated with AUF1 and were destabilized in a p37AUF1-dependent manner in cells. These findings provide a mechanistic explanation for the diverse population of AUF1 target mRNAs but also suggest how AUF1 binding could regulate protein and/or microRNA binding events at adjacent sites. PMID:23940053

  1. Sarcospan integration into laminin-binding adhesion complexes that ameliorate muscular dystrophy requires utrophin and α7 integrin

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Jamie L.; Oh, Jennifer; Chou, Eric; Lee, Joy A.; Holmberg, Johan; Burkin, Dean J.; Crosbie-Watson, Rachelle H.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that result in loss of the dystrophin–glycoprotein complex, a laminin receptor that connects the myofiber to its surrounding extracellular matrix. Utrophin, a dystrophin ortholog that is normally localized to the neuromuscular junction, is naturally upregulated in DMD muscle, which partially compensates for the loss of dystrophin. Transgenic overexpression of utrophin causes broad sarcolemma localization of utrophin, restoration of laminin binding and amelioration of disease in the mdx mouse model of DMD. We previously demonstrated that overexpression of sarcospan, a dystrophin- and utrophin-binding protein, ameliorates mdx muscular dystrophy. Sarcospan boosts levels of utrophin to therapeutic levels at the sarcolemma, where attachment to laminin is restored. However, understanding the compensatory mechanism is complicated by concomitant upregulation of α7β1 integrin, which also binds laminin. Similar to the effects of utrophin, transgenic overexpression of α7 integrin prevents DMD disease in mice and is accompanied by increased abundance of utrophin around the extra-synaptic sarcolemma. In order to investigate the mechanisms underlying sarcospan ‘rescue’ of muscular dystrophy, we created double-knockout mice to test the contributions of utrophin or α7 integrin. We show that sarcospan-mediated amelioration of muscular dystrophy in DMD mice is dependent on the presence of both utrophin and α7β1 integrin, even when they are individually expressed at therapeutic levels. Furthermore, we found that association of sarcospan into laminin-binding complexes is dependent on utrophin and α7β1 integrin. PMID:25504048

  2. Further Studies on the Binding of Vitamin B12 to the Cell Wall of a B12-Requiring Lactobacillus

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Takashi

    1972-01-01

    The vitamin B12-binding property of Lactobacillus leichmannii ATCC 7830 has been studied. The organism could bind 0.52 μg of B12 per mg of cells. With regard to the cellular site for B12 accumulation, three-quarters of the B12 bound to the cell was found in the crude cell wall fraction, and the remaining one-quarter was found in the particulate (ribosome) fraction. After receiving enzymatic treatments with ribonuclease, lipase, and trypsin, the wall fraction retained three-fifths of the initial B12. The possibility of cross-contamination of the wall and particulate fractions was excluded by measuring the contents of ribonucleic acid and hexosamines in each fraction. The B12-binding activity of the wall was destroyed by pretreatment of the wall with pepsin, Pronase, or trypsin. However, once bound to the wall, the B12 was not released by the same treatments. These facts suggest that B12 is bound to a polypeptide in the wall on which these enzymes act and that, once bound, B12 somehow inhibits the enzymatic actions as described earlier with L. delbrueckii no. 1. A B12-polypeptide complex was isolated by treatment with 0.2 n HCl from walls to which B12 had been bound. The complex was then purified. The complex moves as a single band on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Its molecular weight was estimated around 21,500 with microheterogeneity on a Sephadex G-75 column. The mode of B12 binding was found to be similar to that of L. delbrueckii. Images PMID:4550659

  3. Idas, a novel phylogenetically conserved geminin-related protein, binds to geminin and is required for cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Pefani, Dafni-Eleutheria; Dimaki, Maria; Spella, Magda; Karantzelis, Nickolas; Mitsiki, Eirini; Kyrousi, Christina; Symeonidou, Ioanna-Eleni; Perrakis, Anastassis; Taraviras, Stavros; Lygerou, Zoi

    2011-07-01

    Development and homeostasis of multicellular organisms relies on an intricate balance between cell proliferation and differentiation. Geminin regulates the cell cycle by directly binding and inhibiting the DNA replication licensing factor Cdt1. Geminin also interacts with transcriptional regulators of differentiation and chromatin remodelling factors, and its balanced interactions are implicated in proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. Here, we describe Idas (Idas being a cousin of the Gemini in Ancient Greek Mythology), a previously uncharacterised coiled-coil protein related to Geminin. We show that human Idas localizes to the nucleus, forms a complex with Geminin both in cells and in vitro through coiled-coil mediated interactions, and can change Geminin subcellular localization. Idas does not associate with Cdt1 and prevents Geminin from binding to Cdt1 in vitro. Idas depletion from cells affects cell cycle progression; cells accumulate in S phase and are unable to efficiently progress to mitosis. Idas protein levels decrease in anaphase, whereas its overexpression causes mitotic defects. During development, we show that Idas exhibits high level expression in the choroid plexus and the cortical hem of the mouse telencephalon. Our data highlight Idas as a novel Geminin binding partner, implicated in cell cycle progression, and a putative regulator of proliferation-differentiation decisions during development. PMID:21543332

  4. Binding of adeno-associated virus type 5 to 2,3-linked sialic acid is required for gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Walters, R W; Yi, S M; Keshavjee, S; Brown, K E; Welsh, M J; Chiorini, J A; Zabner, J

    2001-06-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are promising gene therapy vectors. Whereas AAV serotype 2-mediated gene transfer to muscle has partially replaced factor IX deficiency in hemophilia patients, its ability to mediate gene transfer to the lungs for cystic fibrosis is hindered by lack of apical receptors. However, AAV serotype 5 infects human airway epithelia from the lumenal surface. We found that in contrast to AAV2, the apical membrane of airway epithelia contains abundant high affinity receptors for AAV5. Binding and gene transfer with AAV5 was abolished by genetic or enzymatic removal of sialic acid from the cell surface. Furthermore, binding and gene transfer to airway epithelia was competed by lectins that specifically bind 2,3-linked sialic acid. These observations suggest that 2,3-linked sialic acid is either a receptor for AAV5 or it is a necessary component of a receptor complex. Further elucidation of the receptor for this virus should enhance understanding of parvovirus biology and expand the therapeutic targets for AAV vectors. PMID:11262413

  5. The small phytoplasma virulence effector SAP11 contains distinct domains required for nuclear targeting and CIN-TCP binding and destabilization

    PubMed Central

    Sugio, Akiko; MacLean, Allyson M; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2014-01-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial phytopathogens that secrete virulence effectors and induce changes in the architecture and defense response of their plant hosts. We previously demonstrated that the small (± 10 kDa) virulence effector SAP11 of Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches’ Broom (AY-WB) binds and destabilizes Arabidopsis CIN (CINCINNATA) TCP (TEOSINTE-BRANCHED, CYCLOIDEA, PROLIFERATION FACTOR 1 AND 2) transcription factors, resulting in dramatic changes in leaf morphogenesis and increased susceptibility to phytoplasma insect vectors. SAP11 contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that targets this effector to plant cell nuclei.To further understand how SAP11 functions, we assessed the involvement of SAP11 regions in TCP binding and destabilization using a series of mutants.SAP11 mutants lacking the entire N-terminal domain, including the NLS, interacted with TCPs but did not destabilize them. SAP11 mutants lacking the C-terminal domain were impaired in both binding and destabilization of TCPs. These SAP11 mutants did not alter leaf morphogenesis. A SAP11 mutant that did not accumulate in plant nuclei (SAP11ΔNLS-NES) was able to bind and destabilize TCP transcription factors, but instigated weaker changes in leaf morphogenesis than wild-type SAP11.Overall the results suggest that phytoplasma effector SAP11 has a modular organization in which at least three domains are required for efficient CIN-TCP destabilization in plants. PMID:24552625

  6. Tumor Cellular Proteasome Inhibition and Growth Suppression by 8-Hydroxyquinoline and Clioquinol Requires Their Capabilities to Bind Copper and Transport Copper into Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Shumei; Yang, Lei; Cui, Qiuzhi Cindy; Sun, Ying; Dou, Q. Ping; Yan, Bing

    2009-01-01

    We have previously reported that when mixed with copper, 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-OHQ) and its analog clioquinol (CQ) inhibited the proteasomal activity and proliferation in cultured human cancer cells. CQ treatment of high copper-containing human tumor xenografts also caused cancer suppression, associated with proteasome inhibition in vivo. However, the nature of copper dependence of these events has not been elucidated experimentally. In the current study, by using chemical probe molecules that mimic structures of 8-OHQ and CQ, but have no copper binding capability, we dissected the complex cellular processes elicited by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu mixture and revealed that copper-binding to 8-OHQ or CQ is required for transportation of copper complex into human breast cancer cells and the consequent proteasome-inhibitory, growth-suppressive and apoptosis-inducing activities. In contrast, the non-copper-binding analogs of 8-OHQ or CQ blocked the very first step – copper binding in this chain of events mediated by 8-OHQ-Cu or CQ-Cu. PMID:19809836

  7. The small phytoplasma virulence effector SAP11 contains distinct domains required for nuclear targeting and CIN-TCP binding and destabilization.

    PubMed

    Sugio, Akiko; MacLean, Allyson M; Hogenhout, Saskia A

    2014-05-01

    Phytoplasmas are insect-transmitted bacterial phytopathogens that secrete virulence effectors and induce changes in the architecture and defense response of their plant hosts. We previously demonstrated that the small (± 10 kDa) virulence effector SAP11 of Aster Yellows phytoplasma strain Witches' Broom (AY-WB) binds and destabilizes Arabidopsis CIN (CINCINNATA) TCP (TEOSINTE-BRANCHED, CYCLOIDEA, PROLIFERATION FACTOR 1 AND 2) transcription factors, resulting in dramatic changes in leaf morphogenesis and increased susceptibility to phytoplasma insect vectors. SAP11 contains a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLS) that targets this effector to plant cell nuclei. To further understand how SAP11 functions, we assessed the involvement of SAP11 regions in TCP binding and destabilization using a series of mutants. SAP11 mutants lacking the entire N-terminal domain, including the NLS, interacted with TCPs but did not destabilize them. SAP11 mutants lacking the C-terminal domain were impaired in both binding and destabilization of TCPs. These SAP11 mutants did not alter leaf morphogenesis. A SAP11 mutant that did not accumulate in plant nuclei (SAP11ΔNLS-NES) was able to bind and destabilize TCP transcription factors, but instigated weaker changes in leaf morphogenesis than wild-type SAP11. Overall the results suggest that phytoplasma effector SAP11 has a modular organization in which at least three domains are required for efficient CIN-TCP destabilization in plants. PMID:24552625

  8. Mg2+ -dependent ATP occlusion at the first nucleotide-binding domain (NBD1) of CFTR does not require the second (NBD2).

    PubMed

    Aleksandrov, Luba; Aleksandrov, Andrei; Riordan, John R

    2008-11-15

    ATP binding to the first and second NBDs (nucleotide-binding domains) of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) are bivalent-cation-independent and -dependent steps respectively [Aleksandrov, Aleksandrov, Chang and Riordan (2002) J. Biol. Chem. 277, 15419-15425]. Subsequent to the initial binding, Mg(2+) drives rapid hydrolysis at the second site, while promoting non-exchangeable trapping of the nucleotide at the first site. This occlusion at the first site of functional wild-type CFTR is somewhat similar to that which occurs when the catalytic glutamate residues in both of the hydrolytic sites of P-glycoprotein are mutated, which has been proposed to be the result of dimerization of the two NBDs and represents a transient intermediate formed during ATP hydrolysis [Tombline and Senior (2005) J. Bioenerg. Biomembr. 37, 497-500]. To test the possible relevance of this interpretation to CFTR, we have now characterized the process by which NBD1 occludes [(32)P]N(3)ATP (8-azido-ATP) and [(32)P]N(3)ADP (8-azido-ADP). Only N(3)ATP, but not N(3)ADP, can be bound initially at NBD1 in the absence of Mg(2+). Despite the lack of a requirement for Mg(2+) for ATP binding, retention of the NTP at 37 degrees C was dependent on the cation. However, at reduced temperature (4 degrees C), N(3)ATP remains locked in the binding pocket with virtually no reduction over a 1 h period, even in the absence of Mg(2+). Occlusion occurred identically in a DeltaNBD2 construct, but not in purified recombinant NBD1, indicating that the process is dependent on the influence of regions of CFTR in addition to NBD1, but not NBD2. PMID:18605986

  9. The transactivation domain AF-2 but not the DNA-binding domain of the estrogen receptor is required to inhibit differentiation of avian erythroid progenitors.

    PubMed

    von Lindern, M; Boer, L; Wessely, O; Parker, M; Beug, H

    1998-02-01

    Earlier work demonstrated that an activated estrogen receptor (ER) is required for long-term self-renewal of c-ErbB-expressing avian erythroid progenitors. Here, we demonstrate that activation of the ER does not only arrest or retard differentiation of early progenitors but that it affects erythroid differentiation at all stages of erythroid maturation. A search for genes whose expression is affected by the ER showed that the 17beta-estradiol-activated receptor suppressed the differentiation-associated up-regulation of Gata-1, SCL-1, and globin genes in partially mature cells. In the same cells, the expression of carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) and histone H5 was enhanced. This led to premature expression of CAII, a possible explanation for the toxic effects of overexpressed ER. Repression specifically required the transactivation domain AF-2, but neither an intact DNA-binding domain (DBD) nor the AF-1 domain. The transcriptional activation of CAII, however, required both an intact AF-2 and a functional DBD. The requirement for the AF-2, but not the DBD, suggested that the ER may compete with other nuclear hormone receptors for transcriptional coactivators that bind AF-2, a domain well conserved within this family of transcription factors. We show, however, that this model does not apply for the most likely candidate, the avian thyroid hormone receptor. PMID:9482667

  10. Binding of protein kinase C to neutrophil membranes in the presence of Ca2+ and its activation by a Ca2+-requiring proteinase.

    PubMed Central

    Melloni, E; Pontremoli, S; Michetti, M; Sacco, O; Sparatore, B; Salamino, F; Horecker, B L

    1985-01-01

    In the presence of micromolar concentrations of Ca2+, both protein kinase C and a cytosolic Ca2+-requiring neutral proteinase of human neutrophils become associated with the neutrophil membrane. Binding to the membrane results in activation of the proteinase, which then catalyzes limited proteolysis of the kinase to produce a form that is fully active in the absence of Ca2+ and phospholipid. This irreversibly activated protein kinase is released from the membrane and may thus have access, in the intact cell, to intracellular protein substrates. In the absence of the proteinase, Ca2+ promotes the binding of protein kinase C, but conversion to the Ca2+/phospholipid-independent form does not occur and the kinase remains associated with the membrane fraction. PMID:2995965

  11. Mast cell–expressed orphan receptor CCRL2 binds chemerin and is required for optimal induction of IgE-mediated passive cutaneous anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Zabel, Brian A.; Nakae, Susumu; Zúñiga, Luis; Kim, Ji-Yun; Ohyama, Takao; Alt, Carsten; Pan, Junliang; Suto, Hajime; Soler, Dulce; Allen, Samantha J.; Handel, Tracy M.; Song, Chang Ho; Galli, Stephen J.; Butcher, Eugene C.

    2008-01-01

    Mast cells contribute importantly to both protective and pathological IgE-dependent immune responses. We show that the mast cell–expressed orphan serpentine receptor mCCRL2 is not required for expression of IgE-mediated mast cell–dependent passive cutaneous anaphylaxis but can enhance the tissue swelling and leukocyte infiltrates associated with such reactions in mice. We further identify chemerin as a natural nonsignaling protein ligand for both human and mouse CCRL2. In contrast to other “silent” or professional chemokine interreceptors, chemerin binding does not trigger ligand internalization. Rather, CCRL2 is able to bind the chemoattractant and increase local concentrations of bioactive chemerin, thus providing a link between CCRL2 expression and inflammation via the cell-signaling chemerin receptor CMKLR1. PMID:18794339

  12. Delineation of a T-cell activation motif required for binding of protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains.

    PubMed Central

    Koyasu, S; Tse, A G; Moingeon, P; Hussey, R E; Mildonian, A; Hannisian, J; Clayton, L K; Reinherz, E L

    1994-01-01

    To define the T-cell receptor signal transduction motif, we have transfected human and murine T-cell lines with a chimeric receptor consisting of the extracellular and transmembrane domains of human CD8 alpha and the membrane-proximal portion of CD3 zeta containing at its C terminus either an 18-amino acid segment (NQLYNELNLGRREEYDVL) or alanine-scanning point mutant derivatives. Crosslinking of the extracellular domain of the chimera is sufficient to initiate Ca2+ flux, interleukin 2 production, and tyrosine phosphorylation of cellular proteins including the chimera. Subsequently, the chimera becomes associated with several tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins, among them the 70-kDa protein tyrosine kinase ZAP70. Mutational data identify the T-cell activation motif as Y(X)2L(X)7Y(X)2L and show that each of the four designated residues is necessary for the above activation events. Recombinant protein containing the two tandem SH2 domains derived from ZAP70 binds to a synthetic peptide corresponding to the above 18-amino acid motif but only when both tyrosines are phosphorylated; in contrast, little or no binding is observed to monophosphorylated or nonphosphorylated analogues. These results imply that after receptor crosslinking in T cells, and by inference also in B cells and mast cells, the motif is phosphorylated on both tyrosine residues, thereafter serving as a docking site for protein tyrosine kinases containing tandem SH2 domains. Images PMID:7517560

  13. Heavy metal tolerance in the fission yeast requires an ATP-binding cassette-type vacuolar membrane transporter.

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, D F; Kreppel, L; Speiser, D M; Scheel, G; McDonald, G; Ow, D W

    1992-01-01

    In response to heavy metal stress, plants and certain fungi, such as the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, synthesize small metal-binding peptides known as phytochelatins. We have identified a cadmium sensitive S. pombe mutant deficient in the accumulation of a sulfide-containing phytochelatin-cadmium complex, and have isolated the gene, designated hmt1, that complements this mutant. The deduced protein sequence of the hmt1 gene product shares sequence identity with the family of ABC (ATP-binding cassette)-type transport proteins which includes the mammalian P-glycoproteins and CFTR, suggesting that the encoded product is an integral membrane protein. Analysis of fractionated fission yeast cell components indicates that the HMT1 polypeptide is associated with the vacuolar membrane. Additionally, fission yeast strains harboring an hmt1-expressing multicopy plasmid exhibit enhanced metal tolerance along with a higher intracellular level of cadmium, implying a relationship between HMT1 mediated transport and compartmentalization of heavy metals. This suggests that tissue-specific overproduction of a functional hmt1 product in transgenic plants might be a means to alter the tissue localization of these elements, such as for sequestering heavy metals away from consumable parts of crop plants. Images PMID:1396551

  14. Requirements for capsid-binding and an effector function in TRIMCyp-mediated restriction of HIV-1

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz-Griffero, Felipe; Vandegraaff, Nick; Li Yuan; McGee-Estrada, Kathleen; Stremlau, Matthew; Welikala, Sohanya; Si Zhihai; Engelman, Alan; Sodroski, Joseph . E-mail: joseph_sodroski@dfci.harvard.edu

    2006-08-01

    In owl monkeys, a retrotransposition event replaced the gene encoding the retroviral restriction factor TRIM5{alpha} with one encoding TRIMCyp, a fusion between the RING, B-box 2 and coiled-coil domains of TRIM5 and cyclophilin A. TRIMCyp restricts human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) infection by a mechanism dependent on the interaction of the cyclophilin A moiety and the HIV-1 capsid protein. Here, we show that infection by retroviruses other than HIV-1 can be restricted by TRIMCyp, providing an explanation for the evolutionary retention of the TRIMCyp gene in owl monkey lineages. The TRIMCyp-mediated block to HIV-1 infection occurs before the earliest step of reverse transcription. TRIMCyp-mediated restriction involves at least two functions: (1) capsid binding, which occurs most efficiently for trimeric TRIMCyp proteins that retain the coiled-coil and cyclophilin A domains, and (2) an effector function that depends upon the B-box 2 domain.

  15. Signals at the bacteriophage phi 29 DNA replication origins required for protein p6 binding and activity.

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, M; Gutiérrez, J; Prieto, I; Hermoso, J M; Salas, M

    1989-01-01

    Protein p6 of Bacillus subtilis phage phi 29 binds specifically to the ends of the viral DNA that contain the replication origins, giving rise to a nucleoprotein structure. DNA regions recognized by protein p6 have been mapped by deletion analysis and DNase I footprinting. Main protein p6-recognition signals have been located between nucleotides 62 and 125 at the right phi 29 DNA end and between nucleotides 46 and 68 at the left end. In addition, recognition signals are also present at other sites within 200-300 bp at each phi 29 DNA end. Protein p6 does not seem to recognize a specific sequence in the DNA, but rather a structural feature, which could be bendability. The formation of the protein p6-DNA nucleoprotein complex is likely to be the structural basis for the protein p6 activity in the initiation of replication. Images PMID:2767056

  16. Multiple Glycogen-binding Sites in Eukaryotic Glycogen Synthase Are Required for High Catalytic Efficiency toward Glycogen

    SciTech Connect

    Baskaran, Sulochanadevi; Chikwana, Vimbai M.; Contreras, Christopher J.; Davis, Keri D.; Wilson, Wayne A.; DePaoli-Roach, Anna A.; Roach, Peter J.; Hurley, Thomas D.

    2012-12-10

    Glycogen synthase is a rate-limiting enzyme in the biosynthesis of glycogen and has an essential role in glucose homeostasis. The three-dimensional structures of yeast glycogen synthase (Gsy2p) complexed with maltooctaose identified four conserved maltodextrin-binding sites distributed across the surface of the enzyme. Site-1 is positioned on the N-terminal domain, site-2 and site-3 are present on the C-terminal domain, and site-4 is located in an interdomain cleft adjacent to the active site. Mutation of these surface sites decreased glycogen binding and catalytic efficiency toward glycogen. Mutations within site-1 and site-2 reduced the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by 40- and 70-fold, respectively. Combined mutation of site-1 and site-2 decreased the V{sub max}/S{sub 0.5} for glycogen by >3000-fold. Consistent with the in vitro data, glycogen accumulation in glycogen synthase-deficient yeast cells ({Delta}gsy1-gsy2) transformed with the site-1, site-2, combined site-1/site-2, or site-4 mutant form of Gsy2p was decreased by up to 40-fold. In contrast to the glycogen results, the ability to utilize maltooctaose as an in vitro substrate was unaffected in the site-2 mutant, moderately affected in the site-1 mutant, and almost completely abolished in the site-4 mutant. These data show that the ability to utilize maltooctaose as a substrate can be independent of the ability to utilize glycogen. Our data support the hypothesis that site-1 and site-2 provide a 'toehold mechanism,' keeping glycogen synthase tightly associated with the glycogen particle, whereas site-4 is more closely associated with positioning of the nonreducing end during catalysis.

  17. The lux autoinducer-receptor interaction in Vibrio harveyi: binding parameters and structural requirements for the autoinducer.

    PubMed Central

    Cao, J G; Wei, Z Y; Meighen, E A

    1995-01-01

    To assess the binding parameters and the structure-function relationship of the Vibrio harveyi lux autoinducer, N-(D-3-hydroxybutanoyl)homoserine lactone (D-HBHL), to light emission, a series of acylhomoserine lactone analogues were synthesized and their effects on the stimulation of luminescence of an autoinducer-deficient mutant of V. harveyi, D1, examined. Of the analogues with 3-hydroxyacyl chains, only N-(3-hydroxyvaleryl)homoserine lactone (HVHL) could act as an inducer, with about 85% of the potency of D-HBHL in stimulation of luminescence; the apparent Kd of the putative receptor for HVHL was 3.8 microM, close to that for the natural autoinducer (1.4 microM). Analogues with longer 3-hydroxyacyl chains, N-(3-hydroxyhexanoyl)homoserine lactone and N-(3-hydroxyheptanoyl)homoserine lactone, acted as competitive inhibitors of HBHL with apparent KI values of 77 and 53 microM respectively. Replacement of the 3-hydroxybutanoyl moiety with a 3-methylbutanoyl or 3-methoxybutanoyl group created weak competitive inhibitors, N-(isovaleryl)- and N-(3-methoxybutanoyl)- homoserine lactones, with apparent KI values of 150 and 360 microM respectively. Two other analogues, N-(2-hydroxybutanoyl)- and N-(4-hydroxybutanoyl)-homoserine lactone, could neither stimulate nor inhibit luminescence. The approach used in these studies to demonstrate binding of autoinducer analogues at the same site, as well as measurement of the relative dissociation constant, may be of value in analysing analogues activating or inhibiting luminescence and other processes that are under control of acylhomoserine lactone autoregulators. PMID:8526853

  18. Inhibition of tumorigenesis driven by different Wnt proteins requires blockade of distinct ligand-binding regions by LRP6 antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ettenberg, Seth A.; Charlat, Olga; Daley, Michael P.; Liu, Shanming; Vincent, Karen J.; Stuart, Darrin D.; Schuller, Alwin G.; Yuan, Jing; Ospina, Beatriz; Green, John; Yu, Qunyan; Walsh, Renee; Schmitz, Rita; Heine, Holger; Bilic, Sanela; Ostrom, Lance; Mosher, Rebecca; Hartlepp, K. Felix; Zhu, Zhenping; Fawell, Stephen; Yao, Yung-Mae; Stover, David; Finan, Peter M.; Porter, Jeffery A.; Sellers, William R.; Klagge, Ingo M.; Cong, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Disregulated Wnt/β-catenin signaling has been linked to various human diseases, including cancers. Inhibitors of oncogenic Wnt signaling are likely to have a therapeutic effect in cancers. LRP5 and LRP6 are closely related membrane coreceptors for Wnt proteins. Using a phage-display library, we identified anti-LRP6 antibodies that either inhibit or enhance Wnt signaling. Two classes of LRP6 antagonistic antibodies were discovered: one class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt1, whereas the second class specifically inhibits Wnt proteins represented by Wnt3a. Epitope-mapping experiments indicated that Wnt1 class-specific antibodies bind to the first propeller and Wnt3a class-specific antibodies bind to the third propeller of LRP6, suggesting that Wnt1- and Wnt3a-class proteins interact with distinct LRP6 propeller domains. This conclusion is further supported by the structural functional analysis of LRP5/6 and the finding that the Wnt antagonist Sclerostin interacts with the first propeller of LRP5/6 and preferentially inhibits the Wnt1-class proteins. We also show that Wnt1 or Wnt3a class-specific anti-LRP6 antibodies specifically block growth of MMTV-Wnt1 or MMTV-Wnt3 xenografts in vivo. Therapeutic application of these antibodies could be limited without knowing the type of Wnt proteins expressed in cancers. This is further complicated by our finding that bivalent LRP6 antibodies sensitize cells to the nonblocked class of Wnt proteins. The generation of a biparatopic LRP6 antibody blocks both Wnt1- and Wnt3a-mediated signaling without showing agonistic activity. Our studies provide insights into Wnt-induced LRP5/6 activation and show the potential utility of LRP6 antibodies in Wnt-driven cancer. PMID:20713706

  19. Stable binding to E2F is not required for the retinoblastoma protein to activate transcription, promote differentiation, and suppress tumor cell growth

    PubMed Central

    Sellers, William R.; Novitch, Bennett G.; Miyake, Satoshi; Heith, Agnieszka; Otterson, Gregory A.; Kaye, Frederic J.; Lassar, Andrew B.; Kaelin, William G.

    1998-01-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRB) can inhibit cell cycle progression and promote differentiation. pRB interacts with a variety of transcription factors, including members of the E2F and C-EBP protein families and MyoD, and can either repress or activate transcription depending on the promoter under study. These biological and biochemical activities of pRB have been mapped previously to a core domain, referred to as the pRB pocket. Using a panel of synthetic pRB pocket mutants, we found that the acute induction of a G1/S block by pRB is linked to its ability to both bind to E2F and to repress transcription. In contrast, these functions were not required for pRB to promote differentiation, which correlated with its ability to activate transcription in concert with fate-determining proteins such as MyoD. All tumor-derived pRB mutants tested to date failed to bind to E2F and did not repress transcription. Despite an inability to bind to E2F, pRB mutants associated with a low risk of retinoblastoma, unlike high-risk mutants, retained the ability to activate transcription and promote differentiation. Thus, the pRB pocket participates in dual tumor suppressor functions, one linked to cell cycle progression and the other to differentiation control, and these functions can be genetically and mechanistically dissociated. PMID:9420334

  20. Poly(A)-binding proteins are required for microRNA-mediated silencing and to promote target deadenylation in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Flamand, Mathieu N.; Wu, Edlyn; Vashisht, Ajay; Jannot, Guillaume; Keiper, Brett D.; Simard, Martin J.; Wohlschlegel, James; Duchaine, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) link mRNA 3′ termini to translation initiation factors, but they also play key roles in mRNA regulation and decay. Reports from mice, zebrafish and Drosophila further involved PABPs in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated silencing, but through seemingly distinct mechanisms. Here, we implicate the two Caenorhabditis elegans PABPs (PAB-1 and PAB-2) in miRNA-mediated silencing, and elucidate their mechanisms of action using concerted genetics, protein interaction analyses, and cell-free assays. We find that C. elegans PABPs are required for miRNA-mediated silencing in embryonic and larval developmental stages, where they act through a multi-faceted mechanism. Depletion of PAB-1 and PAB-2 results in loss of both poly(A)-dependent and -independent translational silencing. PABPs accelerate miRNA-mediated deadenylation, but this contribution can be modulated by 3′UTR sequences. While greater distances with the poly(A) tail exacerbate dependency on PABP for deadenylation, more potent miRNA-binding sites partially suppress this effect. Our results refine the roles of PABPs in miRNA-mediated silencing and support a model wherein they enable miRNA-binding sites by looping the 3′UTR poly(A) tail to the bound miRISC and deadenylase. PMID:27095199

  1. Poly(A)-binding proteins are required for microRNA-mediated silencing and to promote target deadenylation in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Flamand, Mathieu N; Wu, Edlyn; Vashisht, Ajay; Jannot, Guillaume; Keiper, Brett D; Simard, Martin J; Wohlschlegel, James; Duchaine, Thomas F

    2016-07-01

    Cytoplasmic poly(A)-binding proteins (PABPs) link mRNA 3' termini to translation initiation factors, but they also play key roles in mRNA regulation and decay. Reports from mice, zebrafish and Drosophila further involved PABPs in microRNA (miRNA)-mediated silencing, but through seemingly distinct mechanisms. Here, we implicate the two Caenorhabditis elegans PABPs (PAB-1 and PAB-2) in miRNA-mediated silencing, and elucidate their mechanisms of action using concerted genetics, protein interaction analyses, and cell-free assays. We find that C. elegans PABPs are required for miRNA-mediated silencing in embryonic and larval developmental stages, where they act through a multi-faceted mechanism. Depletion of PAB-1 and PAB-2 results in loss of both poly(A)-dependent and -independent translational silencing. PABPs accelerate miRNA-mediated deadenylation, but this contribution can be modulated by 3'UTR sequences. While greater distances with the poly(A) tail exacerbate dependency on PABP for deadenylation, more potent miRNA-binding sites partially suppress this effect. Our results refine the roles of PABPs in miRNA-mediated silencing and support a model wherein they enable miRNA-binding sites by looping the 3'UTR poly(A) tail to the bound miRISC and deadenylase. PMID:27095199

  2. Endogenous mutagenesis by an insertion sequence element identifies Aeromonas salmonicida AbcA as an ATP-binding cassette transport protein required for biogenesis of smooth lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Chu, S; Noonan, B; Cavaignac, S; Trust, T J

    1995-01-01

    Analysis of an Aeromonas salmonicida A layer-deficient/O polysaccharide-deficient mutant carrying a Tn5 insertion in the structural gene for A protein (vapA) showed that the abcA gene immediately downstream of vapA had been interrupted by the endogenous insertion sequence element ISAS1. Immunoelectron microscopy showed that O polysaccharides did not accumulate at the inner membrane-cytoplasm interface of this mutant. abcA encodes an unusual protein; it carries both an amino-terminal ATP-binding cassette (ABC) domain showing high sequence similarity to ABC proteins implicated in the transport of certain capsular and O polysaccharides and a carboxyl-terminal potential DNA-binding domain, which distinguishes AbcA from other polysaccharide transport proteins in structural and evolutionary terms. The smooth lipopolysaccharide phenotype was restored by complementation with abcA but not by abcA carrying site-directed mutations in the sequence encoding the ATP-binding site of the protein. The genetic organization of the A. salmonicida ABC polysaccharide system differs from other bacteria. abcA also differs in apparently being required for both O-polysaccharide synthesis and in energizing the transport of O polysaccharides to the cell surface. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7777581

  3. A combined in silico/in vitro approach unveils common molecular requirements for efficient BVDV RdRp binding of linear aromatic N-polycyclic systems.

    PubMed

    Carta, A; Briguglio, I; Piras, S; Corona, P; Ibba, R; Laurini, E; Fermeglia, M; Pricl, S; Desideri, N; Atzori, E M; La Colla, P; Collu, G; Delogu, I; Loddo, R

    2016-07-19

    In this work, we present and discuss a comprehensive set of both newly and previously synthesized compounds belonging to 5 distinct molecular classes of linear aromatic N-polycyclic systems that efficiently inhibits bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) infection. A coupled in silico/in vitro investigation was employed to formulate a molecular rationale explaining the notable affinity of all molecules to BVDV RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) NS5B. We initially developed a three-dimensional common-feature pharmacophore model according to which two hydrogen bond acceptors and one hydrophobic aromatic feature are shared by all molecular series in binding the viral polymerase. The pharmacophoric information was used to retrieve a putative binding site on the surface of the BVDV RdRp and to guide compound docking within the protein binding site. The affinity of all compounds towards the enzyme was scored via molecular dynamics-based simulations, showing high correlation with in vitro EC50 data. The determination of the interaction spectra of the protein residues involved in inhibitor binding highlighted amino acids R295 and Y674 as the two fundamental H-bond donors, while two hydrophobic cavities HC1 (residues A221, I261, I287, and Y289) and HC2 (residues V216, Y303, V306, K307, P408, and A412) fulfill the third pharmacophoric requirement. Three RdRp (K263, R295 and Y674) residues critical for drug binding were selected and mutagenized, both in silico and in vitro, into alanine, and the affinity of a set of selected compounds towards the mutant RdRp isoforms was determined accordingly. The agreement between predicted and experimental data confirmed the proposed common molecular rationale shared by molecules characterized by different chemical scaffolds in binding to the BVDV RdRp, ultimately yielding compound 6b (EC50 = 0.3 μM; IC50 = 0.48 μM) as a new, potent inhibitor of this Pestivirus. PMID:27161176

  4. The RNA Binding Protein Igf2bp1 Is Required for Zebrafish RGC Axon Outgrowth In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gaynes, John A.; Otsuna, Hideo; Campbell, Douglas S.; Manfredi, John P.; Levine, Edward M.

    2015-01-01

    Attractive growth cone turning requires Igf2bp1-dependent local translation of β-actin mRNA in response to external cues in vitro. While in vivo studies have shown that Igf2bp1 is required for cell migration and axon terminal branching, a requirement for Igf2bp1 function during axon outgrowth has not been demonstrated. Using a timelapse assay in the zebrafish retinotectal system, we demonstrate that the β-actin 3’UTR is sufficient to target local translation of the photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede in growth cones of pathfinding retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) in vivo. Igf2bp1 knockdown reduced RGC axonal outgrowth and tectal coverage and retinal cell survival. RGC-specific expression of a phosphomimetic Igf2bp1 reduced the density of axonal projections in the optic tract while sparing RGCs, demonstrating for the first time that Igf2bp1 is required during axon outgrowth in vivo. Therefore, regulation of local translation mediated by Igf2bp proteins may be required at all stages of axon development. PMID:26325373

  5. The immunoglobulin domain of the sodium channel β3 subunit contains a surface-localized disulfide bond that is required for homophilic binding

    PubMed Central

    Yereddi, Nikitha R.; Cusdin, Fiona S.; Namadurai, Sivakumar; Packman, Len C.; Monie, Tom P.; Slavny, Peter; Clare, Jeffrey J.; Powell, Andrew J.; Jackson, Antony P.

    2013-01-01

    The β subunits of voltage-gated sodium (Nav) channels possess an extracellular immunoglobulin (Ig) domain that is related to the L1 family of cell-adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that in HEK293 cells, secretion of the free Ig domain of the β3 subunit is reduced significantly when it is coexpressed with the full-length β3 and β1 subunits but not with the β2 subunit. Using immunoprecipitation, we show that the β3 subunit can mediate trans homophilic-binding via its Ig domain and that the β3-Ig domain can associate heterophilically with the β1 subunit. Evolutionary tracing analysis and structural modeling identified a cluster of surface-localized amino acids fully conserved between the Ig domains of all known β3 and β1 sequences. A notable feature of this conserved surface cluster is the presence of two adjacent cysteine residues that previously we have suggested may form a disulfide bond. We now confirm the presence of the disulfide bond in β3 using mass spectrometry, and we show that its integrity is essential for the association of the full-length, membrane-anchored β3 subunit with itself. However, selective reduction of this surface disulfide bond did not inhibit homophilic binding of the purified β3-Ig domain in free solution. Hence, the disulfide bond itself is unlikely to be part of the homophilic binding site. Rather, we suggest that its integrity ensures the Ig domain of the membrane-tethered β3 subunit adopts the correct orientation for productive association to occur in vivo.—Yereddi, N. R., Cusdin, F. S., Namadurai, S., Packman, L. C., Monie, T. P., Slavny, P., Clare, J. C., Powell, A. J., Jackson, A. P. The immunoglobulin domain of the sodium channel β3 subunit contains a surface-localized disulfide bond that is required for homophilic binding. PMID:23118027

  6. Induction of p53-Independent Apoptosis by the Adenovirus E4orf4 Protein Requires Binding to the Bα Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 2A

    PubMed Central

    Marcellus, Richard C.; Chan, Helen; Paquette, Denis; Thirlwell, Sarah; Boivin, Dominique; Branton, Philip E.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that the E4orf4 protein of human adenovirus type 2 (Ad2) induces p53-independent apoptosis. We believe that this process may play a role in cell death and viral spread at the final stages of productive infection. E4orf4 may also be of therapeutic value in treating some diseases, including cancer, through its ability to induce apoptosis when expressed individually. The only previously identified biochemical function of E4orf4 is its ability to associate with the Bα subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A). We have used a genetic approach to determine the role of such interactions in E4orf4-induced cell death. E4orf4 deletion mutants were of only limited value, as all were highly defective. We found that E4orf4 proteins from most if not all adenovirus serotypes induced cell death, and thus point mutations were introduced that converted the majority of highly conserved residues to alanines. Such mutants were used to correlate Bα-subunit binding, association with PP2A activity, and cell killing following the transfection of appropriate cDNAs into p53-null H1299 or C33A cells. The results indicated that binding of the Bα subunit is essential for induction of cell death, as every mutant that failed to bind efficiently was totally defective for cell killing. This class of mutations (class I) largely involved residues between amino acids 51 and 89. Almost all E4orf4 mutant proteins that associated with PP2A killed cancer cells at high levels; however, several mutants that associated with significant levels of PP2A were defective for killing (class II). Thus, binding of E4orf4 to PP2A is essential for induction of p53-independent apoptosis, but E4orf4 may possess one or more additional functions required for cell killing. PMID:10933694

  7. Rice Stomatal Closure Requires Guard Cell Plasma Membrane ATP-Binding Cassette Transporter RCN1/OsABCG5.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Shuichi; Takano, Sho; Sato, Moeko; Furukawa, Kaoru; Nagasawa, Hidetaka; Yoshikawa, Shoko; Kasuga, Jun; Tokuji, Yoshihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Nakazono, Mikio; Takamure, Itsuro; Kato, Kiyoaki

    2016-03-01

    Water stress is one of the major environmental stresses that affect agricultural production worldwide. Water loss from plants occurs primarily through stomatal pores. Here, we report that an Oryza sativa half-size ATP-binding cassette (ABC) subfamily G protein, RCN1/OsABCG5, is involved in stomatal closure mediated by phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation in guard cells. We found that the GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5-fusion protein was localized at the plasma membrane in guard cells. The percentage of guard cell pairs containing both ABA and GFP-RCN1/OsABCG5 increased after exogenous ABA treatment, whereas they were co-localized in guard cell pairs regardless of whether exogenous ABA was applied. ABA application resulted in a smaller increase in the percentage of guard cell pairs containing ABA in rcn1 mutant (A684P) and RCN1-RNAi than in wild-type plants. Furthermore, polyethylene glycol (drought stress)-inducible ABA accumulation in guard cells did not occur in rcn1 mutants. Stomata closure mediated by exogenous ABA application was strongly reduced in rcn1 mutants. Finally, rcn1 mutant plants had more rapid water loss from detached leaves than the wild-type plants. These results indicate that in response to drought stress, RCN1/OsABCG5 is involved in accumulation of ABA in guard cells, which is indispensable for stomatal closure. PMID:26708605

  8. The ATP-binding cassette transporter OsABCG15 is required for anther development and pollen fertility in rice.

    PubMed

    Niu, Bai-Xiao; He, Fu-Rong; He, Ming; Ren, Ding; Chen, Le-Tian; Liu, Yao-Guang

    2013-08-01

    Plant male reproductive development is a complex biological process, but the underlying mechanism is not well understood. Here, we characterized a rice (Oryza sativa L.) male sterile mutant. Based on map-based cloning and sequence analysis, we identified a 1,459-bp deletion in an adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter gene, OsABCG15, causing abnormal anthers and male sterility. Therefore, we named this mutant osabcg15. Expression analysis showed that OsABCG15 is expressed specifically in developmental anthers from stage 8 (meiosis II stage) to stage 10 (late microspore stage). Two genes CYP704B2 and WDA1, involved in the biosynthesis of very-long-chain fatty acids for the establishment of the anther cuticle and pollen exine, were downregulated in osabcg15 mutant, suggesting that OsABCG15 may play a key function in the processes related to sporopollenin biosynthesis or sporopollenin transfer from tapetal cells to anther locules. Consistently, histological analysis showed that osabcg15 mutants developed obvious abnormality in postmeiotic tapetum degeneration, leading to rapid degredation of young microspores. The results suggest that OsABCG15 plays a critical role in exine formation and pollen development, similar to the homologous gene of AtABCG26 in Arabidopsis. This work is helpful to understand the regulatory network in rice anther development. PMID:23570336

  9. Investigation of the Structure Requirement for 5-HT6 Binding Affinity of Arylsulfonyl Derivatives: A Computational Study

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Ming; Li, Yan; Li, Hanqing; Zhang, Shuwei

    2011-01-01

    5-HT6 receptor has been implicated in a series of diseases including anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and cognitive dysfunctions. 5-HT6 ligands have been reported to play a significant role in the treatment for central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Presently, a large series of 223 5-HT6 ligands were studied using a combinational method by 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics calculations for further improvement of potency. The optimal 3D models exhibit satisfying statistical results with r2ncv, q2 values of 0.85 and 0.50 for CoMFA, 0.81 and 0.53 for CoMSIA, respectively. Their predictive powers were validated by external test set, showing r2pred of 0.71 and 0.76. The contour maps also provide a visual representation of contributions of steric, electrostatic, hydrophobic and hydrogen bond fields as well as the prospective binding models. In addition, the agreement between 3D-QSAR, molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation proves the rationality of the developed models. These results, we hope, may be helpful in designing novel and potential 5-HT6 ligands. PMID:21954341

  10. The Calmodulin-Binding Transcription Activator CAMTA1 Is Required for Long-Term Memory Formation in Mice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bas-Orth, Carlos; Tan, Yan-Wei; Oliveira, Ana M. M.; Bengtson, C. Peter; Bading, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The formation of long-term memory requires signaling from the synapse to the nucleus to mediate neuronal activity-dependent gene transcription. Synapse-to-nucleus communication is initiated by influx of calcium ions through synaptic NMDA receptors and/or L-type voltage-gated calcium channels and involves the activation of transcription factors by…

  11. Seed Dormancy in Arabidopsis Requires Self-Binding Ability of DOG1 Protein and the Presence of Multiple Isoforms Generated by Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jia; Soppe, Wim J. J.

    2015-01-01

    The Arabidopsis protein DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 (DOG1) is a key regulator of seed dormancy, which is a life history trait that determines the timing of seedling emergence. The amount of DOG1 protein in freshly harvested seeds determines their dormancy level. DOG1 has been identified as a major dormancy QTL and variation in DOG1 transcript levels between accessions contributes to natural variation for seed dormancy. The DOG1 gene is alternatively spliced. Alternative splicing increases the transcriptome and proteome diversity in higher eukaryotes by producing transcripts that encode for proteins with altered or lost function. It can also generate tissue specific transcripts or affect mRNA stability. Here we suggest a different role for alternative splicing of the DOG1 gene. DOG1 produces five transcript variants encoding three protein isoforms. Transgenic dog1 mutant seeds expressing single DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter did not complement because they were non-dormant and lacked DOG1 protein. However, transgenic plants overexpressing single DOG1 variants from the 35S promoter could accumulate protein and showed complementation. Simultaneous expression of two or more DOG1 transcript variants from the endogenous DOG1 promoter also led to increased dormancy levels and accumulation of DOG1 protein. This suggests that single isoforms are functional, but require the presence of additional isoforms to prevent protein degradation. Subsequently, we found that the DOG1 protein can bind to itself and that this binding is required for DOG1 function but not for protein accumulation. Natural variation for DOG1 binding efficiency was observed among Arabidopsis accessions and contributes to variation in seed dormancy. PMID:26684465

  12. Juxtaposition of Two Distant, Serine-Arginine-Rich Protein-Binding Elements Is Required for Optimal Polyadenylation in Rous Sarcoma Virus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Stephen W.; McNally, Mark T.

    2011-01-01

    The Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) polyadenylation site (PAS) is very poorly used in vitro due to suboptimal upstream and downstream elements, and yet ∼85% of viral transcripts are polyadenylated in vivo. The mechanisms that orchestrate polyadenylation at the weak PAS are not completely understood. It was previously shown that serine-arginine (SR)-rich proteins stimulate RSV PAS use in vitro and in vivo. It has been proposed that viral RNA polyadenylation is stimulated through a nonproductive splice complex that forms between a pseudo 5′ splice site (5′ss) within the negative regulator of splicing (NRS) and a downstream 3′ss, which repositions NRS-bound SR proteins closer to the viral PAS. This repositioning is thought to be important for long-distance poly(A) stimulation by the NRS. We report here that a 308-nucleotide deletion downstream of the env 3′ss decreased polyadenylation efficiency, suggesting the presence of an additional element required for optimal RSV polyadenylation. Mapping studies localized the poly(A) stimulating element to a region coincident with the Env splicing enhancer, which binds SR proteins, and inactivation of the enhancer and SR protein binding decreased polyadenylation efficiency. The positive effect of the Env enhancer on polyadenylation could be uncoupled from its role in splicing. As with the NRS, the Env enhancer also stimulated use of the viral PAS in vitro. These results suggest that a critical threshold of SR proteins, achieved by juxtaposition of SR protein binding sites within the NRS and Env enhancer, is required for long-range polyadenylation stimulation. PMID:21849435

  13. Requirements for stress granule recruitment of fused in sarcoma (FUS) and TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43).

    PubMed

    Bentmann, Eva; Neumann, Manuela; Tahirovic, Sabina; Rodde, Ramona; Dormann, Dorothee; Haass, Christian

    2012-06-29

    Cytoplasmic inclusions containing TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) or Fused in sarcoma (FUS) are a hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and several subtypes of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). FUS-positive inclusions in FTLD and ALS patients are consistently co-labeled with stress granule (SG) marker proteins. Whether TDP-43 inclusions contain SG markers is currently still debated. We determined the requirements for SG recruitment of FUS and TDP-43 and found that cytoplasmic mislocalization is a common prerequisite for SG recruitment of FUS and TDP-43. For FUS, the arginine-glycine-glycine zinc finger domain, which is the protein's main RNA binding domain, is most important for SG recruitment, whereas the glycine-rich domain and RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain have a minor contribution and the glutamine-rich domain is dispensable. For TDP-43, both the RRM1 and the C-terminal glycine-rich domain are required for SG localization. ALS-associated point mutations located in the glycine-rich domain of TDP-43 do not affect SG recruitment. Interestingly, a 25-kDa C-terminal fragment of TDP-43, which is enriched in FTLD/ALS cortical inclusions but not spinal cord inclusions, fails to be recruited into SG. Consistently, inclusions in the cortex of FTLD patients, which are enriched for C-terminal fragments, are not co-labeled with the SG marker poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP-1), whereas inclusions in spinal cord, which contain full-length TDP-43, are frequently positive for this marker protein. PMID:22563080

  14. Polyribosome binding by GCN1 is required for full activation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2{alpha} kinase GCN2 during amino acid starvation.

    PubMed

    Sattlegger, Evelyn; Hinnebusch, Alan G

    2005-04-22

    The protein kinase GCN2 mediates translational control of gene expression in amino acid-starved cells by phosphorylating eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, activation of GCN2 by uncharged tRNAs in starved cells requires its direct interaction with both the GCN1.GCN20 regulatory complex and ribosomes. GCN1 also interacts with ribosomes in cell extracts, but it was unknown whether this activity is crucial for its ability to stimulate GCN2 function in starved cells. We describe point mutations in two conserved, noncontiguous segments of GCN1 that lead to reduced polyribosome association by GCN1.GCN20 in living cells without reducing GCN1 expression or its interaction with GCN20. Mutating both segments simultaneously produced a greater reduction in polyribosome binding by GCN1.GCN20 and a stronger decrease in eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha phosphorylation than did mutating in one segment alone. These findings provide strong evidence that ribosome binding by GCN1 is required for its role as a positive regulator of GCN2. A particular mutation in the GCN1 domain, related in sequence to translation elongation factor 3 (eEF3), decreased GCN2 activation much more than it reduced ribosome binding by GCN1. Hence, the eEF3-like domain appears to have an effector function in GCN2 activation. This conclusion supports the model that an eEF3-related activity of GCN1 influences occupancy of the ribosomal decoding site by uncharged tRNA in starved cells. PMID:15722345

  15. Progesterone receptor-NFκB complex formation is required for progesterone-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Sung-Po; Yang, Ho-Ching; Kuo, Chun-Ting; Wen, Heng-Ching; Chen, Li-Ching; Huo, Yen-Nien; Lee, Wen-Sen

    2015-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that progesterone (P4) up-regulates p53 expression in human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVECs) through P4 receptor (PR) activation of extranuclear signaling pathways. However, the involvement of nuclear PR in P4-increased p53 expression is still unclear. Here, the molecular mechanism underlying PR-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs was investigated. Treatment with P4 increased nuclear factor of κ light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, α phosphorylation (IκBα and nuclear factor-κB (NFκB) nuclear translocation. Interestingly, P4 also increased PR-A, but not PR-B, nuclear translocation in HUVECs. Immunoprecipitation assay illustrated that P4 increased the formation of PR-A-NFκB complex in both the cytosol and the nucleus of HUVEC. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed an interaction between PR and the NFκB binding motif on the p53 promoter. Ablation of the NFκB binding motif in the p53 promoter completely abolished P4-increased p53 promoter activity. In the absence of P4, overexpression of NFκB did not increase NFκB nuclear translocation. In contrast, treatment of NFκB-overexpressing HUVECs with P4 for only 4 hours, which is much shorter than the time (21.5 h) required for P4-induced IκBα phosphorylation, increased NFκB nuclear translocation. Blockade of PR activity abolished this effect. Taken together, these results uncover a novel role of PR for P4-induced NFκB nuclear translocation and suggest that PR-A-NFκB complex formation is required for NFκB nuclear translocation and binding onto the p53 promoter in HUVECs. Our data indicate that both nuclear and extranuclear signaling pathways of PR are involved in P4-regulated p53 expression in HUVECs. PMID:25353185

  16. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  17. The BDLF3 gene product of Epstein-Barr virus, gp150, mediates non-productive binding to heparan sulfate on epithelial cells and only the binding domain of CD21 is required for infection.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Liudmila S; Valencia, Sarah M; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M

    2016-07-01

    The cell surface molecules used by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to attach to epithelial cells are not well-defined, although when CD21, the B cell receptor for EBV is expressed epithelial cell infection increases disproportionately to the increase in virus bound. Many herpesviruses use low affinity charge interactions with molecules such as heparan sulfate to attach to cells. We report here that the EBV glycoprotein gp150 binds to heparan sulfate proteoglycans, but that attachment via this glycoprotein is not productive of infection. We also report that only the aminoterminal two short consensus repeats of CD21 are required for efficient infection, This supports the hypothesis that, when expressed on an epithelial cell CD21 serves primarily to cluster the major attachment protein gp350 in the virus membrane and enhance access of other important glycoproteins to the epithelial cell surface. PMID:27061054

  18. Characterizing Requirements for Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) Modification and Binding on Base Excision Repair Activity of Thymine-DNA Glycosylase in Vivo.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Dylan; Coey, Christopher T; Yang, Wei-Chih; Drohat, Alexander C; Matunis, Michael J

    2016-04-22

    Thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) plays critical roles in DNA base excision repair and DNA demethylation. It has been proposed, based on structural studies and in vitro biochemistry, that sumoylation is required for efficient TDG enzymatic turnover following base excision. However, whether sumoylation is required for TDG activity in vivo has not previously been tested. We have developed an in vivo assay for TDG activity that takes advantage of its recently discovered role in DNA demethylation and selective recognition and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine. Using this assay, we investigated the role of sumoylation in regulating TDG activity through the use of TDG mutants defective for sumoylation and Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO) binding and by altering TDG sumoylation through SUMO and SUMO protease overexpression experiments. Our findings indicate that sumoylation and SUMO binding are not essential for TDG-mediated excision and repair of 5-carboxylcytosine bases. Moreover, in vitro assays revealed that apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1 provides nearly maximum stimulation of TDG processing of G·caC substrates. Thus, under our assay conditions, apurinic/apyrimidinic nuclease 1-mediated stimulation or other mechanisms sufficiently alleviate TDG product inhibition and promote its enzymatic turnover in vivo. PMID:26917720

  19. Gonococcal transferrin-binding protein 1 is required for transferrin utilization and is homologous to TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Cornelissen, C N; Biswas, G D; Tsai, J; Paruchuri, D K; Thompson, S A; Sparling, P F

    1992-09-01

    The pathogenic Neisseria species are capable of utilizing transferrin as their sole source of iron. A neisserial transferrin receptor has been identified and its characteristics defined; however, the biochemical identities of proteins which are required for transferrin receptor function have not yet been determined. We identified two iron-repressible transferrin-binding proteins in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, TBP1 and TBP2. Two approaches were taken to clone genes required for gonococcal transferrin receptor function. First, polyclonal antiserum raised against TBP1 was used to identify clones expressing TBP1 epitopes. Second, a wild-type gene copy was cloned that repaired the defect in a transferrin receptor function (trf) mutant. The clones obtained by these two approaches were shown to overlap by DNA sequencing. Transposon mutagenesis of both clones and recombination of mutagenized fragments into the gonococcal chromosome generated mutants that showed reduced binding of transferrin to whole cells and that were incapable of growth on transferrin. No TBP1 was produced in these mutants, but TBP2 expression was normal. The DNA sequence of the gene encoding gonococcal TBP1 (tbpA) predicted a protein sequence homologous to the Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas putida TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors. Thus, both the function and the predicted protein sequence of TBP1 were consistent with this protein serving as a transferrin receptor. PMID:1325963

  20. ATP release due to Thy-1–integrin binding induces P2X7-mediated calcium entry required for focal adhesion formation

    PubMed Central

    Henríquez, Mauricio; Herrera-Molina, Rodrigo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Alvarez, Alvaro; Kong, Milene; Muñoz, Nicolás; Eisner, Verónica; Jaimovich, Enrique; Schneider, Pascal; Quest, Andrew F. G.; Leyton, Lisette

    2011-01-01

    Thy-1, an abundant mammalian glycoprotein, interacts with αvβ3 integrin and syndecan-4 in astrocytes and thus triggers signaling events that involve RhoA and its effector p160ROCK, thereby increasing astrocyte adhesion to the extracellular matrix. The signaling cascade includes calcium-dependent activation of protein kinase Cα upstream of Rho; however, what causes the intracellular calcium transients required to promote adhesion remains unclear. Purinergic P2X7 receptors are important for astrocyte function and form large non-selective cation pores upon binding to their ligand, ATP. Thus, we evaluated whether the intracellular calcium required for Thy-1-induced cell adhesion stems from influx mediated by ATP-activated P2X7 receptors. Results show that adhesion induced by the fusion protein Thy-1-Fc was preceded by both ATP release and sustained intracellular calcium elevation. Elimination of extracellular ATP with Apyrase, chelation of extracellular calcium with EGTA, or inhibition of P2X7 with oxidized ATP, all individually blocked intracellular calcium increase and Thy-1-stimulated adhesion. Moreover, Thy-1 mutated in the integrin-binding site did not trigger ATP release, and silencing of P2X7 with specific siRNA blocked Thy-1-induced adhesion. This study is the first to demonstrate a functional link between αvβ3 integrin and P2X7 receptors, and to reveal an important, hitherto unanticipated, role for P2X7 in calcium-dependent signaling required for Thy-1-stimulated astrocyte adhesion. PMID:21502139

  1. Activation of hormone-sensitive lipase requires two steps, protein phosphorylation and binding to the PAT-1 domain of lipid droplet coat proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Hu, Liping; Dalen, Knut; Dorward, Heidi; Marcinkiewicz, Amy; Russell, Deanna; Gong, Dawei; Londos, Constantine; Yamaguchi, Tomohiro; Holm, Cecilia; Rizzo, Mark A; Brasaemle, Dawn; Sztalryd, Carole

    2009-11-13

    Lipolysis is an important metabolic pathway controlling energy homeostasis through degradation of triglycerides stored in lipid droplets and release of fatty acids. Lipid droplets of mammalian cells are coated with one or more members of the PAT protein family, which serve important functions in regulating lipolysis. In this study, we investigate the mechanisms by which PAT family members, perilipin A, adipose differentiation-related protein (ADFP), and LSDP5, control lipolysis catalyzed by hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL), a major lipase in adipocytes and several non-adipose cells. We applied fluorescence microscopic tools to analyze proteins in situ in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and anisotropy Forster resonance energy transfer. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching data show that ADFP and LSDP5 exchange between lipid droplet and cytoplasmic pools, whereas perilipin A does not. Differences in protein mobility do not correlate with PAT protein-mediated control of lipolysis catalyzed by HSL or endogenous lipases. Forster resonance energy transfer and co-immunoprecipitation experiments reveal that each of the three PAT proteins bind HSL through interaction of the lipase with amino acids within the highly conserved amino-terminal PAT-1 domain. ADFP and LSDP5 bind HSL under basal conditions, whereas phosphorylation of serine residues within three amino-terminal protein kinase A consensus sequences of perilipin A is required for HSL binding and maximal lipolysis. Finally, protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation of HSL increases lipolysis in cells expressing ADFP or LSDP5; in contrast, phosphorylation of perilipin A exerts the major control over HSL-mediated lipolysis when perilipin is the main lipid droplet protein. PMID:19717842

  2. Profilin Binding to Poly-l-Proline and Actin Monomers along with Ability to Catalyze Actin Nucleotide Exchange Is Required for Viability of Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jia; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2001-01-01

    We tested the ability of 87 profilin point mutations to complement temperature-sensitive and null mutations of the single profilin gene of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We compared the biochemical properties of 13 stable noncomplementing profilins with an equal number of complementing profilin mutants. A large quantitative database revealed the following: 1) in a profilin null background fission yeast grow normally with profilin mutations having >10% of wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline, but lower affinity for either ligand is incompatible with life; 2) in the cdc3-124 profilin ts background, fission yeast function with profilin having only 2–5% wild-type affinity for actin or poly-l-proline; and 3) special mutations show that the ability of profilin to catalyze nucleotide exchange by actin is an essential function. Thus, poly-l-proline binding, actin binding, and actin nucleotide exchange are each independent requirements for profilin function in fission yeast. PMID:11294914

  3. Negative Feedback Regulation of the Yeast Cth1 and Cth2 mRNA Binding Proteins Is Required for Adaptation to Iron Deficiency and Iron Supplementation

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Pastor, Mar; Vergara, Sandra V.

    2013-01-01

    Iron (Fe) is an essential element for all eukaryotic organisms because it functions as a cofactor in a wide range of biochemical processes. Cells have developed sophisticated mechanisms to tightly control Fe utilization in response to alterations in cellular demands and bioavailability. In response to Fe deficiency, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae activates transcription of the CTH1 and CTH2 genes, which encode proteins that bind to AU-rich elements (AREs) within the 3′ untranslated regions (3′UTRs) of many mRNAs, leading to metabolic reprogramming of Fe-dependent pathways and decreased Fe storage. The precise mechanisms underlying Cth1 and Cth2 function and regulation are incompletely understood. We report here that the Cth1 and Cth2 proteins specifically bind in vivo to AREs located at the 3′UTRs of their own transcripts in an auto- and cross-regulated mechanism that limits their expression. By mutagenesis of the AREs within the CTH2 transcript, we demonstrate that a Cth2 negative-feedback loop is required for the efficient decline in Cth2 protein levels observed upon a rapid rise in Fe availability. Importantly, Cth2 autoregulation is critical for the appropriate recovery of Fe-dependent processes and resumption of growth in response to a change from Fe deficiency to Fe supplementation. PMID:23530061

  4. A NASP (N1/N2)-Related Protein, Sim3, Binds CENP-A and Is Required for Its Deposition at Fission Yeast Centromeres

    PubMed Central

    Dunleavy, Elaine M.; Pidoux, Alison L.; Monet, Marie; Bonilla, Carolina; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L.; Ekwall, Karl; McLaughlin, Paul J.; Allshire, Robin C.

    2007-01-01

    Summary A defining feature of centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-ACnp1. It is not known how CENP-ACnp1 is specifically delivered to, and assembled into, centromeric chromatin. Through a screen for factors involved in kinetochore integrity in fission yeast, we identified Sim3. Sim3 is homologous to known histone binding proteins NASPHuman and N1/N2Xenopus and aligns with Hif1S. cerevisiae, defining the SHNi-TPR family. Sim3 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, yet it associates with CENP-ACnp1 and also binds H3. Cells defective in Sim3 function have reduced levels of CENP-ACnp1 at centromeres (and increased H3) and display chromosome segregation defects. Sim3 is required to allow newly synthesized CENP-ACnp1 to accumulate at centromeres in S and G2 phase-arrested cells in a replication-independent mechanism. We propose that one function of Sim3 is to act as an escort that hands off CENP-ACnp1 to chromatin assembly factors, allowing its incorporation into centromeric chromatin. PMID:18158900

  5. The ARID-HMG DNA-binding protein AtHMGB15 is required for pollen tube growth in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chuan; Wang, Yu-Jiao; Liang, Yan; Niu, Qian-Kun; Tan, Xiao-Yun; Chu, Liang-Cui; Chen, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Qin; Ye, De

    2014-09-01

    In flowering plants, male gametes (sperm cells) develop within male gametophytes (pollen grains) and are delivered to female gametes for double fertilization by pollen tubes. Therefore, pollen tube growth is crucial for reproduction. The mechanisms that control pollen tube growth remain poorly understood. In this study, we demonstrated that the ARID-HMG DNA-binding protein AtHMGB15 plays an important role in pollen tube growth. This protein is preferentially expressed in pollen grains and pollen tubes and is localized in the vegetative nuclei of the tricellular pollen grains and pollen tubes. Knocking down AtHMGB15 expression via a Ds insertion caused retarded pollen tube growth, leading to a significant reduction in the seed set. The athmgb15-1 mutation affected the expression of 1686 genes in mature pollen, including those involved in cell wall formation and modification, cell signaling and cellular transport during pollen tube growth. In addition, it was observed that AtHMGB15 binds to DNA in vitro and interacts with the transcription factors AGL66 and AGL104, which are required for pollen maturation and pollen tube growth. These results suggest that AtHMGB15 functions in pollen tube growth through the regulation of gene expression. PMID:24923357

  6. Asc1p, a WD40-domain containing adaptor protein, is required for the interaction of the RNA-binding protein Scp160p with polysomes.

    PubMed Central

    Baum, Sonja; Bittins, Margarethe; Frey, Steffen; Seedorf, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Scp160p interacts in an mRNA-dependent manner with translating ribosomes via multiple RNA-binding heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K-homology (KH) domains. In the present study, we show by protein-protein cross-linking that Scp160p is in close proximity to translation elongation factor 1A and the WD40 (Trp-Asp 40)-repeat containing protein Asc1p at ribosomes. Analysis of a truncation mutant revealed that the C-terminus of Scp160p is essential for ribosome binding and that Cys(1067) at the C-terminus of Scp160p is required to obtain these cross-links. The interaction of Scp160p with ribosomes depends on Asc1p. In fast-growing yeast cells, nearly all Asc1p is tightly bound to ribosomes, but it can also be present in a ribosome-free form depending on growth conditions. The functional homologue of Asc1p, mammalian RACK1 (receptor of activated C kinase), was previously characterized as an adaptor protein bridging activated signalling molecules with their substrates. Our results suggest that Scp160p connects specific mRNAs, ribosomes and a translation factor with an adaptor for signalling molecules. These interactions might regulate the translation activity of ribosomes programmed with specific mRNAs. PMID:15012629

  7. Mutational analysis of the RNA-binding domain of the Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) movement protein reveals its requirement for cell-to-cell movement

    SciTech Connect

    Carmen Herranz, Ma; Mingarro, Ismael; Pallas, Vicente . E-mail: vpallas@ibmcp.upv.es

    2005-08-15

    The movement protein (MP) of Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) is required for cell-to-cell movement. MP subcellular localization studies using a GFP fusion protein revealed highly punctate structures between neighboring cells, believed to represent plasmodesmata. Deletion of the RNA-binding domain (RBD) of PNRSV MP abolishes the cell-to-cell movement. A mutational analysis on this RBD was performed in order to identify in vivo the features that govern viral transport. Loss of positive charges prevented the cell-to-cell movement even though all mutants showed a similar accumulation level in protoplasts to those observed with the wild-type (wt) MP. Synthetic peptides representing the mutants and wild-type RBDs were used to study RNA-binding affinities by EMSA assays being approximately 20-fold lower in the mutants. Circular dichroism analyses revealed that the secondary structure of the peptides was not significantly affected by mutations. The involvement of the affinity changes between the viral RNA and the MP in the viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  8. A NASP (N1/N2)-related protein, Sim3, binds CENP-A and is required for its deposition at fission yeast centromeres.

    PubMed

    Dunleavy, Elaine M; Pidoux, Alison L; Monet, Marie; Bonilla, Carolina; Richardson, William; Hamilton, Georgina L; Ekwall, Karl; McLaughlin, Paul J; Allshire, Robin C

    2007-12-28

    A defining feature of centromeres is the presence of the histone H3 variant CENP-A(Cnp1). It is not known how CENP-A(Cnp1) is specifically delivered to, and assembled into, centromeric chromatin. Through a screen for factors involved in kinetochore integrity in fission yeast, we identified Sim3. Sim3 is homologous to known histone binding proteins NASP(Human) and N1/N2(Xenopus) and aligns with Hif1(S. cerevisiae), defining the SHNi-TPR family. Sim3 is distributed throughout the nucleoplasm, yet it associates with CENP-A(Cnp1) and also binds H3. Cells defective in Sim3 function have reduced levels of CENP-A(Cnp1) at centromeres (and increased H3) and display chromosome segregation defects. Sim3 is required to allow newly synthesized CENP-A(Cnp1) to accumulate at centromeres in S and G2 phase-arrested cells in a replication-independent mechanism. We propose that one function of Sim3 is to act as an escort that hands off CENP-A(Cnp1) to chromatin assembly factors, allowing its incorporation into centromeric chromatin. PMID:18158900

  9. Cwc24p Is a General Saccharomyces cerevisiae Splicing Factor Required for the Stable U2 snRNP Binding to Primary Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Coltri, Patricia P.; Oliveira, Carla C.

    2012-01-01

    Splicing of primary transcripts is an essential process for the control of gene expression. Specific conserved sequences in premature transcripts are important to recruit the spliceosome machinery. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae catalytic spliceosome is composed of about 60 proteins and 5 snRNAs (U1, U2, U4/U6 and U5). Among these proteins, there are core components and regulatory factors, which might stabilize or facilitate splicing of specific substrates. Assembly of a catalytic complex depends on the dynamics of interactions between these proteins and RNAs. Cwc24p is an essential S. cerevisiae protein, originally identified as a component of the NTC complex, and later shown to affect splicing in vivo. In this work, we show that Cwc24p also affects splicing in vitro. We show that Cwc24p is important for the U2 snRNP binding to primary transcripts, co-migrates with spliceosomes, and that it interacts with Brr2p. Additionally, we show that Cwc24p is important for the stable binding of Prp19p to the spliceosome. We propose a model in which Cwc24p is required for stabilizing the U2 association with primary transcripts, and therefore, especially important for splicing of RNAs containing non-consensus branchpoint sequences. PMID:23029180

  10. The Vaccine Candidate Substrate Binding Protein SBP2 Plays a Key Role in Arginine Uptake, Which Is Required for Growth of Moraxella catarrhalis

    PubMed Central

    Otsuka, Taketo; Kirkham, Charmaine; Brauer, Aimee; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Moraxella catarrhalis is an exclusively human pathogen that is an important cause of otitis media in children and lower respiratory tract infections in adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. A vaccine to prevent M. catarrhalis infections would have an enormous global impact in reducing morbidity resulting from these infections. Substrate binding protein 2 (SBP2) of an ABC transporter system has recently been identified as a promising vaccine candidate antigen on the bacterial surface of M. catarrhalis. In this study, we showed that SBP1, -2, and -3 individually bind different basic amino acids with exquisite specificity. We engineered mutants that each expressed a single SBP from this gene cluster and showed in growth experiments that SBP1, -2, and -3 serve a nutritional function through acquisition of amino acids for the bacterium. SBP2 mediates uptake of arginine, a strict growth requirement of M. catarrhalis. Adherence and invasion assays demonstrated that SBP1 and SBP3 play a role in invasion of human respiratory epithelial cells, consistent with a nutritional role in intracellular survival in the human respiratory tract. This work demonstrates that the SBPs of an ABC transporter system function in the uptake of basic amino acids to support growth of M. catarrhalis. The critical role of SBP2 in arginine uptake may contribute to its potential as a vaccine antigen. PMID:26597985